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nyheder2019maj03

End to Aids in sight as huge study finds drugs stop HIV transmission

Paper says risk between male partners is zero if virus fully suppressed by antiretrovirals Aids and HIV timeline: from Terry Higgins to PrEP An end to the Aids epidemic could be in sight after a landmark study found men whose HIV infection was fully suppressed by antiretroviral drugs had no chance of infecting their partner. The success of the medicine means that if everyone with HIV were fully t

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Ministeriet og DSB: Kan vi køre batteritog til Kalundborg?

DSB, Movia og Transportministeriet analyserer, om det er muligt at spare elektrificeringen til Kalundborg og køre direkte tog med batterier mellem København og Nykøbing Sjælland.

13h

Selvmordsrate steg med 28,9 procent efter Netflix-serie udkom

Dansk ekspert kalder første sæson af '13 reasons why' uhensigtsmæssig og dramatisk.

11h

Spotify tests new voice-controlled advertisements that launch podcasts or playlists

Spotify is jumping into the voice technology game. The streaming platform is testing voice-controlled advertisements for some users in the U.S., it revealed on a call with investors this week.

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Why serving others is the most effective way to be a leader

Robert K. Greenleaf coined the phrase "servant leadership" in his 1970 essay The Servant as Leader . "It begins with the natural feeling that one wants to serve, to serve first," Greenleaf wrote. "Then conscious choice brings one to aspire to lead." Former Onyx CEO Tony Coles says this philosophy of leadership "has influenced almost everything" he has done. In this video, learn the key servant le

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The Government Shutdown Killed an Artist's Space Sculpture

Trevor Paglen’s highly anticipated space sculpture made it to orbit, but a shutdown-induced lag at the FCC kept it from inflating as intended.

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An asteroid's water may offer clues to the origin of life on Earth

Space Itokawa is surprisingly wet. These latest findings are likely only the prelude to a slew of new research involving asteroids and water.

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Be heard. Start connecting with people's minds and hearts.

You want to be heard. And there's no school for connecting with audiences more powerful than stand-up comedy. Lisa Lampanelli's career has taught her a few basic principles you can use to connect with any audience, to any purpose. These include practicing servant leadership, being yourself, and speaking from the heart.

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Global Health: F.D.A. Approves the First Vaccine for Dengue Fever, but Limits Its Use

The agency placed restrictions on who can get the vaccine, Dengvaxia. Its use overseas has lagged amid concerns over rare safety risks.

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Humans Domesticated Dogs And Cows. We May Have Also Domesticated Ourselves

Humans have turned many wild animals into cuddlier creatures. We've domesticated wolves into dogs, boars into barnyard pigs and mountain goats into livestock that do yoga. But in addition to helpful animals and adorable pets, humans may have also domesticated an altogether different creature: Homo sapiens. The so-called self-domestication hypothesis, floated by Charles Darwin and formulated by 21s

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Autonomous truck tested on A14 upgrade in UK first

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Biology Will Build the Next Tech Revolution

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Stephenson Cancer Center physician is senior author on major study

A gynecologic oncologist at the Stephenson Cancer Center at OU Medicine was a national leader of a newly published research study that reveals good news for women with ovarian cancer — longer survival times plus a treatment option that causes fewer difficult side effects.

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Cooperation among fishers can improve fish stock in coral reefs

Cooperation within a group of people is key to many successful endeavors, including scientific ones. According to a study published in Nature Communications, cooperation among competing fishers can boost fish stocks on coral reefs.

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Missing molecule hobbles cell movement

Cells are the body's workers, and they often need to move around to do their jobs. Frequently, a cell will move through a tissue — say, the wall of a blood vessel — the way a rock climber scales a cliff, using a protein called integrin to grab onto a spot and pull itself in that direction. But cells missing the CD13 protein on their cell walls can't recruit integrin, and get stuck in place.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Putin the Word Out

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, May 3. ‣ The U.S. economy added 263,000 jobs in April, exceeding expectations, and the national unemployment rate shrank to 3.6 percent, the lowest rate since 1969. Here’s what else we’re watching: Trump-Putin (Again): President Donald Trump said he discussed Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report with Russian President Vladimir Putin in an hour-long phone

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Wisconsin university helps cat get new back legs

A tabby cat has new back legs, with the help of some University of Wisconsin-Madison students and a 3D printer.

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Wisconsin university helps cat get new back legs

A tabby cat has new back legs, with the help of some University of Wisconsin-Madison students and a 3D printer.

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This flexible metal Lightning Cable will probably outlast your phone

Get the Tech2 MFI-certified cable for $12.99. This flexible metal Tech2 MFI-certified Lightning cable will probably outlast your phone and you can get it for $12.99.

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I'm looking a cogsci book like him. Any suggestions?

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Tiny Specks Zoom Into Beautiful Galaxies In Amazing Hubble Image

Say Cheese A resplendent new composite image shows off 265,000 galaxies — which were slowly but surely captured over 16 years of observations by the Hubble Space Telescope. The image, called the Hubble Legacy Field, is made up of 7,500 separate images of distant galaxies. Some are so far away that our images of them represent how they looked as far back as just 500 million years after the Big Ban

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Trump’s Surreal Phone Call With Vladimir Putin

On June 13, 2018, Special Counsel Robert Mueller charged 12 officers of the GRU, the Russian intelligence agency, with committing “large-scale cyber operations to interfere with the 2016 U.S. presidential election.” Three days later, President Donald Trump met with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki, Finland. Speaking at a press conference beside Putin, Trump absolved Russia of any hack

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Tesla Will Make Some Autopilot Features Always-On by Default

Tesla wants to make your drive safer by implementing some of Autopilot's features while the self-driving system is disabled. The post Tesla Will Make Some Autopilot Features Always-On by Default appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Facebook gives social scientists unprecedented access to its user data

Facebook gives social scientists unprecedented access to its user data Facebook gives social scientists unprecedented access to its user data, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01447-5 Projects from around the world will delve into questions including how misinformation spreads on social media platforms and who distributes it.

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Stanford researchers' artificial synapse is fast, efficient and durable

A battery-like device could act as an artificial synapse within computing systems intended to imitate the brain's efficiency and ability to learn.

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Study asks patients' input to improve the hospital experience

Patient and caregivers were among the 499 stakeholders who submitted their priority questions about hospital care for the i-HOPE Study, led by Dr. Luci Leykum of the Long School of Medicine at UT Health San Antonio. The study resulted in 11 priority questions that can inform research to improve the patient experience in America's hospitals.

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DNA test is an effective cervical cancer screening tool for women in low-income countries

Dartmouth researchers have introduced an inexpensive DNA-based test for human papillomavirus (HPV), the cause of cervical cancer, in Honduras. The test aid can effectively be used to screen women who have never been screened for this deadly disease. Results of the initiative revealed not only high positivity rates of HPV but unexpected differences in the types of HPV compared to those found in the

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Industry-ready process makes plastics chemical from plant sugars

Developing renewable, plant-based alternatives for petroleum-derived chemicals is a major piece of the effort to transition away from a fossil-fuel based economy toward a more sustainable and environmentally friendly bio-based economy. But integration of novel and unproven technology into existing industrial systems carries an element of risk that has made commercialization of such advances a sign

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Futuristic Robot Farm Begins Selling Its First Produce

Tasty Tech In October, startup Iron Ox opened its first farm , where robots would tackle many of the tasks traditionally undertaken by humans. Now, the company’s leafy greens are available for purchase , meaning the next salad you eat could contain lettuce cultivated by a robot named Angus — a futuristic example of how tech is transforming agriculture. Green Thumb Iron Ox is now selling three typ

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Photos: Hurricane Michael Toppled Over Trees and Uprooted 19th Century Artifacts

A category 5 storm uprooted artifacts from a 19th century freed slave community, tangled up in rootballs of large toppled over trees.

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Hurricane Michael Unearths Evidence of Fort Occupied by Hundreds of Freed Slaves

The fort was the "nexus of freedom and slavery resistance."

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Found: First Tibetan Evidence of Neanderthal Cousins, the Denisovans

This is the first evidence of Denisovans living on the Tibetan Plateau.

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AI & Government Oversight

Hearing a news story the other day about AI being able to detect skin cancer in samples much higher incidence rate than human Doctors, I got to thinking about…Government Oversight, in general, combined with true Artificial Intelligence. Have there been any stories in the press about AI-enhanced Government Oversight or AI-enhanced leadership? For example, where you would have the President of th

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Watch This “Police Robot” Pull a Car Over

Traffic Stop Robocop American nonprofit research institute SRI International has developed a prototype of what it’s calling a “police robot,” as IEEE Spectrum reports . The robot is meant to prevent accidents that occur when the police pull over drivers. The brain behind the bot is Rueben Brewer, a senior robotics research engineer at SRI. Brewer started building the prototype in his garage. “Wit

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Study finds that collaborating with business contributes to academic productivity

Results of survey involving more than 1,000 researchers were presented to 8th Annual Meeting of Global Research Council in São Paulo.

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‘Unknown Outside Indiana’

The previous four “Our Towns” posts have been about Indiana: One about Angola and the importance of its relationship with Trine University; one about Fort Wayne and its ambitious reconstruction of a cavernous abandoned GE works; and two about Muncie, first about sustainability programs and then about a virtually unique approach to the long-troubled public schools. They had a common theme: how sur

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Antiretroviral Treatments Suppress HIV Transmission

A study of hundreds of gay couples finds that HIV-positive men taking antiretroviral medication don't pass the virus to their partners, even when having unprotected sex.

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What would alternate, alien forms of life look like?

Life on Earth (and therefore all life we know) relies on carbon and water. Carbon and water make for excellent ingredients when making life, but many other elements could serve in their place under the right conditions. What are these alternative forms of life and under what conditions could they flourish? None All life on Earth, and thus, all life we've ever observed in the universe, shares a fe

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Europe's ban on palm oil might actually hurt the environment

Environment There are better ways to save Asian rainforests. The EU ban could reduce demand for palm oil, but many, including the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, aren’t sure it will be effective in stemming…

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German police shut down major 'darknet' illegal trading site

German police have shut down one of the world's largest illegal online markets in the so-called darkweb and arrested the three men allegedly running it, prosecutors said Friday.

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China’s ubiquitous digital payments processor loves the blockchain

Ant Financial has several blockchain-powered applications, despite being based in a country that frowns on some aspects of the technology.

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Stanford Scientist Says In-Ear Gadgets Will Monitor Our Brains

Jacking In Personal gadgets known as “hearables,” which communicate with the neural signals passing through our ears in order to monitor and interact with our brains, are on their way. Hearables could help us focus on specific conversations, like smart hearing aids, or monitor our brain activity to treat tinnitus. That’s according to Poppy Crum, the Stanford University neuroscientist and chief sc

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Rise in Youth Suicide After Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why

From the 2001 Cerebrum essay, “Suicide in the Young” by Kay Redfield Jamison, Ph.D. Illustration © Kristina Swarner On March 31, 2017, a controversial series called, 13 Reasons Why premiered on Netflix. The show tells the story of a young high schooler who commits suicide and leaves behind a series of 13 cassette tapes for the people she held responsible. In the month following the show’s 2017 re

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UK medical chief: ‘We are in an arms race against microbes’

UK medical chief: ‘We are in an arms race against microbes’ UK medical chief: ‘We are in an arms race against microbes’, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01409-x Britain’s outgoing chief medical officer, Sally Davies, says there are still clear gaps in the fight against antimicrobial resistance.

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Quantum parity Hall effect in Bernal-stacked trilayer graphene [Physics]

The quantum Hall effect has recently been generalized from transport of conserved charges to include transport of other approximately conserved-state variables, including spin and valley, via spin- or valley-polarized boundary states with different chiralities. Here, we report a class of quantum Hall effect in Bernal- or ABA-stacked trilayer graphene (TLG),…

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Study Finds “Zero Risk” of HIV Transmission During Drug Treatment

Power of ART An extensive HIV study has yielded a groundbreaking discovery: antiretroviral therapy (ART) completely eliminates gay men’s risk of transmitting HIV through sex. “Our findings provide conclusive evidence for gay men that the risk of HIV transmission with suppressive ART is zero,” researcher Alison Rodger said in a press release , adding that “this powerful message can help end the HI

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The Family Weekly: Have Millennials Killed Infidelity?

(Shutterstock / Rawpixel) This Week in Family Millennials have killed plenty of time-honored American traditions—and cheating on your spouse might be the next one on the list. A new study found that younger Americans are less likely than those 55 and older to cheat on their spouse. But given that Millennial couples are also more likely to live together before they’re married, and more likely to w

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Pandas Are More Like Carnivores Than You Think

Ah, giant pandas. Aside from their reputation for being, well, not the sharpest crayons in the box, they’re most closely associated with munching almost exclusively on bamboo. But that taste for bamboo has always stumped researchers. First off, other members of the bear family are either carnivorous or at the very least omnivorous. Plus, despite having evolved specific physical traits, like their

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This 3D Bioprinted Organ Just Took Its First "Breath"

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NIH Imposes Term Limits for Lab Chiefs

More turnover in the agency's intramural program could boost diversity among laboratory leadership.

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After A Big Failure, Scientists And Patients Hunt For A New Type Of Alzheimer's Drug

Now that so many experimental drugs targeting amyloid-beta have bombed, scientists are looking for different approaches for treating Alzheimer's, including a drug that failed as a cancer treatment. (Image credit: Courtesy of Timothy Weaver)

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Birds, bats, and beluga whales: An incomplete list of animal spies

Animals Some dolphins were even trained to kill. History is littered with animal spies, both real and wrongly accused. From pigeon reconnaissance to the GoPro beluga, here are the stories of daring undercover…

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Industry-ready process makes plastics chemical from plant sugars

A team from the Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center and the University of Wisconsin-Madison describe an efficient and economically feasible process for producing HMF, a versatile plant-derived chemical considered crucial for building a renewable economy.

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‘The Church Is Ending’

Bobby Moser never much liked going to church. Growing up in “a tiny slice of nowhere” in Texas, as he described it to me, evangelical churches were the norm. “With big crowds and loud music and rock-concert-like energy, faith became spectacle, not personal,” Moser said. His grandmother’s church, however, stood in stark contrast to its Baptist neighbors. Built in 1885, George’s Creek is a small wh

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Photos of the Week: German Asparagus, Traffic Zebras, Enormous Bear

The Great Mosque of Djenne in Mali, pet rescue in flooded Quebec, sea lion rescue in California, memorials to a synagogue shooting in California, conflict in Libya, the NRA Fashion and Firearms show in Indiana, a giant “spider” in New York, May Day protests in Europe, an attempted uprising in Venezuela, a tornado in Romania, rusty locomotives in Lebanon, and much more

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New approach could accelerate efforts to catalogue vast numbers of cells

Artistic sketches can be used to capture details of a scene in a simpler image. Researchers are now bringing that concept to computational biology, with a novel method that extracts comprehensive samples — called 'sketches' — of massive cell datasets that are easier to analyze for biological and medical studies.

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Cattle ranching could help conserve rare African antelope, lions

Ranch managers' placement of cattle corrals away from Jackson's hartebeest likely would allow the antelope species to increase, with lions focused on the zebras that congregate at the resulting glades in central Kenya.

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What the wheat genome tells us about wars

First they mapped the genome of wheat; now they have reconstructed its breeding history. Scientists have examined the genetic diversity of wheat varieties in the WHEALBI study. By doing so, they discovered which cereals our ancestors cultivated, where today's wheat comes from, and what the Cold War has to do with it all.

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Stickier than expected: Hydrogen binds to graphene in 10 femtoseconds

Graphene is an extraordinary material consisting of pure carbon just a single atomic layer thick. It is extremely stable, strong and conductive. In electronics, however, graphene has crucial disadvantages. It cannot be used as a semiconductor, since it has no bandgap. Now researchers have produced an "atomic scale movie" showing how hydrogen atoms can chemically bind to graphene to produce a ban

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A model to decipher the complexity of gene regulation

SysGenetiX project (UNIGE/UNIL) aimed to investigate the regulatory elements, as well as the manifold interactions between them and with genes, with the ultimate goal of understanding the mechanisms that render some people more predisposed to manifesting particular diseases than others. By studying chromatin modifications in the cells, scientists identified the very structure of these regulatory e

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RIT professor develops microfluidic device to better detect Ebola virus

A faculty-researcher at Rochester Institute of technology has developed a prototype micro device with bio-sensors that can detect the deadly Ebola virus. With this type of device, those infected can be treated earlier, and the early detection process can potentially decrease the spread of infections.

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First demonstration of antimatter wave interferometry

An international collaboration with participation of the University of Bern has demonstrated for the first time in an interference experiment that antimatter particles also behave as waves besides having particle properties. This success paves the way to a new field of investigations of antimatter.

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Nanoscale thermometers from diamond sparkles

The development of a novel, non-invasive technique that uses quantum light to measure temperature at the nanoscale will have immediate applications for both industry and fundamental scientific research, scientists say.

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Tiny droplets open the doors to in-flight imaging of proteins

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated the creation of a beam of nanodroplets capable of delivering a variety of biological samples, from cell organelles to single proteins, virtually free from any contaminations, to the focus of an X-ray laser which can be used to image them.

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New holographic technique opens the way for quantum computation

EPFL physicists have developed a method based on the principles of holograms to capture 3D images of objects beyond the reach of light.

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Bottom-up approach can synthesize microscopic diamonds for bioimaging, quantum computing

In a paper published May 3 in Science Advances, researchers at the University of Washington, the US Naval Research Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory announced that they can use extremely high pressure and temperature to introduce specific types of chemical elements into the crystal lattice of nanodiamonds — giving the microscopic diamonds properties that could be useful for

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High-pressure, high-temperature molecular doping of nanodiamond

The development of color centers in diamond as the basis for emerging quantum technologies has been limited by the need for ion implantation to create the appropriate defects. We present a versatile method to dope diamond without ion implantation by synthesis of a doped amorphous carbon precursor and transformation at high temperatures and high pressures. To explore this bottom-up method for colo

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Dirac nodal surfaces and nodal lines in ZrSiS

Topological semimetals are characterized by symmetry-protected band crossings, which can be preserved in different dimensions in momentum space, forming zero-dimensional nodal points, one-dimensional nodal lines, or even two-dimensional nodal surfaces. Materials harboring nodal points and nodal lines have been experimentally verified, whereas experimental evidence of nodal surfaces is still lacki

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Dynamically controllable polarity modulation of MoTe2 field-effect transistors through ultraviolet light and electrostatic activation

Energy band engineering is of fundamental importance in nanoelectronics. Compared to chemical approaches such as doping and surface functionalization, electrical and optical methods provide greater flexibility that enables continuous, reversible, and in situ band tuning on electronic devices of various kinds. In this report, we demonstrate highly effective band modulation of MoTe 2 field-effect t

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Single-atom nanozymes

Conventional nanozyme technologies face formidable challenges of intricate size-, composition-, and facet-dependent catalysis and inherently low active site density. We discovered a new class of single-atom nanozymes with atomically dispersed enzyme-like active sites in nanomaterials, which significantly enhanced catalytic performance, and uncovered the underlying mechanism. With oxidase catalysi

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Grayscale digital light processing 3D printing for highly functionally graded materials

Three-dimensional (3D) printing or additive manufacturing, as a revolutionary technology for future advanced manufacturing, usually prints parts with poor control of complex gradients for functional applications. We present a single-vat grayscale digital light processing (g-DLP) 3D printing method using grayscale light patterns and a two-stage curing ink to obtain functionally graded materials wi

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First demonstration of antimatter wave interferometry

Interference of matter waves is at the heart of quantum physics and has been observed for a wide range of particles from electrons to complex molecules. Here, we demonstrate matter wave interference of single positrons using a period-magnifying Talbot-Lau interferometer based on material diffraction gratings. The system produced high-contrast periodic fringes, which were detected by means of nucl

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Final fate of a Leidenfrost droplet: Explosion or takeoff

When a liquid droplet is placed on a very hot solid, it levitates on its own vapor layer, a phenomenon called the Leidenfrost effect. Although the mechanisms governing the droplet’s levitation have been explored, not much is known about the fate of the Leidenfrost droplet. Here we report on the final stages of evaporation of Leidenfrost droplets. While initially small droplets tend to take off, u

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Holographic imaging of electromagnetic fields via electron-light quantum interference

Holography relies on the interference between a known reference and a signal of interest to reconstruct both the amplitude and the phase of that signal. With electrons, the extension of holography to the ultrafast time domain remains a challenge, although it would yield the highest possible combined spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we show that holograms of local electromagnetic fields can be obt

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Electrospray sample injection for single-particle imaging with x-ray lasers

The possibility of imaging single proteins constitutes an exciting challenge for x-ray lasers. Despite encouraging results on large particles, imaging small particles has proven to be difficult for two reasons: not quite high enough pulse intensity from currently available x-ray lasers and, as we demonstrate here, contamination of the aerosolized molecules by nonvolatile contaminants in the solut

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Anti-Stokes excitation of solid-state quantum emitters for nanoscale thermometry

Color centers in solids are the fundamental constituents of a plethora of applications such as lasers, light-emitting diodes, and sensors, as well as the foundation of advanced quantum information and communication technologies. Their photoluminescence properties are usually studied under Stokes excitation, in which the emitted photons are at a lower energy than the excitation ones. In this work,

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The sequence of events during folding of a DNA origami

We provide a comprehensive reference dataset of the kinetics of a multilayer DNA origami folding. To this end, we measured the folding kinetics of every staple strand and its two terminal segments during constant-temperature assembly of a multilayer DNA origami object. Our data illuminate the processes occurring during folding of the DNA origami in fine detail, starting with the first nucleating

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Scientists discover evolutionary link to modern-day sea echinoderms

Scientists have discovered a new species that lived more than 500 million years ago — a form of ancient echinoderm that was ancestral to modern-day groups such as sea cucumbers, sea urchins, sea stars, brittle stars and crinoids. The fossil shows a crucial evolutionary step by echinoderms that parallels the most important ecological change to have taken place in marine sediments.

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Blood pressure drug shows no benefit in Parkinson's disease

A study of a blood pressure drug does not show any benefit for people with Parkinson's disease.

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What happens when schools go solar? Overlooked benefits

Rooftop solar projects at schools could reduce harmful air pollution, help the environment and enhance student learning while cutting electricity costs, a new study finds. Overall, the energy switch could deliver benefits valued at $4 billion.

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Researchers putting the brakes on lethal childhood cancer

Researchers conclude that blocking MYC could be 'unexpectedly effective' in treating MRT as well as other cancers driven by inactivation of SNF5.

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Obstacles to overcome before operating fleets of drones becomes reality

The technology exists to replace a single remote controlled drone with an automated fleet, but a researcher says there are several obstacles to tackle first. He is part of a team developing models to efficiently operate a fleet, while maintaining security.

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Specialized plant cells regain stem-cell features to heal wounds

If plants are injured, cells adjacent to the wound fill the gaps with their daughter cells. However, which cells divide to do the healing and how they manage to produce cells that match the cell type of the missing tissue has been unclear. Scientists have now shown that to correctly replace dead cells, neighbors to the inside of the wound re-activate their stem cell programs.

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Physicists Make Waves by Adding Antimatter to Classic Double-Slit Experiment

Physicists Make Waves by Adding Antimatter to Classic Double-Slit Experiment For the first time, researchers have shown that antimatter interferes as a quantum wave in the same way regular matter does. Waves_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: SkillUp via Shutterstock Physics Friday, May 3, 2019 – 14:00 Bailey Bedford, Contributor (Inside Science) — One of the strangest things about quantum mechanics

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A novel technique that uses quantum light to measure temperature at the nanoscale

Being able to measure, and monitor, temperatures and temperature changes at miniscule scales—inside a cell or in micro and nano-electronic components—has the potential to impact many areas of research from disease detection to a major challenge of modern computation and communication technologies, how to measure scalability and performance in electronic components.

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Bottom-up approach can synthesize microscopic diamonds for bioimaging, quantum computing

Scientists are excited about diamonds—not the types that adorn jewelry, but the microscopic variety that are less than the width of a human hair. These so-called "nanodiamonds" are made up almost entirely of carbon. But by introducing other elements into the nanodiamond's crystal lattice—a method known as "doping"—researchers could produce traits useful in medical research, computation and beyond.

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'Russian' whale leads to espionage speculations in Norway

A spy, a far away visitor or a fugitive on the run? A mysterious Beluga whale, caught wearing a suspicious harness, has ignited the imaginations of Norwegians who have yet to receive answers.

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What would alternate, alien forms of life look like?

Life on Earth (and therefore all life we know) relies on carbon and water. Carbon and water make for excellent ingredients when making life, but many other elements could serve in their place under the right conditions. What are these alternative forms of life and under what conditions could they flourish? None All life on Earth, and thus, all life we've ever observed in the universe, shares a fe

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Antimatter keeps with quantum theory. It’s both particle and wave

A new variation of the classic double-slit experiment confirms that antimatter, like normal matter, has wave-particle duality.

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Even Mild Cases of Asthma Can Slow Down Elite Racehorses

Researchers found 80 percent of racehorses surveyed suffered from airway inflammation that impacts performance

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Moms Are Microdosing Magic Mushrooms, Just Like Tech Execs

Ladies’ Choice Silicon Valley has been singing the praises of microdosing for years — and it seems the mainstream is now catching on to the trend. In a fascinating new story by The Guardian , a number of women in the United Kingdom make the same claims as those tech execs: taking small amounts of psychedelic drugs — not enough to “trip” — is improving their concentration and creativity, as well a

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'Russian' whale leads to espionage speculations in Norway

A spy, a far away visitor or a fugitive on the run? A mysterious Beluga whale, caught wearing a suspicious harness, has ignited the imaginations of Norwegians who have yet to receive answers.

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NASA reveals heavy rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Fani

Satellite data revealed heavy rainfall in powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani before it made landfall in northeastern India. Fani brought that soaking rain to the region and continues to drop heavy rainfall on May 3, as it moves toward Bangladesh.

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New approach could accelerate efforts to catalogue vast numbers of cells

Artistic sketches can be used to capture details of a scene in a simpler image. MIT researchers are now bringing that concept to computational biology, with a novel method that extracts comprehensive samples — called 'sketches' — of massive cell datasets that are easier to analyze for biological and medical studies.

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NASA reveals heavy rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Fani

Satellite data revealed heavy rainfall in powerful Tropical Cyclone Fani before it made landfall in northeastern India. Fani brought that soaking rain to the region and continues to drop heavy rainfall on May 3, 2019 as it moves toward Bangladesh.

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InfoWars Made a New Facebook Page One Hour After Ban

Whack-a-Mole Less than a day after Facebook banned the far-right conspiracy website InfoWars, the site had created a new account, according to CNBC — a signal that banning extremist content will be more of a game of whack-a-mole than a one-time decision by social platforms. Jones reappeared on Facebook with a page titled “InfoWars is Back,” and immediately hopped on a livestream to decry the ban.

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New approach for solving protein structures from tiny crystals

Scientists have developed a new approach for solving atomic-scale 3-D protein structures from tiny crystals. The advance will open up this structural biology technique to a wide range of hard-to-crystallize proteins in bacteria, viruses, plants, and humans.

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Ford’s CX Program: Auto Service at Your Home or Workplace

Ford taps Henry's great-great-granddaughter to improve the customer experience. The program also helps Ford retain customers. Most dealers are signing on. The post Ford’s CX Program: Auto Service at Your Home or Workplace appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Overfishing risks ocean deserts as stocks plummet

With bigger boats, deeper nets and better sonar than ever before, the fishing industry's response to our insatiable appetite for fish risks transforming much of the world's oceans into aquatic desert.

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Overfishing risks ocean deserts as stocks plummet

With bigger boats, deeper nets and better sonar than ever before, the fishing industry's response to our insatiable appetite for fish risks transforming much of the world's oceans into aquatic desert.

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What medicine can teach academia about preventing burnout

What medicine can teach academia about preventing burnout What medicine can teach academia about preventing burnout, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01451-9 The medical programmes we see in our training as physician-scientists are becoming more progressive and supportive of students. Here’s what academia can learn from them, say Yoo Jung Kim and Erik Faber.

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Wearable sensor detects child motor deficits

A wristwatch-like motion-tracking device can detect movement problems in children that doctors or parents may miss, according to a new study. The findings could help identify children with subtle motor impairments for treatment before limitations develop into potentially significant and intractable disabilities, researchers say. “I had a teenager come into my clinic because he was trying on glove

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Mental well-being predicts leisure time physical activity in midlife

Men and women with high mental well-being at the age of 42 were more physically active at the age of 50 compared to those who got lower scores in mental well-being at age 42. Different exercise activities are related to the different dimensions of well-being in midlife.

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Drug reduces risk of relapse with neuromyelitis optica

The drug eculizumab, a synthetic antibody that inhibits the inflammatory response, significantly reduced the risk of relapse with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). This rare but severe autoimmune inflammatory disorder can cause blindness, paralysis and death.

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MIT, Stanford and others to build blockchain payments network to rival VisaNet

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A new camera can photograph you from 45 kilometers away

submitted by /u/filosoful [link] [comments]

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How to fix Nature and avoid human misery: UN report

Revamping global food production, retooling the financial sector, moving beyond GDP as a measure of progress and other "transformative changes" are needed to save Nature and ourselves, a major UN biodiversity report is set to conclude.

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Research shows cattle ranching could help conserve rare African antelope, lions

Endangered African antelope and the lions that prey on them may benefit from certain cattle ranching practices in Kenya, according to newly published research led by a 2017 University of Wyoming Ph.D. graduate.

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Research shows cattle ranching could help conserve rare African antelope, lions

Endangered African antelope and the lions that prey on them may benefit from certain cattle ranching practices in Kenya, according to newly published research led by a 2017 University of Wyoming Ph.D. graduate.

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A Man in Oklahoma Cracked His Neck. It Caused a Stroke.

A 28-year-old man in Oklahoma experienced a stroke after simply cracking his neck, according to news reports.

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Seagrass' strong potential for curbing erosion

A new study shows how seagrass can help to protect shorelines against erosion and help to mitigate damage from rising sea level, potentially providing useful guidance for seagrass restoration efforts.

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Protein protects against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Researchers propose a possible therapeutic target to treat fatty liver, a disease for which there is currently no treatment.

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New approach for solving protein structures from tiny crystals

Scientists have developed a new approach for solving atomic-scale 3-D protein structures from tiny crystals. The advance will open up this structural biology technique to a wide range of hard-to-crystallize proteins in bacteria, viruses, plants, and humans.

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Crowd oil: Fuels from air-conditioning systems

Researchers have proposed a method enabling air conditioning and ventilation systems to produce synthetic fuels from carbon dioxide (CO2) and water from the ambient air. Compact plants are to separate CO2 from the ambient air directly in buildings and produce synthetic hydrocarbons which can then be used as renewable synthetic oil.

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Myths about gossip busted

A new study asserts that women don't engage in 'tear-down' gossip any more than men, and lower income people don't gossip more than their more well-to-do counterparts. It also holds younger people are more likely to gossip negatively than their older counterparts.

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How the immune system recognizes pathogens: Interaction Time

Researchers show how the immune system distinguishes between self molecules and non-self molecules such as those from pathogens.

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Is fair play in running more important than fairness to Caster Semenya as a human? | Gaby Hinsliff

All her life, the South African athlete has been portrayed as a freak. Her case is as much about ethics as about sport or science When she was a girl, growing up in rural South Africa, the runner Caster Semenya would sometimes face a humiliating ritual before a race. She grew accustomed, her coaches once said, to having to retreat to the bathroom with a member of a suspicious rival athletics team

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Scientists Just Detected a Black Hole Devouring a Neutron Star

Star Killer In 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory — better known as LIGO — famously observed gravitational waves indicating the cosmic shockwave of two merging black holes. In April, scientists at the observatory recorded another “first” — this time the waves given off by a black hole as it devoured a neutron star, according to Ars Technica . The first-of-its-kind event

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Vampire Weekend’s Father of the Bride Is an Ambivalent Epic About World Peace

Remember world peace? It’s been a while since that dream was so common as to be a punch line. Beauty queens now skip the pleas for global harmony and instead get specific about Latin American territorial disputes . The peace symbol was initially designed to rally for nuclear disarmament, one of the many international consensuses unraveling lately. Peace as a cultural obsession, a meme, belongs to

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Research shows cattle ranching could help conserve rare African antelope, lions

Ranch managers' placement of cattle corrals away from Jackson's hartebeest likely would allow the antelope species to increase, with lions focused on the zebras that congregate at the resulting glades in central Kenya.

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Induced labor not more expensive to health care system than spontaneous labor

The results of a joint study between University of Utah Health and Intermountain Healthcare show inducing labor one week early costs the same as waiting for spontaneous labor.

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LIGO and Virgo detect neutron star smash-ups

On April 25, 2019, the National Science Foundation's Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the European-based Virgo detector registered gravitational waves from what appears likely to be a crash between two neutron stars — the dense remnants of massive stars that previously exploded. One day later, on April 26, 2019 the LIGO-Virgo network spotted another candidate source

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Obesity: Could fat cell differences predict diabetes risk?

Scientists identify three types of fat precursor cell and suggest that the distribution of these cells could predict obesity-related conditions.

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Watch: 3D-printed air sac mimics lung and ‘breathes’

A new bioprinting technique clears a major hurdle on path to 3D printing replacement organs. The innovation allows scientists to create exquisitely entangled vascular networks that mimic the body’s natural passageways for blood, air, lymph, and other vital fluids. Bioengineers say the advance means they have cleared a major hurdle on the path to 3D printing replacement organs with a breakthrough

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Fracking: Earthquakes are triggered well beyond fluid injection zones

Using data from field experiments and computer modeling of ground faults, researchers have discovered that the practice of subsurface fluid injection used in 'fracking' and wastewater disposal for oil and gas exploration could cause significant, rapidly spreading earthquake activity beyond the fluid diffusion zone. The results account for the observation that the frequency of man-made earthquakes

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New approach for solving protein structures from tiny crystals

Using x-rays to reveal the atomic-scale 3-D structures of proteins has led to countless advances in understanding how these molecules work in bacteria, viruses, plants, and humans—and has guided the development of precision drugs to combat diseases such as cancer and AIDS. But many proteins can't be grown into crystals large enough for their atomic arrangements to be deciphered. To tackle this cha

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New approach for solving protein structures from tiny crystals

Using x-rays to reveal the atomic-scale 3-D structures of proteins has led to countless advances in understanding how these molecules work in bacteria, viruses, plants, and humans—and has guided the development of precision drugs to combat diseases such as cancer and AIDS. But many proteins can't be grown into crystals large enough for their atomic arrangements to be deciphered. To tackle this cha

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Narwhals Are Flourishing Despite Vulnerable Genetic Diversity

Narwhals, the unicorns of the sea, have survived for a million years with low genetic diversity — a trait that usually suggests a species is close to extinction. But a recent survey found narwhals number in the hundreds of thousands, countering the assumption that lots of gene variants within a population are necessary for survival. "There's this notion that in order to survive and be resilient to

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History of the Horse: Ancient DNA Reveals Lost Lineages

In the largest-ever ancient DNA study of its kind, researchers have pieced together the history of the horse: It's an epic saga sprawling across continents and 5,000 years of evolution and domestication, and yes, it has plot twists. Among the finds: researchers uncovered two lost lineages of the animal on opposite ends of Eurasia and determined that the modern horse is very different than even its

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Crowd the Tap: Empowering Communities to Examine Their Lead Exposure

Lead water pipes have been a fixture of modern civilization for more than two thousand years. Ancient Romans channeled water into homes and bathhouses through lead piping. In fact, the Latin word for lead, plumbum, is where we get the English word “plumbing.” Yet we have also long recognized that lead can have a serious impact on our health. Vitrivius, who lived during the first century BCE, wrote

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Stickier than expected: Hydrogen binds to graphene in 10 femtoseconds

Graphene is an extraordinary material consisting of pure carbon just a single atomic layer thick. It is extremely stable, strong and conductive. In electronics, however, graphene has crucial disadvantages. It cannot be used as a semiconductor, since it has no bandgap. Now researchers from Göttingen and Pasadena have produced an "atomic scale movie" showing how hydrogen atoms can chemically bind to

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Math paves the way for fleets of connected drones

New research aims to expand drone technology by deploying fleets of drones. But making that happen is not as simple as launching multiple aircraft at once. Borzoo Bonakdarpour, an assistant professor of computer science, says unlike piloting a single drone by remote control, operating a fleet requires an automated system to coordinate the task, but allows drones to independently respond to weathe

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Strong cyclone lashes east India, impacts Asian subcontinent

Cyclone Fani tore through India's eastern coast on Friday as a grade 5 storm, lashing beaches with rain and winds gusting up to 205 kilometers (127 miles) per hour and affecting weather as far away as Mount Everest as it approached the former imperial capital of Kolkata.

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Here's What it Looks Like When A Gene 'Turns On'

In the murky darkness, blue and green blobs are dancing. Sometimes they keep decorous distances from each other, but other times they go cheek to cheek — and when that happens, other colors flare. The video, reported last year, is fuzzy and a few seconds long, but it wowed the scientists who saw it. For the first time, they were witnessing details of an early step — long unseen, just cleverly infe

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'It makes me enjoy playing with the kids': is microdosing mushrooms going mainstream?

Before the school run, or commuting to work, increasing numbers are taking tiny doses of psychedelic drugs in the UK. Why? Rosie has just returned from the school run. She drops a bag of groceries on to her kitchen table, and reaches for a clear plastic cup, covered by a white hanky and sealed with a hairband. Inside is a grey powder; her finely ground homegrown magic mushrooms. “I’ll take a very

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Futuristic Type 1 civilization

submitted by /u/Science_Explorer [link] [comments]

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German research promised a decade of budget increases

State and federal government pledge €17 billion in extra funds through 2030

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Rising Mississippi River Tests a City's Adaptation Plan

Record-wet weather in the Midwest has brought some of the worst flooding in decades — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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7 things parents should know about the measles outbreak

Health Medical professionals answer your biggest questions. Doctors break down what you need to do to keep your kids healthy.

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What the wheat genome tells us about wars

First they mapped the genome of wheat; now they have reconstructed its breeding history. Joining forces with other European researchers, scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have examined the genetic diversity of wheat varieties in the WHEALBI study. By doing so, they discovered which cereals our ancestors cultivated, where today's wheat comes from, and what the Cold War has to do with it a

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SpaceX Is Sending Living Bits of Human Organs to Space

Rocket Chips If all goes according to plan, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch from Cape Canaveral early Saturday morning with the goal of helping deliver more than 5,500 pounds of cargo to the International Space Station (ISS) — including tiny bits of human organs. The special delivery is part of the Tissue Chips in Space Initiative , a project designed to help scientists observe human biology

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Needleless vaccine will protect children from dangerous viruses

Orally administered vaccine can protect millions from hepatitis B. Oral vaccines are both safer and less expensive than injections. Therefore, researchers are continuously pursuing ways to produce an oral vaccine that is sufficiently effective. Now, physicists have delivered virologists a 'recipe' for improving vaccine drops using methods from the world of nanophysics.

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Monitoring the lifecycle of tiny catalyst nanoparticles

In order to tailor nanoparticles in such a way that they can catalyze certain reactions selectively and efficiently, researchers need to determine the properties of single particles as precisely as possible. So far, an ensemble of many nanoparticles is analyzed. The problem of these investigations is that the contributions of different particles interfere, so that the properties of individual part

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Novel thermoelectric nanoantenna design for use in solar energy harvesting

Researchers have demonstrated an innovative nanodevice for harvesting solar energy. The article reports that evolutive dipole nanoantennas (EDNs) generate a thermoelectric voltage three times larger than the classic dipole nanoantenna (CDN).

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Early-stage detection of Alzheimer's in the blood

Using current techniques, Alzheimer's disease, the most frequent cause of dementia, can only be detected once the typical plaques have formed in the brain. At this point, therapy seems no longer possible. However, the first changes caused by Alzheimer's take place on the protein level up to 20 years sooner. A two-tier method can help detect the disease at a much earlier stage.

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The sense of touch is formed in the brain before birth

All the surface of the human body is represented in the cerebral cortex in a transversal band localized at the external part of the cerebral hemispheres: the somatosensory cortex. Each body region occupies in that band a distinct extension depending on its use and sensitivity. For instance, the hands and the lips, on which humans rely most, occupy the largest area. Thus, the 3D representation of t

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How grunting influences perception in tennis

Grunting noises in tennis influence the prediction of ball flight, according to sport psychologists.

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More than 100 years of data show Pennsylvania tick population shift

The prevalence of the most abundant species of ticks found in Pennsylvania has shifted over the last century, according to scientists, who analyzed 117 years' worth of specimens and data submitted primarily by residents from around the state.

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Vital signs can now be monitored using radar

A radar system can wirelessly monitor the vital signs of patients, eliminating the need to hook them up to any machines.

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Breaking bread with rivals leads to more fish on coral reefs

When fishermen and women communicate with their fisher rivals, and cooperate over local environmental problems, they can improve the quality and quantity of fish on coral reefs. The study advances a framework that can be applied to other complex environmental problems where environmental conditions depend on the relationships between people and nature.

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A Shortage of Skilled Medical Lab Workers Is Looming

Automation can help; so can encouraging STEM students to consider careers in diagnostics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why do people with depression like listening to sad music?

A 2015 study found that people diagnosed with depression were more inclined to listen to sad music. The researchers believed, then, that this finding meant depressed individuals sought to maintain their low mood. However, a new study, published in the journal Emotion , has flipped that implication on its head: rather than maintain their mood, researchers now say the sad music may be calming to pe

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Netflix’s Ted Bundy Movie Is a Study in True Crime’s Most Troubling Questions

As this new age of true crime wears on, powered by podcasts, social media, and endless docuseries, the same concerns about sensationalism and exploitation persist. Does the public’s fascination with grisly murders end up glorifying the perpetrators of these horrific acts? Is the lurid thrill we get from listening to conversations with killers worth giving them the very attention they might crave?

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A Shortage of Skilled Medical Lab Workers Is Looming

Automation can help; so can encouraging STEM students to consider careers in diagnostics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Black hole may have swallowed neutron star, say astronomers

Scientists analyse whether gravitational wave detectors picked up signs of collision Astronomers may have spotted a neutron star being swallowed by a black hole for the first time, marked by a belch of gravitational waves rippling across the cosmos. If confirmed, the detection by the twin Ligo detectors in the US and the Virgo detector in Italy would be the first evidence that black holes and neu

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Caster Semenya: a questionable ruling and a worrying precedent | Letters

The ruling against Caster Semenya is discriminatory, argues Malcolm Ferguson-Smith , while Jane Singer says it breaches the founding spirit of the Olympics. Sarah Mulholland fears for the future It is far from clear that testosterone is responsible for the athletic success of Caster Semenya and Dutee Chand ( Caster Semenya loses testosterone legal case but may launch new appeal , 2 May). They are

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Microsoft Announces Developer Edition of HoloLens 2

Microsoft announced its HoloLens 2 Developer Edition ahead of Build, but the bundle is a bit underwhelming. The post Microsoft Announces Developer Edition of HoloLens 2 appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Ingenious Gadget Could Harvest Battery Material From the Ocean

New Source These days, most batteries for electric vehicles are based on cobalt — a dwindling element sourced from mines that often employ child labor and other unethical practices . Now, a team of MIT engineers say they’ve found an alternative, according to New Scientist : using a beach ball-like apparatus hanging from abandoned oceanic oil rigs, it may be possible to absorb enough cobalt to bui

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Climate extremes: Impact on global crop yield variations

Climate extremes, such as drought, heatwaves, heavy precipitation and more are responsible for 18 to 43 percent of variation in crop yields for maize, spring wheat, rice and soybeans. according to a new article. The researchers have also identified global regions which are highly susceptible to extremes and also supply a high proportion of the world market. Climate change is likely to make these a

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Prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation may increase the risk of hypertension, a known cause of heart disease and stroke

A long-term study of Russian nuclear plant workers suggests that prolonged low-dose radiation exposure increases the risk of hypertension. This study is the first to associate an increased risk of hypertension to low doses of ionizing radiation among a large group of workers who were chronically exposed over many years. The higher the cumulative dose of radiation, the greater the risk, the study s

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Link between starch digestion gene, gut bacteria

A newly discovered relationship between genetic variation and the gut microbiome could help nutritionists personalize their recommendations. People with a high number of copies of a gene called AMY1, which expresses a salivary enzyme for breaking down starch, correlated strongly with a certain profile of gut and mouth bacteria, according to a new study.

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Fifteen years of mosquito data implicate species most likely to transmit West Nile virus in Iowa

A study which analyzed 15 years of mosquito surveillance data shows Iowa's western counties experience a higher abundance of the species thought to most commonly carry West Nile virus. Culex tarsalis, the mosquito species most often implicated in West Nile transmission, usually becomes most active in early September. The data support similar findings in Nebraska and South Dakota.

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Less-invasive mastectomy safe for more breast cancer patients

A less-invasive mastectomy that leaves the surface of the breast intact has become a safe option for more patients, including those whose breast cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes or who have risk factors for surgical complications, a a new study shows. In the procedure, known as a nipple-sparing mastectomy, surgeons remove breast tissue, leaving the skin, nipple and areola, and immediately r

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What drives multiple female acorn woodpeckers to share a nest?

In some acorn woodpecker family groups, related females lay eggs in the same nest and raise the chicks cooperatively with one or more related males.

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Exploding electrical wires underwater to understand shock waves

Shock wave studies allow researchers to achieve the warm dense matter that's found only in the extreme conditions around stars and created in the laboratory for inertial confinement fusion research, and researchers recently set out to understand the relation, if any, between the evolution of a shock wave and the expansion of the exploding wire.

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Field experiment finds a simple change that could boost agricultural productivity by 60%

Acknowledging 75% of the crop to tenants in crop-sharing contracts, instead of the customary 50%, can boost agricultural productivity and income levels in developing countries. In a field experiment in Uganda, researchers found that, introducing the new sharing rules, output is 60% higher and tenants' income increases by 140%.

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Why do we send out magazines wrapped in plastic?

A look into what it would take to make MIT Technology Review more environmentally friendly.

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Shrimp From 5 U.K. Rivers Have One Thing in Common: Cocaine

A new study of chemicals in river wildlife found pesticides in many of its samples, and cocaine in all of them. The drug’s source remained a mystery.

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Microsoft Announces Developer Edition of HoloLens 2

Microsoft announced its HoloLens 2 Developer Edition ahead of Build, but the bundle is a bit underwhelming. The post Microsoft Announces Developer Edition of HoloLens 2 appeared first on ExtremeTech.

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UK call center to trial 4 day week

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AI Is About to Completely Change the Face of Entertainment

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How the news took over reality | News

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Council Post: Automation Is Not The Enemy; It's The Path To Creative Growth

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New review identifies four hallmarks of cancer metastasis

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Kansas Cancer Center have identified four hallmarks of cancer metastasis — when cancer has spread to different parts of the body from where it started. Metastasis is believed to be the cause of up to 90 percent of cancer deaths.

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Study examines private insurance claims for naloxone prescriptions

A study based on a national database of private insurance claims suggests few patients at high risk of opioid overdose receive prescriptions for naloxone, which can reverse an overdose, during encounters with the health care system from hospitalizations and emergency department visits to physician visits.

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Why Is Trump Suddenly Talking About God?

Donald Trump is finding religion. Or at least, religion is finding its way into his remarks and his campaign’s rhetoric to an unprecedented extent. On Thursday, the president celebrated the National Day of Prayer at the White House, and he said the Almighty had helped him persevere through the ordeal of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation. “People say, ‘How do you get through that whol

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Ny laserlastbil skal gøre bæreevnemålinger af veje mere udbredte

Virksomheden Dynatest har i et samarbejde med DTU udviklet en lastbil, der kan måle vejstrækningers bæreevne selv ved høj fart.

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Pay rises for US faculty members remain low for third year in a row

Pay rises for US faculty members remain low for third year in a row Pay rises for US faculty members remain low for third year in a row, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01411-3 Vast salary gaps exist between US university presidents and faculty members, and men continue to earn more than women.

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Kid-friendly hep b vaccine would ditch the needle

A new technique could lead to an oral hepatitis B vaccine. Hepatitis B infects millions of people every year. Hundreds of thousands die. And small children are particularly at risk. Due to high cost and the stable environmental conditions required for vaccine storage, many people in developing countries don’t receive vaccines against this dangerous virus. As such, researchers have been working to

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Actually, We Should Not All Use They/Them Pronouns

A response to a recent Scientific American essay — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A new camera can photograph you from 45 kilometers away

Developed in China, the lidar-based system can cut through city smog to resolve human-sized features at vast distances.

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Extinct Human Lineage Settled the Tibetan Plateau Long Before Modern Humans

Culture A newly analyzed jawbone is the first confirmed Denisovan fossil found anywhere outside Siberia. 05/01/2019 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor To read more…

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Mind-blowing stage sculptures that fuse music and technology | Es Devlin

It starts with a sketch. Then it evolves into a larger-than-life visual masterpiece, a celebration of human connection. Follow along as legendary artist and designer Es Devlin takes us on a visual tour of her work — including iconic stage sculptures she's created for Beyoncé, Adele, Kanye West, U2 and more — and previews her design for the upcoming World Expo 2020 in Dubai.

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Old mascara wands are saving adorable Appalachian animals

Animals Volunteer wildlife nurses use household items to help their furry patients. From cosmetics to cuddly squirrels, used mascara wands find new life at the Appalachian Wildlife Refuge. The small, non-profit wildlife rehabilitation center in western…

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Gadget Lab Podcast: The Making of Adam Savage

The host of the new Discovery show "Savage Builds" and author of the new book "Every Tool’s a Hammer" joins us to talk about the joy and agony of making things.

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Climate student protesters grab mic at RWE investor huddle

German students brought their weekly climate protests to energy giant RWE's home turf Friday, grabbing the microphone from bosses to urge a speedier exit from coal at the group's annual shareholder meeting.

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Actually, We Should Not All Use They/Them Pronouns

A response to a recent Scientific American essay — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mental well-being predicts leisure time physical activity in midlife

Men and women with high mental well-being at the age of 42 were more physically active at the age of 50 compared to those who got lower scores in mental well-being at age 42. Different exercise activities are related to the different dimensions of well-being in midlife.

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New approach for solving protein structures from tiny crystals

Scientists have developed a new approach for solving atomic-scale 3-D protein structures from tiny crystals. The advance will open up this structural biology technique to a wide range of hard-to-crystallize proteins in bacteria, viruses, plants, and humans.

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Researchers identify a protein that protects against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Work headed by scientist Antonio Zorzano proposes a possible therapeutic target to treat fatty liver, a disease for which there is currently no treatment. The study, which was done in collaboration with the Pere Virgili Institute, has been published in the journal Cell.

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Heart damage from preterm birth may be corrected with exercise in young adulthood

Heart abnormalities caused by premature birth may be corrected with exercise in young adulthood, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

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Actually, We Should Not All Use They/Them Pronouns

A response to a recent Scientific American essay — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists Have a New Idea to Make a Fusion Reactor Practical

Lithium Upgrade Scientists are hoping a new upgrade at U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) could finally make fusion power a reality — by harnessing the power of a silvery metal called lithium. As part of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment, a team of researchers are coating the inside walls of the reactor with lithium, the same stuff in the batteries in a wide

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New Anti-CRISPR Drugs Could Prevent Creation of Killer Plagues

Pros and Cons CRISPR could end disease and world hunger . It could also destroy humanity. For years, experts have speculated about the weaponization of gene-editing , pondering its use to create everything from killer plagues to deadly viruses . In 2016, the U.S. director of national intelligence even identified gene-editing as a potential weapon of mass destruction . There’s also the possibility

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Quantum sensor for photons

A photodetector converts light into an electrical signal, causing the light to be lost. Researchers have now built a quantum sensor that can measure light particles non-destructively. It can be used to further investigate the quantum properties of light.

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Teaching happiness to dementia caregivers reduces their depression, anxiety

Caring for family members with dementia — which is on the rise in the US — causes significant emotional and physical stress that increases caregivers' risk of depression, anxiety and death. A new method of coping with that stress by teaching people how to focus on positive emotions reduced their anxiety and depression after six weeks, reports a new national study. It also resulted in better self

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Big Island residents struggle a year after historic eruption

A year after a volcano on Hawaii's Big Island rained lava and gases in one of its largest and most destructive eruptions in recorded history, people who lost their homes and farms in the disaster are still struggling to return to their cherished island lifestyle.

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Pinpointing a spatial address for RNA profiles in tissues

Pinpointing a spatial address for RNA profiles in tissues Pinpointing a spatial address for RNA profiles in tissues, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01405-1 Knowing the gene-expression pattern of individual cells can unlock their identity. A refined method for generating cellular RNA profiles offers a way to obtain such data at a high level of spatial resolution in intact ti

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Hippos, haloes and black holes — April’s best science images

Hippos, haloes and black holes — April’s best science images Hippos, haloes and black holes — April’s best science images, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01356-7 The month’s sharpest science shots — selected by Nature’s photo team.

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Study demonstrates seagrass' strong potential for curbing erosion

An MIT study shows how seagrass can help to protect shorelines against erosion and help to mitigate damage from rising sea level, potentially providing useful guidance for seagrass restoration efforts.

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Preventing 2020 campaign cyberattacks won't be easy or cheap

While candidates were focused on campaigning in 2016, Russians were carrying out a devastating cyber operation that changed the landscape of American politics, with aftershocks continuing well into Donald Trump's presidency.

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UN panel calls WikiLeaks founder's UK sentence excessive

A panel of legal experts affiliated with the United Nations has criticized the 50-week sentence a British judge imposed on WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange for jumping bail.

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Musk doubles down on investment as Tesla raises capital goal

Tesla CEO Elon Musk is more than doubling the stock he will buy in a new public offering in an apparent bid to earn investors' confidence as he tries to turn around his struggling electric car company.

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Hubble spots a stunning spiral galaxy

Few of the universe's residents are as iconic as the spiral galaxy. These limelight-hogging celestial objects combine whirling, pinwheeling arms with scatterings of sparkling stars, glowing bursts of gas, and dark, weaving lanes of cosmic dust, creating truly awesome scenes—especially when viewed through a telescope such as the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. In fact, this image from Hubble frame

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The Books Briefing: There’s No One Right Way to Be a Mother

“Maternity entails its own unsettling journeys,” The Atlantic ’s literary editor, Ann Hulbert, wrote earlier this year. It’s a statement that underscores the fact that motherhood can be fraught for many women, regardless of whether they have children. There’s no singular or “right” way to be a mother, and fiction and nonfiction works alike have been excavating the maternal role of women for years

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Hubble spots a stunning spiral galaxy

NGC 2903 is located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Leo (the Lion), and was studied as part of a Hubble survey of the central regions of roughly 145 nearby disk galaxies.

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Hotspot in the genome may drive psychosis in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

A newly identified epigenetic hotspot for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may give scientists a fresh path forward for devising more effective treatments and biomarker-based screening strategies. More than 100 million people worldwide have either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, which are characterized by periods of hallucinations, delusions and irregular thought processes. They are both asso

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Boston Dynamics – Introducing Handle [February, 2017]

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Regenstrief, IU, Purdue research presented on national stage

Regenstrief Institute faculty members are sharing the institute's groundbreaking research with national leaders in geriatrics at the 2019 annual meeting for the American Geriatrics Society in Portland, Oregon, May 2-4.

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Can antibiotics treat endometriosis?

In mice, treatment with an antibiotic reduces the size of lesions from endometriosis, researchers report. The researchers are planning a large, multicenter clinical trial to test the drug metronidazole in women who have the painful condition. Endometriosis is a chronic problem for up to 10 percent of women ages 25 to 40. Endometriosis affects about 5 million women in the United States and an esti

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You Probably Shouldn’t Bring CBD Oil to an Airport

Most Americans probably know it’s a bad idea to bring weed to the airport. Cannabis has been federally illegal since the 1930s, and one of modern air travel’s most prominent features is the layers of federal law-enforcement inspection one must traverse in order to board a plane. Even in states that have legalized marijuana for recreational use, carrying too much of it through TSA can get you arre

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Breaking bread with rivals leads to more fish on coral reefs

Cooperation is key to most successful endeavours. And, scientists find, when fishermen and women cooperate with other fishers, this can boost fish stocks on coral reefs.

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How Does Trust Shape Our World

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After Record-Breaking Storms, Mozambique Faces a Humanitarian Crisis

Six weeks after Cyclone Idai devastated Malawi, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique, a second storm dealt another blow to the region, further stretching limited relief funding and resources. Cyclone Kenneth slammed into Mozambique's northern coast on April 25 with sustained winds of 140 miles per hour.

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Joyless economies: Slavery, feudalism, and unregulated capitalism

Wealth inequality in modern capitalism creates a joyless economy for both the rich and the poor, says Yanis Varoufakis. Wealth inequality in a time of economic abundance makes society less civilized. More evenly distributed resources allow humans to create the literature, art and intellectual works that make human life richer. The universalized depression and stress caused by inequality is "incon

8h

More than 100 years of data show Pennsylvania tick population shift

The prevalence of the most abundant species of ticks found in Pennsylvania has shifted over the last century, according to Penn State scientists, who analyzed 117 years' worth of specimens and data submitted primarily by residents from around the state.

8h

Climate extremes explain 18%-43% of global crop yield variations

Researchers from Australia, Germany and the US have quantified the effect of climate extremes, such as droughts or heatwaves, on the yield variability of staple crops around the world.

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More than 100 years of data show Pennsylvania tick population shift

The prevalence of the most abundant species of ticks found in Pennsylvania has shifted over the last century, according to Penn State scientists, who analyzed 117 years' worth of specimens and data submitted primarily by residents from around the state.

8h

Pot Used for Scientific Research is Pretty Weak

Science Schwag In order to study cannabis and its effects on humans, scientists must source it from the National Center for Natural Products Research at the University of Mississippi in Oxford. And that comes with a big downside: it’s super weak compared to the stuff you can get on the street, according to Nature . And that’s a problem, because it might put U.S. cannabis research results out of w

8h

Hubble spots a stunning spiral galaxy

NGC 2903 is located about 30 million light-years away in the constellation of Leo (the Lion), and was studied as part of a Hubble survey of the central regions of roughly 145 nearby disk galaxies.

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Study shows drug reduces risk of relapse with neuromyelitis optica

The drug eculizumab, a synthetic antibody that inhibits the inflammatory response, significantly reduced the risk of relapse with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD). This rare but severe autoimmune inflammatory disorder can cause blindness, paralysis and death. Mayo Clinic researchers and international collaborators report their findings in a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlle

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Hotspot in the genome may drive psychosis in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

A newly identified epigenetic hotspot for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may give scientists a fresh path forward for devising more effective treatments and biomarker-based screening strategies. More than 100 million people worldwide have either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, which are characterized by periods of hallucinations, delusions and irregular thought processes. They are both asso

8h

How grunting influences perception in tennis

Grunting noises in tennis influence the prediction of ball flight. Sport psychologists from Jena University (Germany) come to this conclusion in a new study.

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How did the moon end up where it is?

The moon is slowly moving away from the Earth, but what causes that? Mattias Green and David Waltham explore the possible answers.

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Space tourism: far, far away fares

The dangers are real, as are the discomforts

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The Moms Who Were Extremely Online in 1993

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with a group of moms who met online in the early days of the internet. They were initially all part of the same parenting discussion board on Usenet, and when a couple dozen moms discovered they were

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The Photographs That Paved the Way for Apollo 11

A new exhibition charts the history of moon photography—just in time for the 50th anniversary of the NASA mission.

8h

AI Is About to Completely Change the Face of Entertainment

Twenty years ago, entertainment was dominated by a handful of producers and monolithic broadcasters, a near-impossible market to break into. Today, the industry is almost entirely dematerialized, while storytellers and storytelling mediums explode in number. And this is just the beginning. Netflix turned entertainment on its head practically overnight, shooting from a market cap of US$8 billion i

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Blodprov kan visa på rätt behandling vid prostatacancer

Prostatacancer är den vanligaste cancerformen i Sverige och ungefär var fjärde drabbad man får spridd cancer. Initial hormonell behandling fungerar väl för de flesta med spridd prostatacancer. Men med tiden utvecklar tumören resistens, vilket resulterar i kastrationsresistent prostatacancer. Även för detta tillstånd finns idag behandlingsalternativ, till exempel läkemedlen Zytiga (abirateronaceta

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Forurenet drikkevand sætter spørgsmålstegn ved Miljøministeriets overvågning af grundvandet

PLUS. Mens vandværkerne kontrollerer drikkevandet og laver boringskontroller af grundvandet, er det Miljøministeriets ansvar, at overvågningen af grundvandet er tilstrækkelig. Rigsrevisionen undersøger nu, om ministeriet har levet op til det ansvar og taget advarsler om pesticidfund alvorligt.

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Finding Comfort in the Gloomy Beauty of The Cure’s Disintegration

When I first encountered The Cure, I was lost. I was 16 and had recently moved from Florida to Denver with my family. We were poor, which added an extra dimension of alienation as I tried to adjust to a new school. On top of that, I was grappling with the onset of what I wouldn’t realize until decades later was bipolar II disorder. The music of The Cure, equal parts menacing and cleansing, split

8h

Jay Inslee’s Climate Plan Is Keeping It 100

The climate candidate now has a climate plan—or at least the beginnings of one. On Friday, Governor Jay Inslee of Washington announced a major plank of his climate-focused platform for president: a three-part plan to reshape the U.S. auto market, building code, and power grid over the next decade and a half. You could call it the 100-100-100 plan. Inslee would require that, by 2030, 100 percent o

8h

Early-stage detection of Alzheimer's in the blood

Using current techniques, Alzheimer's disease, the most frequent cause of dementia, can only be detected once the typical plaques have formed in the brain. At this point, therapy seems no longer possible. However, the first changes caused by Alzheimer's take place on the protein level up to 20 years sooner. A two-tier method can help detect the disease at a much earlier stage.

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Monitoring the lifecycle of tiny catalyst nanoparticles

In order to tailor nanoparticles in such a way that they can catalyse certain reactions selectively and efficiently, researchers need to determine the properties of single particles as precisely as possible. So far, an ensemble of many nanoparticles is analysed. The problem of these investigations is that the contributions of different particles interfere, so that the properties of individual part

8h

Needleless vaccine will protect children from dangerous viruses

Orally administered vaccine can protect millions from hepatitis B. Oral vaccines are both safer and less expensive than injections. Therefore, researchers are continuously pursuing ways to produce an oral vaccine that is sufficiently effective. Now, University of Copenhagen physicists have delivered virologists a 'recipe' for improving vaccine drops using methods from the world of nanophysics.

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A question of time

Researchers show how the immune system distinguishes between self molecules and non-self molecules such as those from pathogens.

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Quantum sensor for photons

A photodetector converts light into an electrical signal, causing the light to be lost. Researchers led by Tracy Northup at the University of Innsbruck have now built a quantum sensor that can measure light particles non-destructively. It can be used to further investigate the quantum properties of light.

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Extinction Rebellion told prison is not a 'yoga retreat'

The climate change group deletes advice saying "most prison officers are black and wish you no harm".

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How to create custom shortcut keys with Arduino

DIY You're still pressing buttons, but like, not as many. If you spend a lot of time at your computer, there are a variety of tasks you perform over and over. One option for making your computer-bound life a tiny bit easier is…

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Robots bring 10,000 deliveries and late-night food service to college

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AI is transforming humans into robots, right now

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Controversial Research: Two Drugs May Reduce Autism Symptoms

Preliminary Results New experiments show that two drugs seem to improve the social and communication skills of people with Autism Spectrum Disorder, according to Spectrum . But scientists caution against treating recent studies as conclusive evidence that the drugs could help treat autism-related symptoms. It’s a conflict that highlights, above all else, how autism is a complicated condition that

8h

Quantum sensor for photons

A photodetector converts light into an electrical signal, causing the light to be lost. Researchers led by Tracy Northup at the University of Innsbruck have now built a quantum sensor that can measure light particles non-destructively. It can be used to further investigate the quantum properties of light.

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Tiny Australia bird stalls divisive coal mine project

A tiny finch flew into the centre of Australia's bitter environmental politics Friday when local authorities blocked the construction of a contentious coal mine until the rare bird is protected.

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These logic problems will make long car rides feel shorter

Head Trip Playing with time. There’s nothing more painful than watching time pass during a road trip. Instead, occupy your mind with these logic problems. Then whip them out on future car rides, and…

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Brain imaging lie detector can be beaten with simple techniques, research shows

This is a peer-reviewed observational study conducted in humans.Researchers have shown that a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) 'lie detector' test, which measures brain activity, can be 'deceived' by people using mental countermeasures.The study suggests that more should be done to detect mental countermeasures before using fMRI tests for forensic applications.

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Crowd oil — Fuels from air-conditioning systems

Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the University of Toronto have proposed a method enabling air conditioning and ventilation systems to produce synthetic fuels from carbon dioxide (CO2) and water from the ambient air. Compact plants are to separate CO2 from the ambient air directly in buildings and produce synthetic hydrocarbons which can then be used as renewable synt

9h

UC Riverside study busts myths about gossip

A new UC Riverside study asserts that women don't engage in 'tear-down' gossip any more than men, and lower income people don't gossip more than their more well-to-do counterparts. It also holds younger people are more likely to gossip negatively than their older counterparts.

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What the wheat genome tells us about wars

First they mapped the genome of wheat; now they have reconstructed its breeding history. Joining forces with other European researchers, scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have examined the genetic diversity of wheat varieties in the WHEALBI study. By doing so, they discovered which cereals our ancestors cultivated, where today's wheat comes from, and what the Cold War has to do with it a

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Monitoring the lifecycle of tiny catalyst nanoparticles

Nanoparticles can be used in many ways as catalysts. To be able to tailor them in such a way that they can catalyse certain reactions selectively and efficiently, researchers need to determine the properties of single particles as precisely as possible. So far, an ensemble of many nanoparticles is analysed. However, the problem of these investigations is that the contributions of different particl

9h

Trump offshore drilling plan may be dead in the water, but there are better ways to lead on energy

President Trump's effort to expand offshore oil and gas exploration has stalled, and may be dead in the water. The newest obstacle is an April ruling in Alaska's U.S. District Court that blocked Trump's order to lift a ban on energy leasing in Arctic waters.

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What the wheat genome tells us about wars

First they mapped the genome of wheat; now they have reconstructed its breeding history. Joining forces with other European researchers, scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have examined the genetic diversity of wheat varieties in the WHEALBI study. By doing so, they discovered which cereals our ancestors cultivated, where today's wheat comes from, and what the Cold War has to do with it a

9h

Voldgiftssag: Entreprenør har ikke ansvaret for skader fra MgO-plader

En entreprenør, der brugte de omdiskuterede MgO-plader i byggeri i 2014, er ansvarsfri, fordi anerkendt brancheblad havde nævnt materialet i en artikel, inden beslutningen blev truffet.

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How to increase train use by up to 35% with one simple trick

Train riders have to get to stations somehow. This is often referred to as the "first mile" or "last mile" problem. There are many technical solutions to help travellers get from home to the station and back, ranging from cars to electronic scooters, but most people use a much older technology, their feet, to get from A to B. What is seldom considered is access to the train platform itself.

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Many electric utilities are struggling – will more go bankrupt?

Over the past 12 months, consumers in the U.S. have experienced the disappearance of familiar retailers, such as Toys R Us and Sears, due in part to how online shopping has changed the way consumers shop for goods.

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Addressing food insecurity in the digital age

In the search for food —whether through foraging, hunting or agriculture —we are constantly at war with nature. In addition, food is distributed unequally: over 800 million people experience hunger while two billion are overweight or obese.

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Making the invisible visible: New method opens unexplored realms for liquid biopsies

A new approach to RNA sequencing reveals thousands of previously inaccessible RNA fragments in blood plasma that might serve as disease- and organ-specific biomarkers.

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F. Gary Gray Is Working on a 'Saints Row' Movie Adaptation

Also, Microsoft's trash talk guidelines are great.

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Riding a Scooter? Protect Your Head

Half of injuries to 190 scooter riders in Austin last fall were to the head; only one of the injured riders was wearing a helmet.

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What other countries can teach the US about raising teacher pay

Teacher strikes swept the United States in 2018, from West Virginia to Oklahoma, Colorado, Arizona, North Carolina and beyond.

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These award-winning photographs capture rarely seen wildlife and landscapes

Winners of the California Academy of Sciences’ annual photo contest dove deep underwater and hiked to great heights to create these striking images.

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Study reveals amyloid clumps of a truncated p53 structure related to endometrial cancer

Brazilian scientists have discovered that a truncated variant of the tumor suppressor protein p53 is present as amyloid aggregates in endometrial cancer cells. Published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the study points to new perspectives for treating tumors in which p53 variants are important components of these clusters, given that alterations in the p53 protein are associated with more

9h

Novel thermoelectric nanoantenna design for use in solar energy harvesting

In an article published in the SPIE Journal of Nanophotonics (JNP), researchers from a collaboration of three labs in Mexico demonstrate an innovative nanodevice for harvesting solar energy. The paper, 'Thermoelectric efficiency optimization of nanoantennas for solar energy harvesting,' reports that evolutive dipole nanoantennas (EDNs) generate a thermoelectric voltage three times larger than the

9h

The sense of touch is formed in the brain before birth

All the surface of the human body is represented in the cerebral cortex in a transversal band localized at the external part of the cerebral hemispheres: the somatosensory cortex. Each body region occupies in that band a distinct extension depending on its use and sensitivity. For instance, the hands and the lips, on which humans rely most, occupy the largest area. Thus, the 3D representation of t

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Even if you don't live in the midwest, this spring's floods could still impact you

From enduring drought to intense floods, agriculture is particularly sensitive and vulnerable to changes in our climate. Floods are temporary, but their socioeconomic impact is long-lasting and far-reaching to every corner of the world. "It is clear that agriculture prices have entered a new age of volatility," according to a report by Oliver Wyman, a leader of global management consulting firm.

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Too Much Wasted Time

Here’s a note of warning sounded in a lead editorial in Nature: . . .I think that, in two decades, we will look back on the past 60 years — particularly in biomedical science — and marvel at how much time and money has been wasted on flawed research. . . . . .many researchers persist in working in a way almost guaranteed not to deliver meaningful results. They ride with what I refer to as the fou

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A closer look at the molecular mechanism that switches control of activation of eIF2 by eIF2B

A team of researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research in Japan has developed a tool to prevent neurogenerative diseases. They have demonstrated a way to observe the molecular mechanism that switches control of activation of eIF2 by eIF2B when a cell undergoes stress. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their use of cryo-electron microscopy to b

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Making the invisible visible: New method opens unexplored realms for liquid biopsies

A new approach to RNA sequencing reveals thousands of previously inaccessible RNA fragments in blood plasma that might serve as disease- and organ-specific biomarkers.

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How could a changing climate affect human fertility?

Human adaptation to climate change may include changes in fertility, according to a new study. They found that, through its economic effects, climate change could have a substantial impact on fertility, as people decide how much time and money they devote to child-rearing, and whether to use those resources to have more children or invest more in the future of each child.

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High-density cities are economically beneficial but lead to greater inequality

Densely built cities with people living and working in close proximity are economically efficient but lead to higher levels of inequality, according to new research from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

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A closer look at the molecular mechanism that switches control of activation of eIF2 by eIF2B

A team of researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research in Japan has developed a tool to prevent neurogenerative diseases. They have demonstrated a way to observe the molecular mechanism that switches control of activation of eIF2 by eIF2B when a cell undergoes stress. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their use of cryo-electron microscopy to b

9h

Globular cluster system of Messier 106—a relic of cosmic high noon?

An international scientific team led by a Mexican researcher discovered globular clusters rotating at the same speed as the gas in the disk of the spiral galaxy Messier 106 (also known as M106 or NGC 4258) to which they belong. Because of their disk-like arrangement and speed, these distant objects could be relics of cosmic high noon.

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A new synthetic nanofactory inspired by nature

Bacteria across our planet contain nanometer-sized factories that do many different things. Some make nutrients, others isolate toxic materials that could harm the bacteria. We have barely scratched the surface of their functional diversity.

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Developing cells do synchronized swimming inside the embryo

The very beginnings of life inside a tiny developing embryo are mesmerizing to watch. Each movement and biochemical reaction is executed with well-ordered precision about 95 percent of the time, leading to the development of a healthy organism.

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Man Survives 70-Foot Fall into Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano

The man had climbed over a railing at the Steaming Bluff overlook to get closer to the edge of the cliff.

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Developing cells do synchronized swimming inside the embryo

The very beginnings of life inside a tiny developing embryo are mesmerizing to watch. Each movement and biochemical reaction is executed with well-ordered precision about 95 percent of the time, leading to the development of a healthy organism.

9h

A quantum leap in particle simulation

A group of scientists at the Department of Energy's Fermilab has figured out how to use quantum computing to simulate the fundamental interactions that hold together our universe.

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Researcher investigates threats to coral and other ocean life

Before she turned into a deep-sea detective, Joleah Lamb herded fruit flies, groomed dogs and extracted blood from humans.

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Researcher investigates threats to coral and other ocean life

Before she turned into a deep-sea detective, Joleah Lamb herded fruit flies, groomed dogs and extracted blood from humans.

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Haves: 1 mia. kroner til grundforskning i klima og AI – Søges: Stærke ledere

Staten og en række fonde har skudt 1 mia. kroner i nye forskningsenheder, der skal bringe Danmark i front med de store emner som kunstig intelligens og klima.

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Avoid smoky environments to protect your heart

If a room or car is smoky, stay away until it has cleared. That's the main message of new research.

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Sculpting super-fast light pulses

Researchers have developed a novel and compact method of shaping ultrafast light pulses.

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Forest fires accelerating snowmelt across western US

Forest fires are causing snow to melt earlier in the season, a trend occurring across the western US that may affect water supplies and trigger even more fires, according to a new study.

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More than 100 years of data show Pennsylvania tick population shift

The prevalence of the most abundant species of ticks found in Pennsylvania has shifted over the last century, according to Penn State scientists, who analyzed 117 years' worth of specimens and data submitted primarily by residents from around the state.

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Organic Solar Cell Breakthrough

It’s interesting to try to envision the energy infrastructure 50 and 100 years in the future. Which technologies will prove the most cost and carbon effective? Of course, this can be a bit of a self-fulfilling prophesy – the technologies we think will work will be the ones we invest in and develop. This is why I think we should hedge our bets by developing every viable option. Can nuclear fission

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Biomedical devices designed with natural fluorescence for in vivo monitoring

Researchers at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country have developed a biomedical device for cell immune-isolation (microcapsules) with luminescence for in vivo tracking. The work has been published in the Journal of Biophotonics.

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Facebook considering its own bitcoin for payments

The Wall Street Journal reports that Facebook plans a cryptocurrency-based payment system that it could launch for billions of users worldwide.

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Machine set to see if lithium can help bring fusion to Earth

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Technology Isn't Destroying Jobs, But Is Increasing Inequality

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Robot farming startup Iron Ox has started selling its first produce

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Permits were supposed to make climbing Yosemite’s Half Dome safer. They made things worse

Study finds injuries and death per person rose after national park began to restrict access

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Ny professor i føtalmedicin og -terapi på Rigshospitalet

Olav Bjørn Petersen er ny professor i føtalmedicin og føtalterapi ved Center for Føtalmedicin og Graviditet i Obstetrisk Klinik på Rigshospitalets Juliane Marie Center

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Erfaren leder på sundhedsområdet bliver kontorchef for KL’s Socialpolitiske Kontor

Janet Marie Samuel rykker fra jobbet som leder af koordineringsenheden for sundhedsreformen for at blive ny kontorchef for KL’s Socialpolitiske Kontor.

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SpaceX Is Launching 'Organs on a Chip' to the ISS

Organs on a chip were created to expedite the process of drug discovery. Sending them to the International Space Station can speed things up even more.

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Portland Is Again Blazing Trails for Open Internet Access

The city that fought AT&T to open its cable lines in the 1990s is now considering a publicly owned open-access fiber network.

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Review: Netflix's Animated 'Tuca & Bertie' Is the Tits

When animated boobs are everywhere, it helps to have a woman in charge.

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Sweating the small stuff

Assistant professor of medical engineering Wei Gao is enriching the field of personalized and precision medicine with an abundant source of chemical data: sweat.

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2020 Democrats Aim High With Climate Change Proposals

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is centering his presidential campaign on combating climate change. On Friday, he rolled out his plan to shift the country to carbon-free energy. (Image credit: George Frey/Getty Images)

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The Serendipity of Swiss Cheese

This holey mathematical object was discovered by a Swiss mathematician and then forgotten for decades — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Robots to the rhino rescue

The critically endangered northern white rhino might have more of a chance thanks to a partnership between the University of California San Diego and San Diego Zoo Global.

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Study demonstrates seagrass' strong potential for curbing erosion

Most people's experience with seagrass, if any, amounts to little more than a tickle on their ankles while wading in shallow coastal waters. But it turns out these ubiquitous plants, varieties of which exist around the world, could play a key role in protecting vulnerable shores as they face onslaughts from rising sea levels.

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Uncovering the Sacrificial Puppies of the Shang Dynasty

A new study suggests young dogs were frequently buried with humans in China some 3,000 years ago, but the precise reasons remain elusive — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Robots to the rhino rescue

The critically endangered northern white rhino might have more of a chance thanks to a partnership between the University of California San Diego and San Diego Zoo Global.

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SpaceX Finally Confirms Dragon Capsule Explosion

The admission comes from the company's vice president of mission assurance Hans Koenigsmann. The post SpaceX Finally Confirms Dragon Capsule Explosion appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Single molecule puts sperm on track

Sperm start their sprint to the ovum when they detect changes in the environment through a series of calcium channels arranged like racing stripes on their tails. A team of Yale researchers has identified a key molecule that coordinates the opening and closing of these channels, a process that activates sperm and helps guides them to the egg.

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Single molecule puts sperm on track

Sperm start their sprint to the ovum when they detect changes in the environment through a series of calcium channels arranged like racing stripes on their tails. A team of Yale researchers has identified a key molecule that coordinates the opening and closing of these channels, a process that activates sperm and helps guides them to the egg.

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Bottom sediment reveals that climate change flows into lakes

Increasing amounts of dark-coloured carbon compounds that originate from catchment areas flow into the Arctic and northern lakes. They alter resource utilization and community structure of macroinvertebrates, says MSci Henriikka Kivilä in her doctoral thesis in aquatic sciences at the University of Jyväskylä. Long-term sediment records also revealed that in addition to surface flow, nutrients of m

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Cobalt for 500,000 electric cars could be harvested from the oceans

Enough cobalt for hundreds of thousands of electric car batteries could be collected by dangling plastic balls from disused oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico

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Genetic variants may put some athletes at higher risk of sudden death

People with one copy of a sickle cell gene are thought to have no health issues, but other gene variants may place carriers at a higher risk of sudden collapse

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Study examines impact of climate change on Louisiana's Houma tribe

While Indigenous populations such as the Houma tribe on Louisiana's Gulf Coast are especially vulnerable to environmental change, mistrust fomented by the tribe's history with overt discrimination, forcible relocation and institutional racism complicates efforts to help them adapt to it, new research suggests.

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Rise of the Lady Backpack

When Sara Farrar worked in California, she took a purse to work every day. It seemed like the hip thing to do, and since she drove to work, it was easy to toss the thing into the car in the morning. When she moved to a consulting job, she upgraded to a fancier purse so she could be taken seriously among her more well-heeled co-workers, “regardless of how impractical this was as I ran through the

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Nibbling parasite ‘decorates’ itself with bits of host

An amoeba parasite bites off pieces of host cells and puts their proteins on its own surface to protect itself from attack, according to a new study. Entamoeba histolytica causes severe diarrheal disease, mainly in tropical countries. It lives in the gut, causing ulcers and bleeding. In severe cases it can break out and invade other organs. Amoebae and many other cells—including some that protect

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Immigrants: Citizens' acceptance depends on questions asked

How many immigrants per year should Switzerland be prepared to welcome? Do the figures put forward by political parties and conveyed by the media play a role in influencing public opinion? Psychologists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, set about testing a well-known form of reasoning bias called anchoring bias—it consists of providing a deliberately low or high figure for inform

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Rare Recording Captures Einstein Talking About Music and the Atomic Bomb

The private conversation was recorded nearly 70 years ago.

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Study finds model for getting students to complete community college

Community college students who receive comprehensive supports are more than 30 percent more likely to enroll full-time and continue in their first year in the program, according to a new study by the University of Chicago Poverty Lab.

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Laser-driven spin dynamics in ferrimagnets: How does the angular momentum flow?

When exposed to intense laser pulses, the magnetization of a material can be manipulated very fast. Fundamentally, magnetization is connected to the angular momentum of the electrons in the material. A team of researchers led by scientists from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) has now been able to follow the flow of angular momentum during ultrafast op

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Image: Ries crater, Germany

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over an area in southern Germany, where approximately 15 million years ago an asteroid crashed through Earth's atmosphere. The high-speed impact formed what is now known as the Ries crater. Although difficult to spot at first in the image, the result of the impact is actually still visible today.

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Life's biochemical networks could have formed spontaneously on Earth

Researchers in Strasbourg, France, have found that mixing two small biomolecules, glyoxylate and pyruvate, in iron-salt-rich water produces a reaction network resembling life's core biochemistry. This discovery provides insight into how chemistry on the early Earth primed the evolution of the most ancient life. The study was published in the journal Nature.

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Data with flippers? Studying the ocean from a seal's POV

Scientist Lia Siegelman is using a surprising data source to study the ocean around Antarctica—one that has flippers and bears a passing resemblance to Jabba the Hut.

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Finnish school students outperform U.S. students on 'fake news' digital literacy tasks

A recent study revealed students at an international school in Finland significantly outperformed U.S. students on tasks which measure digital literacy in social media and online news. The researchers suggest this may be due to the Finnish and International Baccalaureate curricula's different way of facilitating students' critical thinking skills compared to the U.S. system and curriculum. The res

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Life's biochemical networks could have formed spontaneously on Earth

Researchers in Strasbourg, France, have found that mixing two small biomolecules, glyoxylate and pyruvate, in iron-salt-rich water produces a reaction network resembling life's core biochemistry. This discovery provides insight into how chemistry on the early Earth primed the evolution of the most ancient life. The study was published in the journal Nature.

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Data with flippers? Studying the ocean from a seal's POV

Scientist Lia Siegelman is using a surprising data source to study the ocean around Antarctica—one that has flippers and bears a passing resemblance to Jabba the Hut.

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The Oral and Genital Herpes Viruses Are Having 'Sex.' The Result Is Worrisome.

There's a lot more "sex" going on between the oral and genital herpes viruses than scientists previously thought, according to a new study.

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How Do You Stop a Hypothetical Asteroid from Hitting Earth? NASA's On It.

We'll have to deflect a space rock someday. It's just a question of when.

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Ancient Millipede Walked with Dinosaurs, Died in a Sticky Trap

Exceptional preservation led to the discovery of a new millipede suborder.

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A Mysterious Hacker Group Is On a Supply Chain Hijacking Spree

A group of likely Chinese hackers has poisoned the software of at least six companies in just the last three years.

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The Comedian Is in the Machine. AI Is Now Learning Puns

Researchers are using artificial intelligence techniques to create puns. Today's aren't so funny, but tomorrow's might be better.

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How to Build, and Keep Building, a Cathedral Like Notre-Dame

Architects' pitches for how to restore Notre-Dame are spurring a debate over when to hew to tradition and when to, say, put a beehive in the spire.

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Facebook data show how many people left Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

Conventional surveys can’t track migration after natural disasters in real time. But Facebook data may provide a crude estimate of those who flee.

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Hjärnmekanism upptäckt – som reglerar kroppsvikten

I kroppen är interleukin-6 framför allt känd som en signalmolekyl i vårt immunsystem. Proteinet frisätts av immunceller vid en infektion och medverkar i försvaret mot bakterier och virus, men har också visats ha betydelse för andra processer i kroppen, bland annat energiomsättning. Feta gnagare hade mindre IL-6 Precis som många människor äter gnagare för mycket när de erbjuds kalorität mat. I stu

11h

What Number of Kids Makes Parents Happiest?

Bryan Caplan is an economist and a dad who has thought a lot about the joys and stresses of being a parent. When I asked him whether there is an ideal number of children to have, from the perspective of parents’ well-being, he gave a perfectly sensible response: “I’m tempted to start with the evasive economist answer of ‘Well, there’s an optimal number given your preferences.’” When I pressed him

11h

How to Save $45 Billion on Health Care Costs Each Year

Nearly 700,000 people get sick or die each year from infections they get in the hospital—most of which are preventable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

An Exomoon Eludes Astronomers—for Now

Researchers may have already glimpsed the first-known exomoon—a satellite of a planet orbiting another star; but confirmation of that potential discovery could be many years away — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

An Exomoon Eludes Astronomers—for Now

Researchers may have already glimpsed the first-known exomoon—a satellite of a planet orbiting another star; but confirmation of that potential discovery could be many years away — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Making the invisible visible: New method opens unexplored realms for liquid biopsies

A new approach to RNA sequencing reveals thousands of previously inaccessible RNA fragments in blood plasma that might serve as disease- and organ-specific biomarkers

12h

Alvorligt sikkerhedshul i pre-installeret software gør størstedelen af Dell-computere sårbare

Et kritisk sikkerhedshul i det preinstallerede Dell SupportAssist software kan udnyttes til remote code execution. Størstedelen af Dell computere antages at være sårbare.

12h

Uber hit with Australia class action ahead of stock listing

Global ride-sharing firm Uber on Friday faced another legal bump on the road to its blockbuster initial public offering, with taxi drivers launching a class action lawsuit in Australia.

12h

Forsinket fra første færd: It-problemer rammer ny letbane til Grenaa

Problemer med bomme og fejlramt i software har givet massive forsinkelser på Letbanens nyåbnede strækning mellem Aarhus og Grenaa.

12h

Faceless Killer: The Invisible Threat of Air Pollution

Pollution’s victims, counted in aggregate and understood only through statistical analysis, are usually rendered faceless. In "Choked," the reporter Beth Gardiner visits the communities that suffer the most, and finds reason for optimism despite the sluggish reaction of many governments to fix the problem.

12h

Aids breakthrough as study finds drugs stop HIV transmission

Virus cannot be passed on through sexual contact if infected partner takes antiretroviral drugs

12h

Anti-Semitism Is Thriving in America

In my neighborhood, there are a number of synagogues and churches. The church doors are open, welcoming all. The synagogues have armed guards, fences, door codes, and people who will stop strangers as they enter. Ostensibly these are welcomers , but their real job is to check whether these strangers wish to do the people inside harm. Our children look at the church across the street and recognize

12h

My Brother Is Stuck in a Mauritanian Prison

O n March 22 , as I was about to wrap up a meeting with a client, I got a phone call. At first I ignored the vibrating phone, but the same number kept calling. “Aren’t you going to take that?” my client asked politely. As I reached out to take the call, the phone stopped buzzing. Then it vibrated with a short message: “Your brother was arrested.” My heart sank. I stumbled out of my meeting trying

12h

A Boom Time for U.S. Sanctions

The United States, as of this writing, has 7,967 sanctions in place. Treasury Department data show them in many sizes. There are sanctions on individual people, like the Mexican drug kingpin Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzman; on companies, like Cubacancun Cigars and Gift Shops; and even on entire governments or their branches, like on Iran and its main security force, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corp

12h

The Right Way to Think About ‘Electability’

The highest priority for Democrats in 2020 is a challenger who can beat President Donald Trump. Many believe that Joe Biden is the candidate best able to do it. They may be right. Biden has excellent name recognition rooted in his association with a popular two-term president. And no one doubts that he has the experience to do the job. Then again, skeptics retort, the former vice president doesn’

12h

Spelreklam en fälla för redan beroende

Spelbolagen har de senaste åren investerat allt mer i marknadsföring. 2007 spenderade de en miljard på marknadsföring. Förra året låg summan på nära sju och en halv miljard. Men trots denna kraftiga ökning av spelreklam har andelen som spelar minskat. Idag spelar runt 60 procent av befolkningen minst några gånger per år. För 20 år sedan låg siffran på nära 90 procent. Sverige har haft en stark tr

12h

Symbios mellan granbarkborre och svamp skadar skogen

Granbarkborren är en av de olika slag av barkborrar som Tao Zhao undersöker och den insekt som gör störst skada på det svenska granskogar. Den torra sommaren 2018 ledde till stora angrepp i södra Sverige och Skogsstyrelsen har gjort beräkningar som visar att angreppen av granbarkborren kan bli stora även 2019. – Granbarkborrarna är framgångsrika eftersom de kan locka till sig många barkborrar med

12h

Citrix: Vi var hacket i ca. 5 måneder – muligvis via password spraying

Remote-desktop-virksomheden Citrix har været kompromitteret i fem måneder i forbindelse med et cyberangreb.

12h

Fra lange pauser til speed-snak: Hør, hvordan radioens stemmer har ændret sig gennem 100 år

Den teknologiske udvikling har blandt andet ændret, hvordan man taler i radioen.

12h

Syrup Is as Canadian as a Maple Leaf. That Could Change With the Climate.

A growing body of research suggests that warming temperatures linked to climate change may significantly shrink the range where it’s possible to make maple syrup.

12h

You Will Never Smell My World the Way I Do

Scientists find that whiskey’s smokiness, the smell of beets and lily of the valley perfume can be utterly different depending on your genetic wiring.

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Landbruget langt efter prognoser for ny ammoniak-teknologi

PLUS. Under to-tre procent af de danske stalde benytter gylle­forsuring til at holde fordampningen af ammoniak nede. Det svarer til en tiendedel af forudsigelserne.

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Rangers find three-eyed snake in Australia's Humpty Doo

A three-eyed snake found slithering down a road in the northern Australian town of Humpty Doo has sparked amusement in a country already accustomed to unusual wildlife.

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Rangers find three-eyed snake in Australia's Humpty Doo

A three-eyed snake found slithering down a road in the northern Australian town of Humpty Doo has sparked amusement in a country already accustomed to unusual wildlife.

12h

The village that keeps rising from the volcanic ashes

Four years after the volcano erupted—razing everything in its path in Cape Verde's Cha das Caldeiras valley—the floor tiles of the small, rebuilt inn are warm to the touch.

12h

Could high-flying drones power your home one day?

How kites and drones could generate electricity to supplement conventional wind turbines.

12h

Transport evidence of asymmetric spin–orbit coupling in few-layer superconducting 1Td-MoTe2

Transport evidence of asymmetric spin–orbit coupling in few-layer superconducting 1 T d -MoTe 2 Transport evidence of asymmetric spin–orbit coupling in few-layer superconducting 1 T d -MoTe 2 , Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09995-0 Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides with peculiar spin–orbit coupling may lead to exotic phenomena. Here, the authors report a lar

12h

Disruption of podocyte cytoskeletal biomechanics by dasatinib leads to nephrotoxicity

Disruption of podocyte cytoskeletal biomechanics by dasatinib leads to nephrotoxicity Disruption of podocyte cytoskeletal biomechanics by dasatinib leads to nephrotoxicity, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09936-x Kinase inhibitors used in chemotherapy are known for their adverse effects on kidney physiology. Here, Calizo et al. show that dasatinib is associated with a higher

12h

Integrating Hi-C and FISH data for modeling of the 3D organization of chromosomes

Integrating Hi-C and FISH data for modeling of the 3D organization of chromosomes Integrating Hi-C and FISH data for modeling of the 3D organization of chromosomes, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10005-6 Methodological advances have increased our understanding of chromatin structure through chromosome conformation capture techniques and high resolution imaging, but integrat

12h

The ecological drivers of variation in global language diversity

The ecological drivers of variation in global language diversity The ecological drivers of variation in global language diversity, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09842-2 Could similar ecological and biogeographic drivers explain the distributions of biological diversity and human cultural diversity? The authors explore ecological correlates of human language diversity, find

12h

Microbial coexistence through chemical-mediated interactions

Microbial coexistence through chemical-mediated interactions Microbial coexistence through chemical-mediated interactions, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10062-x The drivers of coexistence between species with different growth rates are of interest in both ecology and applied microbial science. The authors show, via modelling, that species interactions moderated by consumpt

12h

Microclot array elastometry for integrated measurement of thrombus formation and clot biomechanics under fluid shear

Microclot array elastometry for integrated measurement of thrombus formation and clot biomechanics under fluid shear Microclot array elastometry for integrated measurement of thrombus formation and clot biomechanics under fluid shear, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10067-6 Blood clotting is a complex process involving platelet adhesion and clot stiffening. Here the authors

12h

Topological analog signal processing

Topological analog signal processing Topological analog signal processing, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10086-3 Analog signal processors could potentially offer faster operation and lower power consumption than digital versions, but are not yet commonly used for large scale applications due to considerable observational errors. Here, the authors demonstrate the unique rel

12h

Differential methylation of enhancer at IGF2 is associated with abnormal dopamine synthesis in major psychosis

Differential methylation of enhancer at IGF2 is associated with abnormal dopamine synthesis in major psychosis Differential methylation of enhancer at IGF2 is associated with abnormal dopamine synthesis in major psychosis, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09786-7 Dopamine dysregulation is centrally linked to major psychosis. Here, the authors characterise the hypomethylation

12h

Climate extremes explain 18%-43% of global crop yield variations

Climate extremes, such as drought, heatwaves, heavy precipitation and more are responsible for 18%-43% of variation in crop yields for maize, spring wheat, rice and soybeans. according to a new paper published in Environmental Research Letters. The researchers have also identified global regions which are highly susceptible to extremes and also supply a high proportion of the world market. Climate

12h

Breaking bread with rivals leads to more fish on coral reefs

When fishermen and women communicate with their fisher rivals, and cooperate over local environmental problems, they can improve the quality and quantity of fish on coral reefs. The study advances a framework that can be applied to other complex environmental problems where environmental conditions depend on the relationships between people and nature.

12h

Prolonged exposure to low-dose radiation may increase the risk of hypertension, a known cause of heart disease and stroke

A long-term study of Russian nuclear plant workers suggests that prolonged low-dose radiation exposure increases the risk of hypertension.This study is the first to associate an increased risk of hypertension to low doses of ionizing radiation among a large group of workers who were chronically exposed over many years. The higher the cumulative dose of radiation, the greater the risk, the study sh

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12h

Uber hit with Australia class action ahead of stock listing

Global ride-sharing firm Uber on Friday faced another legal bump on the road to its blockbuster initial public offering, with taxi drivers launching a class action lawsuit in Australia.

13h

Sweden's Ericsson launches AI lab in Canada

Swedish telecoms giant Ericsson on Thursday announced the launch of its "global artificial intelligence accelerator" in Montreal, where other tech heavyweights like Google, Facebook and Microsoft have invested in AI research and development.

13h

PiPred – a deep-learning method for prediction of π-helices in protein sequences

PiPred – a deep-learning method for prediction of π-helices in protein sequences PiPred – a deep-learning method for prediction of π-helices in protein sequences, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43189-4 PiPred – a deep-learning method for prediction of π-helices in protein sequences

13h

Publisher Correction: Adjuvanting a viral vectored vaccine against pre-erythrocytic malaria

Publisher Correction: Adjuvanting a viral vectored vaccine against pre-erythrocytic malaria Publisher Correction: Adjuvanting a viral vectored vaccine against pre-erythrocytic malaria, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43120-x Publisher Correction: Adjuvanting a viral vectored vaccine against pre-erythrocytic malaria

13h

ALK4/5-dependent TGF-β signaling contributes to the crosstalk between neurons and microglia following axonal lesion

ALK4/5-dependent TGF-β signaling contributes to the crosstalk between neurons and microglia following axonal lesion ALK4/5-dependent TGF-β signaling contributes to the crosstalk between neurons and microglia following axonal lesion, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43328-x ALK4/5-dependent TGF-β signaling contributes to the crosstalk between neurons and microglia following ax

13h

The DNA Alkylguanine DNA Alkyltransferase-2 (AGT-2) Of Caenorhabditis Elegans Is Involved In Meiosis And Early Development Under Physiological Conditions

The DNA Alkylguanine DNA Alkyltransferase-2 (AGT-2) Of Caenorhabditis Elegans Is Involved In Meiosis And Early Development Under Physiological Conditions The DNA Alkylguanine DNA Alkyltransferase-2 (AGT-2) Of Caenorhabditis Elegans Is Involved In Meiosis And Early Development Under Physiological Conditions, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43394-1 The DNA Alkylguanine DNA Alk

13h

Assessment of Dapagliflozin Effectiveness as Add-on Therapy for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Qatari Population

Assessment of Dapagliflozin Effectiveness as Add-on Therapy for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Qatari Population Assessment of Dapagliflozin Effectiveness as Add-on Therapy for the Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in a Qatari Population, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43052-6 Assessment of Dapagliflozin Effectiveness as Add-on Therapy for the Treatment

13h

Publisher Correction: Implications of the strain irreversibility cliff on the fabrication of particle-accelerator magnets made of restacked-rod-process Nb3Sn wires

Publisher Correction: Implications of the strain irreversibility cliff on the fabrication of particle-accelerator magnets made of restacked-rod-process Nb 3 Sn wires Publisher Correction: Implications of the strain irreversibility cliff on the fabrication of particle-accelerator magnets made of restacked-rod-process Nb 3 Sn wires, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43071-3 Publ

13h

Clinical and Echocardiographic Risk Factors Predict Late Recurrence after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

Clinical and Echocardiographic Risk Factors Predict Late Recurrence after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Clinical and Echocardiographic Risk Factors Predict Late Recurrence after Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43283-7 Clinical and Echocardiographic Risk Factors Predict Late Recurrence after Ra

13h

Regularity is not a key factor for encoding repetition in rapid image streams

Regularity is not a key factor for encoding repetition in rapid image streams Regularity is not a key factor for encoding repetition in rapid image streams, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39697-y Regularity is not a key factor for encoding repetition in rapid image streams

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Bacteroidetes use thousands of enzyme combinations to break down glycans

Bacteroidetes use thousands of enzyme combinations to break down glycans Bacteroidetes use thousands of enzyme combinations to break down glycans, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10068-5 Bacteroidetes genomes contain polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs), each of which encodes enzymes for the breakdown of one particular glycan. By analyzing the enzyme composition of 13,537

13h

Akt and STAT5 mediate naïve human CD4+ T-cell early metabolic response to TCR stimulation

Akt and STAT5 mediate naïve human CD4+ T-cell early metabolic response to TCR stimulation Akt and STAT5 mediate naïve human CD4+ T-cell early metabolic response to TCR stimulation, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10023-4 T-cell subsets differ in metabolic requirements for particular tasks. Here the authors characterize metabolic fluxes in naïve human CD4+ cells upon activati

13h

Coordination-driven self-assembly of a molecular figure-eight knot and other topologically complex architectures

Coordination-driven self-assembly of a molecular figure-eight knot and other topologically complex architectures Coordination-driven self-assembly of a molecular figure-eight knot and other topologically complex architectures, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10075-6 Molecular knots and links continue to fascinate synthetic chemists. Here, the authors use stacking and hydroge

13h

A de novo strategy for predictive crystal engineering to tune excitonic coupling

A de novo strategy for predictive crystal engineering to tune excitonic coupling A de novo strategy for predictive crystal engineering to tune excitonic coupling, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10011-8 In molecular solids, photoluminescence of dye molecules is often suppressed owing to excitonic coupling with adjacent chromophores. Here the authors use a computational metho

13h

GWAS of bone size yields twelve loci that also affect height, BMD, osteoarthritis or fractures

GWAS of bone size yields twelve loci that also affect height, BMD, osteoarthritis or fractures GWAS of bone size yields twelve loci that also affect height, BMD, osteoarthritis or fractures, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09860-0 Size and shape of bones are important for height and body shape. Here, Styrkarsdottir et al identify 12 loci in a GWAS for bone area derived from

13h

Coral carbon isotope sensitivity to growth rate and water depth with paleo-sea level implications

Coral carbon isotope sensitivity to growth rate and water depth with paleo-sea level implications Coral carbon isotope sensitivity to growth rate and water depth with paleo-sea level implications, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10054-x Rising anthropogenic CO2 levels in the atmosphere are resulting in ocean acidification which may impact coral growth rates. Here, the author

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Molecular determinants regulating selective binding of autophagy adapters and receptors to ATG8 proteins

Molecular determinants regulating selective binding of autophagy adapters and receptors to ATG8 proteins Molecular determinants regulating selective binding of autophagy adapters and receptors to ATG8 proteins, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10059-6 Autophagy adaptors and receptors contain LC3-interacting region (LIR) motifs that bind selectively to the LIR docking site of

13h

What is a storm surge and why is it so dangerous?

Severe cyclone Fani, which blasted ashore Friday in India, is expected to pack a frequently underestimated yet lethal threat: storm surge.

13h

Infrastructure Week Became a Joke. Now It’s for Real.

Two years into Donald Trump’s presidency, Infrastructure Week has come to promise five business days of drama and discussion about almost anything other than infrastructure. With campaign season ramping up, though, that may be about to change. The origins of this story begin on a Friday in June 2017, when Gary Cohn, then the chairman of the National Economic Council, teased that the following Mon

13h

Muscle-building protein shakes may threaten health

A recent study in mice warns that 'overloading' on the amino acids that popular protein shakes contain may lead to health problems and shorten lifespan.

13h

A Dramatic Year for Kilauea Volcano

Hawaii's feisty young volcano has gone through massive changes in the last 365 days. Today we take a look back at the Lower East Rift Zone eruption and its aftermath. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Climate change forcing Alaskans to hunt for new ways to survive

As far back as he can remember, Willard Church Jr. has gone out ice fishing well into the month of April, chopping holes that were easily four feet deep into the Kanektok River near his home.

13h

Two dead as monster cyclone batters eastern India

Two people died Friday after Cyclone Fani slammed into eastern India, officials said, as the storm sent coconut trees flying, blew away food stands and cut off power and water.

13h

Facebook considering its own bitcoin for payments

The Wall Street Journal reports that Facebook plans a cryptocurrency-based payment system that it could launch for billions of users worldwide.

13h

Scientology cruise ship leaves St Lucia after measles quarantine

Church of Scientology vessel held in port after contagious disease detected onboard A cruise ship quarantined for a reported case of measles has left the Caribbean island of St Lucia after health officials supplied 100 doses of vaccine to the ship, according to reports. The Church of Scientology cruise ship was confined to port this week by island health officials after the highly contagious dise

13h

Nålefri vaccination skal beskytte børn mod farlige virusser

Vaccine som dråber eller pulver kan forhindre millioner af mennesker i at få hepatitis B. Vaccination…

13h

Fremtidens operationsstue: »Nu er vi fri for at falde i de mange ledninger på gulvet«

Standardiserede operationsstuer skal skabe mere fleksibilitet på det nye Odense Universitetshospital. For at være sikker på, at stuerne passer til alle kirurgiske specialer, er OUH gået i gang med at teste Fremtidens Operationsstue. Dagens Medicin fulgte med kirurgen Anette Kjeldsen til en af de første operationer.

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Nye operationsstuer skal give kirurger mere fleksibilitet

Kirurger på Odense Universitetshospital kan se frem til ens operationsstuer, når landets største supersygehus er bygget færdigt. Operationsstuerne vil skabe større fleksibilitet, siger projektleder Mogens Rasmussen.

13h

Flere operationsstuer bliver standardiserede

Når landets supersygehuse står klar, vil mange af operationsstuerne være standardiserede. Det skal skabe mere fleksibilitet i en omskiftelig fremtid, forklarer projektdirektør Carsten Kronborg, der har været med til at bygge flere af landets supersygehuse.

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Kirurger vil have ens krav for alle landets operationsstuer

Standardiserede operationsstuer er som udgangspunkt en god ide, mener næstformand i Dansk Kirurgisk Selskab, Jens Hillingsø. Det er dog dybt »åndssvagt«, at forarbejdet til alle landets supersygehuse ikke er koordineret bedre, mener han.

13h

Forskere vil efterligne effekt af fedmeoperation

Christoffer Martinussen fra Hvidovre Hospital er førsteforfatter på et studie, der forsøger at efterligne den positive effekt, som gastric bypass-operation har på type 2-diabetes. Her kan optagelsen af kulhydrater i tarmen spille en vigtig rolle, viser nyt studie.

13h

#62 Glas, metal og funktionelle lidelser

Podcasten Stetoskopet undersøger diagnosen funktionelle lidelser nærmere. Hvordan er det at leve med, hvilke udfordringer står lægen overfor, og hvad siger forskningen?

13h

Avoid smoky environments to protect your heart

If a room or car is smoky, stay away until it has cleared. That's the main message of research presented today at EuroHeartCare 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

14h

Ny syn på hur hjärnan fungerar

Forskare vid Lunds universitet har, i samarbete med italienska forskare, efter en serie studier visat att inte bara en del utan de flesta delarna av hjärnan kan engageras när vi hanterar de signaler som uppstår vid beröring. Resultaten öppnar för en ny syn på hur hjärnans nätverk av nervceller behandlar information, och därmed hur hjärnan fungerar.

14h

Biodiversity heroes: The teenagers saving Madagascar's wildlife

This quiet, teen revolution could pave the way to Madagascar's sustainable future.

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YouTube confirms its original shows, including Cobra Kai, will get ad-supported free runs

Back in November, YouTube announced its “Single Slate” plan, which sees ad-supported and subscription programming combined into a single initiative. Speaking at YouTube’s annual Brandcast event, …

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The Future of Drug Trials Is Better Data and Continuous Monitoring

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Kan en planet huse liv? Svaret skal findes i dens indre

Det er ikke nok at studere exoplaneters atmosfære. Nøglen til at afgøre om en planet kan huse liv, skal findes i dens indre, mener amerikansk forskergruppe.

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Podcast: Vidtgående overvågningslov og stigende ammoniak-niveau i landbruget

En ny overvågningslov giver Center for Cybersikkerhed videre beføjelser, og så stiger udslippet af ammoniak i landbruget – selvom de har lovet det modsatte.

14h

Image of the Day: Passive Flapping

A robot model of a winged but flightless dinosaur suggests the dinosaur may have flapped its wings while moving on the ground.

14h

Training for first-time marathon 'reverses' aging of blood vessels

Training for and completing a first-time marathon 'reverses' aging of major blood vessels, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The study found that older and slower runners benefit the most.

14h

Climate change may turn octopuses partially blind from lack of oxygen

Retinas need oxygen to function, but climate change is creating low-oxygen zones in the sea, which will drastically weaken vision in marine animals

14h

How could a changing climate affect human fertility?

Human adaptation to climate change may include changes in fertility, according to a new study by an international group of researchers.

14h

Nu kan du kolla födelsemärkena – utan remiss

Hudcancer är den vanligaste cancerformen i Sverige. Under Euromelanoma-veckan får den som är orolig för hudförändringar möjlighet att besöka en hudspecialist utan remiss – men allt färre mottagningar erbjuder möjligheten.

15h

Scottish Government Commits To Net-Zero Emissions By 2045

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AI Evolved These Creepy Images to Please a Monkey’s Brain

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15h

Interview with an Oxford Food Psychologist

The surprising ways our brains steer our eating experiences, and how to use them to our advantage According to Dr. Charles Spence, when it comes to experiencing food, taste is the least important factor. But can that really be true? To learn about food psychology – or how our brains process multisensory information about what … Continue reading Interview with an Oxford Food Psychologist

16h

Nedfrysning af nerveender skal fjerne knæsmerter ved artrosepatienter

Et nyt forskningsprojekt skal undersøge, om smerter fra knæartrose kan fjernes ved at indføre en særlig nål og lamme specifikke nerveender med en lille iskugle.

16h

Gigtpatienter tilfredse med behovsstyret forløb

Færre faste kontroller, men mulighed for selv at kontakte hospitalet ved behov. Denne omlægning har givet gigtpatienter på Rigshospitalet Glostrup en følelse af at have indflydelse, viser ny rapport.

16h

Sådan overvåger vi de nye SGLT-2-hæmmere

Type 1-diabetes patienter får nu adgang til behandling med SGLT-2-hæmmere, som er forbundet med en øget risiko for ketoacidose. Det kræver stor forsigtighed og opmærksomhed hos både patienter og behandlere, og et nationalt monitorerings-projekt skal nu skabe et overblik over, hvordan midlerne klarer sig i virkelighedens patienter.

16h

Ny strategi skal sikre bedre sammenhæng i diabetesindsatsen

Diabetescenter vil sikre, at indsatsen sker på patientens præmisser. Ny strategi skal bryde barrierer på tværs af sektorer og finde nye samarbejdsmodeller til gavn for borgerne.

16h

What Does It Look Like to "Turn On" a Gene?

Only recently have scientists directly witnessed this most pivotal of events in biology, thanks to new technology that allows them to observe the process in living cells. It's teaching them a lot.

16h

Life-saving kidney delivered by drone

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How YouTube Is Shaping the Future of Work | JSTOR Daily

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17h

Oceans of Noise: Episode Three – Science Weekly podcast

Wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson concludes a three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean examining the possible threats caused to marine life by noise pollution. In this final episode he looks at solutions and discovers an unlikely role for sound artists such as himself As wildlife recordist Chris Watson looks for solutions to ocean noise pollution, he hears from Tim Gordon ,

17h

Oceans of Noise: Episode Two – Science Weekly podcast

Wildlife recordist Chris Watson is joined by award-winning sound artist Jana Winderen on a voyage around Norway’s Austevoll islands, aboard a research vessel recording the grunting of spawning cod Contrary to popular belief, or the writings of Jacques Cousteau, life under the ocean surface is not a silent world but in fact a dense and rich sonic environment where sound plays a fundamental role to

17h

Oceans of Noise: Episode One – Science Weekly podcast

Wildlife recordist Chris Watson begins a three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean, celebrating the sounds and songs of marine life and investigating the threat of noise pollution Contrary to popular belief, and the writings of Jacques Cousteau, life beneath the ocean surface is not a silent world but a dense and rich sonic environment where sound plays a fundamental role in life

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Oceans of Noise: Episode Three – Science Weekly podcast

Wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson concludes a three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean examining the possible threats caused to marine life by noise pollution. In this final episode he looks at solutions and discovers an unlikely role for sound artists such as himself. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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Oceans of Noise: Episode Two – Science Weekly podcast

Wildlife recordist Chris Watson is joined by award-winning sound artist Jana Winderen on a voyage around Norway’s Austevoll islands, aboard a research vessel recording the grunting of spawning cod. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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Oceans of Noise: Episode One – Science Weekly podcast

Wildlife recordist Chris Watson begins a three-part journey into the sonic environment of the ocean, celebrating the sounds and songs of marine life and investigating the threat of noise pollution. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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‘There Is Not Enough Land Here’

ZOLANI, South Africa—On the outskirts of this overcrowded township in South Africa’s Cape Winelands, Phumlani Zota, a 32-year-old pig farmer, sifted through piles of waste in a refuse dump beneath the Langeberg mountains, filling a burlap sack with scraps of food for his livestock. “There is not enough land here,” he told me. Yet on all sides, the impoverished settlement was hemmed in by great tr

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Nasa tester: Hvordan forhindrer vi en asteroide i at ramme Jorden?

Forskere fra hele verden deltager i denne uge i en stor katastrofeøvelse, der skal forberede dem på det værste.

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Vital signs can now be monitored using radar

A radar system developed at the University of Waterloo can wirelessly monitor the vital signs of patients, eliminating the need to hook them up to any machines.

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Elderly survivors of three common cancers face persistent risk of brain metastasis

Elderly survivors of breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma face risk of brain metastasis later in life, and may require extra surveillance in the years following initial cancer treatment.

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Azithromycin appears to reduce treatment failure in severe, acute COPD exacerbations

The antibiotic azithromycin may reduce treatment failure in patients hospitalized for an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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The teenagers saving Madagascar's forest

Warnings about the future of the country's wildlife has led young locals to learn new skills to farm sustainably.

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Gravide med type 1-diabetes har øget risiko for tidlig fødsel

Svensk studie viser, at der er en lineær sammenhæng mellem blodsukkerniveau og risiko for at føde for tidligt. Men også de kvinder, der holder det anbefalede blodsukkerniveau, har en forøget risiko, viser undersøgelsen

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How to Save $45 Billion on Health Care Costs Each Year

Nearly 700,000 people get sick or die each year from infections they get in the hospital—most of which are preventable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Mystery of Human Uniqueness – Issue 72: Quandary

If you dropped a dozen human toddlers on a beautiful Polynesian island with shelter and enough to eat, but no computers, no cell phones, and no metal tools, would they grow up to be like humans we recognize or like other primates? Would they invent language? Without the magic sauce of culture and technology, would humans be that different from chimpanzees? Nobody knows. (Ethics bars the toddler t

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A pill to turn back time

Does it make sense to treat ageing as a disease?

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Real change requires experts to collaborate

Like scientific research, good policymaking now needs different perspectives

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How artificial intelligence could change your real world shopping experience

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Forsvarsminister afviser at straffe dårlig it-sikkerhed med bøder

Selvom det er den enkelte virksomhed, kommune eller region, der har ansvaret for at sikre sig mod it-angreb, bør der ikke deles bøder ud til disse, hvis ikke der er styr på it-sikkerheden i forbindelse med cyberangreb, mener forsvarsministeren.

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Løber fra internationale løfter: Landbrugets udslip af sundhedsskadelig ammoniak stiger

PLUS. Siden 2013 er udslippet af ammoniak steget, og der er ifølge forskerne ikke længere mulighed for, at Danmark kan leve op til løfterne om et stort fald i 2020. Skandale, siger miljøorganisationer.

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New research, April 22-28, 2019

A selection of new climate related research articles is shown below. This post has separate sections for: Climate Change, Climate Change Impacts, Climate Change Mitigation, and Other Papers. Climate change impacts Mankind Impacts of exposure to ambient temperature on burden of disease: a systematic review of epidemiological evidence Can increased outdoor CO2 concentrations impact on the ventilati

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Climate change could cost the U.S. economy hundreds of billions a year by 2090

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections A newly-published peer-reviewed analysis of climate change impacts across broad sectors of the U.S. economy provides what may be the most comprehensive economic assessment to date of those costs. The April report in the journal Nature Climate Change is a condensed version of the Environmental Protection Agency’s 2017 Climate Change Impacts and Risk

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Why the 'post-natural' age could be strange and beautiful

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Skræddersyede patientfællesskaber vinder frem på sociale medier

Patienter søger erfaringsbaseret og specialiseret viden på sociale medier som Facebook, indikerer…

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Sociologisk forskning anvendt i ny kampagne

Som en del af opfølgningen på en rapport med sociologisk forskning har Trafikselskabet Movia…

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Research sparks new insights on laser welding

Researchers discuss an ambitious project to understand the basic principles of laser welding better than ever before.

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Vaccination may help protect bats from deadly disease

A new study shows that vaccination may reduce the impact of white-nose syndrome in bats, marking a milestone in the international fight against one of the most destructive wildlife diseases in modern times.

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Removal of gene completely prevents development of aggressive pancreatic cancer in mice

The action of a gene called ATDC is required for the development of pancreatic cancer, a new study finds.

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Philippines Cable TV Airs Pirated Copy Of Avengers: Endgame

Image credit – MarvelIt was recently reported that a pirated copy of Avengers: Endgame was making its rounds on the internet. However, it was suggested that it might not be a big deal …

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Opinion: How to Define Life

As artificial life forms become more sophisticated, we propose a simple list of criteria to determine whether synthetic biological organisms and robots are living beings.

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Chemists Investigate Casanova's Clap

In his memoirs, the womanizing writer Giacomo Casanova described suffering several bouts of gonorrhea—but researchers found no trace of the microbe on his handwritten journals. Karen Hopkin reports.

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Derivation of simian tropic HIV-1 infectious clone reveals virus adaptation to a new host [Microbiology]

To replicate in a new host, lentiviruses must adapt to exploit required host factors and evade species-specific antiviral proteins. Understanding how host protein variation drives lentivirus adaptation allowed us to expand the host range of HIV-1 to pigtail macaques. We have previously derived a viral swarm (in the blood of…

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Substrate complex competition is a regulatory motif that allows NF{kappa}B RelA to license but not amplify NF{kappa}B RelB [Systems Biology]

Signaling pathways often share molecular components, tying the activity of one pathway to the functioning of another. In the NFκB signaling system, distinct kinases mediate inflammatory and developmental signaling via RelA and RelB, respectively. Although the substrates of the developmental, so-called noncanonical, pathway are induced by inflammatory/canonical signaling, crosstalk is…

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Circadian clock regulation of the glycogen synthase (gsn) gene by WCC is critical for rhythmic glycogen metabolism in Neurospora crassa [Genetics]

Circadian clocks generate rhythms in cellular functions, including metabolism, to align biological processes with the 24-hour environment. Disruption of this alignment by shift work alters glucose homeostasis. Glucose homeostasis depends on signaling and allosteric control; however, the molecular mechanisms linking the clock to glucose homeostasis remain largely unknown. We investigated…

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Targeting RIPK1 for the treatment of human diseases [Cell Biology]

RIPK1 kinase has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of a wide range of human neurodegenerative, autoimmune, and inflammatory diseases. This was supported by extensive studies which demonstrated that RIPK1 is a key mediator of apoptotic and necrotic cell death as well as inflammatory pathways. Furthermore, human…

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Researchers investigate differences in coatings of drug-coated balloon catheters

Drug-coated balloon catheters to open narrowed blood vessels and to deliver drugs to the impacted sites are used frequently for the treatment of peripheral arterial disease. Scientists believe improvement of the coatings could lead to better designs and improved outcomes. Now for the first time, researchers have examined these coatings at microscopic levels in hopes of producing more efficient alt

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Science retracts report on deadly Kumamoto earthquake

Science is retracting a 2017 paper about the deadly Kumamoto earthquake about a month after the university announced that the paper’s first author, Aiming Lin, had committed misconduct, including falsification of data and plagiarism. Science editor in chief Jeremy Berg told us in late March that the journal had been trying to obtain more information in … Continue reading Science retracts report on

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“We got scammed:” Authors “sincerely apologize” for plagiarism they blame a ghostwriter for

The journal Cureus is retracting three articles by a mashup of authors from Pakistan and the United States for plagiarism, which the researchers blame on their use of a hired gun to prepare the papers. The articles were published over a roughly one-month stretch in August and September 2018 and covered an impressively polymathic range … Continue reading “We got scammed:” Authors “sincerely apologi

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How DNA Testing at the US-Mexico Border Will Actually Work

A pilot project to test the DNA of migrant families raises concerns about the rise of a genetic surveillance state.

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Fingerprint of sleep habits as warning sign for heart disease

Chronic short sleep is associated with increased risk of clogged arteries, heart disease, and thus increased morbidity and mortality. New research in Experimental Physiology may have figured out why lack of sleep increases susceptibility to heart disease, and allowing doctors to identify the patients who might need to change their habits before they develop disease.

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Sonic the Hedgehog director says character is getting makeover after backlash

In 2006, New Line Cinema added five days of reshoots for Snakes on a Plane, six months after principal filming had wrapped. The new shoots helped change the films rating from PG-13 to R, courtesy …

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Pandas’ share of protein calories from bamboo rivals wolves’ from meat

The panda gut digests protein in bamboo so well that the animal’s nutritional profile for calories resembles a wolf’s.

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Pandas’ share of protein calories from bamboo rivals wolves’ from meat

The panda gut digests protein in bamboo so well that the animal’s nutritional profile for calories resembles a wolf’s.

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Opportunistic cancer cells 'slip through the gaps' to spread through blood vessels

Cancer cells may rely on opportunism, as well as chemical signalling, to spread through the body, according to new findings by mathematicians.

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Open heart surgery outperforms stents in patients with multivessel disease

Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery may be the best treatment option for most patients with more than one blocked heart artery.

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Seeking better detection for chronic malaria

In people with chronic malaria, certain metabolic systems in the blood change to support a long-term host-parasite relationship, a finding that is key to eventually developing better detection, treatment and eradication of the disease, according to new research.

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The mechanism of action of an antitumor drug used for the treatment of glioblastoma

The antibody mAb806 is used to treat glioblastoma, although its mechanism of action has been unknown until now. The study paves the way to extend treatment with mAb806 to more types of tumors and to the development of more personalised therapies.

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Facebook Bans Extremists, Jakarta Is Drowning, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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Bagsiden: Alternativ kinesisk CE-mærkning

En tidligere kollega fra gamle dage på redaktionen er blevet inspireret til at fortælle en anekdote fra dengang, det forenede Kgl. (danske!) Post- og Telegrafvæsen stadig hang sammen. Dens pointe ser desværre ud til stadig at holde:

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Chemists Investigate Casanova's Clap

In his memoirs, the womanizing writer Giacomo Casanova described suffering several bouts of gonorrhea—but researchers found no trace of the microbe on his handwritten journals. Karen Hopkin… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Chip mimics the brain for better computing

A battery-like device could act as an artificial synapse within computing systems intended to imitate the brain’s efficiency and ability to learn, according to new research. The brain’s capacity for simultaneously learning and memorizing large amounts of information while requiring little energy has inspired an entire field to pursue brain-like—or neuromorphic—computers. A team of researchers pre

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The Atlantic Daily: Facebook and Instagram Crack Down on (Some) Extremists

What We’re Following ( The Atlantic ) Facebook and Instagram cracked down on extremist figures. Accounts from Alex Jones, Milo Yiannopoulos, and Louis Farrakhan—among several others—were all kicked off both platforms. The move comes as Facebook, which owns Instagram, continues to grapple with its inability to root out extremist views and misinformation, and its complicity in election interference

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Will the Uber and Lyft strike raise wages?

Next week, Uber and Lyft drivers plan to strike in eight major US cities in an effort to raise their wages and improve working conditions. Will it work? Probably not, according to Joyce Beebe , a fellow in public finance at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy who has recently published research on the “sharing economy.” The drivers, in Los Angeles, Boston, Chicago, Minneapolis, Ph

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It’s a mystery how narwhals have survived

A narwhal discovery challenges the idea that genetic diversity is necessary for a species to survive. Researchers at the Natural History Museum of Denmark sequenced the genome of a narwhal from West Greenland, and opened a window to the past million years of its evolutionary history. The findings suggest that narwhals have had consistently low genetic diversity throughout the entire period but ha

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Four Ways Leonardo Da Vinci Was Well Ahead of His Time

His knowledge and learning crossed so many boundaries.

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Star crash likely gave Earth some gold and platinum

Astrophysicists have identified a violent collision of two neutron stars 4.6 billion years ago as the likely source of some of the most coveted matter on Earth. This single cosmic event, close to our solar system, gave birth to 0.3 percent of the Earth’s heaviest elements, including gold, platinum, and uranium. Imre Bartos at the University of Florida and Szabolcs Márka at Columbia University rep

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Drugs that block CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing identified

The discovery of the first small-molecule inhibitors of the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) protein could enable more precise control over CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing, researchers report.

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Why S. America got more grass-eaters 6M years ago

Armadillos as big as Volkswagens and other grass-eating mammals became more diverse in South America about 6 million years ago, report researchers. Why? Because shifts in atmospheric circulation drove changes in climate and vegetation. Geoscientists already knew the Earth was cooling 7 to 5.5 million years ago, a period of time known as the late Miocene. The new research shows that about 7 to 6 m

22h

How could a changing climate affect human fertility?

Human adaptation to climate change may include changes in fertility, according to a new study by an international group of researchers. They found that, through its economic effects, climate change could have a substantial impact on fertility, as people decide how much time and money they devote to child-rearing, and whether to use those resources to have more children or invest more in the future

23h

The US Army is still looking for its perfect quadcopter drone

Technology The Department of Defense awarded $11 million to six companies to make it happen. It’s not hard to imagine how a small drone, like a quadcopter with a camera on it, could be useful for a soldier in the Army.

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Women taking pill may be less likely to suffer ACL injury, study finds

Hormonal contraceptives potentially reduce risk of tear to anterior cruciate ligament Women on the combined pill appear to be less likely to tear a key ligament in their knee, research suggests. Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament in the knee are common, particularly in people taking part in sport , where such injuries sometimes end careers. Continue reading…

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Facebook Bans Alex Jones, Other Extremists—but Not as Planned

Alex Jones, Infowars, Laura Loomer and Milo Yiannopoulos are expelled from Facebook and Instagram, but the ban's rollout went awry.

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Black Hole Ships

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Tapping fresh water under the ocean has consequences

While offshore groundwater resources could be used for drinking, agriculture and oil recovery, new research suggests tapping into them could lead to adverse impacts onshore.

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Researchers crack the peanut genome

Working to understand the genetics of peanut disease resistance and yield, researchers led by scientists at the University of Georgia have uncovered the peanut's unlikely and complicated evolution.

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Arsenic-breathing life discovered in the tropical Pacific Ocean

In low-oxygen parts of the ocean, some microbes are surviving by getting energy from arsenic. This holdover from the ancient Earth was not known to still exist in the open ocean.

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Promising material could lead to faster, cheaper computer memory

Currently, information on a computer is encoded by magnetic fields, a process that requires substantial energy and generates waste heat. Researchers have confirmed that bismuth ferrite could store information cheaply and with less wasted energy.

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Drugs that block CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing identified

The discovery of the first small-molecule inhibitors of the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) protein could enable more precise control over CRISPR-Cas9-based genome editing, researchers report.

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A genomic tour-de-force reveals the last 5,000 years of horse history

Each year on the first Saturday in May, Thoroughbred horses reach speeds of over 40 miles per hour as they compete to win the Kentucky Derby. But the domestic horse wasn't always bred for speed. In fact, an international team now has evidence to suggest that the modern horse is genetically quite different from the horses of even just a few hundred years ago.

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Giant panda's bamboo diet still looks surprisingly carnivorous

Giant pandas are unusual in being extremely specialized herbivores that feed almost exclusively on highly fibrous bamboo, despite belonging to a clade (Carnivora) of primarily flesh-eating carnivores. But a study suggests that the switch to a restricted vegetarian diet wasn't, in some respects, as big an evolutionary leap as it seems.

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McKesson, Drug Distribution Giant, Settles Lawsuit Over Opioids in West Virginia

The state accused the nation’s largest drug distributor of flooding rural counties with opioids. McKesson denied the allegations in a $37 million settlement.

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US lawmakers: social media answers on extremist content too vague

Two US lawmakers berated social media firms Thursday for failing to provide specific information on their efforts to root out extremist content on their platforms.

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Aids and HIV timeline: from Terry Higgins to PrEP

End of transmission may be in sight after nearly three decades of medical advances Landmark study raises hopes of end to HIV transmission In 1982, one year after the first Aids-related death in the UK, the DJ and Hansard reporter Terry Higgins died. His partner, Rupert Whitaker, and friends established what would become the Terrence Higgins Trust, now the UK’s leading HIV charity, in his memory.

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Drug combination could be effective for treatment-resistant gonorrhea

Scientists comparing treatments for gonorrhea have identified a drug combination that could be an effective back-up for patients not responding to current therapy. The research team, from University Hospitals Birmingham, found that a treatment of the antibiotic gentamicin with azithromycin worked almost as well as the currently used ceftriaxone for genital gonorrhea.

23h

Perils of water polo head injuries

Water polo athletes take note: A new study maps out the frequency of head injuries in the sport and reveals which positions are the most vulnerable.

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Knit 1, purl 2: Assembly instructions for a robot?

Researchers have used computationally controlled knitting machines to create plush toys and other knitted objects that are actuated by tendons. It's an approach they say might someday be used to cost-effectively make soft robots and wearable technologies.

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Aging baby boomers push sky high incidence of shingles of the eye

More Americans are being diagnosed with eye complications of shingles, but older adults can call the shots on whether they are protected from the painful rash that can cost them their eyesight.

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Meet the Companies Reinventing City Life at Urban-X Demo Day 05

We joined URBAN-X to learn how the seven companies of UBX Cohort 05 are developing solutions for reclaiming city life and revolutionizing urban living. Watch our live footage from DemoDay05 to hear more, and jump to these timestamps to learn more about each company: 1:50 – Circuit provides free, electric shuttle transportation in 17 cities around the US. 9:33 – Toggle is revolutionizing construct

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Publisher Correction: Structural basis of ligand recognition at the human MT1 melatonin receptor

Publisher Correction: Structural basis of ligand recognition at the human MT 1 melatonin receptor Publisher Correction: Structural basis of ligand recognition at the human MT 1 melatonin receptor, Published online: 03 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1209-0 Publisher Correction: Structural basis of ligand recognition at the human MT 1 melatonin receptor

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Giving ex-convicts healthcare helps all of us

Health Community health programs for prisoners after release reduces recidivism. Programs that link people released from prison who have chronic illnesses with community health workers who also have a history of incarceration have been shown to…

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Less Is Moore

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, May 2. ‣ Attorney General William Barr pulled out of today’s House Judiciary Committee hearing. ‣ House Speaker Nancy Pelosi accused Barr of committing the crime of lying to Congress, likely referring to his remarks during an April hearing that he was not aware of any concerns Robert Mueller might have about his summary of the final report. Here’s what el

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Fusion power is attracting private-sector interest

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EXCLUSIVE: UK to open first ‘body farm’ for forensic research

EXCLUSIVE: UK to open first ‘body farm’ for forensic research EXCLUSIVE: UK to open first ‘body farm’ for forensic research, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01436-8 Sites that allow the study of human remains have long existed in the United States and have started to appear recently in other countries.

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Viral infections during pregnancy linked to behavioral abnormalities in offspring

Male and female rats whose mother experienced a simulated viral infection during pregnancy behave abnormally, consistent with behavioral alterations in autism or schizophrenia.

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Finnish school students outperform US students on 'fake news' digital literacy tasks

A recent study revealed students at an international school in Finland significantly outperformed US students on tasks which measure digital literacy in social media and online news. The researchers suggest this may be due to the Finnish and International Baccalaureate curricula's different way of facilitating students' critical thinking skills compared to the US system and curriculum.

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Chewing versus sex in duck-billed dinosaurs

The duck-billed hadrosaurs walked the Earth over 90-million years ago and were one of the most successful groups of dinosaurs. But why were these 2-3 ton giants so successful? A new study shows that their special adaptations in teeth and jaws and in their head crests were crucial, and provides new insights into how these innovations evolved.

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Researchers develop soft tissue substitute with fewer side effects

A team of plastic surgeons and material scientists has made an important advance in treating the common clinical problem of soft tissue loss.

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Boys with a rare muscle disease are breathing on their own, thanks to gene therapy

New results cap a year of early stage successes for muscle disorders

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Viral peptides critical to natural HIV control

Investigators have used a novel approach to identify specific amino acids in the protein structure of HIV that appear critical to the ability of the virus to function and replicate. They also have found that the immune systems of individuals naturally able to control HIV infection target these amino acids with pathogen-killing CD8 T cells.

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Discovery of RNA transfer through royal jelly could aid development of honey bee vaccines

Researchers have discovered that honey bees are able to share immunity with other bees and to their offspring in a hive by transmitting RNA 'vaccines' through royal jelly and worker jelly. The jelly is the bee equivalent of mother's milk: a secretion used to provide nutrition to worker and queen bee larvae.

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Synthetic biology used to target cancer cells while sparing healthy tissue

Synthetic proteins engineered to recognize overly active biological pathways can kill cancer cells while sparing their healthy peers, according to a new study.

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Mobile prenatal app shown to reduce in-person visits during pregnancy

Using the mobile app Babyscripts reduced in-person prenatal care visits while maintaining patient and provider satisfaction, according to new research.

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Two neutron stars collided near the solar system billions of years ago

Researchers finds sign of cosmic event that created elements that became part of us.

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High rates of formula use with low-income infants

New research found high rates of non-exclusive breastfeeding and early infant formula introduction. Their sample included low-income, predominately Hispanic immigrant women participating in a local Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).

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India could meet air quality standards by cutting household fuel use

India could make a major dent in air pollution by curbing emissions from dirty household fuels such as wood, dung, coal and kerosene, shows a new analysis. Eliminating emissions from just these sources — without any changes to industrial or vehicle emissions — would bring the average outdoor air pollution levels below the country's air quality standard, the study shows.

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Beyond Meats IPO success signals meat alternatives here to stay

Beyond Meats began trading publicly on Thursday under the ticker BYND. Beyond Meats and Impossible Foods are two alternative meat companies that've been dominating the space in recent years, with investors such as Bill Gates and Leonardo DiCaprio. Alternative meat companies could significantly help the U.S. food industry cut down on environmentally harmful practices, namely the raising of cattle.

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Science Academy Pushes to Eject Sexual Harassers

A preliminary vote by the National Academy of Sciences was the latest move to address discrimination against women in historically male-dominated science fields.

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Topical cream found as less-toxic therapy to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis

Paromomysin-based topical treatments were shown to be effective in curing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), according to a randomized, double blind study conducted in Panama. Leishmaniasis, transmitted by a female phlebotomine sand fly bite, is endemic in 98 countries and has approximately 0.7 to 1.2 million CL cases each year.

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New chemical probe for visualizing brain immune cells

Researchers have, for the first time, developed a chemical probe that enables live-imaging of a type of immune cells in the brain, known as microglia, in a live animal brain.

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Embryo stem cells created from skin cells

Researchers have found a way to transform skin cells into the three major stem cell types that comprise early-stage embryos. The work (in mouse cells) has significant implications for modeling embryonic disease and placental dysfunctions, as well as paving the way to create whole embryos from skin cells.

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Reservoir bugs: Study shows why stomach pathogen is so tough to eradicate

Once the stomach-dwelling bacteria Helicobacter pylori is established in the stomach, investigators have learned that even competing strains of the same species can't displace it.

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Study reveals link between starch digestion gene, gut bacteria

A newly discovered relationship between genetic variation and the gut microbiome could help nutritionists personalize their recommendations.

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Study reveals link between starch digestion gene, gut bacteria

A newly discovered relationship between genetic variation and the gut microbiome could help nutritionists personalize their recommendations.

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Found in Antarctica: A 'weirdo particle' that predates the sun

Researchers cut open a small meteorite found in the LaPaz icefield in Antarctica to uncover a very surprising find. Inside this meteorite was a small inclusion that they determined came directly from the nova of a white dwarf to Earth. By studying the inclusion's composition, researchers were able to glean new insights into the thermodynamics of white dwarf novae, ultimately shedding light onto h

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Police Are Using Facial Recognition Tech on Unconscious Suspects

Sketchy Behavior In 2017, the sheriff’s office in Washington County, Oregon, became the first law enforcement agency to use Rekognition, Amazon’s facial recognition tool. Then, for two day in March 2019, the office granted journalists for The Washington Post access to its squad cars and facilities to observe how the technology was transforming cops’ operations. What those journalists discovered w

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Traces Of Cocaine, Pesticides Detected In U.K. Shrimp

Scientists collected freshwater shrimp at 15 locations in Suffolk. Shrimp from all of the sites were found to have detectable amounts of cocaine, and many had other drugs or pesticides. (Image credit: King's College London)

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Verizon Could Be Looking To Sell Off Tumblr

A couple of years ago, Verizon announced that they would be acquiring Yahoo, which in turn also meant that they would be acquiring some of the other properties that Yahoo owns as well, such …

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Scientists discover evolutionary link to modern-day sea echinoderms

Scientists at The Ohio State University have discovered a new species that lived more than 500 million years ago—a form of ancient echinoderm that was ancestral to modern-day groups such as sea cucumbers, sea urchins, sea stars, brittle stars and crinoids. The fossil shows a crucial evolutionary step by echinoderms that parallels the most important ecological change to have taken place in marine s

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Study reveals link between starch digestion gene, gut bacteria

A newly discovered relationship between genetic variation and the gut microbiome could help nutritionists personalize their recommendations. People with a high number of copies of a gene called AMY1, which expresses a salivary enzyme for breaking down starch, correlated strongly with a certain profile of gut and mouth bacteria, according to a new Cornell University study.

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Scientists discover evolutionary link to modern-day sea echinoderms

Scientists at The Ohio State University have discovered a new species that lived more than 500 million years ago — a form of ancient echinoderm that was ancestral to modern-day groups such as sea cucumbers, sea urchins, sea stars, brittle stars and crinoids. The fossil shows a crucial evolutionary step by echinoderms that parallels the most important ecological change to have taken place in marin

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Research on Reddit identifies opioid addiction self-treatment risks

Using advanced machine-learning techniques, Georgia Tech researchers have examined nearly 1.5 million Reddit posts to identify risks associated with several of the most common alternative — and unproven — 'treatments' for opioid addiction.

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These trippy images were designed by AI to super-stimulate monkey neurons

To find out which sights specific neurons in monkeys 'like' best, researchers designed an algorithm, called XDREAM, that generated images that made neurons fire more than any natural images the researchers tested. As the images evolved, they started to look like distorted versions of real-world stimuli.

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New clues to coastal erosion

New research has uncovered a missing nutrient source in coastal oceans, which could promote better water quality and sand management on popular beaches. While the release of nutrients buried in the seabed 'feeds' coastal marine ecosystems, the latest research has found a new physical mechanism which erodes seabed sediment at depths up to 20 meters, well outside (between 10 km and 20 km) from the s

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An evolutionary rescue in polluted waters

The combination of a big population, good genes and luck helps explain how a species of fish in the Houston Ship Channel was able to adapt to what normally would be lethal levels of toxins for most other species. The exceptional survivor story of the Gulf killifish can provide insights into what other species may need to adapt to drastically changed environments.

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Putting vision models to the test

Neuroscientists have performed the most rigorous testing yet of computational models that mimic the brain's visual cortex. The results suggest that the current versions of these models are similar enough to the brain to allow them to actually control brain states in animals.

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Focuster helps you prioritize the tasks that matter

Get this slick productivity app for $59. Focuster helps you prioritize the tasks that matter and you can get this slick productivity app for $59.

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Facebook lukker for 'farlige' personer fra det ekstreme højre

Alex Jones og Milo Yiannopoulos er blandt dem, som har fået lukket deres profiler.

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Spacewatch: Nasa lander detects first signals of possible marsquakes

If confirmed, faint signals would be first detection of seismic activity on Mars Nasa’s InSight Mars lander has detected signals of what could have been a marsquake . The signals were recorded on 6 April and if confirmed would be the first detection of seismic activity on Mars. Although the signals are only faint, they fit the profile of moonquakes that were detected with seismometers left on the

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A Neural Net Hooked Up to a Monkey Brain Spat Out Bizarre Images

MonkeyVision In a strange new experiment, scientists at Harvard hooked a monkey’s brain up to a neural net and tried to stimulate individual neurons responsible for recognizing faces. By showing the monkey images generated by the AI, the scientists tried to activate those particular neurons as much as possible. Eventually, the AI system learned to generate images that would trigger individual bra

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Hearing loss weakens skills that young cancer survivors need to master reading

Researchers have identified factors that explain why severe hearing loss sets up pediatric brain tumor survivors for reading difficulties with far-reaching consequences. The findings lay the foundation for developing interventions to help survivors become better readers. The findings suggest that interventions should focus on improving neurocognitive and language-based skills like processing speed

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Blood pressure drug shows no benefit in Parkinson's disease

A study of a blood pressure drug does not show any benefit for people with Parkinson's disease, according to findings released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, May 4-10, 2019.

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‘The world has never seen anything like this’: WHO chief on battling Ebola in a war zone

‘The world has never seen anything like this’: WHO chief on battling Ebola in a war zone ‘The world has never seen anything like this’: WHO chief on battling Ebola in a war zone, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01432-y Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus talks about fighting the outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo amid attacks on health workers.

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We Launched a Paywall. It Worked! Mostly.

Here’s what we learned, including some surprises, in year one.

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Trilobites: Parasites Infect These Beetles. It Might Be a Good Thing.

The insects digest more decaying wood when hosting nematodes, potentially benefiting the whole ecosystem.

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Top Executives of Insys, an Opioid Company, Are Found Guilty of Racketeering

The defendants were accused of conspiring to bribe doctors to prescribe a fentanyl-based painkiller and misleading insurers about patients’ need for the drug.

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