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nyheder2019maj06

Tobacco-Related Alterations in Airway Gene Expression are Rapidly Reversed Within Weeks Following Smoking-Cessation

Tobacco-Related Alterations in Airway Gene Expression are Rapidly Reversed Within Weeks Following Smoking-Cessation Tobacco-Related Alterations in Airway Gene Expression are Rapidly Reversed Within Weeks Following Smoking-Cessation, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43295-3 Tobacco-Related Alterations in Airway Gene Expression are Rapidly Reversed Within Weeks Following Smokin

10h

Stor FN-rapport: Én million dyre- og plantearter er truet af udryddelse

En global biodiversitetskrise truer menneskehedens livsgrundlag, advarer FN.

8h

Hundredevis af dispensationer til forbudte pesticider skal endevendes

PLUS. Siden 2011 har Miljø- og Fødevareministeriet givet landmænd 108 dispensationer til at bruge ellers forbudte pesticider på deres marker. Nu gennemsøger Rigsrevisionen de mange dispensationer for at finde ud af, om ministeriet har overholdt reglerne.

5h

This Site Tests Whether You Can Spot AI-Generated Faces

A/B Testing Deepfakes and other AI-generated images have become commonplace the algorithms that churn them out have become widespread. On one sugar-coated hand, this means cooler movie and video game visual effects . On the other hand, it means that bad actors can produce photorealistic propaganda , fake porn of real people , or other convincing but fake media. That’s why two University of Washin

6min

Hubble Scientists Just Released the Most Detailed Picture of the Universe Ever

The Hubble Space Telescope has created the most detailed family photo of the universe ever, featuring 265,000 galaxies.

6min

Astronauts may have vision problems because of liquid in their brains

In microgravity, astronauts’ brains fill with fluid and it doesn’t drain for months after they return to Earth, which may be why their vision worsens

7min

Traces of five drugs found on 1000-year-old South American ritual kit

Cocaine and components of ayahuasca were detected on an ancient pouch found in Bolivia, providing evidence of hallucinogen use in pre-Columbian times

7min

Ayahuasca fixings found in 1,000-year-old bundle in the Andes

Today's hipster creatives and entrepreneurs are hardly the first generation to partake of ayahuasca, according to archaeologists who have discovered traces of the powerfully hallucinogenic potion in a 1,000-year-old leather bundle buried in a cave in the Bolivian Andes.

10min

A new approach to targeting tumors and tracking their spread

MIT researchers have developed nanosized antibodies that home in on the meshwork of proteins surrounding cancer cells. This approach could be track tumors as they grow, metastasize or respond to treatment, or as a way to deliver cancer drugs.

10min

Prostate cancer patients with gene mutation at three times the risk of dying

Scientists have identified a gene mutation in the tumours of men with prostate cancer that is linked to very poor survival — and which could be used to pick out patients for more intensive treatment.

10min

Rapid bacterial analysis and testing for antibiotic sensitivity demonstrated

Medical professionals may soon be able to detect bacteria in patient samples in minutes rather than days thanks to a new approach that traps and tests single cells, according to a team of biomedical engineers.

10min

Social media has limited effects on teenage life satisfaction

A study of 12,000 British teenagers has shown that links between social media use and life satisfaction are bidirectional and small at best, but may differ depending on gender and how the data are analysed.

10min

What does Earth's core have in common with salad dressing? Maybe this

A Yale-led team of scientists may have found a new factor to help explain the ebb and flow of Earth's magnetic field — and it's something familiar to anyone who has made a vinaigrette for their salad.

10min

Ancient ritual bundle contained multiple psychotropic plants

A thousand years ago, Native Americans in South America used multiple psychotropic plants — possibly simultaneously — to induce hallucinations and altered consciousness, according to an international team of anthropologists.

10min

Genetic adaptation to climate change

New research led by the University of Southampton has shown that the threat of range losses for some species as a result of climate change could be overestimated because of the ability of certain animals to adapt to rising temperatures and aridity.

10min

11min

Vaccine design can dramatically improve cancer immunotherapies

When it comes to the effectiveness of nanotherapeutic vaccines, shape matters.

13min

Facebook pulls down more fake accounts tied to Russia – CNET

People behind the accounts used "deceptive tactics" such as impersonating other users, the social network says.

17min

Traces of five drugs found on 1000-year-old South American ritual kit

Cocaine and components of ayahuasca were detected on an ancient pouch found in Bolivia, providing evidence of hallucinogen use in pre-Columbian times

17min

Ash dieback: Killer tree disease set to cost UK £15bn

The tree disease will cost taxpayers a third more than the foot-and-mouth outbreak in cattle in 2001.

19min

This 5000-year-old mass grave hides a family tragedy

Mothers, sons, and siblings fill the grave—but where are the fathers?

21min

Archaeologists find richest cache of ancient mind-altering drugs in South America

Leather pouch high in the Bolivian Andes contains traces of cocaine, ayahuasca

21min

Effects Of Surgery On A Warming Planet: Can Anesthesia Go Green?

Anesthesia revolutionized surgery by vanquishing patients' pain. But many of the chemicals are greenhouse gases. One Oregon doctor who has done the math says some are much less damaging to the planet. (Image credit: Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB)

23min

An ancient pouch reveals the hallucinogen stash of an Andes shaman

South American shamans in the Andes Mountains carried mind-altering ingredients 1,000 years ago, a study finds.

29min

New computational tool improves gene identification

Looking to improve the identification of genes associates with disease, a research team has developed a new bioinformatics tool that analyzes CRISPR pooled screen data and identifies candidates for potentially relevant genes with greater sensitivity and accuracy than other existing methods.

29min

Blue supergiant stars open doors to concert in space

Blue supergiants are rock-and-roll: they live fast and die young. This makes them rare and difficult to study. Before space telescopes were invented, few blue supergiants had been observed, so our knowledge of these stars was limited. Astronomers have now studied the sounds originating inside these stars and discovered that almost all blue supergiants shimmer in brightness because of waves on thei

29min

Failure to account for genetic variation can result in overestimating extinction risk

New research led by the University of Southampton has shown that the threat of range losses for some species as a result of climate change could be overestimated because of the ability of certain animals to adapt to rising temperatures and aridity. The researchers have now developed a new approach to more accurately determine vulnerability, which could aid conservation efforts by ensuring they are

31min

Rapid bacterial analysis and testing for antibiotic sensitivity demonstrated

Medical professionals may soon be able to detect bacteria in patient samples in minutes rather than days thanks to a new approach that traps and tests single cells, according to a team of biomedical engineers.

31min

Mechanics, chemistry and biomedical research join forces for noninvasive tissue therapy

A fortuitous conversation between two University of Illinois scientists has opened a new line of communication between biomedical researchers and the tissues they study. The new findings, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that high-intensity focused ultrasound waves can penetrate biological tissue to activate molecules able to perform specific tasks.

31min

Origin of Sino-Tibetan language family revealed by new research

The Sino-Tibetan language family includes early literary languages, such as Chinese, Tibetan and Burmese, and is represented by more than 400 modern languages spoken in China, India, Burma, and Nepal. It is one of the most diverse language families in the world, spoken by 1.4 billion speakers. Although the language family has been studied since the beginning of the 19th century, scholars' knowledg

31min

What does Earth's core have in common with salad dressing? Maybe this

A Yale-led team of scientists may have found a new factor to help explain the ebb and flow of Earth's magnetic field—and it's something familiar to anyone who has made a vinaigrette for their salad.

31min

Ancient ritual bundle contained multiple psychotropic plants

A thousand years ago, Native Americans in South America used multiple psychotropic plants—possibly simultaneously—to induce hallucinations and altered consciousness, according to an international team of anthropologists.

31min

Failure to account for genetic variation can result in overestimating extinction risk

New research led by the University of Southampton has shown that the threat of range losses for some species as a result of climate change could be overestimated because of the ability of certain animals to adapt to rising temperatures and aridity. The researchers have now developed a new approach to more accurately determine vulnerability, which could aid conservation efforts by ensuring they are

31min

Vaccine design can dramatically improve cancer immunotherapies

When it comes to the effectiveness of nanotherapeutic vaccines, shape matters.

31min

Rapid bacterial analysis and testing for antibiotic sensitivity demonstrated

Medical professionals may soon be able to detect bacteria in patient samples in minutes rather than days thanks to a new approach that traps and tests single cells, according to a team of biomedical engineers.

31min

Radical desalination approach may disrupt the water industry

Columbia Engineering researchers report that they have developed a radically different desalination approach–"temperature swing solvent extraction (TSSE)"–for hypersaline brines. Their study demonstrates that TSSE can desalinate very high-salinity brines, up to seven times the concentration of seawater. Says PI Ngai Yin Yip, "Our results show that TSSE could be a disruptive technology–it's effe

31min

URI researchers: Offshore wind farm increased tourism on Block Island

Researchers at the University of Rhode Island who analyzed AirBnB rental data before and after construction of the Block Island Wind Farm have found that, contrary to some concerns, the turbines have increased tourism on the island.

31min

Playing on Your Phone at the Store Could Make You Buy More Junk

Cellular Hang Up Want to leave the store with exactly what you planned to buy? You might want to consider setting your smartphone to “Do Not Disturb.” A new study has found that shoppers who use phones for tasks unrelated to retail tend to purchase items they didn’t plan to buy or forget ones they did — a startling example of how the ubiquity of mobile devices may be impacting the decision making

34min

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Outsourced Workers Are Training AIs With Your Private FB Posts

Labeling by Hand Reuters reports that millions of “Facebook photos, status updates and other content posted since 2014,” including private posts, have been combed over by outsourced workers in India in order to train the company’s AI and develop new features. It’s yet another example of the social media network’s careless handling of its billions of users’ privacy — giving third party contractors

41min

'Game of Thrones' Recap, Season 8 Episode 4: So Much for Breaking the Wheel

The show's story right now is one of regression, of spectacle over humanity—and it's infuriating.

43min

Killifish Survive Polluted Waters Thanks to Genes from Another Fish

Gulf killifish have made a stunning comeback in Houston with the help of genetic mutations imported from interspecies mating with Atlantic killifish.

45min

Newfound 'Mini T. Rex' Was a Tiny Terror at Just 3 Feet Tall

A previously unknown tyrannosaur terrorized prey about 92 million years ago, but unlike its relative — the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex — this newfound dinosaur was a pipsqueak, its body just a tad longer than a T. rex skull.

49min

Photos: Tiny Tyrannosaur Dinosaur Was About As Big As T. Rex's Skull

This 92-million-year-old tyrannosaur was so small, it was only slightly larger than the skull of its mighty relative, Tyrannosaurus rex.

49min

New Tiny Tyrannosaur Species Fills Gap in T. rex Origin Story

In 1902, famed fossil hunter Barnum Brown was prospecting in Montana when he discovered the first documented remains of a Tyrannosaurus rex. The creature was nearly 40 feet long with banana-sized teeth, warranting its name, “king of the tyrant lizards.” Finds since then have only reinforced T. rex’s status as one of the planet’s most ferocious predators ever. We now know that — in a world of large

49min

A Monkey Brain and an AI Teamed Up to Make These Unsettling Images

Impressionist art, or perhaps nightmare fuel — these images are a confusing mess to the human eye. But to a macaque's brain cells, says a group of researchers, the images are fascinating. The pictures are the result of an experiment that paired artificial intelligence with primate intelligence. The goal was to create images specifically tuned to stimulate neurons in a monkey's visual cortex. It's

49min

Immediate HIV treatment initiation: Increased but not yet universal in NYC

A new study published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases found that immediate treatment initiation for HIV infection has improved since local and federal guidelines began to recommend universal treatment for all persons diagnosed with HIV, regardless of their disease stage.

53min

Massive 10-Petawatt Laser Can Vaporize Matter

The most powerful laser ever made has one-tenth the power of the sun and is being used in cancer therapy research. P.S. It works. The post Massive 10-Petawatt Laser Can Vaporize Matter appeared first on ExtremeTech .

54min

What to expect from the 2019 hurricane season

Environment El Niño conditions could cancel out the effects of a warming Atlantic. The Weather Company predicts we’re in store for a projected 14 named storms, including seven hurricanes, of which three are major hurricanes (category 3 to 5). The…

56min

Researchers propose air conditioners as climate-change remedy

submitted by /u/funke75 [link] [comments]

56min

New immunodeficiency disease discovered

A new immunodeficiency disease caused by a novel genetic mutation has been identified by researchers, providing unique insights into cell biology.

57min

Schools get big savings when they go solar

Solar panels on school roofs could reduce air pollution, help the environment, and cut electricity costs, according to a new study. The study shows that taking advantage of all viable space for solar panels could allow schools to meet up to 75 percent of their electricity needs and reduce the education sector’s carbon footprint by as much as 28 percent. Overall, the energy switch could deliver be

1h

Show your hands: Smartwatches sense hand activity

We've become accustomed to our smartwatches and smartphones sensing what our bodies are doing, be it walking, driving or sleeping. But what about our hands? It turns out that smartwatches, with a few tweaks, can detect a surprising number of things your hands are doing, according to researchers at Carnegie Mellon University.

1h

Bacteria causing infections can be detected more rapidly

Prof. Young-Tae Chang, Dr. Nam Young Kang, Dr. Hwa-Young Kwon, and Xiao Liu of POSTECH Department of Chemistry developed a fluorescent probe, BacGo that can detect Gram-positive bacteria precisely and promptly. They published their research on the most renowned journal of the field of chemistry, Angewandte Chemie. The research team used bacterial sludge from wastewater for the demonstration experi

1h

Huntington drug successfully lowers levels of disease-causing protein

An international clinical trial has found that a new drug for Huntington disease is safe, and that treatment with the drug successfully lowers levels of the abnormal protein that causes the debilitating disease in patients.

1h

Study reveals final fate of levitating Leidenfrost droplets

A new study shows why levitating droplets on hot surfaces eventually explode if they start our large enough.

1h

Mechanics, chemistry and biomedical research join forces for noninvasive tissue therapy

A fortuitous conversation between two University of Illinois scientists has opened a new line of communication between biomedical researchers and the tissues they study. The new findings, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, show that high-intensity focused ultrasound waves can penetrate biological tissue to activate molecules able to perform specific tasks.

1h

Heart failure deaths rising in younger adults

Death rates due to heart failure are now increasing, and this increase is most prominent among younger adults under 65, considered premature death, reports a new study. The increase was highest among black men. This study shows for the first time that death rates due to heart failure have been increasing since 2012. The increase is likely due to the obesity and diabetes epidemics. About 6 million

1h

First in-vivo trial of subharmonic contrast-enhanced imaging for detection of PCa

A new technique for imaging of microbubble ultrasound contrast agents may be useful in detection of prostate cancer (PCa) not found by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2019 Annual Meeting, set for May 5-10 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

1h

1 Million Animal And Plant Species Are At Risk Of Extinction, U.N. Report Says

"Protecting biodiversity amounts to protecting humanity," says UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay, who warns that species are being lost at an alarming rate. (Image credit: Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images)

1h

The DroneBullet Is Built to Seek and Destroy Other Drones

Naturally, governments and law enforcement are worried about the hazards drones represent, and that's why AerialX designed the DroneBullet. It's a new type of drone that's one part quadcopter and one part missile. The post The DroneBullet Is Built to Seek and Destroy Other Drones appeared first on ExtremeTech .

1h

The Affordable Care Act and Economic Opportunity

Medicaid expansion makes it less likely that the children of poor mothers will grow up to be poor adults — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Lifestyle factors that could harden arteries

A new study pinpoints lifestyle factors that could lead to hardened arteries.

1h

Cryptic mutation is cautionary tale for crop gene editing

Unexpected interactions between mutations can be a thorn in the side for plant breeders. Scientists unveil what drove one infamous 'cryptic' mutation.

1h

Ash dieback is predicted to cost £15 billion in Britain

A team of researchers calculated the true economic cost of ash dieback — and the predictions are staggering.

1h

Oxygen linked with the boom and bust of early animal evolution

Extreme fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen levels corresponded with evolutionary surges and extinctions in animal biodiversity during the Cambrian explosion, finds a new study.

1h

One Million Species at Risk of Extinction, Threatening Human Communities Around the World, U.N. Report Warns

A global assessment compiled by hundreds of scientists found that humans are inflicting staggering damage on the world’s biodiversity

1h

Experimental device generates electricity from the coldness of the universe

A drawback of solar panels is that they require sunlight to generate electricity. Some have observed that for a device on Earth facing space, the chilling outflow of energy from the device can be harvested using the same kind of optoelectronic physics we have used to harness solar energy. New work, in Applied Physics Letters, looks to provide a potential path to generating electricity like solar c

1h

Researchers find protein that suppresses muscle repair in mice

Researchers report that a protein known to be important to protein synthesis also influences muscle regeneration and regrowth in an unexpected manner. The discovery, along with the identification of an inhibitor that blocks its effects, could one day lead to new methods for treating disorders that result in muscle weakness and loss of muscle mass, the researchers said.

1h

Regenstrief faculty discuss communication and patient advocacy at national meeting

Regenstrief Institute research scientists are presenting some of the institute's latest research on patient engagement and advocacy at the Society of General Internal Medicine Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., May 8-11. Presentations include: Too Many Don'ts and Not Enough Dos: A Survey of Hospital Portal Information for Patients and Care Management for Effective use of Opiods (CAMEO): A Randomi

1h

Global Biodiversity Assessment Reports "Unprecedented" Declines

The intergovernmental organization reports "accelerating" species extinctions, with 25 percent of animal and plant species evaluated under threat of extinction.

1h

The Affordable Care Act and Economic Opportunity

Medicaid expansion makes it less likely that the children of poor mothers will grow up to be poor adults — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Sensor can detect spoiled milk before opening

Expiration dates on milk could eventually become a thing of the past with new sensor technology.

1h

These Advanced Brain Training Courses Will Improve Your Life By Improving Your Mind

Do you want to learn faster, focus better, solve problems more easily, and generally improve your brain function? Well, years of scientific research in the fields of neuroscience and psychology have yielded a number of strategies, tips, and tricks that can help you realize these goals. And it’s easier than ever to master them all with the Supercharged Brain Training Bundle . There are many things

1h

The story of the former olympian who designed the world's most beloved boat

Technology In 1970, Bruce Kirby created the perfect single-person sailboat. What made the Laser so unbeatable? Kirby is a world-class sailor and Olympian himself but he is most famous as the designer of a slew of boats known for their swiftness, and also their clarity and…

1h

Pigment-producing stem cells can regenerate vital part of nervous system

Neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) affect millions of people worldwide and occur when parts of the nervous system lose function over time. Researchers have discovered that a type of skin-related stem cell could be used to help regenerate myelin sheaths, a vital part of the nervous system linked to neurodegenerative disorders.

1h

Drug candidate for reversing mucosal barrier damage by HIV

Investigators tested a laboratory-made version of a naturally occurring protein (recombinant fragment of human Surfactant Protein D or rfhSP-D) on bioengineered vaginal tissues, immune cells and microbes to determine if the drug candidate could help prevent HIV transmission safely.

1h

Even more amphibians are endangered than we thought

Due to a lack of data on many amphibian species, only about 44 percent of amphibians have up-to-date assessments on their risk of extinction, compared to nearly 100% of both birds and mammals. Now, researchers have used known ecological, geographical, and evolutionary attributes of these data-deficient species to model their extinction risk — and their assessment suggests that at least 1,000 more

1h

New class of catalysts for energy conversion

Researchers are reporting on a new class of catalysts that is theoretically suitable for universal use.

1h

New all-fiber device simplifies free-space based quantum key distribution

Researchers have developed a simple and stable device to generate the quantum states necessary for quantum key distribution. The device could make it more practical to develop a global data network that uses this very secure method of encryption to protect everything from credit card transactions to texts.

1h

Low-cost intervention boosts undergraduate interest in computer science

A recent study finds that an online intervention taking less than 30 minutes significantly increased interest in computer science for both male and female undergraduate students. However, when it comes to the intervention's impact on classroom performance, the picture gets more complicated.

1h

Pushing early beta-cell proliferation can halt autoimmune attack in type 1 diabetes model

Researchers have found that increasing the proliferation and turnover of beta cells before signs of type 1 diabetes could halt the development of the disease.

1h

Mental health in academia is topic of the week at a sold-out UK meeting

Mental health in academia is topic of the week at a sold-out UK meeting Mental health in academia is topic of the week at a sold-out UK meeting , Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01468-0 In conjunction with Britain’s Mental Health Awareness Week, a first-of-its-kind conference seeks to boost conversation around threats to student wellness.

1h

Winners of the 2019 BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition

Entrants in this year’s contest were invited to submit images that showcase Earth’s biodiversity and show some of the mounting threats to the natural world. These images originally appeared on bioGraphic , an online magazine about science and sustainability and the official media sponsor for the California Academy of Sciences’ BigPicture Natural World Photography Competition . The organizers were

1h

Coming soon: Windows Terminal—finally a tabbed, emoji-capable Windows command-line

Big performance enhancements for the Linux subsystem are also on the way.

1h

Shipwrecks off NC coast harbor tropical migrants

Shipwrecks and sunken structures off the North Carolina coast may act as stepping stones for tropical fish searching for favorable habitats at or beyond the edge of their normal geographic range. A study co-led by Duke University scientists finds these fishes prefer artificial reefs over natural ones and suggests linked networks of these human-made structures could be used to aid the survival of t

1h

AI can detect depression in a child's speech

A machine learning algorithm can detect signs of anxiety and depression in the speech patterns of young children, potentially providing a fast and easy way of diagnosing conditions that are difficult to spot and often overlooked in young people. If undiagnosed, they can lead to an increased risk of substance abuse and suicide later in life.

1h

Sensor can detect spoiled milk before opening

Expiration dates on milk could eventually become a thing of the past with new sensor technology.

1h

Telescopes in space for even sharper images of black holes

Astronomers propose placing two or three satellites in circular orbit around the Earth to observe black holes.

1h

SF Is so Expensive That People Are Using Parking Spots as Offices

Striking a Chord Web developer Victor Pontis has had enough of cars in San Francisco — parking spaces, he says, just take up too much space. His idea: turn the prime real estate of parking spots into coworking spaces, complete with desks and chairs, that he called WePark — and charge only the price of a parking meter, which is a fraction of the price of other local coworking spaces. I have set up

1h

På randen af udryddelse: Disse dyr findes nu kun i zoo

En million arter er truet af udryddelse. Her er nogle af de dyr, der er så tæt på at forsvinde, at de nu kun findes i fangenskab.

2h

The Kentucky Derby Decision Might Avert Disaster

The stewards at Churchill Downs were absolutely right to disqualify Maximum Security after the talented colt drifted out at the top of the stretch and nearly wiped out the entire field in the 145th running of the Kentucky Derby. In fact, what’s striking about the reaction to the ruling is that those closest to the sport have been the least surprised by it. There are plenty of things wrong about h

2h

The One Animal That Humbles Humankind

When Doug Peacock returned from his second tour in Vietnam, he was ready for some peace and quiet. He found it in the wilds of Montana and Wyoming, where Yellowstone National Park provided refuge for thousands of species of wildlife. Peacock learned to live among these creatures in the mountains and on the plains. An encounter with a grizzly bear, however, would change everything. “My companions

2h

$70 off a robot vacuum, 31 percent off a digital photo frame, and other deals worth bringing home

Gadgets The low-down on the day's best bargains. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

2h

Quantum computing with graphene plasmons

A novel material that consists of a single sheet of carbon atoms could lead to new designs for optical quantum computers. Physicists have shown that tailored graphene structures enable single photons to interact with each other.

2h

If Drones Had 'Claws,' They Might Be Able To Fly For Longer

Small drones have a problem — their battery life runs out relatively quickly. A team of roboticists says it has created special landing gear that can help conserve precious battery life. (Image credit: Dr. Kaiyu Hang/Yale University)

2h

Pigment-producing stem cells can regenerate vital part of nervous system

Neurodegenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS) affect millions of people worldwide and occur when parts of the nervous system lose function over time. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have discovered that a type of skin-related stem cell could be used to help regenerate myelin sheaths, a vital part of the nervous system linked to neurodegenerative disor

2h

Study finds lifestyle factors that could harden arteries

A new study from the University of Georgia pinpoints lifestyle factors that could lead to hardened arteries.

2h

New computational tool improves gene identification

Looking to improve the identification of genes associates with disease, a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has developed a new bioinformatics tool that analyzes CRISPR pooled screen data and identifies candidates for potentially relevant genes with greater sensitivity and accuracy than other existing methods.

2h

Autism gene linked to brain and behavior deficits in mice

Mice lacking the gene Shank3 display structural and functional deficits in the prefrontal cortex, finds a study published in JNeurosci. The research advances our understanding of one of the most common genetic risk factors for autism spectrum disorders.

2h

LIGO is on the lookout for these 8 sources of gravitational waves

Gravitational wave hunters are on a cosmic scavenger hunt. Here’s what they’re hoping to find.

2h

Google's Android Auto Refreshed With Dark Mode And Enhanced Navigation Bar

Google I/O isn't scheduled to kick off until tomorrow, but Google has announced an update for it Android Auto infotainment system ahead of schedule. Perhaps tomorrow's event is just too jam-packed …

2h

New Video Shows 3D Printed Lung “Breathing”

First Breaths Scientists just took a major step forward towards 3D printed organs — with a new lung-like system full of air sacs can expand and contract, filling the same biological role as our lungs do by pumping oxygen into blood. Bioprinted organs could someday help people who are waiting and sometimes dying on the organ transplant waitlist. In research published in the journal Science last we

2h

The Conversation

How Much Immigration Is Too Much? We need to make hard decisions now about what will truly benefit current and future Americans, David Frum argued in April. David Frum’s statistically dense exploration of America’s immigration conundrum is an important and welcome antidote to the simplistic and xenophobic rhetoric of the president, which dominates the public discourse. Mr. Frum’s analysis, howeve

2h

Quantum computing with graphene plasmons

A novel material that consists of a single sheet of carbon atoms could lead to new designs for optical quantum computers. Physicists have shown that tailored graphene structures enable single photons to interact with each other.

2h

1100 GW new solar by 2035 in US politician's climate plan

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Study presents drug candidate for reversing mucosal barrier damage by HIV

Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital led by Raina Fichorova, MD, PhD, in collaboration with an international team, tested a laboratory-made version of a naturally occurring protein (recombinant fragment of human Surfactant Protein D or rfhSP-D) on bioengineered vaginal tissues, immune cells and microbes to determine if the drug candidate could help prevent HIV transmission safely.

2h

The fossilization process of the dinosaur remains

A piece of work conducted between the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country and the University of Zaragoza has conducted an in-depth analysis of the dinosaur fossils at La Cantalera-1, one of the Iberian sites belonging to the Lower Cretaceous with the largest number of vertebrates. The structure of the fossilized bone tissue as well as the fossilization processes have been studied. It has been

2h

United Nations: One Million Species Are Poised to Go Extinct

Human Error After spending three years compiling the United Nations’ first comprehensive biodiversity report, researchers came to an alarming conclusion : humans have driven one million species to the brink of extinction — putting more species at risk than ever before in human history. “Ecosystems, species, wild populations, local varieties, and breeds of domesticated plants and animals are shrin

2h

Microsoft's offers software tools to secure elections

Microsoft is announcing an ambitious effort intended to make U.S. voting more secure and verifiable.

2h

To skirt gang violence, look tough on Facebook?

Among young people associated with gangs on Chicago’s South Side, online confrontations don’t typically escalate to in-person violence and can even deter it, research finds. The menacing photos that Tevin, a young man affiliated with a Chicago street gang, posted on social media were dramatically different from the 20-year-old whom Stanford University sociologist Forrest Stuart got to know. Sever

2h

'Avengers: Endgame' Might Surpass 'Avatar' at the Box Office

Also, 'Spider-Man: Far From Home' has a new trailer. Watch it here.

2h

Bengal Tigers May Not Survive Climate Change

The tigers of the Bangladesh Sundarbans may be gone in fifty years, according to a new study.

2h

Sensor can detect spoiled milk before opening

Expiration dates on milk could eventually become a thing of the past with new sensor technology from Washington State University scientists.

2h

NRL tests sensor on-orbit the ISS to protect space-based assets

Developed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Plasma Physics Division, in conjunction with the Spacecraft Engineering Department, the Space PlasmA Diagnostic suitE (SPADE) experiment launched from Kennedy Space Center in Florida to the International Space Station onboard the SpaceX Dragon resupply mission (CRS-17), May 4.

2h

Can 3-D Printing Produce Lung and Liver Tissue for Transplants?

New technique creates working models—with a little help from grocery-store food coloring — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Can 3-D Printing Produce Lung and Liver Tissue for Transplants?

New technique creates working models—with a little help from grocery-store food coloring — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Caster Semenya, Testosterone and the History of Gender Segregation in Sports

Sports are segregated by sex. But what happens when athletes don't fit neatly into sport's definition of gender?

2h

Patients reading visit notes report striking benefit over time

A new study from OpenNotes examines the benefits of patients reading their doctors' visit notes, specifically those from traditionally underserved populations.

2h

Russian scientists developed a system for malignant brain tumors diagnosing during surgery

Scientists of the Research Medical University of Volga region and the Institute of Applied Physics, RAS have developed a system for malignant brain tumors diagnosing during surgery. The method is based on optical coherence tomography (OCT). Doctors obtained images of brain tissue that clearly show the differences between malignant and healthy cells. The method simplifies tumor removal operations a

2h

Sensor can detect spoiled milk before opening

Expiration dates on milk could eventually become a thing of the past with new sensor technology from Washington State University scientists.

2h

Rapid heating equipment for semiconductor devices using innovative wireless lamp

Researchers from Tokyo University of Agriculture & Technology (TUAT), ORC Manufacturing Co. Ltd. and Techno Research., Ltd achieved high quality crystallization of amorphous silicon film by developing rapid heating technology with the microwave induced wireless heating lamp. The wireless lamp is excellent in energy saving, durability and maintainability, and it can be expected to be developed into

2h

New all-fiber device simplifies free-space based quantum key distribution

Researchers have developed a simple and stable device to generate the quantum states necessary for quantum key distribution. The device could make it more practical to develop a global data network that uses this very secure method of encryption to protect everything from credit card transactions to texts.

2h

Watch This Hulking Robot Play “The Floor Is Lava”

Plank Walk On Friday, IHMC Robotics unveiled a new video in which a humanoid robot named Atlas gingerly — and autonomously — walks across various objects, including suspended wooden planks and wobbly cinder blocks. It basically looks like someone challenged the robot to play “the floor is lava” with the leftover supplies from a construction site, and the bot is surprisingly good at the game — put

2h

Ekspert efter russisk flyulykke: Lyn bør ikke sætte moderne fly i brand

Flere passagerer på det forulykkede fly hørte et højt smæld, men det er usandsynligt, at lynnedslaget alene satte flyet i brand.

2h

Airbnb vs. hotels: New research sheds light on how they can compete and benefit

Researchers from the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science which sheds new light on the impact Airbnb and similar "sharing economy" companies are having on the hospitality industry. The findings suggest that in some cases, the presence of Airbnb can help attract more demand in some markets while challenging the tradi

3h

Hurricane Maria Prompts Rare Investigation into Building Damage

The National Institute of Standards and Technology inquiry will also examine communications failures and the storms’ death toll — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

VIDEOS: Future You

"Future You" is a monthly video series exploring how today's emerging science and technology could change what it means to be human by the year 2050 with NPR's Future Correspondent Elise Hu.

3h

Cryptic mutation is cautionary tale for crop gene editing

Even in this "age of the genome," much about genes remains shrouded in mystery. This is especially true for "cryptic mutations"—mutated genes that are hidden, and have unexpected effects on traits that are only revealed when combined with other mutations. Learning from one infamous cryptic mutation in particular, researchers from CSHL share important lessons for breeding or gene editing in crops.

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Cryptic mutation is cautionary tale for crop gene editing

Even in this "age of the genome," much about genes remains shrouded in mystery. This is especially true for "cryptic mutations"—mutated genes that are hidden, and have unexpected effects on traits that are only revealed when combined with other mutations. Learning from one infamous cryptic mutation in particular, researchers from CSHL share important lessons for breeding or gene editing in crops.

3h

Secrets of the 'blue supergiant' revealed

Blue supergiants are the rock-and-roll stars of the universe. They are massive stars that live fast and die young which makes them rare and difficult to study, even with modern telescopes.

3h

New disease discovered by CU Anschutz researchers

A new immunodeficiency disease caused by a novel genetic mutation has been identified by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus providing unique insights into cell biology.

3h

New all-fiber device simplifies free-space based quantum key distribution

Researchers have developed a simple and stable device to generate the quantum states necessary for quantum key distribution. The device could make it more practical to develop a global data network that uses this very secure method of encryption to protect everything from credit card transactions to texts.

3h

Cryptic mutation is cautionary tale for crop gene editing

Unexpected interactions between mutations can be a thorn in the side for plant breeders. Scientists unveil what drove one infamous 'cryptic' mutation.

3h

Apps connect teachers, parents, and students with special needs

Two new studies highlight the problems with existing apps for students with special needs, their teachers, and their parents and work toward tools that do more to help children and the people who support them. K-12 educators have been using technology in the classroom with increasing frequency but not always with great success, particularly when teaching students with special needs, says Gabriela

3h

‘Morpheus’ chip turns hacking into an impossible Rubik’s cube

A new chip called MORPHEUS blocks potential hacking attacks by encrypting and randomly reshuffling key bits of its own code and data 20 times per second. This is infinitely faster than a human hacker can work and thousands of times faster than even the fastest electronic hacking techniques. The new computer processor architecture could usher in a future where computers proactively defend against

3h

The 'Game of Thrones' Starbucks Cup: What's Inside?

One quadruple latte for Tormund in a horn to go, please.

3h

The Science of Asking What People Want

Market research can extract plenty of data, but its greatest value is in evoking reactions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Did you solve it? Sandwich sudoku – a new puzzle goes viral

The solutions to today’s puzzles Earlier today I set you three sandwich sudoku puzzles. It’s a new variant of Sudoku that is getting lots of attention. To get a printable page of the problems click this link. If you got stuck with the last one, which was very hard, this video reveals how to solve it. Continue reading…

3h

ESA Satellite Accidentally Discovered Three New Asteroids

Hello There A European satellite called Gaia just made a new surprise discovery. Originally charged with mapping out the positions and movements of the stars, according to Space.com , the space probe also happened to spot three previously-undiscovered asteroids that orbit the Sun at an unusual angle compared to the rest of the solar system. Spotted The asteroids, which are the first new asteroids

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Let's watch the 2019 Microsoft Build Conference keynote

Technology See where Microsoft is going courtesy of its developers' conference keynote. Here's what you need to know from Microsoft's Build Conference.

3h

The Democratic Party Just Ticked Off Its Youngest Organizers

Updated on May 6 at 1:05 p.m. ET The youths in the Democratic Party are angry. Sixty-eight chapters of the College Democrats are urging voters not to donate to the party’s congressional-campaign arm after it instituted a new policy to protect incumbents from primary challenges. The protesting students say that the change will deter young candidates and people from historically marginalized commun

3h

The Science of Asking What People Want

Market research can extract plenty of data, but its greatest value is in evoking reactions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

The Science of Asking What People Want

Market research can extract plenty of data, but its greatest value is in evoking reactions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Low-cost intervention boosts undergraduate interest in computer science

A recent study finds that an online intervention taking less than 30 minutes significantly increased interest in computer science for both male and female undergraduate students. However, when it comes to the intervention's impact on classroom performance, the picture gets more complicated.

3h

Telescopes in space for even sharper images of black holes

Astronomers have just managed to take the first image of a black hole, and now the next challenge facing them is how to take even sharper images, so that Einstein's Theory of General Relativity can be tested. Radboud University astronomers, along with the European Space Agency (ESA) and others, are putting forward a concept for achieving this by launching radio telescopes into space. They publish

3h

New class of catalysts for energy conversion

Numerous chemical reactions relevant for the energy revolution are highly complex and result in considerable energy losses. This is the reason why energy conversion and storage systems or fuel cells are not yet widely used in commercial applications. Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung in Düsseldorf are now reporting on a new class of catalysts t

3h

The power of randomization: Magnetic skyrmions for novel computer technology

Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have succeeded in developing a key constituent of a novel unconventional computing concept. This constituent employs the same magnetic structures that are being researched in connection with storing electronic data on shift registers known as racetracks.

3h

Pushing early beta-cell proliferation can halt autoimmune attack in type 1 diabetes model

Researchers at Joslin have found that increasing the proliferation and turnover of beta cells before signs of type 1 diabetes could halt the development of the disease.

3h

Airbnb vs. hotels: New research sheds light on how they can compete and benefit

Researchers from the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science which sheds new light on the impact Airbnb and similar 'sharing economy' companies are having on the hospitality industry. The findings suggest that in some cases, the presence of Airbnb can help attract more demand in some markets while challenging the tradi

3h

This AI Is Spitting Out Coherent, Almost-Funny Dad Puns

Pun Generator Imagine you tell your dad something about a negotiator, or a car. Just enough material for him to land an appalling pun: That’s because [the] negotiator got my car back to me in one peace. But this is the work of no dad. Instead, it was created by a pun-generating artificial intelligence, created by Stanford researchers to prove that a neural network can have a sense of humor, too.

3h

Climate education for kids increases climate concerns for parents

A new study finds that educating children about climate change increases their parents' concerns about climate change.

3h

Unexpectedly big wins improve two kinds of memory

Researchers have discovered that instances in which outcomes are better than expected — finding an unexpectedly good parking spot, for example, or spotting a $20 bill on the sidewalk — improves memories of specific events. This is in addition to the long-established role that unexpectedly good outcomes have in influencing what are called integrated memories.

3h

Soy protein lowers cholesterol, study suggests

With the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) planning to remove soy from its list of heart healthy foods, researchers set out to provide a meta-analysis of 46 existing trials that evaluated soy and determine whether the proposed move aligns with existing literature.

3h

Driving chemical reactions with light

How can chemical reactions be triggered by light, following the example of photosynthesis in nature? This process is still poorly understood. However, researchers have now uncovered a major piece of the puzzle.

3h

Bullying among adolescents hurts both the victims and the perpetrators

About a tenth of adolescents across the globe have been the victim of psychological or physical violence from their classmates. In a new study researchers show that victims and their perpetrators both suffer as a result of these attacks: They are more inclined to consume alcohol and tobacco, are more likely to complain of psychosomatic problems and their chances of having problems with their socia

3h

Hunting jeopardizes forest carbon storage, yet is overlooked in climate mitigation efforts

The loss of animals, often due to unregulated or illegal hunting, has consequences for the carbon storage capacity of forests, yet this link is rarely mentioned in high-level climate policy discussions, according to a new study.

3h

Rheumatoid arthritis drug diminishes Zika birth defects in mice

In experiments with pregnant mice infected with the Zika virus, researchers report they have successfully used a long-standing immunosuppressive drug to diminish the rate of fetal deaths and birth defects in the mice's offspring.

3h

Excessive use of skin cancer surgery curbed with awareness effort

Sometimes a little gentle peer persuasion goes a long way toward correcting a large problem.

3h

As Saudi Arabia Builds A Nuclear Reactor, Some Worry About Its Motives

Saudi Arabia is building a small civilian nuclear reactor, the nation's first. Nuclear power is an important part of its energy plans. Arms control experts ask if its intention is entirely peaceful. (Image credit: Planet Labs Inc)

3h

Universal Pattern Explains Why Materials Conduct

In a wire, electrons rebound off each other in such a complicated fashion that there’s no way to follow exactly what’s happening. But over the last 50 years, mathematicians and physicists have begun to grasp that this blizzard of movement settles into elegant statistical patterns. Electron movement takes one statistical shape in a conductor and a different statistical shape in an insulator. That,

3h

Is Conference Room Air Making You Dumber?

A small body of evidence suggests that when it comes to decision making, indoor air may matter more than we have realized.

3h

Microsoft’s Chromium Edge Browser Will Have Internet Explorer Built In

Microsoft has confirmed some new changes for the Chromium-based Edge browser that it has been working on. One of the biggest additions is an “IE Mode” for Edge which basically means …

3h

Microsoft, at its Build 2019 conference, wants us to have conversations with our computers – CNET

The software discusses what it believes artificial intelligence programs will be like to work with in the future.

3h

The Problem With Social-Media Protests

Social media are often thought of as the new ground for political and social activism. But while it’s easy to create a social movement on Twitter or Facebook, translating that into actual policy change is very different. Before the internet changed the speed at which the world moves, movements were slower-growing. A year of organizing and directly advocating for change led to the 13-month-long Mo

3h

Helt ny släkting till Tyrannosaurus rex funnen

Dinosauriernas superkändis, den skräckinjagande Tyrannosaurus rex har fått en ny släkting. I New Mexico i USA har forskare nämligen funnit en helt ny typ av dinosaurie, Suskityrannus.

3h

Plastic gets a do-over: Breakthrough discovery recycles plastic from the inside out

A team of researchers at Berkeley Lab has designed a recyclable plastic that, like a Lego playset, can be disassembled into its constituent parts at the molecular level, and then reassembled into a different shape, texture, and color again and again without loss of performance or quality.

3h

Blue supergiant stars open doors to concert in space

Blue supergiants are rock-and-roll: they live fast and die young. This makes them rare and difficult to study. Before space telescopes were invented, few blue supergiants had been observed, so our knowledge of these stars was limited. Using recent NASA space telescope data, an international team led by KU Leuven studied the sounds originating inside these stars and discovered that almost all blue

3h

Twisting whirlpools of electrons

Using a novel approach, EPFL physicists have been able to create ultrafast electron vortex beams, with significant implications for fundamental physics, quantum computing, future data-storage and even certain medical treatments.

3h

Kids can make sceptical parents change their minds on climate change

A special curriculum for kids helped them persuade their parents to see climate change as a threat, and it had the most effect on conservative parents

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We've found the medium-sized tyrannosaurs that came before T. rex

Two fossils have been found of a new tyrannosaur species that lived around 90 million years ago, before the creatures evolved into giants like T. rex

3h

Loss of the UK’s ash trees due to fungal disease may cost £15 billion

Ash dieback, a fungal disease in the UK’s ash trees, could cost the country nearly £15 billion in clean-up and lost ecosystem benefits like carbon sequestration

3h

The Coming Generation War

“There is a mysterious cycle in human events,” said Franklin Delano Roosevelt, accepting the Democratic nomination for president in Philadelphia in 1936. “To some generations much is given. Of others much is expected. This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with destiny.” In the 20th century, many sociologists and historians flirted with the idea that generational changes could explain U.S.

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Microsoft’s Satya Nadella Throws the Doors Open Ahead of Build

The company’s CEO will lay out his vision for openness at Microsoft’s annual developer conference.

4h

Image: Storm in the Teacup quasar

This image shows a quasar nicknamed the Teacup due to its shape. A quasar is an active galaxy that is powered by material falling into its central supermassive black hole. They are extremely luminous objects located at great distances from Earth. The Teacup is 1.1 billion light years away and was thought to be a dying quasar until recent X-ray observations shed new light on it.

4h

Children Change Their Parents' Minds about Climate Change

Study of students schooled on the issue showed them going on to shift their elders’ attitudes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

What Scallops' Many Eyes Can Teach Us About the Evolution of Vision

Scallop eyes, which function similar to telescopes, are even more complex than scientists previously knew

4h

Children Change Their Parents' Minds about Climate Change

Study of students schooled on the issue showed them going on to shift their elders’ attitudes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Children Change Their Parents' Minds about Climate Change

Study of students schooled on the issue showed them going on to shift their elders’ attitudes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

New Tiny Tyrannosaur Species Fills Gap in T. rex Origin Story

In 1902, famed fossil hunter Barnum Brown was prospecting in Montana when he discovered the first documented remains of a Tyrannosaurus rex. The creature was nearly 40 feet long with banana-sized …

4h

Electrify America launches its app, adds two new membership plans – Roadshow

Charging is priced based on the amount of power the EV can draw.

4h

Apple’s Redesigned Mac Pro May Be Unveiled At WWDC

Apple’s developers conference takes place next month and the company will primarily be making software-related announcements. However, if a new report is to be believed, the company …

4h

'Private Post' Means Something Slightly Different to Facebook

When you privately share something to a specific group of friends on Facebook, there’s a chance other people will read it. Reuters reports that Facebook employs a couple hundred contractors …

4h

‘Game of Thrones’ Left a Starbucks Cup in a Scene and Fans Are Freaking Out

“The Last of the Starks,” Episode 4 in Game of Thrones’ final season, had many shocking scenes (note: major spoilers ahead), including Brienne of Tarth sleeping with Jaime …

4h

Gray whales starving to death in the Pacific, and scientists want to know why

From Baja California to Puget Sound, scientists are seeing signs that gray whales are in distress. And they have no idea why.

4h

Making a 'to do' list for trauma docs

Researchers from Drexel's College of Computing & Informatics have been integrating a tablet-based checklist tool into the workflow of a pediatric trauma center and, over the course of 15 months, have shown that it doesn't hamper doctors' performance.

4h

Quantum computing with graphene plasmons

A novel material that consists of a single sheet of carbon atoms could lead to new designs for optical quantum computers. Physicists from the University of Vienna and the Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona have shown that tailored graphene structures enable single photons to interact with each other. The proposed new architecture for quantum computer is published in the recent issue of np

4h

Tip sheet: Studies on opioid-prescribing practices

Although opioids play a key role in reducing pain when recovering from surgery, some patients transition to chronic users and become dependent on them. In order to find out what situations result in patients continuing to refill their opioid prescriptions after a surgery, Johns Hopkins researchers scoured a database of more than 900,000 people who had a surgery scheduled and were prescribed opioid

4h

Secrets of the 'blue supergiant' revealed

'Blue supergiants' — the final phase in a giant star's lifetime — have been seen for the fist time.

4h

Detailed brain map uncovers hidden immune cells that may be involved in neurodegenerative disorders

Our brains do not only contain neurons, but also a variety of immune cells that play an important role for its functioning. A team led by professor Kiavash Movahedi (VIB Center for Inflammation Research at VUB) has developed a comprehensive cell atlas of the brain's immune compartment. This revealed not only the striking diversity of brain macrophages, but also found microglia where they were not

4h

A barrier that keeps cancer at bay

Scientists at EPFL have discovered a biological 'barrier' that prevents cancer cells from forming new tumors and more importantly, from metastasizing. The study examines pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and breast cancer.

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Untangling a cancer signaling network suggests new roadmap to tumor control

In this advanced age of molecular sleuthing, a research team led by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center have findings that suggest tumors will eventually become resistant to drug inhibitors of a common cancer pathway (dubbed YAP/TAZ), now in preclinical development. But in the same study, published in Developmental Cell, they posit that pairing those inhibitors with another drug, now o

4h

Brain injury from low oxygen affects specific cells, Stanford-led study finds

Low oxygen levels are a well-known cause of brain injury in premature babies. But the mechanism by which low oxygen hurts the developing human brain has been unclear. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have identified a specific set of brain cells that are particularly susceptible to harm from low oxygen exposure in early development.

4h

Many more amphibian species at risk of extinction than previously thought

Frogs already knew it wasn't easy being green, but the going just got a lot tougher for the 1,012 additional species of amphibians who have now been newly identified as at risk of extinction in a Yale-led study.

4h

Form drives function in cancer proliferation

A new study finds that the protein responsible for the crawling movements of cells also drives the ability of cancer cells to grow when under stress.

4h

New computational tool enables powerful molecular analysis of biomedical tissue samples

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine invented a computational technique called CIBERSORTx that can analyze the RNA of individual cells taken from whole-tissue samples or data sets.

4h

Clinical trial looks at absorption levels of sunscreen active ingredients into bloodstream

The US Food and Drug Administration recommends that active ingredients in sunscreen absorbed into the bloodstream above a certain level undergo toxicology testing. Researchers from the FDA conducted this small randomized clinical trial of 24 healthy volunteers to determine bloodstream concentrations of four active ingredients (avobenzone, oxybenzone, octocrylene and ecamsule) in four sunscreens ap

4h

Oxygen linked with the boom and bust of early animal evolution

Extreme fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen levels corresponded with evolutionary surges and extinctions in animal biodiversity during the Cambrian explosion, finds new study led by UCL and the University of Leeds.

4h

Study reveals how social relationships transform bird flocks

Flocks of birds may appear to move with a single mind, but new research shows jackdaws stick with their mates — even though it harms the flock.

4h

Impossible research produces 400-year El Niño record, revealing startling changes

Coral experts around the world said it was impossible to extract a multi-century record of El Niño events. But one persistent PhD student, now Dr. Mandy Freund, with the help of Australian scientists willing to 'give it a shot' has produced the world's first 400-year long record of El Niño events. And the changes they have found to El Niños in recent decades are startling.

4h

Men taking medications for enlarged prostate face delays in prostate cancer diagnosis

University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that men treated with medications for benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate) experienced a two-year delay in diagnosis of their prostate cancer and were twice as likely to have advanced disease upon diagnosis.

4h

Female flies respond to sensation of sex, not just sperm

Female fruit flies will temporarily reject other partners after mating, thanks to special proteins in a male fly's ejaculate. New research shows that the feeling of sex, even without sperm, can trigger the same response.

4h

Unexpectedly big wins improve two kinds of memory

Brown University researchers have discovered that instances in which outcomes are better than expected — finding an unexpectedly good parking spot, for example, or spotting a $20 bill on the sidewalk — improves memories of specific events. This is in addition to the long-established role that unexpectedly good outcomes have in influencing what are called integrated memories.

4h

How common is e-cigarette use among adults in households with kids?

Nearly 5 percent of adults living in households with children use e-cigarettes based on analyses of national survey data from 2016-2017.

4h

A brain region for Pokémon characters?

Adults who played Pokémon videogames extensively as children have a brain region that responds preferentially to images of Pikachu and other characters from the series.

4h

Feeling valued, respected appear most important for job satisfaction in academic medicine

A survey of physicians in the Massachusetts General Hospital Department of Medicine finds that feeling valued, being treated with respect and working in a supportive environment were the factors most strongly associated with job satisfaction.

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Direct dispensing of naloxone by pharmacists can cut opioid overdose deaths, study finds

The opioid antidote naloxone can reverse the effects of an overdoes if given to a person promptly and many states have approved rules to make the drug more widely available. A new study finds that allowing pharmacists to directly dispense the drug without a physician's prescription can sharply reduce fatal opioid-related overdoses, while less-robust strategies had little effect on deaths.

4h

Climate education for kids increases climate concerns for parents

A new study from North Carolina State University finds that educating children about climate change increases their parents' concerns about climate change.

4h

New 3-foot-tall relative of Tyrannosaurus rex

'Suskityrannus gives us a glimpse into the evolution of tyrannosaurs just before they take over the planet,' said Sterling Nesbit.

4h

Even more amphibians are endangered than we thought

Due to a lack of data on many amphibian species, only about 44% of amphibians have up-to-date assessments on their risk of extinction, compared to nearly 100% of both birds and mammals. Now, researchers reporting May 6 in Current Biology have used known ecological, geographical, and evolutionary attributes of these data-deficient species to model their extinction risk — and their assessment sugge

4h

Ash dieback is predicted to cost £15 billion in Britain

A team of researchers from the University of Oxford, Fera Science, Sylva Foundation and the Woodland Trust has calculated the true economic cost of ash dieback — and the predictions, published today in Current Biology, are staggering.

4h

Gray whales starving to death in the Pacific, and scientists want to know why

From Baja California to Puget Sound, scientists are seeing signs that gray whales are in distress. And they have no idea why.

4h

Demonstrating the impact of research to society is a worldwide challenge

Different societies have different expectations about the impact of research. Many seek immediate results from public investment in the various knowledge areas. However, warn heads of research funding organizations, it is important not to overlook the fact that many research projects have an impact only after many years, and should be considered a store of knowledge for the future.

4h

Blod och svett tar träningsappen till nästa nivå

Var du en av de 20 000 personer som sprang Stockholm Maraton 2018? Då minns du hur varmt det var, och hur många som var tvungna att bryta på grund av det. Ett av de största problemen när det är varmt ute är att hålla vätskebalansen i schack. Och det är här KTH-forskaren Gaston Crespos och hans kollegers nya teknik kommer in i bilden. Svettkontroll varnar i god tid – Ett av de områden där tekniken

4h

Med problemlösning lär sig elever matematik bättre

– Elevernas möjligheter att lära sig matematik begränsas av den undervisning som elever vanligtvis möter i skolan. För att elever ska få bra möjligheter att lära sig matematik behöver de oftare få jobba med problemlösning på lektionerna. Lärarna kan stödja elevernas arbete genom att anpassa sitt stöd till elevernas svårigheter, säger Johan Sidenvall, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och mate

4h

Dynamic energy management system for SMBs

Solar power, wind power and the lot – the growing use of renewable energy sources is resulting in substantial fluctuations in energy production. Fraunhofer researchers have now made it possible to design industrial processes in small and medium-sized businesses to be demand-responsive. This enables companies to maximize their use of green power from their own power plants, to respond to fluctuatio

4h

Indicators point toward worse Great Lakes flooding than 2017

Record-high lake levels led to devastating flood damage in Great Lakes coastal communities in 2017, but in the two years since, little has changed.

4h

Green New Deal could push Kentucky away from coal even faster

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The Australian company that banned work on Wednesdays

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The State Of The World’s Water

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5G Is Here. What Does That Mean for Exponential Tech?

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4h

Rainy days make everything worse—even restaurant reviews

Nexus Media News Cloudy with a chance of lousy meatballs People's restaurant experiences are shaped by the food, the service and… the weather.

4h

Low-cost intervention boosts undergraduate interest in computer science

A recent study finds that an online intervention taking less than 30 minutes significantly increased interest in computer science for both male and female undergraduate students. However, when it comes to the intervention's impact on classroom performance, the picture gets more complicated.

4h

Recognising sustainable behaviour

Solving the growing problem of space debris will require everyone who flies rockets and satellites to adhere to sustainable practices, which doesn't always happen. Now there will be a way to recognise those who do.

4h

Industrial-era decline in subarctic Atlantic productivity

Industrial-era decline in subarctic Atlantic productivity Industrial-era decline in subarctic Atlantic productivity, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1181-8 A continuous, multi-century record of subarctic Atlantic marine productivity shows that a marked decline in net primary productivity has occurred across the subarctic Atlantic basin over the past two centuries.

4h

Tiny Tyrannosaur trod lightly 92 million years ago

Two juvenile skeletons fill gaps in the story of the mighty T.rex . Nick Carne reports.

4h

Swiss court declares driver an Uber employee

A Swiss court has ruled that a former Uber driver was an employee of the ride-sharing firm, not an independent contractor, in a potentially landmark decision, the driver's lawyer said Monday.

4h

UN report: Humans accelerating extinction of species

People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday.

4h

Even more amphibians are endangered than we thought

At least a quarter of the world's approximately 8,000 known species of amphibian are recognized as threatened and at risk of extinction. But due to a lack of data on many amphibian species, only about 44 percent of amphibians have up-to-date assessments on their risk of extinction, compared to nearly 100 percent of both birds and mammals. Now, researchers reporting May 6 in the journal Current Bio

4h

New computational tool enables powerful molecular analysis of biomedical tissue samples

Single-cell RNA sequencing is emerging as a powerful technology in modern medical research, allowing scientists to examine individual cells and their behaviors in diseases like cancer. But the technique, which can't be applied to the vast majority of preserved tissue samples, is expensive and can't be done at the scale required to be part of routine clinical treatment.

4h

Ash dieback is predicted to cost 15 billion in Britain

A team of researchers from the University of Oxford, Fera Science, Sylva Foundation and the Woodland Trust has calculated the true economic cost of ash dieback—and the predictions, published today in Current Biology, are staggering.

4h

Climate education for kids increases climate concerns for parents

A new study from North Carolina State University finds that educating children about climate change increases their parents' concerns about climate change.

4h

New three-foot-tall relative of Tyrannosaurus rex

A new relative of the Tyrannosaurus rex—much smaller than the huge, ferocious dinonsaur made famous in countless books and films, including, yes, "Jurassic Park—has been discovered and named by a Virginia Tech paleontologist and an international team of scientists.

4h

Johns Hopkins to offer school leaders safety programming

A Johns Hopkins University initiative announced Monday will offer short courses to principals and other school leaders as part of an effort to create standards around school health and safety.

4h

Oxygen linked with the boom and bust of early animal evolution

Extreme fluctuations in atmospheric oxygen levels corresponded with evolutionary surges and extinctions in animal biodiversity during the Cambrian explosion, finds new study led by UCL and the University of Leeds.

4h

Study reveals how social relationships transform bird flocks

Flocks of birds may appear to move with a single mind, but new research shows jackdaws stick with their mates—even though it harms the flock.

4h

Impossible research produces 400-year El Nino record, revealing startling changes

Melbourne: Australian scientists have developed an innovative method using cores drilled from coral to produce a world first 400-year long seasonal record of El Niño events, a record that many in the field had described as impossible to extract.

4h

Female flies respond to sensation of sex, not just sperm

Female fruit flies can feel when a sexual partner is a good fit. Scientists have long known that proteins in a male fly's ejaculate make female flies temporarily lose interest in other partners. It's a trick male flies use to raise the chance that eggs get fertilized with their sperm, not someone else's. But a new study suggests that the sensation of sex—regardless of sperm—can also make females r

4h

Exploring 3-D technology in pottery studies: 'It is the future'

In the depots of the Faculty of Archaeology, many artifacts, accumulated after decades of fieldwork across Europe and the Middle East, are stored. A new project, the Leiden Inventory Depot (LID), aims to unlock this wealth of information to the outside world. The 3-D scanning of objects takes a central role in this endeavor. Our master's student Vasiliki Lagari is contributing to the creation of t

4h

Sunscreen Chemicals Soak All the Way Into Your Bloodstream

But whether that's a health risk remains unclear, according to a new FDA-backed study.

4h

Everything around you can become a computer | Ivan Poupyrev

Designer Ivan Poupyrev wants to integrate technology into everyday objects to make them more useful and fun — like a jacket you can use to answer phone calls or a houseplant you can play like a keyboard. In a talk and tech demo, he lays out his vision for a physical world that's more deeply connected to the internet and shows how, with a little collaboration, we can get there. Unveiled in this ta

4h

Germany Announces Continued Increases to Research Funding

State and federal ministers say they will pump up science budgets by 3 percent per year for the next decade, as they have done since 2006.

4h

Soy protein lowers cholesterol, study suggests

With the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) planning to remove soy from its list of heart healthy foods, researchers at St. Michael's Hospital set out to provide a meta-analysis of 46 existing trials that evaluated soy and determine whether the proposed move aligns with existing literature.

4h

Rheumatoid arthritis drug diminishes Zika birth defects in mice

In experiments with pregnant mice infected with the Zika virus, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have successfully used a long-standing immunosuppressive drug to diminish the rate of fetal deaths and birth defects in the mice's offspring.

4h

Even more amphibians are endangered than we thought

At least a quarter of the world's approximately 8,000 known species of amphibian are recognized as threatened and at risk of extinction. But due to a lack of data on many amphibian species, only about 44 percent of amphibians have up-to-date assessments on their risk of extinction, compared to nearly 100 percent of both birds and mammals. Now, researchers reporting May 6 in the journal Current Bio

4h

New computational tool enables powerful molecular analysis of biomedical tissue samples

Single-cell RNA sequencing is emerging as a powerful technology in modern medical research, allowing scientists to examine individual cells and their behaviors in diseases like cancer. But the technique, which can't be applied to the vast majority of preserved tissue samples, is expensive and can't be done at the scale required to be part of routine clinical treatment.

4h

Ash dieback is predicted to cost 15 billion in Britain

A team of researchers from the University of Oxford, Fera Science, Sylva Foundation and the Woodland Trust has calculated the true economic cost of ash dieback—and the predictions, published today in Current Biology, are staggering.

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Study reveals how social relationships transform bird flocks

Flocks of birds may appear to move with a single mind, but new research shows jackdaws stick with their mates—even though it harms the flock.

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Female flies respond to sensation of sex, not just sperm

Female fruit flies can feel when a sexual partner is a good fit. Scientists have long known that proteins in a male fly's ejaculate make female flies temporarily lose interest in other partners. It's a trick male flies use to raise the chance that eggs get fertilized with their sperm, not someone else's. But a new study suggests that the sensation of sex—regardless of sperm—can also make females r

4h

SpaceX shipment reaches space station after weekend launch

A SpaceX shipment arrived at the International Space Station on Monday following a weekend launch.

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Russian plane in deadly fire found few customers worldwide

The Aeroflot-operated SSJ100 passenger jet that caught fire during an emergency landing in Moscow is part of Russia's efforts to maintain a presence in civil aviation in a market dominated by companies like Boeing, Airbus and Embraer.

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The perils of a leader who is too extroverted

Extroverts are often seen as natural leaders in organizations. But a new study suggests that some leaders may have too much of a good thing.

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Researchers discover new strain of canine distemper in wild animals in New Hampshire, Vermont

A distinct strain of canine distemper virus, which is a widespread virus of importance to wildlife and domesticated dogs, has been identified in wild animals in New Hampshire and Vermont, according to pathologists with the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Lab at the University of New Hampshire. No virus in this distinct subgroup of canine distemper virus has yet been reported in a domesticated

4h

Image-based computer model reveals finer details of tumor blood flow

Researchers have developed an image-based computer model of tumor behavior that captures more of the complexity of cancer growth.

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Circulating tumor DNA gives treatment options for the most common ovarian cancer type

According to a new research, circulating tumor DNA can be used detect treatment options for ovarian cancer patients who don't benefit from chemotherapy.

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Messenger cells bring good news for bone healing

How do bones heal, and how could they heal better? The answer to these questions may lie in a newly discovered population of 'messenger' cells, according to a recent study.

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Nature's dangerous decline 'unprecedented,' species extinction rates 'accelerating'

Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history — and the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, with grave impacts on people around the world now likely, warns a landmark new report from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES).

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Researchers discover new strain of canine distemper in wild animals in New Hampshire, Vermont

A distinct strain of canine distemper virus, which is a widespread virus of importance to wildlife and domesticated dogs, has been identified in wild animals in New Hampshire and Vermont, according to pathologists with the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Lab at the University of New Hampshire. No virus in this distinct subgroup of canine distemper virus has yet been reported in a domesticated

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Messenger cells bring good news for bone healing, study finds

How do bones heal, and how could they heal better? The answer to these questions may lie in a newly discovered population of "messenger" cells, according to a recent USC Stem Cell study published in the journal eLife.

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Messenger cells bring good news for bone healing, study finds

How do bones heal, and how could they heal better? The answer to these questions may lie in a newly discovered population of "messenger" cells, according to a recent USC Stem Cell study published in the journal eLife.

4h

Study finds that collaborating with business contributes to academic productivity

Interaction between universities and companies in Brazil has societal, economic and environmental impacts, as well as positive effects on academic productivity. Researchers and research groups who collaborate with business organizations are scientifically more productive. The intellectual and scientific impacts of the partnership are positive.

4h

Why reducing carbon emissions from cars, trucks and ships will be so hard

A growing number of cities, states and countries aim to dramatically reduce or even eliminate carbon emissions to avert catastrophic levels of climate change.

4h

The New Royal Baby’s Historical Significance

After months of anticipation, a new baby boy entered Britain’s royal family on Monday, taking his place as the seventh in line to the throne. The hubbub has been going on for months; paparazzi and the 24-hour news cycle provided fodder for endless speculation in the lead-up to the birth: on where the delivery would take place , what the couple might name their newborn , and even what astrological

4h

My Wife Is One More Reason to Have Your Kids Vaccinated

It's not just young children or the immunocompromised that public health officials are trying to protect by encouraging everyone to be vaccinated. There are those among us who do not seem to develop the antibodies from the standard measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, though no one really knows why.

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Hunting jeopardizes forest carbon storage, yet is overlooked in climate mitigation efforts

The loss of animals, often due to unregulated or illegal hunting, has consequences for the carbon storage capacity of forests, yet this link is rarely mentioned in high-level climate policy discussions, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden and the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

4h

Bullying among adolescents hurts both the victims and the perpetrators

About a tenth of adolescents across the globe have been the victim of psychological or physical violence from their classmates. In a new study researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) show that victims and their perpetrators both suffer as a result of these attacks: They are more inclined to consume alcohol and tobacco, are more likely to complain of psychosomatic problems an

4h

Researchers develop better way to determine coastal flooding risk

Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a new methodology for building computer models that paves the way to better understanding the flood risks faced by coastal communities.

4h

Electric vehicles: A new model to reduce time wasted at charging points

Over half the time (61.4 percent) that electric vehicles spend connected to public charging stations, they're idly occupying a space that another car could use, according to a JRC-led study of e-vehicle charging times in the Netherlands.

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How to manage your digital afterlife and why it matters

If you were to die tomorrow, what would happen to your Facebook page?

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Researcher discusses how environment affects the way societies develop

This is the latest in a series of stories spotlighting how faculty, students and alumni at the Harris School of Public Policy are driving impact for the next generation. Leading up to the May 3 grand opening of the Harris's new home at the Keller Center, these stories will examine three of the most critical issues facing our world: strengthening democracy, fighting poverty and inequality, and conf

4h

Germany Announces Continued Increases to Research Funding

State and federal ministers say they will pump up science budgets by 3 percent per year for the next decade, as they have done since 2006.

4h

Understanding of atrial fibrillation-related dementia

Researchers have determined that atrial fibrillation (Afib) is independently associated with changes that occur with aging and dementia.

5h

New research uncovers how life-threatening fungal diseases adapt to survive in humans

A new study has uncovered how serious fungal infections grow in humans by conserving phosphate, highlighting a possible target for treatment.

5h

Better way to determine coastal flooding risk

Researchers have developed a new methodology for building computer models that paves the way to better understanding the flood risks faced by coastal communities.

5h

Sit! Seek! Fly! Scientists train dogs to sniff out endangered insects

Three very good dogs – named Bayar, Judd and Sasha – have sniffed out the endangered Alpine Stonefly, one of the smallest animals a dog has been trained to successfully detect in its natural habitat.

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Sit! Seek! Fly! Scientists train dogs to sniff out endangered insects

Three very good dogs – named Bayar, Judd and Sasha – have sniffed out the endangered Alpine Stonefly, one of the smallest animals a dog has been trained to successfully detect in its natural habitat.

5h

Study identifies better, cheaper ways to stem arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh

In what has been called "the largest mass poisoning of a population in history," some 40 million people in Bangladesh are drinking water that contains unsafe levels of arsenic. The naturally occurring element seeps into groundwater reached by shallow wells, and from there it has a huge impact on the health and lives of Bangladeshis; chronic exposure to arsenic is estimated to be responsible for si

5h

Study reveals fate of indoor chemical emissions, including unexpected buildup of lactic acid from sweat

Lactic acid—the main chemical in human sweat—leaves our skin, travels through the air, and sticks to our walls. And according to a team of chemists who outfitted the University of Colorado Art Museum with state-of-the-art air-sampling instruments: it's doing so at surprisingly high rates. The finding highlights the need to better understand the fate of the indoor chemicals, especially those that m

5h

Two studies cast doubt on existence of exomoon

Two teams working independently have looked at the possibility of an exomoon circling the exoplanet Kepler-1625b, which orbits the star Kepler-1625. They report little to no evidence supporting its existence. One team, led by Laura Kreidberg, has written a paper describing their work, which is posted on the arXiv preprint server. Another team led by René Heller published a paper in the journal Ast

5h

Six suborbital research payloads from MIT fly to space and back

Blast off! MIT made its latest foray into research in space on May 2 via six payloads from the Media Lab Space Exploration Initiative, tucked into Blue Origin's New Shepard reusable space vehicle that took off from a launchpad in West Texas.

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Starlink's satellites will be orbiting at a much lower altitude, reducing the risks of space junk

Among Elon Musk's many plans for the future, one of the more ambitious has been the creation of a constellation of satellites that will offer broadband internet access to the entire world. Known as "Starlink," the company's long-term plan is to deploy over 12,000 internet satellites to low Earth orbit (LEO) by the mid-2020s.

5h

Ingen selvkørende busser på DTU alligevel

Projektet var det første af sin art i Danmark. Men nu har Autonomous Mobility indtil videre opgivet projektet.

5h

Finding meaning in life without religion

Meaning is a relative term, though some religious sects claim to have a stronghold on a definition. While meaning is possible through doctrine, there are other ways to find meaning in life. The story of activist and model, Halima Aden, highlights how meaning can come from many angles. None Can life have meaning without religion? The common sentiment, expressed by the religious, usually translates

5h

A New Royal Baby Offers Brits a Welcome Reprieve

With Brexit (briefly) on hold , Britons finally have the chance to focus on other important things: Climate change . Local elections . The upcoming state visit of President Donald Trump . But perhaps no topic has generated more interest—or gossip—than the arrival of the newest member of the British royal family. Prince Harry announced Monday that he was “absolutely thrilled” that his wife had giv

5h

Humans Are Driving One Million Species to Extinction

Landmark UN-backed report finds that agriculture is one of the biggest threats to Earth’s ecosystems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Eddy currents affect flux of salt more than heat

Modeling the 3-D structure of Red Sea eddies shows how transport of energy and biochemical materials influences circulation patterns in the Red Sea.

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Da Vinci's hand impairment caused by nerve damage, not stroke, suggests new study

A fainting episode causing traumatic nerve damage affecting his right hand could be why Leonardo da Vinci's painting skills were hampered in his late career. While the impairment affected his ability to hold palettes and brushes to paint with his right hand, he was able to continue teaching and drawing with his left hand. Most authors have believed that the origin of da Vinci's right hand palsy wa

5h

Improving the well-being of heart-failure patients

An implantable cardioverter defibrillator can save lives, but can also trigger fears — a Würzburg study shows how a web-based intervention can improve psychosocial well-being.

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Driving chemical reactions with light

How can chemical reactions be triggered by light, following the example of photosynthesis in nature? This process is still poorly understood. However, researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany und Rice University in Houston, USA, have now uncovered a major piece of the puzzle. Their findings have been published recently in Science Advances.

5h

'Google Maps' for cancer: Image-based computer model reveals finer details of tumor blood flow

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have developed something akin to a 'Google Maps' approach for more accurately computing and visualizing the structural and functional blood vessel changes needed for tumor growth. By pairing high-quality 3D imaging data of tumor specimens from animal models with sophisticated mathematical formulas, the researchers say they now have a model that accuratel

5h

Trans-catheter aortic valve replacement can improve outcomes in low-risk surgical patients

A new study examines the effects of TAVR with a balloon-expandable valve for low-risk patients.

5h

The E.U. is strict on G.M. crops, but is it logical?

The arguments about risk and unnaturalness that support the European Union’s strict policy on genetically modified crops don’t stand up to scrutiny, a new study concludes. The paper in Transgenic Research also says that the use of genetically modified (GM) plants is consistent with the principles of organic farming. The EU’s rules on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are so restrictive that i

5h

Let's mimic termite nests to keep human buildings cool

When it comes to building sustainable buildings, humans have a lot to learn from termites. A recent study that colleagues and I published in Science Advances explains how some African termites maintain cool and stable temperatures in their nests throughout the year. The answer lies in the wall of the nests, composed of tiny but highly-connected pores.

5h

Sexual aggression key to spread of deadly tumours in Tasmanian devils

Tasmanian devils have a reputation as a fearsome animal – most of the time this is undeserved. When it comes to the mating season, however, it's a fair judgement. Between February and April, mating can be incredibly aggressive, with male and female devils prone to biting one another both during and after the act.

5h

Let's mimic termite nests to keep human buildings cool

When it comes to building sustainable buildings, humans have a lot to learn from termites. A recent study that colleagues and I published in Science Advances explains how some African termites maintain cool and stable temperatures in their nests throughout the year. The answer lies in the wall of the nests, composed of tiny but highly-connected pores.

5h

The power of randomization: Magnetic skyrmions for novel computer technology

Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have succeeded in developing a key constituent of a novel unconventional computing concept. This constituent employs the same magnetic structures that are being researched in connection with storing electronic data on shift registers known as racetracks. In this, researchers investigate so-called skyrmions, which are magnetic vortex-like str

5h

Air pollution levels could impact on heatwaves

Measures to reduce air pollution could affect the severity of heatwaves in coming decades, a study suggests.

5h

Avengers: Endgame and why a smaller population doesn't guarantee paradise

In Avengers: Endgame, the highly-anticipated 22nd film in the Marvel franchise, Earth's mightiest heroes contend with the repercussions of supervillain Thanos wiping out half of all life in the universe with the snap of his fingers.

5h

Sexual aggression key to spread of deadly tumours in Tasmanian devils

Tasmanian devils have a reputation as a fearsome animal – most of the time this is undeserved. When it comes to the mating season, however, it's a fair judgement. Between February and April, mating can be incredibly aggressive, with male and female devils prone to biting one another both during and after the act.

5h

Switching Out of Fossil Fuel Feedstocks

Industrial chemistry time! Let’s stipulate that the world’s chemical feedstock industries, on the whole, are not what you would describe as environmentally friendly. There are a lot of moving parts, and some of them are definitely better than others (in their use of energy, carbon emissions, and use of renewable resources as starting materials), but everything is short of the ideal. What’s the id

5h

When is Amazon Prime Day 2019, what's coming and how can I get the best deals? – CNET

Tips, predictions, current deals and more for the company's big summer sale.

5h

Smart pill bottle keeps drugs safe

Low-cost, stretchy sensors can be assembled inside the lid of a drug container to help monitor patient safety.

5h

First demonstration of antimatter wave interferometry

Matter waves constitute a crucial feature of quantum mechanics, in which particles have wave properties in addition to particle characteristics. This wave-particle duality was postulated in 1924 by the French physicist Louis de Broglie. The existence of the wave property of matter has been successfully demonstrated in a number of experiments with electrons and neutrons, as well as with more comple

5h

Constellation of weather satellites to cover the globe

Want more accurate weather forecasts? You're in luck: Last month, researchers at CU Boulder saw the fruits of their labors launch aboard a new satellite. That satellite is the first in a planned fleet of Earth-orbiters that the team says will one day record weather data at every point on the globe every 15 minutes.

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New holographic technique opens the way for quantum computation

Photography measures how much light of different color hits the photographic film. However, light is also a wave, and is therefore characterized by the phase. Phase specifies the position of a point within the wave cycle and correlates to depth of information, meaning that recording the phase of light scattered by an object can retrieve its full 3-D shape, which cannot be obtained with a simple ph

5h

Six ways robots are used today that you probably didn't know about

How many times in the past week do you think your life was affected by a robot?

5h

Smart pill bottle keeps drugs safe

Low-cost, stretchy sensors can be assembled inside the lid of a drug container to help monitor patient safety.

5h

Reconstructing the acoustics of Notre Dame

The April 15 fire that devastated the roof of the 850-year-old Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral left many people around the globe wondering whether it's possible to rebuild it in a way that can recreate the cultural icon's complex signature acoustics.

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A positron, smeared

Antimatter particle conforms to quantum theory, researchers find.

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The biggest danger about an asteroid strike? Lawyers

Blasting away at incoming space rock raises real risks of nuclear war, experts say. Richard A Lovett reports.

5h

Time and space, as never seen before

Hubble scientists produce mosaic showing more than a quarter of a million galaxies. Andrew Masterson reports.

5h

Nematode worms suffer from PTSD

In a Pavlovian twist, researchers train tiny worms to fear a pleasant scent. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

5h

A step closer to future 5G smartphones with the world's first Antenna-on-Display

It has been few years since physical key boards have been replaced by on-screen touch sensors for wireless devices such as cellular phones. This eventually triggered the modern day smartphone-era by introducing large-screen displays on portable devices.

5h

Rethinking digital service design could reduce their environmental impact

Digital technology companies could reduce the carbon footprint of services like YouTube by changing how they are designed, experts say.

5h

Hearing loss weakens skills that young cancer survivors need to master reading

A new study offers clues for interventions to help young cancer survivors with severe hearing loss master reading.

5h

New model improves staging and risk predictions for esophageal cancer patients

A new nomogram for assessing metastatic risk in esophageal cancer patients shows promise for more accurate risk-stratification, which is particularly relevant for stage T2 patients.

5h

Review of preparation and structures of silicon nanowire/germanium quantum dot composite materials

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, a team of researchers from Yunnan University, China, have reviewed the recent research on preparation methods and structures of Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and Germanium quantum dots (GeQDs) and their composites, in order to explore their novel physical properties and improve on their optoelectronic properties.

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Review on the synthesis and anti-oxidation of copper nanowires for transparent conductive electrodes

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, a team of researchers have reviewed the methods of synthesizing copper nanowires (Cu NWs) and techniques to improve its oxidation resistance. With excellent electrical, optical, and thermal properties, Cu NWs are an attractive alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) as a traditional electrode material.

5h

Clinical trial shows promise for increasing lung transplant patients' life expectancy

A new study shows that a potential treatment for ischemia- reperfusion injury is safe for humans.

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The chick’s in the mail: postal marks used to trace salmonella sources

Live chickens can be a deadly proposition. A new scheme aims to cut the risk. Andrew Masterson reports.

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5G Is Here. What Does That Mean for Exponential Tech?

5G , hailed as the future of connectivity , is now a reality. Over the last months, the first 5G networks have been rolled out in South Korea and the US. While initial impressions are mixed, the new networks hold the key to advancing the spread of a slew of exponential technologies and catalyzing fundamental changes to a long list of industries and services. The 5G Rollout Race In early April, Ve

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Puljemidler til lægehuse fordelt: Se hvilke kommuner og regioner, der har fået del i sundhedsmillioner

I alt 38 ud af 70 projekter har fået del i regeringens over 200 mio. kr til nye læge- og sundhedshuse. Projektchef i Vive ser puljen som ‘opvarmning’ til udviklingen af det nære sundhedsvæsen.

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Techathlon podcast: Trying the new Oculus Quest, broken tech promises, and the week’s tech news

Technology Play along with our technology podcast and you might even learn something. Play along with our technology game show podcast.

5h

Spider-Man: Far From Home's Latest Trailer Dropped a Major Bomb About the MCU

Spider-Man: Far From Home’s first trailer begins with a brief warning from Tom Holland because the film features major spoilers about Avengers: Endgame, a movie that (surprise) brings Peter …

5h

Five things we've learned from nature crisis study

The UN's global assessment of nature has some hard hitting lessons for the world.

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Stop aging in space

Wrinkles, muscle pain, high blood pressure and a clumsy brain are all natural consequences of getting old. As our cells rust over time, a key to fighting chronic disease may be in tiny, smartly designed particles that have the potential to become an anti-ageing supplement. A European experiment seeking innovative antioxidants is on its way to space.

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Human society under urgent threat from loss of Earth's natural life

Scientists reveal 1 million species at risk of extinction in damning UN report Human society is in jeopardy from the accelerating decline of the Earth’s natural life-support systems, the world’s leading scientists have warned, as they announced the results of the most thorough planetary health check ever undertaken. From coral reefs flickering out beneath the oceans to rainforests desiccating int

5h

New technique for minimally invasive lung cancer surgery — ultrasonic device safe, effective

According to a new study, an ultrasonic vessel-sealing device can improve patient outcomes by reducing the incidence of thoracotomy conversion for VATS/robotic anatomical lung resection.

5h

Engineering artificial cell membranes to drive in situ fibrin hydrogel formation

Re-engineering the cell membrane for improved biofunction is an emerging, powerful tool in cell biology to develop next-generation cell therapies. The process can allow users to supplement cells with added therapeutic functionalities. Additional functionalities can include cell homing, surface adhesion or resistance to hypoxia for enhanced cellular capabilities. However, the number of such example

5h

Probiotics can’t evict this bug from tiny stomach pits

New research shows how H. pylori , a potentially pathogenic bacterial species that infects half the people on Earth, establishes its niche. The stomach-dwelling bacteria Helicobacter pylori survives in the stomach—a hellish, churning vat of hydrochloric acid—by holing up inside that organ’s pitlike glands and establishing squatter’s rights. Once the germ has set up shop, the investigators learned

5h

The evolution of skyrmions in Ir/Fe/Co/Pt multilayers and their topological Hall signature

Magnetic skyrmions are tiny entities, manifesting in magnetic materials that consist of localized twists in the magnetization direction of the medium. Each skyrmion is highly stable because eliminating it requires untwisting the magnetization direction of the material, just as a knot on a string can only be untied by pulling the rest of the string out of the knot. Magnetic skyrmions are a promisin

5h

Tiny droplets open the doors to in-flight imaging of proteins

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated the creation of a beam of nanodroplets capable of delivering a variety of biological samples, from cell organelles to single proteins, virtually free from any contaminations, to the focus of an X-ray laser which can be used to image them.

5h

Engineering artificial cell membranes to drive in situ fibrin hydrogel formation

Re-engineering the cell membrane for improved biofunction is an emerging, powerful tool in cell biology to develop next-generation cell therapies. The process can allow users to supplement cells with added therapeutic functionalities. Additional functionalities can include cell homing, surface adhesion or resistance to hypoxia for enhanced cellular capabilities. However, the number of such example

5h

Artificial intelligence improves power transmission

To integrate volatile renewable sources into the energy supply, capacities of the power grid have to be increased. The need for new lines can be reduced by better utilization of existing lines as a function of weather conditions. To this end, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) work on self-learning sensor networks to model the cooling effect of weather based on real data. In fa

5h

Is blinded review enough? How gendered outcomes arise even under anonymous evaluation

Even when a scientist's gender wasn't revealed, female scientists got a lower score than males for grant proposals they submitted for review, according to a working paper led by Southern Methodist University professor Julian Kolev.

5h

Astronomers investigate star-forming processes in the young stellar object G29.862–0.044

Astronomers have conducted a multiwavelength study of a young stellar object (YSO) known as G29.862–0.044, which provides more hints into star-forming processes. Results of the study, presented in a paper published April 24 on arXiv.org, could be important for improving our general knowledge about how stars form and evolve.

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Portrait of a Google AI art project as a poetic you

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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How To Adapt Jobs To Work with Automation—a Guide for Companies

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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A mind-blowing explanation of the speed of light

The only things that travel at the speed of light are photons. Nothing with any mass at all can travel at the speed of light because as it gets closer and closer to the speed of light, its mass increases. And if it were actually traveling at the speed of light, it would have an infinite mass. Light does not experience space or time. It's not just a speed going through something. All of the univer

5h

Hockey’s Next Head-Injury Reckoning

The National Hockey League is facing renewed scrutiny into the lasting consequences that violence in its sport has on players. On May 1, the league’s commissioner, Gary Bettman, appeared at Canadian Parliament to address questions about head and brain injuries in hockey—a topic of growing alarm among current and former players, but one that Bettman has frequently dismissed. Bettman maintained thi

6h

Crowd oil—fuels from air-conditioning systems

Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the University of Toronto have proposed a method enabling air conditioning and ventilation systems to produce synthetic fuels from carbon dioxide (CO2) and water from the ambient air. Compact plants are to separate CO2 from the ambient air directly in buildings and produce synthetic hydrocarbons which can then be used as renewable synt

6h

GaN power ICs with integrated sensors for efficient charging of electric vehicles

A team of Fraunhofer researchers has succeeded in significantly enhancing the functionality of GaN power ICs for voltage converters: the researchers at Fraunhofer IAF integrated current and temperature sensors onto a GaN-based semiconductor chip, along with power transistors, freewheeling diodes and gate drivers. This development paves the way for more compact and efficient on-board chargers in el

6h

It's time we stopped human evolution, geneticist claims

Measles cases in the US have hit a 25-year high, with 78 new infections in the past week alone. In a sign of the times, a cruise ship with hundreds of Scientologists on board was quarantined in St Lucia after one passenger was diagnosed with the disease. It's the sort of news you can expect when parents stop vaccinating their children, which many did from the 1990s onwards for fear that scientists

6h

Deer, invasive earthworms gang up to damage forested areas

Case Western Reserve biologists say combined effect of two species could be harming Ohio's forest ecosystems; research could inform deer-park management

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It's time we stopped human evolution, geneticist claims

Measles cases in the US have hit a 25-year high, with 78 new infections in the past week alone. In a sign of the times, a cruise ship with hundreds of Scientologists on board was quarantined in St Lucia after one passenger was diagnosed with the disease. It's the sort of news you can expect when parents stop vaccinating their children, which many did from the 1990s onwards for fear that scientists

6h

Deer, invasive earthworms gang up to damage forested areas

Case Western Reserve biologists say combined effect of two species could be harming Ohio's forest ecosystems; research could inform deer-park management

6h

This Startup Uses Cell Phone Signals to Forecast Weather

Weather Sensors Many companies rely on radar signals and satellites to predict the weather. Boston-based startup ClimaCell, however, pulls its data from a range of sources including cell phones, street cameras, connected vehicles, and drones. This allows it to forecast weather conditions on a hyper-local level — and with what it claims is 60 percent better accuracy . “A lot of the things around u

6h

UMN researchers advance understanding of atrial fibrillation-related dementia

University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have determined that atrial fibrillation (Afib) is independently associated with changes that occur with aging and dementia.

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Shambhala helps understand the 'decoding' of RNA

Scientists at Sechenov University, together with their Russian and American colleagues, developed the tool named Shambhala, which can process the 'decoding' of RNA obtained on different equipment to make them suitable for comparison and further study. More information can be found in the BMC Bioinformatics journal.

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Circulating tumor DNA gives treatment options for the most common ovarian cancer type

According to a new research, circulating tumor DNA can be used detect treatment options for ovarian cancer patients who don't benefit from chemotherapy.

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Messenger cells bring good news for bone healing, USC stem cell study finds

How do bones heal, and how could they heal better? The answer to these questions may lie in a newly discovered population of 'messenger' cells, according to a recent USC Stem Cell study published in the journal eLife.

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Scientists Think They've Found the Ancient Neutron Star Crash That Showered Our Solar System in Gold

A nearby neutron star collision may have rained bling on our solar system when it was a baby.

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The Internet Has a Cancer-Faking Problem

When Stephany Angelacos was diagnosed with Stage 2 breast cancer in 2016, she immediately turned to the internet for support. Online, there are numerous groups and forums where people dealing with cancer can share their experiences. Angelacos researched her disease and its treatments, and then, inspired by how knowledgeable everyone was, decided to found her own invite-only breast-cancer Facebook

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Growing up in poverty doubles risk of psychosis disorder later

Growing up in an impoverished urban neighborhood more than doubles your chances over the average person of developing a psychosis-spectrum disorder by middle adulthood, according to a new study. Researchers, who followed nearly 4,000 families for more than three decades, say the results suggest that intervention through social policies and investment in neighborhood improvements, as well as ident

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New strain of canine distemper in wild animals in NH, VT

A distinct strain of canine distemper virus, which is a widespread virus of importance to wildlife and domesticated dogs, has been identified in wild animals in New Hampshire and Vermont, according to pathologists.

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Using a mobile while browsing the shelves may make shoppers buy more

In-store mobile phone use that is unrelated to shopping may be associated with an increase in unplanned purchases.

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Icefish Study Adds Another Color to the Story of Blood

The rainbow of pigments that animals use for blood illustrates a central truth about evolution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Star Wars News: George Lucas Worked on the 'Rise of Skywalker' Story

J.J. Abrams and his team met with Lucas while working on the film.

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Seafloor Maps Reveal Underwater Caves, Slopes—and Fault Lines

Drone ships, deep-sea robots, and better sonar are finding unknown seafloor habitats as well as volcanoes, faults, and tsunami-triggering slopes.

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Icefish Study Adds Another Color to the Story of Blood

The rainbow of pigments that animals use for blood illustrates a central truth about evolution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New research uncovers how life-threatening fungal diseases adapt to survive in humans

A new study from The Westmead Institute for Medical Research has uncovered how serious fungal infections grow in humans by conserving phosphate, highlighting a possible target for treatment.

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Smart pill bottle keeps drugs safe

Low-cost, stretchy sensors can be assembled inside the lid of a drug container to help monitor patient safety.

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Eddy currents affect flux of salt more than heat

Modeling the 3D structure of Red Sea eddies shows how transport of energy and biochemical materials influences circulation patterns in the Red Sea.

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Cancer cells have a problem with junk RNA that makes them vulnerable

The important role of the ADAR enzyme and junk RNA in cancer cells opens an entirely new playbook for the treatment of tumors, one that is focused on RNA rather than DNA.

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Researchers develop better way to determine coastal flooding risk

Researchers have developed a new methodology for building computer models that paves the way to better understanding the flood risks faced by coastal communities.

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Humans Are Speeding Extinction and Altering the Natural World at an ‘Unprecedented’ Pace

A dire United Nations report, based on thousands of scientific studies, paints an urgent picture of biodiversity loss and finds that climate change is amplifying the danger to humanity.

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Facebook Invites Journalists to See New 'War Room,' Won't Let Them Ask Workers Questions

Facebook, the social media giant that helped enable genocide and yet is still allowed to exist for some reason, had a big public relations push this weekend. And if the news stories that came …

6h

A step closer to future 5G smartphones with the world's first Antenna-on-Display

A University-Industry research consortium lead by Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) and joined by industry partners such as Dong-Woo Fine Chem, SK Telecom, LG Electronics, Keysight Technologies, and Y.Tech announced the world's first 'Antenna-on-Display (AoD)' technology.

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Psykiatrikern: Därför kan vi inte låta bli våra mobiler

Det är inte konstigt att vi inte kan lägga ifrån oss våra mobiltelefoner, vi är nämligen evolutionärt programmerade till att bli beroende av dem. Och det använder apputvecklare och företag för att fånga vår uppmärksamhet. Det säger Anders Hansen.

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The perils of a leader who is too extroverted

Extroverts are often seen as natural leaders in organizations. But a new study suggests that some leaders may have too much of a good thing. Researchers found that informal leaders were better liked and more sought after for advice when they hit a middle 'sweet spot' on levels of assertiveness and warmth, two facets of extroversion.

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Missing molecule hobbles cell movement

Cells are the body's workers, and they often need to move around to do their jobs. Frequently, a cell will move through a tissue — say, the wall of a blood vessel — the way a rock climber scales a cliff, using a protein called integrin to grab onto a spot and pull itself in that direction. But cells missing the CD13 protein on their cell walls can't recruit integrin, and get stuck in place.

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New holographic technique opens the way for quantum computation

Physicists have developed a method based on the principles of holograms to capture 3D images of objects beyond the reach of light.

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Exercise may improve memory in heart failure patients

Two-thirds of patients with heart failure have cognitive problems, according to new research.

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Lung cancer: Less invasive surgery for faster recovery

Every day, 78 Canadians receive a diagnosis of lung cancer, the most deadly form of cancer. Some will have one lobe of a lung removed. The results of a large international clinical study, pave the way for the widespread of thoracoscopic lobectomy — video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) — combined with pulmonary artery sealing using an ultrasonic energy device. This technique reduce the ris

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Induced labor not more expensive to health care system than spontaneous labor

A new study shows inducing labor one week early costs the same as waiting for spontaneous labor.

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New review identifies four hallmarks of cancer metastasis

Researchers have identified four hallmarks of cancer metastasis — when cancer has spread to different parts of the body from where it started. Metastasis is believed to be the cause of up to 90 percent of cancer deaths.

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Lægemiddelstyrelsen overtager udsendelse om nye bivirkninger til læger

Information om ny viden om medicinbivirkninger er 1. maj overgået fra lægemiddelvirksomhederne til Lægemiddelstyrelsen. Medlem af Lægeforeningens lægemiddeludvalg ser ændringen som en styrkelse af patientsikkerheden.

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Artificial Intelligence Being Used For Mental Health Care

submitted by /u/inkblottings [link] [comments]

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How Robotics and Technology are Affecting Our Wellbeing

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Scientists Study Evolution of Flight With Dino Robot, Ostrich Backpack

A team of researchers has shown that dinosaurs might have been flapping their wings before they even had them. The post Scientists Study Evolution of Flight With Dino Robot, Ostrich Backpack appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Rice husks can remove microcystin toxins from water

An abundant and inexpensive agricultural byproduct, rice husks have been investigated as a water purification solution in the past. This is the first time they have been shown to remove microcystin, the toxin released by harmful algal blooms that are increasingly occurring in the Great Lakes and other freshwater lakes around the world.

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Thomas Midgley, Jr. may have been the most environmentally disastrous person of all time

Energy Excerpt: Humans The following is an excerpt from the new book "Humans: A Brief History of How We F****d It All Up" by Tom Phillips. It tells the story of Thomas Midgley, the inventor of…

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A Mattress Foam Density Guide

The term density is certainly familiar to you; you might probably have heard about it. Density is defined as the relative mass of an object that occupies a specific volume. That is no different from what a mattress foam density means; it refers to the mass of mattress foam in a unit cubic foot. Foam density is a significant factor you need to consider whenever you intend to buy a mattress. Differ

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Brain imaging lie detector can be beaten with simple techniques

Researchers have shown that a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) 'lie detector' test, which measures brain activity, can be 'deceived' by people using mental countermeasures. The study suggests that more should be done to detect mental countermeasures before using fMRI tests for forensic applications.

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Training for first-time marathon 'reverses' aging of blood vessels

Training for and completing a first-time marathon 'reverses' aging of major blood vessels, according to new research. The study found that older and slower runners benefit the most.

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The Raunchiest Women on TV Are Technically Birds

On Tuca & Bertie , the new Netflix series from the BoJack Horseman animator and production designer Lisa Hanawalt , the birds don’t need bees. The show follows its titular friends—cartoon bird-women voiced by Tiffany Haddish and Ali Wong, respectively—as the two navigate the familiar pitfalls of young adulthood: job troubles, assorted existential crises, and escalating libidos. The series, which

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Low-Battery Anxiety Is Real. So Is the Solution

Your smartphone's battery is not your life force—even if it feels that way.

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Legendary Haight Street Gets a New, Legal King of Weed

Equity programs can help get those affected by the War on Drugs into the cannabis business. That's helped Shawn Richard win approval for the first legal weed shop in the famed Upper Haight.

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The new techniques revealing the varied shapes of chromatin

The new techniques revealing the varied shapes of chromatin The new techniques revealing the varied shapes of chromatin, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01426-w Researchers are realizing that the DNA–protein complex doesn’t just have one form but many.

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Detecting Lies in the Brain

It’s fairly common knowledge at this point that the polygraph test for detecting who is lying is not reliable enough to be used practically. Here is a good summary by the American Psychological Association (APA). The bottom line is that the entire idea of a lie-detector is problematic for various reasons. First, the underlying premises have not really emerged from psychological research, and has

7h

UNH researchers discover new strain of canine distemper in wild animals in New Hampshire, Vermont

A distinct strain of canine distemper virus, which is a widespread virus of importance to wildlife and domesticated dogs, has been identified in wild animals in New Hampshire and Vermont, according to pathologists with the New Hampshire Veterinary Diagnostic Lab at the University of New Hampshire.

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IPBES: Nature's dangerous decline 'unprecedented,' species extinction rates 'accelerating'

Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history — and the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, with grave impacts on people around the world now likely, warns a landmark new report from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), the summary of which was approved at the 7th session of the IPBES Plenary, meeting last we

8h

The perils of a leader who is too extroverted

Extroverts are often seen as natural leaders in organizations. But a new study suggests that some leaders may have too much of a good thing. Researchers found that informal leaders were better liked and more sought after for advice when they hit a middle 'sweet spot' on levels of assertiveness and warmth, two facets of extroversion.

8h

Last-Ditch Hack Led to the Invention of Quantum Mechanics

Max Planck had no idea where his solution would lead

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Watch Concrete Explode As Scientists Probe Weird Phenomenon

Concrete can't burn, but it can blow up.

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'Oumuamua's Cousin?

A search of a meteor-detection archive reveals a possible second interstellar visitor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ancient Guatemalan Sculptors Knowingly Crafted Magnetic 'Potbelly' Statues

The giant heads and distorted bodies are magnetized in particular spots.

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Destruction of nature is as big a threat to humanity as climate change

A million species are threatened by human activity, but it's not too late to save what's left of our planet's biodiversity, says a major new UN report

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Robots and Lasers Are Bringing Shipbuilding into the Digital Age

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Gravitational Waves Keep Rolling Past Earth

The stars orbited each other like a pair of dancers, their sequined costumes glowing against a dark stage. Round and round they went, until the distance between them began to shrink. The closer they got, the faster they spun . And then, smack ! The stars collided. About 500 million years later, Mansi Kasliwal’s phone rang in the middle of the night in April. “Dear human,” a robotic voice said whe

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Dear Therapist: My Stepson’s Mother Kept a Big Secret From Him

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, Many years ago, a close friend confided that she had been pregnant at age 16, and that after being with her baby for five days, she was obligated to give him up for adoption. When she told me, she was in her m

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Eden no more

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This Programming Tool Makes It Easier for Apps to Work Anywhere

WebAssembly was created by Mozilla to build applications for browsers, but it's increasingly finding a home in cloud computing centers.

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Google I/O 2019: What to Expect at I/O As Google's Sprawling Dominion Grows

The company's annual developer conference will be a showcase for its advances in AI, AR, Android, and more.

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Google I/O 2019: Watch Live Video of the Keynote Right Here

The annual developer conference kicks off at 10 am Pacific on May 7 in Mountain View, California.

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Medical student evaluations appear riddled with racial and gender biases

Women and minorities are more frequently described by personality in medical student evaluations, but men are described by their skills, a study says.

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Humans are driving one million species to extinction

Humans are driving one million species to extinction Humans are driving one million species to extinction, Published online: 05 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01448-4 Landmark United Nations-backed report finds that agriculture is one of the biggest threats to Earth’s ecosystems.

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'Oumuamua's Cousin?

A search of a meteor-detection archive reveals a possible second interstellar visitor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Destruction of nature as big a threat to humanity as climate change

A million species are threatened by human activity, but it's not too late to save what's left of our planet's biodiversity, says a major new UN report

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Artificiell fotosyntes i såpbubblor ska skapa nytt solbränsle

Människans energibehov förväntas öka stort i framtiden, till och med dubbleras fram till 2050, enligt flera prognoser. Det kommer att finnas behov av ren energi i stora mängder, och en potentiell lösning ges av solen. Bränslen från solljus listades som nummer fyra av ” top emerging technologies ” av World Economic Forum 2017 . Det bästa sättet att lagra solenergi i stora mängder och under lång ti

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Spin-Swapping Particles Could Be "Quantum Cheshire Cats"

A proposed experiment to swap fundamental properties between photons carries profound implications for our understanding of reality itself — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dataset bridges human vision and machine learning

Neuroscientists and computer vision scientists say a new dataset of unprecedented size—comprising brain scans of four volunteers who each viewed 5,000 images—will help researchers better understand …

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Spin-Swapping Particles Could Be "Quantum Cheshire Cats"

A proposed experiment to swap fundamental properties between photons carries profound implications for our understanding of reality itself — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Boeing kendte til problemer med sensoralarm et år inden flystyrt

Boeing vidste, at alarmen krævede tilkøb af ekstraudstyr. Men firmaet gav ikke myndighederne besked.

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Extinctions increasing at unprecedented pace, UN warns

Study finds human expansion is threatening 1m species with extinction

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For Patients With Memory Loss, Working Towards Better Diagnosis

A number of brain disorders, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy, can only be officially diagnosed with an autopsy, so many people live without knowing much about the trajectories their minds are taking. To help fill these gaps, doctors are using new brain-measuring software, including Neuroreader.

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Dataset bridges human vision and machine learning

Neuroscientists and computer vision scientists at Carnegie Mellon University and Fordham University say a new dataset of unprecedented size — comprising brain scans of four volunteers who each viewed 5,000 images — will help researchers better understand how the brain processes images.

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Rapport: OPP-sygehus er 2,5 procent dyrere end offentlig anlægsmodel

En undersøgelse fra VIVE viser, at OPP-byggeriet af en psykiatrisk afdeling i Vejle er 2,5 procent dyrere end et tilsvarende byggeri i Aabenraa, der er offentligt. Dog vurderes det, at kvaliteten er højere.

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Cyberangreb er blevet gengældt med luftangreb – realtime

Et digitalt angreb blevet gengældt med et fysisk angreb i realtid. Israels luftvåben har bombet formodet udgangspunkt for et cyberangreb.

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Zuckerberg: Hele verden burde have GDPR

Facebook-direktøren er bekymret for, at diktatorer vil få fat i brugerdata fra datacentre.

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Article retracted after critics say it has “racist ideological underpinnings”

A psychology journal has retracted a controversial article about mental ability in South African women after a petition calling on the publication to withdraw the paper generated more than 5,000 signatures. The paper, “Age- and education-related effects on cognitive functioning in Colored South African women,” was published in Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition in March. … Continue reading Arti

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Chernobyl Is a Gruesome, Riveting Fable

There’s a scene early in Chernobyl where a man pries open a metal door and accidentally looks right into the exposed core of a nuclear reactor—a blinding, lethal, white snowstorm of poison and chaos that scorches him where he stands. This is, you might reason, not a bad metaphor for life online in 2019: the surprises, the gravitational yank of innocuous portals, the toxic aftershock. And then one

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The Economic Question Voters Should Ask Themselves

The 2020 presidential candidates will argue strenuously about important economic questions relevant to all Americans. These include wealth and income inequality, the design of health-care insurance, systems for financing higher education, and the relative tax burdens imposed on capital and labor. Even the Green New Deal is at bottom a proposed solution to an economic problem—that of “externalitie

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Landmark analysis documents the alarming global decline of nature

Massive scientific review calls for “transformative change” to protect species and ecosystems

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Rapport sår tvivl om skadeligheden af kemikalier fra oprydningen efter Deepwater Horizon

Dispergeringsmidler er ikke så slemme som først antaget, og de kan derfor stadig være gavnlige at anvende ved store olieudslip.

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Web annotation tool Hypothesis hits a milestone

Web annotation tool Hypothesis hits a milestone Web annotation tool Hypothesis hits a milestone, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01427-9 Users of the open-source software have posted more than 5 million comments on scholarly sites.

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A million species risk extinction, are we one of them?

Humanity is rapidly destroying the natural world upon which our prosperity—and ultimately our survival—depends, according to a landmark UN assessment of the state of Nature released Monday.

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Nature crisis: Humans 'threaten 1m species with extinction'

A compelling UN assessment shows the full picture of humanity's devastating impact on biodiversity and nature.

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Kvinnor har högre betyg – män är bättre på högskoleprovet

Kvinnor har högre skolbetyg än män. Upp till två tredjedelar av skillnaden tycks bero på att kvinnor har högre motivation för skolarbete och lägger ner mer tid på det. Männen presterar bättre än kvinnorna på högskoleprovet. Skillnaden är ungefär lika stor som mellan skolbetygen, men till männens fördel. Ungefär 40 procent av männens högre resultat förklaras av att de män som skriver provet har hö

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Så blir idrottsklubbar framgångsrika

Boken bygger på en omfattande intervjustudie med klubbledare, tränare och spelare i åtta, över tid mycket framgångsrika, elitidrottsklubbar inom fotboll, ishockey, handboll och basket, både på herr- och damsidan. Författare är Margareta Oudhuis, senior professor i arbetsvetenskap vid Högskolan i Borås och Stefan Tengblad, professor i företagsekonomi vid Högskolan i Skövde. De har under flera år s

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Hopping bacteria—New look at behavior upends common assumptions about bacteria

Current biological models assume that many bacteria spread in a run-and-tumble pattern of diffusion, based on behavior in liquid laboratory cultures. But new research from Princeton University …

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Samsung is developing a 'perfect full-screen' phone with selfie cameras hidden under the display

According to Korean outlet, MyDrivers, Samsung's new handset, which will place cameras and sensors beneath the display making it almost entirely edge-to-edge, is under development.

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Big pharma/cancer: the allure of a cure

Commercial rewards will be elusive in a crowded market

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The winter weather window that is costing rapeseed growers millions

UK rapeseed growers are losing up to a quarter of their crop yield each year because of temperature rises during an early-winter weather window.

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Filming how our immune system kills bacteria

To kill bacteria in the blood, our immune system relies on nanomachines that can open deadly holes in their targets. UCL scientists have now filmed these nanomachines in action, discovering a key bottleneck in the process which helps to protect our own cells.

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Taming defective porous materials for robust and selective heterogeneous catalysis

Precise engineering of defects transforms metal-organic frameworks into selective heterogeneous catalysts for ethylene dimerization without activators or solvent. Computational mechanistic studies shed light into the nature of the active sites and its role in promoting selectivity.Condensation of reactant molecules within the pores of the material significantly improves the catalyst stability.

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Hopping bacteria

Scientists have long known that key models of bacterial movement in real-world conditions are flawed. A new study from Princeton University illuminates precise behavior patterns of E. coli and corrects a longstanding error in predicting their behavior.

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RNA m6A methylation regulates the epithelial mesenchymal transition of cancer cells and translation of Snail

RNA m 6 A methylation regulates the epithelial mesenchymal transition of cancer cells and translation of Snail RNA m 6 A methylation regulates the epithelial mesenchymal transition of cancer cells and translation of Snail, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09865-9 RNA m6A methylation is known to be dysregulated in many cancers. Here, the authors show that m6A methylation of Sn

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Identifying immunologically-vulnerable regions of the HCV E2 glycoprotein and broadly neutralizing antibodies that target them

Identifying immunologically-vulnerable regions of the HCV E2 glycoprotein and broadly neutralizing antibodies that target them Identifying immunologically-vulnerable regions of the HCV E2 glycoprotein and broadly neutralizing antibodies that target them, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09819-1 A good vaccine should direct the immune response to virus regions that are most di

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The transcription factor CBFB suppresses breast cancer through orchestrating translation and transcription

The transcription factor CBFB suppresses breast cancer through orchestrating translation and transcription The transcription factor CBFB suppresses breast cancer through orchestrating translation and transcription, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10102-6 CBFB is highly mutated in breast cancers and is known to interact with RUNX proteins to regulate transcription. Here, the

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Single-molecule kinetics of pore assembly by the membrane attack complex

Single-molecule kinetics of pore assembly by the membrane attack complex Single-molecule kinetics of pore assembly by the membrane attack complex, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10058-7 The membrane attack complex (MAC) is a hetero-oligomeric protein assembly that kills pathogens by perforating their cell envelopes. Here, the authors use atomic force microscopy to show that

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Gas reactions under intrapore condensation regime within tailored metal–organic framework catalysts

Gas reactions under intrapore condensation regime within tailored metal–organic framework catalysts Gas reactions under intrapore condensation regime within tailored metal–organic framework catalysts, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10013-6 The search for robust heterogeneous catalysts for the production of linear α-olefins is still a challenge as they do not show well-defin

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Bacterial hopping and trapping in porous media

Bacterial hopping and trapping in porous media Bacterial hopping and trapping in porous media, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10115-1 Many bacteria swim with run-and-tumble motion in unconfined fluid. Here the authors report that confinement of these bacteria in a 3D porous medium changes this motion into hopping and trapping, in which the cells are intermittently and trans

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GMO-gær fra gærfabrik havnede i kloakken

Et nyt forretningsområde for de Danske Gærfabrikker er sat i bero. Først skal det opklares, hvordan en tank med 1000 liter gærekstrakt kunne revne.

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In vitro evolution of enhanced RNA replicons for immunotherapy

In vitro evolution of enhanced RNA replicons for immunotherapy In vitro evolution of enhanced RNA replicons for immunotherapy, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43422-0 In vitro evolution of enhanced RNA replicons for immunotherapy

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Magnetic resonance neurography appearance and diagnostic evaluation of peripheral nerve sheath tumors

Magnetic resonance neurography appearance and diagnostic evaluation of peripheral nerve sheath tumors Magnetic resonance neurography appearance and diagnostic evaluation of peripheral nerve sheath tumors, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43450-w Magnetic resonance neurography appearance and diagnostic evaluation of peripheral nerve sheath tumors

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The role of gut microbiota in shaping the relapse-remitting and chronic-progressive forms of multiple sclerosis in mouse models

The role of gut microbiota in shaping the relapse-remitting and chronic-progressive forms of multiple sclerosis in mouse models The role of gut microbiota in shaping the relapse-remitting and chronic-progressive forms of multiple sclerosis in mouse models, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43356-7 The role of gut microbiota in shaping the relapse-remitting and chronic-progress

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Continuous Objective Assessment of Near Work

Continuous Objective Assessment of Near Work Continuous Objective Assessment of Near Work, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43408-y Continuous Objective Assessment of Near Work

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Short-term mindfulness practice attenuates reward prediction errors signals in the brain

Short-term mindfulness practice attenuates reward prediction errors signals in the brain Short-term mindfulness practice attenuates reward prediction errors signals in the brain, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43474-2 Short-term mindfulness practice attenuates reward prediction errors signals in the brain

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Distribution of Functional CD4 and CD8 T cell Subsets in Blood and Rectal Mucosal Tissues

Distribution of Functional CD4 and CD8 T cell Subsets in Blood and Rectal Mucosal Tissues Distribution of Functional CD4 and CD8 T cell Subsets in Blood and Rectal Mucosal Tissues, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43311-6 Distribution of Functional CD4 and CD8 T cell Subsets in Blood and Rectal Mucosal Tissues

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Long DCL4-substrate dsRNAs efficiently induce RNA interference in plant cells

Long DCL4-substrate dsRNAs efficiently induce RNA interference in plant cells Long DCL4-substrate dsRNAs efficiently induce RNA interference in plant cells, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43443-9 Long DCL4-substrate dsRNAs efficiently induce RNA interference in plant cells

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The winter weather window that is costing rapeseed growers millions

UK rapeseed growers are losing up to a quarter of their crop yield each year because of temperature rises during an early-winter weather window.

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Hopping bacteria—New look at behavior upends common assumptions about bacteria

Current biological models assume that many bacteria spread in a run-and-tumble pattern of diffusion, based on behavior in liquid laboratory cultures. But new research from Princeton University shows the tiny organisms actually use a hopping motion to move among tight spots in natural surroundings like the human intestine.

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Filming how our immune system kill bacteria

To kill bacteria in the blood, our immune system relies on nanomachines that can open deadly holes in their targets. UCL scientists have now filmed these nanomachines in action, discovering a key bottleneck in the process which helps to protect our own cells.

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Low potential enzymatic hydride transfer via highly cooperative and inversely functionalized flavin cofactors

Low potential enzymatic hydride transfer via highly cooperative and inversely functionalized flavin cofactors Low potential enzymatic hydride transfer via highly cooperative and inversely functionalized flavin cofactors, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10078-3 The reduction of 2-naphtoyl-CoA to 5,6 dihydro-2-naphtoyl-CoA by 2-naphtoyl-CoA reductase is below the negative redo

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Fast lithium growth and short circuit induced by localized-temperature hotspots in lithium batteries

Fast lithium growth and short circuit induced by localized-temperature hotspots in lithium batteries Fast lithium growth and short circuit induced by localized-temperature hotspots in lithium batteries, Published online: 06 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09924-1 Operation of lithium batteries at high, non-uniform temperatures can lead to safety issues, but the effects of localized high temperat

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Hopping bacteria—New look at behavior upends common assumptions about bacteria

Current biological models assume that many bacteria spread in a run-and-tumble pattern of diffusion, based on behavior in liquid laboratory cultures. But new research from Princeton University shows the tiny organisms actually use a hopping motion to move among tight spots in natural surroundings like the human intestine.

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Ny professor i medfødte hjertesygdomme på Rigshospitalet

Speciallæge Vibeke Hjortdal er netop starte som professor på Rigshospitalets Thoraxkirurgiske Klinik, hvor hun skal forske i medfødte hjertesygdomme hos børn og unge.

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Taming defective porous materials for robust and selective heterogeneous catalysis

The production of 1-butene via ethylene dimerization is one of the few industrial processes that employs homogeneous catalysis due to its high selectivity, despite the massive amounts of activators and solvents required. Now, a new paper by the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), in collaboration with the López group at the Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) and RTI Interna

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Image of the Day: Gastric Colonies

Scientists map the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach of mice, showing where the bacteria colonize the gastric glands.

11h

12h

Tropisk parasitsjukdom ökar i Sverige

Antalet sjukdomsfall orsakade av Leishmania, en parasit som smittar genom bett av sandmyggor som huvudsakligen finns i tropiska och subtropiska områden och i länder kring Medelhavet, har ökat i Sverige. Den allvarligaste formen leder obehandlad oftast till döden.

12h

12h

Public dread of nuclear power limits its deployment

In the ongoing effort to decarbonize U.S. energy production, there is one energy source that often attracts great controversy. Nuclear power has been a part of the American energy portfolio since the 1950s and still generates one in every five kilowatt-hours of electricity produced in the country. Still, for a number of reasons, including the association between radiation and cancer, the general p

12h

Using a mobile while browsing the shelves may make shoppers buy more

In-store mobile phone use that is unrelated to shopping may be associated with an increase in unplanned purchases, according to a study published in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science.

12h

12h

Banana disease boosted by climate change

Climate change has raised the risk of a fungal disease that ravages banana crops, new research shows.

12h

Banana disease boosted by climate change

Climate change has raised the risk of a fungal disease that ravages banana crops, new research shows.

12h

We are full of bright ideas to solve ecological problems. So let’s act on them | Chris Packham

There is hope in the face of environmental crises. But we must all – farmers, citizens, politicians – embrace change A new UN report is set to reveal that up to 1m species face extinction because of human actions. The loss of pollinating insects and other ecological disasters – from the destruction of flood-saving mangroves to air pollution – poses no less of a threat than climate change, accordin

12h

UV lights on power lines may help save Sandhill cranes

Crane species are declining around the world, and lethal collisions with power lines are an ongoing threat to many crane populations. Current techniques for marking power lines and making them more visible to cranes aren't always effective, but new research published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows that adding UV lights—to which many birds are sensitive—can cut crane collisions wi

12h

UV lights on power lines may help save Sandhill cranes

Crane species are declining around the world, and lethal collisions with power lines are an ongoing threat to many crane populations. Current techniques for marking power lines and making them more visible to cranes aren't always effective, but new research published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows that adding UV lights—to which many birds are sensitive—can cut crane collisions wi

12h

12h

Deception by omission: Del Bigtree’s ICAN calls the studies licensing MMR into question

Del Bigtree's antivaccine group Informed Consent Action Network issued a press release questioning the data used to license the MMR vaccine, with Bigtree claiming on a recent episode of his vlog Highwire that it causes significant GI issues that the FDA "covered up." As usual, Bigtree is deceiving by omission.

12h

Open Access dystopia arrives at Karolinska

A former Karolinska researcher is subject of research misconduct investigation, for forwarding to university OA publishing bills for her past research there. To save €3k, no trick is too dirty for Karolinska Institutet.

12h

Rethinking digital service design could reduce their environmental impact

Digital technology companies could reduce the carbon footprint of services like YouTube by changing how they are designed, experts say.

12h

Using a mobile while browsing the shelves may make shoppers buy more

In-store mobile phone use that is unrelated to shopping may be associated with an increase in unplanned purchases, according to a study published in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science.

12h

12h

Can you solve it? Sandwich sudoku – a new puzzle goes viral

Sudoku variant that mixes logic and arithmetic is an online hit A new type of Sudoku is whetting the appetites of puzzle fans. Sandwich sudoku follows the same rules of sudoku but includes extra clues outside the grid like this: Continue reading…

13h

I grew up eating turkey dinosaurs and tinned spaghetti. Have my kids paid a genetic price? | Charlotte Church

Some families hand down money to the next generation; others bequeath fat. Guess which mine did My nana once said: “You can never be too rich or too thin.” I don’t think she’ll mind me saying that she’s never been too much of either. Nevertheless, her sage words have become something of a family motto, so we decided to have them written in Latin beneath our heraldic crest (a pair of hair-straight

13h

The Pakistani popcorn seller who built his own plane

The engine is from a roadcutter, the wings are burlap, the wheels are borrowed from a rickshaw: a popcorn seller has caught the attention of the Pakistan Air Force by building his own plane.

13h

Boeing didn't tell airlines that safety alert wasn't on

Boeing said Sunday that it discovered after airlines had been flying its 737 Max plane for several months that a safety alert in the cockpit was not working as intended, yet it didn't disclose that fact to airlines or federal regulators until after one of the planes crashed.

13h

Spend Part of the $2 Trillion Infrastructure Plan on Robots

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

14h

See this wed many times https://gotsatoshi.com

Anyone know what this is? Heard to be some kind of product launching but im not sure. Really THE Satoshi is behind this? Filled my email anyway submitted by /u/Jerrymby [link] [comments]

14h

14h

What Happens in One Billion Years?| The Future of The Earth|4k

submitted by /u/Alltimeachievers [link] [comments]

14h

Rethinking digital service design could reduce their environmental impact

Rethinking digital service design could reduce their environmental impact Digital technology companies could reduce the carbon footprint of services like YouTube by changing how they are designed, experts say.

14h

14h

UV lights on power lines may help save Sandhill cranes

Crane species are declining around the world, and lethal collisions with power lines are an ongoing threat to many crane populations. Current techniques for marking power lines and making them …

14h

Kan du se forskel? Kunstig intelligens laver billeder af mennesker, der slet ikke findes

Med billederne kan tøjforhandlere som H&M eller ASOS spare 'photo shoots' med rigtige modeller væk.

15h

Daenerys Targaryen Makes Her Move on Game of Thrones

Every week for the eighth and final season of Game of Thrones , three Atlantic staffers will be discussing new episodes of the HBO drama. Because no screeners were made available to critics in advance this year, we’ll be posting our thoughts in installments. David Sims: I don’t know where to begin with this one, so I suppose I’ll start with the last person I’ve ever wanted to talk about on Game o

15h

Index that tracks impact of pharmaceuticals worldwide to relaunch, focus on more diseases

The Global Health Impact Index, developed by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York to rank pharmaceutical companies based on their drugs' impact on global health, is launching a new, more-robust model that addresses even more diseases worldwide.

15h

Nearly half of public wrongly believe heart failure is normal in old age

Low awareness of heart failure among patients and the public is highlighted in surveys to be presented during Heart Failure 2019 the annual congress of the Heart Failure Association (HFA), a branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), taking place in Athens, Greece from May 25-28, 2019.

15h

Five things to know about physician suicide

Physician suicide is an urgent problem with rates higher than suicide rates in the general public, with potential for extensive impact on health care systems. A 'Five things to know about …' practice article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides an overview of this serious issue.

15h

High rates of Indigenous people in jail is a health crisis

The overincarceration of Indigenous people in Canada is a health crisis, causing more years of life to be lost than premature death from heart disease, injuries and cancer, argues a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

15h

Program involving community volunteers shows promise for reducing health care use by seniors

Incorporating community volunteers into the health care system shows promise in reducing health care usage by older adults and shifting health care from hospitals to primary care, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

15h

Fitness may affect risk of lung, colorectal cancer and survival likelihood after diagnosis

In a recent CANCER study, adults who were the most fit had the lowest risk of developing lung and colorectal cancer. Also, among individuals who developed lung or colorectal cancer, those who had high fitness levels before their cancer diagnosis were less likely to die compared with those who had low fitness levels.

15h

UV lights on power lines may help save sandhill cranes

Crane species are declining around the world, and lethal collisions with power lines are an ongoing threat to many crane populations. Current techniques for marking power lines and making them more visible to cranes aren't always effective, but new research published in The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows that adding UV lights — to which many birds are sensitive — can cut crane collisi

15h

Your Brain in the Smartphone Age

According to recent headlines, today’s device-wielding teens are socially, emotionally and cognitively doomed. Reality, however, is not so clear cut. In this eBook, we've gathered what science… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

VW's eGon is a driveable, educational EV skeleton

How do you illustrate the inner workings of electric cars without resorting to plain cutaway images and videos? If you're VW, you make a rolling skeleton on wheels. The company …

15h

Apple to Face Antitrust Probe in Europe, Courtesy of Spotify

Less than a month after Spotify filed a formal complaint against Apple for its app store practices, a European Commission probe is moving forward, potentially threatening one of the Cupertino …

15h

Ekspert: Tvunget skift af password er en sikkerheds-sovepude

Microsoft har fjernet periodisk skift af password fra deres sikkerheds-baseline. Og den irriterende sikkerhedspolitik har heller ikke den store berettigelse, siger ekspert.

16h

Here's why moderate drinking is probably not good for you | Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz

People who drink one to two standard drinks a day are the healthiest overall. But moderate drinking isn’t an isolated behaviour As a society, we love drinking. There are people who abstain, but by and large we love to drink alcohol – it’s part of our social culture, part of our collective identity, and so pervasive that it can be hard to escape from even if you try. As anyone who’s attempted a Dr

16h

Trafikforsker om Billundbanen: »Det er jo tåbeligt at anlægge en ny bane, der burde nedlægges fra dag ét«

PLUS. I næsten ti år har Billund­banen været en del af politikernes transportforlig, og lige så længe har eksperterne kaldt den for langsom, for dyr og dårlig for miljøet. Alligevel støtter både V og S op om at realisere banen efter folketingsvalget.

16h

Apple Is Vastly Exaggerating iPhone Battery Life According To UK Advocacy Group

A new report by Which?, an advocacy group in the United Kingdom, found that Apple and HTC both overstate battery life on smartphones, sometimes "significantly," which is the case with some …

16h

The Comedian Is in the Machine. AI Is Now Learning Puns

submitted by /u/CoastieKid [link] [comments]

17h

17h

A New Era of Warfare Begins as Cyberattack Leads to Airstrikes

For the first time ever, a government announced publicly that it had used immediate lethal physical force in response to a cyberattack.Read more…

17h

17h

Facebook’s contract workers are looking at your private posts to train AI

A new report from Reuters reveals that contract workers are looking at private posts on Facebook and Instagram in order to label them for AI systems. Like many tech companies, …

17h

18h

Many heart patients miss out on earlier palliative care

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the US, but relatively few heart patients receive a referral to palliative care, according to a new study. When heart patients receive a palliative care referral, they are typically near death and therefore benefit more from hospice services geared to end-of-life, researchers say. Palliative care focuses on quality of life and value-based treatment d

18h

The science of why we can’t live forever

According to scientists the reason we die is because the second law of thermodynamics and natural selection. The whole universe runs down, so, ultimately, even if you could lengthen your lifespan indefinitely, the universe itself will eventually die in a heat death. We die, one predominant view goes, so that our progeny may live — because there are limited resources. Why People Believe Weird Thin

18h

18h

Connecting my bird box camera to the web

Lucy the blue tit is being live-streamed on YouTube after her bird box was connected to the web.

19h

Using a mobile while browsing the shelves may make shoppers buy more

In-store mobile phone use that is unrelated to shopping may be associated with an increase in unplanned purchases, according to a study published in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science.

19h

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19h

Tougher organic solar cells stand up to water, air, and light

Researchers have discovered a remarkable way to make organic solar cells more robust, including conferring resistance to oxygen, water, and light. The market for organic solar cells is expected to grow more than 20 percent between 2017 and 2020, driven by advantages over traditional silicon solar cells. Manufacturers can mass produce organic solar cells at scale with roll-to-roll processing. It’s

19h

2 factors shaped evolution of weird bat skulls

Two major forces have shaped bat skulls over their evolutionary history, according to new research: echolocation and diet. Bats are a diverse bunch. They make up one of the largest groups of mammals, with more than 1,300 species worldwide. Up close, bat species look quite different from one another. Some have large ears. Others sport elaborate noses or long jaws. With so much morphological variet

19h

Stretchy ‘nano-forest’ might power future wearables

Crumpled carbon nanotube forests, or CNT forests, are a potential solution to the power needs of future wearable technology, say researchers. The newly developed supercapacitor demonstrates solid performance and stability, even when researchers stretch it to 800 percent of its original size for thousands of stretching/relaxing cycles. The team’s results, which appear in the journal Advanced Energ

20h

Banana disease boosted by climate change

Climate change has raised the risk of a fungal disease that ravages banana crops, new research shows.

20h

What does a biodiversity emergency mean for humans?

Hundreds of thousands of different species of animals and plants are thought to be facing extinction.

20h

Nature loss: Report to show scale of 'silent crisis'

The world's most comprehensive – and damning – report on the state of nature is to be published in Paris.

20h

4 things trigger the ‘compulsive itch’ for your phone

New research identifies a series of triggers, common across age groups, that start and end compulsive smartphone use. In the decade since smartphones have become ubiquitous, we now have a feeling almost as common as the smartphones themselves: being sucked into that black hole of staring at those specific apps—you know which ones—and then a half an hour has gone by before you realize it. “The sol

20h

21h

Do we have to die?

Recently, I had an existential crisis and worried so much about death. The idea that I have to die was very depressing. I thought about it, and now I realize that it isn't that bad. I've gotten over it, mostly. Also, I have a lot of time to left, as I am a teenager. Do we really have to die, though? My assumption is yes since the chance of an accident or murder happening when you have an infinite

21h

iPhone 11 Could Have Improved Antenna For Better Indoor Navigation

According to a report from analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, he said that he expects that Apple will be introducing a new antenna design with their 2019 iPhones. Now in his latest research note, Kuo has …

22h

2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #18

Story of the Week… Interview of the Week… Toon of the Week… Photo of the Week… SkS Spotlights… Coming Soon on SkS… Climate Feedback Reviews… SkS Week in Review… Poster of the Week… Story of the Week… Biodiversity crisis is about to put humanity at risk, UN scientists to warn ‘We are in trouble if we don’t act,’ say experts, with up to 1m species at risk of annihilation Student

22h

Starwatch: crescent moon points the way to Mars and the heavenly twins

The waxing crescent moon will appear close to Mars in the western sky, with Gemini above Sky watchers have a pretty view to look forward to this week on Wednesday evening. A thin waxing crescent moon will appear close to Mars. The moon will be just 16% illuminated, making it appear as a sliver in the sky. It acts as a useful signpost for finding the constellation of Gemini , which is standing upr

22h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The U.S. Didn’t Get What It Wanted in Venezuela

We’re trying something new: a once-a-week national-security-focused edition of The Atlantic ’s signature politics newsletter. We’ll tell you what to keep an eye on this week, what our reporters are covering, and why the latest natsec developments are significant. Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. The Top Story How the White Hous

23h

China develops unique heat-resistant material for hypersonic aircraft

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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