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nyheder2019maj09

Paper wasps capable of behavior that resembles logical reasoning

A new study provides the first evidence of transitive inference, the ability to use known relationships to infer unknown relationships, in a nonvertebrate animal: the lowly paper wasp.

17h

New Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur sheds light on origin of flight in Dinosauria

A new Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur from 163-million-year-old fossil deposits in northeastern China provides new information regarding the incredible richness of evolutionary experimentation that characterized the origin of flight in the Dinosauria.

1d

Aarhus Pølsefabrik A/S

En katastrofe er under hastig opsejling i Aarhus. Ja, faktisk burde Aarhus Universitetshospital blive et emne i valgkampen, skriver Dagens Medicins chefredaktør Nicolai Döllner.

13h 

Stem cell scientists clear another hurdle in creating transplant arteries

Recent work highlights a better way to grow smooth muscle cells, one of the two cellular building blocks of arteries, from pluripotent stem cells. This research is part of an effort to create artery banks — similar to blood banks common today — with readily-available material to replace diseased arteries during surgery.

2min

Dexterous herring gulls learn new tricks to adapt their feeding habits

Observations of herring gulls have shown how the coastal birds have developed complicated behavior to 'skin' sea creatures to make them safe to eat. Researchers think this feeding habit may be a response to urbanization and changes in food availability.

2min

Mortality causes universal changes in microbial community composition

Mortality causes universal changes in microbial community composition Mortality causes universal changes in microbial community composition, Published online: 09 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09925-0 Environmental stress can affect the outcome of ecological competition. Here, the authors use theory and experiments with a synthetic microbial community to show that a tradeoff between growth rate

4min

Competition for nutrients and its role in controlling immune responses

Competition for nutrients and its role in controlling immune responses Competition for nutrients and its role in controlling immune responses, Published online: 09 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10015-4 Immune cells adapt distinct metabolic strategies to accommodate specific functions associated with cell types or differentiation stages. Here in this review the authors discuss the nutrients, se

4min

Extraordinarily transparent compact metallic metamaterials

Extraordinarily transparent compact metallic metamaterials Extraordinarily transparent compact metallic metamaterials, Published online: 09 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09939-8 Designing effective dielectrics in a broad range of the spectrum is of huge interest. Here, the authors demonstrate how transparent effective dielectrics can be constructed from dense arrays of metallic nanoparticles a

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Trump Thinks Shana-Can

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, May 9. ‣ The United States revealed that it seized a North Korean freighter carrying coal ash last July, because North Korea was using the ship to evade U.S. sanctions. ‣ Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi said House Democrats might move to hold additional Trump-administration officials (past and present) in contempt if they did not adhere to Judiciary Com

11min

Give your mom the gift of mindfulness

Get a 1-year subscription to Big Think Edge for your mom this Mother's Day! A subscription unlocks dozens of lessons on our premium video learning platform. Big Think Edge teaches soft skills or, as we like to say, "thing you can do with your head", like divergent thinking, decision-making, and communication and leadership skills. None What can mindfulness do for your mom? Quite a lot of good, ac

16min

Gravitational waves leave a detectable mark, physicists say

New research shows that gravitational waves leave behind plenty of 'memories' that could help detect them even after they've passed.

16min

Precise temperature measurements with invisible light

Researchers have invented a portable, remarkably stable thermometer capable of measuring temperatures to a precision of within a few thousandths of a degree Celsius.

16min

Researchers discover 'daywake,' a siesta-suppressing gene

Researchers have identified a siesta-suppressing gene in fruit flies, which sheds light on the biology that helps many creatures, including humans, balance the benefits of a good nap against those of getting important activities done during the day.

16min

Methane-consuming bacteria could be the future of fuel

Researchers have found that the enzyme responsible for the methane-methanol conversion in methanotrophic bacteria catalyzes the reaction at a site that contains just one copper ion. This finding could lead to newly designed, human-made catalysts that can convert methane — a highly potent greenhouse gas — to readily usable methanol with the same effortless mechanism.

16min

5 Weird Things You Didn't Know About Chernobyl

Here are five weird facts you probably didn't know about Chernobyl.

27min

Give your mom the gift of mindfulness

Get a 1-year subscription to Big Think Edge for your mom this Mother's Day! A subscription unlocks dozens of lessons on our premium video learning platform. Big Think Edge teaches soft skills or, as we like to say, "thing you can do with your head", like divergent thinking, decision-making, and communication and leadership skills. None What can mindfulness do for your mom? Quite a lot of good, ac

27min

The ocean is teeming with viruses — billions and billions of them

New research suggests that there are nearly 200,000 different viral populations in the ocean. Surprisingly, the Arctic appears to be a viral hotspot. Viruses play an important role in the ocean's food chain and carbon cycle, making research such as this potentially valuable to future climate change work. None Bad news for thalassophobes; there's more than just sharks and giant squids lurking bene

27min

New brain tumor imaging technique uses protein found in scorpion venom

A novel imaging technique that uses a synthesized form of scorpion venom to light up brain tumors has shown promise in a clinical trial.

31min

Antarctic biodiversity hotspots exist wherever penguins and seals poop

Scientists have found that on the desolate Antarctic peninsula, nitrogen-rich poop from colonies of penguins and seals enriches the soil so well that it helps create biodiversity hotspots throughout the region.

31min

Exploiting parasitic yeast to kill yeast pathogens

Insights into the genes and proteins involved in the predatory behavior of a parasitic yeast species could lead to new strategies for controlling yeast pathogens.

31min

New HIV vaccine strategy 'pumps' the immune system

Scientists have found that slowly releasing an HIV vaccine could prompt the body to make more powerful antibodies against the virus.

31min

How sea level rise affects birds in coastal forests

Saltwater intrusion changes coastal vegetation that provides bird habitat. Researchers found that the transition from forests to marshes along the North Carolina coast due to climate change could benefit some bird species of concern for conservation.

31min

Congress Is Furious That NASA Doesn’t Have a Moon Plan Yet

Gotta Go Fast Back in August, the Trump Administration instructed NASA to put an astronaut on the Moon by 2024 — four years sooner than originally planned. That accelerated timeline put NASA in an unexpected tizzy, since it meant the space agency had to quickly find a way to trim four years’ worth of fat from its plans. That work hasn’t been going well, according to the Houston Chronicle — sugges

41min

Blue Origin: Bezos company aims to take people to moon by 2024

The Amazon CEO’s rocket company touts ‘vision of going to space to benefit Earth’ The tech billionaires’ space race is heating up. Jeff Bezos’s aerospace company, Blue Origin, aims to take people to the moon by 2024, he announced on Thursday. Continue reading…

42min

Jeff Bezos has unveiled Blue Origin’s lunar lander

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44min

Officials seek to open major spillway on Mississippi River

Army Corps of Engineers officials in Louisiana aim to open a historic flood control structure above New Orleans on Tuesday for an unprecedented second time in one year.

48min

Amazon's Bezos unveils lunar lander project 'Blue Moon'

Jeff Bezos, who heads both Amazon and space company Blue Origin, unveiled on Thursday a lunar lander that he said would be used to transport equipment, and possibly human beings, to the south pole of the Moon by 2024.

48min

Video games a hobby for majority of Americans, study says

Video games are enormously popular in the United States, with 164 million people—or 65 percent of adults—playing regularly, according to a study released on Thursday.

48min

Uber's rocky road to global powerhouse

Uber, set to make its stock market debut in one of the largest technology share offerings, has become a disruptive force in local transportation and generated its share of controversies.

48min

Milk expression within 8 hours associated with lactation success for VLBW infants in NICU

A study led by physician researchers at Boston Medical Center has shown that first milk expression within eight hours of giving birth is associated with the highest probability of mothers of very low-birth-weight infants being able to provide milk throughout hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit.

48min

We Don’t Want to Find Out How Powerful Mark Zuckerberg Is

The Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes made a personal, riveting case for breaking up Facebook in a new essay published in The New York Times today. His argument hinges on the idea that Mark Zuckerberg is a “good, kind person” but one whose “power is unprecedented and un-American” and whose “influence is staggering, far beyond that of anyone else in the private sector or in government.” A major, if

51min

Shanahan Finishes His Four-Month Audition for Defense Secretary

After keeping him in the audition phase for more than four months, the White House finally announced President Donald Trump’s intent to nominate Patrick Shanahan to drop the acting in his secretary-of-defense job title and make it official. He is likely to be confirmed by the Republican-held Senate, which means he will formally take leadership of a massive bureaucracy trying to fundamentally chan

51min

Gravitational waves leave a detectable mark, physicists say

Gravitational waves, first detected in 2016, offer a new window on the universe, with the potential to tell us about everything from the time following the Big Bang to more recent events in galaxy centers.

59min

Facts Aren't Enough: The Psychology Of False Beliefs

Sometimes, when we believe something, no amount of data can change our minds. This week, why we cling to our beliefs — even when they're wrong. (Image credit: Renee Klahr)

1h

Assessing battery performance: Compared to what?

Scientists must often ask themselves, compared to what? How do the results we generate in the laboratory compare with those obtained by others? How do our theoretical calculations compare with experimental data?

1h

NASA-NOAA satellite catches formation of Tropical Cyclone Lili

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of newly formed Tropical Cyclone Lili, located north of the coast of Australia's Northern Territory.

1h

Studying DNA breaks to protect future space travelers

Earth's atmosphere shields life on the ground from cosmic radiation that can damage DNA. Astronauts in space have no such protection, and that puts them at risk. An investigation on the International Space Station examines DNA damage and repair in space in order to help protect the long-term health of space travelers.

1h

Precise temperature measurements with invisible light

NIST researchers have invented a portable, remarkably stable thermometer capable of measuring temperatures to a precision of within a few thousandths of a degree Celsius.

1h

Jeff Bezos Just Unveiled Blue Origin’s Moon Lander

Alexa, Take Me to the Moon Jeff Bezos’ private space company Blue Origin revealed its long-awaited plans to go to the Moon at a mysterious press event today. Bezos showed off a brand new design of its “Blue Moon” lander, which is designed to carry 6.5 tons to the surface of the Moon. According to Bezos, the Blue Origin team has been working on the design for three years. “A very fundamental long-

1h

Mathematical framework explores how the brain keeps a beat

A new mathematical model demonstrates how neurons in the brain could work together to learn and keep a musical beat. The framework, developed by Amitabha Bose of New Jersey Institute of Technology and Aine Byrne and John Rinzel of New York University, is described in PLOS Computational Biology.

1h

Trump's Trade War With China Hasn't Wrecked Tech—Yet

The president is threatening to lift tariffs on Chinese-made goods to 25%. The effect of last year's tariffs has been surprisingly muted.

1h

Mathematical framework explores how the brain keeps a beat

A new mathematical model demonstrates how neurons in the brain could work together to learn and keep a musical beat. The framework, developed by Amitabha Bose of New Jersey Institute of Technology and Aine Byrne and John Rinzel of New York University, is described in PLOS Computational Biology.

1h

50 US coal power plants shut under Trump

Fifty coal-fired power plants have shut in the United States since President Donald Trump came to office two years ago, an environmental organization said Thursday.

1h

Apple's 'most ambitious' retail store set for US capital

Half store, half museum, Apple's new location in the US capital within a historic landmark is being described as the "most ambitious" project for its retail operations.

1h

Uber to price IPO at $45, valuing company at $82 bn: source

Uber was preparing a share offering that values the global ridesharing giant at up to $82 billion, a source familiar with the deal said Thursday.

1h

Discovery may lead to new materials for next-generation data storage

New research has identified properties in materials that could one day lead to applications such as more powerful data storage devices that continue to hold information even after a device has been powered off.

1h

Solar-powered hydrogen fuels a step closer

A cheaper, cleaner and more sustainable way of making hydrogen fuel from water using sunlight is step closer, thanks to new research.

1h

Level up your Photoshop skills with this $29 course

Get 35 hours of training from expert editors. Get 35 hours of training from expert editors and level up your Photoshop skills with this $29 course.

1h

Woman Records Rare, Dangerous ‘Positive Lightning’ Strike on Video

A woman in Boynton Beach, FL has captured a rare positive lightning strike on camera. "Wow," is pretty much all we can say, possibly followed by some expletives. The post Woman Records Rare, Dangerous ‘Positive Lightning’ Strike on Video appeared first on ExtremeTech .

1h

Combat personnel with brain injuries pinpoints abnormal brain waves

A new study finds that veterans and service members with a history of combat-related mild traumatic brain injury have much higher levels of abnormally fast brain waves in a region that plays a key role in consciousness.

1h

Climate change is giving old trees a growth spurt

Larch trees in the permafrost forests of northeastern China — the northernmost tree species on Earth — are growing faster as a result of climate change. A new study of growth rings from Dahurian larch in China's northern forests finds the hardy trees grew more from 2005 to 2014 than in the preceding 40 years.

1h

Discovery may lead to new materials for next-generation data storage

New research has identified properties in materials that could one day lead to applications such as more powerful data storage devices that continue to hold information even after a device has been powered off.

1h

Solar-powered hydrogen fuels a step closer

A cheaper, cleaner and more sustainable way of making hydrogen fuel from water using sunlight is step closer, thanks to new research.

1h

Scientists Discovered a 2,624-Year-Old Tree in a North Carolina Swamp. Climate Change Could Kill It.

A tree grows in North Carolina, and it has been growing there for a long, looooooong time.

1h

Gravitational waves leave a detectable mark, physicists say

New research shows that gravitational waves leave behind plenty of 'memories' that could help detect them even after they've passed.

1h

HSS researchers advance understandings of the cellular mechanisms driving rheumatoid arthritis

Newly identified subsets of cell types present in the joint tissue of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and how they interact may help develop future precision medicine strategies.

1h

The strange genetic twist in Campbell's tomato soup

Breeders found a genetic tweak that made tomatoes easier to pick, but they didn't grow as well. Modern technology has revealed an ancient surprise hidden in the fruit. New research showcases how much we're still learning about crop gene editing. None It's certainly a classic: Campbell's Soup. How many lunchtimes have been elevated by its warm tomatoey goodness? To us, it's a comforting touchstone

1h

Long-extinct pandas left a living legacy

Long-extinct pandas left a living legacy Long-extinct pandas left a living legacy, Published online: 09 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01469-z G iant pandas were once far more widespread — and more genetically diverse — than they are today.

1h

Serotonin boosts neuronal powerplants protecting against stress

Research from the Vaidya and Kolthur-Seetharam groups (TIFR) shows that the neurotransmitter serotonin enhances the production and functions of neuronal mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, and protect against stress. This study (Fanibunda et al., 2019) published in PNAS, identifies a previously unknown role for serotonin in regulating neuronal energetics. This has important implications for

2h

Breaking Up Facebook Isn’t Enough

In an explosive opinion piece published today in The New York Times , Chris Hughes, a Facebook co-founder and Mark Zuckerberg’s former Harvard roommate, called for the government to break up the social-media company. “I haven’t worked at the company in a decade,” Hughes wrote, “But I feel a sense of anger and responsibility.” [ Read: What Facebook could have been ] That’s a nice gesture, and Hugh

2h

What Do New State Abortion Laws Really Mean for Women?

The so-called fetal "heartbeat" laws ban abortion before many women even know they're pregnant.

2h

Surprising Discovery: Mars Is Leaking Hydrogen from Water Vapor

Drying Up A team of scientists say they’ve discovered the unusual way in which water cycles on Mars. The findings could illuminate how hydrogen from water vapor could be making its way into space on the Red Planet — a potential explanation as to why Mars has turned from a water-rich planet into a dry and desolate one over the course of billions of years. Water World According to the researchers’

2h

New type of highly sensitive vision discovered in deep-sea fish

The deep sea is home to fish species that can detect various wavelengths of light in near-total darkness. Unlike other vertebrates, they have several genes for the light-sensitive photopigment rhodopsin, which likely enables these fish to detect bioluminescent signals from light-emitting organs.

2h

Egg yolk precursor protein regulates mosquitoes' attraction to humans

Feeding mosquitoes sugar makes them less attracted to humans, a response that is regulated by the protein vitellogenin, according to a new study.

2h

The Power of Sandra Bland's Cellphone Video

One frame from the 39-second clip highlights the fiction of the American Dream.

2h

3 famous innovators whose mothers were key to their success

Mother's Day is Sunday, May 12. Philip Seymour Hoffman, Jane Goodall, and Elon Musk all received extraordinary support from their mothers. Without this support, these innovators' careers probably would've turned out much differently. ​Philip Seymour Hoffman Even when his roles were small, such as in 1992's Scent of a Woman , it's hard to forget a performance from Philip Seymour Hoffman. Equally a

2h

Google Is Adding 53 Gender-Fluid Emoji to Its Smartphones

Inclusive Designs Google is releasing 53 new gender-fluid emoji, according to a Fast Company exclusive — the latest example of efforts to make the tiny symbols more inclusive . “We’re not calling this the non-binary character, the third gender, or an asexual emoji — and not gender neutral. Gender neutral is what you call pants,” Android emoji director Jennifer Daniel, who sits on the Unicode cons

2h

Fully Recyclable Plastics.

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

2h

‘It: Chapter Two’ Trailer Brings Pennywise Back to Torment the Losers’ Club

Pennywise, the creepiest clown alive, is coming back to torture the Losers’ Club: An official teaser trailer for It: Chapter Two is finally here, and it shows that some of Derry’s …

2h

A link between mitochondrial damage and osteoporosis

In healthy people, a tightly controlled process balances out the activity of osteoblasts, which build bone, and osteoclasts, which break it down. Damage to cells' mitochondria can make that process go awry, according to new research. The findings shed light on how exposure to cigarette smoke, alcohol, and certain medications and environmental toxins can raise the risk of osteoporosis.

2h

New model of measles-elimination progress may help target vaccination efforts

A country's progress towards measles elimination can be mapped on a 'canonical path' that in turn can guide vaccination strategies, according to a new study.

2h

For teens, online bullying worsens sleep and depression

Teens who experience cyberbullying are more likely to suffer from poor sleep, which in turn raises levels of depression, found a new study.

2h

Study shows one third of statin patients don't reach healthy levels of 'bad' cholesterol

Using electronic health records from the Indiana Network for Patient Care, a new population health study of entire state found that one third of statin patients don't reach healthy levels of 'bad' cholesterol. Results show that more aggressive treatment may be needed for a large number of patients taking statin medications, and that treatment could help reduce cases of cardiovascular disease, the

2h

Assessing battery performance: Compared to what?

Researchers reviewed the literature on the various methods used around the world to characterize the performance of lithium-ion batteries to provide insight on best practices. Their results may one day lead to more reliably comparable methods for testing lithium-ion batteries tailored to different applications.

2h

Mathematical framework explores how the brain keeps a beat

A new mathematical model demonstrates how neurons in the brain could work together to learn and keep a musical beat.

2h

Ancient DNA suggests that some Northern Europeans got their languages from Siberia

Most Europeans descend from a combination of European hunter-gatherers, Anatolian early farmers, and Steppe herders. But only European speakers of Uralic languages like Estonian and Finnish also have DNA from ancient Siberians. Now, with the help of ancient DNA samples, researchers suggest that these languages may have arrived from Siberia by the beginning of the Iron Age, about 2,500 years ago, r

2h

How your brain's executive function works — and how to improve it | Sabine Doebel

You use your brain's executive function every day — it's how you do things like pay attention, plan ahead and control impulses. Can you improve it to change for the better? With highlights from her research on child development, cognitive scientist Sabine Doebel explores the factors that affect executive function — and how you can use it to break bad habits and achieve your goals.

2h

Florida Officials Are Using Drones to Kill Mosquitoes

Droning On Officials in South Florida are excited to announce they’ll be engaging in drone warfare. The Florida Keys Mosquito Control District is going to spend the summer using drones to spread larvicide over the salt marshes that annoying and potentially infectious mosquitoes use as breeding grounds, according to WJCT — a high-tech attempt to keep the pests’ population in check , and one that s

2h

Scientists locate brain area where value decisions are made

Neurobiologists have pinpointed the brain area responsible for value decisions that are made based on past experiences. Data from tens of thousands of neurons revealed an area of the brain called the retrosplenial cortex, or RSC, which was not previously known for 'value-based decision-making,' a fundamental animal behavior that is impaired in neurological conditions ranging from schizophrenia to

2h

Academics Raise Concerns About Predatory Journals on PubMed

The National Library of Medicine has quality control procedures in place, but some researchers believe additional scrutiny is necessary.

2h

US lawmakers propose plan to reduce primate research at National Institutes of Health

US lawmakers propose plan to reduce primate research at National Institutes of Health US lawmakers propose plan to reduce primate research at National Institutes of Health, Published online: 09 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01511-0 Spending bill would require the agency to identify alternatives to research with monkeys and other non-human primates.

2h

Fight or Flight: The Sympathetic Nervous System

The sympathetic nervous system activates the "fight-or-flight" response, quickly readying the body to handle dangerous or stressful situations.

3h

NASA-NOAA satellite catches formation of Tropical Cyclone Lili

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of newly formed Tropical Cyclone Lili, located north of the coast of Australia's Northern Territory.

3h

A link between mitochondrial damage and osteoporosis

In healthy people, a tightly controlled process balances out the activity of osteoblasts, which build bone, and osteoclasts, which break it down. Damage to cells' mitochondria can make that process go awry, according to research led by University of Pennsylvania researchers. The findings shed light on how exposure to cigarette smoke, alcohol, and certain medications and environmental toxins can ra

3h

Most large rivers don't flow freely anymore

Environment A new study shows just how few waterways move unimpeded to the ocean. Of the 246 rivers longer than 621 miles, only about a third flow freely across their entire length, according to the study , published Wednesday in the journal Nature .

3h

Amazon Alexa: Illegally Recording Kids, Privacy Advocates Allege

Creepin’ on Your Kids On Thursday, 19 consumer advocacy and privacy groups announced plans to file a complaint against Amazon with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The complaint alleges that the version of Amazon’s Echo smart speaker designed specifically for use by kids is illegally collecting data on minors. It’s the latest in a long list of allegations over Amazon’s devices violating users’

3h

Australopithecus sediba Not Likely Humans' Ancestor: Study

The fossil record for the ancient hominin A. sediba is younger than that of Homo, a "highly unlikely" scenario for a direct lineage.

3h

Melinda Gates Wants Tech to Wake Up to Women's Empowerment

The co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation talks to WIRED about what international aid can teach Silicon Valley, and why you should put down your phone.

3h

Brazilian biomedical science faces reproducibility test

Brazilian biomedical science faces reproducibility test Brazilian biomedical science faces reproducibility test, Published online: 09 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01485-z Researchers at more than 60 Brazilian labs will assess the replicability of research by their country’s scientists.

3h

New brain tumor imaging technique uses protein found in scorpion venom

A novel imaging technique that uses a synthesized form of scorpion venom to light up brain tumors has shown promise in a clinical trial. The imaging system enables neurosurgeons to better see malignant growths that often are difficult to fully eliminate. The new imaging technique that was studied uses a special high-sensitivity near-infrared camera developed at Cedars-Sinai, along with the imaging

3h

VA-led study of combat personnel with brain injuries pinpoints abnormal brain waves

A VA-led study finds that veterans and service members with a history of combat-related mild traumatic brain injury have much higher levels of abnormally fast brain waves in a region that plays a key role in consciousness.

3h

Measles Outbreaks Follow a Predictable Path—Provided People Get Vaccinated

In the past, measles outbreaks have been brought under control with vaccines, but the dynamic may be shifting — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Measles Outbreaks Follow a Predictable Path—Provided People Get Vaccinated

In the past, measles outbreaks have been brought under control with vaccines, but the dynamic may be shifting — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Jeff Bezos Reveals Blue Origin’s Vision for Space, and a Moon Lander

In a choreographed presentation, the Amazon founder said he wants to build the infrastructure for humans to live in space.

3h

An electric tongue can handle more spicy foods than you can

Spicy food is huge business, and now researchers have found that an electronic tongue, or e-tongue, is more effective and accurate in taste-testing fiery foods than sensitive human taste buds.

3h

Peering into the past, scientists discover bacteria transformed a viral threat to survive

A study reports the first known evidence of bacteria stealing genetic material from their own worst enemy, bacteriophages, and transforming it to survive.

3h

A deep-dive into the impact of arthritis drugs on gene expression

A new computational framework has revealed key differences between four rheumatoid arthritis medications and their impact on biological pathways in mice.

3h

How the dengue virus replicates in infected cells

The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of the dengue virus interacts with another viral protein called NS4A-2K-4B to enable viral replication, according to a new study.

3h

Back to the sources of neural diversity

By deciphering the genetic programs of neurons of the cerebral cortex, researchers have unraveled the mechanisms controlling the genesis of cells in one of the most essential parts of our brain.

3h

An electric tongue can handle more spicy foods than you can

Spicy food is huge business, and now researchers have found that an electronic tongue, or e-tongue, is more effective and accurate in taste-testing fiery foods than sensitive human taste buds.

3h

'Robopets' can benefit health and wellbeing of older care home residents

Robotic pets that respond to human interaction can benefit the health and wellbeing of older people living in care homes, a new study has found.

3h

SpaceX’s Crewed Dragon Failed a Recent Parachute Test

A Dragon spacecraft exploded last month during an engine test, and now NASA's director of human spaceflight tells Congress that SpaceX also experienced an issue with its parachutes during a separate test. The post SpaceX’s Crewed Dragon Failed a Recent Parachute Test appeared first on ExtremeTech .

3h

Some deep-sea fish have evolved souped-up colour night vision

Several species of fish living in the deep ocean have evolved extra copies of genes that enable them to see a range of colour hues in the near-darkness

3h

Radio Atlantic: Liberalism’s Last Stand

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Franklin Foer joins Edward-Isaac Dovere to discuss his story in the June issue of The Atlantic , about Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán. Orbán describes his vision of Hungary as an “alternative to liberal democracy ,” and in recent years, he’s cemented his power by undermining civil society. When Orbán’s party

3h

Gravitational forces in protoplanetary disks may push super-Earths close to their stars

Astronomers found that as planets form out of the chaotic churn of gravitational, hydrodynamic — or, drag — and magnetic forces and collisions within the dusty, gaseous protoplanetary disk that surrounds a star as a planetary system starts to form, the orbits of these planets eventually get in synch, causing them to slide — follow the leader-style — toward the star.

3h

Personalized 'eye-in-a-dish' models reveal genetic underpinnings of macular degeneration

Using stem cells derived from six people, researchers recapitulated retinal cells in the lab. This 'eye-in-a-dish' model allowed them to identify genetic variants that cause age-related macular degeneration, a common cause of vision loss.

3h

Is emotional labor next to be outsourced and professionalized?

Emotional labor is being held up as the one form of work that's safe from automation. This is undervalued and unrecognized — especially in women. Historically, these have been underpaid jobs in care industries. Work is hard. But we don't always realize how hard it is or, indeed, that some forms of labor are work at all. If you stand on your feet or stare at a screen all day, you can point to bodi

3h

A quarter of people who meditate experience negative mental states

More than a quarter of people who regularly meditate say they have experienced negative mental states, including anxiety, fear and disturbed emotions

3h

Some deep-sea fish have evolved souped-up colour night vision

Several species of fish living in the deep ocean have evolved extra copies of genes that enable them to see a range of colour hues in the near-darkness

3h

CIA’s Bizarre “Ninja Bomb” Crushes Enemies Like a “Speeding Anvil”

Ninja Bomb The Wall Street Journal reports that the CIA and the Pentagon have developed a top-secret missile designed to assassinate a single terrorist by crushing them or slicing them up with sword-like protrusions instead of exploding. The weapon, which officials have dubbed a “Ninja Bomb,” can even target individuals in cars and inside buildings. The promise: reduced civilian deaths — and a de

3h

NASA Admits SpaceX Ship Crashed During Failed Test Last Month

Parachute Test NASA administrator Bill Gerstenmaier admitted during a contentious hearing before the House of Representatives Wednesday that SpaceX’s Crew Dragon shuttle smashed into the ground last month after a failed parachute test — alarming news that comes in the wake of a separate SpaceX failure last month when a Crew Dragon apparently exploded during a different test. “The test was not sat

3h

Mathematical framework explores how the brain keeps a beat

A new mathematical model demonstrates how neurons in the brain could work together to learn and keep a musical beat. The framework, developed by Amitabha Bose of New Jersey Institute of Technology and Aine Byrne and John Rinzel of New York University, is described in PLOS Computational Biology.

4h

Color vision found in fish that live in near darkness

An international team of researchers discovered a previously unknown visual system that may allow color vision in deep, dark waters where animals were presumed to be colorblind. According to study co-author, Karen Carleton, from the University of Maryland, this means the genes that determine the spectrum of light vertebrate eyes are sensitive to are much more variable and evolve much more quickly

4h

Methane-consuming bacteria could be the future of fuel

Northwestern University researchers have found that the enzyme responsible for the methane-methanol conversion in methanotrophic bacteria catalyzes the reaction at a site that contains just one copper ion. This finding could lead to newly designed, human-made catalysts that can convert methane — a highly potent greenhouse gas — to readily usable methanol with the same effortless mechanism.

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Meditation needs more research: Study finds 25% suffer unpleasant experiences

More than a quarter of people who regularly meditate have had a 'particularly unpleasant' psychological experience related to the practice, including feelings of fear and distorted emotions, a UCL-led study has found.

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How to generate a brain of correct size and composition

To build the neocortex, a brain area involved in higher cognitive functions, stem cells produce billions of neurons of various types. In a Science study, neuroscientists from Switzerland, Belgium, and the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have now shown that, over time, the neocortical stem cells go through various maturation states, each of them leading to a distinct neuro

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Back to the sources of neural diversity

The diversity of the tasks the cortex can perform is reflected in the diversity of the neurons that compose it. These neurons are spawned from progenitor stem cells, which divide and produce these different cell types. But how do these progenitors manage to generate specific types of neurons in the right place? By identifying the genetic scenarios at work, researchers (UNIGE/UNIL/ULiège) lift the

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Plants and the art of microbial maintenance

How plants use chemicals to sculpt their ecological niche.

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New model of measles-elimination progress may help target vaccination efforts

A country's progress towards measles elimination can be mapped on a 'canonical path' that in turn can guide vaccination strategies, according to a study from scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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How sea level rise affects birds in coastal forests

Saltwater intrusion changes coastal vegetation that provides bird habitat. Researchers found that the transition from forests to marshes along the North Carolina coast due to climate change could benefit some bird species of concern for conservation.

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The origins of neuronal diversity in the developing mouse brain

They way neural progenitor cells produce more daughter cells, of different types, shifts with the individual neuroprogenitor's development, according to a new study of mouse brains.

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Restaurants Are Ignoring Calls From Google’s Smart Assistant

Hello, This is Robot Almost exactly a year ago, everyone was flipping out over Google’s newly announced Duplex feature, which basically pretends to be a human assistant in order to make reservations at restaurants or schedule trips to the hairdresser. But the AI-powered assistant has struggled to win over the hearts of service workers. The Verge reports that restaurants are hanging up on Google’s

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Qualcomm Announces Smart Headset Platform At Google I/O

Qualcomm is rolling out the QCC5100 Series processor aimed at smart headsets at Google I/O to help hardware vendors build product faster and better.Smart earphones are not easy to build because …

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U.S. blocks Chinese state-owned telecom giant out of security concerns, threatens more scrutiny

U.S. officials on Thursday blocked a Chinese state-owned telecom company from operating here and offering phone services to American customers, while sounding fresh fears that Beijing seeks …

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New York Just Gave Congress a New Reason for Impeachment

On Wednesday, the New York State Senate approved two important bills that could shape the legal fight over President Donald Trump’s tax returns and his pardon power, if they become law. But one of those bills—the one allowing New York State to give tax returns upon a request from Congress—also includes a word that could undermine the U.S. House of Representatives’ efforts to get Trump’s state tax

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How the US Veered Off the Path to Measles Elimination

The U.S. is moving backwards on the path to the elimination of measles.

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Feed Mosquitoes Sugar to Keep the Bites Away

Feed Mosquitoes Sugar to Keep the Bites Away When the bloodsucking insects eat sugar, they express more of a specific protein that can curb their attraction to humans. AsianTigerMosquito_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: CDC/ James Gathany Rights information: Public domain Creature Thursday, May 9, 2019 – 14:00 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) – A spoonful of sugar may help keep the fever m

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News at a glance

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Ready to pounce

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Choosing a partner

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A keener eye

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Generational cancer

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Not so fast

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Multiplatform evaluation of global trends in wind speed and wave height

In this study, global satellite data were analyzed to determine trends in oceanic wind speed and significant wave height over the 33-year period from 1985 to 2018. The analysis uses an extensive database obtained from 31 satellite missions comprising three types of instruments—altimeters, radiometers, and scatterometers. The analysis shows small increases in mean wind speed and significant wave h

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Structures of the M1 and M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor/G-protein complexes

Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are G protein–coupled receptors that respond to acetylcholine and play important signaling roles in the nervous system. There are five muscarinic receptor subtypes (M1R to M5R), which, despite sharing a high degree of sequence identity in the transmembrane region, couple to different heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) to transmit signals. M1R, M3R,

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Restriction of PD-1 function by cis-PD-L1/CD80 interactions is required for optimal T cell responses

Targeted blockade of PD-1 with immune checkpoint inhibitors can activate T cells to destroy tumors. PD-1 is believed to function mainly at the effector, but not in the activation, phase of T cell responses, yet how PD-1 function is restricted at the activation stage is currently unknown. Here we demonstrate that CD80 interacts with PD-L1 in cis on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to disrupt PD-L1/

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Particulate methane monooxygenase contains only mononuclear copper centers

Bacteria that oxidize methane to methanol are central to mitigating emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. The nature of the copper active site in the primary metabolic enzyme of these bacteria, particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), has been controversial owing to seemingly contradictory biochemical, spectroscopic, and crystallographic results. We present biochemical and electron para

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Parallel programming of an ionic floating-gate memory array for scalable neuromorphic computing

Neuromorphic computers could overcome efficiency bottlenecks inherent to conventional computing through parallel programming and readout of artificial neural network weights in a crossbar memory array. However, selective and linear weight updates and 1 billion write-read operations and support >1-megahertz write-read frequencies.

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Site-selective enzymatic C-H amidation for synthesis of diverse lactams

A major challenge in carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond functionalization is to have the catalyst control precisely where a reaction takes place. In this study, we report engineered cytochrome P450 enzymes that perform unprecedented enantioselective C-H amidation reactions and control the site selectivity to divergently construct β-, -, and -lactams, completely overruling the inherent reactivities of the

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Adult-born hippocampal neurons bidirectionally modulate entorhinal inputs into the dentate gyrus

Young adult-born granule cells (abGCs) in the dentate gyrus (DG) have a profound impact on cognition and mood. However, it remains unclear how abGCs distinctively contribute to local DG information processing. We found that the actions of abGCs in the DG depend on the origin of incoming afferents. In response to lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) inputs, abGCs exert monosynaptic inhibition of mature

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Measles and the canonical path to elimination

All World Health Organization regions have set measles elimination goals. We find that as countries progress toward these goals, they undergo predictable changes in the size and frequency of measles outbreaks. A country’s position on this "canonical path" is driven by both measles control activities and demographic factors, which combine to change the effective size of the measles-susceptible pop

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Vision using multiple distinct rod opsins in deep-sea fishes

Vertebrate vision is accomplished through light-sensitive photopigments consisting of an opsin protein bound to a chromophore. In dim light, vertebrates generally rely on a single rod opsin [rhodopsin 1 (RH1)] for obtaining visual information. By inspecting 101 fish genomes, we found that three deep-sea teleost lineages have independently expanded their RH1 gene repertoires. Among these, the silv

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Complex signal processing in synthetic gene circuits using cooperative regulatory assemblies

Eukaryotic genes are regulated by multivalent transcription factor complexes. Through cooperative self-assembly, these complexes perform nonlinear regulatory operations involved in cellular decision-making and signal processing. In this study, we apply this design principle to synthetic networks, testing whether engineered cooperative assemblies can program nonlinear gene circuit behavior in yeas

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New Products

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LMBR1L regulates lymphopoiesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling

Precise control of Wnt signaling is necessary for immune system development. In this study, we detected severely impaired development of all lymphoid lineages in mice, resulting from an N -ethyl- N -nitrosourea–induced mutation in the limb region 1–like gene ( Lmbr1l ), which encodes a membrane-spanning protein with no previously described function in immunity. The interaction of LMBR1L with glyc

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Temporal patterning of apical progenitors and their daughter neurons in the developing neocortex

During corticogenesis, distinct subtypes of neurons are sequentially born from ventricular zone progenitors. How these cells are molecularly temporally patterned is poorly understood. We used single-cell RNA sequencing at high temporal resolution to trace the lineage of the molecular identities of successive generations of apical progenitors (APs) and their daughter neurons in mouse embryos. We i

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A specialized metabolic network selectively modulates Arabidopsis root microbiota

Plant specialized metabolites have ecological functions, yet the presence of numerous uncharacterized biosynthetic genes in plant genomes suggests that many molecules remain unknown. We discovered a triterpene biosynthetic network in the roots of the small mustard plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Collectively, we have elucidated and reconstituted three divergent pathways for the biosynthesis of root t

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Comment on "Activation of methane to CH3+: A selective industrial route to methanesulfonic acid"

Díaz-Urrutia and Ott (Reports, 22 March 2019, p. 1326) report a selective conversion of methane to methanesulfonic acid that is proposed to occur by a cationic chain reaction in which CH 3 + adds to sulfur trioxide (SO 3 ) to form CH 3 –S(O) 2 O + . This mechanism is not plausible because of the solvent reactivity of CH 3 + , the non-nucleophilicity of the sulfur atom of SO 3 , and the high energ

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Delivery Bots Could Make Cities More Accessible for Everyone

submitted by /u/i_love_anachronisms [link] [comments]

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The roots of all goodness

Plants fuel their own microbial populations, research shows.

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Cats rival dogs on many tests of social smarts. But is anyone brave enough to study them?

Social cognition researchers are finally probing the secrets of the feline mind—when the cats deign to cooperate

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In the deep, dark ocean fish have evolved superpowered vision

Photoreceptor genes have diversified in deep-living fish to capture every possible photon

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Everything you could ever want to know about flying the U-2 spy plane

Technology We heard from two U-2 pilots about what it’s like to operate the storied aircraft. This is what it's like to fly (and land) an Air Force U-2.

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Choosing a partner

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Discovery may lead to new materials for next-generation data storage

Research funded in part by the US Army identified properties in materials that could one day lead to applications such as more powerful data storage devices that continue to hold information even after a device has been powered off.

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Will MSC micropellets outperform single cells for cartilage regeneration?

Repair of cartilage injuries or defects is aided by the introduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which can be incorporated into hydrogels to amplify their effects. In a new report, researchers directly compared chondrogenic induction by hydrogels that were prepared using MSCs either as single cell suspensions or as 100-500-cell micropellets.

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Nurse care coordinators are key to success of patient-centered medical home programs

In a new study, George Mason University faculty researchers assessed primary care provider experiences with the CareFirst Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) program. Nurse care coordinators and individual care plans for adults with chronic conditions were key to improving health care delivery.

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For teens, online bullying worsens sleep and depression

Teens who experience cyberbullying are more likely to suffer from poor sleep, which in turn raises levels of depression, found a University at Buffalo study.

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Assessing battery performance: Compared to what?

A team from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, University of Warwick, OVO Energy, Hawaii National Energy Institute, and Jaguar Land Rover reviewed the literature on the various methods used around the world to characterize the performance of lithium-ion batteries to provide insight on best practices. Their results may one day lead to more reliably comparable methods f

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Study shows one third of statin patients don't reach healthy levels of 'bad' cholesterol

Using electronic health records from the Indiana Network for Patient Care, a new population health study of entire state found that one third of statin patients don't reach healthy levels of 'bad' cholesterol. Results show that more aggressive treatment may be needed for a large number of patients taking statin medications, and that treatment could help reduce cases of cardiovascular disease, the

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Researchers create standardized measurement for pediatric facial palsy

An international team of researchers has developed a standardized measurement for pediatric facial palsy that will improve the care for current and future patients with the condition.

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This Deep-Sea Fish Has the Most Types of Opsins Among Vertebrates

The silver spinyfin has an extraordinary diversity of rod photopigments, which researchers propose may allow it to see color in the deep, dark sea.

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Telemedicine: The future of health care is already here

Digital technologies that disrupted industries like communication and transportation are steadily changing health care, too. Virtual health care will save consumers money while growing the industry by billions of dollars. Non-visit care combined with smartphone apps will give patients more power over their health care. None Progress in health care over the last 200 years has typically resulted fr

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How sea level rise affects birds in coastal forests

When saltwater inundates coastal forests as sea levels rise, it kills salt-sensitive trees, leaving "ghost forests" of bare snags behind. A new study from North Carolina State University explores how changes in vegetation affect coastal bird species.

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Egg yolk precursor protein regulates mosquitoes' attraction to humans

Feeding mosquitoes sugar makes them less attracted to humans, a response that is regulated by the protein vitellogenin, according to a study publishing May 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Jessica Dittmer, Paolo Gabrieli and colleagues at the Università degli Studi di Pavia in Italy.

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Plants and the art of microbial maintenance

It's been known for centuries that plants produce a diverse array of medically-valuable chemicals in their roots.

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Exploiting parasitic yeast to kill yeast pathogens

Insights into the genes and proteins involved in the predatory behavior of a parasitic yeast species could lead to new strategies for controlling yeast pathogens, according to a study published May 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Jürgen Wendland of the Carlsberg Research Laboratory in Denmark and Vrije Universiteit Brussel in Belgium, and colleagues.

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Color vision found in fish that live in near darkness

An international team of researchers discovered a previously unknown visual system that may allow color vision in deep, dark waters where animals were presumed to be colorblind. The research appears on the cover of the May 10, 2019, issue of the journal Science.

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For fish in the inky blackness, colours abound

Genetic research reveals previously unknown vision proteins in deep sea species. Stephen Fleischfresser reports.

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Why do dams collapse? The answer is both obvious and unclear

Catastrophic structure failures need to be better researched, experts say. Nick Carne reports.

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How sea level rise affects birds in coastal forests

When saltwater inundates coastal forests as sea levels rise, it kills salt-sensitive trees, leaving "ghost forests" of bare snags behind. A new study from North Carolina State University explores how changes in vegetation affect coastal bird species.

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Egg yolk precursor protein regulates mosquitoes' attraction to humans

Feeding mosquitoes sugar makes them less attracted to humans, a response that is regulated by the protein vitellogenin, according to a study publishing May 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Jessica Dittmer, Paolo Gabrieli and colleagues at the Università degli Studi di Pavia in Italy.

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Plants and the art of microbial maintenance

It's been known for centuries that plants produce a diverse array of medically-valuable chemicals in their roots.

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Exploiting parasitic yeast to kill yeast pathogens

Insights into the genes and proteins involved in the predatory behavior of a parasitic yeast species could lead to new strategies for controlling yeast pathogens, according to a study published May 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Jürgen Wendland of the Carlsberg Research Laboratory in Denmark and Vrije Universiteit Brussel in Belgium, and colleagues.

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Color vision found in fish that live in near darkness

An international team of researchers discovered a previously unknown visual system that may allow color vision in deep, dark waters where animals were presumed to be colorblind. The research appears on the cover of the May 10, 2019, issue of the journal Science.

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Methane-consuming bacteria could be the future of fuel

Known for their ability to remove methane from the environment and convert it into a usable fuel, methanotrophic bacteria have long fascinated researchers. But how, exactly, these bacteria naturally perform such a complex reaction has been a mystery.

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Fooling nerve cells into acting normal

Scientists have discovered that a neuron's own electrical signal, or voltage, can indicate whether the neuron is functioning normally. If that voltage is absent, scientists say everything is 'out of whack.'

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A Once-Missing Piece of Stonehenge Could Reveal Where Iconic Standing Stones Were Quarried

A circular "core" of stone, drilled out of one of the giant Neolithic standing stones at Stonehenge in southwest England, has been returned after being taken as a souvenir more than 60 years ago.

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Rural Communities Are Getting Obese Faster Than City Dwellers

Around the world, obesity is on the rise. A global uptick in body mass index, or BMI — a measure of whether a person’s weight is healthy for how tall they are — has coincided with rapid urbanization, leading to the assumption that urbanization is the main reason behind the global obesity epidemic. Now, a large new report reveals the rise of global BMI comes from people living in rural areas rather

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BioLegend Moves Global Headquarters to Newly Constructed, State-of-the-Art Campus in San Diego, California

BioLegend Campus Inauguration Symposium focused on Cancer Immunotherapy features Nobel Laureate and World-Renowned Immunologists

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A Married Couple Walk Into a Bar. We Watch.

A couple, their marriage on the rocks, walk into a bar. What sounds like the beginning of an uncomfortable joke is actually the premise—and the entirety—of State of the Union , a sharp, 10-episode relationship comedy written by the author Nick Hornby and directed by Stephen Frears, who’d previously adapted Hornby’s novel High Fidelity . Airing on SundanceTV , every episode lasts just about 10 min

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Cold war politics hampered life-saving phage therapy research | Letters

Western scientists ignored the progress being made in the Soviet east, argues David Hanke Phage therapy ( Girl is first patient saved by GM virus treatment , 9 May) has a long history, predating antibiotics, but has been largely confined to the (former) USSR since the 30s. As early as 1896, British bacteriologist Ernest Hankin discovered filterable antibacterial activity killing cholera in Ganges

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Oldest known trees in eastern North America documented

A stand of bald cypress trees in North Carolina, including one least 2,624 years old, are the oldest known living trees in eastern North America and the oldest wetland tree species in the world. They show evidence of severe flooding and drought during colonial and pre-colonial times.

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Gravitational forces in protoplanetary disks may push super-Earths close to their stars

The galaxy is littered with planetary systems vastly different from ours. In the solar system, the planet closest to the Sun—Mercury, with an orbit of 88 days—is also the smallest. But NASA's Kepler spacecraft has discovered thousands of systems full of very large planets—called super-Earths—in very small orbits that zip around their host star several times every 10 days.

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This Apple-1 Computer Cost $666 in 1976. Now It Could Sell for $650,000

Interested in spending your life savings on a nearly useless PC with 4 kilobytes of memory and a 1 MHz processor? You're in luck.

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Ancient South American populations dipped due to an erratic climate

Scientists link bouts of intense rainfall and drought around 8,600 to 6,000 years ago to declining numbers of South American hunter-gatherers.

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BU finds tight pants and pubic-hair removal increase risk of vulvodynia

A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that the risk of vulvodynia is nearly doubled by wearing tight-fitting jeans or pants four or more times a week, or removing hair from the mons pubis. Published in the Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, it is the first study to show a link between clothing and grooming and the condition.

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Gravitational forces in protoplanetary disks may push super-Earths close to their stars

Penn State-led astronomers found that as planets form out of the chaotic churn of gravitational, hydrodynamic — or, drag — and magnetic forces and collisions within the dusty, gaseous protoplanetary disk that surrounds a star as a planetary system starts to form, the orbits of these planets eventually get in synch, causing them to slide — follow the leader-style — toward the star.

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Private health plans pay hospitals 2.4 times what Medicare would pay

Hospital costs account for nearly half of all personal health spending for the privately insured, but relatively is known about how much more the privately insured pay hospitals relative to Medicare patients. A new study that examines hospital charges across 25 states in 2017 finds that the prices paid to hospitals for privately insured patients averaged 241% of what Medicare would have paid, with

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A cautionary tale for researchers working on selective drug delivery

Many studies indicating that DNA nanostructures can enter cells more readily than simple DNA strands are flawed, according to new research.

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IDT brings unmatched customization to NGS

Launch of Custom NGS Adapters and portfolio expansion delivers unprecedented flexibility and ease-of-use

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Even Astronauts Binge-Watch TV While in Space

This time last year, Drew Feustel was weightless, floating from room to room on the International Space Station. When he looked out a window, the view was stunning. There was Earth, resplendent and gleaming against the inky darkness of space. There, beneath silky tufts of white clouds, was the rest of humanity. But even in this rarefied environment, Feustel sometimes turned his attention to a pas

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How I Tried to Defy the Facebook Algorithm

Michele Marconi F acebook is often sarcastically described as a platform for sharing baby pictures. When I log in, I do see some of those—but many of the babies in my feed are baby rats. The story of how these hairless pups started populating my News Feed began when a friend told me about a Facebook group—a lively forum for discussing baby names—that had captivated her. I joined too, and soon aft

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An electric tongue can handle more spicy foods than you can

Thousands of new spicy products hit supermarket shelves every year. Some people crave the heat, some fear the burn. But if you enjoy it, spicy food wears out taste buds quickly.

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Do most Americans believe in human-caused climate change?

What percentage of Americans believe in human-caused climate change?

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Many Hospitals Charge Double or Even Triple What Medicare Would Pay

A study of 25 states provides a rare glimpse of the stark disparities between what private insurers and the federal government paid for inpatient and outpatient care.

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DNA nanostructures designed for drug delivery remain a technical challenge

Many studies indicating that DNA nanostructures can enter cells more readily than simple DNA strands are flawed, according to researchers at McGill University.

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Illinois researcher Amy LaViers introduces novel perspective in robotic capability

University of Illinois Assistant Professor Amy LaViers has introduced a new point of view from which to observe robotic capabilities in her paper, 'Counts of Mechanical, External Configurations Compared to Computational, Internal Configurations in Natural and Artificial Systems.'

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Do most Americans believe in human-caused climate change?

A survey of more than 7,000 US adults finds that three format changes produce significant changes in estimates of acceptance of human-caused climate change. Estimates range from 50% to 71% of US adults — and 29% to 61% of Republicans.

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A new view of wintertime air pollution

The team's unexpected finding suggests that in the US West and elsewhere, certain efforts to reduce harmful wintertime air pollution could backfire. Specifically, targeting nitrogen oxides emitted by cars and power plants could initially actually increase harmful air pollution, the researchers reported in their new paper, out today in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

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This Law Would Ban Loot Boxes in Video Games

Skin in the Game Lawmakers in the United States may finally be cracking down on the rise of loot boxes, which let players pay for the chance to win powers or stylish in-game outfits in popular titles ranging from “Fortnite” to “PUBG.” Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO) has introduced a bill — The Protecting Children from Abusive Games Act — which would ban microtransactions, including loot boxes, from ga

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EU ser stort på matematikken

PLUS. Matematikere kritiserer fordelingen af pladser i Europa-Parlamentet.

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A cautionary tale for researchers working on selective drug delivery

Many studies indicating that DNA nanostructures can enter cells more readily than simple DNA strands are flawed, according to new research.

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How Nipah virus spreads from person to person: Lessons from 14 years of investigations

The deadly Nipah virus, which is carried by bats and occasionally infects people, is more likely to be transmitted from person to person when the infected patient is older, male and/or has breathing difficulties, according to a new study.

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Marcus regime in organic devices: Interfacial charge transfer mechanism verified

A new study shows how electrons behave in their injection into organic semiconductor films. Simulations and experiments clearly identified different transport regimes.

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In "Vicious Cycle," Snowmelt Fuels Wildfires, and Wildfires Melt Snow

This feedback poses major concerns for Western water resources and wildfire risk — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This Machine Lets You Play “Tetris” With Your Brain

Drift Compatible A new brain-computer interface can connect three people’s brains, allowing them to play a “Tetris”-like video game together using something resembling telepathy. Companies like Elon Musk’s Neuralink and Facebook are working on mind-reading devices designed to connect people’s brains to machines. While details on those projects have been sparse, this new gamified version of a brai

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Researchers document the oldest known trees in eastern North America

A recently documented stand of bald cypress trees in North Carolina, including one tree at least 2,624 years old, are the oldest known living trees in eastern North America and the oldest known wetland tree species in the world.

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Video: What's the chemistry behind the home pregnancy test?

There are many ways to find out if you're pregnant. One is to wait and see. For those of us who are a little less patient, there's the take-home chemistry kit known as a pregnancy test.

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When people get along, fish thrive

Investments in building community capacity that focus on establishing communication, trust, and a shared understanding among direct resource competitors may improve ecological conditions in coral reef fisheries.

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Predicting disease transmission from bushmeat

Trade of bushmeat and other wildlife for human consumption presents a unique set of challenges to policymakers who are confronted with multiple trade-offs between conservation, food security, food safety, culture, and tradition.

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Biodiversity and carbon: perfect together

Biodiversity conservation is often considered to be a co-benefit of protecting carbon sinks such as intact forests to help mitigate climate change.

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An electric tongue can handle more spicy foods than you can

Spicy food is huge business, and Washington State University researchers have found that an electronic tongue, or e-tongue, is more effective and accurate in taste-testing fiery foods than sensitive human taste buds.

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Fragmented turtles

Scientists looked at how fragmentation is affecting critically endangered Dahl's toad headed turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli) a forest-stream specialist found only in Colombia.

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How Nipah virus spreads from person to person: Lessons from 14 years of investigations

The deadly Nipah virus, which is carried by bats and occasionally infects people, is more likely to be transmitted from person to person when the infected patient is older, male and/or has breathing difficulties, according to a study co-led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Fooling nerve cells into acting normal

In a new study, scientists at the University of Missouri have discovered that a neuron's own electrical signal, or voltage, can indicate whether the neuron is functioning normally. If that voltage is absent, scientists say everything is 'out of whack.'

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How genomics profiling can help identify the best treatment for bladder cancer

A new computational tool — a single-patient classifier — effectively enables physicians to assign a bladder cancer subtype to an individual patient's cancer using that patient's genomic data.

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Routine sickle cell disease screening among migrants may help save lives

Hematologists are zeroing in on the escalating humanitarian crisis in southern Europe by assessing the burden of blood disorders among refugees and identifying strategies to facilitate more timely identification and treatment of refugees with sickle cell disease (SCD). A study from an Italian research team published today in Blood suggests SCD is common among refugees and screening efforts should

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A cautionary tale for researchers working on selective drug delivery

Many studies indicating that DNA nanostructures can enter cells more readily than simple DNA strands are flawed, according to researchers at McGill University.

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Researchers document the oldest known trees in eastern North America

A stand of bald cypress trees in North Carolina, including one least 2,624 years old, are the oldest known living trees in eastern North America and the oldest wetland tree species in the world. They show evidence of severe flooding and drought during colonial and pre-colonial times.

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Trilobites: Wasps Passed This Logic Test. Can You?

The insects frequently found in your backyard appear to be the first invertebrate known to be capable of the skill of transitive inference.

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Should veganism receive the same legal protection as a religion?

Veganism is on the rise globally – but it can be contentious. Only recently, the editor of a food magazine joked that vegans should be force-fed meat while a bank employee told a vegan customer that they should be punched after he objected to some vegan graffiti near his home. But to what degree should veganism be protected by law as a philosophical belief? It is a question that is central to an

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20 percent off an OXO coffee maker and other hot deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Does sunscreen compromise vitamin D levels? Maybe not

Sunscreen can reduce the sun's adverse effects, but there are concerns that it might inhibit the body's production of vitamin D. In a new study, however, investigators recorded an increase of vitamin D in participants during a week of cloudless weather, with very high UV index, even when sunscreens were used properly and prevented sunburn.

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Viable, environmentally-friendly alternative to Styrofoam

Researchers have developed an environmentally-friendly, plant-based material that for the first time works better than Styrofoam for insulation.

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The heart 'talks' to fat cells

Like sending a letter through the mail or a text over a cellular network, the heart can generate messages that travel long distances through the body. Those messages ultimately reach fat cells, new research shows. The findings could have implications for modulating weight gain in patients with heart failure.

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Free video streaming offers some gems – if you can find them

Free services let you watch thousands of movies and TV shows online, but using them feels like wandering through a low-rent, digital version of Blockbuster (RIP).

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Break up Facebook, says company's co-founder

One of the co-founders of Facebook called on Thursday for the social media behemoth to be broken up, warning that the company's head, Mark Zuckerberg, had become far too powerful.

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The World Health Organization Needs to Put Human Behavior at the Center of Its Initiatives

We can “nudge” our way toward a healthier planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The World Health Organization Needs to Put Human Behavior at the Center of Its Initiatives

We can “nudge” our way toward a healthier planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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FROM THE TRANSFECTION EXPERTS: OBTAIN INDUSTRY-LEADING PROTEIN YIELDS WITH THE NEW CHOgro® HIGH YIELD EXPRESSION SYSTEM

Researchers now have an opportunity to achieve higher protein yields from transient transfection of suspension CHO cells.

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In utero gene editing fixes cystic fibrosis mutation in mice.

submitted by /u/SirT6 [link] [comments]

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Researchers explore methods that may allow people to live permanently in VR

submitted by /u/lordhiggsboson [link] [comments]

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Daily briefing: First ever genetically engineered phage treatment halts life-threatening infection

Daily briefing: First ever genetically engineered phage treatment halts life-threatening infection Daily briefing: First ever genetically engineered phage treatment halts life-threatening infection, Published online: 09 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01512-z Engineered virus tackles drug-resistant infection, how to communicate uncertainty and third deadly Japanese earthquake study retracted.

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Personalized 'Eye-in-a-Dish' models reveal genetic underpinnings of macular degeneration

Using stem cells derived from six people, UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers recapitulated retinal cells in the lab. This 'eye-in-a-dish' model allowed them to identify genetic variants that cause age-related macular degeneration, a common cause of vision loss.

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Hummingbird robot uses AI to soon go where drones can't

Purdue University researchers have engineered flying robots that behave like hummingbirds, trained by machine learning algorithms based on various techniques the bird uses naturally every day.

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Copper oxide photocathodes: laser experiment reveals location of efficiency loss

Solar cells and photocathodes made of copper oxide might in theory attain high efficiencies for solar energy conversion. In practice, however, large losses occur. Now a team at the HZB has been able to use a sophisticated femtosecond laser experiment to determine where these losses take place: not so much at the interfaces, but instead far more in the interior of the crystalline material. These re

6h

AMP recommends minimum set of alleles for all clinical CYP2C9 genotyping testing

AMP and CAP have published consensus, evidence-based recommendations to aid in the design and validation of clinical CYP2C9 assays, promote standardization of testing across different laboratories and improve patient care.

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In lab, SLU researchers flip pain switch in spinal cord cells

Facing an urgent need for safer and more effective therapies for those suffering from debilitating pain in the midst of an opioid crisis, Saint Louis University researchers are on a mission to find a non-narcotic off-switch for pain.

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When Was the Last Time American Children Were So Afraid?

This week, America got another reminder of the fear that its schoolchildren must make sense of every day. On Tuesday afternoon, nine students were shot—one of them fatally—at STEM School Highlands Ranch, near Denver. Though the two suspects are teenagers, STEM School Highlands Ranch is K–12, meaning that some young children were exposed to the violence. Among them was a second grader who told a N

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Samsung's ISOCELL Bright GW1 Sensor Could Bring 64MP Imagery To Galaxy S11

Samsung on Thursday announced a pair of new ISOCELL pixel image sensors that will likely find their inside the company's future phones, paving the way for higher resolution and sharper photographs. …

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New Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur sheds light on origin of flight in Dinosauria

A new Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur from 163 million-year-old fossil deposits in northeastern China provides new information regarding the incredible richness of evolutionary experimentation …

6h

We Need to Make Organ Transplantation Easier

To start with, says a successful donor, let’s make insurers cover the anti-rejection meds recipients will need for the rest of their lives — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fish biology: How the cytoplasm separates from the yolk

The segregation of yolk from the surrounding cytoplasm in the very early fish embryo is a key process for the development of the fish larva. Researchers found that actin dynamics in the bulk of the cell drive phase segregation in zebrafish oocytes.

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Stem cells provide information about neuron resilience in ALS

Researchers have developed a stem cell based model in order to study the resilience and vulnerability of neurons in the neurodegenerative disease ALS. The results can aid in the identification of new genetic targets for treatments protecting sensitive neurons.

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Substrate defects key to growth of 2D materials

Creating two-dimentional materials large enough to use in electronics is a challenge despite huge effort but now, researchers have discovered a method for improving the quality of one class of 2D materials, with potential to achieve wafer-scale growth in the future.

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North York General study shows safest method for prostate cancer biopsies

Only one percent of testing for prostate cancer in North America is done using TPBx. North York General Hospital has shown this to be the safest method and can be performed under local anesthetic.

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The heart 'talks' to fat cells, Temple scientists discover

Like sending a letter through the mail or a text over a cellular network, the heart can generate messages that travel long distances through the body. Those messages ultimately reach fat cells, new research by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University shows. The findings could have implications for modulating weight gain in patients with heart failure.

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We Need to Make Organ Transplantation Easier

To start with, says a successful donor, let’s make insurers cover the anti-rejection meds recipients will need for the rest of their lives — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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James Cameron Doesn't Seem to Mind Taunts From 'Avengers' Fans

The director congratulated Marvel on sinking his 'Titanic' at the box office.

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Dams and reservoirs are messing up the world’s longest rivers

Only about one-third, or 37 percent, of the world’s 246 longest rivers remain free-flowing, according to a new study. Dams and reservoirs are drastically reducing the diverse benefits that healthy rivers provide to people and nature across the globe. Researchers assessed the connectivity status of 12 million kilometers (around 7.5 million miles) of rivers worldwide, providing the first ever globa

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Painting a fuller picture of how antibiotics kill

Researchers have used machine-learning algorithms to discover a secondary mechanism that helps some antibiotics kill bacteria. This mechanism involves disrupting bacterial metabolism of nucleotides that the cells need to replicate their DNA.

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Researchers develop viable, environmentally friendly alternative to Styrofoam

Washington State University researchers have developed an environmentally friendly, plant-based material that for the first time works better than Styrofoam for insulation.

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Does sunscreen compromise vitamin D levels?

Sunscreen can reduce the sun's adverse effects, but there are concerns that it might inhibit the body's production of vitamin D. In a new British Journal of Dermatology study, however, investigators recorded an increase of vitamin D in participants during a week of cloudless weather, with very high UV index, even when sunscreens were used properly and prevented sunburn.

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I gave away half my liver in exchange for a new kidney for my mother

To get her mother a new kidney, Aliana Deveza instigated the world’s first swap of different organs between living donors, donating half her liver to a stranger

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A growing number of states call porn a public health crisis

More than a dozen states have moved to declare pornography a public health crisis, raising concerns among some experts who say the label goes too far and carries its own risks.

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Researchers develop viable, environmentally-friendly alternative to Styrofoam

Washington State University researchers have developed an environmentally-friendly, plant-based material that for the first time works better than Styrofoam for insulation.

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I Don't Need A Car Anymore, And I'm Not The Only One

submitted by /u/wewewawa [link] [comments]

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China Mobile blocked from offering phone service in US

U.S. communications regulators on Thursday rejected a Chinese telecom company's application to provide service in the U.S. due to national security risks amid an escalation in tensions between the two countries.

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Britain's answer to 'King Tut's tomb' found on roadside

Excited archeologists on Thursday hailed an ancient burial site found on the side of a road near a pub and a budget supermarket as Britain's answer to the tomb of Egypt's King Tutankhamun.

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In Wall Street debut, Uber set to turn a corner

Uber geared up Thursday for a massive share offering that is a milestone for the ride-hailing industry and the so-called "sharing economy," but which comes amid simmering concerns about its business model.

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Substrate defects key to growth of 2-D materials

Creating two-dimentional materials large enough to use in electronics is a challenge despite huge effort but now, Penn State researchers have discovered a method for improving the quality of one class of 2-D materials, with potential to achieve wafer-scale growth in the future.

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Discovery of the photosensor for yellow-green light-driven photosynthesis in cyanobacteria

Cyanobacteria, a type of bacteria that performs photosynthesis, utilize a photosensor to maximize their light-harvesting capacity under different light environments. A joint research team found a new photosensor that regulates yellow-green light-harvesting antenna in cyanobacteria. Further analysis of the cyanobacterial genomes revealed that this photosensor emerged about 2.1 billion years ago or

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Trilobites: Seeking Life in Antarctica? Look for the Penguins’ Outhouse

The continent, a researcher said, is the “ideal experimental lab,” for studying how nutrients relate to an ecosystem’s biodiversity.

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The Tolkien Biopic Is Just Lord of the Rings References

Too often, a biographical drama about the life of a famous author boils down to a rote depiction of literary influences. John Ronald Reuel Tolkien’s life story is perfectly fascinating in its own right: Orphaned at the age of 12, he grew up a star scholarship student with a passion for linguistics, fought in World War I (including the historically bloody Battle of the Somme), and survived to beco

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The Hidden Subsidy of Fossil Fuels

Governments around the world spend an enormous amount of money every year making it cheaper for fossil-fuel companies to exhaust the planet. But they’re not spending nearly as much as a recent report may make it seem. The International Monetary Fund recently updated its comprehensive report on global fossil-fuel subsidies. It arrives at a staggering conclusion: In 2017, the world subsidized fossi

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Can Fiber Cancel Out Calories?

Nutrition Diva explains how eating more fiber can (and can’t) help you manage your weight and which foods to choose — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Smart drug design to prevent malaria treatment resistance

Malaria treatment resistance could be avoided by studying how resistance evolves during drug development, according to a new paper published in Cell Chemical Biology.

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Substrate defects key to growth of 2D materials

Creating two-dimentional materials large enough to use in electronics is a challenge despite huge effort but now, Penn State researchers have discovered a method for improving the quality of one class of 2D materials, with potential to achieve wafer-scale growth in the future.

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Finnish researchers discover a new moth family

Two moth species new to science belonging to a previously unknown genus and family have been found in Kazakhstan, constituting an exceptional discovery.

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Stem cells provide information about neuron resilience in ALS

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a stem cell based model in order to study the resilience and vulnerability of neurons in the neurodegenerative disease ALS. The results are published in the journal Stem Cell Reports and can aid in the identification of new genetic targets for treatments protecting sensitive neurons.

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How the cytoplasm separates from the yolk

The segregation of yolk from the surrounding cytoplasm in the very early fish embryo is a key process for the development of the fish larva. To identify its underlying mechanisms, biologists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) teamed up with their colleagues from theoretical physics. The discovery: Actin dynamics in the bulk of the cell drive phase segregation in zebra

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Neurodevelopmental disorders may be rooted in genetics and mitochondrial deficits

A new study published in Neuron provides the first evidence showing that individual nerve cells fail to make the right number of connections. The reason for this deficit is limited growth of key nerve cells in the cerebral cortex during early development, due to both genetics and mitochondrial dysfunction.

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Painting a fuller picture of how antibiotics kill

MIT researchers have used machine-learning algorithms to discover a secondary mechanism that helps some antibiotics kill bacteria. This mechanism involves disrupting bacterial metabolism of nucleotides that the cells need to replicate their DNA.

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Secrets of fluorescent microalgae could lead to super-efficient solar cells

Tiny light-emitting microalgae, found in the ocean, could hold the secret to the next generation of organic solar cells, according to new research carried out at the universities of Birmingham and Utrecht.

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Researchers discover 'daywake,' a siesta-suppressing gene

Rutgers researchers have identified a siesta-suppressing gene in fruit flies, which sheds light on the biology that helps many creatures, including humans, balance the benefits of a good nap against those of getting important activities done during the day.

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Smart drug design to prevent malaria treatment resistance

Malaria treatment resistance could be avoided by studying how resistance evolves during drug development.

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New HIV vaccine strategy 'pumps' the immune system

A new HIV vaccine delivery strategy appears to enhance the protective immune response in a preclinical model. Scientists at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have discovered that delivering an HIV vaccine in small doses over a series of days leads to a stronger immune response than when the same vaccine is given all at once.

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Scientists locate brain area where value decisions are made

Neurobiologists at UC San Diego have pinpointed the brain area responsible for value decisions that are made based on past experiences. Data from tens of thousands of neurons revealed an area of the brain called the retrosplenial cortex, or RSC, which was not previously known for 'value-based decision-making,' a fundamental animal behavior that is impaired in neurological conditions ranging from s

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Stem cell scientists clear another hurdle in creating transplant arteries

Recent work highlights a better way to grow smooth muscle cells, one of the two cellular building blocks of arteries, from pluripotent stem cells. This research is part of an effort to create artery banks — similar to blood banks common today — with readily-available material to replace diseased arteries during surgery.

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Ancient DNA suggests that some Northern Europeans got their languages from Siberia

Most Europeans descend from a combination of European hunter-gatherers, Anatolian early farmers, and Steppe herders. But only European speakers of Uralic languages like Estonian and Finnish also have DNA from ancient Siberians. Now, with the help of ancient DNA samples, researchers reporting in Current Biology on May 9 suggest that these languages may have arrived from Siberia by the beginning of

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Peering into the past, scientists discover bacteria transformed a viral threat to survive

A study led by Indiana University researchers reports the first known evidence of bacteria stealing genetic material from their own worst enemy, bacteriophages, and transforming it to survive.

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Antarctic biodiversity hotspots exist wherever penguins and seals poop

Scientists have found that on the desolate Antarctic peninsula, nitrogen-rich poop from colonies of penguins and seals enriches the soil so well that it helps create biodiversity hotspots throughout the region. Their work, appearing May 9 in the journal Current Biology, finds that the influence of this excrement can extend more than 1,000 meters beyond the colony.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan modvirker man statisk elektricitet på kontoret?

Nogle får gevaldige rap over fingrene, når de rører ved dørhåndtag og andre metalgenstande. Hvorfor sker det? Det svarer to ingeniører i Region Midtjylland på.

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It may become impossible to tell if Iran starts making a nuclear bomb

US hostility to arms control treaties has put Iran back on a path to building nuclear weapons, and inspectors could be left blind if the deal collapses

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Penguin and seal dung nourishes organisms that are kilometres away

Nitrogen from penguin and seal faeces in Antarctica can spread to an area up to 240 times the original colony, which serves as a vital nutrient for other plants and animals

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Google's Now Letting Users Pay for Android Apps With Cash

While credit cards are rampant in the United States, it’s not necessarily the case in other countries where cash is still king. At this year’s Google I/O developer conference, the tech giant …

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Major Bank: The Immortality Industry Is the Next Hot Investment

Moonshot Bank of America analysts say that companies focused on immortality and longevity — extending the human lifespan as much as possible — are going to grow in coming years, with the market expected to be worth $600 billion by 2025. Longevity companies have often risen and fallen with little ado. But if these financial experts are correct that biotech companies are poised to start “bringing u

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Facebook Co-Founder: “It’s Time to Break Up Facebook”

Point Break Chris Hughes helped Mark Zuckerberg launch Facebook. But times have changed. In a New York Times op-ed titled “It’s Time to Break Up Facebook,” Hughes argues that Facebook has gained too much power — and that it should be broken up and regulated. “It’s been 15 years since I co-founded Facebook at Harvard, and I haven’t worked at the company in a decade,” Hughes wrote. “But I feel a se

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We may have evidence of a neutron star smashing into a black hole

Space An unprecedented cosmic observation. Detecting gravitational waves doesn’t have the sort of bombshell panache it did when it first happened three years ago, but that doesn’t make it any less remarkable.

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Compound can reverse T.B. resistance to antibiotic

Lab tests indicate a compound can prevent and even reverse resistance to isoniazid, the most widely used antibiotic for treating tuberculosis. About 1.5 million people died of tuberculosis (TB) in 2017, making it the most lethal infectious disease worldwide. A growing rise in drug-resistant TB is a major obstacle to successfully treating the illness, researchers say. Scientists conducted the rese

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Colorful solution to a chemical industry bottleneck

The nanoscale water channels that nature has evolved to rapidly shuttle water molecules into and out of cells could inspire new materials to clean up chemical and pharmaceutical production. KAUST researchers have tailored the structure of graphene-oxide layers to mimic the hourglass shape of these biological channels, creating ultrathin membranes to rapidly separate chemical mixtures.

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Does artificial intelligence deserve the same ethical protections we give to animals?

In the HBO show Westworld, robots designed to display emotion, feel pain, and die like humans populate a sprawling western-style theme park for wealthy guests who pay to act out their fantasies. As the show progresses, and the robots learn more about the world in which they live, they begin to realize that they are the playthings of the person who programmed them.

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Design work on 'brain' of world's largest radio telescope completed

An international group of scientists led by the University of Cambridge has finished designing the 'brain' of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the world's largest radio telescope. When complete, the SKA will enable astronomers to monitor the sky in unprecedented detail and survey the entire sky much faster than any system currently in existence.

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Grading conservation: Which reserves defend forests?

Lands that shelter forests have value often readily tallied by developers, but until now it's been more difficult to prove the success of protecting those forested lands in pursuit of sustainability. That can put conservationists on the defense. Scientists have focused on what makes a protected area the most effective at preventing deforestation. Preserving forests means more trees to suck up gree

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Athletes with sickle cell traits are at more risk to collapse: here's why

A genetic variation known to affect sickle cell disease might be the reason why some college football players experience adverse clinical outcomes during periods of extreme physical exertion and others do not.

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Location is everything for plant cell differentiation

During development, plant cell differentiation is guided by location rather than lineage. Now, researchers have shown that the accumulation and intracellular localization of regulatory protein ATML1, which controls the expression of genes associated with epidermal cell identity, are also critical for the differentiation of plant cells into an epidermal layer.

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Detection of unusual hybrid schistosomes in Malawi

Medical researchers have described the unusual occurrence of novel schistosome hybrids infecting children along the Shire River Valley.

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New treatment could become first targeted therapy designed for 'untreatable' childhood brain cancer

A new type of drug that targets a genetic weakness in an untreatable childhood brain cancer could become the first ever treatment designed to target the disease. The prototype treatment could also offer hope for patients with the rare and devastating 'stone man syndrome' — in which muscles and ligaments turn to bone.

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Bullying linked to student's pain medication use

In a school-based survey study of all students in grades 6, 8, and 10 in Iceland, the use of pain medications was significantly higher among bullied students even when controlling for the amount of pain they felt, as well as age, gender, and socioeconomic status.

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Migraines may increase risk of pregnancy complications

In a study of women in Denmark with and without migraines who became pregnant, migraines were associated with an increased risk of pregnancy-associated hypertension disorders in the mother. Also, in newborns, maternal migraine was associated with an increased risk of a variety of adverse outcomes, including low birth weight, preterm birth, cesarean delivery, respiratory distress syndrome, and febr

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Researchers create 'force field' for super materials

Researchers have developed a revolutionary method to intricately grow and protect some of the world's most exciting nanomaterials — graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNT).

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The bird that came back from the dead

New research has shown that the last surviving flightless species of bird, a type of rail, in the Indian Ocean had previously gone extinct but rose from the dead thanks to a rare process called 'iterative evolution'.

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Wild red deer contribute to the preservation of open landscapes

Similar to farm animals such as cattle or sheep, wild red deer grazing in open landscapes can also contribute to the conservation of protected habitats.

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Life thrives in Antarctic hot spots created by seal and penguin poop

Nitrogen-rich feces create a perfect breeding ground for Antarctic life

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Antarctic biodiversity hotspots exist wherever penguins and seals poop

Scientists have found that on the desolate Antarctic peninsula, nitrogen-rich poop from colonies of penguins and seals enriches the soil so well that it helps create biodiversity hotspots throughout the region. Their work, appearing May 9 in the journal Current Biology, finds that the influence of this excrement can extend more than 1,000 meters beyond the colony.

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Ancient DNA suggests that some Northern Europeans got their languages from Siberia

Most Europeans descend from a combination of European hunter-gatherers, Anatolian early farmers, and Steppe herders. But only European speakers of Uralic languages like Estonian and Finnish also have DNA from ancient Siberians. Now, with the help of ancient DNA samples, researchers reporting in Current Biology on May 9 suggest that these languages may have arrived from Siberia by the beginning of

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Machine learning reveals metabolic pathways disrupted by the drugs, offering new targets to combat resistance

Most antibiotics work by interfering with critical functions such as DNA replication or construction of the bacterial cell wall. However, these mechanisms represent only part of the full picture of how antibiotics act.

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Researchers discover 'daywake,' a siesta-suppressing gene

Rutgers researchers have identified a siesta-suppressing gene in fruit flies, which sheds light on the biology that helps many creatures, including humans, balance the benefits of a good nap against those of getting important activities done during the day.

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Smart drug design to prevent malaria treatment resistance

Malaria treatment resistance could be avoided by studying how resistance evolves during drug development, according to a new paper published in Cell Chemical Biology.

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Peering into the past, scientists discover bacteria transformed a viral threat to survive

Researchers at Indiana University are reporting a previously unknown way that bacteria can develop new genes to evolve and adapt to threats, an insight that might advance efforts against "superbugs."

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Like submicroscopic spacecrafts: graphene flakes to control neuron activity

Like in a science fiction novel, miniscule spacecrafts able to reach a specific site of the brain and influence the operation of specific types of neurons or drug delivery: graphene flakes, the subject matter of the new study of the group of SISSA professor Laura Ballerini, open up future scenarios in research and for developing possible therapies for neurological diseases.

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Discovery of the photosensor for yellow-green light-driven photosynthesis in cyanobacteria

Cyanobacteria, a type of bacteria that performs photosynthesis, utilize a photosensor to maximize their light-harvesting capacity under different light environments. A joint research team led by Toyohashi University of Technology found a new photosensor that regulates yellow-green light-harvesting antenna in cyanobacteria. Further analysis of the cyanobacterial genomes revealed that this photosens

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Athletes with sickle cell traits are at more risk to collapse: here's why

A genetic variation known to affect sickle cell disease might be the reason why some college football players experience adverse clinical outcomes during periods of extreme physical exertion and others do not.

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Rester fra en 66 millioner år gammel fortidskrokodille er fundet i Danmark

To tænder og noget knoglemateriale fra kridttiden er fundet ved Stevns Klint.

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For Antarctic food webs, penguin poo is the gift that keeps on giving

Study finds wind-blown faecal matter boosts inland ecosystems. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Antarctic biodiversity hotspots exist wherever penguins and seals poop

Scientists have found that on the desolate Antarctic peninsula, nitrogen-rich poop from colonies of penguins and seals enriches the soil so well that it helps create biodiversity hotspots throughout the region. Their work, appearing May 9 in the journal Current Biology, finds that the influence of this excrement can extend more than 1,000 meters beyond the colony.

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Machine learning reveals metabolic pathways disrupted by the drugs, offering new targets to combat resistance

Most antibiotics work by interfering with critical functions such as DNA replication or construction of the bacterial cell wall. However, these mechanisms represent only part of the full picture of how antibiotics act.

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Researchers discover 'daywake,' a siesta-suppressing gene

Rutgers researchers have identified a siesta-suppressing gene in fruit flies, which sheds light on the biology that helps many creatures, including humans, balance the benefits of a good nap against those of getting important activities done during the day.

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Peering into the past, scientists discover bacteria transformed a viral threat to survive

Researchers at Indiana University are reporting a previously unknown way that bacteria can develop new genes to evolve and adapt to threats, an insight that might advance efforts against "superbugs."

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KAL’s cartoon

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‘Attention Is the Beginning of Devotion’

I can say definitively now that I faltered in pursuit of my New Year’s resolution. My self-improvement project for the year was to read a fresh poem every morning, before glimpsing the accumulation of unresponded email and lifting the lid off Twitter. My purpose, when I explained it to my wife and kids a few hours before midnight, was to ritualistically remind myself of emotions other than those

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The case for having kids | Wajahat Ali

The global fertility rate, or the number of children per woman, has halved over the last 50 years. What will having fewer babies mean for the future of humanity? In this funny, eye-opening talk, journalist (and self-described exhausted dad) Wajahat Ali examines how the current trend could lead to unexpected problems — and shares why he believes we need to make it easier for people to have babies.

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An idea to save coral reefs from climate change takes a step forward

Transplanting heat-resistant strains may help reefs

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SpaceX will launch dozens of “Starlink” satellites

The prototypes will test the firm’s plans for planet-wide internet access

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In science, grit counts as well as talent

New research confirms the value of an old proverb

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Electric racing cars are catching up fast with petrol-driven ones

That will improve street-legal e-cars, too

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Rapid Oxygen Changes Fueled an Explosion in Ancient Animal Diversity

For more than a billion years after animal life arose, it stagnated in simplicity; sponges represented the height of complexity. Then around 541 million years ago, the pace of life’s transformation abruptly accelerated. This period, known as the Cambrian explosion, roughly bracketed the appearance of nearly all major animal groups alive today. Within a few tens of millions of years, a geologic bl

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Older adults with obesity may have fewer years of healthy life

A study conducted of older Singaporeans (above 60 years) showed that those with a higher Body Mass Index (BMI) might have the same number of remaining years of life compared to those with a lower BMI, but spend fewer of those years in good health.

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Anger more harmful to health of older adults than sadness

Anger may be more harmful to an older person's physical health than sadness, potentially increasing inflammation, which is associated with such chronic illnesses as heart disease, arthritis and cancer, according to new research.

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Scientists find link between digital media use and depression in Chinese adolescents

Adolescents in China who either spend more time on screen activities, such as watching TV or surfing the Web, or less time on non-screen activities, including physical activity, are at risk and significantly more likely to experience depression, according to a new study.

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New clues about how ancient galaxies lit up the Universe

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed that some of the Universe's earliest galaxies were brighter than expected. The excess light is a by-product of the galaxies releasing incredibly high amounts of ionizing radiation. The finding offers clues to the cause of the Epoch of Reionization, a major cosmic event that transformed the universe from being mostly opaque to the brilliant starscape seen

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Denver Becomes First U.S. City to Decriminalize “Magic Mushrooms”

Magic Mushrooms This week, Denver, CO became the first city in the United States to decriminalize psilocybin, a compound with hallucinogenic properties that occurs in some mushrooms — a move that could signal new frontiers both in the country’s evolving relationship with mind-altering substances and in the medical community’s accelerating exploration of psychedelics . “Because psilocybin has such

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California Seeks to Ban Chlorpyrifos-Containing Pesticides

The state's Environmental Protection Agency says that evidence of the chemical’s link to neurological problems in children is overwhelming.

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Detection of unusual hybrid schistosomes in Malawi

LSTM's Professor Russell Stothard is senior author on a new paper in which researchers from the UK and Malawi have described the unusual occurrence of novel schistosome hybrids infecting children along the Shire River Valley.

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Location is everything for plant cell differentiation

During development, plant cell differentiation is guided by location rather than lineage. Now, researchers from Osaka University have shown that the accumulation and intracellular localization of regulatory protein ATML1, which controls the expression of genes associated with epidermal cell identity, are also critical for the differentiation of plant cells into an epidermal layer.

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The Lib Dems’ ‘Bollocks to Brexit’ is crass, but it might just work | Stefan Stern

The party of moderation has found a novel, if slightly risky, way to tap into how remainers feel about Brexit “When the general atmosphere is bad, language must suffer,” wrote George Orwell in his famous essay, Politics and the English Language , just after the second world war. Things are bad, and our language is getting worse. The Liberal Democrats have adopted the slogan “Bollocks to Brexit” in

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Bosch sets goal of being carbon neutral by 2020

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Germany is opening its first electric highway for trucks

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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What do we think?

submitted by /u/Usulthejerboa [link] [comments]

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Läsning efter kunskapskryssningen 6-7 maj 2019

För artonde gången ordnade Forskning & Framsteg en kunskapskryssning med föreläsningar av spännande forskare. Denna gång var resan helt fullbokad. Tack till alla som var med!Här har vi nu samlat beskrivningarna av de olika föreläsningarna och länkar till några artiklar ur tidigare nummer Forskning & Framsteg som berör samma ämnen.Marie Rådbo: Tänk om månen inte fanns!

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The Latest on Drug Failure and Approval Rates

We now have an updated look at clinical success rates in the industry, and it’s a timely topic. Last year there were 59 approvals by the FDA (a new record), and the year before was good as well. So the question is always whether such numbers are artifacts, random noise, or part of a real trend. This article compares the success rates at the beginning of the 2010s with the 2015-2017 period, so we’

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Innovative mechanobiology research expands understanding of cells

Researchers have developed a new technology that allows them to probe cell changes without disturbing the cell's physiology — a major advancement that helps scientists look more closely at cell changes to solve human health problems, according to a new article. This technology, known as deformation microscopy, allows scientists to more accurately assess the interplay between biological systems an

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Scientists grow precursors for human pigment cells

Our hair, skin and eyes are colored by a pigment called melanin, which is produced by pigment cells called melanocytes. Scientists have used stem cell technology to successfully create melanocyte precursor cells. These cells can be used in research on melanoma and other pigment cell-related illnesses.

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Specific identification of chronic lung disease in premature babies

Infants born prematurely frequently develop a form of chronic lung disease known as Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia. Previously, this disease could only be diagnosed clinically and with a low degree of differentiation. Researchers have now successfully developed a new protocol for identifying neonatal patients with the disease by the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

7h

Novel molecular multi-step photoswitches caught in the act

Scientists at the Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences at the University of Amsterdam, together with collaborators from the University of Groningen, the University of Twente and the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy in Italy, have been able to follow the entire sequence of structural transformations in a new class of molecular switches for the first time. By identifying 'cont

7h

Marcus regime in organic devices—interfacial charge transfer mechanism verified

Physicists from the Research Cluster Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) of the TU Dresden, together with researchers from Spain, Belgium and Germany, were able to show in a study how electrons behave in their injection into organic semiconductor films. Simulations and experiments clearly identified different transport regimes. The study was published now in Nature Communications.

7h

Why we always spill tea

Who has never spilled water, tea or wine while pouring it? Pouring liquids is difficult because they tend to cling to the bottle or the teapot spout rather than flowing directly into your cup or glass. A team of scientists from the University of Amsterdam, University of Twente and Saxion University of Applied Sciences put a new spin on this annoying 'teapot effect' by using it to form liquid helic

7h

Research reveals surprisingly powerful bite of tiny early tetrapod

Micro-CT scanning of a tiny snake-like fossil discovered in Scotland has shed new light on the elusive creature, thought to be one of the earliest known tetrapods to develop teeth that allowed it to crush its prey.

7h

Dexterous herring gulls learn new tricks to adapt their feeding habits

Observations of Herring Gulls by scientists from the University of Southampton have shown how the coastal birds have developed complicated behaviour to 'skin' sea creatures to make them safe to eat. Researchers think this feeding habit may be a response to urbanisation and changes in food availability.

7h

Blodprov förutspår svårighetsgrad vid inflammatorisk tarmsjukdom

Örebroforskaren Jonas Halfvarson är ledare för projektet som ska ta fram en individanpassad behandling för personer med tarmsjukdomen IBD. Målet är att förbättra livskvaliteten för den här gruppen. – Problemet med de här sjukdomarna är att de är så varierande. En del personer kanske bara blir dåliga någon enstaka gång i livet. Andra känner av sjukdomen varje dag och deras liv blir därmed allvarli

8h

Dexterous herring gulls learn new tricks to adapt their feeding habits

Observations of Herring Gulls by scientists from the University of Southampton have shown how the coastal birds have developed complicated behaviour to 'skin' sea creatures to make them safe to eat. Researchers think this feeding habit may be a response to urbanisation and changes in food availability.

8h

Parents can't delete what kids tell Amazon voice assistant

Amazon met with skepticism from some privacy advocates and members of Congress last year when it introduced its first kid-oriented voice assistant , along with brightly colored models of its …

8h

Movies are as popular as ever, but rising ticket prices may be shutting many people out of the cinema

The UK cinema association announced late in 2018 that movie admissions were on course to hit 176m for the year, 6m more than in 2017 and the highest since the 1970s when blockbusters such as Star Wars and Jaws had people queuing round the block. This in an era of streaming, online sharing platforms and on-demand, on-the-go access to virtually any film, anywhere.

8h

Parents can't delete what kids tell Amazon voice assistant

Amazon met with skepticism from some privacy advocates and members of Congress last year when it introduced its first kid-oriented voice assistant , along with brightly colored models of its Echo Dot speaker designed for children.

8h

Researchers break down DNA of world's largest mammals to discover how whales defy the cancer odds

Scientists know that age and weight are risk factors in the development of cancer. That should mean that whales, which include some of the largest and longest-lived animals on Earth, have an outsized risk of developing cancer.

8h

Deep sea carbon reservoirs once superheated the Earth—could it happen again?

As concern grows over human-induced climate change, many scientists are looking back through Earth's history to events that can shed light on changes occurring today. Analyzing how the planet's climate system has changed in the past improves our understanding of how it may behave in the future.

8h

Researchers discover a new moth family

In a recently completed study, researchers of the Finnish Museum of Natural History Luomus and their collaborators have described two moth species new to science. In addition, the Ustyurtia zygophyllivora and Ustyurtia charynica species belong to a newly-described Lepidoptera genus and family. Discovering a new family of moths is comparable to researchers specialised in mammals finding entirely ne

8h

Women entrepreneurs thrive managing talented teams and balancing many investors

Only a handful of the top companies in the U.S. are led by a woman.

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'Fire streaks' ever more real in the collisions of atomic nuclei and protons

Collisions of lead nuclei take place under extreme physical conditions. Their course can be described using a model which assumes that the transforming, extremely hot matter — the quark-gluon plasma — flows in the form of hundreds of streaks. Until now, the 'fire streaks' seemed to be purely theoretical structures. However, the latest analysis of collisions of individual protons reinforces the h

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Marcus regime in organic devices: Interfacial charge transfer mechanism verified

Physicists from the Research Cluster Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) of the TU Dresden, together with researchers from Spain, Belgium and Germany, were able to show in a study how electrons behave in their injection into organic semiconductor films. Simulations and experiments clearly identified different transport regimes. The study was published now in Nature Communications.

8h

Dexterous herring gulls learn new tricks to adapt their feeding habits

Observations of Herring Gulls by scientists from the University of Southampton have shown how the coastal birds have developed complicated behaviour to 'skin' sea creatures to make them safe to eat. Researchers think this feeding habit may be a response to urbanisation and changes in food availability.

8h

What do parents of children with cancer search for online?

When a child has cancer, what kind of information do parents seek out? Analyzing their online Google searches to obtain health-related information offers one window into their concerns, and provides insight into how healthcare providers may offer family education and support. Among other things, parents frequently focus on ways to best support their child and on logistical issues, such as directio

8h

Research reveals surprisingly powerful bite of tiny early tetrapod

Micro-CT scanning of a tiny snake-like fossil discovered in Scotland has shed new light on the elusive creature, thought to be one of the earliest known tetrapods to develop teeth that allowed it to crush its prey.

8h

MicroRNA-like RNAs contribute to the lifestyle transition of Arthrobotrys oligospora

Lifestyle transition is a fundamental mechanism that fungi have evolved to survive and proliferate in different environments. As a typical nematode-trapping fungus, Arthrobotrys oligospora switches from saprophytes to predators on induction of nematode preys. During its induced lifestyle transition, microRNA-like RNAs may play a critical role, which paves new ways for understanding fungal adaptati

8h

Older adults with obesity may have fewer years of healthy life

A study by researchers at Duke-NUS, conducted of older Singaporeans (above 60 years) showed that those with a higher Body Mass Index (BMI) might have the same number of remaining years of life compared to those with a lower BMI, but spend fewer of those years in good health.

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The art of the circus

From tightrope to trapeze, circus arts have long fascinated and inspired people of all ages. Now, research from the University of South Australia is revealing the true value of circus skills and their unique ability to deliver significant mental health benefits for Australian children.

8h

Dead Malls, Everywhere

One more installment on the question of whether an unloved and unsightly part of America’s infrastructure—the giant sprawl-malls that drained business from classic downtowns in the 1960s and 1970s, only to become bankrupt dinosaurs in their turn—might actually become the sites of civic and architectural rebirth. The original post, about Fort Wayne, Indiana, was here ; followed by this (partial) d

8h

Researchers break down DNA of world's largest mammals to discover how whales defy the cancer odds

Scientists know that age and weight are risk factors in the development of cancer. That should mean that whales, which include some of the largest and longest-lived animals on Earth, have an outsized risk of developing cancer.

8h

Researchers discover a new moth family

In a recently completed study, researchers of the Finnish Museum of Natural History Luomus and their collaborators have described two moth species new to science. In addition, the Ustyurtia zygophyllivora and Ustyurtia charynica species belong to a newly-described Lepidoptera genus and family. Discovering a new family of moths is comparable to researchers specialised in mammals finding entirely ne

8h

How banning plastic bags could help New York mitigate climate change

New Yorkers use a lot of plastic bags. The city of 8 million goes through 23 billion plastic bags annually. It's a stat that would've seemed unbelievable to me before I moved here until I walked out of a C-Town grocery store with $30 of groceries in six plastic bags. Plastic pollution is a severe environmental problem, but some have suggested that focusing on cleaning up plastic pollution is distr

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Germany's Bosch aims to go carbon-neutral from 2020

Car parts supplier Bosch said Thursday it plans to produce zero net carbon emissions "from 2020" and to spend two billion euros ($2.2 billion) on renewable electricity over the next decade.

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Kinesisk lidar-kamera tager billeder på 45 kilometers afstand

Med lidar-teknologi har kinesiske forskere taget billeder på 45 kilometers afstand igennem smog og tåge. Ambitionen er at tage billeder på flere hundrede kilometers afstand

8h

The bird that came back from the dead

New research has shown that the last surviving flightless species of bird, a type of rail, in the Indian Ocean had previously gone extinct but rose from the dead thanks to a rare process called 'iterative evolution'.

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App and suitcase aid visually impaired people at the airport

A smart suitcase, called BBeep, and a way-finding smartphone app can help people with visual disabilities navigate airport terminals safely and independently, report researchers. The rolling suitcase sounds alarms when users are headed for a collision with a pedestrian, and the navigation app provides turn-by-turn audio instructions to users on how to reach a departure gate—or a restroom or a res

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The deepest cut of all: ancient Mayans self-mutilated to appease the gods

Blades recovered from caves indicate ritual genital cutting was common in the meso-American civilisation. Andrew Masterson reports.

8h

Physics Can Help Develop New Foods — Like Crispy Jellyfish Chips

Physics Can Help Develop New Foods — Like Crispy Jellyfish Chips Researchers find a new method for making jellyfish into an edible product with an enticing, crisp texture. jellyfish-crisp.jpg Image credits: Mie Thorborg Pedersen Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Science article. Physics Thursday, May 9, 2019 – 09:30 Bailey Bedford, Contributor (Inside Science

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Frenchman savours triumphant barrel crossing of Atlantic ocean

A 72-year-old Frenchman arrived on the Caribbean island of Martinique Thursday to celebrate crossing the Atlantic in four months carried by the currents in a custom-made barrel.

8h

The bird that came back from the dead

New research has shown that the last surviving flightless species of bird, a type of rail, in the Indian Ocean had previously gone extinct but rose from the dead thanks to a rare process called 'iterative evolution'.

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High-tech sex toy for women wins back a rescinded award

A trade group has reinstated an award to the makers of a robotic sex toy for women that it had taken away four months ago for not keeping with its image.

8h

Drone sighting briefly grounds flights at Frankfurt airport

Frankfurt airport was shut down for nearly an hour on Thursday morning as operators halted flights over a drone sighting, in the latest such incident affecting a busy European hub.

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Researchers create 'force field' for super materials

Researchers have developed a revolutionary method to intricately grow and protect some of the world's most exciting nanomaterials—graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNT).

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Climate change is giving old trees a growth spurt

Larch trees in the permafrost forests of northeastern China—the northernmost tree species on Earth—are growing faster as a result of climate change, according to new research.

8h

Researchers create 'force field' for super materials

Researchers have developed a revolutionary method to intricately grow and protect some of the world's most exciting nanomaterials — graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNT).

8h

The bird that came back from the dead

New research has shown that the last surviving flightless species of bird, a type of rail, in the Indian Ocean had previously gone extinct but rose from the dead thanks to a rare process called 'iterative evolution'.

8h

Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation

Members of the same bird species can have dramatically different responses to deforestation depending on where they live, finds a new study.

8h

Innovative mechanobiology research expands understanding of cells

Researchers have developed a new technology that allows them to probe cell changes without disturbing the cell's physiology—a major advancement that helps scientists look more closely at cell changes to solve human health problems, according to a new paper in Cell Reports.

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Generating multiphoton quantum states on silicon

In a recent study now published in Light: Science & Applications, Ming Zhang, Lan-Tian Feng and an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the departments of quantum information, quantum physics and modern optical instrumentation in China, detailed a new technique to generate photon-pairs for use in quantum devices. In the study, they used a method known as four-wave mixing to allow three electro

8h

Quiet Evidence of People's Impact on Earth

Photographer George Marazakis documents traces of human activity for his series 'A Cure for Anthropocene'.

8h

The Sad Meaning Behind the *Game of Thrones* Coffee Cup Meme

It symbolizes a lot more than just a production goof.

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Nu får Word en kunstig intelligens, der gør din engelsklærer glad

Microsoft vil tage stavekontrol til et ny niveau. Og det vil vi se meget mere af i fremtiden, siger forsker.

8h

Ride-share companies create, not reduce, traffic congestion

Study finds cars-for-hire business model does nothing to reduce private vehicle use or ownership. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Huge Storm Puts the Saga at Risk of Capsizing | Deadliest Catch

Jake faces a life and death decision when a shifting stack threatens to capsize the Saga. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https:

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Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation

Members of the same bird species can have dramatically different responses to deforestation depending on where they live, finds a new study.

8h

Innovative mechanobiology research expands understanding of cells

Researchers have developed a new technology that allows them to probe cell changes without disturbing the cell's physiology—a major advancement that helps scientists look more closely at cell changes to solve human health problems, according to a new paper in Cell Reports.

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Dr. Alexa Will See You Now: Can We Trust Digital Assistants With Our Health Data?

It’s hard to imagine a field where data is more valuable than in healthcare. Monitoring and interpreting crucial health indices can make the difference between an early diagnosis and a late one—and that, in turn, can be the difference between life and death for some people. As neural networks and machine learning algorithms get better at interpreting these signals, and even diagnosing certain ill

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In China, Surgeons Are Treating Addiction With Brain Implants

Deep Brain Deep brain stimulation (DBS), an experimental technology that involves implanting a pacemaker-like device in a patient’s brain to send electrical impulses, is a hotly debated subject in the field of medicine. It’s an inherently risky procedure and the exact effects on the human brain aren’t yet fully understood. But some practitioners believe it could be a way to alleviate the symptoms

8h

'Disturbing' scale of plastic pollution revealed

Research carried out at the University of Dundee has shown the scale of plastic pollution in the Firth of Forth to be much worse than previously thought.

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Revealing branching time in single-cell omics data

New single-cell omics technology allows scientists to analyse cell development in ways that were not previously possible. Researchers can now identify never-before-seen patterns and phenomena across large quantities of cells—receiving information about genomes, gene expression, and cell heterogeneity for thousands of cells from a single organism simultaneously. This new technology has been named 2

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Revealing branching time in single-cell omics data

New single-cell omics technology allows scientists to analyse cell development in ways that were not previously possible. Researchers can now identify never-before-seen patterns and phenomena across large quantities of cells—receiving information about genomes, gene expression, and cell heterogeneity for thousands of cells from a single organism simultaneously. This new technology has been named 2

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Researchers suggest collapsar accretion disks might be source of heaviest elements

A trio of researchers at Columbia University is suggesting that collapsar accretion disks might be the major source of the heaviest elements. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Daniel Siegel, Jennifer Barnes and Brian Metzger describe their study of the accretion disks that form as neutron stars collapse into black holes, and what they found.

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An all-optical neural network on a single chip

A team of researchers from the University of Münster, the University of Oxford and the University of Exeter has built an all-optical neural network on a single chip. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their chip, which has no optical-to-electronic conversions, and how well it worked. Geoffrey Burr with IBM Research – Almaden has published a News and Views piece dis

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A 49-kilometer-high volcanic ash column rose up over the Mayan civilization

The Ilopango volcano eruption (also known as Tierra Blanca Joven or TBJ) occurred approximately 1,500 years ago. Pyroclastics currents were dispersed over much of the present territory of El Salvador and a volcanic ash column reached a height of 49 km, according to a new research published recently in Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research.

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Demographic dissimilarity and absenteeism in blue-collar teams

"Diversity" is a central buzzword in business and labour-related vocabulary, functioning as either a mark of distinction or open flank of today's employers. Many people believe it is sufficient to hire a small number of currently under-represented groups such as women in classic "male" professions, older employees in young teams (or the reverse, of course). The initially uncomfortable situation ma

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The Universe’s First Supernovae May Have Been Powerful, Asymmetric Jets

Astronomers have discovered an ancient Population II star with very little metal — but a specific spike in zinc that can only be explained by an asymmetrical supernova explosion. The post The Universe’s First Supernovae May Have Been Powerful, Asymmetric Jets appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Climate change denier vs Attenborough: Why did those walruses die?

Sir David Attenborough recently lent his voice to a new Netflix series, “Our Planet,” that documents human impacts on the planet, with a particular focus on climate change. Unsurprisingly, climate change contrarians were unhappy about this series and seized any … Continue reading →

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Co-Founder Chris Hughes: Time to break up Facebook

Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes says it's time to break up the social media behemoth.

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Singapore 'fake news' law could hurt innovation: Google

Technology giant Google said Thursday Singapore's new law against "fake news" could hurt innovation, a crucial element in the high-tech sector which the government is developing as an economic …

8h

Chimpanzees observed ganging up on a leopard and stealing its food

A group of chimpanzees took a dead antelope from a leopard that had apparently killed it, then ate parts of it in full sight of the big cat

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Birds outside their comfort zone are more vulnerable to deforestation

Members of the same bird species can have dramatically different responses to deforestation depending on where they live, finds a new study.

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Traces of Roman-era pollution stored in the ice of Mont Blanc

The deepest layers of carbon-14 dated ice found in the French Alps provide a record of atmospheric conditions in the ancient Roman era. Published in Geophysical Research Letters, the study, led by an international team and coordinated by a CNRS scientist, reveals significant atmospheric pollution from heavy metals: the presence of lead and antimony is linked to mining activity and lead and silver

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White people struggle to perceive emotion on black people's faces

Being able to accurately identify emotions in others is important for social interaction in general, but particularly so in interracial contexts, which are prone to misinterpretations and misunderstandings.

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Study questions current regulations on light pollution and calls for paradigm shift

Researchers from the Universities of Granada and Krakow have warned that Spain's current legislation on light pollution fails to take into account all the necessary factors — including human vision itself.

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Climate change is giving old trees a growth spurt

Larch trees in the permafrost forests of northeastern China — the northernmost tree species on Earth — are growing faster as a result of climate change. A new study of growth rings from Dahurian larch in China's northern forests finds the hardy trees grew more from 2005 to 2014 than in the preceding 40 years.

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Wild red deer contribute to the preservation of open landscapes

Similar to farm animals such as cattle or sheep, wild red deer grazing in open landscapes can also contribute to the conservation of protected habitats. This was demonstrated by a research team from the University of Göttingen and the Institute for Wildlife Biology of Göttingen and Dresden. The results were published in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

8h

Trump Has Just One Trick—And It’s Not Working Anymore

During the 2016 campaign, Hillary Clinton often warned that Donald Trump would do to the United States what he had done to his businesses. She was thinking of his record of debt, failure, and bankruptcy—about which The New York Times offered grim new details this week. But there is an even more disturbing way that Clinton’s warnings are being fulfilled. North Korea has resumed missile testing, di

8h

A way to minimize unexpected base edits to cellular RNA

A team of researchers with the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT has found evidence showing that using base editors can lead to unexpected RNA cellular edits. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the CRISPR type of adenine base editor (ABE), and what they found.

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A way to minimize unexpected base edits to cellular RNA

A team of researchers with the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT has found evidence showing that using base editors can lead to unexpected RNA cellular edits. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the CRISPR type of adenine base editor (ABE), and what they found.

8h

The best weather apps you can put on your phone

DIY Here comes the rain again… From tracking storms to checking for the chance of a shower next weekend, these apps bring accurate forecasts to your phone.

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Aarhus-læger samler sig i Facebook-gruppe i frustration

Over 5000 læger og andre ansatte på Aarhus Universitetshospital har på få uger samlet sig i en Facebook-gruppe. »Vi er bange for, at flagskibet sænkes,« skriver de ansatte.

8h

Aarhus-læger i opråb: Hjælp, vi er i knæ

Med udsigt til nye besparelser på Aarhus Universitetshospital går flere læger ud og råber vagt i gevær. Hvis ikke politikerne på Christiansborg finder flere penge til alle landets supersygehuse, kan det ende rigtigt skidt, advarer de.

8h

Det er letkøbt at sige, at der diagnostiseres for meget

Jeg har lidt på fornemmelsen, at det er noget man siger på ledelsesgangene rundt omkring, og jo oftere man siger det, jo rigtigere lyder det. Men det er forkert.

8h

OUH-direktør: Vi skal også nok få vores økonomiske problemer

Aarhus Universitetshospital er havnet i store økonomiske problemer på grund af udflytningen til nyt supersygehus. Noget tilsvarende kan også ske i Odense, siger OUH- direktør.

8h

Team links Prozac during pregnancy and autism behavior in mice

Researchers have found a potential link between autism-like behavior in adult mice and exposure to a common antidepressant in the womb. They also identified a treatment that helped improve memory loss and social interactions, according to the new study in the journal Molecular Brain . Doctors commonly prescribe antidepressants for treating major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, incl

8h

Mystery solved: Why water skitters on hot surfaces

Rather than sizzling and evaporating on super hot surfaces, water droplets instead stay intact, dancing and skittering over the surface in what’s known as the Leidenfrost effect. Now researchers know how these Leidenfrost droplets meet their ultimate fate. In a new paper, the team shows that Leidenfrost droplets that start off small eventually rocket off the hot surface and disappear, while large

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Location is everything for plant cell differentiation

While the fate of most human cells is determined by their lineage—for example, renal stem cells go on to form the kidney while cardiac progenitor cells form the heart—plant cells are a little more flexible. Research shows that although they undergo orderly division during growth, the fate of plant cells is often determined by their location in the growing plant rather than how they started out. In

8h

In China, Robots Are Taste-Testing Food

Two Robo-Claws Up! Chinese robots equipped with sensors that imitate human eyes, noses, and tongues are pigging out on the job. The taste-testing robots are sampling mass-produced food to make sure the quality is up to snuff. And according to the South China Morning Post , the bots is already saving food manufacturers millions of dollars. FlavorBot The Chinese government has issued a number of re

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Location is everything for plant cell differentiation

While the fate of most human cells is determined by their lineage—for example, renal stem cells go on to form the kidney while cardiac progenitor cells form the heart—plant cells are a little more flexible. Research shows that although they undergo orderly division during growth, the fate of plant cells is often determined by their location in the growing plant rather than how they started out. In

8h

A superior, low-cost catalyst for water-splitting

In a significant step toward large-scale hydrogen production, researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) have developed a low-cost catalyst that can speed up the splitting of water to produce hydrogen gas.

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Discrete energy levels without confinement – a new quantum trick

Nanostructures can be designed such a way that the quantum confinement allows only certain electron energy levels. Researchers from IMDEA Nanociencia, UAM and ICMM-CSIC have, for the first time, observed a discrete pattern of electron energies in an unconfined system, which could lead to new ways of modifying the surface properties of materials.

8h

EU sustainable development policy defines entrepreneurship in three distinct ways

Entrepreneurs should play a role in making our world more sustainable—or is their role in bringing about change a matter of business opportunity? A new study, to be published 9 May 2019, has found three distinct ways in which the European Union defines what entrepreneurship means for sustainable development, producing a blurry message of the role entrepreneurs and business owners have to play in t

8h

Water flea can smell fish and dive into the dark for protection

Water fleas, or Daphnia, ensure their survival by reacting to a signal substance of their predators (fish) with flight. The zoologist Meike Anika Hahn from Professor Dr. Eric von Elert's research group at the University of Cologne's Institute of Zoology has identified this chemical messenger substance, which the fish releases into the water of lakes. When the water flea detects the substance 5α-cy

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Legal ramifications of anti-hacker honeypots

In the context of information technology, IT, a "honeypot" is an attractive online destination usually established to attract malicious third parties who then, assuming they have reached a valuable resource unwittingly reveal details about themselves in order to access what they perceive is within the honeypot. A honeypot might also be referred to as a honeytrap.

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Transparent and flexible battery for power generation and storage

Various uses of electronics and skin-attachable devices are expected with the development of a transparent battery that can both generate and store power. DGIST announced on Tuesday, April 23 that Senior Researcher Changsoon Choi's team in the Smart Textile Research Group have developed film-type, graphene-based multifunctional transparent energy devices.

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Water flea can smell fish and dive into the dark for protection

Water fleas, or Daphnia, ensure their survival by reacting to a signal substance of their predators (fish) with flight. The zoologist Meike Anika Hahn from Professor Dr. Eric von Elert's research group at the University of Cologne's Institute of Zoology has identified this chemical messenger substance, which the fish releases into the water of lakes. When the water flea detects the substance 5α-cy

9h

Life in the ice in a warmer Arctic

Recent research by an international team, involving the University of Cape Town (UCT), investigated how a future, warmer Arctic could impact the algae that live in sea ice—and form the base of the marine food web there. To do this, the team used modeling to predict how growth of sea-ice algae could change as our climate does.

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The necessity for self-driving cars in the future would not be as high if we simply invested more into trains as we should have a long, long time ago

Not going to pretend that I know everything about trains because I don't. What I do know however is how other countries have used trains to expedite transportation dramatically from place to place. Europe is famous for using trains, as well as New York City, and in the US. Ultrafast bullet trains are used in Japan all over. for some silly reason, we decided to go with cars, one of the absolute wo

9h

New clues about how ancient galaxies lit up the universe

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed that some of the Universe's earliest galaxies were brighter than expected. The excess light is a by-product of the galaxies releasing incredibly high amounts of ionizing radiation. The finding offers clues to the cause of the Epoch of Reionisation, a major cosmic event that transformed the universe from being mostly opaque to the brilliant starscape seen

9h

Specific identification of chronic lung disease in premature babies

Infants born prematurely frequently develop a form of chronic lung disease known as Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia. Previously, this disease could only be diagnosed clinically and with a low degree of differentiation. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians University — partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL) — have now successf

9h

Scientists grow precursors for human pigment cells

Our hair, skin and eyes are colored by a pigment called melanin, which is produced by pigment cells called melanocytes. Scientists have used stem cell technology to successfully create melanocyte precursor cells. These cells can be used in research on melanoma and other pigment cell-related illnesses. The findings were published on March 6 in the online edition of Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research.

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Scientists find link between digital media use and depression in Chinese adolescents

Adolescents in China who either spend more time on screen activities, such as watching TV or surfing the Web, or less time on non-screen activities, including physical activity, are at risk and significantly more likely to experience depression, according to a new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier.

9h

THE SIGNS study by Duke-NUS researchers identify factors affecting active and productive ageing

Researchers at Duke-NUS Medical School's Centre for Ageing Research and Education (CARE) conducted a longitudinal study between 2016-2017 looking at factors influencing health, well-being, activity and productivity levels in older Singaporeans. This study is termed the 'Transitions in Health, Employment, Social Engagement, and Intergenerational Transfers in Singapore Study' (THE SIGNS Study) that

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Scientists discover a new class of single-atom nanozymes

A research team led by Prof. DONG Shaojun from the Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered a new class of single-atom nanozymes, which integrates state-of-the-art single-atom technology with intrinsic enzyme-like active sites.

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Patient registries could help control spread of antibiotic bacteria

A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health finds that the spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) — bacteria that have high levels of resistance to most antibiotics — could be reduced if only 25 percent of the largest health care facilities in a region used a patient registry, a database that can track which patients are carrying CRE.

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Anger more harmful to health of older adults than sadness

Anger may be more harmful to an older person's physical health than sadness, potentially increasing inflammation, which is associated with such chronic illnesses as heart disease, arthritis and cancer, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Innovative mechanobiology research expands understanding of cells

Researchers have developed a new technology that allows them to probe cell changes without disturbing the cell's physiology — a major advancement that helps scientists look more closely at cell changes to solve human health problems, according to a new paper in Cell Reports. This technology, known as deformation microscopy, allows scientists to more accurately assess the interplay between biologi

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Genomics uncovers the mystery of the magic drumstick tree — Moringa oleifera

A team of scientists led by Prof. R. Sowdhamini at the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bengaluru, has recently deciphered the transcriptome by purifying and sequencing RNA from five different tissues (root, stem, flower, seed and leaf) of the Moringa tree.

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North Carolina Bald Cypresses Are Among the World's Oldest Trees

Some of the trees along the Black River provide a window into climates dating back thousands of years

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Facebook wants to make your birthday super awesome fun spectacular

Facebook really wants people to keep wishing each other a happy birthday on the social network, so it's launching a new birthday feature and throwing it a party to celebrate.

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This New Plastic Can Be Recycled Repeatedly

Plastic Solution As of 2015, Americans recycled less than 10 percent of the plastics they used, and not only because they’re lazy: Many plastics just aren’t conducive to recycling. Now, scientists from Berkeley Lab say they’ve created a plastic that can be broken down and recycled indefinitely — and it could help the world address its ever-growing plastic pollution problem . Tight Bond All plasti

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The idea that there are only 100 harvests left is just a fantasy

Headlines warn that our soil is becoming so degraded that we are heading for an agricultural Armageddon. Can that be right? James Wong investigates

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Theranos and the Real Lesson of Storefont Medical Hacks

It’s not the fraud or the hype. Theranos was a bad idea because it was a medical hack disguised as a solution. Same goes for a new generation of high-tech storefront clinics.

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'Last Day of Spring' Is a Powerful Exercise in Trans Visibility

The game is a visual novel that shows a trans person's struggle to find safety in a society built to exclude her from the very concept.

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After 18 months — and recommended retractions — no movement in psychology case

“Dissatisfied.” That’s how Nick Brown and James Heathers describe their reaction to the progress — or lack thereof — in the case of Nicholas Guéguen, a psychology researcher whose work the two data sleuths have questioned. Brown and Heathers first wrote about the case in 2017. In a new blog post, they write that the … Continue reading After 18 months — and recommended retractions — no movement in

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When Engineers Become Whistleblowers

They’re often the first to notice waste, fraud and safety issues — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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When Engineers Become Whistleblowers

They’re often the first to notice waste, fraud and safety issues — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Evolution of magnetic field in the star-forming complex G9.62+0.19 revealed by ALMA

Using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), European astronomers have investigated the magnetic field of the high-mass star-forming region known as G9.62+0.19. Results of these observations, presented in a paper published May 1 on arXiv.org, provide insights into the evolution of this magnetic field, which could help astronomers better understand the role of magnetic fields in the formation o

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Training AI to win a dogfight

Artificial intelligence has defeated chess grandmasters, Go champions, professional poker players, and, now, world-class human experts in the online strategy games Dota 2 and StarCraft II. No AI currently exists, however, that can outduel a human strapped into a fighter jet in a high-speed, high-G dogfight. As modern warfare evolves to incorporate more human-machine teaming, DARPA seeks to automat

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How to prepare students for the rise of artificial intelligence in the workforce

The future impacts of artificial intelligence (AI) on society and the labour force have been studied and reported extensively. In a recent book, AI Superpowers, Kai-Fu Lee, former president of Google China, wrote that 40 to 50 per cent of current jobs will be technically and economically viable with AI and automation over the next 15 years.

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Tsunami signals to measure glacier calving in Greenland

In recent years, glaciers near the North and South poles, as well as in mountainous areas, have been shrinking due to the effect of global warming, becoming a significant contributor to the recent sea level rise. Calving glaciers, which discharge icebergs into an ocean or lake, have retreated more rapidly than those on land because of sections collapsing at the glacier front and due to submarine m

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Genome of the endangered pygmy hog reveals interbreeding with several pig species

The little pygmy hog turns out to be a big piece in resolving the complex evolutionary puzzle of wild boar speciation. Researchers from Wageningen University & Research found the common wild boar interbred with other wild boar subspecies during their expansion from South East Asia to the Indonesian isles, Europe and North Africa, just like human ancestors 'interbred' with Neanderthals. Their findi

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A Dying Teenager’s Recovery Started in the Dirt

In 2010, when Lilli Holst scraped a lump of soil from the underside of a rotting eggplant , she had no idea that this act would help to save the life of a British teenager, eight years later and 6,000 miles away. Holst, an undergraduate at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, in South Africa, was participating in a project in which students search through local soil samples for new phages—viruses tha

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Genome of the endangered pygmy hog reveals interbreeding with several pig species

The little pygmy hog turns out to be a big piece in resolving the complex evolutionary puzzle of wild boar speciation. Researchers from Wageningen University & Research found the common wild boar interbred with other wild boar subspecies during their expansion from South East Asia to the Indonesian isles, Europe and North Africa, just like human ancestors 'interbred' with Neanderthals. Their findi

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Building-integrated photovoltaics—aesthetic, efficient and widely accepted

Photovoltaic systems installed on roofs and façades could produce more than 50% of the present-day electricity demand. To accomplish this, however, use would also have to be made of existing buildings, especially residential dwellings in towns and cities. But some property owners and architects continue to doubt whether the integration of photovoltaic systems into buildings is economically viable

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New Zealand introduces groundbreaking zero carbon bill, including targets for agricultural methane

New Zealand's long-awaited zero carbon bill will create sweeping changes to the management of emissions, setting a global benchmark with ambitious reduction targets for all major greenhouse gases.

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Reversible chemistry clears path for safer batteries

Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) and US Army Research Lab (ARL) have taken a critical step on the path to high energy batteries by improving their water-in-salt battery with a new type of chemical transformation of the cathode that creates a reversible solid salt layer, a phenomenon yet unknown in the field of water-based batteries.

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Autonomous boat makes oyster run

A shellfish consignment is carried across the busy North Sea by an Uncrewed Surface Vessel.

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‘Prosumere’ sætter villavejens elnet under pres

PLUS. Der bliver nødt til at ske en ændring i distributionsnettet, hvis det skal kunne følge med den stigende brug af solceller, elbiler og varmepumper. Dansk Energi og Energinet har analyseret udviklingen og er kommet med bud på potentielle løsninger.

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Ny formand for Dansk Selskab for ledelse i Sundhedsvæsenet

Vicedirektør Peter Mandrup Jensen fra Nordsjællands Hospital er udpeget som ny formand for DSS.

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Regionspraksis lukker tidligst, når borgerne har en læge

Kapaciteterne skal først slås op og derfor er oktober 2019 urealistisk, hvilket blev bekræftet på mødet.

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Opposites attract and, together, they can make surprisingly gratifying decisions

Little is known about how consumers make decisions together. A new study finds pairs with opposing interpersonal orientations — the selfish versus the altruistic — can reach amicable decisions about what to watch on TV, or where to eat, for example. All they have to do is let one partner drive the decision.

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The enduring effects of mother-child interactions as children become adults

Interactions between a mother and her child have been linked to cognitive outcomes in childhood, but little work has looked at farther-reaching effects. In a new study that examined data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, more positive mother-child interactions during the first 16 years of life predicted higher education in adulthood, which predicted less decline in episodic memory, or the mem

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Are otters threatening amphibian populations?

The Eurasian otter typically eats fish, but amphibians, which are in global decline, are also part of its diet, especially when fish are scarce. Researchers identified bones of amphibians in otter feces from southern Italy to determine which types of amphibians are typically eaten. They also reviewed 64 studies of otter diet.

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Abrupt climate change drove early South American population decline

Abrupt climate change some 8,000 years ago led to a dramatic decline in early South American populations, suggests new research.

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VR can improve quality of life for people with dementia

Virtual reality (VR) technology could vastly improve the quality of life for people with dementia by helping to recall past memories, reduce aggression and improve interactions with caregivers, new research has discovered.

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How Earth's continents became twisted and contorted over millions of years

Classical plate tectonic theory was developed in the 1960s.

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Probing battery hotspots for safer energy storage

Researchers are striving to make tomorrow's batteries charge faster and store more energy. But these conveniences come with safety challenges, like more heat produced in a battery. For the first time, a team of researchers has studied the effects of tiny areas within lithium metal batteries that are much hotter than their surroundings. These hotspots, the researchers find, can make batteries grow

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With depression, just a little stress stymies blood vessels

Even small, everyday stressors may be enough to diminish function of blood vessels in otherwise healthy people with depression, researchers report. Their study shows that adults with depression who experienced stress in the previous 24 hours had worse endothelial function—a process that helps regulate blood flow—than those with depression alone. The results help explain the links between stress,

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AFRL achieves 'shocking' materials technology breakthrough

The Air Force Research Laboratory, along with research partners at Los Alamos National Laboratory, are working to change the shape of materials technology with a breakthrough development that could open up a new range of possibilities for the military and beyond.

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A new view of wintertime air pollution

The processes that create ozone pollution in the summer can also trigger the formation of wintertime air pollution, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and NOAA, in partnership with the University of Utah. The team's unexpected finding suggests that in the U.S. West and elsewhere, certain efforts to reduce harmful wintertime air pollution could backfire.

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Modedesign kan handla om det inre seendet

Sedan urminnes tider har den kreativa processen setts som något bortom förståelse, något som endast kunnat förklaras med gudomliga ingivelser och genialiska snilleblixtar. Stefanie Malmgren de Oliviera, nyligen disputerad inom konstnärlig textil- och modedesign vid Textilhögskolan, har en annan syn på saken. Med sin avhandling dyker hon ner i människans inre för att systematisera vad hon ser som

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Motstridiga styrprinciper påverkar lärararbetet

– Vi vet sedan tidigare att lärararbetet och villkoren för det har förändrats. Det handlar om att skolan har blivit konkurrensutsatt, elever och föräldrar har ibland kommit att betraktas som kunder och synen på lärares arbete har förändrats, säger Katarina Samuelsson, som skrivit avhandlingen Teachers’ work in times of restructuring – On contextual influences for collegiality and professionality

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Gentest kan ge skräddarsydd behandling för SLE-drabbade

– För att förebygga allvarliga symptom och undvika onödiga läkemedelsbiverkningar är det oerhört viktigt att kunna anpassa behandlingen till den enskilda individen. Det finns ett stort behov av att hitta metoder som tidigt i förloppet kan skilja individer med en god prognos från dem med en sämre, säger Sarah Reid, läkare och doktorand vid Uppsala universitet. Systemisk lupus erythematosus (SLE) ä

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Caution: Grapefruit juice may impose risk on patients with long QT syndrome and should be avoided when taking QT-prolonging drugs

Research confirms that grapefruit juice prolongs the QT interval. This finding has implications for patients taking medications that prolong the QT interval and may have implications for patients with congenital long QT syndrome, according to a new study.

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Researchers create 'impossible' nano-sized protein cages with the help of gold

Researchers have succeeded in creating a 'protein cage' — a nanoscale structure that could be used to deliver drugs to specific places of the body — that can be readily assembled and disassembled.

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The Democrats’ Coalition Could Fundamentally Change by 2020

Though they’ve attracted little attention, recent public polls have sent clear warning signals that the ambitious agenda of the rejuvenated Democratic left could strain the coalition that carried the party to its sweeping gains in the 2018 election. Recent surveys show that such prized progressive ideas as a government-run single-payer health-care system, tuition-free public college, and signific

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Viktor Orbán’s War on Intellect

On a relentlessly gray Budapest morning, Michael Ignatieff took me to the rooftop of Central European University’s main building. The newly erected edifice is all glass, sharp angles, exposed steel, and polished wood. Its roof had been landscaped with billowing grasses and fitted with iron benches, as if a section of New York City’s High Line had been transported to Hungary. “This is probably my

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Researchers create 'impossible' nano-sized protein cages with the help of gold

Researchers have succeeded in creating a 'protein cage' — a nanoscale structure that could be used to deliver drugs to specific places of the body — that can be readily assembled and disassembled.

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Freight trains are our future

Energy Excerpt: Power Trip "Power Trip" by Michael E. Webber is on sale now.

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Genetically Modified Viral Cocktail Treats Deadly Bacteria in Teen

Tweaking the genomes of two phages and combining them with a third phage helped to clear a persistent Mycobacterium infection in the patient.

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A Journey through Gromov's Gap

Moon Duchin shares an abstract theorem with surprising connections to gerrymandering — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How oceanographers prevailed over pirates to study the Great Whirl

How oceanographers prevailed over pirates to study the Great Whirl How oceanographers prevailed over pirates to study the Great Whirl, Published online: 09 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01460-8 An eddy in an attack-plagued stretch of the Arabian Sea extends farther than expected.

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NASA Is Developing 'Soft Robots' That Look Like Inflatable 'Aliens'

And they could be just the thing to explore worlds beyond Earth.

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16 Last-Minute Mother's Day Gift Ideas and Deals (2019)

Did you forget to set a calendar alert? Have no fear. We found some great Mother's Day deals on gifts Mom will love.

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The Evidence Is Strong: Air Pollution Seems to Cause Dementia

Air pollution is much worse for health than people had thought, increasing the risk of Alzheimer's significantly. Meanwhile, air quality is getting worse.

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The Universe Probably 'Remembers' Every Single Gravitational Wave

After these ripples in space and time pass through the universe, they may leave behind a sort of memory of their crossing.

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New clues about how ancient galaxies lit up the universe

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed that some of the universe's earliest galaxies were brighter than expected. The excess light is a byproduct of the galaxies releasing incredibly high amounts of ionizing radiation. The finding offers clues to the cause of the Epoch of Reionization, a major cosmic event that transformed the universe from being mostly opaque to the brilliant starscape seen

10h

Saving energy in the production of chemicals

Whether in agriculture, industry or private households, chemicals are needed everywhere. However, their production requires a very large amount of energy. With a new type of hybrid access, energy can be saved in the double-digit percentage range depending on the plant and process. The development took place in the team of Dr. Michael Bortz and Prof. Karl-Heinz Küfer at the Fraunhofer Institute for

10h

New Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur sheds light on origin of flight in Dinosauria

A new Jurassic non-avian theropod dinosaur from 163 million-year-old fossil deposits in northeastern China provides new information regarding the incredible richness of evolutionary experimentation that characterized the origin of flight in the Dinosauria.

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Star formation burst in the Milky Way 2–3 million years ago

A team led by researchers of the Institute of Cosmos Sciences of the University of Barcelona (ICCUB, UB-IEEC) and the Besançon Astronomical Observatory have analyzed data from the Gaia satellite and found that a heavy star formation burst occurred in the Milky Way about 3,000 million years ago. During this process, more than 50 percent of the stars that created the galactic disc may have been born

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Can a drone reveal the murky secrets of San Francisco Bay?

Environmental scientists can tell a lot about the health of rivers, bays, wetlands and other waterways by studying the flow of sediments suspended in the water, and from the mud that forms when these sediments settle to the bottom.

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Opinion: Why Australia needs to kill cats

Introduced cats are a key threat to 123 of Australia's threatened species.

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Oakland considers banning facial recognition technology for city departments

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Artificial Intelligence May Not 'Hallucinate' After All

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Deep learning could reveal why the world works the way it does

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Musselodling effektivt som miljöåtgärd i Östersjön

Häromåret kom en rapport som menade att denna miljöåtgärd är ineffektiv och att stöd innebär slöseri med samhällets resurser. En ny rapport från SLU hävdar tvärtom att musselodling kan vara en både viktig och kostnadseffektiv åtgärd i Östersjön. Ny teknik som ger betydligt större skördar är ett viktigt skäl till de nya rekommendationerna. Ett av projekten har tagit fram den första jämförelsen av

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Er Europa geologisk set på kollisionskurs med Canada?

PLUS. Ud for Portugals kyst er bunden af en tektonisk plade ved at blive løsrevet fra den øvre del, tyder noget på. Det kan betyde, at Europa langsomt er på vej mod nordvest.

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Believing machines can out-do people may fuel acceptance of self-driving cars

In order for self-driving cars to hit the streets, more people may need to concede that machines can outperform humans, at least in some tasks, according to Penn State researchers.

10h

Opinion: Why Australia needs to kill cats

Introduced cats are a key threat to 123 of Australia's threatened species.

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Researchers investigate airplane seat accommodation

Whether for business or personal travel, now, more than ever, thousands of Americans spend their days in the air. While most airplane passengers are hoping for maximum comfort during their flights, airline companies look to maximize their profits—sometimes at the expense of passengers' space.

10h

100-Plus Neglected Lions Found With Mange, Neurological Problems, on South African Farm

The owner of the lions was a member of the organization that sets animal-welfare standards for lion breeding.

10h

Working scientist podcast: Talking about a technological revolution in the lab

Working scientist podcast: Talking about a technological revolution in the lab Working scientist podcast: Talking about a technological revolution in the lab, Published online: 09 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01499-7 The "chemputer" and other technologies are set to revolutionise academic chemistry for the first time in 200 years, Lee Cronin tells Julie Gould .

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Source Credibility

How much of an influence does the source of information have on our reactions to that information? Not surprisingly, it has a significant effect. A new study supports this conclusion, but I think the implications are far more narrow than the reporting suggests. In the study subjects were first given a generally positive attitude toward a character named Kevin. They were then told something distur

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What Happens in the Hours Before Death? Most People Don't Have a Clue.

A new poll finds that 6 in 10 people are clueless about what happens in the last hours before death.

10h

Nike Wants Your Sneakers to Fit Better, So It's Using AR

The company estimates that 60 percent of people wear the wrong size. Starting in July, your smartphone can help figure out your perfect pair of kicks.

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First brown bear sighting in Portugal in over a century

The first brown bear sighting in Portugal in more than a century was confirmed by wildlife experts on Thursday, after reports of an animal in the northeast of the country.

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First brown bear sighting in Portugal in over a century

The first brown bear sighting in Portugal in more than a century was confirmed by wildlife experts on Thursday, after reports of an animal in the northeast of the country.

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Singapore 'fake news' law could hurt innovation: Google

Technology giant Google said Thursday Singapore's new law against "fake news" could hurt innovation, a crucial element in the high-tech sector which the government is developing as an economic growth driver.

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Voice assistants seem to be worse at understanding commands from women

More women report being misunderstood by voice assistants than men, adding to growing evidence that speech recognition is better with some groups over others

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Clean fuel cells could be cheap enough to replace gas engines in vehicles

Advancements in zero-emission fuel cells could make the technology cheap enough to replace traditional gasoline engines in vehicles.

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Why Surveillance Is the Climate Change of the Internet

Subscribe to Crazy/Genius : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play If you have a hard time understanding the meaning of privacy and the scale of digital surveillance in the modern age—and let’s face it, who doesn’t?—consider a toy named Cayla. Cayla is a doll with long hair, a tiny denim jacket, and little pink shoes. She also comes with a microphone, a Bluetooth app, and built-in voic

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Why Surveillance Is the Climate Change of the Internet

Subscribe to Crazy/Genius : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play If you have a hard time understanding the meaning of privacy and the scale of digital surveillance in the modern age—and let’s face it, who isn’t?—consider a toy named Cayla. Cayla is a doll with long hair, a tiny denim jacket, and little pink shoes. She also comes with a microphone, a Bluetooth app, and built-in voice

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A step toward better understanding brain anatomy of autism spectrum disorder

A new study set out to settle some of the discrepancies related to brain anatomy and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), employing a large dataset to obtain their findings.

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Study identifies better, cheaper ways to stem arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh

An analysis compares four methods of dealing with arsenic contamination in Bangladesh, and pinpoints strategies to deliver cleaner water to the greatest number of people at the lowest cost.

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Complex geology contributed to Deepwater Horizon disaster, new study finds

A new study takes an in-depth look at the challenging geologic conditions faced by the crew of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig and the role those conditions played in the 2010 disaster.

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Clean fuel cells could be cheap enough to replace gas engines in vehicles

Advancements in zero-emission fuel cells could make the technology cheap enough to replace traditional gasoline engines in vehicles.

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The smell of dark chocolate, demystified

Much like a fine wine, high-quality dark chocolate has a multi-layered scent and flavor, with notes of vanilla, banana or vinegar. Now, researchers report which substances — and how much of them — make up this heavenly aroma.

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Humility Is the First Step toward a Healthier World

It sometimes feels like science can do anything—but our health, like the cosmos, is shaped by forces that can dwarf even our most brilliant advances — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Inside China’s Surveillance Crackdown on Uyghurs

In Xinjiang, northwest China, the government is cracking down on the minority Muslim Uyghur population, keeping them under constant surveillance and throwing more than a million people into concentration camps. But in Istanbul, 3,000 miles away, a community of women who have escaped a life of repression are fighting a digital resistance.

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Humans Made This Planet Hell. Hopefully We Can Help Some Species Adapt

A new UN report paints a dire portrait of Earth's human-made biodiversity crisis. But with new genetic techniques in conservation, perhaps we can help save species before it's too late.

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Feds Dismantled the Dark-Web Drug Trade—but It's Already Rebuilding

After recent high-profile dark-web drug market takedowns, new vendors are already filling the void.

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50 years ago, scientists tried to transplant part of a human eye

In 1969, a doctor tried and failed to restore a 54-year-old man’s vision. Fifty years later, scientists are still struggling to make eye transplants work.

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Humility Is the First Step toward a Healthier World

It sometimes feels like science can do anything—but our health, like the cosmos, is shaped by forces that can dwarf even our most brilliant advances — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Are Animal Experiments Justified? – Issue 72: Quandary

The rat sat still in the middle of her cage, moving only in response to my touch, and even then only as if in slow-motion. My subject, GRat66, was a few months old, and except for her long bare tail, fit neatly into my palm a few minutes earlier, when I injected a few drops of a potent opiate under her skin, near the belly. Now, her beady black eyes bulged as she faded into an opiate stupor. I wa

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