Search Posts

nyheder2019maj01

19h

A nanoelectronics-blood-based diagnostic biomarker for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) [Engineering]

There is not currently a well-established, if any, biological test to diagnose myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS). The molecular aberrations observed in numerous studies of ME/CFS blood cells offer the opportunity to develop a diagnostic assay from blood samples. Here we developed a nanoelectronics assay designed as an ultrasensitive assay…

20h

International study suggests that eating more rice could be protective against obesity

Obesity levels are substantially lower in countries that consume high amounts of rice (average 150g/day/person), while counties with lower average rice intake (average 14g/day/person) have higher obesity levels, according to an international study of 136 countries, being presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow.

20h

Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories

Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories A month's worth of cool science stories summed up. Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories Video of Quick Roundup Of Monthly Science Stories Space Wednesday, May 1, 2019 – 15:00 Alistair Jennings, Contributor References: 1) https://eventhorizontelescope.org 2) https://www.insidescience.org/news/scientists-release-first-photo-black-… 3) https://www.nasa.

now

Nuclear 'magic numbers' collapse beyond the doubly magic nickel 78

Scientists have demonstrated that nickel 78, a neutron-rich 'doubly magic' isotope of nickel with 28 protons and 50 neutrons, still maintains a spherical shape that allows it to be relatively stable despite the large imbalance in the number of protons and neutrons. They also discovered a surprise, with the observations from the experiment suggesting that nickel 78 may be the lightest nucleus with

6min

Here's how cancer hijacks wound healing to create its own blood supply

Researchers have shed light on how cancers hijack the body's natural wound-healing response to grow and spread.

6min

Changing climate may affect animal-to-human disease transfer

Climate change could affect occurrences of diseases like bird-flu and Ebola, with environmental factors playing a larger role than previously understood in animal-to-human disease transfer. Researchers have been looking at how different environments provide opportunities for animal-to-human diseases — known as zoonotic diseases — to interact with and infect new host species, including humans.

6min

Australian blue tongue lizard ancestor was round-in-the-tooth

Reconstruction of the most complete fossil lizard found in Australia, a 15 million year old relative of our modern blue tongues and social skinks named Egernia gillespieae, reveals the creature was equipped with a robust crushing jaw and was remarkably similar to modern lizards.

6min

Harnessing sunlight to pull hydrogen from wastewater

Hydrogen is a critical component in the manufacture of thousands of common products from plastic to fertilizers, but producing pure hydrogen is expensive and energy intensive. Now, a research team has harnessed sunlight to isolate hydrogen from industrial wastewater, doubling the previous standard for splitting hydrogen from water in a scalable way.

6min

Do additives help the soil?

A researcher is using her latest study to question whether soil additives are worth their salt. Despite a decades-long practice, there could be environmental consequences of adding bio-fertilizers into soil. It's common practice for farmers to use bio-fertilizers as a method to improve crop production. These added microorganisms will live in the soil, creating a natural and healthy growing environ

6min

New research may be used to treat cancer, heal combat wounds

Researchers have developed computational models using a microbiology procedure that may be used to improve novel cancer treatments and treat combat wounds.

6min

Storing info in molecules, for millions of years

As the data boom continues to boom, more and more information gets filed in less and less space. Even the cloud will eventually run out of space, can't thwart all hackers, and gobbles up energy. Now, a new way to store information could stably house data for millions of years, lives outside the hackable internet, and, once written, uses no energy. All you need is a chemist, some cheap molecules, a

6min

New research may be used to treat cancer, heal combat wounds

Researchers have developed computational models using a microbiology procedure that may be used to improve novel cancer treatments and treat combat wounds.

8min

New scat study provides clues to puzzling existence of Humboldt martens in Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area

With a new scat study, researchers are chipping away at solving a biological mystery on the central Oregon coast: the existence of an isolated population of a small but fierce forest predator that makes its home in the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area.

10min

Columbia researchers examine how our brain generates consciousness — and loses it

In a first of its kind study, researchers from Columbia's Rafael Yuste's Laboratory used cellular resolution in vivo two-photon calcium imaging in mice to investigate changes in the local repertoire of neuronal micro states during anesthesia. The team found that anesthesia disrupts the number of neural patterns by reducing both network micro states and neuronal ensembles in the cortex, and confirm

10min

New study highlights exaggerated physical differences between male and female superheroes

Superheroes like Thor and Black Widow may have what it takes to save the world in movies like Avengers: Endgame, but neither of their comic book depictions has a healthy body mass index (BMI). New research from Binghamton University and SUNY Oswego found that, within the pages of comic books, male superheroes are on average obese, while females are on average close to underweight.

10min

The Plan to Dodge a Killer Asteroid—Maybe Even Good Ol' Bennu

Meet the asteroid-impact planners who hope to protect humans from murderous space rocks and the fate of the dinosaurs.

13min

Find Cold Comfort at the Campsite With an Electric Cooler

These devices work like a portable refrigerator, drawing power from AC or DC power (like the 12-volt plug in your car) to keep your food cool and dry.

13min

Narwhals beat the death sentence of low genetic diversity

Despite their limited evolutionary toolbox, narwhals are thriving

20min

Palm oil's potential to alleviate poverty depends on where it's grown

Palm oil's potential to alleviate poverty depends on where it's grown. Expansion of oil palm production in remote forest areas requires careful planning and evaluation if the communities are to benefit, according to a new report. Their findings show that unsustainable livelihoods, socioeconomic inequality and environmental issues remain major challenges in the oil palm industry.

21min

New inspection process freezes parts in ice

Scientists have developed a novel approach that uses ultrasound to inspect additive-manufactured parts by freezing them in a cylinder of ice and exposing them to ultrasonic waves.

21min

Rheumatoid arthritis patients affected by disabilities well in advance of diagnosis

Patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis often are affected by functional disability a year or two before the disease is diagnosed, according to new research. The results of the study suggest that daily activities such as eating, dressing and walking are affected early in the course of the disease, and that most rheumatoid arthritis patients are affected by functional disability issues.

21min

A third of type 1 diabetes is misdiagnosed in the over 30s

A new study shows that 38 percent of patients with type 1 diabetes occurring after age 30 were initially treated as type 2 diabetes (without insulin). Researchers found that half of those misdiagnosed were still diagnosed as type 2 diabetes 13 years later.

21min

Amid genomic data explosion, scientists find proliferating errors

Researchers found a troubling number of errors in publicly available genomic data as they conducted a large-scale analysis of protein sequences.

21min

Indonesia’s capital is sinking, but climate change isn't the only culprit

Environment There are other environmental issues at play. Jakarta isn’t so much being swallowed by the sea as it is physically lowering into the earth. Move over, Venice—this is the world’s fastest-sinking city.

22min

Forskere har fundet 160.000 år gamle rester af menneskelignende væsen

Der er fundet dna fra et kæbeben hos menneskets forhistoriske fætter – denisova – konkluderer forskere.

26min

Diving deep into water and energy trade-offs

Sometimes people don't see the impacts of sustainability decisions beyond a balance ledger. That places poor in water or energy will still accept money to ship away that very resource they lack — often to a place that doesn't want for that same resource, but happy to conserve it.

31min

'Vampire Facial' at New Mexico Spa Likely Exposed 2 People to HIV

A spa facial might have exposed two clients to HIV.

33min

First hominins on the Tibetan Plateau were Denisovans

So far Denisovans were only known from a small collection of fossil fragments from Denisova Cave in Siberia. A research team now describes a 160,000-year-old hominin mandible from Xiahe in China. Using ancient protein analysis the researchers found that the mandible's owner belonged to a population that was closely related to the Denisovans from Siberia. This population occupied the Tibetan Platea

35min

A comprehensive map of how Alzheimer's affects the brain

Researchers performed the first comprehensive analysis of the genes altered in individual brain cells of patients with Alzheimer's disease, allowing them to identify the distinctive cellular pathways affected in neurons and other types of brain cells.

35min

Adverse events during first years of life may have greatest effect on future mental health

A new study has found evidence that children under 3 years old are most the vulnerable to the effects of adversity — experiences including poverty, family and financial instability, and abuse — on their epigenetic profiles, chemical tags that alter gene expression and may have consequences for future mental health.

35min

Transforming waste heat into clean energy

Through a mechanism known as the Spin Hall effect, it has been shown that a voltage can be generated by harnessing differences in spin populations on a metal contact attached to a ferromagnetic material. Researchers used supercomputers to identify various forms of cobalt oxide combined with nickel and zinc that show promise for thermoelectric generation by taking advance of the Spin Hall effect.

35min

Erectile dysfunction drug 'effective' as heart failure treatment

A drug used to treat erectile dysfunction has been found to slow or even reverse the progression of heart failure in sheep. The study is a breakthrough in the treatment for the disease in which five year survival rates are lower than most common cancers.

35min

HER2 positive breast cancer: Treatment de-escalation needs to be personalized

De-escalation approaches in the treatment of women with HER2 positive breast cancer need to be personalized, according to an expert.

35min

Leonardo da Vinci's Hair Allegedly Found, But Don't Get Too Excited

Two Italian scientists said they have some of Leonardo da Vinci's hair, but the claim is sketchy.

38min

Transforming waste heat into clean energy

Through a mechanism known as the Spin Hall effect, it has been shown that a voltage can be generated by harnessing differences in spin populations on a metal contact attached to a ferromagnetic material. Researchers used supercomputers to identify various forms of cobalt oxide combined with nickel and zinc that show promise for thermoelectric generation by taking advance of the Spin Hall effect.

38min

FDA: Ambien Is Making People Kill Themselves While Asleep

New Warning Sleep medications including Ambien have become infamous for prompting people to act bizarrely in a semi-sleeping stupor — but now the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will require sleeping pill manufacturers to post warnings on labels, according to The New York Times . Harrowing incidents related to sleeping pills have included “accidental overdoses, falls, burns, near drowning

40min

NASA uncovers a 19-year fraud that caused failed missions

An Oregon company provided falsified tests to a NASA rocket builder for almost two decades. The company is now liable for $46 million in payments and the lab manager went to prison. NASA can't test every single component itself, making it important the supply chain is protected. None An Oregon aluminum manufacturer has been defrauding NASA for almost twenty years, resulting in failed missions, an

44min

UK sacks Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson over Huawei leaks

UK Prime Minister Theresa May fired the country's Defense Secretary Gavin Williamson today over his role in a recent Huawei leak. Last week, we learned that the UK plans to use …

48min

Denisovans, A Mysterious Form Of Ancient Humans, Are Traced to Tibet

Until now, the only Denisovan remains came from a cave called Denisova in Siberia. The new find is "much more complete," one expert says. (Image credit: Dongju Zhang/Lanzhou University)

52min

Peanut genome sequenced with unprecedented accuracy

Improved pest resistance and drought tolerance are among potential benefits of an international effort in which Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their collaborators have produced the clearest picture yet of the complex genomic history of the cultivated peanut.

55min

Peanut genome sequenced with unprecedented accuracy

Improved pest resistance and drought tolerance are among potential benefits of an international effort in which Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists and their collaborators have produced the clearest picture yet of the complex genomic history of the cultivated peanut.

55min

NASA satellites track Tropical Cyclone Fani along Eastern India's coastline

NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites have been providing infrared, microwave and visible imagery of Tropical Cyclone Fani as it continued to move northward along the eastern coast of India.

55min

Second-life EV batteries: The newest value pool in energy storage

submitted by /u/Spinach_Feta_Wrap [link] [comments]

57min

Dell EMC Implementing AR to Help Service Organizations

submitted by /u/ovirt001 [link] [comments]

57min

57min

Photos: The Worshippers of the Valley of the Dawn

Every year on May 1, members of the Vale do Amanhecer spiritual community in Brazil gather for their biggest ceremony of the year, the Day of the Spiritual Indoctrinator. The religion known as Vale do Amanhecer (or Valley of the Dawn, or, officially, Social Works of the Christian Spiritualist Order) was founded in 1959 by a charismatic woman known as Tia Neiva. Neiva had been working as a truck d

59min

Extinct Human Lineage Settled the Tibetan Plateau Long Before Modern Humans

Extinct Human Lineage Settled the Tibetan Plateau Long Before Modern Humans A newly analyzed jawbone is the first confirmed Denisovan fossil found anywhere outside Siberia. TibetanPlateau_topNteaser.jpg The autumn view of Jiangla River Valley, the location for the cave that housed the newly analyzed jawbone. Image credits: Dongju Zhang, Lanzhou University Culture Wednesday, May 1, 2019 – 13:45 Ch

1h

Will Eaves wins Wellcome book prize for fictionalised take on Alan Turing

Murmur, which depicts the mathematician’s ordeal after he was convicted for having a gay lover, is hailed by judges as ‘a future classic’ Will Eaves’s fictionalised account of the chemical castration of Alan Turing, Murmur, was hailed as “a future classic” as it won the £30,000 Wellcome book prize on Wednesday night, only the third novel to win the award for science-related writing. Published by

1h

Denisovans: Primitive humans lived at high altitudes

Scientists find evidence an ancient human species called a Denisovan lived at high altitudes in Tibet.

1h

Trilobites: A Violent Splash of Magma That May Have Made the Moon

The object thought to have formed our lunar companion may have smashed into a baby Earth still covered in a fiery ocean.

1h

Environmental pollutants could impact cellular signs of aging

Researchers have linked some environmental pollutants with diseases, a decreased life span and signs of premature aging, such as wrinkles and age spots. But can accelerated aging be detected at the cellular level in healthy people exposed to pollutants? Now, researchers report that although pollutant exposure can affect two hallmarks of aging in people (mitochondrial DNA content and telomere lengt

1h

Narwhals have endured a million years with low genetic diversity, and they're thriving

Researchers have sequenced the genome of a narwhal, the Arctic whale famous for the horn-like tusk protruding from its forehead. Their work finds that compared to other Arctic marine mammals, narwhals have low genetic diversity, which typically indicates a species is struggling. However, narwhal populations number in the hundreds of thousands — but researchers warn they are still vulnerable to cl

1h

Trilobites: Gas That Makes a Mountain Breathe Fire Is Turning Up Around the World

A group of scientists have found unusual types of methane escaping from the deep earth in hundreds of locations.

1h

Alzheimer's disease is a 'double-prion disorder,' study shows

Two proteins central to the pathology of Alzheimer's disease act as prions — misshapen proteins that spread through tissue like an infection by forcing normal proteins to adopt the same misfolded shape — according to new UC San Francisco research.

1h

Modulating a hormonal pathway improves social function in 2 clinical trials of adults and children with autism spectrum disorder

Results from two clinical trials reveal that modulating the hormone vasopressin's biological pathway safely enhanced social functioning in 223 adult men and 30 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

1h

Genome analysis of yams reveals new cradle of crop domestication in West Africa

Yams as seen today in West Africa descended from a forest species, a new study finds. The results challenge the hypothesis that domestication of sub-Saharan African plants mostly arose in tropical savannas. Critically, they also advance researchers' understanding of West African crops' domestication history, helping to identify a major cradle of domestication.

1h

Resolving the 'invisible' gold puzzle

In Carlin-type gold deposits, which make up 75% of the US production, gold does not occur in the form of nuggets or veins, but is hidden — together with arsenic — in pyrite, also known as 'fool's gold.' A team of scientists has now shown for the first time that the concentration of gold directly depends on the content of arsenic in the pyrite.

1h

Improved risk management for geothermal systems

In a new study now published in Science Advances an international team of scientists reports on a successful attempt to control induced seismicity during the deepest-ever hydraulic stimulation of a geothermal well in Helsinki, Finland. In a collaborative effort, researchers from commercial companies, academic institutions and universities, designed and successfully applied a safe stimulation strat

1h

Hippos, the animal silicon pumps

The excrements of hippos play an important role in the ecosystem of African lakes and rivers. Because there are fewer and fewer hippos, this ecosystem is in danger. In the long term, this could lead to food shortages at Lake Victoria. These are some of the results of a study by an international team of researchers published in the journal Science Advances.

1h

CNIO team describes the 'energy engine' of a protein that mediates key processes in cancer cells

The assembly of protein complexes involved in cancer mechanisms, like mTOR, ATR or telomerase, involves proteins — chaperones and co-chaperones — that resemble construction machinery Researchers at CNIO used cryo-electron microscopy to solve how the 'energy engine' of one of these co-chaperones, a potential target to reduce tumor growth, is regulated

1h

The mystery behind cleft palate and lips: Study shines a light on genetic factors

Researchers found more than 100 new genes that could lead to the development of cleft lip and palates. The team discovered that genetic variants near these genes are in regions of the genome called enhancers, which regulate expression of genes to maintain proper cell identity.

1h

ASU researchers find water in samples from asteroid Itokawa

Two cosmochemists at Arizona State University have made the first-ever measurements of water contained in samples from the surface of an asteroid.

1h

Mental disorders more common in people who live alone

Living alone is positively associated with common mental disorders, regardless of age and sex, according to a study published May 1, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Louis Jacob from University of Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, France, and colleagues.

1h

First examples of Iberian prehistoric 'imitation amber' beads at gravesites

Prehistoric Iberians created 'imitation amber' by repeatedly coating bead cores with tree resins, according to a study published May 1, 2019, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Carlos Odriozola from Universidad de Sevilla, Spain, and colleagues.

1h

Wolves more prosocial than pack dogs in touchscreen experiment

In a touchscreen-based task that allowed individual animals to provide food to others, wolves behaved more prosocially toward their fellow pack members than did pack dogs. Rachel Dale of the Wolf Science Center in Vienna, Austria, and colleagues present these findings in the open access journal PLOS ONE on May 1, 2019.

1h

This Virtual Security Guard Looks Like an Anime Character

Virtual Safety Starting next year, if you enter a home or business in Japan, you might be greeted by a virtual security guard that looks like it stepped straight out of an anime series. Japanese security company Secom is spearheading the project, but multiple ventures contributed to the creation of the life-sized, artificially intelligent guards, which come in either male or female forms that are

1h

Homeland Security Will DNA Test People Seeking Asylum

Cheek Swab The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will start to DNA test samples of people crossing into the U.S. to seek asylum next week. The idea is to test whether people who claim to be crossing the border as a family are lying about their relationships — a move that not only invades privacy but also excludes families with adopted children or have other unconventional family family struct

1h

Don’t Sleep on Roger Stone

On the eve of his first major appearance since the release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s final report , Roger Stone assured me that he would be “appropriately attired” for his day in court. The veteran Republican operative and longtime confidant of Donald Trump—who boasts a Richard Nixon back tattoo and whose sartorial choices are known to include top hats, felt fedoras, and steampunk glass

1h

The Critique That Inspired John Singleton to Make Poetic Justice

No one elevated South-Central Los Angeles to the point of universal conversation like the late John Singleton. Filmmakers such as Melvin Van Peebles and Charles Burnett had both set their stories on this terrain previously. But Singleton, with his films, forced the world to take note of an area ravaged by violence and neglect, yet abundant with cultural distinction and richness. The director’s na

1h

1 simple change could cut student loan default rate

Not making a 10-year fixed repayment plan the default choice for student loan borrowers could help bring down the default rate on student loans, researchers report. Americans collectively owe a total of $1.5 trillion in student loans, making student debt the largest category of consumer debt after mortgage debt. But this massive debt load isn’t necessarily a bad thing, according to James Cox, the

1h

Can manipulating a ‘social’ hormone’s activity treat autism?

Vasopressin nasal spray improved symptoms, but so did blocking the molecule’s effects

1h

Flodhästar gynnar nyttiga plankton

Kiselalgerna är en stor grupp växtplankton som finns både i sjöar och hav och som står för 20 procent av den totala fotosyntesen på jorden. Kiselalgerna skyddar sig med hjälp av skal av kisel, vilket medför att de behöver få i sig stora mängder av det här grundämnet.

1h

Half a face enough for recognition technology

Facial recognition technology works even when only half a face is visible, researchers have found.

1h

How both mother and baby genes affect birth weight

The largest study of its kind has led to new insights into the complex relationships surrounding how mothers' and babies' genes influence birth weight.

1h

Why do birds typically live longer than mammals?

Why do birds typically live longer than mammals? A new paper offers a hint, albeit not a conclusive answer.

1h

Researchers grow cells in 'paper organs'

Long before scientists test new medicines in animals or people, they study the effects of the substances on cells growing in Petri dishes. However, a 2D layer of cells is a poor substitute for the much more complex 3D structure of tissues in organs. Now, researchers have used a 3D printer to make paper organs, complete with artificial blood vessels, that they can populate with cells.

1h

Scientists track giant ocean vortex from space

Researchers have found a new way to use satellites to monitor the Great Whirl, a massive whirlpool the size of Colorado that forms each year off the coast of East Africa, they report in a new study.

1h

Diagnosing urban air pollution exposure with new precision

A new review of studies on levels of urban exposure to airborne pollutants and their effects on human health suggests that advanced instrumentation and information technology will soon allow researchers and policymakers to gauge the health risks of air pollution on an individual level.

1h

Cranberry oligosaccharides might help prevent UTIs

Many people have heard that drinking cranberry juice can help prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Although clinical trials of this popular folk remedy have produced mixed results, some studies have shown that drinking cranberry juice can keep bacteria that cause UTIs from sticking to cells lining the urinary tract. Now, researchers have identified cranberry oligosaccharides in the urine of cr

1h

New noninvasive ventilation strategy allows preterm infants to breathe freely

Preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) face heightened risks of death, critical illness, and prolonged hospitalization, particularly if they progress to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A new study suggests that treatment with nasal high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (NHFOV) is a beneficial management strategy in this population, and is superior to nasal co

1h

Clinical guidance for radiation therapy after prostatectomy

Scientists have announced updates to their joint clinical guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy in patients with and without evidence of prostate cancer recurrence to include new published research related to adjuvant radiotherapy.

1h

River wildlife contain cocaine, pharmaceuticals and pesticides

For the first time, researchers have found a diverse array of chemicals, including illicit drugs and pesticides in UK river wildlife. The study looked at the exposure of wildlife, such as the freshwater shrimp Gammarus pulex, to different micropollutants (chemicals found at exceptionally low levels) and the levels of these compounds in the animals.

1h

Pyrogenic iron: The missing link to high iron solubility in aerosols

Atmospheric deposition is a source of potentially bioavailable iron (Fe) and thus can partially control biological productivity in large parts of the ocean. However, the explanation of observed high aerosol Fe solubility compared to that in soil particles is still controversial, as several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this observation. Here, a statistical analysis of aerosol Fe solubi

1h

Hippos (Hippopotamus amphibius): The animal silicon pump

While the importance of grasslands in terrestrial silicon (Si) cycling and fluxes to rivers is established, the influence of large grazers has not been considered. Here, we show that hippopotamuses are key actors in the savannah biogeochemical Si cycle. Through a detailed analysis of Si concentrations and stable isotope compositions in multiple ecosystem compartments of a savannah-river continuum

1h

Behavioral and epigenetic consequences of oxytocin treatment at birth

Oxytocin is used in approximately half of all births in the United States during labor induction and/or augmentation. However, the effects of maternal oxytocin administration on offspring development have not been fully characterized. Here, we used the socially monogamous prairie vole to examine the hypothesis that oxytocin exposure at birth can have long-term developmental consequences. Maternal

1h

Coupled partitioning of Au and As into pyrite controls formation of giant Au deposits

The giant Carlin-type Au deposits (Nevada, USA) contain gold hosted in arsenic-rich iron sulfide (pyrite), but the processes controlling the sequestration of Au in these hydrothermal systems are poorly understood. Here, we present an experimental study investigating the distribution of Au and As between hydrothermal fluid and pyrite under conditions similar to those found in Carlin-type Au deposi

1h

Controlling fluid-induced seismicity during a 6.1-km-deep geothermal stimulation in Finland

We show that near–real-time seismic monitoring of fluid injection allowed control of induced earthquakes during the stimulation of a 6.1-km-deep geothermal well near Helsinki, Finland. A total of 18,160 m 3 of fresh water was pumped into crystalline rocks over 49 days in June to July 2018. Seismic monitoring was performed with a 24-station borehole seismometer network. Using near–real-time inform

1h

A light-driven burst of hydroxyl radicals dominates oxidation chemistry in newly activated cloud droplets

Aerosol particles and their interactions with clouds are one of the most uncertain aspects of the climate system. Aerosol processing by clouds contributes to this uncertainty, altering size distributions, chemical composition, and radiative properties. Many changes are limited by the availability of hydroxyl radicals in the droplets. We suggest an unrecognized potentially substantial source of OH

1h

New clues to ancient water on Itokawa

We performed the first measurements of hydrogen isotopic composition and water content in nominally anhydrous minerals collected by the Hayabusa mission from the S-type asteroid Itokawa. The hydrogen isotopic composition (D) of the measured pyroxene grains is –79 to –53, which is indistinguishable from that in chondritic meteorites, achondrites, and terrestrial rocks. Itokawa minerals contain wat

1h

Pervasive hybridizations in the history of wheat relatives

Cultivated wheats are derived from an intricate history of three genomes, A, B, and D, present in both diploid and polyploid species. It was recently proposed that the D genome originated from an ancient hybridization between the A and B lineages. However, this result has been questioned, and a robust phylogeny of wheat relatives is still lacking. Using transcriptome data from all diploid species

1h

p63 establishes epithelial enhancers at critical craniofacial development genes

The transcription factor p63 is a key mediator of epidermal development. Point mutations in p63 in patients lead to developmental defects, including orofacial clefting. To date, knowledge on how pivotal the role of p63 is in human craniofacial development is limited. Using an inducible transdifferentiation model, combined with epigenomic sequencing and multicohort meta-analysis of genome-wide ass

1h

Structural mechanism for regulation of the AAA-ATPases RUVBL1-RUVBL2 in the R2TP co-chaperone revealed by cryo-EM

The human R2TP complex (RUVBL1-RUVBL2-RPAP3-PIH1D1) is an HSP90 co-chaperone required for the maturation of several essential multiprotein complexes, including RNA polymerase II, small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins, and PIKK complexes such as mTORC1 and ATR-ATRIP. RUVBL1-RUVBL2 AAA-ATPases are also primary components of other essential complexes such as INO80 and Tip60 remodelers. Despite recent e

1h

Yam genomics supports West Africa as a major cradle of crop domestication

While there has been progress in our understanding of the origin and history of agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa, a unified perspective is still lacking on where and how major crops were domesticated in the region. Here, we investigated the domestication of African yam ( Dioscorea rotundata ), a key crop in early African agriculture. Using whole-genome resequencing and statistical models, we sho

1h

Entropic effects enable life at extreme temperatures

Maintaining membrane integrity is a challenge at extreme temperatures. Biochemical synthesis of membrane-spanning lipids is one adaptation that organisms such as thermophilic archaea have evolved to meet this challenge and preserve vital cellular function at high temperatures. The molecular-level details of how these tethered lipids affect membrane dynamics and function, however, remain unclear.

1h

cIAP1/2 inhibition synergizes with TNF inhibition in autoimmunity by down-regulating IL-17A and inducing Tregs

IL-17 and TNF-α are major effector cytokines in chronic inflammation. TNF-α inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), although not all patients respond, and most relapse after treatment withdrawal. This may be due to a paradoxical exacerbation of T H 17 responses by TNF-α inhibition. We examined the therapeutic potential of targeting cellular inhibitors of apoptos

1h

Hippo poop cycles silicon through the East African environment

By chowing down on grass and then excreting into rivers and lakes, hippos play a big role in transporting a nutrient crucial to the food web.

1h

Wolves more prosocial than pack dogs in touchscreen experiment

In a touchscreen-based task that allowed individual animals to provide food to others, wolves behaved more prosocially toward their fellow pack members than did pack dogs. Rachel Dale of the Wolf Science Center in Vienna, Austria, and colleagues present these findings in the open access journal PLOS ONE on May 1, 2019.

1h

Hippos, the animal silicon pumps

The excrement of hippos plays an important role in the ecosystem of African lakes and rivers. Because there are fewer and fewer hippos, this ecosystem is in danger. In the long term, this could lead to food shortages at Lake Victoria, for example. These are some of the results of a new study by an international team of researchers published in the journal Science Advances. Patrick Frings from the

1h

Eczema-associated bacteria may be kept in check by a different microbe

Eczema flare-ups are associated with bacteria that break the skin’s barrier and cause inflammation – but a different type of bacteria can help fight it off

1h

Surprisingly wet asteroid dust could spark a rethink of Earth's water

Samples of space dust from the Hayabusa mission to the asteroid Itokawa are far less dry than we expected, which may prompt a rethink of how Earth got its water

1h

Hormone therapy may improve some symptoms of autism

Two studies suggest that suppressing or boosting the hormone vasopressin may help communication skills and social interactions in autistic children and men

1h

Hippos poop a huge amount of silicon every day – and it’s a good thing

By eating plants and then defecating in the water, hippos act as living silicon pumps – a service that may be essential for the health of their whole ecosystem

1h

Improved risk management for geothermal systems

Enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) are considered a promising source of energy that is clean, provides a sustainable baseload for heat and electricity, and is an emerging key technology in the long-term transition to a fossil fuel-free future. However, developing a geothermal reservoir requires the forceful creation of fluid pathways in the deep underground by injecting large amounts of water under

1h

Wolves more prosocial than pack dogs in touchscreen experiment

In a touchscreen-based task that allowed individual animals to provide food to others, wolves behaved more prosocially toward their fellow pack members than did pack dogs. Rachel Dale of the Wolf Science Center in Vienna, Austria, and colleagues present these findings in the open access journal PLOS ONE on May 1, 2019.

1h

Hippos, the animal silicon pumps

The excrement of hippos plays an important role in the ecosystem of African lakes and rivers. Because there are fewer and fewer hippos, this ecosystem is in danger. In the long term, this could lead to food shortages at Lake Victoria, for example. These are some of the results of a new study by an international team of researchers published in the journal Science Advances. Patrick Frings from the

1h

Resolving the 'invisible' gold puzzle

The Carlin-type gold deposits in Nevada, U.S., are the origin of five percent of the global production and 75 percent of the U.S. production of gold. In these deposits, gold does not occur in the form of nuggets or veins, but is hidden—together with arsenic—in pyrite, also known as "fool's gold." A team of scientists from the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam—German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ has

1h

Researchers find water in samples from asteroid Itokawa

Two cosmochemists at Arizona State University have made the first-ever measurements of water contained in samples from the surface of an asteroid. The samples came from asteroid Itokawa and were collected by the Japanese space probe Hayabusa.

1h

First examples of Iberian prehistoric 'imitation amber' beads at gravesites

Prehistoric Iberians created "imitation amber" by repeatedly coating bead cores with tree resins, according to a study published May 1, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Carlos Odriozola from Universidad de Sevilla, Spain, and colleagues.

1h

Does exercise not fight depression as well for women?

Exercise and sleep may affect depression differently in men and women, according to a new study. Researchers looked at exercise and sleep patterns in more than 1,100 college students at Beijing University. Participants completed three questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms, physical activity habits, and sleep patterns. For men, vigorous and moderate physical activity helped protect against

1h

Wolves care about their mates. Dogs, not so much

Touchscreen test shows wolves are far more cooperative that their domesticated relatives. Andrew Masterson reports.

1h

Hippos crucial to silicon cycle in African river food webs

Study warns population decreases could damage a critical link between plant and algal growth. Mark Bruer reports.

1h

‘Amber’ beads revealed as prehistoric fakes

Neolithic purchasers buying high status goods may have been ripped off by unscrupulous dealers. Andrew Masterson reports.

1h

Hormone hope for autism management

Two studies point to vasopressin as potential tool to improve social skills for people with autism spectrum disorder. Andrew Masterson reports.

1h

Plant studies show where Africa’s early farmers tamed some of the continent’s key crops

Several traditional crops traced to West African river basin

1h

The End of Cyberspace

In the most utopian statement of what the internet might be, the late John Perry Barlow laid out the claim that cyberspace was free. “Governments of the Industrial World, you weary giants of flesh and steel, I come from Cyberspace, the new home of Mind,” Barlow wrote in 1996 . “On behalf of the future, I ask you of the past to leave us alone. You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty

1h

Who Was Bonnie Prince Charlie? | Expedition Unknown

It's like a real life Game of Thrones… with less dragons. Get a lesson in Scottish history with Josh Gates recounting the story of Bonnie Prince Charlie, French gold, and an ill-fated plan to take the throne of Scotland. Stream Full Episodes of Expedition Unknown: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/expedition-unknown/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook:

1h

Water has been found in the dust of an asteroid thought to be bone-dry

Scientists detected water in bits of an asteroid thought to be devoid of the liquid. Such space rocks might have helped create Earth’s oceans.

1h

Peanut genome sequenced with unprecedented accuracy

Improved pest resistance and drought tolerance are among potential benefits of an international effort in which Agricultural Research Service and collaborating scientists have produced the clearest picture yet of the complex genomic history of the cultivated peanut.

1h

NASA: Manufacturer’s Lies Caused Two Satellite Launches to Fail

Faulty Fairings For years, investigators for NASA’s Launch Services Program (LSP) have sought answers about why a pair of Taurus XL rockets failed their satellite launch missions in 2009 and 2011 — and now they’ve found a culprit. On Tuesday, NASA revealed that aluminum manufacturer Sapa Profiles, Inc. (SPI) “altered test results and provided false certifications” for materials used in the rocket

1h

Amid obesity epidemic, many American kids are still ditching water

A research letter, published in JAMA Pediatrics , notes that one out of every five children (ages 2–19) do not drink water on any given day. Children that replace water with sugar-sweetened beverages drink twice as many calories. Researchers note that this is a factor in childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, and other avoidable ailments. None An old friend of mine never drank w

1h

Bacillus Cereus: The Bacterium That Causes 'Fried Rice Sydrome'

Fried rice syndrome is a common type of food poisoning.

1h

Environmental pollutants could impact cellular signs of aging

Researchers have linked some environmental pollutants with diseases, a decreased life span and signs of premature aging, such as wrinkles and age spots. But can accelerated aging be detected at the cellular level in healthy people exposed to pollutants? Now, researchers report that although pollutant exposure can affect two hallmarks of aging in people (mitochondrial DNA content and telomere lengt

1h

These compact camera bags carry just the right amount of gear

Gadgets You don't always need a huge backpack. Three camera bags that won’t weigh you down.

1h

Male researchers’ ‘vague’ language more likely to win grants

Male researchers’ ‘vague’ language more likely to win grants Male researchers’ ‘vague’ language more likely to win grants, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01402-4 Grant reviewers favour ‘broad’ words used more often by men, but proposals using those terms don’t produce better research.

1h

Podcast: China's growing science network, and talking brain signals

Podcast: China's growing science network, and talking brain signals Podcast: China's growing science network, and talking brain signals, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01410-4 Benjamin Thompson and Shamini Bundell bring you the latest science updates.

1h

Matter: Denisovan Jawbone Discovered in a Cave in Tibet

Until now, fossils of the ancient human species had been found in just one Siberian cave. The discovery suggests that Denisovans roamed over much of Asia.

1h

In a Warming World, Evidence of a Human ‘Fingerprint’ on Drought

A new study finds human-caused global warming has affected patterns of drought going back to the the turn of the 20th century.

1h

Hualongdong Skull Is Latest Challenge To Dominant Human Evolution Model

A largely complete, roughly 300,000-year-old skull from southeastern China appears to be the latest evidence challenging the dominant model of human evolution. The Hualongdong skull's unique combination of features make the fossil a tantalizing clue to East Asia's diverse hominin history. Researchers excavating a collapsed cave site unearthed the skull, formally known as Hualongdong 6 (HLD 6), alo

1h

Denisovan Find Hints The Extinct Humans Colonized The 'Roof of the World'

On the mountainous Tibetan Plateau, small groups of nomadic herders still make a living two miles or more above sea level. Most of us would be poorly-equipped to deal with that altitude for long periods of time, but the Tibetans there have unique genetic adaptations that let their bodies function in the thin air. Mysteriously, those genes seem to come from another species of human, the Denisovans,

1h

National Academy of Sciences Votes To Change Its Code of Conduct

If the changes are passed, a member can be ousted for a proven case of sexual harassment by a two-thirds majority vote by academy members.

1h

Slender, neuron-size probes aim for better recordings of brain’s electrical chatter

New electrode designs aim for seamless integration in brain tissue

1h

Alaska Will Finally Get Its Own Fiber-Optic Line

An Alaskan telco is building a 270-mile fiber-optic line that will connect with Canadian carriers and ultimately the Lower 48.

1h

NASA study: Human influence on global droughts goes back 100 years

Human-generated greenhouse gases and atmospheric particles were affecting global drought risk as far back as the early 20th century, according to a study from NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York City.

1h

NASA satellites track Tropical Cyclone Fani along Eastern India's coastline

NASA's Aqua and Terra satellites have been providing infrared, microwave and visible imagery of Tropical Cyclone Fani as it continued to move northward along the eastern coast of India.

1h

Ambien, Other Sleep Aids Get FDA's 'Black Box' Label, Its Strongest Warning

The change follows FDA evaluation of reports describing injuries that are "rare but serious" for users of these medications.

1h

US wildlife officials propose downlisting endangered beetle

U.S. wildlife officials say an endangered carnivorous beetle is making a comeback and should be downlisted to threatened.

1h

Bald eagle died of lead poisoning in Montana's Glacier Park

A bald eagle found dead in Montana's Glacier National Park died of lead poisoning.

1h

Parasites help beetle hosts function more effectively

A common woodland beetle that plays an important role in the decomposition of fallen trees may be getting a boost from a surprising source: parasites.

1h

US wildlife officials propose downlisting endangered beetle

U.S. wildlife officials say an endangered carnivorous beetle is making a comeback and should be downlisted to threatened.

1h

Bald eagle died of lead poisoning in Montana's Glacier Park

A bald eagle found dead in Montana's Glacier National Park died of lead poisoning.

1h

San Francisco billionaire gives $30M to study homelessness

A San Francisco billionaire is donating $30 million to the University of California, San Francisco, to research root causes of homelessness and potential solutions.

1h

Parasites help beetle hosts function more effectively

A common woodland beetle that plays an important role in the decomposition of fallen trees may be getting a boost from a surprising source: parasites.

1h

Female physicists make slow academic headway in the United States

Female physicists make slow academic headway in the United States Female physicists make slow academic headway in the United States, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01414-0 American Institute of Physics study finds women gaining higher proportions of PhDs and faculty positions, but identifies a leak in the pipeline at undergraduate level.

2h

'Spectacular' jawbone discovery sheds light on ancient Denisovans

Scientists extract proteins from a molar to uncover details of mysterious species’ origins A human jawbone found in a cave on the Tibetan plateau has revealed new details about the appearance and lifestyle of a mysterious ancient species called Denisovans . The 160,000-year-old fossil, comprising a powerful jaw and unusually large teeth, suggests these early relatives would have looked something

2h

Restoring brain function in mice with symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

A study in mice shows that selectively removing cells that are no longer dividing from the brains of mice with a form of Alzheimer's disease can reduce brain damage and inflammation, and slow the pace of cognitive decline. These findings add to evidence that such senescent cells contribute to the damage caused by Alzheimer's disease in people.

2h

The sicker the better

A common woodland beetle that plays an important role in the decomposition of fallen trees may be getting a boost from a surprising source: parasites.

2h

The unanticipated early origins of childhood brain cancer

Brain tumours are the leading cause of non-accidental death in children in Canada, but little is known about when these tumours form or how they develop. Researchers have recently identified the cells that are thought to give rise to certain brain tumours in children and discovered that these cells first appear in the embryonic stage of a mammal's development – far earlier than they had expected.

2h

A comprehensive map of how Alzheimer's affects the brain

MIT researchers performed the first comprehensive analysis of the genes altered in individual brain cells of patients with Alzheimer's disease, allowing them to identify the distinctive cellular pathways affected in neurons and other types of brain cells.

2h

Atherosclerosis: Induced cell death destabilizes plaques

Many chronic disorders arise from misdirected immune responses. A Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich team led by Oliver Söhnlein now shows that neutrophils exacerbate atherosclerosis by inducing smooth muscle-cell death and that a tailored peptide inhibits the process.

2h

A new vision for neuroscience

For decades scientists have been searching for a way to watch a live broadcast of the brain. Neurons send and receive massive amounts of information — toe itches! Fire hot! Garbage smells! — at speeds up to 270 miles per hour. Now, with a new microscope, noise-cutting software, red and blue light, and a homemade projector, researchers can capture something no one has seen before: neurons flashin

2h

First hominins on the Tibetan Plateau were Denisovans

So far Denisovans were only known from a small collection of fossil fragments from Denisova Cave in Siberia. A research team now describes a 160,000-year-old hominin mandible from Xiahe in China. Using ancient protein analysis the researchers found that the mandible's owner belonged to a population that was closely related to the Denisovans from Siberia. This population occupied the Tibetan Platea

2h

Scientists see fingerprint of warming climate on droughts going back to 1900

In an unusual new study, scientists say they have detected the fingerprint of human-driven global warming on patterns of drought and moisture across the world as far back as 1900.

2h

Researchers find new target to improve response to cancer immunotherapy

Researchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center looked at a little-understood type of cell death called ferroptosis. They found ferroptosis occurs in tumor cells and plays a role in cancer immunity, suggesting the potential of targeting this pathway to improve immunotherapy treatments.

2h

Changes in the metabolism of normal cells promotes the metastasis of ovarian cancer cells

A systematic examination of the tumor and the tissue surrounding it — particularly normal cells in that tissue, called fibroblasts — has revealed a new treatment target that could potentially prevent the rapid dissemination and poor prognosis associated with high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC), a tumor type that primarily originates in the fallopian tubes or ovaries and spreads throughout the abd

2h

Nuclear 'magic numbers' collapse beyond the doubly magic nickel 78

Scientists have demonstrated that nickel 78, a neutron-rich 'doubly magic' isotope of nickel with 28 protons and 50 neutrons, still maintains a spherical shape that allows it to be relatively stable despite the large imbalance in the number of protons and neutrons. They also discovered a surprise, with the observations from the experiment suggesting that nickel 78 may be the lightest nucleus with

2h

Mouse studies show minimally invasive route can accurately administer drugs to brain

In experiments in mice, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have developed a technique that facilitates the precise placement of cancer drugs at their intended targets in the brain.

2h

CEO of 8minutenergy: Someday Solar Energy Will Be Nearly Free

submitted by /u/Spinach_Feta_Wrap [link] [comments]

2h

2h

Women may soon start using AI to tell good (human) eggs from bad

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

2h

Denisovans: Primitive humans lived at high altitudes

Scientists find evidence an ancient human species called a Denisovan lived at high altitudes in Tibet.

2h

Google adds way to auto-delete your location history, web activity

Google wants to give people an easier way to delete their personal data.

2h

An Unusual Way to Bridge the Town-Gown Divide

This post is about a development that few people outside the state of Indiana have ever heard or read about, but which has implications for the country as a whole. It’s about a highly unusual approach to a highly familiar problem: the economic challenges of public schools. This news comes from America’s original “ Middletown ,” the mid-sized Indiana city of Muncie. In the preceding installment ab

2h

A Revealing Piece of Ancient Human History, Discovered in a Tibetan Cave

In 2008, scientists working in Denisova cave—a cold site in Siberia’s Altai Mountains—uncovered a strange pinky bone, broader than a typical human’s. The DNA within that bone revealed that its owner belonged to an entirely new group of ancient hominins, distinct from Homo sapiens or Neanderthals. That group became known as the Denisovans. Researchers have since decoded the Denisovan genome. But s

2h

Single-cell transcriptomic analysis of Alzheimer’s disease

Single-cell transcriptomic analysis of Alzheimer’s disease Single-cell transcriptomic analysis of Alzheimer’s disease, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1195-2 Single-cell transcriptomic analysis of Alzheimer’s disease

2h

Author Correction: Attosecond angular streaking and tunnelling time in atomic hydrogen

Author Correction: Attosecond angular streaking and tunnelling time in atomic hydrogen Author Correction: Attosecond angular streaking and tunnelling time in atomic hydrogen, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1123-5 Author Correction: Attosecond angular streaking and tunnelling time in atomic hydrogen

2h

CD8+ T cells regulate tumour ferroptosis during cancer immunotherapy

CD8 + T cells regulate tumour ferroptosis during cancer immunotherapy CD8 + T cells regulate tumour ferroptosis during cancer immunotherapy, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1170-y Interferon-γ induces ferroptotic cell death in tumours by suppressing cystine uptake and promoting lipid peroxidation.

2h

Manipulating the tumour-suppressor protein Rb in lung cancer reveals possible drug targets

Manipulating the tumour-suppressor protein Rb in lung cancer reveals possible drug targets Manipulating the tumour-suppressor protein Rb in lung cancer reveals possible drug targets, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01319-y Tumours often become resistant to treatment, but how this occurs is poorly understood. An analysis of how the protein Rb affects tumour growth and the res

2h

A doubly magic nucleus that has two faces

A doubly magic nucleus that has two faces A doubly magic nucleus that has two faces, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01321-4 The neutron-rich nickel nucleus 78Ni is difficult to excite and, once excited, has competing spherical and deformed shapes. These intriguing properties make 78Ni a valuable testing ground for nuclear theory.

2h

Externalized histone H4 orchestrates chronic inflammation by inducing lytic cell death

Externalized histone H4 orchestrates chronic inflammation by inducing lytic cell death Externalized histone H4 orchestrates chronic inflammation by inducing lytic cell death, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1167-6 Histone H4 is released from neutrophil extracellular traps and induces membrane lysis in vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to the destabilization of atheroscle

2h

Author Correction: CPS1 maintains pyrimidine pools and DNA synthesis in KRAS/LKB1-mutant lung cancer cells

Author Correction: CPS1 maintains pyrimidine pools and DNA synthesis in KRAS/LKB1-mutant lung cancer cells Author Correction: CPS1 maintains pyrimidine pools and DNA synthesis in KRAS/LKB1-mutant lung cancer cells, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1133-3 Author Correction: CPS1 maintains pyrimidine pools and DNA synthesis in KRAS/LKB1-mutant lung cancer cells

2h

Biggest Denisovan fossil yet spills ancient human’s secrets

Biggest Denisovan fossil yet spills ancient human’s secrets Biggest Denisovan fossil yet spills ancient human’s secrets, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01395-0 Jawbone from China reveals that the ancient human was widespread across the world — and lived at surprising altitude.

2h

High-temperature bulk metallic glasses developed by combinatorial methods

High-temperature bulk metallic glasses developed by combinatorial methods High-temperature bulk metallic glasses developed by combinatorial methods, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1145-z Bulk metallic glasses made from alloys of iridium, nickel, tantalum and boron are developed by combinatorial methods, with higher strength at high temperature than those previously produced

2h

Arabidopsis FLL2 promotes liquid–liquid phase separation of polyadenylation complexes

Arabidopsis FLL2 promotes liquid–liquid phase separation of polyadenylation complexes Arabidopsis FLL2 promotes liquid–liquid phase separation of polyadenylation complexes, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1165-8 A genetic screen for factors required by the Arabidopsis RNA-binding protein FCA identifies FLL2 as necessary in the formation of FCA nuclear bodies, and thus a role

2h

RB constrains lineage fidelity and multiple stages of tumour progression and metastasis

RB constrains lineage fidelity and multiple stages of tumour progression and metastasis RB constrains lineage fidelity and multiple stages of tumour progression and metastasis, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1172-9 Loss of RB promotes both malignant progression and the development of metastatic disease; however, whereas reactivation of the RB pathway can revert metastatic t

2h

Twentieth-century hydroclimate changes consistent with human influence

Twentieth-century hydroclimate changes consistent with human influence Twentieth-century hydroclimate changes consistent with human influence, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1149-8 Multiple observational datasets and reconstructions using data from tree rings confirm that human activities were probably affecting the worldwide risk of droughts as early as at the beginning of

2h

A possible non-biological reaction framework for metabolic processes on early Earth

A possible non-biological reaction framework for metabolic processes on early Earth A possible non-biological reaction framework for metabolic processes on early Earth, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01322-3 Early life forms established a network of reactions for converting carbon dioxide into organic compounds. A non-biological system of reactions that could have formed th

2h

The mysterious Denisovans have at last come in from the cold

The mysterious Denisovans have at last come in from the cold The mysterious Denisovans have at last come in from the cold, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01310-7 Remains found on the Tibetan Plateau suggest a large hominin adapted to high-altitude life.

2h

Innervation of thermogenic adipose tissue via a calsyntenin 3β–S100b axis

Innervation of thermogenic adipose tissue via a calsyntenin 3β–S100b axis Innervation of thermogenic adipose tissue via a calsyntenin 3β–S100b axis, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1156-9 The newly identified calsyntenin 3β protein has a role in the innervation of thermogenic fat through a mechanism of communication—which is unique to mammals—between thermogenic adipocytes a

2h

78Ni revealed as a doubly magic stronghold against nuclear deformation

78 Ni revealed as a doubly magic stronghold against nuclear deformation 78 Ni revealed as a doubly magic stronghold against nuclear deformation, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1155-x A spectroscopic study of 78Ni confirms its doubly magic nature and reveals it as a stronghold beyond which the magic numbers 28 and 50 break down because of competing deformation.

2h

Prophylactic TNF blockade uncouples efficacy and toxicity in dual CTLA-4 and PD-1 immunotherapy

Prophylactic TNF blockade uncouples efficacy and toxicity in dual CTLA-4 and PD-1 immunotherapy Prophylactic TNF blockade uncouples efficacy and toxicity in dual CTLA-4 and PD-1 immunotherapy, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1162-y In mice, prophylactic administration of TNF inhibitors mitigates some of the immune-related adverse effects of immune checkpoint blockade treatme

2h

Why brown fat has a lot of nerve

Why brown fat has a lot of nerve Why brown fat has a lot of nerve, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01278-4 Brown fat in mammals burns stored calories by producing heat, in a process that is controlled by nerves infiltrating this tissue. A protein that regulates innervation of brown fat and heat generation has been discovered.

2h

A late Middle Pleistocene Denisovan mandible from the Tibetan Plateau

A late Middle Pleistocene Denisovan mandible from the Tibetan Plateau A late Middle Pleistocene Denisovan mandible from the Tibetan Plateau, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1139-x Fossil evidence indicates that Denisovans occupied the Tibetan Plateau in the Middle Pleistocene epoch and successfully adapted to this high-altitude hypoxic environments long before the regional a

2h

Subthreshold firing in Mott nanodevices

Subthreshold firing in Mott nanodevices Subthreshold firing in Mott nanodevices, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1159-6 Mott materials feature scale-less relaxation dynamics after the insulator-to-metal transition that make its electric triggering dependent on recent switching events.

2h

A vitamin-C-derived DNA modification catalysed by an algal TET homologue

A vitamin-C-derived DNA modification catalysed by an algal TET homologue A vitamin-C-derived DNA modification catalysed by an algal TET homologue, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1160-0 An algal TET dioxygenase homologue, CMD1, uses vitamin C as a glycerol donor to modify 5-methylcytosine and helps to regulate gene transcription in response to high light levels.

2h

The new physics needed to probe the origins of life

The new physics needed to probe the origins of life The new physics needed to probe the origins of life, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01318-z Stuart Kauffman’s provocative take on emergence and evolution energizes Sara Imari Walker.

2h

Voltage imaging and optogenetics reveal behaviour-dependent changes in hippocampal dynamics

Voltage imaging and optogenetics reveal behaviour-dependent changes in hippocampal dynamics Voltage imaging and optogenetics reveal behaviour-dependent changes in hippocampal dynamics, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1166-7 A combination of improved near-infrared voltage indicators, high-speed microscopes and targeted gene expression schemes enabled simultaneous in vivo opto

2h

Proteomics reveals NNMT as a master metabolic regulator of cancer-associated fibroblasts

Proteomics reveals NNMT as a master metabolic regulator of cancer-associated fibroblasts Proteomics reveals NNMT as a master metabolic regulator of cancer-associated fibroblasts, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1173-8 The authors find that stromal methyltransferase nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (NNMT) regulates the transition of normal fibroblasts to cancer-associated fib

2h

A nearby neutron-star merger explains the actinide abundances in the early Solar System

A nearby neutron-star merger explains the actinide abundances in the early Solar System A nearby neutron-star merger explains the actinide abundances in the early Solar System, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1113-7 Actinides in the early Solar System could have originated in the merger of two neutron stars about 300 parsecs away.

2h

Synthesis and breakdown of universal metabolic precursors promoted by iron

Synthesis and breakdown of universal metabolic precursors promoted by iron Synthesis and breakdown of universal metabolic precursors promoted by iron, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1151-1 A chemical reaction network that overlaps with the biological Krebs and glyoxylate cycles arises from pyruvate and glyoxylate in the presence of iron, suggesting how early metabolic pathw

2h

Vectorizing the spatial structure of high-harmonic radiation from gas

Vectorizing the spatial structure of high-harmonic radiation from gas Vectorizing the spatial structure of high-harmonic radiation from gas, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10014-5 Ultrafast pulses with controlled parameters are desirable in many applications including probing materials and their interaction with light. Here the authors demonstrate a technique for polarizati

2h

Author Correction: Study of 300,486 individuals identifies 148 independent genetic loci influencing general cognitive function

Author Correction: Study of 300,486 individuals identifies 148 independent genetic loci influencing general cognitive function Author Correction: Study of 300,486 individuals identifies 148 independent genetic loci influencing general cognitive function, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10160-w Author Correction: Study of 300,486 individuals identifies 148 independent genetic

2h

Structural mechanism underlying G protein family-specific regulation of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channel

Structural mechanism underlying G protein family-specific regulation of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channel Structural mechanism underlying G protein family-specific regulation of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channel, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10038-x Opening of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRK) is coupled

2h

Small intestinal microbial dysbiosis underlies symptoms associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders

Small intestinal microbial dysbiosis underlies symptoms associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders Small intestinal microbial dysbiosis underlies symptoms associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09964-7 Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been associated with functional gastrointestinal disorders. Here, t

2h

Author Correction: Engineering of high-precision base editors for site-specific single nucleotide replacement

Author Correction: Engineering of high-precision base editors for site-specific single nucleotide replacement Author Correction: Engineering of high-precision base editors for site-specific single nucleotide replacement, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10069-4 Author Correction: Engineering of high-precision base editors for site-specific single nucleotide replacement

2h

Rapid unimolecular reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates and implications for atmospheric chemistry

Rapid unimolecular reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates and implications for atmospheric chemistry Rapid unimolecular reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates and implications for atmospheric chemistry, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09948-7 Criegee intermediates have received much attention in atmospheric chemistry because of their importance in ozonolysis mech

2h

A modular degron library for synthetic circuits in mammalian cells

A modular degron library for synthetic circuits in mammalian cells A modular degron library for synthetic circuits in mammalian cells, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09974-5 One method of controlling protein degradation is through the use of degrons. Here the authors present a toolbox of characterised degrons as a library to fine-tune biological gene-expression systems. Its

2h

High mitogenic stimulation arrests angiogenesis

High mitogenic stimulation arrests angiogenesis High mitogenic stimulation arrests angiogenesis, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09875-7 High mitogenic stimuli have been suggested to promote endothelial cell proliferation and sprouting during angiogenesis. Here Pontes-Quero et al., by interfering with levels of VEGF and Notch signalling in single endothelial cells in vivo, f

2h

Denisovan Fossil Identified in Tibetan Cave

A mandible dating to 160,000 years ago is the first evidence of Denisovan hominins outside the Russian cave where they were first discovered in 2010.

2h

Jawbone of a Mysterious Denisovan Has Been Discovered in a Remote Cave in Tibet

This is the only fossil evidence of the group outside of a cave in Siberia.

2h

2h

Snart kan du bede Facebook og Google om at slette, hvad de ved om dig

I fremtiden bestemmer du, hvor længe internetgiganterne kan beholde dine data

2h

Air pollution may have muted climate change’s impact on droughts

Which also suggests that as we clean up the air, droughts could get worse.

2h

Analysis: U.S. science adviser has a vision for cutting research red tape, but details are scarce

Kelvin Droegemeier faces long odds in tackling perennial complaint

2h

First fossil jaw of Denisovans finally puts a face on elusive human relatives

New protein method identifies first Denisovan outside of Siberia, on Tibetan Plateau

2h

Jawbone discovery sheds light on Denisovans

Fossil is first evidence of their existence since original find in Siberia

2h

Tidig människosläkting levde på extremt hög höjd

För nästan fyrtio år sedan hittade en buddhistisk munk en käke i en grotta i Tibet. Nu står det klart att den kommer från en denisovamänniska, en nära släkting till både neandertalarna och oss själva.

2h

Is there anything we can do to stop Greenland from turning green?

The speed and scale of Arctic melting is shocking even hardened researchers – the need to act now has never been clearer, says our chief reporter Adam Vaughan

2h

Major discovery suggests Denisovans lived in Tibet 160,000 years ago

The first Denisovan remains discovered outside Siberia suggest our extinct cousins lived at extreme altitude in Tibet long before our species made it there

2h

Signs of human climate change influence on drought traced back to 1900

We have been pumping out greenhouse gases for a very long time – and now we have evidence that humans were changing the climate over a century ago

2h

Introducing this week’s new-look New Scientist magazine

Welcome to the redesigned New Scientist, with a brighter, fresher feel. All your old favourites are still here and we now have more columns and puzzles. We hope you enjoy it

2h

It is time to bring global attention to the trade in Burmese amber

The stunning fossils preserved in Burmese amber may be scientifically priceless, but is the human price too high?

2h

First hominins on the Tibetan Plateau were Denisovans

So far, Denisovans were only known from a small collection of fossil fragments from Denisova Cave in Siberia. A research team now describes a 160,000-year-old hominin mandible from Xiahe in China. Using ancient protein analysis, the researchers found that the mandible's owner belonged to a population that was closely related to the Denisovans from Siberia. This population occupied the Tibetan Plat

2h

Scientists see fingerprint of warming climate on droughts going back to 1900

In an unusual new study, scientists say they have detected the fingerprint of human-driven global warming on patterns of drought and moisture across the world as far back as 1900. Rising temperatures are well documented back at least that far, but this is the first time researchers have identified resulting long-term global effects on the water supplies that feed crops and cities. Among the observ

2h

Nuclear 'magic numbers' collapse beyond the doubly magic nickel 78

Scientists from the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Research and collaborators have used the center's heavy ion accelerator, the RI Beam Factory, to demonstrate that nickel-78, a neutron-rich "doubly magic" isotope of nickel with 28 protons and 50 neutrons, still maintains a spherical shape that makes it relatively stable despite the large imbalance in the number of protons and neutrons

2h

A jawbone shows Denisovans lived on the Tibetan Plateau long before humans

A Denisovan jaw is the earliest evidence of hominids on the Tibetan Plateau, and the first fossil outside of Siberia from the mysterious human lineage.

2h

Jawbone puts Denisovans on the Tibetan Plateau at least 160,000 years ago

Fossil find suggests the mysterious hominins colonise high altitudes way before modern humans. Dyani Lewis reports.

2h

AI research offers more eyes and ears to search and rescue missions

Rescue teams descended on the destruction left by Hurricane Michael in October, frantically searching for survivors. But a week later, more than 1,000 people were still accounted for, leaving families to wait and hope.

2h

Erectile Dysfunction Drug May Help Treat Heart Failure

A drug for erectile dysfunction may also help treat heart failure, a preliminary study in animals suggests.

2h

Barr Misled the Public—And It Worked

Updated at 1:44 p.m. ET on May 1, 2019. When William Barr was appointed attorney general, his critics warned that Barr would do everything he could to either interfere with Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s work or suppress his report. In his confirmation hearings, Barr pledged to release as much of the report as he could under the law. He followed through: There have been no indications of interf

2h

Forget sperm and eggs, researchers have created embryo stem cells from skin cells

A new, groundbreaking study by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) found a way to transform skin cells into the three major stem cell types that comprise early-stage embryos. This work has significant implications for modelling embryonic disease and placental dysfunctions, as well as paving the way to create whole embryos from skin cells.

2h

Cranberry oligosaccharides might help prevent UTIs

Many people have heard that drinking cranberry juice can help prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Although clinical trials of this popular folk remedy have produced mixed results, some studies have shown that drinking cranberry juice can keep bacteria that cause UTIs from sticking to cells lining the urinary tract. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Natural Products have identified

2h

Forget sperm and eggs, researchers have created embryo stem cells from skin cells

A new, groundbreaking study by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) found a way to transform skin cells into the three major stem cell types that comprise early-stage embryos. This work has significant implications for modelling embryonic disease and placental dysfunctions, as well as paving the way to create whole embryos from skin cells.

2h

How an Elaborate Plan to Topple Venezuela’s President Went Wrong

In the effort to topple Nicolás Maduro, Colombia’s ambassador to the United States once told me, the military men propping up Venezuela’s authoritarian president are like chess pieces. If they defect from the regime, “you lose that chess piece,” Francisco Santos explained. “They work better from the inside.” As Tuesday, April 30, began, the United States and its allies thought they finally had ch

2h

Don’t let industry write the rules for AI

Don’t let industry write the rules for AI Don’t let industry write the rules for AI, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01413-1 Technology companies are running a campaign to bend research and regulation for their benefit; society must fight back, says Yochai Benkler.

2h

Daily Briefing: How China is redrawing the map of world science

Daily Briefing: How China is redrawing the map of world science Daily Briefing: How China is redrawing the map of world science, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01417-x The Belt and Road Initiative is changing everything, National Academy of Science leaders have approved a plan to expel sexual harassers and chatting with US presidential adviser Kelvin Droegemeier.

2h

The UK’s New “Dragonfire” Laser Weapon Is Weirdly Steampunk

Dragonfire The Royal Navy is testing a strikingly steampunk mechanical energy system for its Dragonfire Laser Directed Energy Weapon on its most advanced ships. And the new system’s design originally came from an unlikely source: the Williams Formula 1 team. The Royal Navy is hoping its new Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) will reduce the impact on the rest of the ship when it needs to draw

2h

Rethink peak-season pricing in the presence of sharing economy

As hotels experience increased pressure from the growth of hosting sites such as Airbnb, new research from the Tepper School of Business proposes strategies for hotels to cope with the competition while suggesting that government regulation is limited in its ability to control industry disruption.

3h

Cranberry oligosaccharides might help prevent UTIs

Many people have heard that drinking cranberry juice can help prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Although clinical trials of this popular folk remedy have produced mixed results, some studies have shown that drinking cranberry juice can keep bacteria that cause UTIs from sticking to cells lining the urinary tract. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Natural Products have identified

3h

Transforming waste heat into clean energy

Do you feel the warmth coming off your computer or cell phone? That's wasted energy radiating from the device. With automobiles, it is estimated that 60% of fuel efficiency is lost due to waste heat. Is it possible to capture this energy and convert it into electricity?

3h

Mount Sinai researchers discover novel cancer pathway, opening new treatment options

Mount Sinai researchers have broken new ground in the understanding of the MDM2 gene — which is often overexpressed in cancer — finding that when it acts with a specific protein, it can lead to cancer cell death. The study appears in the May 2, 2019, print edition of Molecular Cell.

3h

Scientists identify genes tied to increased risk of ovarian cancer

A team of researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer, Cedars-Sinai Cancer and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have newly identified 34 genes that are associated with an increased risk for developing the earliest stages of ovarian cancer.

3h

2019 Cadillac XT4 Review: Nice Ride. How Come More Safety Isn’t Standard?

The crossover XT4 lives on the edge between the compact and subcompact SUV segments. Cadillac itself will be living on the edge if it doesn't make more safety equipment standard. This isn't 2010. The post 2019 Cadillac XT4 Review: Nice Ride. How Come More Safety Isn’t Standard? appeared first on ExtremeTech .

3h

New inspection process freezes parts in ice

"How on Earth did they make that?" asks Francesco Simonetti, commenting on an ice sculpture of a swan.

3h

Drug companies warm up to continuous manufacturing

For decades, most industries, from petrochemicals to paper, have embraced continuous manufacturing processes. In contrast, the ultraconservative pharmaceutical industry has remained committed to batch operations. But recently, the demands of chemically complex and targeted drugs coming to market have caused many pharmaceutical companies to rethink the way they make medicines, according to an artic

3h

Particles From Cold War Nuclear Bomb Tests Found in Deepest Parts of the Ocean

Crustaceans in the Mariana Trench and other underwater canyons feed on food from the surface laced with carbon-14 from Cold War bomb tests

3h

A Giant Sloth Mystery Brought Me Home to Georgia

A new book from former Smithsonian Secretary Wayne Clough describes his journey into the collections in search of connections to his heritage

3h

Netflix rolls out high-quality audio support for 5.1 surround sound and Dolby Atmos

Based on internal listening tests, scientific studies and listening results from Dolby, Netflix determined that anything above 640 kbps for 5.1 – a 10:1 compression ratio compared to a 24-bit …

3h

Tesla sued by family of man killed in Autopilot crash

The family of the man is accusing Tesla of failures and false promises of its autonomous driving system.

3h

3h

Tesla's Full Self-Driving System

submitted by /u/TehClownz [link] [comments]

3h

More Americans becoming afraid of artificial intelligence, poll finds

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

3h

Tesla Sued for Role in Deadly Crash Involving Autopilot

Grieving Family In March 2018, a Tesla Model X with Autopilot engaged slammed into a concrete highway divider in California. The driver, Apple engineer Walter Huang, died as a result of the crash . And now, Huang’s family is suing Tesla . “Mrs. Huang lost her husband, and two children lost their father because Tesla is beta testing its Autopilot software on live drivers,” the family’s lawyer, B.

3h

The new 'runner's high'? Some often mix weed, workouts

A study of cannabis users in states where it's legal found 82% use the drug before and/or after exercise, with many reporting it increases enjoyment, enhances recovery, and heightens motivation.

3h

Flowering plants, new teeth and no dinosaurs: New study sheds light on the rise of mammals

A new study has identified three factors critical in the rise of mammal communities since they first emerged during the Age of Dinosaurs: the rise of flowering plants; the evolution of tribosphenic molars in mammals; and the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs, which reduced competition between mammals and other vertebrates in terrestrial ecosystems.

3h

The Sun Is Stranger Than Astrophysicists Imagined

A decade’s worth of telescope observations of the sun have revealed a startling mystery: Gamma rays, the highest frequency waves of light, radiate from our nearest star seven times more abundantly than expected. Stranger still, despite this extreme excess of gamma rays overall, a narrow bandwidth of frequencies is curiously absent. The surplus light, the gap in the spectrum, and other surprises a

3h

Dogs reduce distress of patients waiting for emergency hospital care

A visit from a dog can reduce the distress of patients waiting for emergency treatment in hospital, a study by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.Patients who spent 10 minutes with a visiting therapy dog — a four-year-old springer spaniel named Murphy — reported they felt more comfortable, happier and less distressed while waiting for emergency care in hospital.

3h

Robots Have an Increasingly Important Role in Construction

With 400,000 people around the world entering the middle class daily, old methods of creating housing won’t cut it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Robots Have an Increasingly Important Role in Construction

With 400,000 people around the world entering the middle class daily, old methods of creating housing won’t cut it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Huawei Muscles Past Apple To Claim Second Place In Global Smartphone Shipments

When it comes to the world of smartphones, Huawei has been kicking ass and taking names. IDC has released its latest global smartphone market share figures for Q1 2019, and they show a big …

3h

Norge satsar stort på eldrivna flygplan

Runtom i världen forskas det på eldrivna flygplan, och i Norge finns det planer på att elektrifiera inrikesflyget till 2040.

3h

Transforming waste heat into clean energy

Through a mechanism known as the Spin Hall effect, it has been shown that a voltage can be generated by harnessing differences in spin populations on a metal contact attached to a ferromagnetic material.Researchers from The University of Texas Permian Basin used supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to identify various forms of cobalt oxide combined with nickel and zinc that show p

3h

Study of teens with eating disorders compares substance users and non-users

A study of teens in eating disorder outpatient treatment compares long term results and drop-out rates of casual substance (alcohol, tobacco, drugs) users and non-substance users.

3h

Algorithms predicting gene interactions could make cancer treatments more effective

Researchers have developed a database which uses algorithms to predict gene interactions and can help clinicians search for more effective therapeutic solutions to cancer.

3h

Adverse events during first years of life may have greatest effect on future mental health

A Massachusetts General Hospital study has found evidence that children under 3 years old are most the vulnerable to the effects of adversity — experiences including poverty, family and financial instability, and abuse — on their epigenetic profiles, chemical tags that alter gene expression and may have consequences for future mental health.

3h

ASTRO and AUA update joint clinical guidance for radiation therapy after prostatectomy

The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the American Urological Association (AUA) today announced updates to their joint clinical guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy in patients with and without evidence of prostate cancer recurrence to include new published research related to adjuvant radiotherapy.

3h

New noninvasive ventilation strategy allows preterm infants to breathe freely

Preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) face heightened risks of death, critical illness, and prolonged hospitalization, particularly if they progress to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). A new study appearing in the journal CHEST®, published by Elsevier, suggests that treatment with nasal high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (NHFOV) is a beneficial management

3h

New inspection process freezes parts in ice

The University of Cincinnati developed a novel approach that uses ultrasound to inspect additive-manufactured parts by freezing them in a cylinder of ice and exposing them to ultrasonic waves.

3h

China Is Planning a Mission to Deep Space

Space Rock As soon as 2024, China could launch a space probe toward a nearby asteroid with the mission of harvesting and returning samples — marking China’s first foray into deep space. The China National Space Administration (CNSA) announced a new mission intended to learn how asteroids and other small space objects form and how they interact with solar radiation, according to Nature News . And

3h

Narwhals are thriving despite extremely low genetic diversity

Low levels of genetic diversity are normally considered a problem, but the genome of the narwhal suggests that’s not necessarily the case

3h

Pandas gobble as much protein as polar bears despite being vegetarian

Pandas are not as odd as we thought. Though they are vegetarians with a carnivore digestive system, they still manage to eat as much protein as meat eaters

3h

William Barr Didn’t Really Need This Job

Updated on May 1 at 12:59 p.m. ET Like so many prominent Trump-administration officials before him, William Barr didn’t need this job. He had already served once as attorney general, at the young-for-government age of 41, after a rapid rise in the first Bush administration. Barr had lived a financially comfortable life in the private sector since, doing little to dent his image as a respected Rep

3h

Congress Is Likely to Delay Flood Insurance Overhaul, Again

The National Flood Insurance Program, scheduled to expire on May 31, will likely be temporarily renewed unchanged — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

4h

Genetic defect causing intellectual disability discovered by Sussex scientists

Researchers have discovered a new genetic defect which causes a form of intellectual disability; a finding which will improve global screening programs.

4h

Describing aspects of melanoma progression

Three related articles and an editorial focus on various aspects of melanoma progression.

4h

How both mother and baby genes affect birth weight

The largest study of its kind has led to new insights into the complex relationships surrounding how mothers' and babies' genes influence birth weight.

4h

The GPS of neurons now better understood with a study published in Neuron

Researchers demonstrated the role that plays the Boc receptor in the the formation of the nervous system. This breakthrough could, for example, contribute to the creation of tools in regenerative medicine to reconstitute nervous circuits, which would have otherwise been damaged by an accident, causing paralysis.

4h

Mount Sinai researchers identify 20 novel gene associations with bipolar disorder

In the largest study of its kind, involving more than 50,000 subjects in 14 countries, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and more than 200 collaborating institutions have identified 20 new genetic associations with one of the most prevalent and elusive mental illnesses of our time — bipolar disorder.

4h

Narwhals have endured a million years with low genetic diversity, and they're thriving

Danish researchers have sequenced the genome of a narwhal, the Arctic whale famous for the horn-like tusk protruding from its forehead. Their work, appearing May 1 in the journal iScience, finds that compared to other Arctic marine mammals, narwhals have low genetic diversity, which typically indicates a species is struggling. However, narwhal populations number in the hundreds of thousands — but

4h

Massive penguin colony disappears as birds march south

Massive penguin colony disappears as birds march south Massive penguin colony disappears as birds march south, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01385-2 Untimely break-up of sea ice triggered the birds’ relocation.

4h

Hulu, Marvel bring back Ghost Rider with new show – CNET

Plus Marvel will also bring Helstrom to Hulu while Chrissy Teigen gets a cooking show with Momofuku chef David Chang.

4h

4h

Spørg Fagfolket: Sparer bilers stop-start-system virkelig energi?

En læser vil gerne vide, om der overhovedet er noget at spare, når bilen selv stopper motoren ved lyskrydsene i nogle gange få sekunder. Det svarer professor fra DTU på.

4h

Why don’t we grow to be 10 feet tall?

Ask Us Anything Thank millions of years of evolution. And your parents. Our genes account for about 70 to 80 percent of our eventual height, but what keeps us from reaching extreme heights.

4h

Exoplanet “Water Worlds” Could Hold Unfathomably Deep Alien Oceans

Water Worlds Scientists have already spotted thousands of exoplanets — planets that orbit a star outside of the Solar System — and many have the potential to harbor life . A wild new theory suggests that exoplanets two to four times the size of Earth, known as “sub-Neptunes,” are likely to be water worlds rather than gas dwarfs — and their oceans could be so deep that they almost defy comprehensi

4h

‘Unicorn’ whales doing well, despite poor genetic diversity

Narwhal success challenges theory that robust genomes are essential for long-term natural selection. Tanya Loos reports.

4h

What would we do if an asteroid was on a collision course with Earth?

Researchers are undergoing a practice drill to see how we’d respond if our chances were as bad as 1 in 100 that it would hit.

4h

Narwhals have endured a million years with low genetic diversity, and they're thriving

Danish researchers have sequenced the genome of a narwhal, the Arctic whale famous for the horn-like tusk protruding from its forehead. Their work, appearing May 1 in the journal iScience, finds that compared to other Arctic marine mammals, narwhals have low genetic diversity, which typically indicates a species is struggling. However, narwhal populations number in the hundreds of thousands—but re

4h

New research: Airbnb's impact on peak-season hotel pricing

New research by Tepper School professors Hui Li and Kannan Srinivasan proposes strategies for hotels to cope with competition such as Airbnb while suggesting that government regulation is limited in its ability to control industry disruption.

4h

Narwhals have endured a million years with low genetic diversity, and they're thriving

Danish researchers have sequenced the genome of a narwhal, the Arctic whale famous for the horn-like tusk protruding from its forehead. Their work, appearing May 1 in the journal iScience, finds that compared to other Arctic marine mammals, narwhals have low genetic diversity, which typically indicates a species is struggling. However, narwhal populations number in the hundreds of thousands—but re

4h

Why we ignore obvious problems — and how to act on them | Michele Wucker

Why do we often neglect big problems, like the financial crisis and climate change, until it's too late? Policy strategist Michele Wucker urges us to replace the myth of the "black swan" — that rare, unforeseeable, unavoidable catastrophe — with the reality of the "gray rhino," the preventable danger that we choose to ignore. She shows why predictable crises catch us by surprise — and lays out

4h

How China is redrawing the map of world science

How China is redrawing the map of world science How China is redrawing the map of world science, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01124-7 The Belt and Road Initiative, China’s mega-plan for global infrastructure, will transform the lives and work of tens of thousands of researchers.

4h

Build a sustainable Belt and Road

Build a sustainable Belt and Road Build a sustainable Belt and Road, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01309-0 China’s vast Belt and Road Initiative is on course to reshape research in the global south. Science leaders everywhere must work to make it transparent, green and free of conflicts of interest.

4h

Scientists in Pakistan and Sri Lanka bet their futures on China

Scientists in Pakistan and Sri Lanka bet their futures on China Scientists in Pakistan and Sri Lanka bet their futures on China, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01125-6 Researchers are turning to China for support and collaboration as their countries take centre stage in the Belt and Road Initiative.

4h

Cranberry oligosaccharides might help prevent UTIs

Many people have heard that drinking cranberry juice can help prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Although clinical trials of this popular folk remedy have produced mixed results, some studies have shown that drinking cranberry juice can keep bacteria that cause UTIs from sticking to cells lining the urinary tract. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Natural Products have identified

4h

McDonald’s deploys 700 AI-powered menu boards

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

4h

4h

4h

4h

Who's afraid of automation now — and why

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

4h

Eugenics and the master race of the left – archive,30 August 1997

30 August 1997 Forced sterilisations in Scandinavia have shocked the world. But the great founding fathers of British socialism, reports Jonathan Freedland, had dreams almost as vile as those of the Nazis They will be searching their souls in Stockholm tonight. And in Oslo, Helsinki and Copenhagen, too. All over Scandinavia, people are facing up to the stain now spreading across their snow-white

4h

Certifikat-svindel årsag til milliarddyre fejl på forulykkede NASA-raketter

Svindel med aluminiums-certifikater er hovedårsagen til, at NASAs Taurus XL-raketter styrtede i havet i stedet for i bane om jorden i 2009 og 2011. Fejlen har kostet 700 millioner dollars

4h

Scientists track giant ocean vortex from space

Researchers have found a new way to use satellites to monitor the Great Whirl, a massive whirlpool the size of Colorado that forms each year off the coast of East Africa, they report in a new study.

5h

Palm oil's potential to alleviate poverty depends on where it's grown

Expansion of oil palm production in remote forest areas requires careful planning and evaluation if the communities are to benefit, according to a report by researchers at the University of Kent.

5h

Diagnosing urban air pollution exposure with new precision

A new review of studies on levels of urban exposure to airborne pollutants and their effects on human health suggests that advanced instrumentation and information technology will soon allow researchers and policymakers to gauge the health risks of air pollution on an individual level.

5h

Researchers grow cells in 'paper organs'

Long before scientists test new medicines in animals or people, they study the effects of the substances on cells growing in Petri dishes. However, a 2-D layer of cells is a poor substitute for the much more complex 3-D structure of tissues in organs. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have used a 3-D printer to make paper organs, complete with artificial blood vessels, tha

5h

The Mathematics of Maypole Dancing

The Mathematics of Maypole Dancing The braided ribbon on a maypole can be analyzed using a type of math called group theory. Maypole_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: The Barwick-in-Elmet Maypole Trust via Wikipedia Rights information: CC BY-SA 3.0 Culture Wednesday, May 1, 2019 – 09:30 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) — It's May Day, and for many people around the world that means it's tim

5h

Australian blue tongue lizard ancestor was round-in-the-tooth

Reconstruction of the most complete fossil lizard found in Australia, a 15 million year old relative of our modern blue tongues and social skinks named Egernia gillespieae, reveals the creature was equipped with a robust crushing jaw and was remarkably similar to modern lizards.

5h

Diagnosing urban air pollution exposure with new precision

A new review of studies on levels of urban exposure to airborne pollutants and their effects on human health suggests that advanced instrumentation and information technology will soon allow researchers and policymakers to gauge the health risks of air pollution on an individual level.

5h

Researchers grow cells in 'paper organs'

Long before scientists test new medicines in animals or people, they study the effects of the substances on cells growing in Petri dishes. However, a 2D layer of cells is a poor substitute for the much more complex 3D structure of tissues in organs. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have used a 3D printer to make paper organs, complete with artificial blood vessels, that t

5h

Scientists track giant ocean vortex from space

Researchers have found a new way to use satellites to monitor the Great Whirl, a massive whirlpool the size of Colorado that forms each year off the coast of East Africa, they report in a new study.

5h

UC research supports state's effort to raise age limit on tobacco purchases

Merianos' research on the effects of secondhand and thirdhand smoke on teen health has garnered attention from around the world, and more recently her research on the means of acquiring e-cigarettes among adolescents earned her an award from the American Academy of Health Behavior. She presented what she describes as "part two" of that research this week at the Pediatric Academic Societies confere

5h

Palm oil's potential to alleviate poverty depends on where it's grown

Palm oil's potential to alleviate poverty depends on where it's grown. Expansion of oil palm production in remote forest areas requires careful planning and evaluation if the communities are to benefit, according to a report by researchers at the University of Kent. Their findings show that unsustainable livelihoods, socioeconomic inequality and environmental issues remain major challenges in the

5h

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, May 2019

ORNL story tips: Using ORNL's Summit supercomputer, scientists created some of the largest virtual universes; plant-based, super-sticky material proves stickier than mussels; method to 3D print big components with metal could promise low-cost, high-quality builds with less waste; simulated small modular reactors on Summit ran more efficiently than expected.

5h

Risk of metastatic cancer increases in those who have diabetes

As if people living with diabetes didn't have enough health concerns, here's another: increased risk of metastatic cancer. New Cornell University research points to a possible explanation for this health double whammy.

5h

Tourists and fishers key to future of rare manta nursery

Two manta ray hotspots in waters near Bali identified in new research as vital habitats for the threatened species, could be at risk from unregulated tourism and small scale/ artisanal fishing.

5h

New research may be used to treat cancer, heal combat wounds

Army research is the first to develop computational models using a microbiology procedure that may be used to improve novel cancer treatments and treat combat wounds.

5h

Tourists and fishers key to future of rare manta nursery

Two manta ray hotspots in waters near Bali identified in new research as vital habitats for the threatened species, could be at risk from unregulated tourism and small scale/ artisanal fishing.

5h

Do additives help the soil?

A UBC researcher is using her latest study to question whether soil additives are worth their salt.

5h

Shrink films get a grip

Many people fondly remember playing with toys known as Shrinky Dinks—sheets of polystyrene plastic with shapes that kids can color, cut out and heat in an oven, where they shrink into thicker pieces of plastic. Now, researchers have repurposed shrink films for an unexpected use: making strong, durable grippers that could someday encapsulate materials or be incorporated into soft robotics. They rep

5h

Revealed: populists far more likely to believe in conspiracy theories

Largest survey of its kind uncovers suspicion of vaccines in big part of world population Methodology: How the Guardian analysed YouGov-Cambridge data Populists across the world are significantly more likely to believe in conspiracy theories about vaccinations , global warming and the 9/11 terrorist attacks, according to a landmark global survey shared exclusively with the Guardian. The YouGov-Ca

5h

Modifying Natural Products

Here’s a thorough review of a topic that combines complex drug development issues with complex chemistry: trying to optimize the structures of natural products so that they can be more effective drugs. There are detailed looks at examples like the tetracyclines , the polyene macrolides, pactamycin , geldanamycin , and the thiostrepton -like peptides, along with shorter coverage of several other c

5h

Netflix’s Tuca & Bertie Is a Surreal Celebration of Friendship

The easiest way to describe Netflix’s animated comedy Tuca & Bertie is to say that it’s like BoJack Horseman meets Broad City . The new show, out Friday, was created by Lisa Hanawalt, the cartoonist and BoJack production designer whose colorful and absurd visual style notably features hybrid animal-people. And much like the recently concluded Comedy Central series Broad City , Tuca & Bertie is ab

5h

Why do birds typically live longer than mammals?

Why do birds typically live longer than mammals? A new paper offers a hint, albeit not a conclusive answer. Assistant Professors of Biology Cynthia Downs and Ana Jimenez at Hamilton College and Colgate University respectively have co-authored a paper with nine students, "Does cellular metabolism from primary fibroblasts and oxidative stress in blood differ between mammals and birds? The (lack-ther

5h

Why do birds typically live longer than mammals?

Why do birds typically live longer than mammals? A new paper offers a hint, albeit not a conclusive answer. Assistant Professors of Biology Cynthia Downs and Ana Jimenez at Hamilton College and Colgate University respectively have co-authored a paper with nine students, "Does cellular metabolism from primary fibroblasts and oxidative stress in blood differ between mammals and birds? The (lack-ther

5h

US, Russia, China race to develop hypersonic weapons

Russia and China have recently touted their progress in developing hypersonic vehicles, which fly much faster than the speed of sound, which is 767 mph. Hypersonic missiles are rocket-boosted to high altitude and may be launched from land, sea or air. They fly far faster than any other weapons – more than 3,000 mph and potentially up to 10,000 mph – which makes them difficult to identify, avoid or

5h

Environmental pollutants could impact cellular signs of aging

Researchers have linked some environmental pollutants with diseases, a decreased life span and signs of premature aging, such as wrinkles and age spots. But can accelerated aging be detected at the cellular level in healthy people exposed to pollutants? Now, researchers in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology report that although pollutant exposure can affect two hallmarks of aging i

5h

Scientists Created a ‘Neural Decoder’ That Translates Brain Activity Into Speech

The idea of a mind-reading machine might freak a lot of people out, but a new device that can transform brain activity into speech could be the first step towards a lifeline for patients who have lost the use of their voice. Finding ways to translate our thoughts into machine-readable signals is a booming area of research as our ability to record brain waves steadily improves and machine learning

5h

The hunger gaps: how flowering times affect farmland bees

For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them.

5h

As monarchs migrate northward, experts ask Iowans to keep habitat in mind

Monarch butterflies are fluttering this way, and, with some luck, they'll be more plentiful than in previous years when they reach Iowa later this spring.

5h

These Sea Creatures Are Actually Made of Glass

Nineteenth-century glassworkers Leopold and Rudolf Blaschka made very accurate educational aids. Don't feel bad if they fool you.

5h

Team using drones with machine learning to automate methane leak detection

A Southwest Research Institute methane leak detection system is taking flight as part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) project to develop automated inspections of oil and gas facilities.

5h

The hunger gaps: how flowering times affect farmland bees

For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them.

5h

As monarchs migrate northward, experts ask Iowans to keep habitat in mind

Monarch butterflies are fluttering this way, and, with some luck, they'll be more plentiful than in previous years when they reach Iowa later this spring.

5h

Hera's CubeSat to perform first radar probe of an asteroid

Small enough to be an aircraft carry-on, the Juventas spacecraft nevertheless has big mission goals. Once in orbit around its target body, Juventas will unfurl an antenna larger than itself, to perform the very first subsurface radar survey of an asteroid.

5h

To solve the gender pay gap, we need to radically rethink what a job looks like

The introduction of gender pay gap reporting has highlighted the continued gap in pay between men and women. While it is by no means a perfect metric, the very exercise of collecting this data has focused minds in the boardroom like never before.

5h

A 'coup des gens' is underway – and we're increasingly living under the regime of the algorithm

I recently attended a large meeting of faculty to discuss graduate students' evaluation, recruitment and retention.

5h

Why abusive husbands kick dogs but angry neighbors poison them

Volunteering with animal rescue and shelter organizations in Detroit brought me face to face with many manifestations of animal cruelty: dogs left outside and frozen in their yards; dogs with chain link collars embedded in their necks; cats that had gaping wounds full of maggots as the result of being doused with acid; and dogs used for dog fighting.

5h

Qualcomm shows off 5G tech at China Unicom event

Qualcomm this week joined Chinese smartphone makers including OnePlus, Oppo, Xiaomi and ZTE to demonstrate new, faster 5G handsets and mobile networks targeting the China market.

5h

What Sherlock Holmes and Your Brain Have in Common

submitted by /u/TheLavinGuy [link] [comments]

5h

Why do birds typically live longer than mammals?

Why do birds typically live longer than mammals? A new paper offers a hint, albeit not a conclusive answer. Assistant Professors of Biology Cynthia Downs and Ana Jimenez at Hamilton College and Colgate University respectively have co-authored a paper with nine students, 'Does cellular metabolism from primary fibroblasts and oxidative stress in blood differ between mammals and birds? The (lack-ther

5h

Shrink films get a grip (video)

Many people fondly remember playing with toys known as Shrinky Dinks ® — sheets of polystyrene plastic with shapes that kids can color, cut out and heat in an oven, where they shrink into thicker pieces of plastic. Now, researchers have repurposed shrink films for an unexpected use: making strong, durable grippers that could someday encapsulate materials or be incorporated into soft robotics. The

5h

US $244 billion lost annually because people don't have spectacles to correct myopia

Vision impairment caused by uncorrected myopia cost the global economy an estimated US$244 billion in lost productivity in 2015, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Ophthalmology.

5h

The hunger gaps: How flowering times affect farmland bees

For the very first time, researchers from the University of Bristol have measured farmland nectar supplies throughout the whole year and revealed hungry gaps when food supply is not meeting pollinator demand. This novel finding reveals new ways of making farmland better for pollinators, benefitting the many crop plants and wildflowers that depend on them.

5h

Plantation blues

Rare species found living in a coffee crop.

5h

Sex med looks promising as heart failure drug

At least in sheep, a drug allied to Viagra reverses the effects of heart failure. Andrew Masterson reports.

5h

Family fights drive evolutionary ‘arms race’ in seeds

A new study reveals the surprising way that family quarrels in seeds drive rapid evolution. Conflict over the amount of resources an offspring receives from its parent seems to play a special role in the development of certain seed tissues, according to the research. Plant seeds contain tissues that represent three distinct genetic relatives: the mother, the embryo, and a bizarre triploid tissue

5h

S: Den Digitale Prøvevagt vender ikke tilbage i den nuværende form

Den Digitale Prøvevagt blev ikke rullet ud til sommer med henvisning til problemer med kapacitet og stabilitet. Men hvis det står til socialdemokraterne, vender programmet ikke tilbage i den nuværende form

5h

In Uganda, Threatened Chimps Find Protection in Former Poachers

In the Budongo Forest of western Uganda, chimpanzees often fall victim to poachers as they get caught in wire or jaw-like traps set for other animals. Veterinarian Caroline Asiimwe and her team — some of them former poachers themselves — are working to save these endangered animals. It's an uphill battle.

5h

Ny genom-direktør: Bekymringer må ikke bremse udviklingen

Den nyudnævnte direktør for Nationalt Genom Center, Bettina Lundgren, går ydmygt til opgaven med at forvalte så mange danskeres genoplysninger, men advarer samtidigt mod at lade befolkningens bekymringer stå i vejen for udviklingen.

5h

Gigantic Ice Formation Found on Saturn's Moon Titan

The mysterious feature wraps almost halfway around the giant moon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Why abusive husbands kick dogs but angry neighbors poison them

Volunteering with animal rescue and shelter organizations in Detroit brought me face to face with many manifestations of animal cruelty: dogs left outside and frozen in their yards; dogs with chain link collars embedded in their necks; cats that had gaping wounds full of maggots as the result of being doused with acid; and dogs used for dog fighting.

5h

Top ocelot researcher calls conservation strategy 'ecological fairy tale'

In the early 1980s, many scientists believed the endangered ocelot, a spotted wildcat that once roamed as far north as Arkansas and Louisiana, had died out in Texas. Then, on a late winter day in 1982 on a remote Willacy County ranch, a young biologist named Michael Tewes trapped the first Texas ocelot of the modern era.

5h

Businesses that embrace digital technologies are showing more resilience as Brexit uncertainty continues, report shows

New technologies are giving businesses in Wales a much needed boost while questions over Brexit continue, researchers say.

5h

How to stop climate change: six ways to make the world a better place

Nobel Peace Prize nominee Greta Thunberg claims we need system change to save the planet, and the majority of experts, from the IPCC, through to our own research, would certainly agree with this.

5h

Top ocelot researcher calls conservation strategy 'ecological fairy tale'

In the early 1980s, many scientists believed the endangered ocelot, a spotted wildcat that once roamed as far north as Arkansas and Louisiana, had died out in Texas. Then, on a late winter day in 1982 on a remote Willacy County ranch, a young biologist named Michael Tewes trapped the first Texas ocelot of the modern era.

5h

Two birds, one stone: Green roof gardening in the city

I'm a New York native, born and raised in Ozone Park, Queens. My family has a decent amount of space in our small backyard to grow fruits and vegetables. Tomatoes, chili peppers, squash and cucumbers are just a few items we grow each summer. The garden saves us money during grocery trips, helps us eat healthier, and also adds a little more greenery and fresh air to the city.

5h

Har du tjekket dine elektriske stik i dag?

PLUS. Stik er den store synder, når pålideligheden i elektronik halter. Sådan lyder budskabet fra pålidelighedsspecialist Jan Bjerre Christensen, der opfordrer udviklingshusene til at få en holdning til deres stik.

5h

How to sideload Android apps, and why you would want to

DIY Expand your app reach. Do more with your phone, tablet, or TV by installing apps from outside the Google Play Store—just be careful while you do it.

5h

NASA's new carbon observatory is set for launch despite Trump's efforts to ax it

A NASA instrument designed to track carbon in Earth's atmosphere is headed to the International Space Station next week, and the president isn't happy about it.

5h

Army research may be used to treat cancer, heal combat wounds

Army research is the first to develop computational models using a microbiology procedure that may be used to improve novel cancer treatments and treat combat wounds.

5h

Half a face enough for recognition technology

Facial recognition technology works even when only half a face is visible, researchers from the University of Bradford have found.

5h

Here's how cancer hijacks wound healing to create its own blood supply

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have shed light on how cancers hijack the body's natural wound-healing response to grow and spread.

5h

CHOP researchers to present new findings at 2019 INSAR Annual Meeting

Two researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) were among five international experts selected to present the results of two innovative studies shaping the field of autism research at the 2019 annual meeting of the International Society for Autism Research (INSAR), held this year in Montreal, on May 1-4.

5h

Check out the tiny muscles birds use to fly

A 3D model of the skeletal muscles responsible for bird flight provides the most comprehensive and detailed picture of anatomy to date, researchers say. The study will form the basis of future research on the European starling’s wishbone, which these particular muscles support. Scientists hypothesize the wishbone bends during flight. Top, pectoral and shoulder muscle architecture in a European st

5h

Aptamers: Applications and Strategies for Development

Often described as synthetic antibodies, aptamers are single-stranded DNA or RNA molecules that fold into secondary structures which can bind to target molecules with high affinity and specificity. In 1990, the first aptamer was developed against T4 DNA Polymerase using RNA1 . Since then, both aptamer selection methods and subsequent applications have expanded significantly

5h

Image: Opportunity's final traverse map

This final traverse map for NASA's Opportunity rover shows where the rover was located within Perseverance Valley on June 10, 2018, the last date it made contact with its engineering team.

5h

Google Employees Plan Sit-in to Protest “Culture of Retaliation”

Walk Out In November, an estimated 20,000 Google employees across the world staged a walkout to protest how the tech giant handles sexual misconduct. Now, some employees are claiming they faced retaliation from Google — where “ Don’t Be Evil ” used to be a company motto — for taking part in that walkout, leading the organizers of the event to announce a new protest, this one scheduled for 11am on

6h

Assessing air-quality forecasting for London

An assessment of local and regional air-quality forecasts for London, UK is reported in the International Journal of Environment and Pollution. In their evaluation, Amy Stidworthy, Mark Jackson, Kate Johnson, David Carruthers, and Jenny Stocker, of Cambridge Environmental Research Consultants Ltd., explain how levels of nitrogen oxides, ozone, and sooty particulates (PM2.5 and PM10), can be predic

6h

6h

Afdeling på Rigshospitalet får ny klinikchef

Overlæge Jenny Dahl Knudsen er ny klinikchef i Klinisk Mikrobiologisk Afdeling på Rigshospitalet.

6h

'Exotic' genes may improve cotton yield and quality

Improving cotton quality can have ramifications for $12B US cotton trade industry.

6h

Flowering plants, new teeth and no dinosaurs: New study sheds light on the rise of mammals

A new study published April 30 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences identified three factors critical in the rise of mammal communities since they first emerged during the Age of Dinosaurs: the rise of flowering plants, also known as angiosperms; the evolution of tribosphenic molars in mammals; and the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs, which reduced competition between mammals a

6h

Business professor examines why firms don't use human capital data

Many businesses say their most valued assets are their people. But just about anyone who's had a job can tell you that's not always the case. A University of Kansas business professor has co-written a white paper examining one reason that businesses are reluctant to use human capital, or workforce data, in their decisions: Capital markets tend not to reward businesses for workforce excellence.

6h

Curtin researchers find new critically endangered carnivorous plants

Curtin University researchers have discovered a new population of a critically endangered aquatic carnivorous plant in Western Australia's remote Kimberley, following a 10-year search of the region.

6h

Why a drop of oil bounces in a water/ethanol gradient and eventually falls to the bottom of a jar

A team of researchers working at the University of Twente has solved the mystery of why a drop of oil bounces repeatedly when dropped in a water/ethanol gradient but eventually falls to the bottom of a jar. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their study of the odd behavior.

6h

Smithsonian launches 'Journey through an Exploded Star' 3D interactive experience

The Smithsonian today made available a new online interactive experience that allows users to explore a three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the remnants of a supernova, or exploded star.

6h

Curtin researchers find new critically endangered carnivorous plants

Curtin University researchers have discovered a new population of a critically endangered aquatic carnivorous plant in Western Australia's remote Kimberley, following a 10-year search of the region.

6h

Judge blasts Assange for jumping bail, sentences him to almost one year

The Wikileaks founder's legal troubles are far from over.

6h

Harnessing sunlight to pull hydrogen from wastewater

Hydrogen is a critical component in the manufacture of thousands of common products from plastic to fertilizers, but producing pure hydrogen is expensive and energy intensive. Now, a research team at Princeton University has harnessed sunlight to isolate hydrogen from industrial wastewater, doubling the previous standard for splitting hydrogen from water in a scalable way.

6h

Fire-safety sectors call for global PFAS ban, no loopholes for toxic firefighting foam

Fluorinated firefighting foam is a leading cause of PFAS water contamination and is associated with cancer and endocrine disruption. A panel of independent fire-safety experts from across sectors demonstrate that PFAS chemicals are similarly toxic to PFOA and PFOS and are harder to control, leading to increased pollution, exposure, and presence in the food chain. A new report demonstrates the effi

6h

Lure of the 'loot box' looks a lot like gambling

An increasingly popular feature of modern video games is attracting gamers who share the beliefs and behaviours of problem gamblers, new UBC research has found. Gamers who are drawn to 'loot boxes' — randomly generated prizes of undisclosed value that can be attained or purchased within a game–bear a closer resemblance to problem gamblers than they do to problem gamers.

6h

Restoring brain function in mice with symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

A study in mice shows that selectively removing cells that are no longer dividing from the brains of mice with a form of Alzheimer's disease can reduce brain damage and inflammation, and slow the pace of cognitive decline. These findings, say researchers, add to evidence that such senescent cells contribute to the damage caused by Alzheimer's disease in people.

6h

Patients with diabetes are 40% more likely to be readmitted to the hospital

Patients with diabetes and low blood glucose have higher rates of death following hospital discharge, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

6h

Brain mapping: New technique reveals how information is processed

Scientists have discovered a new method for quickly and efficiently mapping the vast network of connections among neurons in the brain. In a study published by Science Advances, researchers combined infrared laser stimulation techniques with functional magnetic resonance imaging in animals to generate mapping of connections throughout the brain.

6h

Poor, crowded cities lack access to opioid reversal drug, Rutgers study finds

People living in the most populous, low-income areas in New Jersey with the highest risk for opioid overdoses have less access to the potentially life-saving opioid reversal drug naloxone, Rutgers researchers find.

6h

Australian blue tongue lizard ancestor was round-in-the-tooth

Reconstruction of the most complete fossil lizard found in Australia, a 15 million year old relative of our modern blue tongues and social skinks named Egernia gillespieae, reveals the creature was equipped with a robust crushing jaw and was remarkably similar to modern lizards.

6h

Flowering plants, new teeth and no dinosaurs: New study sheds light on the rise of mammals

A new study has identified three factors critical in the rise of mammal communities since they first emerged during the Age of Dinosaurs: the rise of flowering plants; the evolution of tribosphenic molars in mammals; and the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs, which reduced competition between mammals and other vertebrates in terrestrial ecosystems.

6h

Changing climate may affect animal-to-human disease transfer

Climate change could affect occurrences of diseases like bird-flu and Ebola, with environmental factors playing a larger role than previously understood in animal-to-human disease transfer.Researchers from The University of Queensland and Swansea University have been looking at how different environments provide opportunities for animal-to-human diseases — known as zoonotic diseases — to interac

6h

As NASA Prepares for the Next Asteroid Impact, Earth Retains Scars of Past Blasts

The Earth has always been in the path of rocks from space. When the solar system was forming, the early Earth was pelted with rocks so frequently that it left the surface molten. In fact, the creation of the Moon was caused by a massive impact of a "rock", albeit a Mars-sized rock. These days, there are many fewer impacts (thankfully) but the threat still remains that an asteroid we might not even

6h

Föreläsning om malignt melanom 6 maj

Välkomna till en föreläsning om malignt melanom i samband med Internationella Melanomdagen. Tid och plats: Måndagen den 6 maj 2019, kl 17.30–20.10, Jubileumsaulan, Jan Waldenströms gata 1, Skånes universitetssjukhus i Malmö.

6h

Salmon Slime Helps Scientists Count Migrating Fish

Environmental DNA could offer a more cost-effective way to monitor wild Alaskan salmon populations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Animals Use Brain Tricks to See in the Dark

Many animals once thought to have poor sight in low light use tricks in their nervous systems to see brilliantly in the dark — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Tracking Your Steps and Other Behaviors Isn't Always the Greatest Idea

People who track their behavior aren’t always better off — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

The Roots of Human Aggression

Experiments in humans and animals have started to identify how violent behaviors begin in the brain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Brain Activity Decoded to Produce Intelligible, Synthesized Speech

New device is a step toward translating thoughts into machine-spoken words — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

AI Tool Could Help Diagnose Alzheimer's

A new algorithm accurately identified more than 90 percent of people who would advance to an Alzheimer’s diagnosis in about six years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

The Sleep-Dementia Connection

Could a better nighttime rest help delay the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

'Exotic' genes may improve cotton yield and quality

Improving cotton quality can have ramifications for $12B US cotton trade industry.

6h

Don't forget our future climate when tightening up building codes

Too often it takes a crisis to trigger changes in legislation and behaviour, when forward thinking, cooperation and future planning could have negated the risk in the first place. Australia's building and construction industry is under the microscope and changes in the law are in the wind, due to situations that could have been avoided. These include the evacuation of Sydney's Opal building and th

6h

'Kingdom Hearts III' and the Value of Difficult Gaming Modes

They can turn videogames into a whole new experience.

6h

Netflix’s Adaptive Streaming Algorithm Will Make Videos Sound Better

The entertainment behemoth applies its adaptive streaming algorithms to sound.

6h

Technology of the future

submitted by /u/bebesiege [link] [comments]

6h

6h

6h

For this exercise, robots are always watching Royal Marines

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

6h

6h

7 Indicators Of The State-Of-Artificial Intelligence (AI), April 2019

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

6h

6h

Seven ways scientists handle technology challenges in resource-poor settings

Seven ways scientists handle technology challenges in resource-poor settings Seven ways scientists handle technology challenges in resource-poor settings, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01314-3 Researchers share their tips for working in environments with unreliable infrastructure.

6h

Scientists develop stereodefined N and S atom-codoped graphdiyne for oxygen evolution

The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is of great significance in energy-related techniques such as metal-air batteries and water splitting. Chinese scientists have doped site-defined sp-N and S atoms into graphdiyne, which enables highly active catalysis of OER. Their findings were published in J. Am. Chem. Soc.

6h

Along one Minnesota river, ice and walleyes signal a changing climate

Looking downstream on the Rainy River, it's hard at first to see how spring is changing along the northern border.

6h

EPA draft groundwater rules disappoint clean water advocates

The Environmental Protection Agency proposed draft cleanup standards Thursday for groundwater contaminated by so-called forever chemicals, but advocates who urged the adoption of such standards said they were too weak.

6h

Animal bones found at bottom of Hoyo Negro shed light on the Great American Biotic Interchange

A team of researchers from the U.S. and Mexico has found bone skeletons at the bottom of the Hoyo Negro cave that show that some animals thought to have existed only in South America also existed in Mexico. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their recovery and study of multiple skeletons retrieved from the floor of the Hoyo Negro cave and what they learned

6h

Explainer: what is inquiry-based learning and how does it help prepare children for the real world?

Inquiry-based learning emphasises a student's role in the learning process and asks them to engage with an idea or topic in an active way, rather than by sitting and listening to a teacher. The overall goal of an inquiry-based approach is for students to make meaning of what they are learning about and to understand how a concept works in a real-world context.

6h

Lægefaglige selskaber i brev til politikerne: Danmark svigter syge børn uden opholdstilladelse

I et brev til politikerne ytrer en lang række sundhedsfaglige selskaber bekymring over, at børn og gravide uden opholdstilladelse ikke får den sundhedshjælp, de har brug for. Det har alvorlige konsekvenser, skriver de.

6h

Humanity's Golden Record, Bubonic Plague in the U.S., and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Beer and Wine Contain Traces of Metal Contaminants from Filtration Process

Heavy metal levels in commercial booze pose no health risk to most drinkers, but the findings could prompt discussions about industry standards for alcohol — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

How to Get Away from Facebook's "Emotion Pump"

Are there better social technologies than Facebook? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Tracking Your Steps and Other Behaviors Isn't Always the Greatest Idea

People who track their behavior aren’t always better off — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Mining Silver from the Atomic Bomb; The Perennial Baby-Walker

Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Machine Learning Gets a Bit More Humanlike

How machines could learn creativity and common sense, among other human qualities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Salmon Slime Helps Scientists Count Migrating Fish

Environmental DNA could offer a more cost-effective way to monitor wild Alaskan salmon populations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

New York Is Building "Living" Wave Barriers to Prepare for the Next Superstorm

A project off Staten Island aims to dissipate wave energy hitting the shore — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Geologists Solve Mystery of Nepal's "Earthquake Gap"

One of Nepal’s major faults appeared worrisomely silent—but new evidence suggests otherwise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

New Fuels Could Make Nuclear Reactors Safer and More Efficient

Advanced fuels could improve the safety and economics of nuclear power plants — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

The Roots of Human Aggression

Experiments in humans and animals have started to identify how violent behaviors begin in the brain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Brain Activity Decoded to Produce Intelligible, Synthesized Speech

New device is a step toward translating thoughts into machine-spoken words — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

AI Tool Could Help Diagnose Alzheimer's

A new algorithm accurately identified more than 90 percent of people who would advance to an Alzheimer’s diagnosis in about six years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Animals Use Brain Tricks to See in the Dark

Many animals once thought to have poor sight in low light use tricks in their nervous systems to see brilliantly in the dark — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Unhealthful Data Gaps

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Doglike Robots Learn New Tricks

Quadruped robots simulate their skills before going out in the real world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Having Cancer Is Bad. Having Cancer When You're Poor Is Worse

People without resources have higher death rates — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Readers Respond to the January 2019 Issue

Letters to the editor from the January 2019 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

The Sleep-Dementia Connection

Could a better nighttime rest help delay the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Pausing Fertility: What Will Happen When the Eggs Thaw?

Technical advances are driving a boom in egg freezing, which promises to let women put off pregnancy indefinitely. But will the science live up to the hype? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Investors Start to Force Companies to Reduce Greenhouse Gases

Investors are making companies act on global warming—and they can do even more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

A Loaded Gun Can Be Dangerous Even If Only a Dog Is Near the Trigger

Even man’s most loyal companion can’t be trusted around guns — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Government Attempts to Silence Science Are Revealed in Detail

A tracker reveals more than 300 government attempts to suppress knowledge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Do additives help the soil?

A UBC researcher is using her latest study to question whether soil additives are worth their salt. Miranda Hart, who teaches biology at UBC's Okanagan campus, says despite a decades-long practice, there could be environmental consequences of adding bio-fertilizers into soil. It's common practice for farmers to use bio-fertilizers as a method to improve crop production. These added microorganisms

6h

Blue whale fossil provides evidence that baleens grew large earlier than thought

A team of researchers with members from Italy, Australia, and Belgium has found evidence that suggests baleen whales grew large earlier than has been thought. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of a whale fossil that was found in 2006 and how old it was.

6h

When is 'Alzheimer's' not Alzheimer's? Researchers characterize a different form of dementia

Alzheimer's is dementia, but not all dementias are Alzheimer's (which may explain why so many Alzheimer's drugs have failed in clinical trials). A new study provides a framework for a newly characterized form of dementia called LATE.

6h

Right combination of diet and bacteria limits cancer progression

Researchers have discovered a combination of dietary factors and gut bacteria that inhibits the progression of colorectal cancer. Their findings could help exploit dietary regimens for therapeutic purposes to improve chemotherapy efficacy and reduce toxicity.

6h

Deadly box jellyfish antidote discovered using CRISPR genome editing

Researchers studying how pain works have discovered an antidote to the deadly sting delivered by the most venomous creature on Earth — the Australian box jellyfish. A single sting to a human causes necrosis of the skin, excruciating pain and, if the dose of venom is large enough, cardiac arrest and death within minutes. The new antidote, discovered using CRISPR genome editing techniques, blocks t

6h

Keto diet has potential in military, researchers say

A new study has researchers hopeful that a ketogenic diet could prove useful in the military, where obesity is an ongoing challenge, both in terms of recruiting soldiers and keeping them fit for service.

6h

Do you smell what I smell?

A new study sheds light on understanding the extensive individual differences in how we sense odors. By showing that small changes in a single olfactory receptor gene can affect how strong and pleasant a person finds an odor, the findings expand understanding of how olfactory receptors in the nose encode information about the properties of odors even before that information reaches the brain.

6h

How the brain integrates sensory input

Hearing, sight, touch – our brain captures a wide range of distinct sensory stimuli and links them together. The brain has a kind of built-in filter function for this: sensory impressions are only integrated if it is necessary and useful for the task at hand.

6h

Rapid permafrost thaw unrecognized threat to landscape, global warming researcher warns

Researchers have assessed abrupt thaw studies across the permafrost zone to estimate the overall effect. They found carbon emissions have the potential to double the climate feedback associated with permafrost thawing because abrupt thaw releases more methane. It will also have drastic effects on landscape, from altering traditional travel and hunting patterns in the North, to causing costly infra

6h

Deadly box jellyfish antidote discovered using CRISPR genome editing

Researchers studying how pain works have discovered an antidote to the deadly sting delivered by the most venomous creature on Earth — the Australian box jellyfish. A single sting to a human causes necrosis of the skin, excruciating pain and, if the dose of venom is large enough, cardiac arrest and death within minutes. The new antidote, discovered using CRISPR genome editing techniques, blocks t

6h

Blue whale fossil provides evidence that baleens grew large earlier than thought

A team of researchers with members from Italy, Australia, and Belgium has found evidence that suggests baleen whales grew large earlier than has been thought. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of a whale fossil that was found in 2006 and how old it was.

6h

Not so sexy salmon

New research reveals that farmed salmon have smaller 'jaw hooks' or 'kype'- a secondary sexual trait, likened to the antlers of a stag, making them less attractive to females than their wild salmon cousins.

6h

Exhaust gas is to blame: Ground-level ozone is damaging crops

It is generally known that pollution has damaged the ozone layer around the Earth. The ozone layer is important for protecting life from harmful UV rays from the sun. However, the fact that pollution leads to too much ozone at ground level is less known.

6h

Not so sexy salmon

New research reveals that farmed salmon have smaller 'jaw hooks' or 'kype'- a secondary sexual trait, likened to the antlers of a stag, making them less attractive to females than their wild salmon cousins.

6h

Gender stereotypes limit power of female presidents across cultures, study shows

Female presidents have less power to shape policy and are held to higher standards in key policy areas than male presidents, according to a study led by a Georgia State political science researcher.

6h

Sensor would catch extra pressure in baby heads

The feel of the soft spot on top of a baby’s head can signal too much pressure inside, but a new monitor offers more comprehensive data without an invasive procedure. Rice University students, working with Texas Children’s Hospital doctors at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen, designed the seemingly simple but sophisticated system to monitor high intracranial pressure (ICP) within the skul

6h

Love your job? Someone may be taking advantage of you

If someone is passionate about what they do, we see it as more legitimate to exploit them, according to new research from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business.

6h

6h

Analysis of old people's civic participation

Older people's civic participation has been associated with improvement of cognitive function and physical and mental health, among other aspects. This is one of the main conclusions of a study led by Rodrigo Serrat, postdoctoral researcher from the Gerontology Research Group (GIG) at the Faculty of Psychology of the UB, who supervised the research study that analysed this field over 55 years.

6h

Heathrow campaigners lose challenge against third runway

High Court judges rule in favour of the government's decision to approve airport expansion plans.

6h

Blast of Ancient Magma Ocean on Earth May Have Led to Moon Formation

There's a new theory for how the Moon came to be that would solve some of the Giant Impact Hypothesis' issues. If Earth had a magma ocean on it already, a lot of problems work out. The post Blast of Ancient Magma Ocean on Earth May Have Led to Moon Formation appeared first on ExtremeTech .

6h

Brain, shape and fossils

Emiliano Bruner, a paleoneurologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has just published an overview article in the Journal of Comparative Neurology on studies of changes in brain shape over the course of human evolution, which considers the evolutionary relationship between humans and other primates.

7h

Lack of affordable rent plagues cities across the United States

New research by USC housing experts reveals lack of affordable rent is a bigger problem than previously realized, not only in big coastal cities but across much of the United States.

7h

Brain, shape and fossils

Emiliano Bruner, a paleoneurologist at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has just published an overview article in the Journal of Comparative Neurology on studies of changes in brain shape over the course of human evolution, which considers the evolutionary relationship between humans and other primates.

7h

Forget smart cities (for a minute), we need to talk about smart farms

There's a lot of talk about digital technology and smart cities, but what about smart farms? Many of us still have a romantic view of farmers surveying rolling hills and farm kids cuddling calves, but our food in Canada increasingly comes from industrial-scale factory farms and vast glass and steel forests of greenhouses.

7h

The biggest government pledge to science spending for 40 years – but who benefits? | Sarah Main

All political parties have said research and innovation can help raise living standards. A good start would be to invest in staff Amid the turbulence of Brexit deadlines and extensions, you might be pleased to know that there are at least some long-term plans afoot. A good news story in government, with major investment attached, has the potential to create a new type of future for the UK. You may

7h

Storage beyond the cloud

As the data boom continues to boom, more and more information gets filed in less and less space. Even the cloud will eventually run out of space, can't thwart all hackers, and gobbles up energy. Now, a new way to store information could stably house data for millions of years, lives outside the hackable internet, and, once written, uses no energy. All you need is a chemist, some cheap molecules, a

7h

Environmental pollutants could impact cellular signs of aging

Researchers have linked some environmental pollutants with diseases, a decreased life span and signs of premature aging, such as wrinkles and age spots. But can accelerated aging be detected at the cellular level in healthy people exposed to pollutants? Now, researchers in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology report that although pollutant exposure can affect two hallmarks of aging i

7h

Declining insects? Bring back set-aside

What if there were no more insects? Recent media headlines all over the world have raised this question, often using apocalyptic terms. Remarkably, on 20 March 2019, the U.K. Parliament even took a few minutes off discussing Brexit to take note of the issue. Is all this entomological fuss justified?

7h

Declining insects? Bring back set-aside

What if there were no more insects? Recent media headlines all over the world have raised this question, often using apocalyptic terms. Remarkably, on 20 March 2019, the U.K. Parliament even took a few minutes off discussing Brexit to take note of the issue. Is all this entomological fuss justified?

7h

African swine fever has killed a million pigs—and isn't slowing down

Health The science behind the world’s deadliest swine disease. Since early August, African swine fever has wiped out pork productions across China, Mongolia, Vietnam, and most recently, Cambodia, without signs of stopping––the virus…

7h

Do 'microglia' hold the key to stop Alzheimer's disease?

Scientists have studied how specialized brain cells called microglia respond to the accumulation of toxic proteins in the brain, a feature typical of Alzheimer's. The three major disease risk factors for Alzheimer's — age, sex and genetics — all affect microglia response, raising the possibility that drugs that modulate this response could be useful for treatment.

7h

Screening for rare but important disease 'biomarkers' gets an accuracy boost

Researchers have created a system that can detect and quantify small and rare biological molecules that are important for detecting disease early.

7h

How gangs use social media

The menacing photos that Tevin, a young man affiliated with a Chicago street gang, posted on social media were dramatically different from the 20-year-old whom Stanford sociologist Forrest Stuart got to know during his two years of field work studying gang culture on the city's South Side.

7h

How To Respond to Anti-Vaxxers

How do we best address the anti-vaccine phenomenon? It's complicated.

7h

Can a molecule from fasting keep blood vessels young?

Scientists have uncovered a molecule that they say could serve as a fountain of youth for the vascular system. It could also offer a way to turn back the circulatory system’s clock, say researchers. The molecule, which the liver produces during fasting or calorie restriction, can delay vascular aging by preventing senescence—the gradual deterioration of a cell’s ability to divide and multiply—amo

7h

Without access

Without access Without access, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01316-1 History lesson.

7h

Marsquake, asteroid mission and China’s quantum prizes

Marsquake, asteroid mission and China’s quantum prizes Marsquake, asteroid mission and China’s quantum prizes, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01311-6 The week in science: 26 April–2 May 2019.

7h

Do Married Millennials Cheat on Each Other?

Millennials have killed malls , cheese , and bar soap . Their thirst for blood unslaked, they’re now coming for good, old-fashioned cheating. At least, that’s according to an analysis the sociologist Nicholas Wolfinger published in 2017 on the Institute for Family Studies website. When asked the survey question “Have you ever had sex with someone other than your husband or wife while you were mar

7h

Scientists reveal the relationship between root microbiome and nitrogen use efficiency in rice

A collaborative team led by Prof. Bai Yang and Prof. Chu Chengcai from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), recently examined the variation in root microbiota within 68 indica and 27 japonica rice varieties grown in field conditions. They revealed that the indica and japonica varieties recruited distinct root microbiota.

7h

Image: Smart particles

Down to the microscopic level, nanoparticles show promising properties. A team of experts in Italy has spent years tailoring tiny inorganic materials and analysing their behaviour. Some have magnetic properties, others are able to give electrical stimuli. In this picture, a peculiar type of nanoparticle is mimicking the biological activity of enzymes in living organisms.

7h

Scientists reveal the relationship between root microbiome and nitrogen use efficiency in rice

A collaborative team led by Prof. Bai Yang and Prof. Chu Chengcai from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), recently examined the variation in root microbiota within 68 indica and 27 japonica rice varieties grown in field conditions. They revealed that the indica and japonica varieties recruited distinct root microbiota.

7h

From catfish to romance fraud, how to avoid getting caught in any online scam

Australian singer-songwriter Casey Donovan opened up again last night about the six years she thought she was involved in a relationship with a man she never met, someone called "Campbell".

7h

Biosolar Leaf Project May Help Fight Air Pollution

submitted by /u/pingpong2019 [link] [comments]

7h

7h

7h

7h

How are automation and AI changing human labor?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

7h

7h

Internet of Things (IoT)

submitted by /u/resolvingsteph [link] [comments]

7h

Another governor to sign law allowing delivery robots on sidewalks | ZDNet

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

7h

7h

7h

A New York Times Exploration into Just How Much Data Advertisers Have

submitted by /u/RedEyedGrassMan [link] [comments]

7h

7h

7h

WIRED Joins the One Free Press Coalition

WIRED is proud to stand with a group of editors and publishers to spotlight journalists under attack worldwide.

7h

The US Urgently Needs New Genetic Privacy Laws

The laws governing DNA data in the US are patchy and incomplete. Yet people keep putting their DNA on the internet, compromising everyone's genetic anonymity.

7h

Preserving the contents of the New York Public Library in a teaspoon of protein, without energy, for millions of years

Books can burn. Computers get hacked. DVDs degrade. Technologies to store information—ink on paper, computers, CDs and DVDs, and even DNA—continue to improve. And yet, threats as simple as water and as complex as cyber-attacks can still corrupt our records.

7h

China Plans Mission to Earth's Pet Asteroid

Spacecraft will return samples to Earth and be open to researchers around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Talks resume between SAS and pilots as more flights cancelled

Negotiations have resumed between Scandinavian airline SAS and its striking pilots, a mediator said Wednesday, as hundreds more flights were cancelled due to the strike action which has affected nearly 350,000 passengers.

7h

Three tonnes of rubbish collected from Everest

A dedicated clean-up team sent to Mount Everest has collected three tonnes of garbage in its first two weeks, officials said Wednesday, in an ambitious plan to clean the world's highest rubbish dump.

7h

India braces for cyclone, puts navy on alert

India deployed emergency personnel Wednesday and ordered the navy on standby as it braced for an extremely severe cyclonic storm barrelling towards the eastern coast.

7h

Study analyzes benefits of tracking devices for auto insurance

The virtual black box of the automotive set, whether it's vehicle plug-in technology or merely a cellphone app while motoring, may lower insurance rates for many drivers. But a new business study involving Washington University in St. Louis provides analytical theories showing that such driver-monitoring technology can not only prove beneficial to the bottom lines of some consumers, but also to in

7h

Deciphering seed dispersal decisions of agouti rodents

Much like the squirrels and chipmunks in deciduous climates, there is a cat-sized creature in tropical regions that practices scatter hoarding – burying the seeds they find if they don't eat them right away.

7h

7h

Data privacy research front and center at human computer interaction event

Shortcomings of security breach notifications, best practices for phishing warnings and lessons learned from the use of analytics to improve student performance are among several studies University of Michigan researchers will present beginning this weekend in the United Kingdom.

7h

Deciphering seed dispersal decisions of agouti rodents

Much like the squirrels and chipmunks in deciduous climates, there is a cat-sized creature in tropical regions that practices scatter hoarding – burying the seeds they find if they don't eat them right away.

7h

Scientists connect quantum bits with sound over record distances

Scientists with the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago have made two breakthroughs in the quest to develop quantum technology. In one study, they entangled two quantum bits using sound for the first time; in another, they built the highest-quality long-range link between two qubits to date. The work brings us closer to harnessing quantum technology to make more powerf

7h

Humans will eat maggots, scientists insist

University of Queensland researchers are investigating the use of maggots, locusts and other alternative proteins in a range of specialty foods.

7h

Drought: A wide-angle picture

Disastrous droughts are striking widespread areas of the world, from South Africa to American West. Benjamin Cook, a research scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, has written a primer on everything one needs to know about the subject. "Drought: An Interdisciplinary Perspective," just out from Columbia University Press

7h

Scientists find cocaine in shrimps in Suffolk rivers

Researchers collected samples from rivers in Suffolk and found the drug when testing for chemicals.

7h

Q&A: Organs on a Chip Head to the International Space Station

Lucie Low, a project leader for Tissue Chips in Space, describes the experiments that are slated to blast off later this week.

7h

Taking on tech giants: Can anyone stop Facebook, Amazon and Google?

Presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren is one of the most prominent voices calling for tech giants to be broken up. Is she right, and can it be done?

8h

Electronic Health Records and Doctor Burnout

They have legitimate value, but we physicians entered the profession to connect with and help patients—not stare at a screen — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Profits for the people, six millennia of cities, and the roots of sickness and health: Books in brief

Profits for the people, six millennia of cities, and the roots of sickness and health: Books in brief Profits for the people, six millennia of cities, and the roots of sickness and health: Books in brief, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01317-0 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

8h

Gamle lokomotiver kan give 16 ud af 1.000 lokoførere lungekræft

Dieselpartiklerne fra de ældre Litra ME-lokomotiver er igen kommet i fokus.

8h

These Super-Precise Clocks Help Weave Together Space And Time

Insanely precise atomic clocks are letting astrophysicists image black holes, steer spacecraft, and maybe one day hunt for gravitational waves.

8h

The Woman Who Saved John McAfee from an Epically Bad Deal

He was going to sell his antivirus software company to Symantec for $20 million. But Sonja Hoel had a smarter, better offer.

8h

OpenAI Wants to Make Ultra-Powerful AI. But Not in a Bad Way

OpenAI, a research institute cofounded by Elon Musk, aims to create artificial intelligence that's better than people at everything.

8h

During the Last Lunar Eclipse, a Meteor Smacked the Moon in the Face at 38,000 Mph

When the moon went dark in January, it got smacked in the face by a rock traveling 38,000 mph (61,000 km/h).

8h

Oldest Human Footprint in Americas May Be This 15,600-Year-Old Mark in Chile

The earliest human footprint on record in the Americas wasn't found in Canada, the United States or even Mexico; it was found much farther south, in Chile, and it dates to an astonishing 15,600 years ago, a new study finds.

8h

Electronic Health Records and Doctor Burnout

They have legitimate value, but we physicians entered the profession to connect with and help patients—not stare at a screen — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Exclusive: AI to monitor UK roads for accidents or unusual behaviour

Some councils in the UK are going to test artificial intelligence on their CCTV cameras for automatically detecting traffic accidents and unusual road behaviour

8h

Why Water Is Weird – Facts So Romantic

It’s striking that water can illustrate and elucidate a martial arts philosophy while also being, to this day, the “least understood material on Earth,” as researchers reported recently. Photograph by takoburito / Shutterstock One day, frustrated after many hours of meditation and practice, Bruce Lee, still a teenager, went sailing. His martial arts teacher, Yip Man, had been instructing Lee in t

8h

Minister: Staten løber ikke fra kontrakten om vindmølleparker

PLUS. Vindmøllerne kommer trods protest fra sommerhusejerne. Ellers vil det koste staten et milliardbeløb for brud på kontrakten.

8h

New giant virus may help scientists better understand the emergence of complex life

The discovery of the Medusavirus holds clues to the evolution of more complex life. A paper published in the Journal of Virology earlier this year has been creating waves because of the ability of the Medusavirus to turn amoeba into "stone." However, the bigger discovery is the possible relationship between the Medusavirus and the evolution of complex life. Tokyo University of Science has released

8h

Middle Pleistocene human skull reveals variation and continuity in early Asian humans

A team of scientists led by Liu Wu and Wu Xiujie from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first ever Middle Pleistocene human skull found in southeastern China, revealing the variation and continuity in early Asian humans. Their findings were published on April 30 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (P

8h

New giant virus may help scientists better understand the emergence of complex life

The discovery of the Medusavirus holds clues to the evolution of more complex life. A paper published in the Journal of Virology earlier this year has been creating waves because of the ability of the Medusavirus to turn amoeba into "stone." However, the bigger discovery is the possible relationship between the Medusavirus and the evolution of complex life. Tokyo University of Science has released

8h

Cosmos, Quantum and Consciousness: Is Science Doomed to Leave Some Questions Unanswered?

Physicists, philosophers debate whether research can ever solve certain mysteries of the universe—and the human mind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Cosmos, Quantum and Consciousness: Is Science Doomed to Leave Some Questions Unanswered?

Physicists, philosophers debate whether research can ever solve certain mysteries of the universe—and the human mind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Energy Department says it will remove plutonium from Nevada

U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry is pledging to expedite the removal of weapons-grade plutonium secretly hauled to Nevada last year as the state and Trump administration remain locked in a court battle about whether the shipment was legal.

8h

9h

Terrawatch: snowball Earth – when glaciers reached the tropics

Rock deposits show there have been many times when the planet has been covered in ice Once upon a time, about 650m years ago, our planet was covered in ice. Glaciers stretched as far as the tropics, and equatorial regions were as cold as modern day Antarctica. Life clung on, huddling around geothermal springs and in pockets of liquid water under the ice caps. Ancient rock deposits suggest our pla

9h

Mayor Buttigieg Is Working Remotely Today

Updated Wednesday, May 1 at 11:56 am SOUTH BEND , Ind.—Outside Elks Lodge 298, a local television reporter jumped in with a question: “Mayor Buttigieg,” he said, “what does it feel like to be back in South Bend?” It was Dyngus Day, the Polish-inspired holiday that takes place every year on the Monday after Easter. Like home games at Notre Dame Stadium, it’s one of South Bend’s can’t-miss events.

9h

Why Baghdadi Risked a Video Appearance

With a new video , the Islamic State’s long-elusive leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, has reemerged. His message was simple: ISIS’s self-declared caliphate in Iraq and Syria has fallen, but the global community forged by ISIS lives on. That makes his video something of a rebuttal to President Donald Trump’s December claim that ISIS was “defeated.” The first question to ask about the video is: Why rel

9h

The Doorbell Company That’s Selling Fear

When news organizations think about competition from tech companies, it’s usually in terms of the audience’s attention and advertisers’ dollars. But if Amazon has its way, a new sort of competition may be coming from a mixture of surveillance, fear, and doorbells. Amazon is currently looking to hire someone with the title “Managing Editor, News.” But it’s not for the entire Amazon empire—it’s for

9h

The Final Scene of Avengers: Endgame Is More Than Worthy

This article contains major spoilers for Avengers: Endgame. Steve Rogers had a date. In 2011’s Captain America: The First Avenger , his introduction into the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Chris Evans’s titular super-soldier promised to take Peggy Carter (Hayley Atwell) dancing. It’s a promise he couldn’t keep: To save the world, he crashed into the Arctic and stayed frozen for nearly 70 years. When

9h

One Big Difference Between Biden and Every Other Recent Democratic Nominee

When critics say that Joe Biden isn’t progressive enough, they’re mostly referring to his record and positions on policy. But the former vice president’s messaging is literally backward-looking. Biden is running a campaign of restoration—returning the United States to its rightful place before (as he sees it) the current president came onto the scene and trashed the joint. “If we give Donald Trum

9h

Hate Invades the Quotidian

The phone sits in the drink holster, next to the gear stick. I want Jack Dorsey’s dopamine hit as bad as a morning cup of coffee. But my daughters are in the back seat, so even at a red light I resist the impulse, and it passes. We’re on our way to a soccer tournament beyond exurbia. There’s no traffic, and all thoughts of politics slip from my conscious mind. At a gas-station break, the phone em

9h

Camille Paglia Can’t Say That

For more than 30 years, the critic Camille Paglia has taught at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. Now a faction of art-school censors wants her fired for sharing wrong opinions on matters of sex, gender identity, and sexual assault. “Camille Paglia should be removed from UArts faculty and replaced by a queer person of color,” an online petition declares. “If, due to tenure, it is absolu

9h

Why pitting prejudices against each other keeps society free

For society to stay open and free, you don't need to eliminate prejudice. You need the opposite: All kinds of prejudice pitted against each other. Intellectual diversity helps society as a whole learn the truth. And as long as society has rules that force ideas to be openly tested, the intolerant will not gain the upper hand. "In America it's legal to be intolerant. It may not be right. It may no

9h

HER2 positive breast cancer: Treatment de-escalation needs to be personalized

De-escalation approaches in the treatment of women with HER2 positive breast cancer need to be personalized, according to Dr. Carmen Criscitiello, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. Her comments come on the occasion of the presentation of updated research results at the inaugural ESMO Breast Cancer Congress 2019, May 2-4, 2019, in Berlin, Germany.

9h

Sent udspil: Regeringen vil genanvende mere affald

Affaldssektoren skal liberaliseres, og det skal hjælpe med at mindske forbrændingen af affaldet, lyder budskabet i en ny affaldsplan fra regeringen. Men udspillet kommer i 11. time og kan ikke nå igennem reelle forhandlinger før folketingsvalget.

9h

Compression plagiarism: An “under-recognized variety” that software will miss

If you’re interested in plagiarism in the scholarly literature nowadays, you’ve probably come across the name Michael Dougherty. Dougherty’s efforts to root out plagiarism has led to dozens of retractions, including several by a prominent priest. In a new paper in Argumentation, Dougherty, author of the recent book Correcting the Scholarly Record for Research Integrity: … Continue reading Compress

9h

Sex drug 'effective' as heart failure treatment

A drug used to treat erectile dysfunction has been found by University of Manchester scientists to slow or even reverse the progression of heart failure in sheep. The British Heart Foundation funded study is a breakthrough in the treatment for the disease in which five year survival rates are lower than most common cancers.

10h

A newly identified mechanism can be targeted to boost angiogenesis

Scientists of the National Center for Cardiovascular Research (CNIC) have discovered a cellular and molecular mechanism that can be exploited to induce productive and sustained angiogenesis in tissues that have become ischemic due to reduced blood supply.

10h

This chip was demoed at Jeff Bezos’s secretive tech conference. It could be key to the future of AI.

The chip on show at Amazon’s MARS event—alongside karate-chopping robots and Martian bases—is many times more efficient than conventional silicon chips.

10h

The Human Brain Project – Museums Video

The Human Brain Project should lay the technical foundations for a new model of ICT-based brain research, driving integration between data and knowledge from different disciplines, and catalysing a community effort to achieve a new understanding of the brain, new treatments for brain disease and new brain-like computing technologies. From: HumanBrainProject

10h

Multi-scale spiking network model of macaque visual cortex

This video describes the first steps with the "Multi-scale spiking network model of macaque visual cortex". More info: https://inm-6.github.io/multi-area-model/ From: HumanBrainProject

10h

Quadrature Frequency-Group Radar and its center estimation algorithms for small Vibrational Displacement

Quadrature Frequency-Group Radar and its center estimation algorithms for small Vibrational Displacement Quadrature Frequency-Group Radar and its center estimation algorithms for small Vibrational Displacement, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43205-7 Quadrature Frequency-Group Radar and its center estimation algorithms for small Vibrational Displacement

10h

Epirubicin-loaded marine carrageenan oligosaccharide capped gold nanoparticle system for pH-triggered anticancer drug release

Epirubicin-loaded marine carrageenan oligosaccharide capped gold nanoparticle system for pH-triggered anticancer drug release Epirubicin-loaded marine carrageenan oligosaccharide capped gold nanoparticle system for pH-triggered anticancer drug release, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43106-9 Epirubicin-loaded marine carrageenan oligosaccharide capped gold nanoparticle system

10h

Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition improves contractile function and restores transverse tubule loss and catecholamine responsiveness in heart failure

Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition improves contractile function and restores transverse tubule loss and catecholamine responsiveness in heart failure Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition improves contractile function and restores transverse tubule loss and catecholamine responsiveness in heart failure, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42592-1 Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibition improves co

10h

Synthesis and in vivo characterization of 18F-labeled difluoroboron-curcumin derivative for β-amyloid plaque imaging

Synthesis and in vivo characterization of 18 F-labeled difluoroboron-curcumin derivative for β-amyloid plaque imaging Synthesis and in vivo characterization of 18 F-labeled difluoroboron-curcumin derivative for β-amyloid plaque imaging, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43257-9 Synthesis and in vivo characterization of 18 F-labeled difluoroboron-curcumin derivative for β-amylo

10h

Honey bees increase their foraging performance and frequency of pollen trips through experience

Honey bees increase their foraging performance and frequency of pollen trips through experience Honey bees increase their foraging performance and frequency of pollen trips through experience, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42677-x Honey bees increase their foraging performance and frequency of pollen trips through experience

10h

Systemic inflammation is associated with malaria and preterm birth in women living with HIV on antiretrovirals and co-trimoxazole

Systemic inflammation is associated with malaria and preterm birth in women living with HIV on antiretrovirals and co-trimoxazole Systemic inflammation is associated with malaria and preterm birth in women living with HIV on antiretrovirals and co-trimoxazole, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43191-w Systemic inflammation is associated with malaria and preterm birth in women

10h

Mouse models and strain-dependency of Chédiak-Higashi syndrome-associated neurologic dysfunction

Mouse models and strain-dependency of Chédiak-Higashi syndrome-associated neurologic dysfunction Mouse models and strain-dependency of Chédiak-Higashi syndrome-associated neurologic dysfunction, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42159-0 Mouse models and strain-dependency of Chédiak-Higashi syndrome-associated neurologic dysfunction

10h

Shear force modulates the activity of acid-sensing ion channels at low pH or in the presence of non-proton ligands

Shear force modulates the activity of acid-sensing ion channels at low pH or in the presence of non-proton ligands Shear force modulates the activity of acid-sensing ion channels at low pH or in the presence of non-proton ligands, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43097-7 Shear force modulates the activity of acid-sensing ion channels at low pH or in the presence of non-proton

10h

Sorting Out Plastics At The Grocery Store

Every visit to the grocery store it seems we're faced with more and more plastic packaging. We visit a grocery store with a recycling expert who has some tips.

10h

Tesla Plans To Boost Solar Business By Slashing Costs

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

10h

Moon might have formed from blobs of a molten Earth

Moon might have formed from blobs of a molten Earth Moon might have formed from blobs of a molten Earth, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01382-5 Magma-ocean theory of Moon’s origin could explain why Earth and its satellite are chemically so similar.

10h

Model and manage the changing geopolitics of energy

Model and manage the changing geopolitics of energy Model and manage the changing geopolitics of energy, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01312-5 Transitioning to a low-carbon world will create new rivalries, winners and losers, argue Andreas Goldthau, Kirsten Westphal and colleagues.

10h

Working Scientist podcast: Slack, and other technologies that are transforming lab life

Working Scientist podcast: Slack, and other technologies that are transforming lab life Working Scientist podcast: Slack, and other technologies that are transforming lab life, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01375-4 Working Scientist podcast: Slack, and other technologies that are transforming lab life

11h

Hver anden dansker har været offer for cyberkriminalitet

Ud af 2.019 har 720 været udsat for phishing, viser en ny undersøgelse.

11h

Image of the Day: Crab Legs

A crab new to scientists lived in the age of dinosaurs in what is now Colombia and the US.

11h

Fejl hos Rigspolitiet gav sirene-kaos i Midtjylland

586.000 borgere blev fejlagtigt bedt om at gå indendøre, da samtlige sirener i Midt- og Vestjyllands politikreds blev aktiveret. Fejlen var menneskelig og skete kort tid efter, at Rigspolitiet i København overtog opgaven

11h

Searching for lost WWII-era uranium cubes from Germany

Back in 2013, Timothy Koeth, an associate research professor at the University of Maryland, received a rather extraordinary birthday gift: a little cloth lunch pouch containing a small object wrapped in brown paper towels. As Koeth peeled back the layers, his eyes grew wide with astonishment. He immediately asked, "Where did you get that?"

12h

Searching for lost WWII-era uranium cubes from Germany

In 2013, Timothy Koeth received an extraordinary gift: a heavy metal cube and a crumpled message that read, 'Taken from Germany, from the nuclear reactor Hitler tried to build. Gift of Ninninger.' Koeth accepted the cube and its note as an invitation to the adventure of a lifetime. In Physics Today, Koeth and Miriam Hiebert describe what they've discovered while exploring the German quest and fail

12h

Huge whales may have evolved millions of years earlier than we thought

It was thought baleen whales suddenly evolved to be massive 2.5 million years ago, but new evidence suggests the change was more gradual and much earlier

12h

12h

How scientists traced a uranium cube to Nazi Germany’s nuclear reactor program

New research suggests that the Nazis had enough uranium to make a working nuclear reactor.

12h

12h

New study finds river wildlife contain cocaine, pharmaceuticals and pesticides

For the first time, researchers at King's College London, in collaboration with the University of Suffolk, have found a diverse array of chemicals, including illicit drugs and pesticides in UK river wildlife. The study published today in Environment International, looked at the exposure of wildlife, such as the freshwater shrimp Gammarus pulex, to different micropollutants (chemicals found at exce

12h

'Exotic' genes may improve cotton yield and quality

Cotton breeders face a "Catch-22." Yield from cotton crops is inversely related to fiber quality. In general, as yield improves, fiber quality decreases, and vice-versa. "This is one of the most significant challenges for cotton breeders," says Peng Chee, a researcher at the University of Georgia.

12h

'Exotic' genes may improve cotton yield and quality

Cotton breeders face a "Catch-22." Yield from cotton crops is inversely related to fiber quality. In general, as yield improves, fiber quality decreases, and vice-versa. "This is one of the most significant challenges for cotton breeders," says Peng Chee, a researcher at the University of Georgia.

12h

This Shockingly Common Brain Disease Looks Like Alzheimer's But Is Something Else

A totally different type of dementia is revealing itself.

12h

12h

The Moon is Finally Getting the Attention It Deserves

We've reached another "will they or won't they?" cliffhanger in the long-running soap opera, When Will Humans Return to the Moon? Last May, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine promised that a crew would be landing there by 2028. "To many, this may sound similar to our previous attempts to get to the Moon," he admitted. "However, times have changed. This will not be Lucy and the football again." A m

13h

AR will mean dystopia if we don’t act today

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

13h

Meet The Engineer Dreaming of a Lunar City

submitted by /u/Witty_Cartographer [link] [comments]

13h

Forensic science labs are on the brink of collapse, warns report

Fears raised about miscarriages of justice and unsolved crimes A crisis in forensic science has brought some of the country’s largest private laboratories to the brink of collapse, risking miscarriages of justice, an inquiry has warned. The House of Lords science and technology committee has called for urgent reforms to forensic science provision, warning that declining standards could lead to cr

13h

Rheumatoid arthritis patients affected by disabilities well in advance of diagnosis

Patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis often are affected by functional disability a year or two before the disease is diagnosed, according to new Mayo Clinic research.The results of the study, to be published in June in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, suggest that daily activities such as eating, dressing and walking are affected early in the course of the disease, and that most rheumatoid arthrit

14h

Childhood cerebellar tumours mirror conserved fetal transcriptional programs

Childhood cerebellar tumours mirror conserved fetal transcriptional programs Childhood cerebellar tumours mirror conserved fetal transcriptional programs, Published online: 01 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1158-7 Sequencing data from the developing cerebellum are compared with bulk sequencing data from paediatric tumours, providing insights into their potential origins and suggesting that many

14h

Box jellyfish: Australian researchers find antidote for world's most venomous creature

Jellyfish’s sting carries enough venom to kill more than 60 people An antidote has been discovered for the world’s most venomous creature, the Australian box jellyfish. Researchers at the University of Sydney have found an antidote for the sting of the jellyfish – which carries enough venom to kill more than 60 people. Continue reading…

14h

Lars bruger sin stemme som værktøj: Sådan skifter han fra Grisling til Pumba på et splitsekund

Det kræver helt særlige teknikker at få tegnefilm til at lyde, som de gør.

14h

'Exotic' genes may improve cotton yield and quality

Improving cotton quality can have ramifications for $12B US cotton trade industry.

15h

Suicide attempts by self-poisoning have more than doubled in teens, young adults

A new study from Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Central Ohio Poison Center found rates of suicide attempts by self-poisoning among adolescents have more than doubled in the last decade in the US, and more than tripled for girls and young women.

15h

Quitting smoking is associated with reduced risk of bladder cancer in postmenopausal women

A large study of postmenopausal women indicated that quitting cigarette smoking was associated with significantly reduced risk of bladder cancer. The most significant reduction in risk occurred in the first 10 years after quitting, with a modest but continued decline in later years.

15h

ThinkGeek Is Having a Massive Sitewide Sale Today

Whether you're into Zelda or Star Wars, the entire site is 25 percent off (and 81 percent off clearance items) until midnight.

15h

A Window on Memory

Watch Princeton University’s Nicholas Turk-Browne describe his research on how the human brain makes, stores, and adjusts memories.

15h

A Window on Memory

[no content]

15h

Nasa-chef: Faren for meteornedslag tages ikke alvorligt nok

Hvis vi skal beskytte planeten, er det afgørende at være opmærksom på meteorer på vej mod Jorden, mener Nasa.

15h

16h

16h

16h

16h

Murphy on AI for Biology

See Robert Murphy of Carnegie Mellon University discuss the revolutionary application of machine learning to biomedical research.

16h

Mac-adresser fra målrettet malware-angreb lagt til skue: Unfair overfor ejerne af disse systemer

Et sikkerhedsfirma har trukket en stribe mac-adresser ud af et hjælpeværktøj fra Kaspersky, og det vækker ikke just begejstring hos den russiske virksomhed.

16h

16h

Dansk myndighed om flygodkendelser: »Der er et enormt kommercielt pres«

PLUS. Der er habilitetsproblemer hos de myndigheder, der godkender fly, og en løsning kræver flere ressourcer, mener dansk luftfartsmyndighed.

16h

17h

New Model Aims to Solve Mystery of the Moon's Formation

Scientists propose that the moon could have formed when a Mars-sized object slammed into an Earth covered in magma seas. Christopher Intagliata reports.

17h

Water in the West: Snow news may not be good news

As the animation of satellite images above shows, this past winter has brought desperately needed snowfall to a large portion of the American West. It consists of images captured by NASA's Terra satellite, centered on the Colorado Rockies — one on April 18 of last year, and the other this past April 19th. All that extra white stuff tells the tale better than any statistics. And looks aren't deceiv

18h

Book Review: The Unraveling of Ocean Life and a World Without Fish

Kurlansky, Mark and Stockton, Frank (Illustrator). World Without Fish. Workman Publishing Company, 2014. 208 pages. Paperback $US10.46 Day-to-day encounters of fish—at the grocery store, through an aquarium—passively reinforce a notion of triviality about aquatic life until we are prompted to take a pause and spare a thought for a breathtaking world beyond the shore. This month’s selection in our

18h

18h

Like ‘Uber for Organs’: Drone Delivers Kidney to Maryland Woman

A team at the University of Maryland is developing drone technology to deliver organs faster and give doctors timely updates on their transit.

18h

International Space Station hit by major power shortage

SpaceX delivery delayed after old power-switching unit malfunctions The International Space Station has been hit by a major power shortage that has forced a delivery from SpaceX to be delayed. SpaceX was supposed to launch a shipment on Wednesday. But an old power-switching unit malfunctioned at the space station on Monday and knocked two power channels offline. The six remaining power channels s

18h

Drug Agency Calls for Strong Warning Labels on Popular Sleep Aids

The labels must mention that side effects include risky behaviors, such as sleepwalking and sleep driving, that can lead to injury and even death.

18h

Should Adults Get a Measles Booster Shot?

Measles outbreaks have occurred in 22 states. Now adults are wondering if they are immune and whether they should get a shot of the vaccine. Here’s what you need to know.

18h

Trilobites: The Microbots Are on Their Way

Tiny sensors with tinier legs, stamped out of silicon wafers, could one day soon help fix your cellphone battery or study your brain.

18h

New study finds river wildlife contain cocaine, pharmaceuticals and pesticides

For the first time, researchers at King's College London, in collaboration with the University of Suffolk, have found a diverse array of chemicals, including illicit drugs and pesticides in UK river wildlife. The study published today in Environment International, looked at the exposure of wildlife, such as the freshwater shrimp Gammarus pulex, to different micropollutants (chemicals found at exce

19h

19h

19h

New Model Aims to Solve Mystery of the Moon's Formation

Scientists propose that the moon could have formed when a Mars-sized object slammed into an Earth covered in magma seas. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Cerebral Inception

Our brains have evolved to the point where we can build artificial brains that might help us understand our brains. Let that sink in.

19h

Robert Murphy Bets Self Driving Instruments Will Crack Biology's Mysteries

The Carnegie Mellon computational biologist thinks machine learning algorithms can direct high-throughput experiments to solve the field’s unanswered questions.

19h

Opinion: AI Beats Animal Testing at Finding Toxic Chemicals

Machine learning could be the key to reducing the use of animals in experiments.

19h

May 2019 Crossword Answers

See how well you did.

19h

Deep Learning Algorithms Identify Structures in Living Cells

Researchers are using artificial intelligence to pick out the features of brightfield microscopy images.

19h

Can Artificial Intelligence Make Scientific Discoveries?

The author of a new book envisions a future when machines advance the research enterprise.

19h

Machine, Learning, 1951

Marvin Minsky engineered the first known artificial neural network, in which “rats” represented as lights learned to solve a maze.

19h

Using Machine Learning to Battle Antibiotic Resistance

Researchers are using artificial intelligence to identify known and novel resistance genes.

19h

Artificial Intelligence Tackles a World of Images

With the help of computer algorithms that excel at pattern recognition, researchers look for meaning in vast pictorial datasets.

19h

Could AI Make Gene Editing More Accurate

Machine learning algorithms predict the repairs made to DNA after Cas9 cuts

19h

Microbiology Meets Machine Learning

Artificially intelligent software has human-like ability to analyze host-pathogen interactions in microscopy images.

19h

Artificially Intelligent Tools Capture Animal Movement

Algorithms for motion capture help neuroscientists dig into the question of how the brain produces behavior.

19h

Artificial Intelligence Shakes Up Drug Discovery

The pharmaceutical industry is looking to machine learning to overcome complex challenges in drug development.

19h

Artificial Intelligence Could Help Monitor Bee Health

A high school student designs a new beehive and gets help from machine learning to monitor for varroa mite infestation.

19h

Contributors

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2019 issue of The Scientist.

19h

Artificial Intelligence Versus Neural Networks

A brief history of AI machine learning artificial neural networks and deep learning

19h

Infographic Human Style Image Analysis Without The Human

Artificially intelligent software has human like ability to analyze host pathogen interactions in microscopy images

19h

Computational Tools Sort Signal from Noise

Researchers are developing computational approaches to extract information from multiple sets of single-cell sequencing data.

19h

Ten Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

19h

Computers Extract Disease Clues from Speech

AI models can pick up subtle alterations in linguistic and vocal attributes of spoken language that may be indicative of failing health.

19h

Infographic AI Predicts Post CRISPR Repairs

Double-strand breaks can produce several different outcomes

19h

May 2019 Crossword

Try your hand at a sciency brain teaser.

19h

Nick Turk Browne Explores the Neuroscience of Learning

The Yale University cognitive neuroscientist studies how the brain extracts patterns from experiences.

19h

Infographic Brain Like Computers Provide More Computer Power

Neuromorphic technology is fueling fast large-scale simulations supporting researchers' endeavors to build models of the human brain

19h

Infographic: How AI Analyzes Cancer

The latest machine learning models can identify many visual and molecular features of a particular cancer. If the technology advances to the clinic, it could help diagnose patients and predict survival.

19h

Artificial Intelligence Sees More in Microscopy than Humans Do

Deep learning approaches in development by big players in the tech industry can be used by biologists to extract more information from the images they create.

19h

AI Uses Images and Omics to Decode Cancer

Machine learning can analyze photographs of cancer, tumor pathology slides, and genomes. Now, scientists are poised to integrate that information into cancer uber-models.

19h

Brain-Inspired Computing Could Lead to Better Neuroscience Models

Computer chips based on biological neurons may help simulate larger and more-complex brain models.

19h

Former Google chief Eric Schmidt steps down from Alphabet's board

Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt is not seeking reelection to the board of directors of Alphabet, Google's parent company. Schmidt will step down from the board after his current …

19h

The Atlantic Daily: Line of Succession

What We’re Following (Lucas Jackson / Reuters) Venezuela’s crisis continues, and the opposition leader now calls for an uprising. Juan Guaidó appeared alongside soldiers today to demand the ouster of President Nicolás Maduro—leading to a spate of violent clashes. Economic strife has ravaged the country in recent years, and three months ago, Guaidó, with backing from the United States, declared hi

19h

Prehistoric predator fossils found in an underwater cave in Mexico

Short-faced bear and wolf-like fossils retrieved from a cave by divers are helping researchers to understand the animals of the Americas 30,000 years ago

19h

Genetic variation across the human olfactory receptor repertoire alters odor perception [Genetics]

Humans use a family of more than 400 olfactory receptors (ORs) to detect odors, but there is currently no model that can predict olfactory perception from receptor activity patterns. Genetic variation in human ORs is abundant and alters receptor function, allowing us to examine the relationship between receptor function and…

20h

Gene expression in oligodendrocytes during remyelination reveals cholesterol homeostasis as a therapeutic target in multiple sclerosis [Neuroscience]

Regional differences in neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia exist in the brain during health, and regional differences in the transcriptome may occur for each cell type during neurodegeneration. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is multifocal, and regional differences in the astrocyte transcriptome occur in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an MS model. MS…

20h