Search Posts

nyheder2019maj02

The Fast Progress of VR

submitted by /u/Yuli-Ban [link] [comments]

6h

Dwarfs under dinosaur legs: 99-million-year-old millipede discovered in Burmese amber

An 8.2-millimeter fossil millipede was discovered in Burmese amber. Having used new-age 3D X-ray microscopy, a Bulgarian-German research team confirmed this is the first fossil millipede of the entire order. The new species, despite having lived alongside the Cretaceous megafauna, is smaller than any of the extant members of its group. Because of its extraordinary morphology, it is described as a

6h

Drikkevandet er under pres: Nu skal Miljøministeriets pesticidkontrol kulegraves

Afsløringer om forurenet drikkevand dukker op på stribe. Nu skal Rigsrevisionen kaste lys over, om Miljøministeriet udsteder dispensationer til forbudte pesticider efter bogen, og om ministeriet lever op til sit ansvar om at føre kontrol med grundvandet.

12h

Decoding Da Vinci

Happy death day to the illustrious painter and inventor. (Image credit: Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

now

US lawmakers: social media answers on extremist content too vague

Two US lawmakers berated social media firms Thursday for failing to provide specific information on their efforts to root out extremist content on their platforms.

now

Facebook bans far-right leader, controversial black activist

Facebook on Thursday banned controversial black activist leader Louis Farrakhan, far-right icon Alex Jones and several others in a heightened crackdown on hate content at the leading social network.

now

NASA goes infrared on powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani

NASA's Aqua satellite focused an infrared eye on a very powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani as it approached landfall in northeastern India. Fani is a powerful Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

now

Obstacles to overcome before operating fleets of drones becomes reality

The technology exists to replace a single remote controlled drone with an automated fleet, but an Iowa State researcher says there are several obstacles to tackle first. He is part of a team developing models to efficiently operate a fleet, while maintaining security.

7min

Only more measles cases will make people take vaccinations seriously

Health Measles faces many more obstacles than the smallpox eradication effort did. It only took a few decades of lower smallpox incidence for a vocal minority to start pushing back against the vaccination campaigns of the 19th century, but they…

9min

12min

Chemical modifiers tag-team to regulate essential mechanism of life

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have made a key observation about one of the most fundamental biological processes: gene transcription.

13min

Sculpting super-fast light pulses: Nanopillars shape light precisely for practical applications

Imagine being able to shape a pulse of light in any conceivable manner—compressing it, stretching it, splitting it in two, changing its intensity or altering the direction of its electric field.

13min

Chemical modifiers tag-team to regulate essential mechanism of life

Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have made a key observation about one of the most fundamental biological processes: gene transcription.

13min

Why Making A 'Designer Baby' Would Be Easier Said Than Done

Ethical concerns aside, the genetic ingredients for human traits are so complex that editing a few embryonic genes is unlikely to have much effect — or achieve the fantasy of enhancing humans. (Image credit: BlackJack3D/Getty Images)

22min

Fatality! Mortal Kombat And Super Mario Kart Among New Inductees To Video Game Hall Of Fame

Each year a new round of video games are inducted into The Strong's World Video Game Hall of Fame, and this year four new titles were added. Most of the newly inducted titles are popular enough …

22min

Navy Plans to Document UFO Sightings, But Keep Them Confidential

Extraterrestrials, take note: The U.S. Navy plans to set up an official reporting and investigative system that will monitor reports from its pilots about unidentified flying objects.

27min

Sculpting super-fast light pulses

Researchers have developed a novel and compact method of shaping ultrafast light pulses.

28min

What happens when schools go solar?

Rooftop solar projects at schools could reduce harmful air pollution, help the environment and enhance student learning while cutting electricity costs, a new study finds. Overall, the energy switch could deliver benefits valued at $4 billion.

28min

2019 National Geographic Travel Photo Contest

This year’s National Geographic Travel Photo Contest is still under way, with entries being accepted for just one more day—the competition closes at noon ET on May 3. The grand-prize winner will be awarded $7,500. National Geographic was once again kind enough to allow me to share some of this year’s entries with you here, gathered from three categories: Nature, Cities, and People. The photos and

29min

Top Executives of Opioid Company Found Guilty of Racketeering

The defendants, from Insys Therapeutics, were accused of conspiring to bribe doctors to prescribe a fentanyl-based painkiller.

31min

F.D.A. Won’t Ban Sales of Textured Breast Implants Linked to Cancer

Many other countries have already banned the products. But the U.S. agency said the risk was still low, despite repeated requests from women and doctors that the implants be removed from the market.

31min

Organ bioprinting gets a breath of fresh air

Bioengineers have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3D printing replacement organs. It's a breakthrough technique for bioprinting tissues with exquisitely entangled vascular networks that mimic the body's natural passageways for blood, air, lymph and other vital fluids.

38min

The Science (or Lack Thereof) Behind Inducing Labor Naturally

We have centuries of lore and rumor on how to get the process of labor started naturally. But do any of them actually work? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

42min

Pandas eat as much protein as carnivores despite their bamboo diet

The panda gut digests protein in bamboo so well that the animal’s nutritional profile for calories resembles a wolf’s.

44min

Organ bioprinting gets a breath of fresh air

Bioengineers have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3D printing replacement organs. It's a breakthrough technique for bioprinting tissues with exquisitely entangled vascular networks that mimic the body's natural passageways for blood, air, lymph and other vital fluids.

45min

Researchers putting the brakes on lethal childhood cancer

Reporting this week in the journal Nature Communications, the researchers conclude that blocking MYC could be 'unexpectedly effective' in treating MRT as well as other cancers driven by inactivation of SNF5.

49min

Robo-dino helps to pinpoint the origins of dinosaur flight

Robo-dino helps to pinpoint the origins of dinosaur flightRobo-dino helps to pinpoint the origins of dinosaur flight, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01399-wThe …

51min

Robo-dino helps to pinpoint the origins of dinosaur flight

Robo-dino helps to pinpoint the origins of dinosaur flight Robo-dino helps to pinpoint the origins of dinosaur flight, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01399-w The spontaneous flaps of a running dinosaur’s ‘wings’ might have paved the way for true powered flapping.

51min

54min

Nanofiber-hydrogel composite allows soft tissue to regenerate

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

54min

A solar-powered mini-device churns out hydrogen fuel

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

54min

Ready or Not, Two Drugs for Autism Edge Closer to Clinic

Caution is in store for preliminary results that need to be replicated with answers to questions raised by experts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

58min

Theorist calculates the incalculable siren song of merging black holes

Mathematical advance could help test Albert Einstein’s theory of gravity more precisely

1h

Global health institute sued for age and sex discrimination

Women at the Arnhold Institute for Global Health allege they were demoted and disparaged

1h

1h

These Specially Formulated Nootropics Enhance Both Mind and Mood

Billions of dollars a year are spent on phones, computers, and other smart devices with the goal of increasing productivity. But more often than not, these devices end up becoming just another distraction. That’s because we fail to realize that our productivity problems usually stem not from a lack of time or technology, but rather from a lack of focus. And without focus, even the most advanced s

1h

How USA Gymnastics Aided in Larry Nassar’s Abuse

What’s hard to comprehend, now, is how much of Dr. Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse of more than 300 pre-teen and teenage girls was conducted in plain sight. Erin Lee Carr’s new HBO documentary, At the Heart of Gold , includes excerpts from instructional videos Nassar posted online for other sports doctors to observe. In them, he runs his hands over girls’ bodies clothed in leotards; points out (and t

1h

Ready or Not, Two Drugs for Autism Edge Closer to Clinic

Caution is in store for preliminary results that need to be replicated with answers to questions raised by experts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Fifteen years of mosquito data implicate species most likely to transmit West Nile virus in Iowa

A study published this week that analyzed 15 years of mosquito surveillance data shows Iowa's western counties experience a higher abundance of the species thought to most commonly carry West Nile virus. Culex tarsalis, the mosquito species most often implicated in West Nile transmission, usually becomes most active in early September. The data support similar findings in Nebraska and South Dakota

1h

New study tracks perils of water polo head injuries

Water polo athletes take note: A new study by University of California, Irvine researchers maps out the frequency of head injuries in the sport and reveals which positions are the most vulnerable.

1h

Running may have made dinosaurs' wings flap before they evolved to fly

Before they evolved the ability to fly, two-legged dinosaurs may have begun to flap their wings as a passive effect of running along the ground.

1h

Millions of people might soon be using cryptocurrency without knowing it

Rocket Lawyer’s new product, Rocket Wallet, could be one of the first practical uses for stablecoins that regular people can actually use.

1h

Razer Is Developing An RGB-Infused Toaster, We're Not Kidding

When you hear the name Razer, the first thing that usually pops into mind are the company's gaming laptops or maybe its PC peripherals. Further down on that list might be the company's relatively …

1h

Facebook bans far-right leaders including Louis Farrakhan, Alex Jones, Milo Yiannopoulos for being “dangerous”

The bans are a sign that the social network is more aggressively enforcing its hate speech policies under pressure from civil rights groups.

1h

Scientists Identify Factors That Make People Naturally Resistant to HIV

Studying key points on the HIV virus that are weak to immune system attacks could lead to new treatments or HIV vaccines

1h

The Suspected Russian Spy Whale Is Acting Weird

Spy Games If the white whale recently discovered in Norway really is a Russian spy , it’s doing a stellar job of gaining the locals’ trust. Jorgen Ree Wiig, an official for the Norwegian Directorate of Fisheries, told The Washington Post that the mammal has refused to leave the port city where fishers discovered it — despite being free to do so. Instead, it’s made itself a fixture of the communit

1h

NASA goes infrared on powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani

NASA's Aqua satellite focused an infrared eye on a very powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani as it approached landfall in northeastern India. Fani is a powerful Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

1h

The world secretly runs on hippo poop

Animals These legendary crappers play an important role in cycling silicon. Hippo poop is a plentiful resource. According to a new study, it’s also good for the environment, as the semi-aquatic mammal is crucial pipeline for the element…

1h

Trilobites: Why Is This Ostrich Wearing an Extra Set of Wings?

Scientists took a creative approach to studying how dinosaurs evolved the flying abilities of modern birds.

1h

Localized efforts to save coral reefs won't be enough, study suggests

A National Science Foundation study of factors that cause corals stress suggests that localized attempts to curb pollution on reefs won't save them without a worldwide effort to reduce global warming.

1h

1h

1h

ESA tipsheet for May 6, 2019

Get a sneak peek at these new scientific papers in the Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment: Nature reserves and wilderness areas plagued by understaffing and budget shortfalls; Extremely old trees endure in China; Fuel breaks stop wildfire in its tracks — but may create new problems; Connecting species to possible future safe havens; and Wildfires as an ecosystem service.

1h

Pathogens find safe harbor deep in the gastric glands

Scientists have long tried to understand how pathogenic bacteria like Helicobacter pylori, a risk factor for stomach ulcers and cancer, survive in the harsh environment of the stomach. In a new study publishing May 2 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, researchers led by Connie Fung and Manuel Amieva at Stanford University propose that H. pylori exploit a specialized niche that provides safe

1h

New cancer therapy target found in mitochondria for potential treatment of blood cancers

A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center identified a new therapeutic target in cancer cells and explains how new anti-cancer drugs called imipridones work by inducing cancer cell death in blood cancers, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and mantle cell lymphoma.

1h

Connecting neurons in the brain

Leuven researchers uncover new mechanisms of brain development that determine when, where and how strongly distinct brain cells interconnect.The brain consists of a large collection of interconnected neurons. How complex patterns of neuronal cells grow into functioning circuits during development has fascinated researchers for decades. A team of scientists at VIB and KU Leuven has now uncovered a

1h

When it comes to planetary habitability, it's what's inside that counts

Which of Earth's features were essential for the origin and sustenance of life? And how do scientists identify those features on other worlds? A team of investigators with array of expertise ranging from geochemistry to planetary science to astronomy published this week an essay in Science urging the research community to recognize the vital importance of a planet's interior dynamics in creating a

1h

Hybridization leads to pollution tolerance in fish from polluted Houston ship channel

Recent hybridization of the Gulf killifish — a large minnow common in the heavily polluted Houston Ship Channel — has enabled the species to adapt rapidly to extreme pollution, a Baylor University study has found.

1h

Study suggests earthquakes are triggered well beyond fluid injection zones

Using data from field experiments and computer modeling of ground faults, researchers at Tufts University have discovered that the practice of subsurface fluid injection used in 'fracking' and wastewater disposal for oil and gas exploration could cause significant, rapidly spreading earthquake activity beyond the fluid diffusion zone. The results account for the observation that the frequency of m

1h

Putting vision models to the test

MIT neuroscientists have performed the most rigorous testing yet of computational models that mimic the brain's visual cortex. The results suggest that the current versions of these models are similar enough to the brain to allow them to actually control brain states in animals.

1h

Opportunistic cancer cells 'slip through the gaps' to spread through blood vessels

Cancer cells may rely on opportunism, as well as chemical signalling, to spread through the body, according to new findings by mathematicians at the University of Birmingham.

1h

Scientists discover how superbugs hide from their host

New research led by the University of Sheffield has discovered how a hospital superbug evades the immune system to cause infection — paving the way for new treatments.

1h

Synthetic biology used to target cancer cells while sparing healthy tissue, study reports

Synthetic proteins engineered to recognize overly active biological pathways can kill cancer cells while sparing their healthy peers, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

1h

Mutational intensity influences a tumor's response to PD-1 immunotherapy

Following FDA approval last year of PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitors for tumors with mismatch repair deficiency, a new study reveals more about why responses of these tumors to this immunotherapy vary, specifically implicating mutation intensity.

1h

Controlling primate neural activity using artwork from artificial neural networks

By showing macaques images generated by an artificial neural network, researchers were able to control the activity of specific neurons within the visual systems of these animals' brains, according to a new study.

1h

Food dye, the secret ingredient for 3D printing biocompatible hydrogels with life-like vasculature

Yellow food dye #5 — a common food additive — is revealed as the secret ingredient in 3D printing biomaterials with complex physically entangled networks, which characterize biological tissues, according to a new report.

1h

Gulf killifish adapts to pollution with help of gene exchange with non-native cousin

The Gulf killifish of Galveston Bay, Texas, was both nearly doomed to local extinction by humans transforming its home to a toxic soup, and also rescued by humans — through their accidental introduction of an invasive fish genetically armed with pollution-resistant traits.

1h

A model to decipher the complexity of gene regulation

SysGenetiX project (UNIGE/UNIL) aimed to investigate the regulatory elements, as well as the manifold interactions between them and with genes, with the ultimate goal of understanding the mechanisms that render some people more predisposed to manifesting particular diseases than others. By studying chromatin modifications in the cells, scientists identified the very structure of these regulatory e

1h

Ragon Institute study identifies viral peptides critical to natural HIV control

Investigators at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard have used a novel approach to identify specific amino acids in the protein structure of HIV that appear critical to the ability of the virus to function and replicate. They also have found that the immune systems of individuals naturally able to control HIV infection target these amino acids with pathogen-killing CD8 T cells.

1h

Pollution-proof fish borrow genes from relatives to survive toxins

One fish is thriving in polluted areas after mating with another species, suggesting threatened species could be saved by deliberate hybridisation

1h

How to Kill HIV: Target Its "Influencers"

Applying network theory to HIV’s structure has revealed the most valuable—and vulnerable—parts of the virus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Instagram and Facebook Ban Far-Right Extremists

In an effort to contain misinformation and extremism that have spread across the platforms, Instagram and its parent company, Facebook, have banned Alex Jones, Infowars, Milo Yiannopoulos, Paul Joseph Watson, Laura Loomer, and Paul Nehlen under their policies against dangerous individuals and organizations. They also banned the Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan , who has repeatedly made anti

1h

AI Evolved These Creepy Images to Please a Monkey’s Brain

In April 2018, a monkey named Ringo sat in a Harvard lab, sipping juice, while strange images flickered in front of his eyes. The pictures were created by an artificial-intelligence algorithm called XDREAM , which gradually tweaked them to stimulate one particular neuron in Ringo’s brain, in a region that’s supposedly specialized for recognizing faces. As the images evolved, the neuron fired away

1h

Pollution-proof fish borrow genes from relatives to survive toxins

One fish is thriving in polluted areas after mating with another species, suggesting threatened species could be saved by deliberate hybridisation

1h

Cannabis used in US research differs genetically to the varieties people smoke

Cannabis used in US research differs genetically to the varieties people smoke Cannabis used in US research differs genetically to the varieties people smoke, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01415-z Strains used for scientific purposes are more like hemp than the marijuana sold in dispensaries, suggests a study.

1h

A dinosaur’s running gait may reveal insights into the history of bird flight

In what may have been a precursor to avian flight, a flightless winged dinosaur may have flapped its wings as it jogged.

1h

How a Half-Inch Beetle Finds Fires 80 Miles Away

Fire chaser beetles' ability to sense heat borders on the spooky — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Ex-Googler: Company Has “Voodoo Doll, Avatar-Like Version of You”

High-Tech Haunting Tristan Harris, a former Google design ethicist, says that contrary to popular belief, those eerily hyper-targeted ads for the very product you just talked about aren’t popping up because your phone’s mic is spying on you. Instead, Google and Facebook have gathered so much data about you and your habits that the corporation can simulate what Harris calls a “little voodoo doll,

1h

Toxic triumph: fish species in polluted waters steals genes from another

Research reveals rapid hybridisation and a population rebound. Stephen Fleischfresser reports.

2h

A model to decipher the complexity of gene regulation

How, where and when genes are expressed determine individual phenotypes. If gene expression is controlled by many regulatory elements, what, ultimately, controls them? And how does genetic variation affect them? The SysGenetiX project, led by the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in collaboration with the University of Lausanne (UNIL), Switzerland, sought to investigate these regulatory elements, as we

2h

How genetics, resources and a long-distant relative helped killfish adapt to extreme pollution

The combination of a big population, good genes and luck helps explain how a species of fish in Texas' Houston Ship Channel was able to adapt to what normally would be lethal levels of toxins for most other species, according to a study to be published May 3 in the journal Science.

2h

Computer model suggests earthquakes are triggered well beyond fluid injection zones

Using data from field experiments and modeling of ground faults, researchers at Tufts University have discovered that the practice of subsurface fluid injection used in 'fracking' and wastewater disposal for oil and gas exploration could cause significant, rapidly spreading earthquake activity beyond the fluid diffusion zone. Deep fluid injections—greater than one kilometer deep—are known to be as

2h

What makes a planet habitable

Which of Earth's features were essential for the origin and sustenance of life? And how do scientists identify those features on other worlds?

2h

Running may have made dinosaurs' wings flap before they evolved to fly

Before they evolved the ability to fly, two-legged dinosaurs may have begun to flap their wings as a passive effect of running along the ground, according to new research by Jing-Shan Zhao of Tsinghua University, Beijing, and his colleagues.

2h

An AI used art to control monkeys’ brain cells

Art created by an artificial intelligence exacts unprecedented control over nerve cells tied to vision in monkey brains, and could lead to new neuroscience experiments.

2h

You should enable Google's new auto-delete privacy feature

Technology It's on its way in 'the coming weeks.' Your phone, and the apps and services connected to it, can determine your location—and that’s a double-edged sword.

2h

How to Kill HIV: Target Its "Influencers"

Applying network theory to HIV’s structure has revealed the most valuable—and vulnerable—parts of the virus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Hospitalized children with depression and another illness stay longer

Children with depression who stay in the hospital for other illnesses like pneumonia, appendicitis, or seizure disorders stay longer, pay more, and are at greater risk of death, research reports. The new study, which appears in the Journal of Affective Disorders , may be the first to look specifically at children diagnosed with depression and another illness, how the care is being provided and co

2h

How to Kill HIV: Target Its "Influencers"

Applying network theory to HIV’s structure has revealed the most valuable—and vulnerable—parts of the virus — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

2h

A model to decipher the complexity of gene regulation

How, where and when genes are expressed determine individual phenotypes. If gene expression is controlled by many regulatory elements, what, ultimately, controls them? And how does genetic variation affect them? The SysGenetiX project, led by the University of Geneva (UNIGE) in collaboration with the University of Lausanne (UNIL), Switzerland, sought to investigate these regulatory elements, as we

2h

How genetics, resources and a long-distant relative helped killfish adapt to extreme pollution

The combination of a big population, good genes and luck helps explain how a species of fish in Texas' Houston Ship Channel was able to adapt to what normally would be lethal levels of toxins for most other species, according to a study to be published May 3 in the journal Science.

2h

Running may have made dinosaurs' wings flap before they evolved to fly

Before they evolved the ability to fly, two-legged dinosaurs may have begun to flap their wings as a passive effect of running along the ground, according to new research by Jing-Shan Zhao of Tsinghua University, Beijing, and his colleagues.

2h

Facebook Is Finding Problems With Artificial Intelligence Too

Facebook is using artificial intelligence to police offensive speech and other tasks. But the technology brings its own unintended consequences.

2h

Singing for science

[no content]

2h

A compact synthetic pathway rewires cancer signaling to therapeutic effector release

An important goal in synthetic biology is to engineer biochemical pathways to address unsolved biomedical problems. One long-standing problem in molecular medicine is the specific identification and ablation of cancer cells. Here, we describe a method, named Rewiring of Aberrant Signaling to Effector Release (RASER), in which oncogenic ErbB receptor activity, instead of being targeted for inhibit

2h

Chromatin three-dimensional interactions mediate genetic effects on gene expression

Studying the genetic basis of gene expression and chromatin organization is key to characterizing the effect of genetic variability on the function and structure of the human genome. Here we unravel how genetic variation perturbs gene regulation using a dataset combining activity of regulatory elements, gene expression, and genetic variants across 317 individuals and two cell types. We show that

2h

Comment on "Quantifying hot carrier and thermal contributions in plasmonic photocatalysis"

Zhou et al . (Reports, 5 October 2018, p. 69) claim to have proven dominance of "hot" electrons over thermal effects in plasmonic photocatalysis. We identify experimental flaws that caused overestimation of the hot carrier contribution. As an alternative interpretation, we fully reproduce their data using a purely thermal Arrhenius law with a fixed activation energy and intensity-dependent heatin

2h

Neural population control via deep image synthesis

Particular deep artificial neural networks (ANNs) are today’s most accurate models of the primate brain’s ventral visual stream. Using an ANN-driven image synthesis method, we found that luminous power patterns (i.e., images) can be applied to primate retinae to predictably push the spiking activity of targeted V4 neural sites beyond naturally occurring levels. This method, although not yet perfe

2h

Response to Comment on "Quantifying hot carrier and thermal contributions in plasmonic photocatalysis"

Sivan et al . claim that the methods used to distinguish thermal from hot carrier effects in our recent report are inaccurate and that our data can be explained by a purely thermal mechanism with a fixed activation energy. This conclusion is invalid, because they substantially misinterpret the emissivity of the photocatalyst and assume a linear intensity–dependent temperature in their model that

2h

Coppers rapid ascent in visible-light photoredox catalysis

Visible-light photoredox catalysis offers a distinct activation mode complementary to thermal transition metal catalyzed reactions. The vast majority of photoredox processes capitalizes on precious metal ruthenium(II) or iridium(III) complexes that serve as single-electron reductants or oxidants in their photoexcited states. As a low-cost alternative, organic dyes are also frequently used but in

2h

Branch-restricted localization of phosphatase Prl-1 specifies axonal synaptogenesis domains

Central nervous system (CNS) circuit development requires subcellular control of synapse formation and patterning of synapse abundance. We identified the Drosophila membrane-anchored phosphatase of regenerating liver (Prl-1) as an axon-intrinsic factor that promotes synapse formation in a spatially restricted fashion. The loss of Prl-1 in mechanosensory neurons reduced the number of CNS presynaps

2h

2h

News at a glance

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

In search of blue

[no content]

2h

Snow's storm

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Retraction

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Spotlight on copper

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Adaptive introgression enables evolutionary rescue from extreme environmental pollution

Radical environmental change that provokes population decline can impose constraints on the sources of genetic variation that may enable evolutionary rescue. Adaptive toxicant resistance has rapidly evolved in Gulf killifish ( Fundulus grandis ) that occupy polluted habitats. We show that resistance scales with pollution level and negatively correlates with inducibility of aryl hydrocarbon recept

2h

Multivascular networks and functional intravascular topologies within biocompatible hydrogels

Solid organs transport fluids through distinct vascular networks that are biophysically and biochemically entangled, creating complex three-dimensional (3D) transport regimes that have remained difficult to produce and study. We establish intravascular and multivascular design freedoms with photopolymerizable hydrogels by using food dye additives as biocompatible yet potent photoabsorbers for pro

2h

Fluid-induced aseismic fault slip outpaces pore-fluid migration

Earthquake swarms attributed to subsurface fluid injection are usually assumed to occur on faults destabilized by increased pore-fluid pressures. However, fluid injection could also activate aseismic slip, which might outpace pore-fluid migration and transmit earthquake-triggering stress changes beyond the fluid-pressurized region. We tested this theoretical prediction against data derived from f

2h

Electrical suppression of all nonradiative recombination pathways in monolayer semiconductors

Defects in conventional semiconductors substantially lower the photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY), a key metric of optoelectronic performance that directly dictates the maximum device efficiency. Two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), such as monolayer MoS 2 , often exhibit low PL QY for as-processed samples, which has typically been attributed to a large native defect d

2h

Concerted proton-electron transfer reactions in the Marcus inverted region

Electron transfer reactions slow down when they become very thermodynamically favorable, a counterintuitive interplay of kinetics and thermodynamics termed the inverted region in Marcus theory. Here we report inverted region behavior for proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET). Photochemical studies of anthracene-phenol-pyridine triads give rate constants for PCET charge recombination that are sl

2h

Carrier lifetimes of >1 {mu}s in Sn-Pb perovskites enable efficient all-perovskite tandem solar cells

All-perovskite–based polycrystalline thin-film tandem solar cells have the potential to deliver efficiencies of >30%. However, the performance of all-perovskite–based tandem devices has been limited by the lack of high-efficiency, low–band gap tin-lead (Sn-Pb) mixed-perovskite solar cells (PSCs). We found that the addition of guanidinium thiocyanate (GuaSCN) resulted in marked improvements in the

2h

Structural topology defines protective CD8+ T cell epitopes in the HIV proteome

Mutationally constrained epitopes of variable pathogens represent promising targets for vaccine design but are not reliably identified by sequence conservation. In this study, we employed structure-based network analysis, which applies network theory to HIV protein structure data to quantitate the topological importance of individual amino acid residues. Mutation of residues at important network

2h

Genetic diversity of tumors with mismatch repair deficiency influences anti-PD-1 immunotherapy response

Tumors with mismatch repair deficiency (MMR-d) are characterized by sequence alterations in microsatellites and can accumulate thousands of mutations. This high mutational burden renders tumors immunogenic and sensitive to programmed cell death–1 (PD-1) immune checkpoint inhibitors. Yet, despite their tumor immunogenicity, patients with MMR-deficient tumors experience highly variable responses, a

2h

eIF2B-catalyzed nucleotide exchange and phosphoregulation by the integrated stress response

The integrated stress response (ISR) tunes the rate of protein synthesis. Control is exerted by phosphorylation of the general translation initiation factor eIF2. eIF2 is a guanosine triphosphatase that becomes activated by eIF2B, a two-fold symmetric and heterodecameric complex that functions as eIF2’s dedicated nucleotide exchange factor. Phosphorylation converts eIF2 from a substrate into an i

2h

Structural basis for eIF2B inhibition in integrated stress response

A core event in the integrated stress response, an adaptive pathway common to all eukaryotic cells in response to various stress stimuli, is the phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2). Normally, unphosphorylated eIF2 transfers the methionylated initiator tRNA to the ribosome in a guanosine 5'-triphosphate–dependent manner. By contrast, phosphorylated eIF2 inhibits it

2h

New Products

[no content]

2h

LIGO and Virgo made 5 likely gravitational wave detections in a month

It took decades to find the first gravitational wave event, and now they’re a weekly occurrence.

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Spotlight on copper

[no content]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

The Guardian view on net-zero carbon emissions: sooner is better | Editorial

Government advisers have explained how to erase the nation’s carbon footprint. Science dictates that we do it as fast as we can By the end of this year we should expect UK law to mandate net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Thursday’s report by the Committee on Climate Change (CCC), which advises the government, sets out not only why this new target is needed, but how it can be achieved. Las

2h

Localized efforts to save coral reefs won't be enough, study suggests

A National Science Foundation study of factors that cause corals stress suggests that localized attempts to curb pollution on reefs won't save them without a worldwide effort to reduce global warming.

2h

2h

Interior Dept. Loosens Offshore-Drilling Safety Rules Dating From Deepwater Horizon

The loosening of regulations on offshore drilling equipment has been a been a key piece of President Trump’s efforts to ease restrictions on fossil fuel companies.

2h

On a Coastline With 1,200 Dead Dolphins, Fishermen and Conservationists Clash

More common dolphins have washed up dead on France’s Atlantic Coast since January than in all of 2017 or 2018. Scientists blame fishing. Fishermen are pushing back.

2h

Staking Out Battle Lines, House Votes to Keep U.S. in Paris Climate Pact

The House passed a bill on Thursday that would block President Trump from quitting the Paris Agreement on climate change.

2h

Fire-Breathing Mountain Fueled by Mysterious Deep-Earth Methane Production

The Flames of Chimaera are fueled by an underground methane seep, but not the garden-variety kind.

2h

Amazon Says It Could Have Fully Automated Warehouses in 10 Years

Decade Deadline Not all of the 125,000 people who work at Amazon warehouses have to worry about losing their jobs to robots — not for 10 years or so, anyways. On Tuesday, Scott Anderson, director of Amazon Robotics Fulfillment, led reporters on a tour of the company’s Baltimore warehouse during which he said it would be “at least 10 years” before Amazon could entirely automate the fulfillment pro

2h

Forest fires accelerating snowmelt across western US, study finds

Forest fires are causing snow to melt earlier in the season, a trend occurring across the western U.S. that may affect water supplies and trigger even more fires, according to a new study by a team of researchers at Portland State University (PSU) , the Desert Research Institute (DRI), and the University of Nevada, Reno.

2h

Cosmology: Uncovering the Story of the Universe

Cosmologists ask the big questions. And sometimes, they find big answers.

2h

Monster Cyclone in India Prompts the Biggest Evacuation in the Country's History

The cyclone has triggered the biggest evacuation in the country's history.

2h

New clues to coastal erosion

New research has uncovered a missing nutrient source in coastal oceans, which could promote better water quality and sand management on popular beaches.

2h

Emergency room patients acuity levels not always considered when within wait time target

New research from the UBC Sauder School of Business reveals that Metro Vancouver emergency patient acuity levels sometimes come second to wait time targets, largely due to doctors being unclear around existing emergency room prioritization guidelines. The study found that patient acuity levels are considered more seriously once wait time targets have passed.

2h

Forest fires accelerating snowmelt across western US, study finds

Forest fires are causing snow to melt earlier in the season, a trend occurring across the western US that may affect water supplies and trigger even more fires, according to a new study by a team of researchers at Portland State University (PSU) , the Desert Research Institute (DRI), and the University of Nevada, Reno.

2h

Chemical modifiers tag-team to regulate essential mechanism of life

For decades, scientists thought that one modification, phosphorylation, ran the show. In a new study, researchers at the Gladstone Institutes discovered that another modification, called acetylation, also occurs on the regulatory tail of the polymerase during gene transcription in more complex organisms like mammals.

2h

Biden Accelerates the Democratic Fight About the White Working Class

White working-class voters’ share of the electorate may be shrinking even faster now than in recent years, new data suggest. But that dynamic shows no signs of dampening the growing debate among Democrats about how heavily the party should focus on recapturing the blue-collar whites who have become the foundation of Donald Trump’s electoral coalition. No choice in 2020 divides Democratic activist

2h

Crossword TEST #2

[no content]

2h

Captain America vs. Thanos: Who's on the Side of Science?

The newly released film Avengers: Endgame can help us make sense of some real-world biotechnology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

How a particle racing through a vacuum leaves a trail of blue light

How a particle racing through a vacuum leaves a trail of blue light How a particle racing through a vacuum leaves a trail of blue light, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01430-0 Blue-tinged Cherenkov radiation could help to illuminate quantum interactions between light and matter.

3h

What next for cyclone-hit Mozambique?

Mozambique is reeling after an unprecedented two cyclones swept ashore within six weeks, wreaking havoc and leaving hundreds dead and tens of thousands displaced.

3h

SpaceX confirms crew capsule destroyed in ground testing

SpaceX has confirmed that its crew capsule was destroyed in ground testing two weeks ago.

3h

A Scientologist Cruise Ship Has Been Quarantined Because of a Measles Case

The nearly 300 passengers and crew aboard were not allowed to disembark on the island

3h

Pandaer har samme diæt som kødædere

PLUS. I naturen veksler pandaer mellem at æde flere bambustyper for at deres indtag af proteiner og kulhydrater konstant minder om kødæderes diæt.

3h

Renewables Surpass Coal in the US for the First Time

April Powers April was a momentous month for coal — but not in a way the industry is likely to celebrate. According to a newly published report by the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA), America generated more electricity from wind , solar , hydro , biomass , and geothermal sources than coal-fired plants in April — a U.S. first that could signal a tipping point in the n

3h

We Used Google’s New AI to Generate Angsty Poetry About the Future

PoemBot A new website uses Google’s artificial intelligence to generate short couplets so vague and lowkey nonsensical that they may as well have been your high school friend’s 2008 Facebook status. The project, Poem Portraits, lets you “donate” a single word that the algorithm then uses to generate a short poem. If you’d like, you can also take a selfie — no word on how Google AI uses it — which

3h

Startups looking to suck CO2 from the air are suddenly luring big bucks

A new Irish firm plans to build a pilot carbon removal plant, relying on technology from the field’s pioneer.

3h

Young frogs that were stressed as tadpoles move less on land, putting their survival at risk

New Oregon State University research shows that juvenile northern red-legged frogs that have experienced climate-related stress as tadpoles are less likely to move on land, putting their survival at risk.

3h

Captain America vs. Thanos: Who's on the Side of Science?

The newly released film Avengers: Endgame can help us make sense of some real-world biotechnology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Young frogs that were stressed as tadpoles move less on land, putting their survival at risk

New Oregon State University research shows that juvenile northern red-legged frogs that have experienced climate-related stress as tadpoles are less likely to move on land, putting their survival at risk.

3h

Tapping fresh water under the ocean has consequences

The last place most people would expect to find fresh groundwater is tens to hundreds of kilometers offshore in the ocean. Yet not only is that exactly where freshwater can be found, in the ground of the continental shelf beneath the ocean, but simulations have shown that it could be a common occurrence across a range of geologic systems.

3h

Older bees pass on immunity-boosting molecules to other bees in jelly

Bees seem to have a kind of collective immune system. When exposed to disease, older bees produce immunity-boosting molecules that get passed on to their young

3h

New chemical probe for visualizing brain immune cells

Researchers in South Korea and Singapore have, for the first time, developed a chemical probe that enables live-imaging of a type of immune cells in the brain, known as microglia, in a live animal brain.

3h

Researchers find gene for urethral obstruction

Even before birth, an obstructed urethra can cause a variety of issues in the unborn child, ranging from mild urinary problems to kidney failure. This highly variable disease is called LUTO (lower urinary tract obstruction). Especially boys are affected. An international team of researchers led by the University of Bonn has now discovered a first gene involved in this rare disease. The results are

3h

Less-invasive mastectomy safe for more breast cancer patients, Mayo Clinic study finds

A less-invasive mastectomy that leaves the surface of the breast intact has become a safe option for more patients, including those whose breast cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes or who have risk factors for surgical complications, a Mayo Clinic study shows. In the procedure, known as a nipple-sparing mastectomy, surgeons remove breast tissue, leaving the skin, nipple and areola, and immedia

3h

New clues to coastal erosion

New research has uncovered a missing nutrient source in coastal oceans, which could promote better water quality and sand management on popular beaches. While the release of nutrients buried in the seabed 'feeds' coastal marine ecosystems, the latest research at Flinders University has found a new physical mechanism which erodes seabed sediment at depths up to 20 meters, well outside (between 10 k

3h

How to push past negative self-talk and confidently take on the world

Our minds are filled, much of the time, with negative nonsense, insisting that we worry about this or that. To start from a place of strength and stability, you need to quiet your mind and gain control. For former NAVY Seal David Goggins, this begins with committing to quieting the mind. It continues with replacing the negative thoughts with positive ones.

3h

Global Warming Has Been Influencing Drought for a Century

Tree rings from around the world match what climate models have suggested — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Amsterdam wants to ban all petrol and diesel cars by 2030

submitted by /u/nzxting [link] [comments]

3h

What is the one thing you are waiting for that will most likely happen in your lifetime?

Please, enlighten me 😀 submitted by /u/opticon12000 [link] [comments]

3h

38 percent off a Dyson vacuum and other great deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

3h

Pinpointing Gaia to map the Milky Way

This image, a composite of several observations captured by ESO's VLT Survey Telescope (VST), shows the ESA spacecraft Gaia as a faint trail of dots across the lower half of the star-filled field of view. These observations were taken as part of an ongoing collaborative effort to measure Gaia's orbit and improve the accuracy of its unprecedented star map.

3h

Hubble astronomers assemble wide view of the evolving universe

Astronomers have put together the largest and most comprehensive 'history book' of galaxies into one single image, using 16 years' worth of observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

3h

Building better life support systems for future space travel

Astronauts on future long-duration spaceflight missions to the Moon and Mars could rely on microalgae to supply essentials including food, water and oxygen. A new investigation aboard the International Space Station tests using the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris as a biological component of a hybrid life support system (LSS).

3h

Aiming at Trump, House OKs bill to keep US in climate accord

The Democratic-controlled House approved a bill Thursday that would prevent President Donald Trump from fulfilling his pledge to withdraw the United States from the landmark Paris climate agreement and ensure the U.S. honors its commitments under the global accord.

3h

Holocaust Survivor Band

Saul Dreier and Reuwen “Ruby” Sosnowicz, both Polish nonagenarian Holocaust survivors, endured dramatically different circumstances during World War II. Dreier survived three concentration camps; in one, a cantor created an impromptu choir in the barracks, and Dreier learned to play drums by banging two spoons together. Sosnowicz spent the war in a barn among cattle, hidden by a Polish farmer. Af

3h

Grounded Max jets could contribute to higher summer fares

The grounding of Boeing 737 Max jets likely means that fare increases this summer will be larger than already expected and airlines will struggle to handle disruptions such as storms that shut down hub airports.

3h

Machine set to see if lithium can help bring fusion to Earth

Lithium, the light silvery metal used in everything from pharmaceutical applications to batteries that power your smart phone or electric car, could also help harness on Earth the fusion energy that lights the sun and stars. Lithium can maintain the heat and protect the walls inside doughnut-shaped tokamaks that house fusion reactions, and will be used to produce tritium, the hydrogen isotope that

3h

Biomarker may predict if immunotherapy is right choice for colorectal cancer patients

Foundational research could help metastatic colorectal cancer patients decide whether to choose immunotherapy or chemotherapy as a first treatment option. 'Immunotherapy is the hot thing, but sometimes traditional chemotherapy can be better. Our study suggests tumor genomics could help doctors decide what kind of treatment will benefit each patient most. Taking this kind of personalized medicine a

3h

Viral infections during pregnancy linked to behavioral abnormalities in offspring

Male and female rats whose mother experienced a simulated viral infection during pregnancy behave abnormally, consistent with behavioral alterations in autism or schizophrenia.

3h

Design flaws create security vulnerabilities for 'smart home' internet-of-things devices

NC State researchers find countermeasures for designers of security systems and other smart home devices.

3h

The Most Exciting Thing About Smartphones Isn’t Here Yet

The truth is, it’s a boring time for smartphones. Most of the huge camera and qualitative improvements of the early years have leveled off. iOS and Android are basically equal ecosystems. Mobile networks are now fast enough to do most of the stuff you want to do most of the time. The top three carriers—AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile—all offer very similar levels of service . Verizon has consistently

3h

Study on explosive volcanism during ice age provides lessons for today's rising CO2

A University of Oklahoma-led study recently found that explosive volcanic eruptions were at least 3-8 times more frequent during the peak of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age (~360 to 260 million years ago). Aerosols produced by explosive volcanism helped keep large ice sheets stable, even when CO2 levels increased, by blocking sunlight. But the volcanic emissions also may have started a cascade of effec

3h

SpaceX Confirms That Accident Destroyed Crew Dragon Capsule

Crew Dragon Explosion SpaceX’s Vice President of Mission Assurance Hans Koenigsmann confirmed today during a press event that the Crew Dragon capsule that flew to the International Space Station all by itself in March — albeit with no astronauts on board — was destroyed during a test failure on April 20. But Koenigsmann still refrained from using the word “explosion.” Explosive Silence The Atlant

3h

Did Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why really increase suicide rates?

A study shows that a rise in suicide among children age 10 to 17 occurred after Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why was released, but the show may not be to blame

3h

Ebola outbreak in the DRC hits record number of cases in a single day

The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic Congo is the second deadliest ever, and has proven difficult to contain because of violent attacks in the region

3h

Daily Briefing: The bumpy ride to carbon zero

Daily Briefing: The bumpy ride to carbon zero Daily Briefing: The bumpy ride to carbon zero, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01444-8 Four scenarios for our low-carbon future, the biggest Denisovan fossil yet (and the first that didn’t come from the Denisova Cave) and how gendered language is affecting grant success.

3h

The International Space Station has found its scientific calling

Carbon observatory joins sensors using station for a lower-cost view on Earth

3h

For giant pandas, bamboo is vegetarian 'meat'

Giant pandas are extremely specialised herbivores that feed almost exclusively on highly fibrous bamboo, despite descending from primarily flesh-eating carnivores.

4h

Another protective zone for whales created off New England

The federal government is creating a new vessel speed restriction zone off Massachusetts to try to protect rare whales.

4h

For giant pandas, bamboo is vegetarian 'meat'

Giant pandas are extremely specialised herbivores that feed almost exclusively on highly fibrous bamboo, despite descending from primarily flesh-eating carnivores.

4h

Another protective zone for whales created off New England

The federal government is creating a new vessel speed restriction zone off Massachusetts to try to protect rare whales.

4h

Study explores the possible benefits of cooperative polyandry

Acorn Woodpeckers live in close-knit family groups and have one of the most complex breeding systems of any bird in the world. In about 20 percent of family groups, up to 3 related females may lay eggs in the same nest. They raise the chicks cooperatively with one or more related males. This behavior is known as joint nesting or "cooperative polyandry." Only five other species of birds worldwide a

4h

Make room on the couch: Worms suffer from PTSD, too

The ability to anticipate the future is key to the survival of all living things. Like humans, worms are capable of forming associative memories—that is, memories that associate a certain sound or smell or tone of voice with a particular outcome.

4h

Tapping fresh water under the ocean has consequences

While offshore groundwater resources could be used for drinking, agriculture and oil recovery, new research suggests tapping into them could lead to adverse impacts onshore.

4h

4h

Senator’s queries prompt NIH and NSF to clarify how they monitor foreign research ties

Senator Chuck Grassley (R–IA) says carefully worded answers raise more questions

4h

Study explores the possible benefits of cooperative polyandry

Acorn Woodpeckers live in close-knit family groups and have one of the most complex breeding systems of any bird in the world. In about 20 percent of family groups, up to 3 related females may lay eggs in the same nest. They raise the chicks cooperatively with one or more related males. This behavior is known as joint nesting or "cooperative polyandry." Only five other species of birds worldwide a

4h

Make room on the couch: Worms suffer from PTSD, too

The ability to anticipate the future is key to the survival of all living things. Like humans, worms are capable of forming associative memories—that is, memories that associate a certain sound or smell or tone of voice with a particular outcome.

4h

Uber riders can buy transit tickets on app for Denver

Riders in Denver will soon be able to buy tickets for public transportation using the Uber app, the latest step on the ride-hailing company's mission to become a one-stop shop for transportation.

4h

'Hacking Darwin' Explores Genetic Engineering — And What It Means To Be Human

The waters of genetic meddling are murky; in a new book, technology futurist Jamie Metzl reviews where we've been in the past as a guideline for where we might be headed. (Image credit: Sourcebooks)

4h

Discovery of RNA transfer through royal jelly could aid development of honey bee vaccines

Researchers have discovered that honey bees are able to share immunity with other bees and to their offspring in a hive by transmitting RNA 'vaccines' through royal jelly and worker jelly. The jelly is the bee equivalent of mother's milk: a secretion used to provide nutrition to worker and queen bee larvae.

4h

What is pepper spray?

Whether it's walking down a dark street at night or fighting off grizzly bears on the trail, pepper spray is an effective tool to fend off an attacker and get safely away. But have you ever thought about what gives this personal-defense-in-a-can its bite—is it just weaponized hot sauce? This week on Reactions, we're taking a look at what's in these little canisters and why it inflicts so much pain

4h

Discovery of RNA transfer through royal jelly could aid development of honey bee vaccines

Researchers have discovered that honey bees are able to share immunity with other bees and to their offspring in a hive by transmitting RNA 'vaccines' through royal jelly and worker jelly. The jelly is the bee equivalent of mother's milk: a secretion used to provide nutrition to worker and queen bee larvae.

4h

Older bees pass on immunity-boosting molecules to their young in jelly

Bees seem to have a kind of collective immune system. When exposed to disease, older bees produce immunity-boosting molecules that get passed on to their young

4h

Apps to Help Quit Smoking Are Selling Your Data

Secrets Secrets Health-centric apps that guide you through mental health issues or help you quit smoking often come with a dark secret: many are selling your personal, sensitive data. Many such apps are selling users’ personal data to Facebook and Google, according to new research published in the journal JAMA Network Open — a symptom of an egregious lack of regulatory oversight. Fine Print Not F

4h

Hacktivists Are on the Rise—but Less Effective Than Ever

Groups like Anonymous are still trying to make waves in Sudan and elsewhere, but the old tools don't work as well as they used to.

4h

Ancient DNA reveals two lost lineages of horses—but not their elusive origins

Largest collection of horse DNA illuminates how humans shaped equine evolution

4h

Vi får færre sprøjtemidler gennem danske fødevarer end tidligere

Det betyder dog ikke, at vi har det fulde overblik over sundhedsmæssige risici, siger ekspert.

4h

The search for the kryptonite that can stop CRISPR

Powerful gene-editing tools have the potential to heal—or to harm. Now there’s a race to develop the antidote to the next bioweapon.

4h

Aging baby boomers push sky high incidence of shingles of the eye

More Americans are being diagnosed with eye complications of shingles, but older adults can call the shots on whether they are protected from the painful rash that can cost them their eyesight.

4h

Researchers crack the peanut genome

Working to understand the genetics of peanut disease resistance and yield, researchers led by scientists at the University of Georgia have uncovered the peanut's unlikely and complicated evolution.

4h

Knit 1, purl 2: Assembly instructions for a robot?

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have used computationally controlled knitting machines to create plush toys and other knitted objects that are actuated by tendons. It's an approach they say might someday be used to cost-effectively make soft robots and wearable technologies.

4h

Researchers make organic solar cells immune to the ravages of water, air and light

Researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering have devised a way of making organic solar panels robust by performing the molecular equivalent of hair removal by waxing: they used adhesive tape to strip the electron-accepting molecules from the topmost surface of the photoactive layer of the cell.

4h

Young frogs that were stressed as tadpoles move less on land, putting their survival at risk

New research shows that juvenile northern red-legged frogs that have experienced climate-related stress as tadpoles are less likely to move on land, putting their survival at risk.

4h

Major violent attacks against Jews spiked 13% worldwide in 2018

Thirteen Jews were murdered as the result of anti-Semitic attacks in 2018, and the number of other major violent anti-Semitic attacks spiked 13%, from 342 to 387 incidents worldwide, according to an annual report published yesterday by Tel Aviv University's Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry.

4h

BU researchers investigate differences in coatings of drug-coated balloon catheters

Drug-coated balloon catheters to open narrowed blood vessels and to deliver drugs to the impacted sites are used frequently for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease. Scientists believe improvement of the coatings could lead to better designs and improved outcomes. Now for the first time, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have examined these coatings at microscopic

4h

Promising material could lead to faster, cheaper computer memory

Currently, information on a computer is encoded by magnetic fields, a process that requires substantial energy and generates waste heat. Researchers have confirmed that bismuth ferrite could store information cheaply and with less wasted energy.

4h

Pluripotency or differentiation — That is the question

Induced pluripotent stem cells can turn into any type of cell in the body or remain in their original form. In Molecular Cell, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München describe how cells 'decide' which of these two directions to take. During their research, they identified a protein and a ribonucleic acid (RNA) that play a highly significant role in this process. Their discovery also allows a

4h

OU study on explosive volcanism during ice age provides lessons for today's rising CO2

A University of Oklahoma-led study recently found that explosive volcanic eruptions were at least 3-8 times more frequent during the peak of the Late Paleozoic Ice Age (~360 to 260 million years ago). Aerosols produced by explosive volcanism helped keep large ice sheets stable, even when CO2 levels increased, by blocking sunlight. But the volcanic emissions also may have started a cascade of effec

4h

British cyber expert pleading guilty to creating malware

A British cybersecurity researcher credited with stopping a worldwide computer virus in 2017 is scheduled in Wisconsin federal court to plead guilty to developing malware to steal banking information.

4h

True spiritual knowledge (urgent please look)

submitted by /u/EndTimeCr1er [link] [comments]

4h

Exploding electrical wires underwater to understand shock waves

If you're not a plasma physicist, exploding electrical wires underwater may sound like a bad idea. But it's actually a way to study shock waves, the propagating disturbances that move faster than the speed of sound.

4h

Experts comb through DNA from possible Da Vinci hair

A lock of what some historians think is Leonardo da Vinci's hair went on display Thursday at a museum in his Tuscan birthplace as they seek to prove it contains his DNA 500 years after the genius died.

4h

Freak Accident With Mandy at the Helm | Deadliest Catch

With Mandy alone at the helm, a freak accident threatens the Northwestern crew. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter.

4h

The mechanism of action of an antitumour drug used for the treatment of gliobla

The antibody mAb806 is used to treat glioblastoma, although its mechanism of action has been unknown until now. The study, published in the journal PNAS, paves the way to extend treatment with mAb806 to more types of tumours and to the development of more personalised therapies.

4h

Dynamic checklist developed for web designers to work more efficiently, creatively

The research team will present their findings at the Association of Computing Machinery's Human-Computer Interaction conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in Glasgow, Scotland, on May 7, 2019.

4h

Seeking better detection for chronic malaria

In people with chronic malaria, certain metabolic systems in the blood change to support a long-term host-parasite relationship, a finding that is key to eventually developing better detection, treatment and eradication of the disease, according to research published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight.

4h

Open heart surgery outperforms stents in patients with multivessel disease

Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery may be the best treatment option for most patients with more than one blocked heart artery, according to research published today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, published by Elsevier.

4h

New brain mechanisms regulating body weight

Researchers at University of Gothenburg, Sweden, clarify the link between the molecule interleukine-6 (IL-6) in the brain and obesity. In experiments on rats and mice they show that the molecule does affect the risk of obesity, and also where this effect occurs in the brain.

4h

For giant pandas, bamboo is vegetarian 'meat'

New research using an approach called nutritional geometry sheds light on giant panda evolution, and their unusual transition from carnivorous ancestry to extreme specialized herbivory.

4h

Make room on the couch: Worms suffer from PTSD, too

Dr. Alon Zaslaver at Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Genetics Department discovered that even a very basic animal life form like the C. elegans worm has the ability to learn from past experiences. Further, Zaslaver and his team pinpointed the exact neurons that store these memories and the physiological changes the worms undergo when they retrieve memories to cope with future hardships.

4h

Severe tinnitus associated with suicide attempts in women

Previously, severe ringing in the ears (tinnitus) has been associated with depression and anxiety, and a 2016 study reported an association with increased risk of suicide attempts. This study used responses to a questionnaire from about 72,000 adults in Sweden to examine whether an association with increased risk of suicide attempts might be different between men and women.

4h

Study looks at association of high cholesterol levels, statin use with glaucoma risk

A study of adults 40 and older suggests high cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk for the most common form of glaucoma, while longer use of a cholesterol-lowering statin, compared with never using, was associated with lower risk. Data for this observational study came from more than 136,000 adults who participated in three national study groups and provided information on their st

4h

Could mouth rinse to detect HPV DNA be associated with predicting risk of head/neck cancer recurrence, death?

Researchers examined if a mouth rinse to detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA might be associated with helping to predict risk of recurrence of head and neck squamous cell cancer and death. This study included 396 adults with head and neck squamous cell cancer of the mouth or throat, of which 202 patients had HPV-positive cancers.

4h

A new method to select the right treatment for advanced prostate cancer

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified blood-based biomarkers that may determine which patients will benefit from continued hormonal therapy for advanced prostate cancer. The results are published in the journal JAMA Oncology. The researchers envision that this discovery may eventually result in a test that contributes to a more personalised treatment of the disease.

4h

Easy on the eyes

New computer program uses artificial intelligence to determine what visual neurons like to see.Algorithm generates synthetic images that morph into 'super stimulus' for neurons, removing inherent bias of using natural images to gauge preferences.The approach could shed light on learning disabilities, autism spectrum disorders and other neurologic conditions.

4h

Discovery of RNA transfer through royal jelly could aid development of honey bee vaccines

Researchers have discovered that honey bees are able to share immunity with other bees and to their offspring in a hive by transmitting RNA 'vaccines' through royal jelly and worker jelly. The jelly is the bee equivalent of mother's milk: a secretion used to provide nutrition to worker and queen bee larvae.

4h

Specialized plant cells regain stem-cell features to heal wounds

If plants are injured, cells adjacent to the wound fill the gaps with their daughter cells. However, which cells divide to do the healing and how they manage to produce cells that match the cell type of the missing tissue has been unclear. Scientists from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have now shown that to correctly replace dead cells, neighbors to the inside of th

4h

These trippy images were designed by AI to super-stimulate monkey neurons

To find out which sights specific neurons in monkeys 'like' best, researchers designed an algorithm, called XDREAM, that generated images that made neurons fire more than any natural images the researchers tested. As the images evolved, they started to look like distorted versions of real-world stimuli. The work appears May 2 in the journal Cell.

4h

A genomic tour-de-force reveals the last 5,000 years of horse history

Each year on the first Saturday in May, Thoroughbred horses reach speeds of over 40 miles per hour as they compete to win the Kentucky Derby. But the domestic horse wasn't always bred for speed. In fact, an international team now has evidence to suggest that the modern horse is genetically quite different from the horses of even just a few hundred years ago. Their work appears May 2, 2019 in the j

4h

Giant panda's bamboo diet still looks surprisingly carnivorous

Giant pandas are unusual in being extremely specialized herbivores that feed almost exclusively on highly fibrous bamboo, despite belonging to a clade (Carnivora) of primarily flesh-eating carnivores. But a study reported in Current Biology on May 2 suggests that the switch to a restricted vegetarian diet wasn't, in some respects, as big an evolutionary leap as it seems.

4h

Researchers identify drugs that block CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

The discovery of the first small-molecule inhibitors of the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) protein could enable more precise control over CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing, researchers report May 2 in the journal Cell.

4h

Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean

In low-oxygen parts of the ocean, some microbes are surviving by getting energy from arsenic. This holdover from the ancient Earth was not known to still exist in the open ocean.

4h

Beat procrastination with these mind tricks for getting more done

Procrastination is a universal problem, but it's easy to feel like you're the only one not getting things done. When you feel like that, getting things done only gets harder. A dedicated life hacker himself, Tim Ferriss has some concrete tips to offer for escaping procrastination quicksand: Keep tasks small and defined, rig the game in your favor, and embrace positive constraints.

4h

Are biodegradable bags better than plastic? It’s complicated.

Environment Misleading labels and life cycle studies make for a messy story. “Biodegradable” or “compostable" products are typically made from plant sources like corn and do eventually biodegrade, meaning that microbes and other organisms break…

4h

Saturn’s secrets revealed by deep learning

Saturn’s secrets revealed by deep learning Saturn’s secrets revealed by deep learning, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01386-1 PlanetNet algorithm has helped scientists to understand a storm on the giant planet.

4h

Buzz Aldrin Calls For “Great Migration of Humankind to Mars”

Great Migration Fifty years ago, astronaut Buzz Aldrin became the second human to walk on the Moon. Now, he’s urging the United States to make putting people on Mars a national priority — and he’s not talking about just a few lucky astronauts. “The United States’ eyes — and our unified commitment — should focus on opening the door, in our time, to the great migration of humankind to Mars,” Aldrin

4h

Field experiment finds a simple change that could boost agricultural productivity by 60%

Raising tenants' share in crop-sharing contracts between landlords and tenants in developing countries can boost agricultural output, by providing tenants with the right incentive to raise agriculture productivity. Bocconi University's Selim Gulesci and colleagues came to this conclusion making use of a field experiment in Uganda.

4h

The Dangerous Ideas of Bill Barr

One of the stranger aspects of the Donald Trump era is the open competition for the president’s affection. From Fox Business’s Lou Dobbs saying that Trump’s presidency is “the most accomplished … in modern history” to the president forcing his Cabinet secretaries to praise him on camera to his former fixer Michael Cohen once declaring that he would “take a bullet” for his former employer, it seem

4h

The Giant Panda Is a Closet Carnivore

The giant panda, a consummate vegetarian, belongs to a group of mammals called Carnivora, so-called because almost all of them—dogs, cats, hyenas, weasels, mongooses, raccoons, and more—eat meat. But the giant panda’s diet of bamboo, and little else, makes it a vegetarian. At least, outwardly. Yonggang Nie and Fuwen Wei of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have spent years tracking wild pandas, ana

4h

New reading of Mesha Stele could have far-reaching consequences for biblical history

The biblical King Balak may have been a historical figure, according to a new reading of the Mesha Stele, an inscribed stone dating from the second half of the 9th century BCE.

4h

Two molecules could give us finer control over CRISPR gene editing

Molecules that act like off switches for CRISPR may one day be used as a drug to make gene editing therapies safer and less likely to cause unwanted mutations

4h

Why the UK’s grand plan to stop gadgets turning against us is flawed

Internet-connected gizmos from kettles to TVs are an underestimated security risk. But the UK government’s response ignores the biggest risk – ourselves, says Chris Stokel-Walker

4h

Compound stops CRISPR enzyme running amok

Compound stops CRISPR enzyme running amok Compound stops CRISPR enzyme running amok, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01412-2 A small molecule is identified that puts the brakes on the Cas9 enzyme.

4h

Brains Speed Up Perception by Guessing What’s Next

Imagine picking up a glass of what you think is apple juice, only to take a sip and discover that it’s actually ginger ale. Even though you usually love the soda, this time it tastes terrible. That’s because context and internal states, including expectation, influence how all animals perceive and process sensory information, explained Alfredo Fontanini , a neurobiologist at Stony Brook Universit

5h

Perseverance toward life goals can fend off depression, anxiety, panic disorders

People who don't give up on their goals (or who get better over time at not giving up on their goals) and who have a positive outlook appear to have less anxiety and depression and fewer panic attacks, according to a study of thousands of Americans over the course of 18 years. Surprisingly, a sense of control did not have an effect on the mental health of participants across time.

5h

A genomic tour-de-force reveals the last 5,000 years of horse history

Each year on the first Saturday in May, Thoroughbred horses reach speeds of over 40 miles per hour as they compete to win the Kentucky Derby. But the domestic horse wasn't always bred for speed. In fact, an international team now has evidence to suggest that the modern horse is genetically quite different from the horses of even just a few hundred years ago.

5h

Specialized plant cells regain stem-cell features to heal wounds

If plants are injured, cells adjacent to the wound fill the gaps with their daughter cells. However, which cells divide to do the healing and how they manage to produce cells that match the cell type of the missing tissue has been unclear. Scientists from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have now shown that to correctly replace dead cells, neighbors to the inside of th

5h

A genomic tour-de-force reveals the last 5,000 years of horse history

Each year on the first Saturday in May, Thoroughbred horses reach speeds of over 40 miles per hour as they compete to win the Kentucky Derby. But the domestic horse wasn't always bred for speed. In fact, an international team now has evidence to suggest that the modern horse is genetically quite different from the horses of even just a few hundred years ago.

5h

Specialized plant cells regain stem-cell features to heal wounds

If plants are injured, cells adjacent to the wound fill the gaps with their daughter cells. However, which cells divide to do the healing and how they manage to produce cells that match the cell type of the missing tissue has been unclear. Scientists from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have now shown that to correctly replace dead cells, neighbors to the inside of th

5h

This hawk likes crab for dinner

Red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus) feed primarily on mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and invertebrates, the majority of which are insects and crustaceans, with the latter represented to date only by crayfish.

5h

Sansa Stark Got Married in Vegas Last Night

Sophie Turner wed Joe Jonas at A Little White Wedding Chapel. Also, Jaden Smith might play Kanye West in a new show.

5h

Climate change: UK 'can cut emissions to nearly zero' by 2050

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

5h

5h

Putin signs controversial internet law

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

5h

Artificial intelligence created these bizarre faces—and monkey neurons love them

Artificial intelligence study probes what neurons in the visual cortex “want” to see

5h

Self-powered wearable tech

For emerging wearable tech to advance, it needs improved power sources. Now researchers from Michigan State University have provided a potential solution via crumpled carbon nanotube forests, or CNT forests.

5h

This hawk likes crab for dinner

This is the first report of a red-shouldered hawk attacking and presumably consuming any species of crab and the first report of probable ghost crab predation by a raptor in North America.

5h

New reading of the Mesha Stele inscription has major consequences for biblical history

Tel Aviv University archaeologists say that a new reading of the inscription on the Mesha Stele has major consequences for biblical history.

5h

What drives multiple female acorn woodpeckers to share a nest?

In some acorn woodpecker family groups, related females lay eggs in the same nest and raise the chicks cooperatively with one or more related males. The reasons that may be driving this rare behavior are outlined in a study recently published in The American Naturalist.

5h

Exploding electrical wires underwater to understand shock waves

Shock wave studies allow researchers to achieve the warm dense matter that's found only in the extreme conditions around stars and created in the laboratory for inertial confinement fusion research, and researchers in Israel recently set out to understand the relation, if any, between the evolution of a shock wave and the expansion of the exploding wire. They describe their work in the Physics of

5h

This hawk likes crab for dinner

Red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus) feed primarily on mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and invertebrates, the majority of which are insects and crustaceans, with the latter represented to date only by crayfish.

5h

Why can't we all get along like Namibia's pastoralists and wildlife?

Conflicts between humans and wildlife are escalating worldwide due to human population growth, urbanization, growth of agricultural and industrial activities, and, in certain areas, increasing wildlife populations.

5h

Researchers identify drugs that block CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

The discovery of the first small-molecule inhibitors of the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) protein could enable more precise control over CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing, researchers report May 2nd in the journal Cell.

5h

Why can't we all get along like Namibia's pastoralists and wildlife?

Conflicts between humans and wildlife are escalating worldwide due to human population growth, urbanization, growth of agricultural and industrial activities, and, in certain areas, increasing wildlife populations.

5h

Invasive beavers: Bad for the climate

Scientists documented the effects of invasive North American beavers (Castor canadensis) on carbon sequestration of a riparian forest in Tierra del Fuego.

5h

Researchers identify drugs that block CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

The discovery of the first small-molecule inhibitors of the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) protein could enable more precise control over CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing, researchers report May 2nd in the journal Cell.

5h

Scientists breed hazelnuts as the next cash crop for Midwest farmers

From a hill surrounded by the thawing mud of empty cornfields, farmer Chris Gamer leaned over a 1-year-old hazelnut bush.

5h

Two neutron stars collided near the solar system billions of years ago

Astrophysicists Szabolcs Marka at Columbia University and Imre Bartos at the University of Florida, have identified a violent collision of two neutron stars 4.6 billion years ago as the likely source of some of the most coveted matter on Earth.

5h

Trump’s Biden Plan? It Could Get Dirty

Seldom has Donald Trump paid a real price for ridiculing anyone he sees as a political threat, or, for that matter, anyone he doesn’t particularly like. Running a longshot campaign in 2016, Trump taunted then-Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly (“There was blood coming out of her eyes, blood coming out of her wherever”) demeaned Khizr and Ghazala Khan, the parents of a soldier killed in Iraq, and insulte

5h

The Catastrophic Performance of Bill Barr

I was willing to give Bill Barr a chance. Consider me burned. When Barr was nominated, I wrote a cautious piece for this magazine declining to give him “a character reference” and acknowledging “legitimate reasons to be concerned about [his] nomination,” but nonetheless concluding that “I suspect that he is likely as good as we’re going to get. And he might well be good enough. Because most of al

5h

Meet the Companies Reinventing City Life at Urban-X Demo Day 05

We joined URBAN-X to learn how the seven companies of UBXcohort05 are developing solutions for reclaiming city life and revolutionizing urban living. Watch our live footage from DemoDay05 to hear more, and find these timestamps to learn more about each company: 1:51 – Circuit provides free, electric shuttle transportation in 17 cities around the US. 9:37 – Toggle is revolutionizing construction r

5h

Machine Learning Optimizes Images For Stimulating Monkey Neurons

Neural networks generate abstract images designed to activate particular cells, lending insight into their function.

5h

Despite vegan diet, giant pandas metabolise like hyper-carnivores

Nutrient analysis finds the bamboo specialists function like meat-eaters. Tanya Loos reports.

5h

5h

How supercharged plants could slow climate change | Joanne Chory

Plants are amazing machines — for millions of years, they've taken carbon dioxide out of the air and stored it underground, keeping a crucial check on the global climate. Plant geneticist Joanne Chory is working to amplify this special ability: with her colleagues at the Salk Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Laboratory, she's creating plants that can store more carbon, deeper underground, for

5h

High thermal conductivity of new material will create energy efficient devices

Researchers have successfully demonstrated the high thermal conductivity of a new material, paving the way for safer and more efficient electronic devices — including mobile phones, radars and even electric cars.

5h

Pretreatment with TNF inhibitors may improve outcomes of combination cancer immunotherapy

This study proposes a new therapeutic approach against cancer that dissociates efficacy and toxicity in the use of combined immunotherapy in animal models. This clinical strategy consists of blocking TNF protein while applying combination immunotherapy treatment (inhibition therapy of PD-1 and CTLA-4, other proteins that 'slow down' the immune response).

5h

Dwarfs under dinosaur legs: 99-million-year-old millipede discovered in Burmese amber

An 8.2-millimeter fossil millipede was discovered in Burmese amber. Having used new-age 3D X-ray microscopy, a research team confirmed this is the first fossil millipede of the entire order. The new species, despite having lived alongside the Cretaceous megafauna, is smaller than any of the extant members of its group. Because of its extraordinary morphology, it is described as a new suborder.

5h

The quiet loss of knowledge threatens indigenous communities

Most of the knowledge that indigenous communities in South America have about plants is not written down. Now, ecologists at the University of Zurich have analyzed comprehensive information about the services provided by palm trees from multiple regions and made it accessible via a network approach. What they also discovered in the process was that the simultaneous loss of biodiversity and knowled

5h

Medical costs create hardships for more than half of Americans

A new study finds more than half of people in the US report problems with affordability, stress, or delaying care because of medical costs.

5h

Why you love coffee and beer

Why do you swig bitter, dark roast coffee while your coworker guzzles sweet cola? Scientists searched for variations in our taste genes that could explain our beverage preferences, because understanding those preferences could indicate ways to intervene in people's diets. But to scientists' surprise, the study showed taste preferences for bitter or sweet beverages aren't based on variations in our

5h

Våren har kommit rekordlångt norrut

Nästan 8500 observationer kom in till Vårkollen som genomfördes för femte året i rad. Vårkollen är ett medborgarforskningsprojekt där forskare analyserar data om vårtecken som frivilliga rapporterat in. Tanken är att få en ögonblicksbild av hur långt våren kommit i landet, så att man kan se om och hur vårens ankomst påverkas av klimatförändringen. – Vi är glada att så många deltar år efter år och

5h

5h

It is unfair to ban Caster Semenya

The middle-distance runner is being punished for having an extraordinary physiology

5h

State-of-the-art imaging uncovers the exciting life history of an unusual Mars meteorite

With human and sample-return missions to Mars still on the drawing board, geologists wishing to study the red planet rely on robotic helpers to collect and analyse samples. Earlier this year we said goodbye to NASA's Opportunity rover, but Insight landed in November 2018, and several space agencies have Mars rover missions on their books for the next few years. But while we're working on ways to b

5h

Astronomer helps create 'history book' image of the universe

Astronomers have assembled a mosaic of nearly 7,500 images of one part of the sky, creating the largest and most comprehensive history book of the universe.

5h

Putin Signs Bill to Create Tightly-Controlled “Russian Internet”

Russia’s Wide Web Russian president Vladimir Putin officially signed a bill into law yesterday, according to documents obtained by CNN , that will move the country toward the creation of a “sustainable, secure and fully functioning” local internet, as the Kremlin referred to it in the documents. During states of emergency, the government would be able to cut off foreign internet entirely. It woul

5h

3D-print og molekyler fra fingeraftryk giver politiet nye ledetråde

PLUS. Serie: Fingeraftryk kan ikke kun bruges til at matche en mistænkt op mod en database. Forskere begynder at kunne trække informationsrige molekyler ud af dem, og så kan kopier åbne mobiltelefoner.

5h

Iter, a reactor in France, may deliver fusion power as early as 2045

Whether commercial start-ups will beat it remains to be seen

5h

Fusion power is attracting private-sector interest

Reactor designs are inspired by everything from smoke rings to shrimps

5h

Space station back to full power, SpaceX launch early Friday

The International Space Station is back up at full power, after the successful replacement of a failed electrical box.

5h

As car-sharing picks up in US, so do legislative battles

When Chris Williamson was in the market for a new family car, a timely ad and conversations with a co-worker convinced him to try something out of the ordinary. He bought a BMW 3 Series convertible and covers the payments by renting it to strangers on a peer-to-peer car sharing app called Turo.

5h

KAL’s cartoon

[no content]

5h

Politics this week

[no content]

5h

Business this week

[no content]

5h

AIDS in America — Back in the headlines at long last

President Trump's recent call to end the HIV epidemic in the US has turned attention to a domestic public health crisis that has been absent from the headlines. A NEJM commentary explores the state of AIDS in America, barriers that stand in the way of ending this persistent public health threat, and propose what can be adopted from the progress made toward epidemic control in sub-Saharan Africa to

5h

Two neutron stars collided near the solar system billions of years ago

Columbia University and University of Florida researchers finds sign of cosmic event that created elements that became part of us.

5h

Invasive beavers: Bad for the climate

Scientists documented the effects of invasive North American beavers (Castor canadensis) on carbon sequestration of a riparian forest in Tierra del Fuego.

5h

Sexuality continues to change and develop well into adulthood, finds study

A new study has shown that traditional labels of 'gay', 'bisexual' and 'straight' do not capture the full range of human sexuality, and whether a person is attracted to the same, or opposite sex can change over time.

5h

Why can't we all get along (like Namibia's pastoralists and wildlife?)

Scientists interviewed pastoralists in Namibia's Namib Desert to see how they felt about conflicts with wildlife, which can include lions and cheetahs preying on livestock and elephants and zebras eating crops.

5h

What is pepper spray? (video)

Whether it's walking down a dark street at night or fighting off grizzly bears on the trail, pepper spray is an effective tool to fend off an attacker and get safely away. This week on Reactions, we're taking a look at what's in these little canisters and why it inflicts so much pain. And for those times when you accidentally spray yourself, we'll also give you some tips on what to do: https://you

5h

Mobile prenatal app shown to reduce in-person visits during pregnancy

Using the mobile app Babyscripts reduced in-person prenatal care visits while maintaining patient and provider satisfaction, according to research published in JMIR mHealth and uHealth by physician researchers from the George Washington University

5h

Hubble astronomers assemble wide view of the evolving universe

Astronomers have put together the largest and most comprehensive 'history book' of galaxies into one single image, using 16 years' worth of observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

5h

Hubble assembles wide view of the distant universe

Astronomers developed a mosaic of the distant Universe that documents 16 years of observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The image, called the Hubble Legacy Field, contains roughly 265,000 galaxies that stretch back to just 500 million years after the Big Bang.

5h

Johns Hopkins researchers develop soft tissue substitute with fewer side effects

A team of plastic surgeons and material scientists has made an important advance in treating the common clinical problem of soft tissue loss.

5h

Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs

The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs. But why were these 2-3 tonne giants so successful? A new study, published in Paleobiology, shows that their special adaptations in teeth and jaws and in their head crests were crucial, and provides new insights into how these innovations evolved.

5h

How Much Does Precipitation Increase the Risk of Car Crashes?

How Much Does Precipitation Increase the Risk of Car Crashes? Researchers used radar to provide new insight into how precipitation raises the chances of deadly car crashes. Snowy-Road.jpg Image credits: Dejan Krsmanovic via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Culture Thursday, May 2, 2019 – 09:30 Bailey Bedford, Contributor (Inside Science) — Driving in a downpour carries obvious risks, but a n

5h

Pinpointing Gaia to enable the most accurate map ever of more than a billion stars

Gaia, operated by the European Space Agency (ESA, surveys the sky from orbit to create the largest, most precise, three-dimensional map of our Galaxy. One year ago, the Gaia mission produced its much-awaited second data release, which included high-precision measurements—positions, distance and proper motions—of more than one billion stars in our Milky Way galaxy. This catalogue has enabled transf

5h

Species conservation: some success, many failures

With as many as a million species threatened with extinction due to mankind's destruction of the planet, there have been scant conservation successes in recent years.

5h

Gravitational waves hunt now in overdrive

The LIGO-VIRGO instruments tasked with detecting gravitational waves triggered five times in April.

5h

Species conservation: some success, many failures

With as many as a million species threatened with extinction due to mankind's destruction of the planet, there have been scant conservation successes in recent years.

5h

Newly discovered gene mutation reduces fear and anxiety, and increases social interaction

Researchers have discovered of a new type of gene mutation that reduces fear and anxiety, and increases social interaction. The researchers employed gene manipulation technology to remove the P4h-tm gene from the mouse genome and found an unexpected change in mouse behavior. P4h-tm knockout mice showed striking courage and a lack of learned helplessness compared to congenic wild-type mice with a f

5h

Mathematician's breakthrough on non-toxic pest control

Breakthrough 'gene silencing' technique uses naturally occurring soil bacteria to kill specific crop-destroying pests without harming other insects or the environment. Non-toxic pest control could help feed growing global population, boost organic food production and drive bio-fuel production. Experiments show up to 92% more crops survive with this approach compared to no pest control.

5h

Spider venom is a dangerous cocktail

Spider venom does not only consist of neurotoxins but also of a multitude of dangerous constituents. Researchers present a summary of many years of spider venom research in a new study and show how various substances present in spider venom interact with each other and thus effectively render the spider's prey defenseless.

5h

Laser-driven spin dynamics in ferrimagnets: How does the angular momentum flow?

A team of researchers has now been able to follow the flow of angular momentum during ultrafast optical demagnetization in a ferrimagnetic iron-gadolinium alloy in great detail, in order to understand the fundamental processes and their speed limits.

5h

The Mind of Leonardo Da Vinci

The original Renaissance man died 500 years ago, but the nature of his genius continues to fascinate us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Lasersvetsning hjälper bilindustrin att minska miljöpåverkan

Karl Fahlströms forskning visar på lösningar som Volvo Cars, Scania och flera andra företag har direkt nytta av. Han har nyligen presenterat resultaten av sitt forskningsprojekt i sin doktorsavhandling på Högskolan Väst. Ett resultat som egentligen består av flera olika delar. – Den gemensamma nämnaren i min forskning är lasersvetsning av lätta material, förklarar han. Jag har framförallt fokuser

5h

Ancient millipede found, trapped in amber

An exquisite, tiny fossil prompts a rethink on arthropod evolution. Andrew Masterson reports.

5h

Tinder wants you to find love or whatever at Bonnaroo – CNET

Tinder's new Festival Mode will be available for 12 music festivals in the US and UK this year.

5h

New material to pave the way for more efficient electronic devices

Researchers at the University of Bristol have successfully demonstrated the high thermal conductivity of a new material, paving the way for safer and more efficient electronic devices – including mobile phones, radars and even electric cars.

5h

Apple removing or restricting apps for controlling screen time

Apple's removal of nearly a dozen apps that help users manage screen time raises questions about the company's dominance and its commitment to helping people stay off their iPhones amid concerns about the negative effects of smartphones, including on children, according to a new report.

5h

Google workers protest 'culture of retaliation' with sit-in

Google employees staged a sit-in Wednesday to protest what they call a "culture of retaliation" at the company—the latest in a series of demonstrations by tech industry workers.

5h

New prognostic test could enable personalised treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have developed a new test that can reliably predict the future course of inflammatory bowel disease in individuals, transforming treatments for patients and paving the way for a personalised approach.

5h

Chewing versus sex in the duck-billed dinosaurs

The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs. But why were these 2-3 tonne giants so successful? A new study, published in Paleobiology, shows that their special adaptations in teeth and jaws and in their head crests were crucial, and provides new insights into how these innovations evolved.

5h

Field experiment finds a simple change that could boost agricultural productivity by 60%

Acknowledging 75% of the crop to tenants in crop-sharing contracts, instead of the customary 50%, can boost agricultural productivity and income levels in developing countries. In a field experiment in Uganda, Bocconi University's Selim Gulesci and colleagues found that, introducing the new sharing rules, output is 60% higher and tenants' income increases by 140%.

5h

Bronx river turtles get a check-up

A team of scientists and veterinarians gave a health evaluation of turtles living in the Bronx River, one of the most urbanized rivers in the U.S. and the only remaining freshwater river that flows through New York City.

5h

Pinpointing Gaia to map the Milky Way

This image, a composite of several observations captured by ESO's VLT Survey Telescope (VST), shows the ESA spacecraft Gaia as a faint trail of dots across the lower half of the star-filled field of view. These observations were taken as part of an ongoing collaborative effort to measure Gaia's orbit and improve the accuracy of its unprecedented star map.

5h

It's hard to be a nomad in Mongolia

Scientists tracked 22 Mongolian gazelles (Procapra gutturosa) over the vast grasslands of Mongolia for a 1-3 year period using GPS.

5h

India could meet air quality standards by cutting household fuel use

India could make a major dent in air pollution by curbing emissions from dirty household fuels such as wood, dung, coal and kerosene, shows a new analysis led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and the India Institute of Technology. Eliminating emissions from just these sources — without any changes to industrial or vehicle emissions — would bring the average outdoor air po

5h

Why you love coffee and beer

Why do you swig bitter, dark roast coffee while your coworker guzzles sweet cola? Scientists searched for variations in our taste genes that could explain our beverage preferences, because understanding those preferences could indicate ways to intervene in people's diets. But to scientists' surprise, the study showed taste preferences for bitter or sweet beverages aren't based on variations in our

5h

CRISPR Used in Human Trials for the First Time in the US

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

5h

California's Latest Weapon Against Climate Change Is Low-Tech Farm Soil

submitted by /u/WoundedKnee82 [link] [comments]

5h

The race to build a space internet available to anyone, anywhere

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

5h

Battle of the exomoon: Astronomers can't agree on controversial find

What appeared to be the first moon ever discovered around a planet circling another star may not really exist, but it seems like we’ll never know for sure

5h

A 3-D reconstruction of the fossil allowed for the description of an entirely new suborder

Even though we are led to believe that during the Cretaceous the Earth used to be an exclusive home for fearsome giants, including carnivorous velociraptors and arthropods larger than a modern adult human, it turns out that there was still room for harmless minute invertebrates measuring only several millimetres.

5h

3-D printing of biological tissue

The future of medicine is biological – and scientists hope we will soon be using 3-D-printed biologically functional tissue to replace irreparably damaged tissue in the body. A team of researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGB has been working with the University of Stuttgart for a number of years on a project to develop and optimize suitable bioin

5h

Listen: Should the government regulate social media?

Should governments regulate social media? What would that regulation look like? In this episode of the Policy 360 podcast, Phil Napoli, professor of public policy at Duke University, breaks down how it might work. Recently, a man opened fire in two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand leaving 50 dead and dozens more injured. The shooter announced the massacre on the internet and streamed it live

5h

The Mind of Leonardo Da Vinci

The original Renaissance man died 500 years ago, but the nature of his genius continues to fascinate us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

India prepares for 'extremely severe' Bay of Bengal cyclone

Hundreds of thousands of people were evacuated along India's eastern coast on Thursday as authorities braced for a cyclone moving through the Bay of Bengal that was forecast to bring extremely severe wind and rain.

6h

Bailey Bedford

Contributor Bailey Bedford is a freelance science journalist based in Santa Cruz, California. His stories have appeared in Eos, The Mercury News, Mongabay and other outlets. Follow him on Twitter @BBedfordScience . Author social media Twitter

6h

Dansk professor modtager international forskningspris

Professor og forskningsleder på Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Peter Rossing, modtager som den første dansker international pris for forskning i diabetes og hjertekarsygdomme.

6h

3-Eyed Snake Found in Australia Surprises Rangers

Rangers in Australia could hardly believe their eyes when they came across a wild snake with three functioning peepers on its head.

6h

A leap forward in estimating crop water use

To conserve and manage fresh water, particularly in arid regions such as Saudi Arabia, it is important to understand how the water is used each day. KAUST scientists are using data gathered by shoebox-sized satellites, or CubeSats, to learn more about daily agricultural water use.

6h

CRISPR Used in Human Trials for the First Time in the US

CRISPR just hit another landmark. Last week, the University of Pennsylvania (UPenn) confirmed that they have treated two cancer patients using the gene editing darling married with another biomedical wizard, CAR-T . For now, it’s too early to tell if the treatment proved beneficial in either patient, but the team hopes to release a first batch of results in a conference or journal “ at an appropr

6h

UK Parliament declares climate change emergency

The Welsh and Scottish governments have also declared an emergency – along with dozens of towns and cities.

6h

Earth magma ocean ended up on the moon

New modelling resolves contradictions in Earth-moon hypothesis. Lauren Fuge reports.

6h

Ancient millipede found, trapped in amber

An exquisite, tiny fossil prompts a rethink on arthropod evolution. Andrew Masterson reports.

6h

Earth hit by 17 meteors a day

US conference mulls the challenges of when and where space rocks smack into the planet. Richard A Lovett reports.

6h

Beer, coffee preference is about buzz, not taste

Genome study finds beverage preferences are rooted in psychoactive rather than flavour effect. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

6h

The Mind of Leonardo Da Vinci

The original Renaissance man died 500 years ago, but the nature of his genius continues to fascinate us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Reasons for delay in pelvic organ prolapse treatment revealed

Many women do not seek early treatment for pelvic organ prolapse due to confusion and a lack of awareness around the condition's symptoms — and feelings of shame and embarrassment — according to new research.

6h

1 strategy looks best for climate change persuasion

There are more and less effective ways to convince people of the need for action on climate change, research suggests. The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report last fall warning of a catastrophic effect on the world’s people, environment, and economy if temperatures rise by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius, which could happen as soon as 2040. But meaningful act

6h

Time Is Shaped by Language

submitted by /u/TheLavinGuy [link] [comments]

6h

In Defense of Disbelief: An Anti-Creed

We should doubt all theories and theologies that claim to solve the problem of who we really are. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Snabb kollaps av permafrost ökar klimatutsläppen

En ”slumrande jätte” finns dold i permafrost, den frusna marken under tundra och skogar på norra halvklotet. När den jätten vaknar får det stora konsekvenser för den globala uppvärmningen, visar en ny studie som har letts av Merritt Turetsky, University of Guelph i Kanada. I forskarteamet ingår tre forskare från Stockholms universitet, Gustaf Hugelius, Peter Kuhry och Britta Sannel från Instituti

6h

LIGO and Virgo detect neutron star smash-ups

On April 25, 2019, the National Science Foundation's Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the European-based Virgo detector registered gravitational waves from what appears likely to be a crash between two neutron stars—the dense remnants of massive stars that previously exploded. One day later, on April 26, the LIGO-Virgo network spotted another candidate source with a p

6h

Microplastics accumulate in hotspots for deep-sea life

Research published earlier in the week reveals that microplastics often accumulate on the deep sea floor in the same place as diverse and dense marine life communities. This is because the same submarine sediment flows that transfer the oxygen and nutrients needed to sustain life, also transport microplastics from urban rivers to the deep-sea floor via pathways such as submarine canyons.

6h

Google’s latest AI art project turns your face into a ‘poem portrait’

Google is always sponsoring weird and inventive projects with the help of artificial intelligence, and its latest is characteristically odd. Named PoemPortraits, the web app takes …

6h

Simulating and optimizing industrial spinning processes

Spinning polymer filaments, for example for personal care articles, is highly complex: simulating the processes involved is too much for currently available computing power to handle. Fraunhofer researchers have successfully applied new approaches to simplify the calculations necessary for simulation. Now for the first time complete spinning processes can be simulated, providing a better understan

6h

New net zero emissions target won't end UK's contribution to global warming – here's why

Six months on from the UN's landmark 1.5°C report, which urged immediate global action to prevent global warming from rising beyond this dangerous level, the Committee on Climate Change (CCC) has advised the UK government to go zero-carbon by 2050. The committee's report asserts that the target constitutes the country's "highest possible ambition" and that it is not credible to aim for an earlier

6h

Pretreatment with TNF inhibitors may improve outcomes of combination cancer immunotherapy

This study proposes a new therapeutic approach against cancer that dissociates efficacy and toxicity in the use of combined immunotherapy in animal models. This clinical strategy consists of blocking TNF protein while applying combination immunotherapy treatment (inhibition therapy of PD-1 and CTLA-4, other proteins that 'slow down' the immune response). Nature, the leading international weekly jo

6h

High thermal conductivity of new material will create energy efficient devices

Researchers at the University of Bristol have successfully demonstrated the high thermal conductivity of a new material, paving the way for safer and more efficient electronic devices — including mobile phones, radars and even electric cars.

6h

The quiet loss of knowledge threatens indigenous communities

Most of the knowledge that indigenous communities in South America have about plants is not written down. Now, ecologists at the University of Zurich have analyzed comprehensive information about the services provided by palm trees from multiple regions and made it accessible via a network approach. What they also discovered in the process was that the simultaneous loss of biodiversity and knowled

6h

Finnish school students outperform US students on 'fake news' digital literacy tasks

A recent study revealed students at an international school in Finland significantly outperformed US students on tasks which measure digital literacy in social media and online news. The researchers suggest this may be due to the Finnish and International Baccalaureate curricula's different way of facilitating students' critical thinking skills compared to the US system and curriculum. The results

6h

The immaculate conception?

A new, groundbreaking study by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) found a way to transform skin cells into the three major stem cell types that comprise early-stage embryos. This work has significant implications for modelling embryonic disease and placental dysfunctions, as well as paving the way to create whole embryos from skin cells.

6h

Laser-driven spin dynamics in ferrimagnets: How does the angular momentum flow?

A team of researchers led by scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) in Berlin has now been able to follow the flow of angular momentum during ultrafast optical demagnetization in a ferrimagnetic iron-gadolinium alloy in great detail, in order to understand the fundamental processes and their speed limits. The results were published in Physica

6h

NEJM publishes bb2121 Phase 1 data in patients with multiple myeloma

Celgene Corporation and bluebird bio announce results from ongoing multicenter Phase 1 study of bb2121 anti-BCMA CAR T cell therapy in patients with multiple myeloma published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

6h

For children, depression increases hospital use and mortality, Rutgers study finds

Children with depression admitted to the hospital for other illnesses like pneumonia, appendicitis or seizure disorders, stay longer, pay more and are at greater risk of death, a Rutgers New Jersey Medical School study finds.

6h

How to spring back into outdoor exercise

DIY Ready to ditch the gym? Here's how to move your workout outside. Spring has arrived, but before you limber up to run, bike, and contort yourself in the park and on the trails, make sure you’re ready for the great outdoors.

6h

Applications dip after scandals at prestigious universities

The national admissions scandal that broke last month will likely cause a brief dip in new applications to the universities involved, research finds. “There is a common hypothesis that negative media may increase demand for institutions of which awareness is the primary challenge,” says Jonathan Smith, an assistant professor of economics in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia Sta

6h

Children and teens who drink low-calorie sweetened beverages do not save calories

US children and teens who consumed low-calorie or zero-calorie sweetened beverages took in about 200 extra calories on a given day compared to those who drank water, and they took in about the same number of calories as youth who consumed sugary beverages, according to a new study.

6h

Snoring causes injuries and prevention of healing in the upper airways

The recurrent vibrations caused by snoring can lead to injuries in the upper airways of people who snore heavily. This in turn, can cause swallowing dysfunction and render individuals more vulnerable for developing the severe condition obstructive sleep apnea.

6h

Tumor cells' drug addiction may be their downfall

New research shows how cancer cells' acquired-resistance to anti-cancer drugs proves fatal once the treatment compound is withdrawn.

6h

Eco-friendly formulations based on vegetable oils

There is an increasing demand for green products, but for them to be genuinely sustainable, manufacturers must also use adhesives and paints that are made of bio-based feedstocks. Advanced materials developed in Fraunhofer labs point the way forward.

6h

Dealing with the absurdity of human existence in the face of converging catastrophes

Homo sapiens means wise human, but the name no longer suits us. As an evolutionary biologist who writes about Darwinian interpretations of human motivations and cultures, I propose that at some point we became what we are today: Homo absurdus, a human that spends its whole life trying to convince itself that its existence is not absurd.

6h

Blockchain can help break the chains of modern slavery, but it is not a complete solution

There's a good chance the device on which you are reading this contains cobalt. It's an essential metal for batteries in phones and laptops. There's also a chance the cobalt was mined by slaves.

6h

Should we turn the Sahara Desert into a huge solar farm?

submitted by /u/Spinach_Feta_Wrap [link] [comments]

6h

6h

6h

US Navy tests underwater robots that recharge by eating fish faeces

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

6h

Dealing with the absurdity of human existence in the face of converging catastrophes

Homo sapiens means wise human, but the name no longer suits us. As an evolutionary biologist who writes about Darwinian interpretations of human motivations and cultures, I propose that at some point we became what we are today: Homo absurdus, a human that spends its whole life trying to convince itself that its existence is not absurd.

6h

The quiet loss of knowledge threatens indigenous communities

Most of the knowledge that indigenous communities in South America have about plants is not written down. Now, ecologists at the University of Zurich have analyzed comprehensive information about the services provided by palm trees from multiple regions and made it accessible via a network approach. What they also discovered in the process was that the simultaneous loss of biodiversity and knowled

6h

Immigrants: citizens' acceptance depends on questions asked

How many immigrants per year should Switzerland be prepared to welcome? Psychologists (UNIGE) set about testing a well-known reasoning bias that consists in providing a deliberately figure for information purposes before respondents give their opinion on a subject. The researchers found that the figure supplied played a vital role in shaping respondents' opinions, regardless of their political ori

6h

Spider venom is a dangerous cocktail

Spider venom does not only consist of neurotoxins but also of a multitude of dangerous constituents. Researchers of the University of Bern present a summary of many years of spider venom research in a new study and show how various substances present in spider venom interact with each other and thus effectively render the spider's prey defenseless.

6h

Sussex mathematician's breakthrough on non-toxic pest control

Breakthrough 'gene silencing' technique uses naturally occurring soil bacteria to kill specific crop-destroying pests without harming other insects or the environment. Non-toxic pest control could help feed growing global population, boost organic food production and drive bio-fuel production. Experiments show up to 92% more crops survive with this approach compared to no pest control.

6h

Novel healthcare program for former prisoners reduces recidivism

A healthcare program tailored to the needs of recently released prisoners can significantly reduce recidivism, according to a new study led by a Yale researcher. The findings show how an approach that provides community-based primary care can play a role in the nationwide effort to decrease prison populations.

6h

Risk of deaths among incarcerated youth by suicide on the rise

A new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, shows there is little disagreement that youth in custody are at an increased risk for suicidal behavior.

6h

Perseverance toward life goals can fend off depression, anxiety, panic disorders

People who don't give up on their goals (or who get better over time at not giving up on their goals) and who have a positive outlook appear to have less anxiety and depression and fewer panic attacks, according to a study of thousands of Americans over the course of 18 years. Surprisingly, a sense of control did not have an effect on the mental health of participants across time.

6h

Genes hold the key to birthweight

The largest genetic study of its kind has led to new insights into how the genes of mothers and babies influence birth weight.

6h

Drönare med klor kan landa var som helst

För att en drönare ska kunna vila på en lyktstolpe, en gren eller ett hörn av en byggnad har forskarna designat tre olika moduler som lätt kan monteras på en drönare. Modulerna efterliknar hur exempelvis fåglar och fladdermöss använder sina klor för att landa. – Batteritiden är en av de stora nackdelarna med drönare men tack vore våra moduler kan vi förlänga drifttiden hos drönare, säger Johannes

6h

As air pollution increases in some US cities, the Trump administration is weakening clean air regulations

Air pollution kills. In the United States, 1 of every 25 deaths occurs prematurely because of exposure to outdoor air pollution.

6h

The quiet loss of knowledge threatens indigenous communities

Most of the knowledge that indigenous communities in South America have about plants is not written down. Now, ecologists at the University of Zurich have analyzed comprehensive information about the services provided by palm trees from multiple regions and made it accessible via a network approach. What they also discovered in the process was that the simultaneous loss of biodiversity and knowled

6h

What It’s Like to Be Quarantined on a College Campus

Duoduo “Danny” Ying didn't pay much attention to the UCLA chancellor’s school-wide memo that arrived in his email inbox last Wednesday. The note, also published on the school’s website, simply seemed to reiterate what he already knew: An unnamed student at the University of California, Los Angeles “had contracted the measles,” the chancellor wrote. Los Angeles County is one of several regions acr

6h

David J. Thouless (1934-2019)

David J. Thouless (1934-2019) David J. Thouless (1934-2019), Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01424-y Theoretical physicist who discovered topological phases of matter.

6h

Intel’s Data-Center Flavor of Xe GPU Will Support Ray Tracing

Intel announced today that its upcoming Xe GPU would support professional ray tracing application, at least in the data center version. The post Intel’s Data-Center Flavor of Xe GPU Will …

6h

Australian voyage to reveal climate change effects in Indian Ocean

An Australian voyage retracing part of the historic first International Indian Ocean Expedition expects to reveal the effects of climate change on the physics, chemistry and biology of the waters of the south-east Indian Ocean.

6h

A Three-Eyed Snake Has Been Discovered in a Small Australian Town

Ever get the feeling you're being watched?

6h

Sådan skal renseanlæggets udløbsledning producere el

PLUS. Flere renseanlæg har store fald på deres udløbsledninger. BlueKolding installerer nu som de første i Danmark en turbine til at producere strøm fra vandet. Men tilbagebetalingstiden er lang

6h

Researchers ready B cells for novel cell therapy

Scientists are paving the way to use gene-edited B cells — a type of white blood cell in the immune system — to treat a wide range of potential diseases that affect children, including hemophilia and other protein deficiency disorders, autoimmune diseases, and infectious diseases. If successful, their research would open the door to offering this experimental cell therapy as the first-of-its-kin

7h

Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet

Scientists have discovered that two major forces have shaped bat skulls over their evolutionary history: echolocation and diet. Their findings help explain the wide diversity of skull shapes among bats and reveal the intricate details of how evolutionary pressures can shape animal bodies.

7h

Chinese hospitals set to sell experimental cell therapies

Chinese hospitals set to sell experimental cell therapies Chinese hospitals set to sell experimental cell therapies, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01161-2 Under a draft proposal, patients would be able to buy some therapies without regulatory approval.

7h

Brain-Machine Interfaces Could Give Us All Superpowers

The new documentary 'I Am Human' chronicles how neurotechnology could restore sight, retrain the body, and treat diseases—then make us all more than human.

7h

Mathematician's breakthrough on non-toxic pest control that doesn't harm bees

A University of Sussex mathematician, Dr. Konstantin Blyuss, working with biologists at the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, has developed a chemical-free way to precisely target a parasitic worm that destroys wheat crops.

7h

Mathematician's breakthrough on non-toxic pest control that doesn't harm bees

A University of Sussex mathematician, Dr. Konstantin Blyuss, working with biologists at the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, has developed a chemical-free way to precisely target a parasitic worm that destroys wheat crops.

7h

Genetic study of yams adds more evidence of the Niger River Basin serving as a cradle of agriculture

An international team of researchers has found more evidence to support the theory that the Niger River Basin was an early cradle of agriculture. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their genetic analysis of yams and what they found.

7h

Spider venom is a dangerous cocktail

Spider venom does not only consist of neurotoxins but also of a multitude of dangerous constituents. Researchers of the University of Bern present a summary of many years of spider venom research in a new study and show how various substances present in spider venom interact with each other and thus effectively render the spider's prey defenseless.

7h

UK becomes first country to declare a 'climate emergency'

On Wednesday night a bipartisan UK Parliament passed an extraordinary measure: a national declaration of an Environment and Climate Emergency.

7h

Newly discovered gene mutation reduces fear and anxiety, and increases social interaction

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Oulu have discovered of a new type of gene mutation that reduces fear and anxiety, and increases social interaction. The researchers employed gene manipulation technology to remove the P4h-tm gene from the mouse genome and found an unexpected change in mouse behaviour. P4h-tm knockout mice showed striking courage and a lack of

7h

Biological Lanthanides, Weirdly

I hadn’t realized it, but there are some new elements that have been added to the “essential for biochemistry” list, and they’re a bit of a surprise. (I blogged about odd metals in biology a few years ago ). I would guess that anything new at this point would be a surprise – the most recent element added to such a list was cadmium, which was found to be used by some species of diatoms in 2000. Th

7h

Genetic study of yams adds more evidence of the Niger River Basin serving as a cradle of agriculture

An international team of researchers has found more evidence to support the theory that the Niger River Basin was an early cradle of agriculture. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their genetic analysis of yams and what they found.

7h

Spider venom is a dangerous cocktail

Spider venom does not only consist of neurotoxins but also of a multitude of dangerous constituents. Researchers of the University of Bern present a summary of many years of spider venom research in a new study and show how various substances present in spider venom interact with each other and thus effectively render the spider's prey defenseless.

7h

Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet

Humans may be forgiven for overlooking bats. After all, many bat species are out and about when we're turning in. And generations of Dracula lore may have made us a little wary.

7h

Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet

Humans may be forgiven for overlooking bats. After all, many bat species are out and about when we're turning in. And generations of Dracula lore may have made us a little wary.

7h

Birds use social cues to make decisions

A new study suggests that some birds prioritize social information over visual evidence when making breeding choices.

7h

New digital filter approach aims to improve chemical measurements

An expert in measurement science has led a team to design a new filter aimed at helping drug developers and researchers create more exact measurements early in the drug development stage, which can ultimately help move a drug to clinical trials faster.

7h

Naughty dentists, or how UCLA hunts a whistleblower

Dentistry professors at UCLA published manipulated data in top-level journals. When a colleague reported them, the university retaliated against the whistleblower.

7h

Synchronizing food production can have disastrous effects

Crop failures are an important cause of food price spikes, conflict and food insecurity. The likelihood of local crop failures being catastrophic at the global level is exacerbated when they happen at the same time —that is, when our agricultural systems become more synchronized.

7h

New study finds high rates of formula use with low-income infants, recommends changes

New research by George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services found high rates of non-exclusive breastfeeding and early infant formula introduction. Their sample included low-income, predominately Hispanic immigrant women participating in a local Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).

7h

How on Earth Did Stephen Moore Get Picked for the Federal Reserve?

Stephen Moore’s nomination to the Federal Reserve is in danger of going the way of Herman Cain’s—which is to say, it is in danger of never happening at all. President Donald Trump had planned to nominate both men to the Fed’s Board of Governors, but after a barrage of criticism, Cain asked Trump last month not to nominate him, Trump said in a tweet . Now Moore’s nomination is teetering, with a gr

7h

It's time to vote for happiness and well-being, not mere economic growth. Here's why:

As the federal election approaches, we're expected to drown in slogans like "lower taxes", "wage growth", "franking credit reform" or "negative gearing reforms". These mostly assume voters are as obsessed as the politicians with economic and financial issues, rather than, say, the kind of Australia they want their grandchildren to live in.

7h

Machine learning paves the way for next-level quantum sensing

Researchers at the University of Bristol have reached new heights of sophistication in detecting magnetic fields with extreme sensitivity at room temperature by combining machine learning with a quantum sensor.

7h

7h

7h

7h

These squishy robots are designed to survive falls, save lives

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

7h

7h

7h

FPGAs Open Gates in Machine Learning

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

7h

Learning about Critical Thinking from Kitty Claws and Ice Cream Cones

Picture books provide some of our earliest and most concise introductions into how and why we make decisions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

The Only Thing You Can’t Subscribe to Now Is Stability

I’m a person with a toilet-paper subscription. I bought it through my Amazon Prime subscription: Every few months, an embarrassing box of toilet paper arrives at my apartment, at which point I’m charged around $30, which includes the 5 percent savings the retailer awarded me to secure my toilet-paper business in perpetuity. The same thing happens when the pet-supply company sends me two bags of d

7h

Another Rom-Com About How Crazy It Would Be to Fall for Seth Rogen

It is a truth universally acknowledged, at least in cinematic comedies of the past decade or so, that just about every woman on-screen must be in want of Seth Rogen. From Knocked Up to Zack and Miri Make a Porno to Neighbors , Hollywood has continually presented the star as a romantic lead while marveling at the supposed ludicrousness of the concept, to the extent that his new vehicle is a rom-co

7h

No ink needed for these graphene artworks

When you read about electrifying art, "electrifying" isn't usually a verb. But an artist working with a Rice University lab is in fact making artwork that can deliver a jolt.

7h

Seeking disorder as a catalyst for change

Green chemists dream of replicating the reactions of photosynthesis. Of the possible outcomes, one of the most talked about is the ability to make affordable hydrogen fuels from water. In theory, the only by-product of burning hydrogen is water. But right now most hydrogen is either extracted from fossil fuels or made using energy intensive processes powered by fossil fuels.

7h

Simulations identify importance of lattice distortions in ion-conducting fuel cell materials

Ionic conduction involves the movement of ions from one location to another inside a material. The ions travel through point defects, which are irregularities in the otherwise consistent arrangement of atoms known as the crystal lattice. This sometimes sluggish process can limit the performance and efficiency of fuel cells, batteries, and other energy storage technologies.

7h

New BioIVT research on botanical-drug interactions published in Applied In Vitro Toxicology

This study investigates the potential for clinically-relevant botanical-drug interactions (BDIs) with Boswellia serrata (Indian Frankincense), a botanical that is used as an anti-inflammatory supplement. The popularity of products containing B. serrata extract is growing. US retail sales of B. serrata reached $14.6 million in 2017 and it continues to move up the top 40 list of best-selling herbal

7h

Narhvalens overraskende overlevelsesstrategi: En million år med ekstrem lav genetisk diversitet

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har kortlagt en Vestgrønlandsk narhvals genetiske slægtshistorie…

7h

Searching in vein: a history of artificial blood

Health For centuries scientists have sought an artificial substitute for blood. Equipped with modern nanotechnology and a humbler strategy, bioengineers think they’re closer than ever. Since the early 1600s, physicians have unsuccessfully pursued a suitable substitute for the life-giving elixir of blood. We’ve come a long way, but the modern demand for…

7h

When Coding Is Criminal

Opinion: Programmers whose code is used to commit a crime face new and perilous legal threats.

8h

Jakarta Is Sinking. Now Indonesia Has to Find a New Capital

By 2050, 95 percent of North Jakarta could be submerged. Blame rising seas, but also the fact that the city is sinking 10 inches a year.

8h

Why I Love My Teeny Tiny Knock-Off Nokia

It's about the size of an eraser, but don't underestimate its formidable practicality!

8h

How did the Earth get its water? Asteroid sample gives a surprising answer

Water is essential for life on Earth and is one of our most precious natural resources. But considering how our planet formed, it is quite surprising how much water we still have. The Earth aggregated from a cloud of gas and dust – a protoplanetary disk – and was incandescently hot for the first few million years. Its surface was kept molten by impacts from comets and asteroids. Earth's interior w

8h

Pilots Reporting UFOs

The Navy recently drafted new policies for how its pilots and other personnel should report any encounters with “unexplained aerial phenomena” – more commonly known as unidentified flying objects, or UFOs. They say this is in response to an uptick in pilots reporting such encounters and requesting a formal way to report them. The reporting on this topic ironically reveals the underlying problem i

8h

Do You Suffer from “Compassion Collapse”?

submitted by /u/TheLavinGuy [link] [comments]

8h

Suicidal thoughts? Therapy-oriented website can help

Mental health researchers behind the website nowmattersnow.org have demonstrated that the site could be beneficial in decreasing suicidal thoughts.

8h

High levels of pharmaceuticals in the Humber estuary

Analysis of water samples from the UK's Humber estuary revealed high levels of pharmaceuticals, with ibuprofen found at some of the highest concentrations ever reported across the globe.

8h

Phonon-mediated quantum state transfer and remote qubit entanglement

Quantum information platforms are based on qubits that talk to each other and photons (optical and microwave) are the carrier of choice—to date, to transfer quantum states between qubits. However, in some solid-state systems, acoustic vibrational properties of the material themselves known as phonons can be advantageous. In a recent study published on Science Advances, B. Bienfait and colleagues a

8h

Is it ethical to revive a dead pig’s brain?

Did researchers really bring dead pigs back to life? The headlines earlier this month didn’t say exactly that (the words “partly alive” were more common), but the story still had the scientific community buzzing: Yale University researchers had revived some cellular function in the brains of slaughtered swine. The researchers did not revive enough function to restore consciousness, they stress, b

8h

CO2-udledningen fra transport faldt i 2018 – men er stadig højere end efter krisen

Mens den samlede CO2-udledning steg fra 2017 til 2018, så faldt udledningen fra transport. Det er dog stadig ikke nede på de niveauer, der var umiddelbart efter finanskrisen.

8h

Skanning efter bevis mot smoltslukande skarvar

Flera tusen av de ett- och tvååriga laxfiskar, så kallade smolt, som sätts ut i Dalälven varje år märks med små elektroniska märken – PIT tags (Passive Integrated Transponder). Märkningen görs primärt för att få information om vad som händer med fiskarna och hur många som återvänder till älven i vuxen ålder. Även i Testeboån har Testeboåns fiskevårdsområde (FVOF)på senare år börjat märka smolt fr

8h

New approach could accelerate efforts to catalogue vast numbers of cells

Artistic sketches can be used to capture details of a scene in a simpler image. MIT researchers are now bringing that concept to computational biology, with a novel method that extracts comprehensive samples—called "sketches"—of massive cell datasets that are easier to analyze for biological and medical studies.

8h

What happens when schools go solar?

Sunshine splashing onto school rooftops and campuses across the country is an undertapped resource that could help shrink electricity bills, new research suggests.

8h

New approach could accelerate efforts to catalogue vast numbers of cells

Artistic sketches can be used to capture details of a scene in a simpler image. MIT researchers are now bringing that concept to computational biology, with a novel method that extracts comprehensive samples—called "sketches"—of massive cell datasets that are easier to analyze for biological and medical studies.

8h

Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean

Arsenic is a deadly poison for most living things, but new research shows that microorganisms are breathing arsenic in a large area of the Pacific Ocean. A University of Washington team has discovered that an ancient survival strategy is still being used in low-oxygen parts of the marine environment.

8h

NASA Uncovers 20-Year Aluminum Scheme That Caused 2 Failed Missions

It turns out a company called Sapa Profiles, Inc. (SPI) has been selling compromised aluminum for almost 20 years with falsified testing certificates. This likely caused the loss of two NASA spacecraft. The post NASA Uncovers 20-Year Aluminum Scheme That Caused 2 Failed Missions appeared first on ExtremeTech .

8h

Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality

Imperial researchers are using a new approach to understand why same-sex behaviour is so common across the animal kingdom.

8h

Scientists explore the evolution of animal homosexuality

Imperial researchers are using a new approach to understand why same-sex behaviour is so common across the animal kingdom.

8h

Experiments and analyses show how electrons and protons get together on an electrode surface

One of the most fundamental chemical reactions that takes place in energy-conversion systems—including catalysts, flow batteries, high-capacity energy-storing supercapacitors, and systems to make fuels using solar energy—has now been analyzed in detail. The results could inform the development of new electrode or catalyst materials with properties precisely tuned to match the energy levels needed

8h

Promising material could lead to faster, cheaper computer memory

Computer memory could become faster and cheaper thanks to research into a promising class of materials by University of Arkansas physicists.

8h

FRIPON camera atop ESTEC

Asteroid researcher Kristiane Schmidt and ESA data technician Andrea Toni inspect a camera fixed to the five-storey-high rooftop of ESA's technical heart in the Netherlands, keeping a constant watch for fireballs – very bright meteors burning up in the atmosphere.

8h

Fashion production is modern slavery: Five things you can do to help now

Fashion shouldn't cost lives and it shouldn't cost us our planet. Yet this is what is happening today. Globalization, fast fashion, economies of scale, social media and offshore production have created a perfect storm for cheap, easy and abundant fashion consumption. And there are few signs of it slowing down: clothing production has nearly doubled in the last 15 years.

8h

Announcing Crazy/Genius Season 3: Unbreak the Internet

Subscribe to Crazy/Genius : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Ten years ago, “Move fast and break things” was the clarion call of the world’s tech giants. Well, they moved fast and broke stuff, alright. Lots of stuff. Whether it’s Facebook privacy scandals, YouTube’s radicalization of the far right, or China’s brutal use of surveillance gadgetry, digital technology seems to be a r

8h

Chemistry Can Be More Fun than You Think

A first-year college student has rebooted the periodic table of the elements in a whimsical and compelling way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

A solar-powered mini-device churns out hydrogen fuel

A solar-powered mini-device churns out hydrogen fuel A solar-powered mini-device churns out hydrogen fuel , Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01387-0 Clean fuel could be produced using concentrated solar energy.

8h

I Aarhus skal solcellerne også stå for opvarmning

PLUS. Over 700 kvadratmeter solceller på taget af en boligforening i Aarhus skal ud over el også levere opvarmet kølevand.

8h

US Navy tests underwater robots that recharge by eating fish faeces

The US Navy has built a device for charging underwater robots that gets its energy by digesting fish faeces and other organic matter on the sea floor

9h

'Walls Often Fail; They Have Unintended Consequences'

As America argues about the security of the nation’s southern border, Iraq and Syria grapple with a wall of their own, one that’s keeping people safe—and tearing them apart. One writer journeys across the divide.

9h

The Existential Crisis Plaguing Online Extremism Researchers

Chronicling the internet's worst impulses can be depressing, and every remedy only seems to make things worse.

9h

15 Best Mother’s Day Gifts: Ideas for New Moms (2019)

First-time moms can find the transition overwhelming. These Mother's Day gifts will help. So will the snacks.

9h

InSight captures sunrise and sunset on Mars

NASA's InSight lander captured a series of sunrise and sunset images.

9h

How do you like your coffee? Rectally?

Fill it to the rim? Please don't.

9h

Can Silicon Valley entrepreneurs make crickets the next chicken?

Entrepreneurs are bringing automation and data analysis to insect agriculture to build a profitable business that helps feed the planet.

9h

Chemistry Can Be More Fun than You Think

A first-year college student has rebooted the periodic table of the elements in a whimsical and compelling way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

The Philosopher Who Says We Should Play God – Issue 72: Quandary

Australian bioethicist Julian Savulescu has a knack for provocation. Take human cloning. He says most of us would readily accept it if it benefited us. As for eugenics—creating smarter, stronger, more beautiful babies—he believes we have an ethical obligation to use advanced technology to select the best possible children. A protégé of the philosopher Peter Singer, Savulescu is a prominent moral

9h

Human Exceptionalism Stifles Progress – Issue 72: Quandary

Last November Chinese scientist He Jiankui announced the birth of twin babies whose germline he claimed to have altered to reduce their susceptibility to contracting HIV. The news of embryo editing and gene-edited babies prompted immediate condemnation both within and beyond the scientific community. An ABC News headline asked: “Genetically edited babies—scientific advancement or playing God?” Th

9h

Fästingar gynnas av varmare klimat

Den fästing som står för nästan alla angrepp på människor och andra däggdjur i Sverige heter Ixodes ricinus och kallas den ”vanliga fästingen”. Varje år drabbas mellan 200 och 400 svenskar av allvarlig TBE-sjukdom, som orsakas av ett virus som kallas TBEV (tick-borne encephalitis virus). Sjukdomen har ökat stadigt sedan 1980-talet. I vissa fall leder TBE-sjukdom till hjärnhinne- och hjärninflammat

9h

Animal bones found at bottom of Hoyo Negro shed light on the Great American Biotic Interchange

A team of researchers from the U.S. and Mexico has found bone skeletons at the bottom of the Hoyo Negro cave that show that some animals thought to have existed only in South America also existed …

9h

Watching Apollo 11 with NASA Historian Bill Barry

The agency’s chief historian discusses the film and what the moon missions can teach us about global challenges today — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Watching Apollo 11 with NASA Historian Bill Barry

The agency’s chief historian discusses the film and what the moon missions can teach us about global challenges today — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Autism Symptoms May Improve with Modification of Hormone Pathway

Two clinical trials that altered vasopressin signaling report improved social functions in people with autism spectrum disorder, but researchers caution against overinterpreting the results.

9h

A Boy Heard a Buzzing Sound in His Ear. It Was a Tick on His Eardrum.

There are some sounds you hope you never hear. For example, the buzzing sound of a tick burrowing into your eardrum.

9h

The Bad News About Delivering Bad News

As a research assistant at one of the top teaching hospitals in the U.S., I’ve come to realize how little we understand about teaching doctors to communicate with patients. Doctors have been looking to the scientific community for guidance, but research studies rarely offer genuinely useful solutions.

9h

Ice Age Bear and Wolf-Like Creature Found in Underwater Mexican Cave

Divers excavating an underwater cave in Mexico have discovered the bones of giant meat eaters that lived there during the last ice age, a new study reported.

9h

Amazon says fully automated shipping warehouses are at least a decade away

submitted by /u/nopantsdolphin [link] [comments]

9h

How do we integrate Fusion Energy?

I always wondered once fusion energy is fruitful, in which areas we will be able to use its energy? I guess the most direct application is to use it similar to nuclear reactors and just feed the existing electricity infrastructure to produce light, run machines and so on. But are there also different applications when it comes to food production for instance? Or does it all come down to producing

9h

9h

Smashed Ancient Tablet Suggests Biblical King Was Real. But Not Everyone Agrees.

The Mesha Stele is a 3-foot-tall black basalt stone that dates to the second half of the ninth century B.C.

9h

Radio Atlantic: Is Politics Funny Anymore?

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Last weekend’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner was the first one in years without a comedian. In the Donald Trump era, comedians have struggled to adjust—are things too serious? Too biased? Too absurd? Is any of it funny anymore? Jordan Klepper has been on three very different political-comedy shows in three years.

9h

All of the Impeachable Offenses

Ever since the release of the Mueller report, old-guard Democrats have held back on the question of impeachment. Though House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer walked back his comments that impeachment was “not worthwhile,” he set the tone for his party’s skepticism of what, Democratic leaders warn, could be a politically risky move. Meanwhile, the president announced on Twitter, “Only high crimes and

9h

Why It Matters Where College Students Binge-Drink

On Saturday, April 27, at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, a group of students calling themselves the Coalition to End Fraternity Violence seized the fraternity house of the campus’s Phi Kappa Psi chapter, one of two fraternities on campus. Earlier in April, according to The Philadelphia Inquirer , internal documents from the frat that were leaked to campus news outlets included Phi Kappa Psi

9h

Knock Down the House and the Quiet Insurgency of Tears

A scene near the end of the new documentary Knock Down the House finds Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, five days after her surprise win in the 2018 primary, visiting the landmark that would soon become her office. Perched on a ledge in front of the U.S. Capitol, the building sprawling and gleaming in the midsummer sun, the Democratic nominee for New York’s 14th Congressional District talks about an ear

9h

BAT's year-long study to assess potential health effects of using Tobacco Heating Products

A year-long study to assess the health effects of switching from smoking cigarettes to using Tobacco Heating Products has been launched by British American Tobacco (BAT).

9h

Researchers ready B cells for novel cell therapy

Scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute are paving the way to use gene-edited B cells — a type of white blood cell in the immune system — to treat a wide range of potential diseases that affect children, including hemophilia and other protein deficiency disorders, autoimmune diseases, and infectious diseases. If successful, their research would open the door to offering this experime

9h

Stressing about aging damages your brain, shortens your life

The best anti-aging advice? Stop stereotyping old people! Cultural messaging about the pitfalls of old age causes undue stress that prematurely ages the brain and shortens life spans. People who have a positive outlook on aging can live 7.5 years longer than those who buy into cultural stereotypes about getting old. It's important to look at the positives of aging, not just the risk factors: Alzh

9h

9h

Denne elbil koster under 80.000 kroner – men kan vise sig at være for simpel til det nordiske marked

Lav topfart og ikke specielt avanceret teknologi. Det lyder ikke som oplagte salgspunkter. Til gengæld er Renaults nye elbil billig.

10h

Julian Assange dømt til 50 ugers fængsel for overtrædelse af kaution i Storbritannien

Dommen falder på baggrund af Wikileaks-medstifterens skjul på den ecuadorianske ambassade i Storbritannien.

10h

Clonal evolution patterns in acute myeloid leukemia with NPM1 mutation

Clonal evolution patterns in acute myeloid leukemia with NPM1 mutation Clonal evolution patterns in acute myeloid leukemia with NPM1 mutation, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09745-2 NPM1 gene mutation is a founding event in acute myeloid leukaemia. Here, the authors find that at relapse, some patients lose the NPM1 mutation and show distinct mutational and gene expression p

10h

Three phylogenetic groups have driven the recent population expansion of Cryptococcus neoformans

Three phylogenetic groups have driven the recent population expansion of Cryptococcus neoformans Three phylogenetic groups have driven the recent population expansion of Cryptococcus neoformans , Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10092-5 Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen which primarily affects people with immune defects including those living with HI

10h

TMEM33 regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis in renal tubular epithelial cells

TMEM33 regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis in renal tubular epithelial cells TMEM33 regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis in renal tubular epithelial cells, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10045-y Polycystin-2 (PC2) is an ion channel commonly found mutated in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Here Arhatte et al. identify transmembrane protein 33 (TM

10h

The emergence of cost effective battery storage

The emergence of cost effective battery storage The emergence of cost effective battery storage, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09988-z It is important to examine the economic viability of battery storage investments. Here the authors introduced the Levelized Cost of Energy Storage metric to estimate the breakeven cost for energy storage and found that behind-the-meter stor

10h

Transmission of natural scene images through a multimode fibre

Transmission of natural scene images through a multimode fibre Transmission of natural scene images through a multimode fibre, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10057-8 The optical transmission of images through a multimode fibre remains an outstanding challenge. Here, the authors implement a method that statistically reconstructs the inverse transformation matrix for a fibre

10h

Differences in S/G ratio in natural poplar variants do not predict catalytic depolymerization monomer yields

Differences in S/G ratio in natural poplar variants do not predict catalytic depolymerization monomer yields Differences in S/G ratio in natural poplar variants do not predict catalytic depolymerization monomer yields, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09986-1 The ratio of syringyl (S) and guaiacyl (G) units in lignin has been regarded as a major factor in determining the maxi

10h

Using symmetry to elucidate the importance of stoichiometry in colloidal crystal assembly

Using symmetry to elucidate the importance of stoichiometry in colloidal crystal assembly Using symmetry to elucidate the importance of stoichiometry in colloidal crystal assembly, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10031-4 Theoretical schemes to predict colloidal crystals of arbitrary complexity are highly desirable. Here the authors develop a general approach based on symmetr

10h

Whole-genome sequencing reveals novel tandem-duplication hotspots and a prognostic mutational signature in gastric cancer

Whole-genome sequencing reveals novel tandem-duplication hotspots and a prognostic mutational signature in gastric cancer Whole-genome sequencing reveals novel tandem-duplication hotspots and a prognostic mutational signature in gastric cancer, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09644-6 Structural variations in gastric cancer impact progression. Here, the authors perform whole-

10h

Brug tid på at teste koden til din elektronik – og spar tid i sidste ende

PLUS. Tid brugt på at fejlfinde kode er godt givet ud, og få simple processer og ­rutiner gør det til et overskueligt arbejde, lyder det fra ekspert.

10h

CFCS-loven vedtages i dag: Nu kan ansatte få tvangsovervåget data

Med den udvidede CFCS-lov får staten mulighed for at sende falske e-mails til ansatte, for at teste om de kan lokkes til at klikke på links eller udlevere oplysninger.

10h

Tumor cells' drug addiction may be their downfall

Work by researchers at the Babraham Institute in partnership with the global biopharmaceutical company AstraZeneca shows how cancer cells' acquired resistance to anti-cancer drugs proves fatal once the treatment compound is withdrawn.

10h

Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet

Scientists at the University of Washington have discovered that two major forces have shaped bat skulls over their evolutionary history: echolocation and diet. Their findings, published May 2, 2019 in Nature Communications, help explain the wide diversity of skull shapes among bats and reveal the intricate details of how evolutionary pressures can shape animal bodies.

10h

10h

Molecular-scale visualization and surface charge density measurement of Z-DNA in aqueous solution

Molecular-scale visualization and surface charge density measurement of Z-DNA in aqueous solution Molecular-scale visualization and surface charge density measurement of Z-DNA in aqueous solution, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42394-5 Molecular-scale visualization and surface charge density measurement of Z-DNA in aqueous solution

10h

Large apparent growth increases in boreal forests inferred from tree-rings are an artefact of sampling biases

Large apparent growth increases in boreal forests inferred from tree-rings are an artefact of sampling biases Large apparent growth increases in boreal forests inferred from tree-rings are an artefact of sampling biases, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43243-1 Large apparent growth increases in boreal forests inferred from tree-rings are an artefact of sampling biases

10h

Effects of water depth on GBD associated with total dissolved gas supersaturation in Chinese sucker (Myxocyprinus asiaticus) in upper Yangtze River

Effects of water depth on GBD associated with total dissolved gas supersaturation in Chinese sucker ( Myxocyprinus asiaticus ) in upper Yangtze River Effects of water depth on GBD associated with total dissolved gas supersaturation in Chinese sucker ( Myxocyprinus asiaticus ) in upper Yangtze River, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42971-8 Effects of water depth on GBD associ

10h

Amelioration of obesity-related biomarkers by Lactobacillus sakei CJLS03 in a high-fat diet-induced obese murine model

Amelioration of obesity-related biomarkers by Lactobacillus sakei CJLS03 in a high-fat diet-induced obese murine model Amelioration of obesity-related biomarkers by Lactobacillus sakei CJLS03 in a high-fat diet-induced obese murine model, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43092-y Amelioration of obesity-related biomarkers by Lactobacillus sakei CJLS03 in a high-fat diet-induce

10h

Cluh plays a pivotal role during adipogenesis by regulating the activity of mitochondria

Cluh plays a pivotal role during adipogenesis by regulating the activity of mitochondria Cluh plays a pivotal role during adipogenesis by regulating the activity of mitochondria, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43410-4 Cluh plays a pivotal role during adipogenesis by regulating the activity of mitochondria

10h

Resonant Tunneling Induced Enhancement of Electron Field Emission by Ultra-Thin Coatings

Resonant Tunneling Induced Enhancement of Electron Field Emission by Ultra-Thin Coatings Resonant Tunneling Induced Enhancement of Electron Field Emission by Ultra-Thin Coatings, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43149-y Resonant Tunneling Induced Enhancement of Electron Field Emission by Ultra-Thin Coatings

10h

Remotely sensed indicators and open-access biodiversity data to assess bird diversity patterns in Mediterranean rural landscapes

Remotely sensed indicators and open-access biodiversity data to assess bird diversity patterns in Mediterranean rural landscapes Remotely sensed indicators and open-access biodiversity data to assess bird diversity patterns in Mediterranean rural landscapes, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43330-3 Remotely sensed indicators and open-access biodiversity data to assess bird di

10h

How Drug Companies Helped Shape A Shifting, Biological View Of Mental Illness

Mind Fixers , by historian Anne Harrington, takes a hard look at the ways the marketing of a new pill to treat a mental disorder can change the way the condition is defined and treated. (Image credit: James Wardell/Radius Images/Getty Images)

11h

Luftforureningen er dobbelt så slem som ventet: Minister fastholder milde miljøzoner

Miljøministeren skærper ikke lovforslag om miljøzoner yderligere, selv om ministeriets rådgivere har offentliggjort nye tal, der viser, at de økonomiske omkostninger ved luftforureningen er dobbelt så store som hidtil antaget.

11h

12h

Image of the Day: Amoeba Nibbles

A pathogenic amoeba species ingests parts of human cells and steals human cell membrane proteins to display on its own surface.

12h

Graviditetsdiabetes: skillnader mellan Indien och Sverige

Indiska kvinnor är både yngre och smalare än svenska kvinnor när de utvecklar graviditetsdiabetes, visar en ny studie från Lunds universitets Diabetescentrum.Forskarna fann även en genvariant som ökar risken för graviditetsdiabetes hos svenska kvinnor men som tvärtom visade sig ha en skyddande effekt hos de indiska kvinnorna.

12h

Huge mega-rafts carried dinosaur-era animals on round-the-world trips

Floating logs over 10 metres long were the basis for miniature ecosystems that carried marine creatures all over the world during the Jurassic era

12h

12h

Children and teens who drink low-calorie sweetened beverages do not save calories

US children and teens who consumed low-calorie or zero-calorie sweetened beverages took in about 200 extra calories on a given day compared to those who drank water, and they took in about the same number of calories as youth who consumed sugary beverages, according to a new study.

12h

12h

Creating AI Based Cameraman

submitted by /u/aswath_madhu [link] [comments]

13h

13h

Finding cures against aging should be humanity's number 1 priority

Curing aging is a biological and technological issue that can be solved, optimally sooner than later, so we arrive to the big question: Should we cure aging? I will answer this by addressing some of the most common myths regarding life-extension. 1) "Curing aging is morally wrong" According to the principles of bioethics, like the principle of beneficence, since curing aging would benefit people,

13h

Forced responses: May 2019

A bimonthly open thread on climate solutions and policies. If you want to discuss climate science, please use the Unforced Variations thread instead.

13h

Alaska's indigenous people feel the heat of climate change

The cemetery has already been moved twice, the old school is underwater and the new one is facing the same fate as erosion constantly eats away at the land in Napakiak.

13h

Unforced variations: May 2019

This month’s open thread about climate science topics. For discussions about solutions and policy, please use the Forced Variations open thread.

13h

Beyond Meat raises $241 mn amid growing appetite for vegan food

Vegan burger upstart Beyond Meat, whose backers include Hollywood star Leonardo DiCaprio and Microsoft founder Bill Gates, has raised $241 million from its initial public offering, valuing the firm at about $1.5 billion as it surfs a wave of flexitarianism.

13h

New reading of Mesha Stele could have far-reaching consequences for biblical history

The biblical King Balak may have been a historical figure, according to a new reading of the Mesha Stele, an inscribed stone dating from the second half of the 9th century BCE.

13h

Attacks on Brazil's ecological paradises threaten biodiversity

Brazil is home to more than half of the world's plant and animal species, but its ecological paradises are facing growing threats from big business and criminal outfits who have found a champion in far-right President Jair Bolsonaro, experts say.

13h

Study shows birds use social cues to make decisions

A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that some birds prioritize social information over visual evidence when making breeding choices.

13h

Defining Hurricane Michael's impact on St. Joe Bay, Florida

Hurricane Michael tore a path through Panama City, Mexico Beach, and Port St. Joe, Florida in October 2018. The storm devastated the area and created a new pass along the St. Joseph Peninsula, just north of the entrance to T.H. Stone Memorial St. Joseph Peninsula State Park. The Bay is a Florida Aquatic Preserve and supports vast meadows of seagrass and a rich assemblage of animals that live in th

13h

Vaccination may help protect bats from deadly disease

A new study shows that vaccination may reduce the impact of white-nose syndrome in bats, marking a milestone in the international fight against one of the most destructive wildlife diseases in modern times.

13h

Study shows birds use social cues to make decisions

A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that some birds prioritize social information over visual evidence when making breeding choices.

13h

Vaccination may help protect bats from deadly disease

A new study shows that vaccination may reduce the impact of white-nose syndrome in bats, marking a milestone in the international fight against one of the most destructive wildlife diseases in modern times.

13h

New digital filter approach aims to improve chemical measurements

Precise measurements are critical to the discovery, development and usage of medications. Major financial and scientific decisions within pharmaceutical companies are informed by the outcomes of chemical and biological analyses. Even slight measurement variations can add risk and uncertainty in these high-stakes decisions.

13h

When apple trees blossom, worker bees rock

In an apple orchard outside Paris, a constant hum among the blossoming trees bears witness to thousands of worker bees pollinating millions of flowers in just three weeks.

13h

When apple trees blossom, worker bees rock

In an apple orchard outside Paris, a constant hum among the blossoming trees bears witness to thousands of worker bees pollinating millions of flowers in just three weeks.

13h

13h

Hulu reports growing user base, new shows, with Disney in control

Hulu announced Wednesday that its user base has grown to some 28 million as the streaming video platform now controlled by Walt Disney gears up to take on Netflix.

13h

780,000 evacuated in India ahead of major cyclone

Nearly 800,000 people in India's eastern coastal districts have been evacuated ahead of the expected arrival of a major cyclone packing winds of up to 200 kilometres (125 miles) per hour, officials said Thursday.

13h

Judge rules Lyft must follow New York rules for driver minimum wage

Ride-hailing company Lyft must abide by a new rule in New York guaranteeing the equivalent of a minimum wage to drivers, a judge ruled Wednesday.

13h

SpaceX capsule was destroyed in 'anomaly': lawmaker

A space capsule suspected to have exploded last month in an incident characterized by manufacturer SpaceX as an "anomaly" was in fact completely destroyed, a US Senator confirmed Wednesday.

13h

UK climate panel sets big goals: less meat, drive electric

The U.K. should effectively eliminate greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 by rapidly adopting policies that will change everything from the way people heat their homes to what they eat, an independent committee that advises the British government on climate change recommended Thursday.

13h

As car-sharing picks up in US, so do legislative battles

When Chris Williamson was in the market for a new family car, a timely ad and conversations with a co-worker convinced him to try something out of the ordinary. He bought a BMW 3 Series convertible and covers the payments by renting it to strangers on a peer-to-peer car sharing app called Turo.

13h

13h

13h

How the (Once) Most Corrupt Country in the World Got Clean(er)

JAKARTA, Indonesia—Political corruption is a fact of life in many countries, and it can be fiendishly difficult to control. The worst offenders, almost by definition, are some of the most powerful figures in their community. Many of the police officers, prosecutors, and judges who might hold them in check owe their job to the very same individuals. It’s a thorny problem, even for countries with w

14h

Chimpstagram: video of ape browsing app goes viral – what is going on?

The internet has been captivated by Sugriva and her use of Instagram, but some animal experts haven’t been so impressed Chimpanzees are known to use at least 22 types of tools in the wild but in captivity a less rudimentary device now appears to be within ape capabilities – Instagram. Last week, a video showing a chimpanzee casually swiping through Instagram on a smartphone was posted on the phot

15h

Kun den stærkeste overlever: Det gælder bare ikke for narhvalen

Narhvalen har overraskende lav genetisk diversitet, afslører dansk forskning.

15h

New digital filter approach aims to improve chemical measurements

A Purdue University professor and expert in measurement science has led a team to design a new filter aimed at helping drug developers and researchers create more exact measurements early in the drug development stage, which can ultimately help move a drug to clinical trials faster.

15h

Snoring causes injuries and prevention of healing in the upper airways

The recurrent vibrations caused by snoring can lead to injuries in the upper airways of people who snore heavily. This in turn, can cause swallowing dysfunction and render individuals more vulnerable for developing the severe condition obstructive sleep apnea. These findings are reported by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden.

15h

Study shows birds use social cues to make decisions

A new study in The Auk: Ornithological Advances suggests that some birds prioritize social information over visual evidence when making breeding choices.

15h

Medical costs create hardships for more than half of Americans

A new study by American Cancer Society researchers finds more than half of people in the US report problems with affordability, stress, or delaying care because of medical costs

15h

Teaching happiness to dementia caregivers reduces their depression, anxiety

Caring for family members with dementia — which is on the rise in the US — causes significant emotional and physical stress that increases caregivers' risk of depression, anxiety and death. A new method of coping with that stress by teaching people how to focus on positive emotions reduced their anxiety and depression after six weeks, reports a new national study. It also resulted in better self

15h

1,4 pct. af fødevarer i Danmark indeholder flere pesticidrester end tilladt

Blandt de testede fødevaregrupper er frugt og grøntsager den gruppe, der oftest indeholder pesticidrester, konkluderer ny rapport fra Danmarks Tekniske Universitet.

16h

16h

Kaspersky: Malware brugte Google Docs som kommunikationskanal

Avanceret malware kunne i udgangspunktet kun dekrypteres af serienummer på det rigtige offers harddisk.

16h

Ny opgørelse skyder miljøministerens centrale kvælstof-påstand ned

Jakob Ellemann-Jensen gentog flere gange på samråd, at landbruget ikke har udnyttet landbrugspakkens øgede kvælstofkvote. En opgørelse fra Aarhus Universitet viser imidlertid, at landbruget har udnyttet lige så stor en del som før landbrugspakken, og nu føler oppositionen sig vildledt.

16h

Software Sniffs Out Rat Squeaks

Algorithms learned to sift ultrasonic rat squeaks from other noise, which could help researchers who study rodents’ emotional states. Lucy Huang reports.

17h

The start-up striving to accelerate drug discovery

Insitro is attempting to create an equal partnership between the life sciences and computer sciences

17h

17h

18h

Amazon's Growing Robot Army Keeps Warehouses Humming

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

18h

Software Sniffs Out Rat Squeaks

Algorithms learned to sift ultrasonic rat squeaks from other noise, which could help researchers who study rodents’ emotional states. Lucy Huang reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Software Sniffs Out Rat Squeaks

Algorithms learned to sift ultrasonic rat squeaks from other noise, which could help researchers who study rodents’ emotional states. Lucy Huang reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

How hacked rental e-scooters could be the future of street crime

As we travel in autonomous cars or on electronic scooters, a trick involving a bit of malicious code may put our computer networks at risk, warns Annalee Newitz

18h

18h

Vaccine shows lasting effects against fentanyl addiction in rats

A vaccine that combines a fentanyl antigen with a tetanus toxoid has been shown to reduce fentanyl choices and increase food choices with effects lasting several months in rats. These results suggest that the vaccine may not only decrease dangerous drug-taking behavior, but can also increase behaviors maintained by healthier non-drug alternatives.

18h

Molecular dynamics simulation-guided drug sensitivity prediction for lung cancer with rare EGFR mutations [Medical Sciences]

Next generation sequencing (NGS)-based tumor profiling identified an overwhelming number of uncharacterized somatic mutations, also known as variants of unknown significance (VUS). The therapeutic significance of EGFR mutations outside mutational hotspots, consisting of >50 types, in nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is largely unknown. In fact, our pan-nation screening of…

19h

Indigenous knowledge networks in the face of global change [Sustainability Science]

Indigenous communities rely extensively on plants for food, shelter, and medicine. It is still unknown, however, to what degree their survival is jeopardized by the loss of either plant species or knowledge about their services. To fill this gap, here we introduce indigenous knowledge networks describing the wisdom of indigenous…

19h

Family of neural wiring receptors in bilaterians defined by phylogenetic, biochemical, and structural evidence [Biochemistry]

The evolution of complex nervous systems was accompanied by the expansion of numerous protein families, including cell-adhesion molecules, surface receptors, and their ligands. These proteins mediate axonal guidance, synapse targeting, and other neuronal wiring-related functions. Recently, 32 interacting cell surface proteins belonging to two newly defined families of the Ig…

19h

A homeotic shift late in development drives mimetic color variation in a bumble bee [Evolution]

Natural phenotypic radiations, with their high diversity and convergence, are well-suited for informing how genomic changes translate to natural phenotypic variation. New genomic tools enable discovery in such traditionally nonmodel systems. Here, we characterize the genomic basis of color pattern variation in bumble bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Bombus), a group that…

19h

Cell contact and Nf2/Merlin-dependent regulation of TEAD palmitoylation and activity [Cell Biology]

The Hippo pathway is involved in regulating contact inhibition of proliferation and organ size control and responds to various physical and biochemical stimuli. It is a kinase cascade that negatively regulates the activity of cotranscription factors YAP and TAZ, which interact with DNA binding transcription factors including TEAD and activate…

19h

Sunset on Mars

InSight captures the end of the day, 55 million kilometres away.

19h

19h

Vaccine shows lasting effects against fentanyl addiction in rats

A vaccine that combines a fentanyl antigen with a tetanus toxoid has been shown to reduce fentanyl choices and increase food choices with effects lasting several months in rats. These results suggest that the vaccine may not only decrease dangerous drug-taking behavior, but can also increase behaviors maintained by healthier non-drug alternatives. The findings are presented in the journal Neuropsy

19h

N.J. has naloxone ‘deserts’ in opioid hotspots

People living in the most populous, low-income areas in New Jersey with the highest risk for opioid overdoses have less access to the potentially life-saving opioid reversal drug naloxone, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed how a city’s population and affluence correlate with the availability of naloxone in retail pharmacies. Also known by the brand names Narcan and Evzio, naloxone re

19h

Trump’s Stonewall Is Beginning to Crack

To date, the cover-up has worked about as well as President Donald Trump could have hoped. Almost four years after Trump declared his campaign for the presidency, and more than 30 months since he won that office, he has successfully kept secret almost all the things he wished to keep secret. How much debt does he owe, and to whom? How much of his income derives from people who do business with th

20h

Foot fossils say our ancestors weren’t stuck in trees

African apes adapted to living on the ground, according to a new study that suggests humans evolved from an ancestor not limited to life in the trees. Researchers say the analysis adds a new chapter to evolution and sheds light on what preceded human bipedalism. “Our unique form of human locomotion evolved from an ancestor that moved in similar ways to the living African apes—chimpanzees, bonobos

20h

Climate change: UK 'can cut emissions to nearly zero' by 2050

It could be done at no added cost from previous estimates, and reduce GDP by just 1-2%, a report says.

20h

Trump Administration Files Formal Request to Strike Down All of Obamacare

The court filing, which goes beyond an earlier administration position, is expected to be an issue in the presidential campaign.

20h

The Atlantic Daily: Why Does William Barr Want This Job?

What We’re Following (Susan Walsh / AP) William Barr went to Capitol Hill to defend his handling of the Mueller Report. The attorney general played an outsized role in shaping the narrative that the special counsel had written a nothingburger—though the report itself was more nuanced. (A letter from Mueller himself revealed he took issue with Barr’s representations.) After his testimony, Democrat

20h

20h

BHS Launches the Max-AI® AQC-C Recycling CoBot

submitted by /u/bebesiege [link] [comments]

20h

20h

Netflix Amps Up Its Sound, an Asteroid Task Force, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

20h

New reading of Mesha Stele could have far-reaching consequences for biblical history

The biblical King Balak may have been a historical figure, according to a new reading of the Mesha Stele, an inscribed stone dating from the second half of the 9th century BCE.

20h