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nyheder2019maj08

Medicinal mushroom newly reported from Thailand helps reveal optimum growth conditions

A species of globally recognised medicinal mushroom was recorded for the first time in Thailand. Commonly referred to as lingzhi, the fungus (Ganoderma tropicum) was collected from the base of a living tree in Chiang Rai Province, Northern Thailand. In their study, published in the open-access journal MycoKeys, the scientists also report the first assessment of the optimum conditions needed for th

1h

Mystery of texture of Guinness beer: Inclination angle of a pint glass is key to solution

A team of researchers from Osaka University and Kirin Holdings Company, Limited demonstrated that the texture formation in a pint glass of Guinness beer is induced by flow of a bubble-free fluid film flowing down along the wall of the glass, a world first. This phenomenon is found to be analogous to roll waves commonly observed in water sliding downhill on a rainy day. Their research results were

3h

Uanset valgresultat: Omstridt billundbane bliver til virkelighed

En rød valgsejr kan sætte en kæp i hjulet på hovedparten af projekterne i regeringens transportplan, men Socialdemokratiet vil ikke aflyse Billundbanen på trods af den vedholdende kritik.

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Superjet flights cancelled following Russian plane disaster

Russian national carrier Aeroflot cancelled four flights that normally use the Sukhoi Superjet aircraft Wednesday, days after a deadly crash-landing in Moscow where 41 people died in a fire.

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Most EU countries cut CO2 emissions last year: estimates

Most European Union countries reduced carbon dioxide emissions last year, estimates showed Wednesday, marking a turnaround in the battle against greenhouse gases as campaigners urged faster action to avoid the most damaging effects of climate change.

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New York Times adds more digital subscribers, shares climb

Share of the company that owns The New York Times rose Wednesday after the publisher reported that it grew digital subscribers again in its latest quarter.

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Coke Funded Nutrition Research — and Killed Anti-Sugar Results

Cancelled Coca-Cola pours a lot of money into nutrition and health research . But newly-uncovered documents reveal that the cash comes with strings attached. If Coke didn’t like the outcomes of a study — like, for example, if researchers determined that sugary beverages aren’t great for people — fine print allowed Coca-Cola to snap its fingers and block the research from ever seeing the light of

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Creating a global map of the protein shape universe

Proteins can provide a detailed look inside the human body and how it protects itself from many diseases. Proteins, which make up about 15% of body mass, are the most abundant solid substances in the human body. They are important working molecules of the immune system, metabolism, brain function, body motion, and any physically and chemically functional parts in a body. Each protein has a specifi

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Creating a global map of the protein shape universe

Proteins can provide a detailed look inside the human body and how it protects itself from many diseases. Proteins, which make up about 15% of body mass, are the most abundant solid substances in the human body. They are important working molecules of the immune system, metabolism, brain function, body motion, and any physically and chemically functional parts in a body. Each protein has a specifi

6min

Radioactive carbon from nuclear bomb tests found in deep ocean trenches

Radioactive carbon released into the atmosphere from 20th-century nuclear bomb tests has reached the deepest parts of the ocean, new research finds.

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We Must Talk about Our Climate Crisis

Building community around solutions is crucial — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We Must Talk about Our Climate Crisis

Building community around solutions is crucial — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Surreal Love Stories of BoJack Horseman Creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg

Years before the BoJack Horseman creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg would earn critical acclaim for his animated Netflix show about a depressed equine actor , the writer attempted a different kind of artistic leap: He tried to woo a woman with his own version of a mixtape. Over the course of a month, he assembled all of his favorite poems, short stories, and articles into a document that he then photoc

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To see climate’s uneven cost, look to Maine clammers

In this podcast episode, Maine clams offer a window into the economic consequences of climate change. Maine clammers have traditionally bagged about half of the nation’s entire soft-shell clam harvest. But the harvest has been declining for years, and in 2017, it was the lowest in 87 years. What happened to all the clams? Scientists point to climate change. The Gulf of Maine has been getting warm

11min

A war is brewing over lithium mining at the edge of Death Valley

A small Cessna soared high above the Mojave Desert recently, its engine growling in the choppy morning air. As the aircraft skirted the mountains on the edge of Death Valley National Park, a clutch of passengers and environmentalists peered intently at a broiling salt flat thousands of feet below.

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Understanding the power of honey through its proteins

Honey is a culinary staple that can be found in kitchens around the world. Humans have used honey throughout history, and its long shelf life and medicinal properties make it a unique, multipurpose natural product. Although it seems that a lot is known about the sweet substance, surprisingly little is known about its proteins. Now, researchers report in ACS' Journal of Natural Products new data on

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World's First Ever Organ Delivery Via Drone

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Soaking up pharmaceuticals and personal care products from water

Medications excreted in the urine or dumped into the toilet can end up in the water supply, just like lotions or cosmetics that wash off the body and go down the sink or shower drain. Unfortunately, conventional wastewater treatment cannot completely remove pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed an adsorbe

24min

Understanding the power of honey through its proteins

Honey is a culinary staple that can be found in kitchens around the world. Humans have used honey throughout history, and its long shelf life and medicinal properties make it a unique, multipurpose natural product. Although it seems that a lot is known about the sweet substance, surprisingly little is known about its proteins. Now, researchers report in ACS' Journal of Natural Products new data on

24min

Creating a global map of the protein shape universe

Purdue University researchers have come up with a novel way to classify proteins and their shapes, which lays the foundation of how we understand protein structures and functions.

25min

When sand behaves like oil

Sand, coffee grounds and rice behave very differently than water or oil, but under certain conditions they will suddenly exhibit astonishing similarities. Scientists have found a way to better understand the behaviour of granular materials.

25min

1/3 of all cancers in Canada can be prevented by a combination of policymaking & education

A special issue of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, responds to these questions, showcasing results from the Canadian Population Attributable Risk of Cancer (ComPARe) project — the most comprehensive, up-to-date estimate of the preventable burden of cancer in Canada.

25min

Radioactive carbon from nuclear bomb tests found in deep ocean trenches

Radioactive carbon released into the atmosphere from 20th-century nuclear bomb tests has reached the deepest parts of the ocean, a new study in AGU's journal Geophysical Research Letters finds. Crustaceans in deep ocean trenches have incorporated this 'bomb carbon' into the molecules that make up their bodies.

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American Cancer Society sets 2035 challenge goals

The American Cancer Society has set a challenge goal to reduce overall cancer mortality 40% between 2015 and 2035.

25min

Understanding the power of honey through its proteins

Honey is a culinary staple that can be found in kitchens around the world. Humans have used honey throughout history, and its long shelf life and medicinal properties make it a unique, multipurpose natural product. Although it seems that a lot is known about the sweet substance, surprisingly little is known about its proteins. Now, researchers report in ACS' Journal of Natural Products new data on

25min

Physicists propose perfect material for lasers

Weyl semimetals are a recently discovered class of materials, in which charge carriers behave the way electrons and positrons do in particle accelerators. Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Ioffe Institute in St. Petersburg have shown that these materials represent perfect gain media for lasers.

25min

Soaking up pharmaceuticals and personal care products from water

Medications excreted in the urine or dumped into the toilet can end up in the water supply, just like lotions or cosmetics that wash off the body and go down the sink or shower drain. Unfortunately, conventional wastewater treatment cannot completely remove pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed an adsorbe

25min

Mining microbial treasures from toxic sites

Filled with a noxious brew of copper, cadmium and arsenic, with a pH rivaling that of sulfuric acid, Montana's Berkeley Pit seems inhospitable to life. Nonetheless, scientists have discovered microorganisms in this abandoned copper mine and other human-made noxious sites. These extreme environments induce microbes to synthesize potent, never-before-seen molecules that could find uses in human medi

30min

Behold the mayo: Experiments reveal 'instability threshold' of elastic-plastic material

Arindam Banerjee, an associate professor of mechanical engineering and mechanics at Lehigh University, studies the dynamics of materials in extreme environments. He and his team have built several devices to effectively investigate the dynamics of fluids and other materials under the influence of high acceleration and centrifugal force.

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Why some red wines taste 'dry'

Wine connoisseurs can easily discriminate a dry red wine, such as Cabernet Sauvignon, from a fruitier red, like Pinot Noir. Scientists have long linked the "dryness" sensation in wine to tannins, but how these molecules create their characteristic mouthfeel over time is not fully understood. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have found that tannin struct

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The Rarely Used Congressional Power That Could Force William Barr's Hand

Impeachment is Congress’s most famous , yet rarely exercised, power over wayward presidents and other federal officers. But as Trump administration officials continue to defy House subpoenas related to Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, Democrats in control of the chamber could turn to an even blunter weapon in their arsenal: arrest. Courts have recognized that the House and Senate e

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The Push to ‘Predict’ Police Shootings

When employers surveil workers, it’s usually to cut costs and ensure efficiency—checking when people are clocking in and leaving, whether they’re hitting sales goals, and so on. But for police, operating efficiently is a matter of life and death, law and order. Their bosses, and the communities they serve, want to know if they’re potentially violating someone’s rights. In the event of a shooting,

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Matematikere finder sexforbryderes gemte dna-spor

PLUS. I sager om voldtægt står politiet ofte tilbage med et virvar af dna, som ikke kan bruges i efterforskningen. Men på Aalborg Universitet finder man nye spor i virvaret ved at se på kønskromosomer og muligvis snart mitokondrier.

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Germany Installed Cables Over a Highway to Power Electric Trucks

Electric Highway A stretch of a prominent Germany highway just got a high-tech upgrade: overhead power lines — like the ones you only see over rail tracks — that can power hybrid trucks. The German government announced yesterday that a 6.2 mile (10 km) stretch of the autobahn got the upgrade, a test that could pave the way for a new carbon neutral strategy to transport goods. The system, first de

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Stress in early life could make people more likely to develop depression

New research by the University of Bristol has found that early life adversity could make an individual more at risk of developing negative thinking, which could lead to major depressive disorder (MDD). The findings provide biological and psychological evidence to support work first proposed in the 1960s.

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Why some red wines taste 'dry'

Wine connoisseurs can easily discriminate a dry red wine, such as Cabernet Sauvignon, from a fruitier red, like Pinot Noir. Scientists have long linked the 'dryness' sensation in wine to tannins, but how these molecules create their characteristic mouthfeel over time is not fully understood. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have found that tannin struct

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Novel molecular multi-step photoswitches caught in the act

Scientists from the University of Groningen, the University of Amsterdam, the University of Twente (all in the Netherlands) and the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy in Italy, have been able to follow the entire sequence of structural transformations in a new class of molecular switches for the first time. By identifying 'control knobs' to direct their operation, better control of th

47min

World-class research performance that bloomed in an undergraduate class

Research achievement through an Undergraduate Group Research Program (UGRP) was published on an international scientific journal. Expects to lay a foundation for the development of a new personality test method that can complement the existing psychology test.

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Statewide initiative doubles survival rates after severe TBI

The implementation of a massive, statewide public health initiative led by University of Arizona researchers and involving 21,000 prehospital care patients has doubled the survival rate of severe traumatic brain injury victims and tripled the survival rate among those who were intubated.

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How do you find a virus that's completely unknown? Study says, look to the genome

Researchers have identified a previously unknown viral family, which turns out to be the second-most common DNA virus in human lung and mouth specimens, where it is associated with severe critical illness and gum disease.

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Stark racial, financial divides found in opioid addiction treatment

Escaping the grip of opioid addiction doesn't come easily for anyone. But a new study reveals sharp racial and financial divides in which Americans receive effective treatments for opioid addiction. Those differences have only grown larger as the national opioid crisis has intensified, the research shows.For every appointment where a person of color received a prescription for the addiction-treatm

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Articles focus on psoriasis, risk of mental health disorders

Two related articles and an editorial focus on the chronic inflammatory skin disorder psoriasis and the risk of mental health disorders.

47min

Disparities associated with buprenorphine prescriptions for opioid use disorder

This study used national survey data to estimate buprenorphine prescription rates to treat opioid use disorder by race/ethnicity and by payment type for office visits, which is how most patients with buprenorphine prescriptions get care. Researchers report buprenorphine office visits increased from 0.04% to 0.36% of ambulatory visits from 2004-2015 and that represented about 13.4 million visits fr

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China charts a path into European science

China charts a path into European science China charts a path into European science, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01126-5 As the Belt and Road Initiative spreads to central and eastern Europe, China’s investments in research and technology are raising concerns in the West.

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South America is embracing Beijing’s science silk road

South America is embracing Beijing’s science silk road South America is embracing Beijing’s science silk road, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01127-4 From a secretive space facility to plans for new telescopes, South America is starting to see the scientific impacts of China’s global infrastructure expansion.

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UK goes a week without coal but the renewables revolution is stalling

The country that first started turning coal into electricity has managed without it for a week. But don't be fooled by the good news

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Wasps are the first invertebrates seen to use a type of logic

Wasps may be able use a type of logical reasoning called transitive inference to avoid an electric shock and are the first invertebrates we've seen doing so

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AMD's tech to power new supercomputer for Department of Energy

Advanced Micro Devices announced Tuesday that its technology will help power a new supercomputer at Tennessee-based Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2021.

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China Replaces PUBG With Bizarre, Propaganda-Filled Clone

Pea Shooter Chinese game developer Tencent just tried to pull off an incredibly bold sleight-of-hand trick — with laughable results. At roughly the same time blockbuster battle royale shooter Public Unknown’s Battle Grounds, better known as PUBG, suddenly disappeared for tens of millions of Chinese gamers, a new near-carbon copy of the game was announced called “Game for Peace.” But while the gov

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What is Juche, the state ideology of North Korea?

North Korea is an anomaly among nations, but is there a method to its madness? Juche, meaning "self-reliance", is the official ideology of the country which supposedly informs its actions. Some observers question the sincerity of the ideology, dismissing it as mere propaganda. None North Korea is a strange country. Known semi-derisively as "The Hermit Kingdom," it famously isolates itself from fo

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How do you find a virus that's completely unknown? Study says, look to the genome

Viruses, the most abundant biological entities on earth, are a scourge on humanity, causing both chronic infections and global pandemics that can kill millions. Yet, the true extent of viruses that infect humans remains completely unknown. Some newly discovered viruses are recognized because of the sudden appearance of a new disease, such as SARS in 2003, or even HIV/AIDS in the early 1980s. New t

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Are heat-not-burn tobacco products a safer alternative to cigarettes?

The rise of vaping has seen tobacco firms revisit an old cigarette alternative, but the health benefits are far from clear

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Cambridge science history museum reopens after renovation

The Whipple Museum contains 10,000 scientific instruments with many dating from the 17th Century.

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How early humans walked the walk

Health Excerpt: A Walking Life Do you remember learning to walk? Most of us don’t. Yet, as infants, learning to walk takes our complete attention. It may even be what makes us human.

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DGIST acquired the first KELAF Certification as a Daegu-Gyeongbuk Educational Institution

Designated as a KELAF and held signboard hanging ceremony as organized by the Ministry of Drug and Food Safety. They will lay the foundation for advanced bio research by securing the reliability and ethicality of animal experiments.

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Great chocolate is a complex mix of science, physicists reveal

The science of what makes good chocolate has been revealed by researchers studying a 140-year-old mixing technique.

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Behold the mayo: Experiments reveal 'instability threshold' of elastic-plastic material

Lehigh University's Arindam Banerjee and his team have succeeded in characterizing the interface between an elastic-plastic material and a light material under acceleration. The results are described in a paper published today in Physical Review E called "Rayleigh-Taylor-instability experiments with elastic-plastic materials."

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Workplace discrimination: if they don't fit, they always call in sick?

Prof. Florian Kunze (University of Konstanz, Cluster of Excellence 'The Politics of Inequality') and Max Reinwald (University of Konstanz, Graduate School for Decision Sciences) investigate workplace behavior of employees who are in the minority in their teams.

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Development of 'transparent and flexible battery' for power generation and storage at once

DGIST Senior Researcher Changsoon Choi's team developed single-layer graphene based multifunctional transparent devices. Expected to be used in various devices such as electronics and skin-attachable devices with power generation and self-charging capability

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A new culprit for multiple sclerosis relapses

A molecule that helps blood clot may also play a role in multiple sclerosis relapses, researchers report in the May 6, 2019 issue of PNAS. The new research may help answer the mystery of why remissions happen, as well as find early markers of the disease. The research also shows a new way to study multiple sclerosis (MS) in mice that is closer to the human form of the disease.

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How do you find a virus that's completely unknown? Study says, look to the genome

Viruses, the most abundant biological entities on earth, are a scourge on humanity, causing both chronic infections and global pandemics that can kill millions. Yet, the true extent of viruses that infect humans remains completely unknown. Some newly discovered viruses are recognized because of the sudden appearance of a new disease, such as SARS in 2003, or even HIV/AIDS in the early 1980s. New t

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Basking sharks are back on West Coast, and researchers fish for answers

Ryan Lawler saw the dorsal fin in the distance, swaying slowly side to side, and assumed it was a great white shark. As his boat got closer, he saw the massive fish's snout sticking out of the water, its mouth wide open.

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Basking sharks are back on West Coast, and researchers fish for answers

Ryan Lawler saw the dorsal fin in the distance, swaying slowly side to side, and assumed it was a great white shark. As his boat got closer, he saw the massive fish's snout sticking out of the water, its mouth wide open.

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The Particular Cruelty of Domestic Violence

Domestic violence is like no other crime. It does not happen in a vacuum. It does not happen because someone is in the wrong place at the wrong time. Homes and families are supposed to be sacred territory, the “haven in a heartless world,” as my college sociology teacher drilled into me. This is part of what makes the violence so untenable. It’s violence from someone you know, from someone who cl

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Are measles vaccines a ‘religious obligation’?

Getting vaccinated against measles is not only religiously acceptable, but also a religious obligation, according to an expert on health law, ethics, and Jewish studies. The measles vaccine (which is typically combined with mumps and rubella—known as the MMR vaccine) is 97 percent effective at preventing measles after two doses. But with 764 confirmed cases and rising, the United States is experi

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The crisis of leadership — and a new way forward | Halla Tómasdóttir and Bryn Freedman

What should modern leadership look like? Entrepreneur and former Icelandic presidential candidate Halla Tómasdóttir thinks global leaders need to change their ways — or risk becoming irrelevant. In a conversation with curator Bryn Freedman, she shows how anybody can step up and make a difference, even if you don't yet have power. "There's a leader inside every single one of us," she says, "and ou

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Amazon upgrades its Blink outdoor security camera with better battery, two-way talk

Sure, Google’s getting most of the smart home love this week, but you didn’t think Amazon would let an I/O pass without releasing a little news of its own, did you? The company just announced …

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Artificial Intelligence May Not 'Hallucinate' After All

What makes an algorithm mistake a helicopter for a gun? Researchers think the answer has to do more with man than machine.

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Fynsk ‘svingerklub’ i nye forsøg: På vej mod rekordstort Foucault-pendul

Nye succesrige forsøg med vinduesviskermotor baner vej for et 12 meter højt Focault-pendul, der skal være forløber til verdens største i Svendborg.

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Inhibition of ribosome biogenesis as a novel approach for multi-stage cancer treatment

Nearly ninety per cent of all cancer patient deaths are due to metastasis. A study from Uppsala University shows that a process that allows the cells to metastasise is aided by the synthesis of new ribosomes, the cell components in which proteins are produced. The results open the possibility for new treatment strategies for advanced cancers. The study is published in Nature Communications.

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Intel Quietly Kills Off Xeon Phi

Intel has put the Xeon Phi family to bed for good, with cancellation notices on the Knights Mill Xeon Phi processor. Both the PCIe and socketed Larrabee descendants are officially dead, with Xe rising in the wings as a hoped-for replacement. The post Intel Quietly Kills Off Xeon Phi appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Allianz aims for "climate-neutral" investments by 2050

German insurer Allianz aims to make the massive investments that back its business "climate-neutral" by 2050, chief executive Oliver Baete told shareholders Wednesday.

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Facebook picks London for WhatsApp payment base

Facebook has chosen London as its base for a payment system on WhatsApp, its mobile messaging service confirmed Wednesday, highlighting the capital's attractiveness as a fintech hub despite Brexit strains.

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Uber, Lyft drivers protest in cities across the US

Drivers for ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft turned off their apps to protest what they say are declining wages at a time when both companies are raking in billions of dollars from investors.

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Study finds Wi-Fi location affects online privacy behavior

Does sitting in a coffee shop versus at home influence a person's willingness to disclose private information online? Does the on-screen appearance of a public location's online "terms and conditions" have an effect? According to researchers at Penn State, the answer to both questions is "yes," especially if the user has a tendency to instinctively distrust public wireless networks.

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Thousands of people in Finland to receive genetic health predictions

A large genetic trial in Finland will soon tell 3,400 volunteers their personal risk of developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and a type of blood clot

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Medicinal mushroom newly reported from Thailand helps reveal optimum growth conditions

A species of globally recognised medicinal mushroom was recorded for the first time in Thailand. Commonly referred to as lingzhi, the fungus (Ganoderma tropicum) was collected from the base of a living tree in Chiang Rai Province, Northern Thailand. Additionally, the study reports the first assessment of the optimum conditions needed for the species to grow its mycelia (the vegetative part of a fu

1h

Medicinal mushroom newly reported from Thailand helps reveal optimum growth conditions

A species of globally recognised medicinal mushroom was recorded for the first time in Thailand. Commonly referred to as lingzhi, the fungus (Ganoderma tropicum) was collected from the base of a living tree in Chiang Rai Province, Northern Thailand. Additionally, the study reports the first assessment of the optimum conditions needed for the species to grow its mycelia (the vegetative part of a fu

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There’s a Global Crackdown on the Dark Web Happening Right Now

Hunting Criminals Criminals are going to have a tougher time using the dark web for illegal activity . On Tuesday, the FBI announced the seizure of Deep Dot Web, a website that provided links to dark web marketplaces — the latest example of law enforcement cracking down on the shadowy side of the internet. Web of Crime The dark web is a lot like the “surface web” you’re probably using right now.

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Development of graphene with enhanced speed of high frequency signal transmission

DGIST Professor Jae Eun Jang's team developed high frequency signal transmission line technology which maximizes carrier concentration of graphene using graphene-amorphous carbon junction structure.

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Gold makes invisible surfaces visible in CT

Zoologists in Cologne and Bonn have developed a new method for displaying previously invisible surface details using computer tomography. The key to success was a method from scanning electron microscopy: coating the sample with gold.

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Research highlights role of psychological distress and emotional eating in obesity

New research, published in the research journal Obesity, has found that people on lower incomes may be more likely to have obesity due to psychological distress that gives rise to emotional eating to cope.

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Water flea can smell fish and dive into the dark for protection

Zoologists at the University of Cologne have discovered the messenger substance responsible for the flight of the small planktonic crustacean Daphnia from fish in lakes. This animal's dive into deeper waters has significant consequences for the concentration of algae in the lake's ecosystem. The scientists hope that in future, a better understanding of this interaction might help restore the biolo

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Negative economic messaging impacting on suicide rates, says new research

Relentless negative reporting on economic downturns is impacting on people's emotions and contributing to the suicide rate, according to new research.

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Occurrence of back-to-back heat waves likely to accelerate with climate change

As the planet continues to warm, multi-day heat waves are projected to increase in frequency, length and intensity. The additive effects of these extreme heat events overwhelm emergency service providers and hospital staff with heat-related maladies, disrupt the electrical grid and can even cause delays in air travel.

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Electricity grid cybersecurity will be expensive – who will pay, and how much?

Recently, a neighbor asked one of us whether Russia, China, North Korea and Iran really are capable of hacking into the computers that control the U.S. electricity grid. The answer, based on available evidence, is "Yes." The follow-up question was, "How expensive will it be to prevent, and who will end up paying for it?"

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Elusive seal posse colonized an Alaskan lake

The seals of Iliamna Lake in Alaska are a robust yet highly unusual and cryptic posse. New research investigates their origins. Hundreds of harbor seals live in the lake, the largest body of freshwater in Alaska and one of the most productive systems for sockeye salmon in the Bristol Bay region. Although how the seals first colonized the lake remains a mystery, it is thought that sometime in the

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Google Confirms Pixel 3a And Pixel 3a XL Aren't One-Offs, Folding Phone In Development

Yesterday, Google announced its Pixel 3a and Pixel 3a XL mid-range smartphones which rock a Qualcomm Snapdragon 670 SoC, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of internal storage and the familiar two-tone design …

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Trigger for directed cell motion

Researchers have discovered that curvatures of cell membranes trigger a self-organizing system. As a result, cells can move in the same direction over a longer distance, forming search patterns.

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A moody gut often accompanies depression: New study helps explain why

A new study suggests that depression and GI trouble sometimes spring from the same source — low serotonin — and identifies a potential treatment that could ease both conditions simultaneously.

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Collision-detecting suitcase, wayfinding app help blind people navigate airports

Researchers say a smart suitcase that warns blind users of impending collisions and a wayfinding smartphone app can help people with visual disabilities navigate airport terminals safely and independently.

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New Zealand introduces bill for zero carbon emissions by 2050

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New space race to bring satellite internet to the world

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World’s first self-built solar-powered boat of its kind in Key West

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Complex geology contributed to Deepwater Horizon disaster, new study finds

A study from The University of Texas at Austin is the first published in a scientific journal to take an in-depth look at the challenging geologic conditions faced by the crew of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig and the role those conditions played in the 2010 disaster.

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Inequality is deliberately built into cities: segregated playgrounds are just the start

Developers in London have come under scrutiny for segregating people who live in social or affordable housing from residents who pay market rates. Prominent cases have included children from social housing being blocked from using a playground in a new development, and "poor doors" providing separate entrances for social housing residents.

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Roman mining activities polluted European air more heavily than previously thought

Roman-era mining activities increased atmospheric lead concentrations by at least a factor of 10, polluting air over Europe more heavily and for longer than previously thought, according to a new analysis of ice cores taken from glaciers on France's Mont Blanc.

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Geologists suggest Horseshoe Abyssal Plain may be start of a subduction zone

A team of geologists led by João Duarte gave a presentation at this past month's European Geosciences Union meeting that included a suggestion that the Horseshoe Abyssal Plain may represent the start of a new subduction zone. They presented evidence of possible peeling on the bottom of the tectonic plate that lies off the coast of Portugal.

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Mini-centrifuge for simpler study of blood cells opens new organ-on-chip possibilities

A simple innovation the size of a grain of sand means we can now analyse cells and tiny particles as if they were inside the human body.

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The smell of dark chocolate, demystified

Chocolate is one of the most-consumed treats around the world, and the smell alone is usually enough to evoke strong cravings from even the most disciplined eaters. Much like a fine wine, high-quality dark chocolate has a multi-layered scent and flavor, with notes of vanilla, banana or vinegar. Now, researchers report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry which substances—and how much

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How Researchers Used AI to Better Understand Biological Vision

A few years back, DeepMind’s Demis Hassabis famously prophesized that AI and neuroscience will positively feed into each other in a “virtuous circle.” If realized, this would fundamentally expand our insight into intelligence, both machine and human. We’ve already seen some proofs of concept, at least in the brain-to-AI direction. For example, memory replay , a biological mechanism that fortifies

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Delays can limit how well Ebola vaccines work

Early implementation of the Ebola vaccine is critical to slow the spread of the disease, researchers say. A delay of just one week can drastically reduce the efficacy of the vaccine in highly populated areas, research shows. Outbreak of the disease in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is raging—900 people have died in the last nine months. The epidemic began last August with 1,340 confirmed an

2h

Physicists propose perfect material for lasers

Weyl semimetals are a recently discovered class of materials in which charge carriers behave the way electrons and positrons do in particle accelerators. Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Ioffe Institute in St. Petersburg have shown that these materials represent perfect gain media for lasers. The research findings were published in Physical Review B.

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"Classical ways of conserving nature are insufficient"

Earlier this week, the Global Assessment on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services was been published by IPBES, the science-policy platform that serves under the flag of the United Nations. In the assessment major concerns are raised on the state and trends of biodiversity. The way currently deal with the loss of nature will not suffice in turning the tide, the researchers state. But what should be d

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Expert discusses the traffic impacts of Uber, Lyft

When John Zimmer took a city planning course in college, he had an epiphany: We've built our communities entirely around cars. As a result, we have more traffic and pollution and fewer green spaces, sidewalks and parks. Determined to revolutionize public transportation, Zimmer became co-founder and president of Lyft, a popular transportation network company (TNC).

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"Classical ways of conserving nature are insufficient"

Earlier this week, the Global Assessment on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services was been published by IPBES, the science-policy platform that serves under the flag of the United Nations. In the assessment major concerns are raised on the state and trends of biodiversity. The way currently deal with the loss of nature will not suffice in turning the tide, the researchers state. But what should be d

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Australian doctors overprescribing flu antivirals

Australian doctors are prescribing antivirals for people with the flu who may not benefit, putting patients at risk of unnecessary side effects and potentially increasing the risk of antimicrobial resistance to these medications, researchers from the University of Adelaide have found.

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A highly sensitive detection for spicy tastes to choose kimchi of your preference!

The World Institute of Kimchi has announced that it has developed a new analytical tool for the ultra-trace ratiometric detection of capsaicinoids, an analysis method that can be easily applied to analyze the spicy tastes of kimchi in industrial fields. As a result, the team successfully devised a simple yet reliable ultrasensitive analytical technique that takes less than 30 mins, while its detec

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A bag of godly goodies

Fox-snout pouch reveals shamanic meds.

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Warnings sounded on robo-surgery risks

Claimed benefits not supported by evidence, surgeons and regulators say. Paul Biegler reports.

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ET might use gravitational waves to communicate, researchers suggest

A minor change to interferometer parameters might reveal the Earth is not alone. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Dogs trained to find endangered insects

Canine ‘citizen-scientists’ are helping map a rare fly population. Tanya Loos reports.

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Mystery of texture of Guinness beer: inclination angle of a pint glass is key to solution

Researchers demonstrated that the texture-formation in a pint glass of Guinness beer is induced by flow of a bubble-free fluid film flowing down along the wall of the glass, a world first. This phenomenon is found to be analogous to roll waves commonly observed in water sliding downhill on a rainy day.

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'Stop and search' frequency reduced when law enforcement and academic research cooperate

It has been a busy few days in the fierce debate about addressing the knife crime problem in England and Wales. London Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick unveiled year-on-year declines in knife crime and homicides in the capital for the year ended March, and claimed it was thanks to more police stop and search. Just days earlier, the College of Policing, which oversees police standards

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Science images can capture attention and pique curiosity in a way words alone can't

Were you recently gobsmacked when you saw the very first image of a black hole? I know I was.

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Tech-saavy people more likely to trust digital doctors

Would you trust a robot to diagnose your cancer? According to researchers at Penn State, people with high confidence in machine performance and also in their own technological capabilities are more likely to accept and use digital healthcare services and providers.

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Can we spot lung cancer before it starts?

Genomic differences related to the immune system may play a key role in the early development of lung cancer, according to new research. The finding reveals potential for developing new therapeutics that could boost immune activity to prevent or halt progression of the disease, says senior author Avrum Spira, director of the Johnson & Johnson Innovation Lung Cancer Center at Boston University and

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A Very Important Climate Fact That No One Knows

Does the country’s most popular climate policy actually work? A controversial new study suggests that a type of state policy—usually called a “renewable portfolio standard,” or RPS—may impose large hidden costs on Americans. But a wide range of experts, including engineers, political theorists, and economists, aren’t sure the paper can actually make its case. As Congress and the White House have

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The Secret That Was Hiding in Trump’s Taxes

Over the course of a decade beginning in the mid-1980s, Donald Trump publicly presented himself as a highly successful entrepreneur even as he claimed business losses exceeding $1 billion, The New York Times reported on Tuesday. “Over all,” the newspaper explained , “Mr. Trump lost so much money that he was able to avoid paying income taxes for eight of the 10 years.” The scoop reflects poorly on

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Damselflies should choose their friends wisely, in order to cope with the cold Scottish climate

Damselflies are more likely to be able to withstand the cold Scottish climate if they are part of the 'right social group', according to scientists from the University of Aberdeen.

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Amino acid in fruit fly intestines found to regulate sleep

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has found that an amino acid made in fruit fly intestines plays a key role in regulating their sleep. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their study of D-serine in Drosophila melanogaster and what they found.

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For a Split Second, a (Simulated) Particle Went Backward in Time

Using a quantum computer, physicists successfully reversed time for an artificial atom. You can even try it at home.

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Location and brand affect people's trust in cloud services

People's stereotypes regarding different locations around the world influence whether they feel secure in storing their data in cloud service centers in those locations, according to researchers at Penn State, who also found that stereotypes regarding brand authority influence people's trust in cloud services.

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Damselflies should choose their friends wisely, in order to cope with the cold Scottish climate

Damselflies are more likely to be able to withstand the cold Scottish climate if they are part of the 'right social group', according to scientists from the University of Aberdeen.

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Jets and winds from galaxy cores appear to share a common cause

Astronomers have a rough understanding of how galaxies emit jets from their cores. Galaxy cores also blow out winds of ionized gas, for which researchers lack a general explanation. SRON astronomers have now found a correlation between jets and winds, suggesting magnetic fields as a common cause. The study is published in Astronomy & Astrophysics.

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Amino acid in fruit fly intestines found to regulate sleep

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has found that an amino acid made in fruit fly intestines plays a key role in regulating their sleep. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes their study of D-serine in Drosophila melanogaster and what they found.

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Great chocolate is complex mix of science, study finds

The science of what makes good chocolate has been revealed by researchers studying a 140-year-old mixing technique.

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Epson's $500 smart glasses are literally powered by your phone

Smart glasses have been kicking around for more than half a decade now, so it's a bit jarring when a new model is released and they look, well… ugly. Google has already demonstrated …

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The secrets of secretion—isolating eucalyptus genes for oils, biofuel

Close genetic analysis of 480 blue mallee eucalyptus plants provides clues to modify cultivars for greater yield, whether for essential oils or jet fuel.

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Image: Anchor antenna

This patch antenna under test at ESA's technical heart is designed to maintain a radio link between the two satellites making up the Proba-3 mission, allowing the pair to fly in formation to maintain an artificial eclipse of the sun.

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What geology reveals about North Korea's nuclear weapons – and what it obscures

North Korea's leader, Chairman Kim Jong Un, clearly is in no hurry to demilitarize his country. In the wake of two historic yet unproductive summits with President Trump, Kim made a state visit in April to Moscow, where he made clear that his country will not give up its nuclear weapons without international security guarantees. North Korea also tested what appeared to be short-range missiles on A

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New research shows community forest management reduces both deforestation and poverty

Giving local communities in Nepal the opportunity to manage their forests has simultaneously reduced deforestation and poverty in the region, new research has shown.

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The secrets of secretion—isolating eucalyptus genes for oils, biofuel

Close genetic analysis of 480 blue mallee eucalyptus plants provides clues to modify cultivars for greater yield, whether for essential oils or jet fuel.

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Negative economic messaging impacting on suicide rates, says new research

Relentless negative reporting on economic downturns is impacting on people's emotions and contributing to the suicide rate, according to new research.

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New avenues for improving modern wheat

Since the Agricultural Revolution about 12,000 years ago, humans have been selectively breeding plants with desirable traits such as high grain yield and disease resistance. Over time, Triticum aestivum, otherwise known as bread wheat, has emerged as one of the world's most important crops. Together with the growing human population and the changing climate, the demand for wheat with a higher yiel

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Occurrence of back-to-back heat waves likely to accelerate with climate change

Princeton University researchers have provided the first estimation of the potential damage from back-to-back, or compound, heat waves, which the authors found will increase as global warming continues. But government warning systems and health-care outreach do not currently calculate the risks of sequential heat waves. Instead, risk and response are determined by the severity of individual episod

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Otago ethicist shines light on lack of discussion about body donation after euthanasia

As New Zealand considers a bill looking to legalise euthanasia, an Otago University ethicist considers it's time to shine the light on the ethical complications surrounding body donation and assisted dying.

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In Swiss Academic Science, Charges of Bullying and Gender Bias

For all of its attributes as a country known for learning and tolerance, some critics say Switzerland harbors a culture of sexism within its academic institutions — and in workplaces more broadly. Now, federal authorities are investigating two elite schools for evidence of systemic gender bias.

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4D knitting makes rabbits that cuddle and lampshades that move

Knitting in four dimensions makes objects that can move, including a rabbit that cuddles, a jumper with moving arms, and a shape-changing lampshade

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Mystery of texture of Guinness beer: inclination angle of a pint glass is key to solution

Researchers demonstrated that the texture-formation in a pint glass of Guinness beer is induced by flow of a bubble-free fluid film flowing down along the wall of the glass, a world first. This phenomenon is found to be analogous to roll waves commonly observed in water sliding downhill on a rainy day.

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Researchers violate Bell's inequality with remotely connected superconducting qubits

The efficient generation of entanglement between remote quantum nodes is a crucial step in securing quantum communications. In past research, entanglement has often been achieved using a number of different probabilistic schemes.

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Using metals with high thermoelectric power factor to create efficient all-solid-state active cooler

A team of researchers from the Ohio State University and the University of Virginia has found a way to use metals with a high thermoelectric power factor to create efficient all-solid-state active coolers. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Applied, the group describes their new approach to cooling electronic devices and how well it worked.

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Lenovo ThinkPad X395, T495 and T495s Laptops Announced With 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Pro APUs

Earlier this month, we saw Lenovo pull the wraps off a new ThinkBook S family of consumer laptops and today we're witnessing the launch of a revised family of ThinkPad business laptops. The …

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Campus energy advances can be optimized and replicated

With a few changes to its existing energy operations, Stanford could further reduce its carbon footprint and costs in a model that other large campuses, towns and even cities can benefit from, a new study finds.

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Tsunami signals to measure glacier calving in Greenland

Scientists have employed a new method utilizing tsunami signals to calculate the calving magnitude of an ocean-terminating glacier in northwestern Greenland, uncovering correlations between calving flux and environmental factors such as air temperature, ice speed, and ocean tides.

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Diabetes complications soar in the US, but not Canada, as teenagers become young adults

A new study finds that hospitalizations for diabetic ketoacidosis rise sharply as adolescents transition to adulthood in the US, but not in Canada. The authors conclude that disruption in health coverage in the US for young adults is the leading factor in the increase in hospitalizations, compared to the universal and seamless coverage of the Canadian system.

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Broccoli sprout compound may restore brain chemistry imbalance linked to schizophrenia

In a series of recently published studies using animals and people, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have further characterized a set of chemical imbalances in the brains of people with schizophrenia related to the chemical glutamate. And they figured out how to tweak the level using a compound derived from broccoli sprouts.

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Mini-centrifuge for simpler study of blood cells opens new organ-on-chip possibilities

Micro-device to enable tailored experiments in drug development and disease research via new 'organ-on-chip' systems.

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Novel and rapid device opens new doors for Parkinson's disease diagnostics

Researchers from Osaka University developed a new device that can measure levels of α-synuclein aggregates in cerebrospinal fluid. This 'HANdai Amyloid Burst Inducer' device amplifies and detects misfolded α-synuclein using ultrasonication. The use of ultrasonication greatly reduced the assay processing time compared with existing methods. Seeding activity of α-synuclein was correlated with diseas

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What a nearby kilonova would look like

Physicists imagined what we’d see in the sky if two neutron stars collided just 1,000 light-years from Earth.

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Catalyst and Jacobus and LEMS: The Latest Chapter

I last wrote about the situation with Catalyst Pharmaceuticals here last December when Firdapse, their drug for Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, was approved by the FDA. If you know the story, though (or follow the links in that post) you’ll see that referring to it as “their drug” is a rather legalistic way of looking at things. Firdapse is 3,4-diaminopyridine , and it’s been used as a therapy

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New species of fish parasite named after Xena, the warrior princess

A study of crustacean parasites attaching themselves inside the branchial cavities (the gills) of their fish hosts was conducted in order to reveal potentially unrecognized diversity of the genus Elthusa in South Africa. While there had only been one known species from South Africa, a new article adds another three to the list, including one named after fictional character Xena because of the stro

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Essential tool for precision farming: New method for photochemical reflectance index measurement

Precision farming, which relies on spatially heterogeneous application of fertilizers, biologically active compounds, pesticides, etc., is one of the leading trends in modern agricultural science.

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Essential tool for precision farming: New method for photochemical reflectance index measurement

Precision farming, which relies on spatially heterogeneous application of fertilizers, biologically active compounds, pesticides, etc., is one of the leading trends in modern agricultural science.

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Bring on the biosimilars

Bring on the biosimilars Bring on the biosimilars, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01401-5 Some of the most effective modern drugs are complex biological molecules. As their patents expire, drug developers are fashioning copycat versions that could make such therapies cheaper and more broadly available.

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Biosimilars: mimicking biological drugs

Biosimilars: mimicking biological drugs Biosimilars: mimicking biological drugs, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01400-6 With the patents on many biological drugs soon to expire, the biosimilars revolution is about to shift into top gear.

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A study analyzes the academic repercussions of institutional scientific dissemination

Communicating research results to the public generates a range of positive effects on the careers of university professors, according to a study carried out by researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad de Valencia (UV), which analyzed the perception of university researchers who have participated in institutional communication campaigns.

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Complex geology contributed to Deepwater Horizon disaster, new study finds

A study from The University of Texas at Austin is the first published in a scientific journal to take an in-depth look at the challenging geologic conditions faced by the crew of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig and the role those conditions played in the 2010 disaster.

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Study identifies better, cheaper ways to stem arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh

An analysis compares four methods of dealing with arsenic contamination in Bangladesh, and pinpoints strategies to deliver cleaner water to the greatest number of people at the lowest cost.

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Discovery of microbial activity in carbon sinking as a gatekeeper of Earth's deep carbon

Carbon is transported from Earth's surface to the mantle where the oceanic crust subducts beneath continents. The efficiency of this transfer has profound implications for Earth's deep mantle and shallow crust, and the proportions of carbon being routed through this mechanism were previously poorly understood. An interdisciplinary team of scientists working in a volcanic region in Costa Rica has n

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Rediscovering Cannabis: The Pan-Cannabis Genome Project

Whether due to a changing regulatory climate, positive results from early clinical trials, or simply a desire to untangle cannabis’s mythology, scientists have rediscovered cannabis after ignoring it for decades. Find out how a plant's genetic signature translates into a compound profile!

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Early spring: Predicting budburst with genetics

Tree and shrub genetics can be used to produce more accurate predictions of when leaves will burst bud in the spring, according to a new study.

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Cause of sepsis-induced lung injury

A KAIST research team succeeded in visualizing pulmonary microcirculation and circulating cells in vivo with a custom-built 3D intravital lung microscopic imaging system. They found a type of leukocyte called neutrophils aggregate inside the capillaries during sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI), leading to disturbances and dead space in blood microcirculation. According to the researchers, thi

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Threatened sturgeon learns for the fitness

An international team led by IGB is providing one of the first proofs of the complex learning behaviour of fish in a recent study. The Atlantic sturgeon is considered extinct in Germany. The IGB is coordinating the reintroduction of these up to five meter large river giants and is investigating whether sturgeon training can increase their fitness for the wild. An important fitness factor is their

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Threatened sturgeon learns for the fitness

An international team led by IGB is providing one of the first proofs of the complex learning behaviour of fish in a recent study. The Atlantic sturgeon is considered extinct in Germany. The IGB is coordinating the reintroduction of these up to five meter large river giants and is investigating whether sturgeon training can increase their fitness for the wild. An important fitness factor is their

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Den oversete tredje vej til fusions-energi

PLUS. Der bør afsættes flere midler til forskning i magneto- inertial fusion, mener en uafhængig forskergruppe, der rådgiver USA’s regering.

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How highly sexualised imagery is shaping 'influence' on Instagram—and harassment is rife

Australians are some of the most active social media users in the world and Instagram is particularly popular. One in three of us have an account, with more than 9,000,000 monthly active users. The rise of Instagram reflects our increasingly visual culture, with 45% of Australians having taken a selfie and uploaded it to social media.

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Ny klinikchef til Rigshospitalets anæstesi- og operationsklinik

Casper Claudius bliver fra 1. juli ny klinikchef på Rigshospitalet, Han kommer fra en stilling på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospitaler.

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How milk does an animal body good

It has been called the world's most perfect food, and there's unequivocal evidence that it can fight off disease and build better baby brains. But even after decades of research, very little is known about how breast milk does its work. To help complete the puzzle, chemists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) are building a library to catalog important parts of this amazin

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Scientists design better method to build molecules that could be drugs—in half the steps

Pharmaceutical chemists have a trick when they're designing a drug and want to make it easier for the body to take up without metabolic side effects: they might add a quaternary center—a carbon atom bonded to four other carbon atoms. The trouble is, such centers are often extremely hard to synthesize.

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Territorial management and governance of the Columbian Amazon by indigenous people

In the Colombian Amazon, we find an indigenous organization that manages the protection of around two million hectares of rainforest. As we covered in a previous article, this organization, called Azicatch, worked in association with WWF-Colombia and Fundación Puerto Rastrojo in 2016 to identify its territory's ecosystem services and the risks of losing them using their own methodologies as a key

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Researchers discover a trigger for directed cell motion

When an individual cell is placed on a level surface, it does not keep still, but starts moving. This phenomenon was observed by the British cell biologist Michael Abercrombie as long ago as 1967. Since then, researchers have been thriving to understand how cells accomplish this feat. This much is known: Cells form so-called lamellipodia—cellular protrusions that continuously grow and contract—to

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The smell of dark chocolate, demystified

Chocolate is one of the most-consumed treats around the world, and the smell alone is usually enough to evoke strong cravings from even the most disciplined eaters. Much like a fine wine, high-quality dark chocolate has a multi-layered scent and flavor, with notes of vanilla, banana or vinegar. Now, researchers report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry which substances — and how m

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Learning language

When it comes to learning a language, the left side of the brain has traditionally been considered the hub of language processing. But new research from the University of Delaware shows the right brain plays a critical early role in helping learners identify the basic sounds associated with a language. That could help find new teaching methods to better improve student success in picking up a fore

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Dehesa health starts from the ground up

Holm oak decline threatens dehesa sustainability. Though the pseudofungus oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomisería is thought to be the main cause of holm oak decline, climate conditions have been shown to influence it, as well. Even so, this puzzle has yet to be solved.

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Dehesa health starts from the ground up

Holm oak decline threatens dehesa sustainability. Though the pseudofungus oomycete Phytophthora cinnamomisería is thought to be the main cause of holm oak decline, climate conditions have been shown to influence it, as well. Even so, this puzzle has yet to be solved.

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Fighting food waste by finding ways to use the useless

Every Thursday and Sunday I walk my frozen banana peels and carrot tops to Columbia's farmers market. It's my small effort to combat food waste, which happens from production to retail to consumption. At the production level, farmers cannot always sell their produce due to surplus. Produce makes it to the retail level can end up being wasted due to imperfections and oversupply. And as consumers, o

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Find the real breakfast of champions with this helpful chart

Health See just how badly sugar is ruining your morning. Cereal commercials have been telling us for decades that they’re part of a healthy breakfast, but are they?

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Remembering a Man Who Had the Thing Itself

Courtesy of Michael Bauman “If you would seek my monument, look around you”—the words of Christopher Wren’s famous epitaph, laid into the floor of St. Paul’s Cathedral, in London, came to mind when a friend called with the news that Richard Todd, the longtime executive editor of The Atlantic , had died on April 21 after a fall. He was 78. Dick was the opposite of showy, flashy, or promotional. Th

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The J. R. R. Tolkien Story That Makes the Case for Fantasy Fiction

There’s good reason to discuss hobbits again this spring: On Friday, a biopic about the life of J. R. R. Tolkien opens in theaters nationwide, just as an exhibition of the author’s art, manuscripts, and maps concludes at the Morgan Library and Museum in New York City. The mumbling , mild-mannered Oxford professor who brought imaginary realms to life remains one of the most popular writers in the

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Fængslet forsker og menneskerettighedsforkæmper får rektorstøtte

Københavns Universitets rektor støtter den saudiarabiske historiker og menneskerettighedsforkæmper…

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Can diabetes influence cancer's spread?

People with cancer may have a higher risk of tumors spreading to other sites in the body if they also have diabetes. New research explains why.

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Nonhuman life should be central to sustainability problem-solving

A landmark new United Nations report warns that the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, and that upwards of one million species are gravely at risk.

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Lægepolitiker: Man kan ikke ændre noget ved at gå på arbejde i det offentlige sundhedsvæsen

Frem mod Folketingsvalget den 5. juni bringer Dagens Medicin interviews med alle de seks læger, der stiller op til valget. Chefkirurg på Herlev Hospital Jakob Rosenberg er det første interview.

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The Internet Changed Astrology. Then Came the Memes

The future of the practice may live online.

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Birds introduced to Hawaii have evolved rapidly in just decades

Non-native birds are replacing Hawaii’s endemic species, adapting to new environments at a blistering pace of evolution on the island of O’ahu

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Facebook opens up to social scientists, carbon mapper launches and South Africa’s publishing trends

Facebook opens up to social scientists, carbon mapper launches and South Africa’s publishing trends Facebook opens up to social scientists, carbon mapper launches and South Africa’s publishing trends, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01419-9 The week in science: 3–9 May 2019.

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Brick city

Brick city Brick city, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01429-7 A new life.

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Finding the freelance cheats

"The modern contract cheating industry allows students and ghostwriters to connect to each other over the internet, often using through an essay mill, agency website or other third-party service," explains Thomas Lancaster Department of Computing, Imperial College London, UK, in the International Journal of Indian Culture and Business Management.

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The (evolving) art of war

In 1969, the Soviet Union moved troops and military equipment to its border with China, escalating tensions between the communist Cold War powers. In response, China created a new military strategy of "active defense" to repel an invading force near the border. There was just one catch: China did not actually implement its new strategy until 1980.

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Fracking can cause earthquakes tens of kilometres away – new research

Earthquakes threaten to be a show-stopper for fracking. In the Netherlands, the largest gas field in Europe will be shut down by 2030 after sustained damage to homes from earthquakes became too severe. In Oklahoma, US officials have severely curtailed operations after injection of waste water underground caused several earthquakes above magnitude five – one nearly 180,000 times stronger than the 2

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Proposal to spend 25% of EU budget on climate change

Eight countries propose the strategy – but nations such as Germany oppose strengthening commitments.

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Biophysicists resolve true structure of highly promising optogenetic protein KR2 rhodopsin

A team of biophysicists from Russia, Germany, and France, featuring researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, has discovered and studied the structure of the KR2 rhodopsin under physiological conditions. This pioneering work breaks ground for a future breakthrough in optogenetics, a highly relevant area of biomedicine with applications in neurological disease treatment and m

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Passenger planes need enough cabin crew to operate all the exits in an emergency

The crash of Aeroflot flight SU1492 in Moscow raises concerns about cabin safety in terms of the number of crew needed in an emergency.

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Quantum bit communication breaks distance record

Two new studies are big steps toward the development of quantum technology. In one, researchers entangled two quantum bits using sound for the first time and, in another, they built the highest-quality long-range link between two qubits to date. The work brings us closer to harnessing quantum technology to make more powerful computers, ultra-sensitive sensors, and secure transmissions. “Both of t

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Want to ace your tests? Take notes by hand

If you're a student looking for the most advanced learning machine available, give laptops a pass—and pick up an age-old notebook.

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Arctic rivers provide fingerprint of carbon release from thawing permafrost

The feedback between a warming climate and accelerated release of carbon currently frozen into permafrost around the Arctic is one of the grand challenges in current climate research. A study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by a team of researchers led by Stockholm University used radiocarbon dating of carbon in four large Siberian-Arctic rivers to pinpoi

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New material also reveals new quasiparticles

Researchers at PSI have investigated a novel crystalline material that exhibits electronic properties that have never been seen before. It is a crystal of aluminum and platinum atoms arranged in a special way. In the symmetrically repeating unit cells of this crystal, individual atoms were offset from each other in such a way that they—as connected in the mind's eye—followed the shape of a spiral

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Exobiology in a box

The International Space Station is the platform to study a variety of fields without gravity getting in the way. A new experiment is furthering the Station's capabilities for investigating exobiology, or the study of life in space.

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Explosions of universe's first stars spewed powerful jets

Several hundred million years after the Big Bang, the very first stars flared into the universe as massively bright accumulations of hydrogen and helium gas. Within the cores of these first stars, extreme, thermonuclear reactions forged the first heavier elements, including carbon, iron, and zinc.

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How often do authors with retractions for misconduct continue to publish?

How does retraction change publishing behavior? Mark Bolland and Andrew Grey, who were two members of a team whose work led to dozens of retractions for Yoshihiro Sato, now third on the Retraction Watch leaderboard, joined forces with Vyoma Mistry to find out. We asked Bolland to answer several questions about the new University of … Continue reading How often do authors with retractions for misco

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Biophysicists resolve true structure of highly promising optogenetic protein KR2 rhodopsin

A team of biophysicists from Russia, Germany, and France, featuring researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, has discovered and studied the structure of the KR2 rhodopsin under physiological conditions. This pioneering work breaks ground for a future breakthrough in optogenetics, a highly relevant area of biomedicine with applications in neurological disease treatment and m

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Scientists investigate dwarf planet's ring

Discovered in 2004, Haumea is a dwarf planet located beyond Pluto's orbit in a region of the solar system called the Kuiper Belt. Pluto was demoted from the category of fully fledged planets in 2006 because of the discovery of Haumea and other dwarf planets.

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Tissue chip headed to International Space Station for osteoarthritis study

On May 4, a National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)-supported tissue-chip system with direct clinical applications to health conditions here on Earth was launched on the SpaceX CRS 17/Falcon 9 rocket.

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Coca-Cola and Corporate Sponsored Research

A new study reveals that Coca-Cola included restrictive clauses in some research funding contracts. This is a good opportunity to review how such behavior can be stopped.

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What Does It Mean to Be ‘Ready’ for a Relationship?

Six months after her divorce, Jo Carter, a project manager at a university in Madison, Wisconsin, thought she was ready to date. She had married her high-school prom date a year after graduating from college, and they were together for 19 years before splitting up. “So I’m newly divorced at 41, and I haven’t been on a date with someone new since I was 20, maybe,” she says. “And the dating scene i

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Blockering av cellernas proteinfabriker kan minska cancerspridning

När tumörer går mot mer avancerade stadier backar de i sin utvecklingsfas, blir mer aggressiva och förlorar egenskapen hos den ursprungliga vävnaden. De erhåller också en förmåga att förflytta sig, vilket gör att de kan sprida sig och bilda metastaser på andra ställen i kroppen, som så småningom kan leda till av patienten avlider. För att tumörer i kroppens epitelvävnad, till exempel i hud och sl

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Scientists dunked test tubes in hot springs to recreate life’s origins

Nearly 4 billion years after life arose on Earth, researchers have been trying to recreate the first steps towards life in hot, bubbling pools in New Zealand

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Psychiatry's Inevitable Hubris

Can clinicians help their patients even in the absence of certainty? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Astronomers Assemble the Most Detailed Picture of the Universe Ever

Astronomers have used data from the Hubble to create the largest, deepest look at the universe ever recorded. The post Astronomers Assemble the Most Detailed Picture of the Universe Ever appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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D eadly Japanese earthquake study retracted over false data

D eadly Japanese earthquake study retracted over false data D eadly Japanese earthquake study retracted over false data, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01466-2 The paper is the third study about the 2016 Kuamamoto earthquake to be retracted.

4h

Infections and Drugs to Treat Them Tied to Eating Disorders in Teens

A new study adds to growing evidence that immune system dysfunction and altered gut microbes may contribute to the development of eating disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Support the JASON science-advisory group

Support the JASON science-advisory group Support the JASON science-advisory group, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01435-9 The elite panel that guides the US government is undermined by wavering financial support. More-secure backing is in the national interest.

5h

How Tiny Crustaceans Survive the Crushing Pressures of the Mariana Trench

As if preparing for battle, some shrimplike creatures suit up in aluminum armor to survive the ravages of the deepest part of the oceans, a new study finds.

5h

My Wild Ride in a Robot Race Car

On a track in Northern California, our writer tags along with the scrappy tinkerers of the autonomous-vehicle gold rush, who gather to share tech and race their robot cars. It’s the Homebrew Computer Club on wheels.

5h

Psychiatry's Inevitable Hubris

Can clinicians help their patients even in the absence of certainty? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Psychiatry's Inevitable Hubris

Can clinicians help their patients even in the absence of certainty? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Contracts give Coca-Cola power to 'quash' health research, study suggests

A study of over 87,000 documents obtained through Freedom of Information requests has revealed a contract mechanism that could allow Coca-Cola to "quash" findings from some of the health research …

5h

Infections and Drugs to Treat Them Tied to Eating Disorders in Teens

A new study adds to growing evidence that immune system dysfunction and altered gut microbes may contribute to the development of eating disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Antimatter Is Both a Particle and a Wave, New Experiment Confirms

Antimatter is made of waves, and physicists have proven it at the level of a single antimatter particle.

5h

Infections and Drugs to Treat Them Tied to Eating Disorders in Teens

A new study adds to growing evidence that immune system dysfunction and altered gut microbes may contribute to the development of eating disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Infections and Drugs to Treat Them Tied to Eating Disorders in Teens

A new study adds to growing evidence that immune system dysfunction and altered gut microbes may contribute to the development of eating disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Få læger udnytter særlige muligheder i lægedækningstruede områder

1,8 mio. danskere er nu tilknyttet en læge i et lægedækningstruet område, viser ny PLO-analyse. Læger i disse områder har en række fordele i overenskomsten, som kun få indtil videre har benyttet.

5h

This new lifelike biomaterial self-reproduces and has a metabolism

submitted by /u/feralraindrop [link] [comments]

5h

Hackere har stjålet 270 mio. kr. i kryptovaluta fra vekselbureau

Verdens største kryptovaluta-vekselbureau, Binance, er blevet ramt af et datalæk og har fået stjålet mere end 7.000 bitcoins.

5h

John Stuart Mill's big idea: Harsh critics make good thinkers

19th-century political philosopher John Stuart Mill defended the right of free societies to explore radical and dangerous ideas. One of his arguments was based on humility: You must be prepared to be wrong, and genuinely be open to being persuaded. Put your ideas into intellectual battle by exposing them to the harshest critics. These critics will show up your flaws and make you a more sophistica

5h

Tencent Puts A Bullet In PUBG Mobile For China In Favor Of Government-Themed Clone

The mobile version of PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds (PUGB) sees over 70 million average daily users in China, but even so, Tencent Holdings is yanking the game and replacing it with a more …

5h

The Triumph of German Democracy

After the defeat of Nazi Germany, the U.S. occupation authorities carried out a series of public-opinion surveys in the American occupation zone. One question asked whether Nazism was “a bad idea, or a good idea badly carried out.” In his history of postwar Germany, Frederick Taylor writes: “The view that Nazism had been simply and unequivocally a ‘bad idea’ was never held by more than 40 percent

5h

The Brain of the Pentagon

When the memorial service for the former defense official Andrew W. Marshall, who recently passed away at the age of 97, was held, an eclectic throng attended. Former senior Cabinet officials, generals (the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff gave one of the eulogies), professors, think tankers, and bureaucrats from several continents showed up. There were historians, anthropologists, econ

5h

When Algorithms Make the Evidence Vanish

I f grisly images stay up on Facebook or YouTube long enough, self-appointed detectives around the world sometimes use them to reconstruct a crime scene. In July 2017, a video capturing the execution of 18 people appeared on Facebook. The clip opened with a half-dozen armed men presiding over several rows of detainees. Dressed in bright-orange jumpsuits and black hoods, the captives knelt in the

5h

Lincoln’s Lid

Even in our fractious, ill-tempered times, we can all come together to agree on this: $6 million is a lot to pay for a hat. That’s true even if the hat is a stovepipe model that once belonged to Abraham Lincoln. If it turns out not to have belonged to Lincoln, well then, the $6 million really does begin to look like a serious extravagance. And if you borrowed the $6 million to pay for the hat tha

5h

How Authoritarians Manipulate Elections

When Recep Erdoğan was first elected prime minister of Turkey, in 2003, he vowed to respect the country’s democratic institutions, and to vacate office if he ever lost the public’s trust. The reality of Erdoğan’s rule has been rather more bleak. Although international newspapers and magazines initially portrayed him as a democratic reformer, he systematically expanded his powers and purged oppone

5h

Iceland turns carbon dioxide to rock for cleaner air

In the heart of Iceland's volcano country, 21st-century alchemists are transforming carbon dioxide into rock for eternity, cleaning the air of harmful emissions that cause global warming.

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Fraud Simple

US cancer research professors Paul B Fisher, Paul Dent and Stephen Grant look like the characters of a Joel and Ethan Coen crime movie, unfortunately never filmed. Smut Clyde will give you a peek into their spree of data manipulation

5h

Ny teknologi og bedre batterier: Batteritoget er tilbage på skinnerne

PLUS. Batteritog bliver nu et alternativ, som flere tog­operatører kigger imod. De første overvejelser er i gang i Danmark.

5h

This Company Says The Future Of Nuclear Energy Is Smaller, Cheaper And Safer

An Oregon company plans a new kind of nuclear power plant that many consider the future of the industry. It's smaller and cheaper and could work well with renewable energy. (Image credit: NuScale Power)

6h

Èn fælles akut indgang for praktiserende læger i Nordjylland

Praktiserende læger i Region Nordjylland skal nu kun ringe ét sted hen, når akutte patienter skal sendes videre til behandling på hospitalet. Den fælles visitation skal spare tid og ressourcer, lyder det fra regionen.

6h

1 million species are under threat. Here are 5 ways we speed up extinctions

One million of the world’s plant and animal species are now under threat of extinction, a new report finds.

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Skats it-systemer kan ikke tale sammen: Nu kan 100.000 danskere miste deres nummerplader

Mens Udviklings- og Forenklingsstyrelsen forsøger at få Skats it-systemer til at køre på skinner, gennemgår Skattestyrelsen manuelt de danske bilejeres misligholdte gæld.

6h

Pilotanlæg henter værdi ud af rester fra produktionen af rapsolie

PLUS. Teknologisk Institut har sammensat et skalérbart og fleksibelt anlæg, der kan hente ny værdi ud af rester fra fødevareproduktion.

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Britain to go a full week without coal

submitted by /u/Saoirse-on-Thames [link] [comments]

6h

Ultra-secure form of virtual money proposed

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Blindtarmsinflammation och akne signalerar ökad risk för prostatacancer

Det är känt sedan tidigare att inflammation bidrar till utveckling av många cancerformer. Den nya studien pekar på att det också skulle kunna gälla för prostatacancer. – Vi kunde se att män som hade haft blindtarmsinflammation eller hade akne vid tiden för mönstring oftare fick prostatacancer senare i livet. En möjlig förklaring till det är benägenhet att utveckla en viss typ av inflammation, säg

6h

Superlattice by charged block copolymer self-assembly

Superlattice by charged block copolymer self-assembly Superlattice by charged block copolymer self-assembly, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10141-z Understanding the phase behavior of charged block copolymers may potentially lead to unexplored self-assembled morphologies. Here, the authors report the preparation of ion-containing diblock copolymers featuring a superlattice

6h

Enhancing the performance of pure organic room-temperature phosphorescent luminophores

Enhancing the performance of pure organic room-temperature phosphorescent luminophores Enhancing the performance of pure organic room-temperature phosphorescent luminophores, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10033-2 Pure organic molecules displaying room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) are a rapidly emerging class of luminophores. In this Review, the authors discuss the pri

6h

Deep-ocean mixing driven by small-scale internal tides

Deep-ocean mixing driven by small-scale internal tides Deep-ocean mixing driven by small-scale internal tides, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10149-5 The geography of deep-ocean mixing driven by internal tides is poorly constrained in ocean models. Here the authors unveil the global variability of energetic small-scale internal tides, combining an analytical model with sate

6h

Initial state of DNA-Dye complex sets the stage for protein induced fluorescence modulation

Initial state of DNA-Dye complex sets the stage for protein induced fluorescence modulation Initial state of DNA-Dye complex sets the stage for protein induced fluorescence modulation, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10137-9 Protein-induced fluorescence enhancement (PIFE) is a popular tool for characterizing protein-DNA interactions. Here, authors provide a perspective on un

6h

Maritime Continent water cycle regulates low-latitude chokepoint of global ocean circulation

Maritime Continent water cycle regulates low-latitude chokepoint of global ocean circulation Maritime Continent water cycle regulates low-latitude chokepoint of global ocean circulation, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10109-z The freshwater surface layer from the south China seas weakens the Indonesian throughflow during boreal winter, but the impact of the monsoon water cy

6h

Synthesis of an aromatic N-heterocycle derived from biomass and its use as a polymer feedstock

Synthesis of an aromatic N-heterocycle derived from biomass and its use as a polymer feedstock Synthesis of an aromatic N-heterocycle derived from biomass and its use as a polymer feedstock, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10178-0 Aromatic N-heterocyclic compounds are important chemicals, but produced from petroleum. Here the authors show a pyridazine-based compound 6-(4-hyd

6h

Transient opening of trimeric prefusion RSV F proteins

Transient opening of trimeric prefusion RSV F proteins Transient opening of trimeric prefusion RSV F proteins, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09807-5 The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) F glycoprotein forms a trimeric complex and mediates viral entry. Using structures of RSV F in complex with antibodies, Gilman et al. here show a breathing motion of the prefusion conforma

6h

Nanopore blockade sensors for ultrasensitive detection of proteins in complex biological samples

Nanopore blockade sensors for ultrasensitive detection of proteins in complex biological samples Nanopore blockade sensors for ultrasensitive detection of proteins in complex biological samples, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10147-7 Nanopore sensors have long analysis times when analytes are at low concentration and non-specific signals in complex media. Here the authors u

6h

Binance says hackers stole $40 million worth of bitcoin in one transaction

Binance said no user funds will be affected, and that it will use an emergency insurance fund to cover the losses in full.

6h

As climate changes, small increases in rainfall may cause widespread road outages

As more rain falls on a warming planet, a new computer model shows that it may not take a downpour to cause widespread disruption of road networks. The model combined data on road networks with the hills and valleys of topography to reveal 'tipping points' at which even small localized increases in rain cause widespread road outages.

6h

The science of magic, dung beetles on parade, and the unexplored depths: Books in brief

The science of magic, dung beetles on parade, and the unexplored depths: Books in brief The science of magic, dung beetles on parade, and the unexplored depths: Books in brief, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01423-z Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

6h

Daily briefing: Formatting tips to smooth the review process for your paper

Daily briefing: Formatting tips to smooth the review process for your paper Daily briefing: Formatting tips to smooth the review process for your paper, Published online: 02 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01459-1 How to polish your paper’s formatting quirks, the new physics needed to probe the origins of life and a call to stop industry writing the rules for AI.

6h

E.P.A. Leaders Disregarded Agency’s Experts in Issuing Asbestos Rule, Memos Show

The rule, issued in April, restricted the use of asbestos, a known carcinogen, but agency scientists and lawyers had called in two memos for a ban.

7h

Efter besparelser og nyt budget: Milliardbyggeriet af Statens Naturhistoriske Museum kan nu gå i gang

Museumsbyggeriet til over en milliard kroner er klar til første spadestik, men tidsplanen er uklar og økonomien fortrolig.

7h

Real-world safety and efficacy of paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir plus dasabuvir ± ribavirin in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 and advanced hepatic fibrosis or compensated cirrhosis: a multicenter pooled analysis

Real-world safety and efficacy of paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir plus dasabuvir ± ribavirin in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 and advanced hepatic fibrosis or compensated cirrhosis: a multicenter pooled analysis Real-world safety and efficacy of paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir plus dasabuvir ± ribavirin in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 and advanced hepatic fibrosis o

7h

Stages identifying and transcriptome profiling of the floral transition in Juglans regia

Stages identifying and transcriptome profiling of the floral transition in Juglans regia Stages identifying and transcriptome profiling of the floral transition in Juglans regia , Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43582-z Stages identifying and transcriptome profiling of the floral transition in Juglans regia

7h

Simultaneous Quantitation of Cationic and Non-ionic Contrast Agents in Articular Cartilage Using Synchrotron MicroCT Imaging

Simultaneous Quantitation of Cationic and Non-ionic Contrast Agents in Articular Cartilage Using Synchrotron MicroCT Imaging Simultaneous Quantitation of Cationic and Non-ionic Contrast Agents in Articular Cartilage Using Synchrotron MicroCT Imaging, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43276-6 Simultaneous Quantitation of Cationic and Non-ionic Contrast Agents in Articular Carti

7h

Neuralized family member NEURL1 is a ubiquitin ligase for the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase 9A

Neuralized family member NEURL1 is a ubiquitin ligase for the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase 9A Neuralized family member NEURL1 is a ubiquitin ligase for the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase 9A, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43069-x Neuralized family member NEURL1 is a ubiquitin ligase for the cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase 9A

7h

A Bio-inspired Hypoxia Sensor using HIF1a-Oxygen-Dependent Degradation Domain

A Bio-inspired Hypoxia Sensor using HIF1a-Oxygen-Dependent Degradation Domain A Bio-inspired Hypoxia Sensor using HIF1a-Oxygen-Dependent Degradation Domain, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43618-4 A Bio-inspired Hypoxia Sensor using HIF1a-Oxygen-Dependent Degradation Domain

7h

Lattice Discontinuities of 1T-TaS2 across First Order Charge Density Wave Phase Transitions

Lattice Discontinuities of 1T-TaS 2 across First Order Charge Density Wave Phase Transitions Lattice Discontinuities of 1T-TaS 2 across First Order Charge Density Wave Phase Transitions, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43307-2 Lattice Discontinuities of 1T-TaS 2 across First Order Charge Density Wave Phase Transitions

7h

Non-invasive obstetric anal sphincter injury diagnostics using impedance spectroscopy

Non-invasive obstetric anal sphincter injury diagnostics using impedance spectroscopy Non-invasive obstetric anal sphincter injury diagnostics using impedance spectroscopy, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43637-1 Non-invasive obstetric anal sphincter injury diagnostics using impedance spectroscopy

7h

As climate changes, small increases in rainfall may cause widespread road outages

As more rain falls on a warming planet, a new computer model shows that it may not take a downpour to cause widespread disruption of road networks. The model combined data on road networks with the hills and valleys of topography to reveal "tipping points" at which even small localized increases in rain cause widespread road outages.

7h

Deep learning could reveal why the world works the way it does

At a major AI research conference, one researcher laid out how existing AI techniques might be used to analyze causal relationships in data.

7h

How Brain-Computer Interface Technology Could Change the World

https://medium.com/@advaitjoshi1998/the-rise-of-the-connected-human-organism-the-future-of-humanity-51ebd717ce0f ​ What do you think about this? submitted by /u/ajarch [link] [comments]

7h

Study shows cell's cytoskeleton does more than hold up a cell, it transfers energy

Dysfunctions and malformations in the scaffold of a cell are thought to contribute to heart muscle weakness, neurodegenerative disease and even deafness. Now biophysics research at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) has taken a closer look at a cell's cytoskeleton and found a new purpose: It aids in energy transfer and information processing within neurons.

7h

Australia regulator blocks massive TPG-Vodafone merger

Australian regulators on Wednesday blocked the multi-billion-dollar merger between Vodafone Hutchison Australia and TPG Telecom, in a surprise announcement that sent shares in the two firms plunging.

7h

US regulators under scrutiny as they look to punish Facebook

Federal privacy regulators are under scrutiny in Congress as they negotiate a record fine with Facebook to punish the company for alleged violations of its users' privacy.

7h

Study shows cell's cytoskeleton does more than hold up a cell, it transfers energy

Dysfunctions and malformations in the scaffold of a cell are thought to contribute to heart muscle weakness, neurodegenerative disease and even deafness. Now biophysics research at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) has taken a closer look at a cell's cytoskeleton and found a new purpose: It aids in energy transfer and information processing within neurons.

7h

Jakt på okända ämnen i dricksvattnet

Svenska vattenverk arbetar hårt för att säkerställa god kvalitet på vårt dricksvatten. För att förhindra sjukdomsspridning behöver vattenverken klorera vattnet. Ett dilemma är att kloreringen kan leda till att potentiellt hälsoskadliga biprodukter bildas. Bara ett fåtal kända biprodukter kontrolleras vanligtvis i dricksvattnet, bland annat de så kallade trihalometanerna (till exempel kloroform),

7h

Elections: New report highlights innovative research on 21st century political world

How and why people become engaged in politics? Are the electronic voting machines immune to vote-rigging? Can we tackle the growing phenomenon of misinformation on social media? What impact the financial crash had on the development of political conflict in Europe? Is civil society increasingly dependent on state finance and regulation? Here are some of the questions, ERC grantees investigate and

7h

Europæiske industrivirksomheder får råderet over nye 5G-frekvenser

I Tyskland dedikerer telemyndigheder 100 MHz 5G-frekvenser til industrivirksomheder senere i år. Noget lignende gør sig gældende i Sverige, mens DI ikke har oplevet dansk efterspørgsel på lokale 5G-netværk i industrien.

7h

Fix the broken food system in three steps

Fix the broken food system in three steps Fix the broken food system in three steps, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01420-2 Build a global network for mapping, modelling and managing agriculture, biodiversity, trade and nutrition, argue Guido Schmidt-Traub, Michael Obersteiner and Aline Mosnier.

8h

Image of the Day: Micro Cleaners

Microrobots kill bacteria and clean surfaces covered in biofilm.

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New legal data traces almost 11 years of state 'zero tolerance' school discipline policies

A new legal dataset published on LawAtlas.org today shows shifts and trends in state-level "zero tolerance" or exclusionary school discipline laws, focusing on how the laws regulate expulsion and suspension.

8h

Podd: Kartlägger cancercellernas fingeravtryck

Tack vare de senaste årens extremt snabba teknikutveckling kan cancerforskare leta efter ledtrådar, både bland våra och cancercellernas gener. Men hur kan kunskap om förändringar i cancertumören leda till nya behandlingar och vad skiljer en cancercell från en vanlig cell?

8h

Festivals claim the description 'festival tent' implies they're single-use

Organisers of more than 60 festivals say calling them 'festival tents' just encourages people to leave them behind.

8h

Research team finds new ways to generate stem cells more efficiently

Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are among the most important tools in modern biomedical research, leading to new and promising possibilities in precision medicine. To create them requires transforming a cell of one type, such as skin, into something of a blank slate, so it has the potential to become virtually any other kind of cell in the body, useful for regenerative therapies for everythin

8h

Research team finds new ways to generate stem cells more efficiently

Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are among the most important tools in modern biomedical research, leading to new and promising possibilities in precision medicine. To create them requires transforming a cell of one type, such as skin, into something of a blank slate, so it has the potential to become virtually any other kind of cell in the body, useful for regenerative therapies for everythin

8h

8h

Move over, silicon switches: There's a new way to compute

Logic and memory devices, such as the hard drives in computers, now use nanomagnetic mechanisms to store and manipulate information. Unlike silicon transistors, which have fundamental efficiency limitations, they require no energy to maintain their magnetic state: Energy is needed only for reading and writing information.

8h

Siemens on track for 2019 ahead of power and gas spinoff

German industrial conglomerate Siemens said Wednesday it was sticking to its targets for 2018-19 after a steady second quarter, having announced the spinoff of its historic power and gas unit a day before.

9h

Jerusalem's dilemma over hordes of stray cats

A dozen cats wake up in cages stacked on top of one another, a pungent odour in the air, while in a room next door two vets work diligently.

9h

9h

Jerusalem's dilemma over hordes of stray cats

A dozen cats wake up in cages stacked on top of one another, a pungent odour in the air, while in a room next door two vets work diligently.

9h

New space race to bring satellite internet to the world

Anxiety has set in across the space industry ever since the world's richest man, Jeff Bezos, revealed Project Kuiper: a plan to put 3,236 satellites in orbit to provide high-speed internet across the globe.

9h

Lyft loss widens to $1.1 bn, unveils Waymo partnership

Lyft said Tuesday its loss in the past quarter widened to $1.1 billion in the ride-hailing giant's first financial report as a public company, as it announced it was teaming up with former Google car unit Waymo on autonomous taxis.

9h

New Zealand unveils plan to go carbon neutral by 2050

New Zealand introduced legislation Wednesday to make the South Pacific nation carbon neutral by 2050, although greenhouse gas emissions from the economically vital agricultural sector will not have to meet the commitment.

9h

Pixel 3A vs. Pixel 3: how the specs compare for Google’s latest phones

Google just took the wraps off its latest smartphone: the Pixel 3A, a cheaper version of its flagship Pixel phone that starts at just $400, or roughly half of what the more powerful …

9h

China’s mountain observatory begins hunt for origins of cosmic rays

China’s mountain observatory begins hunt for origins of cosmic rays China’s mountain observatory begins hunt for origins of cosmic rays, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01467-1 The Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory is now operational.

9h

Toyota annual net profit drops by a quarter

Japanese car giant Toyota said Wednesday its annual net profit fell by a quarter, despite record sales, blaming investment losses—but it forecast an upturn in the year ahead.

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US is hotbed of climate change denial, major global survey finds

Exclusive : Out of 23 big countries, only Saudi Arabia and Indonesia had higher proportion of doubters The US is a hotbed of climate science denial when compared with other countries, with international polling finding a significant number of Americans do not believe human-driven climate change is occurring. A total of 13% of Americans polled in a 23-country survey conducted by the YouGov-Cambrid

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10h

A cold-water cure? My weekend with the ‘Ice Man’

Wim Hof claims cold-water immersion can help fight modern diseases. As outdoor swimming becomes ever more popular in the UK, photojournalist Jonny Weeks joined him for a weekend to experience it firsthand “Look at this beautiful tree. An oak, Quercus robur . It’s yelling at us, ‘Helloooo!’” says Wim Hof, the doyen of cold endurance stunts, as we head across Hampstead Heath , north London, for a s

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A U.S. Ally Is Turning to China to ‘Build, Build, Build’

CLARK, Philippines—Vince Dizon makes sure his guests take in the view from his ninth-story office before they leave. A set of windows looks out over a hazy, expansive airfield that was the center of the United States’ largest overseas military base, until it was handed back to the Philippines in 1991. The concrete skeleton of a new commercial-airline terminal can now be seen in the distance. Dizo

10h

Move over, silicon switches: There's a new way to compute

Researchers have introduced a voltage-controlled topological spin switch for logic and memory devices, such as computer hard drives, that now use nanomagnetic mechanisms to store and manipulate information. Unlike silicon transistors, these devices require no energy to maintain their magnetic state: Energy is needed only for reading and writing information. The researchers' innovation greatly redu

11h

Researchers discover new pathway for improving metabolic health

Blocking the action of an enzyme involved in protein digestion may improve metabolic health, according to a new study published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology–Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. The paper was chosen as an APSselect article for May.

11h

Clean fuel cells could be cheap enough to replace gas engines in vehicles

Advancements in zero-emission fuel cells could make the technology cheap enough to replace traditional gasoline engines in vehicles.

11h

CMU researchers make transformational AI seem 'unremarkable'

A surgeon might never feel the need to ask an AI for advice, much less allow it to make a clinical decision for them, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University say. But an AI might guide decisions if it were embedded in the decision-making routines already used by the clinical team, providing AI-generated predictions and evaluations as part of the overall mix of information. It's an approach they

11h

No developmental differences in children conceived via assisted reproductive technology

A study comparing developmental milestones of children conceived via ART and spontaneously conceived children showed both groups achieved developmental milestones in a similar timeline. A significant difference existed at 12 months where those conceived through ART were more likely to report their child met all milestones than spontaneously conceived children's parents. Developmental milestones we

11h

Could sleep molecules lead to a blood test for Alzheimer's disease?

A new study published today in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, has found that a particular class of molecules may help with diagnosing Alzheimer's Disease.

11h

Survey: New moms often overlook critical postpartum care during 'fourth trimester'

A new mom's world is forever changed when her baby arrives. Priorities often shift from themselves to their children, and their own health can fall to the bottom of their to-do lists during the months after delivery, known as the fourth trimester. A new national survey by Orlando Health found more than a quarter of women did not have a plan to manage their health during this time, while more than

11h

Lentils will help you run faster: Communicating food benefits gets kids to eat healthier

Affirming statements like 'eat your lentils if you want to grow bigger and run faster' are more effective at getting kids to make healthy food choices than presenting the food repeatedly without conversation.

11h

Teaching children to eat healthy: Repetition is the key

Early childhood is a critical period for establishing healthy eating behaviors, yet many preschoolers in the United States are not meeting dietary recommendations. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, found repeated opportunities for children to become familiar with the food without pressure helped them understand the benefits of healthy eating and

11h

Menneske-robotten Atlas lærer sig selv at 'gå på line'

Ved hjælp af laserteknologi og algoritmer finder robotten vej hen over en smal planke mellem to platforme.

12h

Mini 3D-printed heart offers hope for transplants

An Israeli experiment holds promise for a solution to organ shortages

12h

How greed and corruption blew up South Korea’s nuclear industry

submitted by /u/Midnight_in_Seattle [link] [comments]

12h

Ministeriet om snyd med vælgererklæringer: Systemdesignet burde have fanget det

Hos Økonomi- og Indenrigsministeriet medgiver man nu, at systemet til digitale vælgererklæringer nok skulle have været designet anderledes, så betænkningstiden på syv dage ikke kunne omgås.

12h

I fire år kommer S-togene til at bremse meget langsomt med nye signaler

PLUS. Først om yderligere to år er Siemens klar med en løsning, som gør, at det nye signalsystem ikke længere vil nedbremse S-togene, som om skinnerne er glatte.

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New study reveals "extraordinary change" in El Niño possibly linked to climate change

In a first, researchers have used chemical fingerprints locked within coral skeletons to build a season-by-season record of El Niño episodes dating back 400 years — a feat many experts regarded as impossible. That record, presented in a new study appearing in the scientific journal Nature Geoscience, reveals an "extraordinary change" in the behavior of El Niño, according to the researchers. That s

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IKEA tries out biodegradable fungi packaging

submitted by /u/Kyswinne [link] [comments]

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Scientists discover new antibiotic resistance gene

submitted by /u/TheEarthquakeLady [link] [comments]

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Lyft’s Loss Grows, but Execs Say the Bleeding Will Stop Soon

In its first quarterly results as a public company, Lyft said revenue almost doubled, but its loss grew even faster.

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Study Uncovers How Coca-Cola Influences Science Research

Coca-Cola has poured millions of dollars into scientific research at universities. But if the beverage giant doesn’t like what scientists find, the company has the power to make sure that their research never sees the light of day. That’s according to an analysis published in the Journal of Public Health Policy that explains how Coca-Cola uses contract agreements to influence the public health res

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Contracts give Coca-Cola power to 'quash' health research, study suggests

New study of FOI documents uncovers provisions that could allow the beverage giant to suppress findings from health science it funds at North American universities. Researchers argue that Coca-Cola's contracts run counter to their public declarations of openness.

16h

Powder from scrap tires can bring color to displays

Physicists have discovered how to transform recovered carbon black powder to offer a wide range of colors for potential display applications. Recovered carbon black powder is a common pigment produced from scrap rubber tires. There is a growing demand to use it as an environmentally friendly and sustainable material as a reinforcing filler in tires and many other applications. Applying focused la

16h

Google’s Latest Message: We’re Just Here to Help

Google executives outlined new privacy-focused services at its annual I/O conference—while omitting that they still need to make money.

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Google's $399 iPhone Killer, A Bold CIA Privacy Move, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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The Atlantic Daily: Show Me the Money

What We’re Following (Reuters) China and the U.S. are on the brink of (yet another) trade war. The Trump administration is raising tariffs as a negotiation tactic in the latest trade talks between the two countries. Robert Lighthizer, the trade representative, has pushed for such brinkmanship to put an end to a Chinese campaign to steal American know-how, and to reverse the country’s decades-long

16h

Ultra-secure form of virtual money proposed

A new type of money that allows users to make decisions based on information arriving at different locations and times, and that could also protect against attacks from quantum computers, has been proposed by a researcher at the University of Cambridge.

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Cancer risk tools underused in general practice, research shows

Potentially life-saving cancer risk assessment tools are being widely underused by general practices across the UK, according to new research.

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Paper wasps capable of behavior that resembles logical reasoning

A new University of Michigan study provides the first evidence of transitive inference, the ability to use known relationships to infer unknown relationships, in a nonvertebrate animal: the lowly paper wasp.

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The clinical and biological significance of HER2 over-expression in breast ductal carcinoma in situ: A large study from a single institution

Upcoming publication from the British Journal of Cancer, investigating HER2 expression as a predictor of recurrence and development in patients with DCIS.

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‘Underwater elephants’ give and take with coral reefs

New research clarifies the relationship between bumphead parrotfish and the reef environments they call home. “They’re underwater elephants,” says Grace Goldberg of the University of California, Santa Barbara, and lead author of the paper in Coral Reefs . Similar to the huge land mammals, bumphead parrotfish ( Bolbometopon muricatum ) are enormous. Reaching 1.4 meters (over 4.5 feet) in length, t

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Despite fewer crimes, millennials face more arrests

Millennials are more likely to be arrested than their predecessor counterparts regardless of self-reported criminal activity, according to a new study. Furthermore, black men who self-reported no offenses were 419 percent more likely to be arrested at the beginning of the 21st century than non-offending blacks of the previous generation, and 31.5 percent more likely to be arrested than whites of

16h

UK drones map Chernobyl's 'Red Forest'

British scientists undertake a new aerial survey of one of the most radioactive locations on Earth.

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The coolest Android Q features Google just announced—and how to try them

Technology Live Caption, Dark Theme, and more. If you missed Google's I/O keynote but want to know what's new with Android, read on.

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Insane pressure and heat ‘dope’ nanodiamonds

Researchers have found a way to use extremely high pressure and temperature to dope nanodiamonds. As reported in Science Advances , researchers used this approach to dope nanodiamonds with silicon, causing the diamonds to glow a deep red—a property that would make them useful for cell and tissue imaging. Scientists are excited about diamonds—not the types in jewelry, but the microscopic variety t

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Paper wasps capable of behavior that resembles logical reasoning

A new University of Michigan study provides the first evidence of transitive inference, the ability to use known relationships to infer unknown relationships, in a nonvertebrate animal: the lowly paper wasp.

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Paper wasps capable of behavior that resembles logical reasoning

A new University of Michigan study provides the first evidence of transitive inference, the ability to use known relationships to infer unknown relationships, in a nonvertebrate animal: the lowly paper wasp.

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S-money: Ultra-secure form of virtual money proposed

A new type of money that allows users to make decisions based on information arriving at different locations and times, and that could also protect against attacks from quantum computers, has been proposed by a researcher at the University of Cambridge.

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Apgar scores 'within the normal range' linked to higher risks of illness and death

Apgar scores of 7, 8, and 9 (considered to be within the normal range) are associated with higher risks of illness and even death in newborns, finds a large study from Sweden published by The BMJ today.

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Fewer than half of British men and women have sex at least once a week

Fewer than half of men and women in Britain aged 16-44 have sex at least once a week, reveals a large study published by The BMJ today.

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The Lancet:Targets to reduce harmful alcohol use are likely to be missed as global alcohol intake increases

Increasing rates of alcohol use suggest that the world is not on track to achieve targets against harmful alcohol use, according to a study of 189 countries' alcohol intake between 1990-2017 and estimated intake up to 2030, published in The Lancet.

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The potential of nanobots to act as a second immune system

Is it theoretically possible that one day there will be nanobots that are injected to our bloodstream and will act as a second immune system? This second immune system would be then able to cure all cancers. Is this possible and if yes why do we not have it yet? submitted by /u/BlackViper123 [link] [comments]

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Britons having less sex and digital life may be to blame – study

Research finds drop in sexual activity steepest for married and cohabiting couples Sex is on the decline in Britain, particularly among married and cohabiting couples, according to a major study that suggests the increasingly busy lives we lead and distractions of the internet may be partly to blame. The data comes from more than 34,000 people in the UK who took part in three waves of a large stu

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Flickering light seems to help mice with Alzheimer’s-like symptoms

Health The next question is whether the same treatment will work in humans. In a new study out this week that builds on past work, a team of researchers found that light pulses protect against neurodegeneration and change the expression of genes…

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Lyft loss widens to $1.1 bn, unveils Waymo partnership

Lyft said Tuesday its loss in the past quarter widened to $1.1 billion in the ride-hailing giant's first financial report as a public company, as it announced it was teaming up with former Google …

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Enemies No More: Microsoft Brings the Linux Kernel to Windows

Microsoft is bringing the heart of Linux to Windows, the latest sign of the software giant's increasing receptiveness to open source software.

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Author Correction: Infection with the Makona variant results in a delayed and distinct host immune response compared to previous Ebola virus variants

Author Correction: Infection with the Makona variant results in a delayed and distinct host immune response compared to previous Ebola virus variants Author Correction: Infection with the Makona variant results in a delayed and distinct host immune response compared to previous Ebola virus variants, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42949-6 Author Correction: Infection with th

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How to Limit How Long Google Keeps Your Data

Google has a new feature that lets you delete your web and app activity after three months. Here's how to use it.

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#CitSciDay2019: Global Community

Citizen Science Day 2019 (#CitSciDay2019) results prove that all of us can make huge contributions to research. Citizen Science Day is an annual celebration presented by SciStarter and the Citizen Science Association in an effort to connect people to real research in need of their help. It taps the curiosity and observations of people to contribute to significant scientific research efforts. This

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Author Correction: Observation of moiré excitons in WSe2/WS2 heterostructure superlattices

Author Correction: Observation of moiré excitons in WSe 2 /WS 2 heterostructure superlattices Author Correction: Observation of moiré excitons in WSe 2 /WS 2 heterostructure superlattices, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1206-3 Author Correction: Observation of moiré excitons in WSe 2 /WS 2 heterostructure superlattices

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Author Correction: Future response of global coastal wetlands to sea-level rise

Author Correction: Future response of global coastal wetlands to sea-level rise Author Correction: Future response of global coastal wetlands to sea-level rise, Published online: 08 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1205-4 Author Correction: Future response of global coastal wetlands to sea-level rise

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SNAPSHOT: A Tropical Velvet Worm's Death Trap

Using nozzle-like extensions on the side of its head, a tropical velvet worm shoots streams of sticky slime when hunting or defending itself. Within the fluid are “nanoglobules,” tiny balls made of lipids and proteins. Once the slime hits the target, it’s over fast: The movement of the struggling prey, such as beetles and termites, causes the globules to harden into fibers as strong as nylon, crea

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: McGahn but Not Forgotten

What We’re Following Today It’s Tuesday, May 7. ‣ The White House has instructed former White House Counsel Don McGahn not to comply with a subpoena from House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler. McGahn’s decision not to comply could lead Nadler to hold him in contempt of Congress. ‣ Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed into law a bill that will prohibit abortion after a heartbeat is detected in an em

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Electric Aircraft Will Help Save The World | CleanTechnica

submitted by /u/bebesiege [link] [comments]

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Social media and boredom: How technology is changing our emotions

submitted by /u/Bizkitgto [link] [comments]

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Meet Elisabeth Bik, who finds problematic images in scientific papers for free

Retraction Watch readers may know the name Elisabeth Bik, whose painstaking work inspecting tens of thousands of Western blot images has led to dozens of retractions in journals including PLOS ONE. Today in The Scientist, we profile Bik, a microbiologist who calls herself a “super-introvert.” Bik tells us: We need this to be a career … Continue reading Meet Elisabeth Bik, who finds problematic ima

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Pilot Dave Mackay on becoming the first Scot in space

In February Dave Mackay guided Virgin Galactic's space craft to almost 56 miles (90km) above earth.

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Navajo Nation and US health agency reach data-sharing agreement

Navajo Nation and US health agency reach data-sharing agreement Navajo Nation and US health agency reach data-sharing agreement, Published online: 07 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01477-z Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health will have access to health information from tribe members.

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This “Peeling” Tectonic Plate Could Cause Catastrophic Earthquakes

Drifting Apart The edge of a tectonic plate, one of the massive shelves of crust that carry the continents and ocean’s floor, is splitting right down the middle. Scientists started to study the plate, located off the coast of Portugal, after it caused an unexpected earthquake and tsunami in 1969. They now suspect that they’re witnessing the birth of a new subduction zone, according to National Ge

18h

China's Scientists Are the New Kids on the Arctic Block

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo berated China this week for using its growing Arctic research program as a Trojan horse for its military and commercial goals.

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See Tesla’s Enhanced Summon Pick up a Driver in a Parking Lot

Get Over Here Way back in January 2016, Tesla released an Autopilot update containing what CEO Elon Musk called the “first baby step in Tesla Summon capability.” After its release, Tesla owners could instruct their vehicles to autonomously pull in or out of a parking space or garage with the push of a button. They just couldn’t expect the car to make any turns. In late 2018, Musk began teasing a

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Android phones will soon receive a 'driving mode' courtesy of Google Assistant

If your car doesn't support Android Auto, you won't be completely out of luck when it comes to safely accessing your contacts, messages, and navigation app of choice moving forward. At their …

19h

Scientists Identify “Pokémon Region” in Gamers’ Brains — Seriously

Detect Seasoned Pokémon masters likely know the original 151 like the back of their hand. And now, new research reveals how that’s possible: brain scans show the region of the brain responsible for storing information about Pokémon. Not only did the neurological Pokédex stay consistent among adults who played the Pokémon games as kids, but it was only responsible for recognizing Pokémon, accordin

19h

UW-Madison research team finds new ways to generate stem cells more efficiently

A new study published in Cell Reports by a team of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Wisconsin Institute for Discovery and School of Medicine and Public Health could improve the efficiency of creating induced pluripont stem cells.

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Net a lifetime of browsing privacy for only $29 with VPN Unlimited

Get lifetime online protection for just $29.99. Net a lifetime of browsing privacy and online protection for only $29 with VPN Unlimited.

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Device auto-squeezes bag valve masks to save lives

A new cost-effective device automates the compression of manual bag valve masks, which feed fresh air into the lungs of intubated patients. The inspiration for the student-led project came when team member Natalie Dickman was covering a shift with Houston EMS, a requirement of a Rice University class in emergency medical techniques. She squeezed the bag again and again in an effort to revive a vi

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At Google I/O 2019, Google Announces Pixel 3a, Android Q, and More

The company rolled out an improved Assistant, some new phones, and updated Android OS, among other things, at its annual developers conference.

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X-ray pulses lasting quadrillionths of a second march in step

X-ray pulses lasting quadrillionths of a second march in step X-ray pulses lasting quadrillionths of a second march in step, Published online: 07 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01457-3 Method produces ultra-bright bursts of uniform X-rays that could help researchers to peer inside living cells.

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Only 1 in 5 donated lungs can actually save lives. These pigs could change the odds.

Health A new method for keeping lung tissue viable. Transplant teams reject a whopping four out of five donated lungs for simple reasons that have proved nearly-impossible to solve—until now.

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Do this if you need to make decisions better and faster

For some people, decision-making comes easily. When faced with multiple options, these lucky few quickly and confidently pick the one that they think would work best. But for the rest of us, making decisions can be a challenge — especially if you have a time limit and it's a major life decision. Believe it or not, it's entirely possible to get better — and faster — at making decisions. Dean Grazi

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dnDSA and ethnicity linked with thickening of blood vessels after kidney transplant

Children who developed anti-human leukocyte antibodies against their donor kidney, known as de novo donor-specific antibodies, were more likely to experience carotid intima-media thickening than those without these antibodies, according to preliminary research presented May 7, 2019, during the 10th Congress of the International Pediatric Transplant Association.

20h

The Sea Lab's Outreach Coordinator contributes to synthesis on Deepwater Horizon oil spill

The Sea Lab's Discovery Hall Programs Outreach Coordinator Rachel McDonald's work conducting outreach on ACER's research is featured in a special issue of the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative's (GoMRI) Current: The Journal of Marine Education.

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Creativity isn't just for the young, new research shows

There are two peaks to creativity: One in our mid-20s and another 30 years later. Conceptual innovators set out with explicit goals that they carefully execute, while experimental innovators are synthesists, collecting ideas and incorporating them as they age. The study focuses on 31 Nobel laureates in economics. None Over the weekend, my wife and I watched The Creative Brain on Netflix. Being a

20h

1st Evidence of a Black Hole Devouring a Neutron Star Sends Ripples Through Space-Time

For the first time, astronomers might have found proof that a black hole collided with a neutron star

20h

Unnatural Order: The Human Threat To Life On Earth

A new U.N. report says one million species of plants and animals are facing extinction. What can we do about it? (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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NASA's DART Mission Will Try to Deflect a Near-Earth Asteroid

(Inside Science) — Science fiction books and films have frequently featured the threat of a giant asteroid colliding with our planet and making humans go the way of the dinosaurs. But smaller space rocks also pose threats, and they tend to be harder to spot in advance. A massive asteroid on a collision course would sail through our atmosphere and explosively burst in the air or crater the ground.

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What Are Elementary Particles?

They're the smallest of the small.

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Google promises better privacy tools, smarter AI assistant

Google announced updates for its artificially intelligent voice assistant and new privacy tools to give people more control over how they're being tracked on the go or in their own home.

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Bringing out the science of wargames

A first-of-its-kind online game, released publicly today, is poised to revolutionize the field of wargaming. Developed by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories with support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, this new multi-player computer game was custom built to explore deterrence and decision-making

20h

Dogs Sacrificed by Shang Dynasty Were Just Pups. Some Were Even Buried Alive.

Life was short and sometimes brutal for many of the dogs of China's Shang Dynasty.

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Incognito Mode Will Soon Be Available In Google Maps

Google introduced Incognito Mode in its Chrome browser a long time ago. It pauses browsing history so any website you visit in that mode isn’t logged in the history. It also won’t …

20h

More Than Half of Pregnancy-Related Deaths Are Preventable, CDC Says

About 700 U.S. women die each year from pregnancy-related complications, but about 60% of these deaths could be prevented.

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A fully functional and animated Cortana hologram [May, 2017]

submitted by /u/hjalmar111 [link] [comments]

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A Scientist Finds Hope in Landmark Report on 1M Species Facing Extinction

submitted by /u/cutmybudgetplease [link] [comments]

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Losing sleep over rude colleagues? Build a "psychological buffer".

A new study has shown the reasons why incivility at work causes sleep problems such as insomnia. Negative health problems associated with workplace stress include cardiovascular disease, negative mood, and increased blood pressure. The researchers suggest creating a "psychological buffer" between you and your workplace through a variety of techniques. None A lot of attention has been given to the

20h

Ocean activity is key controller of summer monsoons

New research finds ocean activity may control the strength and intensity of summer monsoons. The results could help researchers predict how monsoons will change with warming oceans.

20h

Could this rare supernova resolve a longstanding origin debate?

Detection of a supernova with an unusual chemical signature may hold the key to solving the longstanding mystery that is the source of these violent explosions. Observations taken by the Magellan telescopes at Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory in Chile were crucial to detecting the emission of hydrogen that makes this supernova, called ASASSN-18tb, so distinctive.

20h

Groundbreaking study could lead to fast, simple test for Ebola virus

In a breakthrough that could lead to a simple and inexpensive test for Ebola virus disease, researchers have generated two antibodies to the deadly virus. The antibodies, which are inexpensive to produce, potentially could be used in a simple filter paper test to detect Ebola virus and the related Marburg virus.

20h

Tumor mutations may predict response to immunotherapy

Researchers say they have found a potential explanation for the failures.

20h

Surface protein editing in bacteria

University of Minnesota researchers have discovered this previously unknown signaling pathway that regulates surface proteins on bacteria that can lead to new targets for antibiotics.

20h

Neutrons investigate tomatoes for insights into interplant chatter

Plants are chatty creatures. In the last decade, researchers have shown plants communicate using underground fungal networks to exchange chemical information. However, exactly how that process works at the microscopic level is not well understood.

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Germany's Siemens says plans to spin off oil and gas unit

German industrial conglomerate Siemens said Tuesday it plans to spin off its struggling gas and power unit to prepare it for a potential stock market listing next year.

20h

Surface protein editing in bacteria

University of Minnesota researchers have discovered this previously unknown signaling pathway that regulates surface proteins on bacteria that can lead to new targets for antibiotics.

20h

Sunscreen Ingredients Absorbed into Blood: Study

FDA researchers report that multiple active ingredients wind up in users' bloodstream and recommend toxicology testing to investigate the clinical significance of the findings.

20h

New report examines reproducibility and replicability in science

While computational reproducibility in scientific research is generally expected when the original data and code are available, lack of ability to replicate a previous study—or obtain consistent results looking at the same scientific question but with different data—is more nuanced and occasionally can aid in the process of scientific discovery, says a new congressionally mandated report from the

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What's on tap? Michigan's economy

Need some economic growth? Grab a cold craft beer (industry).

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Train your brain to eat less sugar

A recent study led by Evan Forman, PhD, a psychology professor in Drexel University's College of Arts and Sciences, shows that a computer game can be used to train its players to eat less sugar, as way of reducing their weight and improving their health.

20h

Brazilian scientists investigate dwarf planet's ring

Theoretical paper published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society proposes an explanation for the dynamics of the ring around Haumea, a dwarf planet located beyond Pluto's orbit.

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Research brief: Surface protein editing in bacteria

UMN research delves into an unknown cell circuit in bacteria that can lead to new targets for antibiotics.

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Buying the Google Pixel 3A can get you a $100 gift card at B&H, Google Store, or Best Buy

Google’s new Pixel 3A is the best phone under $500, according to our review. Prices start at $399 for the smaller 3A, and $479 for the Pixel 3A XL. Both phones are far cheaper than …

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Google unveils Nest Hub Max, a bigger Google Home Hub with a camera

Outside of the Pixel 3a and 3a XL announcement, the only other hardware announcement at Google I/O was the Nest Hub Max. The Hub Max is a bigger Google Home Hub with bigger sound and a camera. …

20h

A False Dawn for Journalists in Southeast Asia

When the Reuters journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo were freed Tuesday after more than a year in Myanmar’s Insein prison, it was heralded as a victory for press freedom. The Pulitzer Prize–winning reporters, who were jailed in December 2017 for their reporting on the country’s crackdown of its Rohingya minority, were among thousands of prisoners released by the Myanmar government as part of a tr

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As gene testing surges, lawsuits aren’t far behind

Experts want clearer laws, regulations as medical standards evolve

20h

El Niño Is Now Stronger and Stranger, Coral Records Show

Changes to El Niño influence precipitation and temperature patterns around the globe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

The UN's devastating extinction report, explained in 5 charts

Environment Unpacking how we got here. A report by the UN IPBES says human activity is threatening the existence of over a million plant and animal species—more than ever before in human history.

20h

Clinical Trial Underway for a Natural Killer Cell Therapy

The cells, derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, are in testing as an immunotherapy for cancer patients with solid tumors.

20h

Does insulin resistance cause fibromyalgia?

Researchers were able to dramatically reduce the pain of fibromyalgia patients with medication that targeted insulin resistance.

21h

Eye's vulnerability to macular degeneration revealed

Scientists have found significant differences in the shape and biology of the same type of cell taken from different parts of the retina, according to a new study.

21h

Colorado nail salon workers face chronic air pollution, elevated cancer risk

Colorado nail salon employees face increased health risks due to high levels of indoor airborne pollutants such as formaldehyde and benzene, new research finds, concluding that working in a salon is akin to working at an oil refinery or an auto garage.

21h

Technology better than tape measure for identifying lymphedema risk

Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is better than a tape measure for assessing a woman's risk for developing lymphedema, painful swelling in the arm after breast cancer surgery.

21h

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual adolescents at elevated risk for engaging in polysubstance use

In a new study among adolescents in the United States, lesbian, gay, and bisexual adolescents were more likely than heterosexual adolescents to be polysubstance users versus non-users across multiple classes of use: experimental users, marijuana-alcohol users, tobacco-alcohol users, medium-frequency three-substance users, and high-frequency three-substance users.

21h

Groundbreaking study could lead to fast, simple test for Ebola virus

In a breakthrough that could lead to a simple and inexpensive test for Ebola virus disease, researchers have generated two antibodies to the deadly virus. The antibodies, which are inexpensive to produce, potentially could be used in a simple filter paper test to detect Ebola virus and the related Marburg virus.

21h

Could this rare supernova resolve a longstanding origin debate?

Detection of a supernova with an unusual chemical signature may hold the key to solving the longstanding mystery that is the source of these violent explosions. Observations taken by the Magellan telescopes at Carnegie's Las Campanas Observatory in Chile were crucial to detecting the emission of hydrogen that makes this supernova, called ASASSN-18tb, so distinctive.

21h

White House to Convene Committee to Address Research Obstacles

The National Science and Technology Council will bring together agency leaders to “focus on improving the safety, integrity, and productivity of research settings.”

21h

Dinosaurs Get Their Close-Ups in These Stunning Photos

Christian Voigt used analog and digital trickery to isolate individual dinosaurs from larger exhibitions.

21h

The Engineers’ Plan for Creating Border Security With Clean Energy

The nearly 2,000-mile border that separates the U.S. and Mexico is not an easily navigable environment. It meanders across deserts and canyons, riverbeds and wetlands. It’s dotted unevenly with fences, walls, and checkpoints built to control immigration between the countries. President Donald Trump, a year and a half ago, proposed putting solar panels here, on the border wall that had been a rall

21h

Why Don’t White Athletes Understand What’s Wrong With Trump?

S o far, the conversation about the upcoming Boston Red Sox visit to Donald Trump’s White House has centered around the people of color who are skipping the event. The manager Alex Cora, a critic of the Trump administration’s inexcusable treatment of Puerto Rico amid the devastation of Hurricane Maria in 2017, cited his home island’s continuing troubles as his reason for opting out. “Unfortunatel

21h

Huge Analysis Finds “No Evidence” Basic Income Is Sustainable

Looking Back The concept of universal basic income — a regular, unconditional cash payment given to all members of a society — has been around for centuries. In recent years, fear that automation will lead to widespread unemployment has shone a spotlight on the scheme and led to a number of pilot projects to test its viability. Now, a British think-tank called the New Economics Foundation (NEF) h

21h

What's on tap? Michigan's economy

Michigan State University has published a first-of-its-kind study, published in the journal Beverages, that shows the respectable economic impact of burgeoning beer and craft beers' entire value chain on the state of Michigan. Not only does the study accurately quantify Michigan's industry, but it also provides a model for all states to precisely measure their own craft beer industry.

21h

New report examines reproducibility and replicability in science

While computational reproducibility in scientific research is generally expected when the original data and code are available, lack of ability to replicate a previous study — or obtain consistent results looking at the same scientific question but with different data — is more nuanced and occasionally can aid in the process of scientific discovery, says a new congressionally mandated report fro

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