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nyheder2019maj10

Researchers discover the Achilles' heel of an aggressive brain cancer

Researchers from the University of Helsinki, Finland, have discovered a chink in the armor of the tumor cells of glioblastoma, a lethal brain cancer. Alongside the finding, the researchers also came up with a method for attacking this vulnerability. The results gained in experiments conducted with cell cultures and a mouse model are promising.

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Ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige fravælger blå blok

Venstre og Liberal Alliance bløder vælgere, mens især Radikale går frem. Ingeniøren har spurgt landets ingeniører og andre naturvidenskabelige fagfolk, hvor de vil sætte krydset ved folketingsvalget 5. juni.

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Are Birds Dinosaurs and Your Other Questions Answered

Cat-loving paleontologist answers your questions in the National Museum of Natural History's YouTube series, "The Doctor Is In."

now

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With humans out of the way, Chernobyl's wildlife thrives

Environment The nuclear meltdown killed most animals in the area, but now nature is thriving. 33 years after the accident, the Chernobyl exclusion zone is inhabited by brown bears, bison, wolves, lynxes, Przewalski horses, and more than 200 bird species.

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Facebook Cheers on Charming Local Business Al-Qaeda’s “Great Year”

Poor Taste If you still use Facebook, you’re probably familiar with those algorithmically-produced “year in review” videos that the website churns out, setting a slideshow of your posts to cheerful music. At best, the videos are obnoxious. At worst? They spew violent, hateful content . Researchers represented by the National Whistleblower Center found that Facebook automatically created a peppy,

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Here’s What an Album Between a Musician and an “AI Baby” Sounds Like

AI Baby’s First Album Conceptual sound artist and composer Holly Herndon released her new artificial intelligence-inspired album PROTO today. PROTO , Hedron’s fourth album, was a collaboration between Herndon and a sophisticated machine-learning program called “Spawn” — her “AI baby.” Herndon’s Spawn is an “inhuman intelligence housed in a DIY souped-up gaming PC” according to a statement that “p

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Scientists teach computers fear—to make them better drivers

Visceral feedback helps both people and machines make decisions

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Research on repetitive worm behavior may have implications for understanding human disease

Studying microscopic worms, Rockefeller scientists have identified a brain circuit that drives repetitive behavior — providing potential clues for understanding some human psychiatric conditions.

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This Superbug-Killing 'Phage Therapy' May Have Saved a Teen's Life. Here's How It Works.

An experimental treatment with bacteria-fighting viruses may have helped save the life of a British teenager with a critical "superbug" infection.

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Cells ‘hear’ messages with help from shape-shifting molecules

Cells ‘hear’ messages with help from shape-shifting molecules Cells ‘hear’ messages with help from shape-shifting molecules, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01509-8 A receptor on cells has two forms, each associated with a different type of messaging.

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QnAs with Jeffrey S. Moore [QnAs]

The most recent report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers provides a sobering analysis of the state of the transportation infrastructure in the United States (1). The findings detail the many repairs needed to strengthen bridges, roadways, railways, and other vital components of public networks. However, consider a…

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Switch-like activation of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase by membrane-mediated dimerization [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The transformation of molecular binding events into cellular decisions is the basis of most biological signal transduction. A fundamental challenge faced by these systems is that reliance on protein–ligand chemical affinities alone generally results in poor sensitivity to ligand concentration, endangering the system to error. Here, we examine the lipid-binding…

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Caulobacter crescentus Hfq structure reveals a conserved mechanism of RNA annealing regulation [Microbiology]

We have solved the X-ray crystal structure of the RNA chaperone protein Hfq from the alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus to 2.15-Å resolution, resolving the conserved core of the protein and the entire C-terminal domain (CTD). The structure reveals that the CTD of neighboring hexamers pack in crystal contacts, and that the…

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Suppressor screening reveals common kleisin-hinge interaction in condensin and cohesin, but different modes of regulation [Genetics]

Cohesin and condensin play fundamental roles in sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome segregation, respectively. Both consist of heterodimeric structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits, which possess a head (containing ATPase) and a hinge, intervened by long coiled coils. Non-SMC subunits (Cnd1, Cnd2, and Cnd3 for condensin; Rad21, Psc3, and Mis4…

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TLR1/2 ligand enhances antitumor efficacy of CTLA-4 blockade by increasing intratumoral Treg depletion [Immunology and Inflammation]

Immune checkpoint inhibitors such as anti–CTLA-4 antibody are widely accepted therapeutic options for many cancers, but there is still a considerable gap in achieving their full potential. We explored the potential of activating the innate and adaptive immune pathways together to improve tumor reduction and survival outcomes. We treated a…

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Integrative analysis of gene expression, DNA methylation, physiological traits, and genetic variation in human skeletal muscle [Genetics]

We integrate comeasured gene expression and DNA methylation (DNAme) in 265 human skeletal muscle biopsies from the FUSION study with >7 million genetic variants and eight physiological traits: height, waist, weight, waist–hip ratio, body mass index, fasting serum insulin, fasting plasma glucose, and type 2 diabetes. We find hundreds of…

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High-intensity focused ultrasound-induced mechanochemical transduction in synthetic elastomers [Applied Physical Sciences]

While study in the field of polymer mechanochemistry has yielded mechanophores that perform various chemical reactions in response to mechanical stimuli, there is not yet a triggering method compatible with biological systems. Applications such as using mechanoluminescence to generate localized photon flux in vivo for optogenetics would greatly benefit from…

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Destabilization of the human RED-SMU1 splicing complex as a basis for host-directed antiinfluenza strategy [Microbiology]

New therapeutic strategies targeting influenza are actively sought due to limitations in current drugs available. Host-directed therapy is an emerging concept to target host functions involved in pathogen life cycles and/or pathogenesis, rather than pathogen components themselves. From this perspective, we focused on an essential host partner of influenza viruses,…

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My journey from tyrosine phosphorylation inhibitors to targeted immune therapy as strategies to combat cancer [Applied Biological Sciences]

Since the 1980s there has been a drive toward personalized targeted therapy for cancer. “Targeted cancer therapy” originally focused on inhibiting essential tumor survival factors, primarily protein tyrosine kinases. The complexity and rapid mutability of tumors, however, enable them to develop resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), even when these…

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Deep-sea fishes’ eye chemistry might let them see colors in near darkness

An unexpected abundance of proteins for catching dim light evolved independently in three groups of weird deep-sea fishes.

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Driver Says Tesla “Saved His Life” During a High-Speed Crash

Tesla Saves Tesla demagogues either think the company is building the safest cars on market or sells overhyped death-machines. But score a point for the former: On Thursday, Electrek published an interview with Peder Hulthin, a Norwegian Tesla owner who walked away from a high-speed collision with just a few bruises — and he says it’s all thanks to his Tesla, which had Autopilot engaged at the ti

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Measles isn't done, and these U.S. counties are at risk

Health Scientists predicted this measles surge—and the next outbreaks. Measles doesn’t just show up out of nowhere. That's why researchers took air travel into account in their predictions for where measles will strike next.

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Photos of the Week: Lion Rescue, Chihuahua Run, Dinosaur Debut

Uber protests in Los Angeles, freedom for Reuters reporters in Myanmar, “My Emperor” cats in Beijing, equestrian jumping in Mexico, Met Gala appearances in New York, Victory Day observations in Russia, Ramadan prayers in Indonesia, art among ruins on a Greek isle, a gathering of the International Society of Women Airline Pilots, missiles over Israel and Gaza, artworks displayed at the Venice Bien

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Scientists Are Studying the First Supernovas in the Universe

The universe's first stars were extremely hot and incredibly large, often reaching hundreds of times the mass of the Sun. And because they formed just a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, these boiling behemoths contained virtually no elements heavier than hydrogen and helium, which were the only materials readily available at the time. But due to their sizeable stature, the first stars

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New UM study highlights fundamental challenges of living with wildfire

Wildfires can have dramatic impacts on Western landscapes and communities, but human values determine whether the changes caused by fire are desired or dreaded. This is the simple – but often overlooked – message from a collaborative team of 23 researchers led by University of Montana faculty in a study published in the May issue of the journal BioScience.

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Manipulating superconductivity using a 'mechanic' and an 'electrician'

Strongly correlated materials can change their resistivity from infinity to zero with minute changes in conditions. Now, researchers have fabricated a flexible organic 'correlated' transistor that makes it possible to control the effective pressure and doping level by bending the substrate and changing the gate voltage, respectively. This device allows researchers to switch superconductivity on an

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Smallest pixels ever created could light up color-changing buildings

The smallest pixels yet created — a million times smaller than those in smartphones, made by trapping particles of light under tiny rocks of gold — could be used for new types of large-scale flexible displays, big enough to cover entire buildings.

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New study shows scientists who selfie garner more public trust

Many scientists today have embraced social media as tools to communicate their research and to engage broader audiences in scientific discovery and its outcomes. But the rise of the 'social media scientist' has also led communicators and scholars to ask an important and often overlooked question: do people trust the scientists who show up in their social media feeds?

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Explained: Why the Next Black Hole Image Will Be Incredible

Crispy Black Hole It’s been exactly a month since the first photo ever taken of a black hole was released by am international coalition of scientists. The admittedly blurry image was taken by a network of eight telescopes — forming the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) — from across the globe that were all pointing at the same event. But astronomers are looking to get a much better, and crisper, shot

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The Family Weekly: A Historic Royal Baby Arriveth

(Reuters / Pool) This Week in Family A highly anticipated birth on Monday marks what is arguably the first biracial heir to the British Crown. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle tried to keep the details of the pregnancy and delivery out of the public eye, but as the historian Carolyn Harris points out, the public has always had a fascination with the everyday lives of royalty. And this royal baby co

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The Books Briefing: The Bard by Any Other Name

Shakespeare, despite being perhaps the best-known writer in the English language, is a tricky figure to pin down. A new film about the playwright and poet’s life offers just one of many fictional interpretations of his biography. Meanwhile, a heated scholarly debate ( two sides of which were featured in The Atlantic ’s October 1991 issue ) over Shakespeare’s identity has taken a fascinating femin

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In Shakespeare’s Life Story, Not All Is True. In Fact, Much Is Invented.

How do you tell the story of the world’s greatest literary career when the literary part is a gaping hole, “a jigsaw puzzle for which most of the pieces are missing,” as one scholar put it ? You get inventive, to put it charitably. All Is True , a new film directed by and starring Kenneth Branagh, is the latest installment in a long line of highly creative Shakespeare portraiture. In his novel No

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Lawmakers Push NIH to Reduce Nonhuman Primate Research

A spending bill approved by a House committee would require the agency to "accelerate" the replacement of nonhuman primates in laboratories starting in October.

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Nanotubes enable travel of Huntington's protein

Nanotube tunnels extend like bridges for the toxic Huntington's disease protein, and spring back after delivery, a new study finds.

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Google Wants to Use AI to Track Pollution from Every Power Plant on Earth

submitted by /u/pipsdontsqueak [link] [comments]

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Is a measles outbreak likely in your county? Check the map

A new analysis identifies the 25 United States counties most likely to experience measles outbreaks in 2019. The analysis combined international air travel volume, non-medical exemptions from childhood vaccinations, population data, and reported measles outbreak information. “There has been a resurgence of measles cases, among other vaccine preventable diseases, in the US and other countries in r

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Scientist selfies bring a smile

Hitting Insta could be a good career move, research suggests. Nick Carne reports.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Breaking Down Microsoft Build and Google I/O

It’s software conference season! In the latest Gadget Lab podcast, the team shares their takeaways from Facebook F8, Microsoft Build, and Google I/O.

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Large spin-orbit torque efficiency enhanced by magnetic structure of collinear antiferromagnet IrMn

Spin-orbit torque (SOT) offers promising approaches to developing energy-efficient memory devices by electric switching of magnetization. Compared to other SOT materials, metallic antiferromagnet (AFM) potentially allows the control of SOT through its magnetic structure. Here, combining the results from neutron diffraction and spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance experiments, we show that the magn

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High-K dielectric sulfur-selenium alloys

Upcoming advancements in flexible technology require mechanically compliant dielectric materials. Current dielectrics have either high dielectric constant, K (e.g., metal oxides) or good flexibility (e.g., polymers). Here, we achieve a golden mean of these properties and obtain a lightweight, viscoelastic, high-K dielectric material by combining two nonpolar, brittle constituents, namely, sulfur

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Label-free quantitation of glycated hemoglobin in single red blood cells by transient absorption microscopy and phasor analysis

As a stable and accurate biomarker, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is clinically used to diagnose diabetes with a threshold of 6.5% among total hemoglobin (Hb). Current methods such as boronate affinity chromatography involve complex processing of large-volume blood samples. Moreover, these methods cannot measure HbA1c fraction at single–red blood cell (RBC) level, thus unable to separate the contri

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Metal-organic framework based on hinged cube tessellation as transformable mechanical metamaterial

Mechanical metamaterials exhibit unusual properties, such as negative Poisson’s ratio, which are difficult to achieve in conventional materials. Rational design of mechanical metamaterials at the microscale is becoming popular partly because of the advance in three-dimensional printing technologies. However, incorporating movable building blocks inside solids, thereby enabling us to manipulate me

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Photon superbunching from a generic tunnel junction

Generating time-correlated photon pairs at the nanoscale is a prerequisite to creating highly integrated optoelectronic circuits that perform quantum computing tasks based on heralded single photons. Here, we demonstrate fulfilling this requirement with a generic tip-surface metal junction. When the junction is luminescing under DC bias, inelastic tunneling events of single electrons produce a st

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Triggered reversible substitution of adaptive constitutional dynamic networks dictates programmed catalytic functions

The triggered substitution of networks and their resulting functions play an important mechanism in biological transformations, such as intracellular metabolic pathways and cell differentiation. We describe the triggered, cyclic, reversible intersubstitution of three nucleic acid–based constitutional dynamic networks (CDNs) and the programmed catalytic functions guided by the interconverting CDNs

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Two-dimensional ground-state mapping of a Mott-Hubbard system in a flexible field-effect device

A Mott insulator sometimes induces unconventional superconductivity in its neighbors when doped and/or pressurized. Because the phase diagram should be strongly related to the microscopic mechanism of the superconductivity, it is important to obtain the global phase diagram surrounding the Mott insulating state. However, the parameter available for controlling the ground state of most Mott insula

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Approaching high-performance potassium-ion batteries via advanced design strategies and engineering

Potassium-ion batteries (PIBs) have attracted tremendous attention due to their low cost, fast ionic conductivity in electrolyte, and high operating voltage. Research on PIBs is still in its infancy, however, and achieving a general understanding of the drawbacks of each component and proposing research strategies for overcoming these problems are crucial for the exploration of suitable electrode

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Tracking ultrafast hot-electron diffusion in space and time by ultrafast thermomodulation microscopy

The ultrafast response of metals to light is governed by intriguing nonequilibrium dynamics involving the interplay of excited electrons and phonons. The coupling between them leads to nonlinear diffusion behavior on ultrashort time scales. Here, we use scanning ultrafast thermomodulation microscopy to image the spatiotemporal hot-electron diffusion in thin gold films. By tracking local transient

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Scalable electrochromic nanopixels using plasmonics

Plasmonic metasurfaces are a promising route for flat panel display applications due to their full color gamut and high spatial resolution. However, this plasmonic coloration cannot be readily tuned and requires expensive lithographic techniques. Here, we present scalable electrically driven color-changing metasurfaces constructed using a bottom-up solution process that controls the crucial plasm

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Receiving weekend food improves school attendance among children living with hunger

Children living in food-insecure households are more likely to attend school on Fridays if they're participating in a food-distribution program that provides them with backpacks of meals for the weekend, researchers at the University of Illinois found in a new study.

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A case of the chimp sniffles or major outbreak? Syndromic surveillance may hold the key

Two sniffling chimps could be one too many for a wild chimpanzee community susceptible to respiratory disease outbreaks, report Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Minnesota. The team's findings were a result of their development of a syndromic surveillance system to noninvasively and preemptively detect a potential outbreak of respiratory disease. The study recently w

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Manipulating superconductivity using a 'mechanic' and an 'electrician'

In strongly correlated materials such as cuprate high-temperature superconductors, superconductivity can be controlled either by changing the number of electrons or by changing the kinetic energy, or transfer energy, of electrons in the system. Although a large number of strongly correlated materials have been examined with different parameters to understand the mechanism of superconductivity, the

1h

Smallest pixels ever created could light up color-changing buildings

The smallest pixels yet created—a million times smaller than those in smartphones, made by trapping particles of light under tiny rocks of gold—could be used for new types of large-scale flexible displays, big enough to cover entire buildings.

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New study shows scientists who selfie garner more public trust

Many scientists today have embraced social media as tools to communicate their research and to engage broader audiences in scientific discovery and its outcomes. But the rise of the "social media scientist" has also led communicators and scholars to ask an important and often overlooked question: Do people trust the scientists who show up in their social media feeds?

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Meditation apps want to calm you down on the same device that stresses you out

Technology The messy fight for mindfulness. Humans have been meditating for 5,000 years. But in the last decade, something changed: We’ve started to take deep breathing instructions from our phones.

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A Man Is Now Claiming He Recognizes the “Russian Spy Whale”

Red Seas Today, an unexpected twist in the whale tale that’s captured the world’s attention: In April, a group of fishermen in Norway discovered an unusually tame beluga whale wearing a harness seemingly meant to hold a camera. Written on the harness? The words “Equipment of St. Petersburg.” Enter speculation that the whale was a Russian spy . Now, a man has come forward to say he…thinks he’s see

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Nanotubes enable travel of Huntington's protein

Nanotube tunnels extend like bridges for the toxic Huntington's disease protein, and spring back after delivery, a new study finds.

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Walmart's robot zips along in tech revolution that's raising big questions for workers

When an autonomous floor scrubber was rolled out in Walmart's Bonney Lake store last month, shoppers mistook the teal blue scrubber zipping down the aisles for a runaway machine, said manager David Klein. "Some customers are a little freaked out."

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Kamala Harris’s Long-Shot Bid to Fix School Funding

“It is bananas,” Senator Kamala Harris told the audience—members of the American Federation of Teachers’ Michigan chapter—gathered at Marcus Garvey Academy, in Detroit, on Monday. “It is completely upside down that we currently have a system where the funding of a school district is based on the tax base of that community,” the Democratic hopeful vying to run against President Donald Trump in 202

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DOJ Says Chinese Hackers Attacked Anthem, but Not Why

For years, China was rumored to be behind the health insurance company's massive data breach, but now the Justice Department is noticeably silent on the hackers' motives and affiliation.

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Innate Immune Cells May Actually Remember Their Targets

Human natural killer cells, previously considered not to participate in adaptive immunity, remember viral antigens after initial exposures, according to a new study.

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Will smoggy L.A. have 'zero bad air' in 2025? Don't hold your breath

It was one of Mayor Eric Garcetti's most dramatic pledges in his sweeping "Green New Deal" for Los Angeles: "We will have zero days of unhealthy air quality by 2025."

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What Song Exploder Has Taught Us

Ori Toor Headphones on. Earbuds in. Seal your consciousness; prepare to fertilize the inner life. Now, what’s it going to be: some music, or a podcast? A dose of (in my case) Iron Maiden doing “Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” or (again in my case) three dudes muttering about the Premier League? So far, the two spheres—music and words, rapture and sobriety—have been largely nonoverlapping. Few podca

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Netflix's 'The Society' Is a Smart Show About Socialism Full of Dumb Teens

The YA drama about power and privilege is ambitious, but it leans too heavily on tropes.

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How Scientists Use Climate Models to Predict Mosquito-Borne Disease Outbreaks

The ebb and flow of rainy seasons corresponds with the hatching of millions of mosquitoes—and the spread of diseases they carry

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What Are Centrifugal & Centripetal Forces?

These two closely related forces describe circular motion, but the meanings are often mixed up.

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Our Reality Could Be a “Hologram” Created by Quantum Physics

New Answers Ever since Einstein posited that space and time were inextricably linked, scientists have wondered where the cosmic web called spacetime comes from. Now, ongoing research in quantum physics may finally arrive at an explanation: A bizarre phenomenon called quantum entanglement could be the underlying basis for the four dimensions of space and time in which we all live, according to a d

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Instagram to start blocking hashtags with vaccine misinformation

Instagram will start blocking any hashtags spreading misinformation about vaccines, becoming the latest internet platform to crack down on bad health information.

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Can recreational sports really make you a better student?

A new study adds to growing evidence that participating in recreational sports not only can help improve grades while attending college, but it also can help students return for another year.

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Storm water banking could help Texas manage floods and droughts

A study has quantified the amount of water flowing in major Texas rivers during heavy rains and found that there is enough room in coastal aquifers to store most of it. This discovery means that capturing and storing water could be a feasible option for partially mitigating floods and droughts, which are both expected to increase in frequency and intensity as the climate changes.

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Elon Musk cracks a lewd joke at Jeff Bezos' new 'Blue Moon' lander

The moon lander introduced Thursday by Blue Origin, the aerospace company run by Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, has caught the attention of Elon Musk.

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Trump Administration Might "Re-Examine" Climate Modeling

Environmental advocates are troubled by statements EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler made at a gathering of environment ministers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Space-tourism dream edges toward reality in New Mexico

British billionaire Richard Branson and his space-tourism company Virgin Galactic announced new steps Friday toward offering thrill rides into the low reaches of space for paying passengers, with the company immediately starting to move personnel and space vehicles from California to a launch and landing facility in the New Mexico desert.

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Can recreational sports really make you a better student?

A new Michigan State University study adds to growing evidence that participating in recreational sports not only can help improve grades while attending college, but it also can help students return for another year.

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Daily briefing: Deep-sea fish have developed their own way of seeing colour

Daily briefing: Deep-sea fish have developed their own way of seeing colour Daily briefing: Deep-sea fish have developed their own way of seeing colour, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01520-z Fish in the sunless depths of the ocean can see in colour, how Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán crushed Central European University and a scientific and poetic journey underground

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Computer case with transparent LCD side panel

submitted by /u/ThatGuyGetsIt [link] [comments]

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Newly-Invented “Zombie-Like Cells” Act Alive “Despite Being Dead”

Zombie Cells Scientists at the University of Alabama (UA) have figured out a bizarre technique to discover new natural compounds that could one day end up in new pharmaceuticals. They developed human, “zombie-like” cells that are technically no longer alive — but with membranes that continue to bind to different potentially useful compounds in samples. Dead Alive Their research was published in t

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Giant devil rays might have a secret ‘maternity ward’

Dozens of pregnant giant devil rays in fishing nets in a village along Mexico’s northern Gulf of California suggest a previously unknown birthing zone in nearby waters. If further research confirms the possibility, authorities and local fishers should work together to devise a plan that minimizes the risk of negative interactions when pregnant rays migrate there each year in and around April, say

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The Anti-party Anthem Contending for Song of the Summer

It might seem a problem for popular music that young people are reportedly having less sex , drinking less booze , and throwing fewer parties than previous generations . Hedonism advocates such as Axl Rose and Miley Cyrus must be mourning—what in the world is there to sing about? The charts do remain fairly raunchy and rowdy, but slurry odes to antidepressants and Instagram scrolling have joined

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Has Trump Actually Done Anything About Drug Prices?

Donald Trump’s promise of sweeping health-care reform has not come to pass. While the president campaigned heavily on assurances to “repeal and replace Obamacare” on “ day one ” with an unspecified plan for every American to have affordable health care, his claims have now been diluted to a focus on “drug prices.” One of his first comments on the release of the Mueller report was that it was a di

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Take Two Bike Rides and Call Me in the Morning: Cycling as Doctor’s Orders

Doctors in Wales can now prescribe free bike rides to encourage people to exercise under a pilot program, the first in Britain.

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Elon Musk Ridicules Jeff Bezos’ Moon Lander

Crude CEO On Thursday, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ space company Blue Origin presented its plans to reach the Moon, including a brand new design for its “Blue Moon” lander. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk then took to Twitter to crudely imply that Bezos was building unwarranted hype for a plan that wasn’t going anywhere — a move that could be read as the ultimate example of “pot calling the kettle black” irony.

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A new way to build tiny neural networks could create powerful AI on your phone

We’ve been wasting our processing power to train neural networks that are ten times too big.

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Luxembourg and US agree to deepen cooperation in space

The tiny EU country of Luxembourg and the United States agreed on Friday to work more closely on projects in space, including research and exploration as well as defence and commerce.

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Uber begins trading nearly 7% below its IPO price

Uber began trading as a public company at $42 per share Friday, nearly 7% below its initial public offering price.

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Storm water banking could help Texas manage floods and droughts

Massive, destructive floods such as those caused by Hurricane Harvey in 2017 are a stark reality in Texas, but so are prolonged ground-cracking droughts.

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Better microring sensors for optical applications

Tweaking the design of microring sensors enhances their sensitivity without adding more implementation complexity.

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U.N. peacekeepers can shorten civil wars, but it takes lots of troops

United Nations peacekeeping operations can shorten civil wars, but need robust troop deployments to move parties toward negotiated settlements such as ceasefires and peace agreements, researchers say. While most research on PKOs measure their influence on maintaining postwar peace, a new study instead addresses the UN peacekeeping operations’ ability to increase the likelihood of a peaceful confl

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Modern Zoos Aren’t Just for Entertainment

They're animal welfare research and conservation institutions as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NASA Northern quadrant strength in Tropical Cyclone Lili

NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms in Tropical Cyclone Lili as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean. Infrared data provides temperature information, and the strongest thunderstorms that reach high into the atmosphere have the coldest cloud top temperatures.

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Can recreational sports really make you a better student?

A new Michigan State University study adds to growing evidence that participating in recreational sports not only can help improve grades while attending college, but it also can help students return for another year.

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Storm water banking could help Texas manage floods and droughts

A study by The University of Texas at Austin has quantified the amount of water flowing in major Texas rivers during heavy rains and found that there is enough room in coastal aquifers to store most of it. This discovery means that capturing and storing water could be a feasible option for partially mitigating floods and droughts, which are both expected to increase in frequency and intensity as t

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Retracted Study: How a Volcano in Japan Halted an Earthquake

Falsified data suggested that an earthquake was terminated by one of the most active volcanoes in Japan.

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Native plants regenerate on their own after invasive shrubs are removed

Invasive shrubs have become increasingly prevalent in the deciduous forests of eastern North America — often creating a dense understory that outcompetes native plants. Many land managers would like to remove the invaders, but worry about whether a costly remediation program will be needed to help the native plant community rebound.

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Treatment to restore natural heartbeat could be on the horizon for heart failure

A new therapy to re-engage the heart's natural electrical pathways — instead of bypassing them — could mean more treatment options for heart failure patients who also suffer from electrical disturbances, such as arrhythmias, according to new research.

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Prince Charming's kiss unlocking brain's regenerative potential?

Researchers find that 'waves' of Hes1 and Ascl1 gene expression control the quiescent and active state of adult neural stem cells. Hes1 expression promotes quiescence and suppresses Ascl1, and knocking out Hes1 increases Ascl1 expression and subsequent adult neural stem cell activation.

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Researchers discover the Achilles' heel of an aggressive brain cancer

Researchers have discovered a chink in the armor of the tumor cells of glioblastoma, a lethal brain cancer. Alongside the finding, the researchers also came up with a method for attacking this vulnerability. The results gained in experiments conducted with cell cultures and a mouse model are promising.

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James Comey’s ‘Duty of Candor’ Was His Undoing

“T he Department of Justice ,” James Comey explained on Thursday evening, “has a duty of candor to the courts and to Congress.” The former FBI director was talking about William Barr and the “less than honorable” way that Comey believes the attorney general described Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report—in Barr’s summary letter to Congress, during the press conference he held before releasing

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One-off injection may drastically reduce heart attack risk

Doctors hope to trial gene therapy on people with rare disorder in next three years Why researchers are turning to gene therapy to treat heart failure Doctors in the US have announced plans for a radical gene therapy that aims to drastically reduce the risk of heart attack, the world’s leading cause of death, with a one-off injection. The researchers hope to trial the therapy within the next thre

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Why researchers are turning to gene therapy to treat heart failure

Single jab could reduce risk of heart attack for some but wider benefit is yet to be proven Gene therapy startup plans to slash heart attack risk with jab The rise in life expectancy in Britain from 2001 to 2016 was largely driven by better medical care of heart attack patients. People are now more likely to survive heart attacks and live instead with heart failure, where the organ is weakened bu

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Blue Origin Unveils "Blue Moon," Its Big Lunar Lander

The spacecraft could ferry astronauts to the moon’s surface as early as 2024 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Amazon stops selling 'toxic' goods for children in US

Products high in toxic metals were being sold to children, a US investigation finds.

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Vacuum Maker Dyson Patents Off-Road Electric Car

Clean Air Vacuum maker Dyson just unveiled early blueprints for its upcoming off-road electric car. The vehicle seems to be designed to be maneuverable even on rough terrain or off-road driving, according to patent filings reviewed by The Guardian . Specific details on the vehicle are sparse, but Dyson expects to begin selling the car in 2021 at costs comparable to a Tesla . New Features The car

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AI can now defend itself against malicious messages hidden in speech

AI can now defend itself against malicious messages hidden in speech AI can now defend itself against malicious messages hidden in speech, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01510-1 Computer scientists have thwarted programs that can trick AI systems into classifying malicious audio as safe.

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Following DASH diet can reduce heart failure risk in people under 75

A diet proven to have beneficial effects on high blood pressure also may reduce the risk of heart failure in people under age 75, according to a study led by researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health.

3h

NASA Northern quadrant strength in Tropical Cyclone Lili

NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms in Tropical Cyclone Lili as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean. Infrared data provides temperature information, and the strongest thunderstorms that reach high into the atmosphere have the coldest cloud top temperatures.

3h

Mexico Wants the United States to Decriminalize All Drugs

The More on Drugs Mexico’s new president has a plan to decriminalize all drugs — and he’s hopeful the U.S. will follow his lead. President Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s recently released National Development Plan for 2019-2024 asserts that the international “war on drugs” has failed. In light of that, he believes it’s time for Mexico and other nations to lift bans on illegal drugs. It’s a bold pl

3h

Tech-saavy people more likely to trust digital doctors

Would you trust a robot to diagnose your cancer? According to new research, people with high confidence in machine performance and also in their own technological capabilities are more likely to accept and use digital healthcare services and providers.

3h

Believing machines can out-do people may fuel acceptance of self-driving cars

In order for self-driving cars to hit the streets, more people may need to concede that machines can outperform humans, at least in some tasks, according to researchers.

3h

Better microring sensors for optical applications

Tweaking the design of microring sensors enhances their sensitivity without adding more implementation complexity.

3h

A metal sheet stamping simulation promises improved car part production

A research team has used the most up-to-date simulation techniques to determine how to make the best tools to stamp complex shapes into metal sheets without the resulting parts twisting out of shape. Their approach promises higher quality stamped metal parts for use by the car industry.

3h

Modern Zoos Aren’t Just for Entertainment

They're animal welfare research and conservation institutions as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Deepfake Salvador Dalí takes selfies with museum visitors

submitted by /u/monsto [link] [comments]

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Joe Rogan Experience #1294 – Futurist Jamie Metzl

submitted by /u/skoalbrother [link] [comments]

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People Are Roasting Jeff Bezos’ Ridiculous Space Habitats

Big Dreams On Thursday, world’s richest man and online bookstore founder Jeff Bezos shared more details about his vision of building gigantic, rotating orbital cities that would allow humans to live in outer space. Human-induced climate change is ravaging the Earth , so many of the world’s most affluent people have suggested starting over in space. Bezos’ vision involves multiple space habitats t

4h

Mätningarna som kan förklara varför universum mest är materia

Forskningen bedrivs av runt 500 forskare i 14 länder inom det kinesiska partikelfysikexperimentet BESIII och Uppsalaforskarna har haft en ledande roll både i att ta fram metoden som använts samt i de mätningar som gjorts för att bekräfta att metoden fungerar. Forskarna har låtit elektroner och positroner kollidera med varandra för att skapa materia-antimateriaparet Λ. Materia-antimateriaparet Λ ä

4h

Better microring sensors for optical applications

Tweaking the design of microring sensors enhances their sensitivity without adding more implementation complexity.

4h

Clever science cannot prevent the next mass extinction

We must accept that having more children is not in our interest as a species

4h

The universe is 2.5 billion times less magnetic than a fridge magnet

Astronomers have calculate the magnetism of the entire universe by studying the space between galaxies, and it turns out to be very weak indeed

4h

New efficient way to engineer nanostructures mimicking natural immune response complexes

Scientists yield novel method to engineer large multi-antibody-like nanostructures using DNA nanotechnology. The results demonstrate the potential for assembly of multiple proteins and also other materials to enhance properties of traditional therapies.

4h

#MeToo Is Changing How Sex Is Simulated on Set

In 2007, the actor Maria Schneider revealed something disturbing that had occurred while filming what became one of her most lauded performances, in the 1972 movie Last Tango in Paris. Schneider alleged that the director, Bernardo Bertolucci, had not received consent from the then–19-year-old actress to perform one of the most infamous sex scenes in American cinema history. “That scene wasn’t in

4h

The End of the Innocuous White House Visit

The Boston Red Sox owner Tom Werner says he traveled to the White House on Thursday with an “apolitical” agenda in mind. It was neither a “red day” nor a “blue day,” he would stress later that afternoon to reporters—just a “great day” for honoring his franchise’s World Series victory last fall. “To a great degree possible,” Werner said, “people watch sports as a way to get away from their problem

4h

E-cigarette use by young adults linked to childhood maltreatment

A new study led by VCU researchers finds young adults with a history of childhood abuse or neglect are more prone to using e-cigarettes during the transition to adulthood.

4h

What is association of age with risk of death for ICU patients?

This study of nearly 134,000 patients admitted to intensive care units in France examined the association of age with risk of death in the hospital and then three months and three years after discharge.

4h

Time of day associated with physicians ordering cancer screenings, patients completing them

The time of day of a primary care appointment was associated with the likelihood of a physician ordering cancer screenings and of patients completing those screenings in this study of 33 practices with patients eligible for breast or colorectal cancer screening.

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Opioid doctor and pharmacy 'shoppers' may also shop at home, study finds

As states crack down on doctor and pharmacy 'shopping' by people who misuse opioids, a new study reveals how often those individuals may still be able to find opioids to misuse in their family medicine cabinets. For every 200 patients prescribed opioids, one had a family member whose opioid-misuse problem led them to seek the drugs from multiple prescribers and multiple pharmacies.

4h

Cancer screening rates decline when patients see doctors later in day

Decision fatigue and doctors falling behind schedule may lead to lower cancer screening rates, Penn study finds.

4h

A surprising experiment opens the path to new particle manipulation methods

A surprising experiment opens the path to new particle manipulation methods. Unexpected result from acoustics experiment could have applications in biomedical and microsystems research.

4h

Turkey fines Facebook for failing to protect personal data

Turkey's state-run news agency says the country's data protection agency has fined Facebook 1.650 million Turkish lira ($270,000) for contravening data laws.

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75 years later, French 'HistoPad' offers new view of D-Day

The French and the Americans are working together again on a D-Day project—this time to give museum visitors the opportunity to travel back in time and experience the milestone World War II invasion 75 years later.

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Barn som förstår naturen skyddar den

Matteo Giusti kombinerar forskning om hållbar design av städer och miljöpsykologi. Detta för att förstå hur vi ska designa städer så att människor kan känna samhörighet med naturen och få de psykologiska värden som krävs för att skydda den. Han menar att vi nu skapar städer där många barn saknar möjligheten att vara utomhus i en icke-steril miljö. De är hänvisade till miljöer enbart designade för

4h

Study shows native plants regenerate on their own after invasive shrubs are removed

Invasive shrubs have become increasingly prevalent in the deciduous forests of eastern North America—often creating a dense understory that outcompetes native plants. Many land managers would like to remove the invaders, but worry about what happens afterwards. Will they need to launch a costly remediation program to reestablish native plant communities?

4h

Research spotlights the role of cover crops in slowing herbicide resistance

An article in the most recent edition of the journal Weed Science shows that cover crops can play an important role in slowing the development of herbicide resistant weeds.

4h

Before there was a periodic table, there was chaos

Science Excerpt: Mendeleyev’s Dream In this excerpt from "Mendeleyev’s Dream: The Quest for the Elements," author Paul Strathern describes the state of science in the 19th century, and the growing hope…

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Forskere er enige: 166 år gammel flaske med kolera-afføring skal åbnes

De har kun én chance til at analysere det unikke indhold.

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Study shows native plants regenerate on their own after invasive shrubs are removed

Invasive shrubs have become increasingly prevalent in the deciduous forests of eastern North America—often creating a dense understory that outcompetes native plants. Many land managers would like to remove the invaders, but worry about what happens afterwards. Will they need to launch a costly remediation program to reestablish native plant communities?

4h

Research spotlights the role of cover crops in slowing herbicide resistance

An article in the most recent edition of the journal Weed Science shows that cover crops can play an important role in slowing the development of herbicide resistant weeds.

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People more likely to trust machines than humans with their private information

Not everyone fears our machine overlords. In fact, according to Penn State researchers, when it comes to private information and access to financial data, people tend to trust machines more than people, which could lead to both positive and negative online behaviors.

4h

New progress in developing an animal model of hepatitis C

Small differences in a liver cell protein have significant impacts on hepatitis C virus replication in mice and humans, findings that could facilitate the development of a mouse model of the infection. The report, led by researchers at Princeton University, was published today in the journal eLife.

4h

China Implanted Electrodes into a Man's Brain to Treat His Meth Addiction. How Could It Work?

A man in China who spent years battling a methamphetamine addiction has had a device inserted into his brain to treat his addiction, according to news reports.

4h

Moon Blobs, Collapsars, and Long Planets

A roundup of recent research with astrobiological implications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Making a meal of it: Mosquito spit protein controls blood feeding

Researchers developed a transgenic approach to inactivating the mosquito salivary protein AAPP. Transgenic mosquitoes showed significantly longer probing and prediuresis times, and worse feeding success and meal sizes compared with their wild-type counterparts. Although malarial parasite development was unaffected by these behavioral changes in a laboratory setting, real-world stresses associated

4h

Wi-Fi location affects online privacy behavior

Does sitting in a coffee shop versus at home influence a person's willingness to disclose private information online? Does the on-screen appearance of a public location's online 'terms and conditions' have an effect? According to researchers, the answer to both questions is 'yes,' especially if the user has a tendency to instinctively distrust public wireless networks.

4h

New efficient way to engineer nanostructures mimicking natural immune response complexes

Scientists yield novel method to engineer large multi-antibody-like nanostructures using DNA nanotechnology. The results demonstrate the potential for assembly of multiple proteins and also other materials to enhance properties of traditional therapies.

4h

New progress in developing an animal model of hepatitis C

Small differences in a liver cell protein have significant impacts on hepatitis C virus replication in mice and humans, findings that could facilitate the development of a mouse model of the infection. The report, led by researchers at Princeton University, was published today in the journal eLife.

4h

The Last Family-Owned Daily in Mississippi

As mentioned in the kickoff post in this new “Our Towns” series, anyone who cares about America’s civic, cultural, and economic future should care about the fate of the local press. Journalism everywhere is coping with a variety of well-known stresses. The pressure to adapt, while there could still be time to survive, is especially intense on smaller, local outlets that may be the only source of

4h

A surprising experiment opens the path to new particle manipulation methods

Researchers at Aalto University have discovered a surprising phenomenon that changes how we think about how sound can move particles. Their experiment is based on a famous experiment recognisable from high school science classrooms worldwide—the Chlandni Plate experiment, where particles move on a vibrating surface. The experiment was first performed in 1787 by Ernst Chladni, who is now known as t

4h

Peer-to-peer bonuses may have unintended negative consequences, expert warns

So-called peer-to-peer bonuses, where colleagues 'tip' or reward each other with points or money, may seem to offer short-term benefits but ultimately end up damaging performance and wellbeing, an HR expert has warned.

4h

Replanting oil palm may be driving a second wave of biodiversity loss

The environmental impact of palm oil production has been well publicised. Found in everything from food to cosmetics, the deforestation, ecosystem decline and biodiversity loss associated with its use is a serious cause for concern.

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How Uber and other digital platforms could trick us using behavioral science—unless we act fast

Uber's business model is incredibly simple: It's a platform that facilitates exchanges between people. And Uber's been incredibly successful at it, almost eliminating the transaction costs of doing business in everything from shuttling people around town to delivering food.

4h

Suppressed star formation in the early universe

Massive clusters of galaxies, some with more mass than a hundred Milky Way galaxies, have been detected from cosmic epochs as early as about three billion years after the big bang. Their ongoing star formation makes them bright enough to be detected at these distances. These kinds of clusters were predicted by simulations of cosmological evolution but their properties are very uncertain. Astronome

4h

Israel probes Golan Heights mass vulture poisoning

The killings wipe out half the vulture population in the Israeli-occupied territory.

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Sleep is your superpower | Matt Walker

Sleep is your life-support system and Mother Nature's best effort yet at immortality, says sleep scientist Matt Walker. In this deep dive into the science of slumber, Walker shares the wonderfully good things that happen when you get sleep — and the alarmingly bad things that happen when you don't, for both your brain and body. Learn more about sleep's impact on your learning, memory, immune syst

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2D insulators with ferromagnetism are rare; researchers just identified a new one

Collaborating scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Princeton University have discovered a new layered ferromagnetic semiconductor, a rare type of material that holds great promise for next-generation electronic technologies.

4h

Measuring quality of life after pediatric kidney transplant

After receiving a kidney transplant, children may experience worrisome quality-of-life changes that underscore the importance of screening transplant recipients for psychosocial function, according to Children's research presented during the 10th Congress of the International Pediatric Transplant Association.

4h

Post-bypass survival linked to civil status and class

Civil status, education, and income are factors shown to be clearly associated with duration of survival after a bypass operation. A postoperative patient aged 60 with a spouse or cohabiting partner, high educational attainment, and high income has a median life expectancy five years longer than a corresponding person with no live-in partner, a low education level, and low income.

4h

Trilobites: How Fish May See Color in the Deep Ocean’s Darkness

Fish that have never known sunshine could be able to see the world in shades of blue and green we can’t even imagine.

4h

He Crossed the Atlantic in a Barrel. We Asked Him About Dodging Ships and Using ‘La Toilette.’

The French adventurer Jean-Jacques Savin spent over four months alone, floating across the Atlantic Ocean. “It’s freedom,” he said.

4h

Focus on nuclear waste chemistry could help federal cleanup site challenges

Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Washington State University teamed up to investigate the complex dynamics of low-water liquids that challenge nuclear waste processing at federal cleanup sites.

4h

Climate change responsible for severe infectious disease in UK frogs

Climate change has already increased the spread and severity of a fatal disease caused by Ranavirus that infects common frogs (Rana temporaria) in the United Kingdom, according to new research.

4h

Many cats and dogs carrying fleas with high levels of bacteria, finds Big Flea Project

As many as one in four cats and one in seven dogs are carrying fleas, and about 11 per cent of these fleas are infected with potentially pathogenic bacteria, according to a large-scale analysis of owned animals in the UK. Flea bites can be painful and can cause allergic reactions in cats and dogs which is why the Big Flea Project findings highlight the need to re-educate pet owners on flea prevent

5h

The regulatory role of ethical labelling

A Victoria University of Wellington study has found ethical certification has become a 'tick in the box' exercise in some industries, and fails to address underlying sustainability and equality injustices.

5h

Better microring sensors for optical applications

Tweaking the design of microring sensors enhances their sensitivity without adding more implementation complexity.

5h

What happens when a raindrop hits a puddle?

Have you ever taken a walk through the rain on a warm spring day and seen that perfect puddle? You know, the one where the raindrops seem to touch down at just the right pace, causing a dance of vanishing circles?

5h

A dance of two: tailoring interactions between remote fluids of excitons

An international collaboration involving European, Israeli, and US scientists realize for the first time strong and directionally dependent interactions in quantum liquids of excitons, which contrasts with the spatial isotropy of the coupling between charged particles. This spatial anisotropy affects the way particles arrange themselves in space and opens routes to artificially created exotic stat

5h

DNA tells the story of an ancient mass grave

New research clarifies a mysterious 5,000-year-old mass grave in Poland. Ancient DNA indicates the mass murder of a large family, who, despite their brutal deaths, were buried carefully and flanked by gifts. “Those who buried the dead knew them well.” The study, which sheds light on a particularly violent era in European prehistory, appears in PNAS . Powerful blows to the head killed 15 women, ch

5h

Many cats and dogs carrying fleas with high levels of bacteria, finds Big Flea Project

As many as one in four cats and one in seven dogs are carrying fleas, and about 11 per cent of these fleas are infected with potentially pathogenic bacteria, according to a large-scale analysis of owned animals in the UK. Flea bites can be painful and can cause allergic reactions in cats and dogs which is why the Big Flea Project findings highlight the need to re-educate pet owners on flea prevent

5h

People more likely to trust machines than humans with their private information

Not everyone fears our machine overlords. In fact, according to Penn State researchers, when it comes to private information and access to financial data, people tend to trust machines more than people, which could lead to both positive and negative online behaviors.

5h

Research spotlights the role of cover crops in slowing herbicide resistance

An article in the most recent edition of the journal Weed Science shows that cover crops can play an important role in slowing the development of herbicide-resistant weeds.

5h

Believing machines can out-do people may fuel acceptance of self-driving cars

In order for self-driving cars to hit the streets, more people may need to concede that machines can outperform humans, at least in some tasks, according to Penn State researchers.

5h

Tech-savvy people more likely to trust digital doctors

Would you trust a robot to diagnose your cancer? According to researchers at Penn State, people with high confidence in machine performance and also in their own technological capabilities are more likely to accept and use digital healthcare services and providers.

5h

Army discovery opens path to safer batteries

In the latest issue of the journal Nature, Army researchers and the University of Maryland demonstrate a transformative step in battery technology with the identification of a new cathode chemistry.

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A dance of two: Tailoring interactions between remote fluids of excitons

An international collaboration involving European, Israeli, and US scientists realize for the first time strong and directionally dependent interactions in quantum liquids of excitons, which contrasts with the spatial isotropy of the coupling between charged particles. This spatial anisotropy affects the way particles arrange themselves in space and opens routes to artificially created exotic stat

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Discovery may lead to new materials for next-generation data storage

Research funded in part by the US Army identified properties in materials that could one day lead to applications such as more powerful data storage devices that continue to hold information even after a device has been powered off.

5h

Making a meal of it: Mosquito spit protein controls blood feeding

Researchers led by Kanazawa University developed a transgenic approach to inactivating the mosquito salivary protein AAPP. Transgenic mosquitoes showed significantly longer probing and prediuresis times, and worse feeding success and meal sizes compared with their wild-type counterparts. Although malarial parasite development was unaffected by these behavioral changes in a laboratory setting, real

5h

Study shows native plants regenerate on their own after invasive shrubs are removed

Invasive shrubs have become increasingly prevalent in the deciduous forests of eastern North America — often creating a dense understory that outcompetes native plants. Many land managers would like to remove the invaders, but worry about whether a costly remediation program will be needed to help the native plant community rebound.

5h

A metal sheet stamping simulation promises improved car part production

A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University used the most up-to-date simulation techniques to determine how to make the best tools to stamp complex shapes into metal sheets without the resulting parts twisting out of shape. Their approach promises higher quality stamped metal parts for use by the car industry.

5h

Eat or be eaten: Street food vendors resist and adapt to changing society

Research from Japan's Kanazawa University examined various ways in which Indonesian street food vendors try to survive and adapt amid urbanization. State-led plans often seek to prohibit or relocate vendors, seeing them as a liability. The study found the vendors resist in subtle ways. They forge reciprocal relationships and seek informal protection. Additionally, some vendors work daytime office

5h

Study finds Wi-Fi location affects online privacy behavior

Does sitting in a coffee shop versus at home influence a person's willingness to disclose private information online? Does the on-screen appearance of a public location's online 'terms and conditions' have an effect? According to researchers at Penn State, the answer to both questions is 'yes,' especially if the user has a tendency to instinctively distrust public wireless networks.

5h

New efficient way to engineer nanostructures mimicking natural immune response complexes

Collaboration between Novo Nordisk and Professor Kurt Gothelf's laboratory at Aarhus University yields novel method to engineer large multi-antibody-like nanostructures using DNA nanotechnology. The results demonstrate the potential for assembly of multiple proteins and also other materials to enhance properties of traditional therapies.

5h

Location and brand affect people's trust in cloud services

People's stereotypes regarding different locations around the world influence whether they feel secure in storing their data in cloud service centers in those locations, according to researchers at Penn State, who also found that stereotypes regarding brand authority influence people's trust in cloud services.

5h

New progress in developing an animal model of hepatitis C

Researchers studying hepatitis C virus have introduced small mutations into mouse liver cells to make the animals more susceptible to the virus, a step toward using mice in hepatitis C vaccine research.

5h

This Congressman Wants to Make All Cryptocurrency Illegal

Bitcoin Basher Congressman Brad Sherman (D-CA) urged his colleagues to “nip this in the bud” and introduce a bill to outlaw all types of cryptocurrency during remarks at a House Financial Services Committee meeting yesterday. “An awful lot of our international power comes from the fact that the U.S. dollar is the standard unit of international finance and transactions,” he said. “Clearing through

5h

AI develops human-like number sense – taking us a step closer to building machines with general intelligence

Numbers figure pretty high up on the list of what a computer can do well. While humans often struggle to split a restaurant bill, a modern computer can make millions of calculations in a mere second. Humans, however, have an innate and intuitive number sense that helped us, among other things, to build computers in the first place.

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Can blockchain revolutionize public finance?

submitted by /u/NakamotoTuringLabs [link] [comments]

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Life-like Gaming is Now Possible (Thanks to A.I.)

submitted by /u/sanem48 [link] [comments]

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Robots Thrive in the Forest on Jobs That Humans Find Too Boring

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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‘Fishing’ shows how staph bacteria talk to each other

Researchers have developed a new method for analyzing the signaling molecules of staphylococci . Greater knowledge of how staphylococci communicate with each other may make it possible to prevent them from causing infections, regardless of whether or not they are resistant. Staphylococcus bacteria is the leading cause of skin infections. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) is espec

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Directors are using virtual reality on set to find the perfect shot

Virtual reality headsets are letting film directors walk around computer generated scenes to find the perfect angle for a shot before recording

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HIV prevention drug can curb the epidemic for high-risk groups in India

A new study by an international research team suggests that making pre-exposure prophylaxis available to men who have sex with men and people who inject drugs in India may be a cost-effective way of curbing the HIV epidemic there.

5h

Uncovering a 5000-year-old family tragedy

An international team, lead by researchers from the universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus, has shed light on a mysterious 5000-year-old mass grave in Poland. Despite being killed brutally, the victims were buried carefully. Ancient DNA has revealed the mass murder to be that of a large family. The new research results shed light on a particularly violent era in European prehistory of which little

5h

Delta will beta test free Wi-Fi starting this month

According to Gogo, who provide internet service to Delta and other major airlines, only 12% of passengers across the airlines they serve currently pay for Wi-Fi. This is bound to increase substantially …

5h

India reportedly opens Android antitrust investigation

India is said to be investigating Google over Android antitrust concerns. The details of the probe are fairly thin for now, because the Competition Commission of India hasn't yet …

5h

Klima står øverst på den politiske dagsorden for ingeniører

Hvilke emner er vigtigst i valgkampen? Ingeniøren har bedt landets ingeniører og andre naturvidenskabelige fagfolk pege på politikområder, der har størst indflydelse på, hvor de sætter krydset den 5. juni.

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A Very Trumpy Reunion on the Las Vegas Strip

LAS VEGAS—All, in their own way, are castoffs from Trumpworld. But this week finds them in a circus of a different sort. A handful of former and wannabe administration officials have descended on the Bellagio Hotel to speak at an annual conference put on by one of their own: Anthony Scaramucci, the investment executive whose stint in the West Wing lasted only 11 days. The summit, called SALT, is

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Onboarding a New Friend

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two women who have the same last name (no relation), both from the Midwest, who did the same internship at the United Nations, one after the other. The first intern made a Google Doc to guide her

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Statins' potential to treat MS unrelated to lowering cholesterol

The widely prescribed statin, simvastatin, can medically help patients with secondary progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS) — for reasons that might be unrelated to the drug's intended cholesterol lowering affects, a new study has found.

5h

One in five people in England harmed by others' drinking over past year

One in five people in England have been harmed in some way by others' drinking over the past year, suggest the results of the largest survey of its kind in the United Kingdom.

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To cheat or not to cheat? Researchers uncover the moral dilemmas of doping

Elite athletes are less likely to take banned substances if they consider the morality of what they are doing, and not just the health consequences of doping, according to a new study.

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As Zuckerberg visits, France threatens new rules on Facebook

France welcomed Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg on Friday with a threat of sweeping new regulation.

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Kristallkulor i alunskiffer kan tyda på isbildning i tropiskt hav

Alunskifferns bildningsmiljö har sedan länge varit problematisk för forskare, men enligt rådande modeller avsattes dessa oljerika skiffrar i ett varmt växthusklimat med geokemiska bevis för extremt varma tropiska vattentemperaturer. Nu har forskare från bland annat Uppsala universitet upptäckt att alunskiffern i Ryssland och Estland även innehåller stora mängder kristallkulor som ursprungligen be

5h

The revolution of plantoids

Robots are usually inspired by humans and animals. But the next frontier is plantoids, plant robots that move and explore the environment with smart sensors. Researcher Barbara Mazzolai has been developing plantoid technology.

5h

Scientists prove gold purifying process used in medieval West Africa works

Humble fragments of clay crucibles and coin molds flecked with gold excavated by a joint team of British and Malian archaeologists in 2005 led archaeologist Sam Nixon, in consultation with Thilo Rehren, a specialist on ancient materials and technologies, to theorize how West Africans used them to purify gold and cast unmarked coins during the 10th and 11th centuries in Tadmekka, Mali. The theory w

5h

White people struggle to perceive emotion on black people's faces

An international study, in which the University of Granada (UGR) participated, has found that white people have difficulty distinguishing emotions on black people's faces—a problem that does not appear to arise the other way around.

5h

Chernobyl is now a hugely important wildlife refuge

Photos record abundant wildlife in all areas of the radioactive exclusion zone. Germán Orizaola from the University of Oviedo in Spain reports.

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Circus kids are happy kids

Circus-training bolsters mental health outcomes. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Nordens Atlantis kan gemme sig ved Doggerbanke

Forskere er i gang med at undersøge, hvordan det forhistoriske land Doggerland har set ud. De håber ikke blot at lave en tredimensionel kortlægning, men også at kunne bevise, at fortidens mennesker har boet på det nu oversvømmede område.

5h

999 trial shows value of live video streaming

Using live video streaming from the scene of accidents and medical emergencies to the dispatch team of a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) has public support and the potential to be rolled out across the UK's ambulance network , according to the team behind a scientific study.

5h

Statins' potential to treat MS unrelated to lowering cholesterol

The widely prescribed statin, simvastatin, can medically help patients with secondary progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SPMS) — for reasons that might be unrelated to the drug's intended cholesterol lowering affects, a UCL study has found.

5h

A cup of joe and you're good to go!

Latte, cappuccino or short black, a morning coffee is an essential for many people looking to kick start their day. But while the humble coffee may be a vital feature of the daily grind, how much is too much?

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5 Breakthroughs Coming Soon in Augmented and Virtual Reality

Convergence is accelerating disruption… everywhere! Exponential technologies are colliding into each other, reinventing products, services, and industries. In this third installment of my Convergence Catalyzer series, I’ll be synthesizing key insights from my annual entrepreneurs’ mastermind event, Abundance 360 . This five-blog series looks at 3D printing , artificial intelligence , VR/AR, energ

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Australia on track for severe flu season

Southern hemisphere case numbers are rising sharply, doctors warn. Joseph Milton reports.

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Intolerance and funding concern Indian scientists ahead of election

Intolerance and funding concern Indian scientists ahead of election Intolerance and funding concern Indian scientists ahead of election, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01465-3 Researchers are troubled by a flat budget, and a rise in extremism and pseudoscience.

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How to keep produce fresh as long as possible

DIY This is a story all about how to keep new food crisp and not turnin’ brown. If you’re tired of your produce going bad after a few days, here are a few tips to keep it fresh.

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How I stumbled on a lost plant just north of Antarctica

Sunny interludes punctuate showers of rain, hail and sleet as furious winds sweep clouds across the sky. It's a typical summer day on Macquarie Island, a sliver of ocean floor that rose more than 2.5 km from the depths of the Southern Ocean, halfway between Tasmania and Antarctica, around 12 million years ago.

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Humans Are Driving a Million Species Towards Extinction, Says U.N. Report

An exhaustive and damning report from the United Nations-sponsored Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) says human activities have thrust global biodiversity into an unprecedented decline. A million animal and plant species now face extinction.

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How I stumbled on a lost plant just north of Antarctica

Sunny interludes punctuate showers of rain, hail and sleet as furious winds sweep clouds across the sky. It's a typical summer day on Macquarie Island, a sliver of ocean floor that rose more than 2.5 km from the depths of the Southern Ocean, halfway between Tasmania and Antarctica, around 12 million years ago.

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How global cities are changing international trade

The geographic diversification of international trade and investment has become a public policy goal of many countries, including Canada.

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Promoting smarter ways to mine within fragile forests

Many of the planet's most valuable mineral resources are to be found within and beneath forested landscapes. And our insatiable appetite for material goods and services—everything from basic essentials to the latest, must-have gadget—is driving global demand for industrial quantities of the minerals and precious metals that form vital components of those products.

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Inspired by a soft body of a leech — a wall-climbing robot

A research team led by Associate Professor Tomoaki Mashimo at Toyohashi University of Technology has successfully developed a leech-shaped robot, 'LEeCH,' which can climb vertical walls. LEeCH is capable of elongating and bending its body without any constraints; just like a leech. Thanks to its flexible body structure and the suction cups, the robot has successfully climbed a vertical wall and ev

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Comparison of global climatologies confirms warming of the global ocean

A report describes the main features of the recently published World Ocean Experiment-Argo Global Hydrographic Climatology. This climatology is based on profile data from ships, Argo floats, and sensors attached to marine mammals. As an important deviation from the widely used climatologies produced previously by the National Oceanographic Data Center, the spatial interpolation was performed on lo

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Prince Charming's kiss unlocking brain's regenerative potential?

Kyoto University researchers find that 'waves' of Hes1 and Ascl1 gene expression control the quiescent and active state of adult neural stem cells. Hes1 expression promotes quiescence and suppresses Ascl1, and knocking out Hes1 increases Ascl1 expression and subsequent adult neural stem cell activation.

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Two types of mid-latitude wave trains lead to extreme heat in South Korea and southern-central Japan

South Korea and southern-central Japan are frequently affected by extreme heat, and the extreme heat in these two regions tend to occur simultaneously. A scientific collaboration of climatologists examined the large-scale circulation leading to the concurrent extreme heat over South Korea and southern-central Japan.

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A new system for treating type 1 diabetes mellitus

Thanks to an innovative system of magnetic microcapsule separation, the Nanobiocel-CIBER BNN research group of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country in collaboration with the BIOMICS group, also of the UPV/EHU, has managed to reduce the volume of microcapsule implants containing insulin-producing pancreatic cells by nearly 80%. That way, the medical complications arising out of implanting l

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Multiple sclerosis: Discovery of a mechanism responsible for chronic inflammation

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease. The defense system that usually protects patients from external aggression turns on its own cells and attacks them for reasons that are not yet known. Scientists have shown that ancient viruses are involved in the acute inflammatory defense response that may contribute to the disease.

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Cognitive enhancers to boost abilities at work considered acceptable by the public

The general public largely views the use of cognitive enhancers such as Adderall as an acceptable practice when used by adults in the workplace, suggests a new study.

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The grandmother effect suggests that proximity is a factor in family size

The human species is one of the very few, along with orcas and pilot whales, where females cease to be fertile after approximately 45 years of age. Since the ultimate goal of any living organism is to spread their genes, the evolution of menopause in women has been quite puzzling for scientists.

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The Future According to Uber

The Uber IPO is finally upon us, and it has proven divisive. The critics point to Uber’s billion-dollar losses and SEC filings so meager a Financial Times commentary called them “ an outrage .” A Bloomberg column even questioned the growth of this growth company, noting that the money coming in to the core ride-hailing service appears to have plateaued . Yet, when the company is listed on the New

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The grandmother effect suggests that proximity is a factor in family size

The human species is one of the very few, along with orcas and pilot whales, where females cease to be fertile after approximately 45 years of age. Since the ultimate goal of any living organism is to spread their genes, the evolution of menopause in women has been quite puzzling for scientists.

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Huge growth in use of quartz for tools shows sophistication of ancient communities

A growth in the use of crystal quartz to make tools thousands of years ago shows the sophistication of ancient communities, according to new research.

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Researchers suggest coal ash and tailings dam disasters could be prevented

A trio of researchers from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, the University of the Witwatersrand and Geosyntec has published a Perspectives piece in the journal Science. Carlos Santamarina, Luis Torres-Cruz and Robert Bachus note in the article that many lives are lost each year when coal ash or tailings dams fail, causing mudslides. Many such failures are preventable.

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Researchers identify rare 2-D insulator with ferromagnetic properties

Collaborating scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Princeton University have discovered a new layered ferromagnetic semiconductor, a rare type of material that holds great promise for next-generation electronic technologies.

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We must rip up our environmental laws to address the extinction crisis

Humans are causing the Earth's sixth mass extinction event, with an estimated one million species at risk of extinction.

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Hummingbird robot flies and hovers like the real thing

Researchers have engineered flying robots that behave like hummingbirds, training them with machine learning algorithms based on various techniques the bird uses naturally every day. This means that after learning a simulation, the robot “knows” how to move around on its own like a hummingbird would. The combination of flying like a bird and hovering like an insect could one day offer a better wa

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Föreläsning om stroke 14 maj

Välkomna till en eftermiddag med föreläsningar om stroke och blodtrycksmätningar på Skånes universitetssjukhus i Malmö.

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Four Chinese scientists were killed in Sri Lanka attack

Four Chinese scientists were killed in Sri Lanka attack Four Chinese scientists were killed in Sri Lanka attack, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01478-y The researchers were in the country last month as part of a joint project to study Indian Ocean weather.

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New report recommends greater transparency in research

Lorena Barba, an associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the School of Engineering and Applied Science, recently presented a congressionally-mandated report to federal lawmakers and experts that will guide future national policy on science and engineering research.

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We must rip up our environmental laws to address the extinction crisis

Humans are causing the Earth's sixth mass extinction event, with an estimated one million species at risk of extinction.

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De fleste DSB-pendlere går glip af erstatning, mens enkelte snyder sig til for meget

DSB har givet forkerte tal til ministeriet, og nogle pendlere savner deres kompensation, mens andre kan snyde sig til for meget. Rigsrevisionen kritiserer DSB i ny rapport om pendleres rejsetidsgaranti.

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Our history in the stars

Astronomers map the substance aluminum monoxide (AlO) in a cloud around a distant young star — Origin Source I. The finding clarifies some important details about how our solar system, and ultimately we, came to be. The cloud's limited distribution suggests AlO gas rapidly condenses to solid grains, which hints at what an early stage of our solar evolution looked like.

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Expert panel calls for increased transparency so consumers can identify quality probiotics

Probiotics are increasingly being researched and marketed as functional ingredients to enhance health. With the aim of bringing consumers certainty about what's in their probiotic product, an expert opinion paper was recently published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology that provides recommendations to the probiotics industry on standards and ways to communicate quality to end-users.

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Treatment to restore natural heartbeat could be on the horizon for heart failure

A new therapy to re-engage the heart's natural electrical pathways — instead of bypassing them — could mean more treatment options for heart failure patients who also suffer from electrical disturbances, such as arrhythmias, according to research led by the University of Chicago Medicine.

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Multiple sclerosis: Discovery of a mechanism responsible for chronic inflammation

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease. The defense system that usually protects patients from external aggression turns on its own cells and attacks them for reasons that are not yet known. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur have shown that ancient viruses are involved in the acute inflammatory defense response that may contribute to the disease.

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Computing faster with quasi-particles

In collaboration with researchers from Harvard University, researchers from the University of Würzburg have made an important step on the road to topological quantum computers. Now, they present their findings in the renowned scientific journal Nature.

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Cognitive enhancers to boost abilities at work considered acceptable by the public

The general public largely views the use of cognitive enhancers such as Adderall as an acceptable practice when used by adults in the workplace, suggests a new study from Penn Medicine neurologists, which published this week in AJOB Neuroscience.

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Good genes

A team of scientists from NAU, Arizona State University, the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, the Center for Coastal Studies in Massachusetts and nine other institutions worldwide to study potential cancer suppression mechanisms in cetaceans, the mammalian group that includes whales, dolphins and porpoises. Their findings, which picked apart the genome of the humpback whale, as well as

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With uncanny accuracy, computer model predicts how certain policies impact air pollution

A multi-institution team unveiled a new tool for understanding and controlling the health and climate impacts of shipping goods — a source not only of greenhouse gases but of soot and smog threatening our health.

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Children are our future, and the planet's. Here's how you can teach them to take care of it

As the global climate crisis accelerates, early childhood teachers and researchers are considering whether and how to approach the issue with children. Should we talk openly about the crisis and encourage children to change their daily practices? Or is there a risk that in doing so, we are inflicting anxiety on young minds, still in critical and early stages of development?

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A mathematical method for calculating black-hole properties from gravitational-wave data

Sean McWilliams, an assistant professor at West Virginia University, has developed a mathematical method for calculating black hole properties from gravitational wave data. He has written a paper describing his method and posted it on the arXiv preprint server. The paper has been accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters.

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Carry-over credits and carbon offsets are hot topics this election – but what do they actually mean?

In this election, often dubbed the "climate election", voters are refusing to settle for weak policies on climate change.

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Foster named to head task force exploring artificial intelligence

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Endangered kakapo parrot gets pioneering brain surgery

The procedure is a world-first amid efforts to save the species, native to New Zealand.

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New professor brings precision data to the dairy barn

The same technology that alerts a self-driving car that there's a pedestrian in the crosswalk could also warn a dairy farmer that a calf is getting sick—even if that calf is mingled among dozens of healthy ones.

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New professor brings precision data to the dairy barn

The same technology that alerts a self-driving car that there's a pedestrian in the crosswalk could also warn a dairy farmer that a calf is getting sick—even if that calf is mingled among dozens of healthy ones.

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There Is No “Depression Gene”

I wrote a couple of years ago about the long-running study of mutations in a serotonin transporter gene. Over the years, polymorphism in the gene have been correlated with all sorts of human behavior and psychiatry, in keeping with the importance of serotonin signaling in human cognition. Depression, anxiety, that whole end of human behavior seemed to be affected by just what sort of genetic vari

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A Bet on Uber Is a Bet on Self-Driving

Uber is scheduled to go public Friday, at an initial valuation of $82 billion, the largest for an IPO since 2014. But its future may rest on eliminating drivers.

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Work Sharp Culinary E5 Kitchen Knife Sharpener Review: Excellent Edges

Work Sharp's sharpener, with its flexible belts, puts a fine edge on your everyday kitchen blades.

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This Senator Wants to Ban Videogame Loot Boxes Aimed at Kids

Missouri Republican Josh Hawley is planning to introduce a bill titled, "The Protecting Children from Abusive Games Act."

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Tunisia seizes illegal red coral worth two million euros

Tunisian authorities said Friday they had seized 671 kilogrammes of illegally harvested red coral worth two million euros and arrested 10 people on suspicion of trafficking.

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Tunisia seizes illegal red coral worth two million euros

Tunisian authorities said Friday they had seized 671 kilogrammes of illegally harvested red coral worth two million euros and arrested 10 people on suspicion of trafficking.

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New research shows community forest management reduces both deforestation and poverty

Giving local communities in Nepal the opportunity to manage their forests has simultaneously reduced deforestation and poverty in the region, new research has shown. In the largest study of its kind, an international team of experts has found that community-forest management led to a 37% relative reduction in deforestation and a 4.3% relative reduction in poverty.

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New method developed to detect and trace homemade bombs

Researchers have developed a new way of detecting homemade explosives which will help forensic scientists trace where it came from.

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Watch a 3D-Printed Neighborhood Spring up From Nothing

Scaling Up We’ve already seen a 3D printer construct a house . Now we can watch one build a whole neighborhood . On Thursday, housing nonprofit New Story shared a video that shows how it plans to build what it calls the “world’s first 3D-printed community” — a futuristic application of 3D-printing technology that could bring affordable housing to the places that need it most. If You Pipe It The v

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Increased risk of post-traumatic stress disorder among children with immigrant father

Children born in Finland who had an immigrant father were two times more likely to be diagnosed with PTSD than those with two Finnish parents, discovered researchers from the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry at the University of Turku in Finland. Researchers stress that schools and clinicians should become more aware of intergenerational transmission of trauma.

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Cancer cells can communicate over longer distances within the body

EPFL researchers have discovered that cancer cells use exosomes to communicate with each other and send information through the bloodstream. This breakthrough opens up new possibilities for the use of cancer immunotherapy techniques.

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Directed evolution opens door to new antibiotics

In the ongoing arms race with humans and their antibiotics on one side, and bacteria with their ability to evolve defenses to antibiotics on the other, humans have enlisted a new ally—other bacteria.

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Computing faster with quasi-particles

Majorana particles are very peculiar members of the family of elementary particles. First predicted in 1937 by the Italian physicist Ettore Majorana, these particles belong to the group of so-called fermions, a group that also includes electrons, neutrons and protons. Majorana fermions are electrically neutral and also their own anti-particles. These exotic particles can, for example, emerge as qu

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Researchers quicken drug discovery method via zombie-like cells

Researchers are using zombie-like cells that behave normally on the outside, but are filled with magnetic particles inside, to screen potential drugs from natural products.

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Technology reveals previously undetectable protein signaling activity in diabetes, cancer

Proteins are the workhorses of the cell. Their activity is often controlled by adding or removing chemicals called phosphates, like switching an electrical current on or off. Measuring how many proteins are phosphorylated, or turned on, has been a roadblock for research. Because phosphorylated proteins are hard to get in large amounts, they can be difficult to analyze, even using advanced instrume

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Ambient plant illumination could light the way for greener buildings

Buildings of the future may be lit by collections of glowing plants and designed around an infrastructure of sunlight harvesting, water transport, and soil collecting and composting systems. That's the vision behind an interdisciplinary collaboration between an MIT architecture professor and a professor of chemical engineering.

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Ambient plant illumination could light the way for greener buildings

Buildings of the future may be lit by collections of glowing plants and designed around an infrastructure of sunlight harvesting, water transport, and soil collecting and composting systems. That's the vision behind an interdisciplinary collaboration between an MIT architecture professor and a professor of chemical engineering.

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Invasive species are Australia's number-one extinction threat

This week many people across the world stopped and stared as extreme headlines announced that one eighth of the world's species – more than a million – are threatened with extinction.

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AgriLife Extension releases new publication on mowing warm-season turfgrass

Mow high, mow low, mow often … ever wonder what the best recommendations are to ensure a beautiful lawn? Not doing it right can be detrimental to warm-season turfgrass, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist.

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Invasive species are Australia's number-one extinction threat

This week many people across the world stopped and stared as extreme headlines announced that one eighth of the world's species – more than a million – are threatened with extinction.

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AgriLife Extension releases new publication on mowing warm-season turfgrass

Mow high, mow low, mow often … ever wonder what the best recommendations are to ensure a beautiful lawn? Not doing it right can be detrimental to warm-season turfgrass, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist.

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Cancer cells can communicate over longer distances within the body

EPFL researchers have discovered that cancer cells use exosomes to communicate with each other and send information through the bloodstream. This breakthrough opens up new possibilities for the use of cancer immunotherapy techniques.

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Uber begins trading nearly 7% below its IPO price

Uber began trading as a public company at $42 per share Friday, nearly 7% below its initial public offering price.

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Unpacking the links: Chronic stress, fertility and the 'hunger hormone'

A new study suggests high levels of the hormone ghrelin, which stimulates appetite and is also released during stress, could be harmful to some aspects of reproductive function.

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Appendix removal associated with development of Parkinson's disease

Patients who had their appendix removed were more likely to develop Parkinson's disease than those whose appendix remained in place, according to the largest study to address the relationship between the two conditions. The retrospective study involving more than 62 million patient records from 26 health systems.

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Low-cost way to explore groundwater resources could be game changer

UNSW Sydney water engineers have revealed that investigating and managing groundwater resources more sustainably can be achieved at lower cost by using existing Earth and atmospheric tidal data.

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How cytoplasm separates from yolk

The segregation of yolk from the surrounding cytoplasm in the very early fish embryo is a key process for the development of fish larva. To identify its underlying mechanisms, biologists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) teamed up with their colleagues in theoretical physics. The discovery: Actin dynamics in the bulk of the cell drive phase segregation in zebrafish o

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Transmission of divine knowledge in the sapiential Thanksgiving Psalms from Qumran

A recently completed doctoral dissertation in Old Testament studies supports a notion gained through prior research, according to which scribes and wisdom teachers had a central role in transmitting divine knowledge in the Second Temple period (approximately 200 BCE-70 CE).

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Discovery of the photosensor for yellow-green light-driven photosynthesis in cyanobacteria

Cyanobacteria, a type of bacteria that perform photosynthesis, utilize a photosensor that regulates green and red light-harvesting antenna proteins for photosynthesis. A joint research team from Toyohashi University of Technology, the University of Tokyo, and the National Institute for Physiological Science found a new photosensor that regulates yellow-green light-harvesting antenna protein in cya

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How cytoplasm separates from yolk

The segregation of yolk from the surrounding cytoplasm in the very early fish embryo is a key process for the development of fish larva. To identify its underlying mechanisms, biologists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) teamed up with their colleagues in theoretical physics. The discovery: Actin dynamics in the bulk of the cell drive phase segregation in zebrafish o

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Discovery of the photosensor for yellow-green light-driven photosynthesis in cyanobacteria

Cyanobacteria, a type of bacteria that perform photosynthesis, utilize a photosensor that regulates green and red light-harvesting antenna proteins for photosynthesis. A joint research team from Toyohashi University of Technology, the University of Tokyo, and the National Institute for Physiological Science found a new photosensor that regulates yellow-green light-harvesting antenna protein in cya

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A plant hormone that speeds root growth could be a new agricultural tool

A molecule sold as a food additive has an underground role, too: helping roots grow faster.

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Setting a precedent in the use of artificial intelligence

Criminal sentencing could be fairer with the help of machine learning, according to Professor Dan Hunter. The Foundation Dean of Swinburne Law School, Hunter observed that sentencing generates a vast store of data, and the process is expensive for individuals and the system, making it the perfect candidate for a technological upgrade.

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A plant hormone that speeds root growth could be a new agricultural tool

A molecule sold as a food additive has an underground role, too: helping roots grow faster.

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Flame design in space may lead to soot-free fire

For decades, scientists have been able to burn fuels in a flame without creating any soot, and they think they know why. They've crunched the numbers and run experiments in high-tech facilities, but there's only one way to be certain about the fundamental relationship between flames and soot:

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Matter around a young star helps astronomers explore stellar history

Astronomers map the substance aluminum monoxide (AlO) in a cloud around a distant young star—Origin Source I. The finding clarifies some important details about how our solar system, and ultimately we, came to be. The cloud's limited distribution suggests AlO gas rapidly condenses to solid grains, which hints at what an early stage of our solar evolution looked like.

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Leonardo da Vinci designed an ideal city that was centuries ahead of its time

The word "genius" is universally associated with the name of Leonardo da Vinci – a true Renaissance man, he embodied scientific spirit, artistic talent and humanist sensibilities. Exactly 500 years have passed since Leonardo died in his home at Château du Clos Lucé, outside Tours, France. Yet far from fading to insignificance, his thinking has carried down the centuries – and still surprises today

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Modern economic theory explains prehistoric Mediterranean societies

A Florida State University professor's research suggests a theory by famed economist Thomas Piketty on present-day wealth inequality actually explains a lot about how smaller-scale societies in the prehistoric Mediterranean developed.

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Directed evolution opens door to new antibiotics

In the ongoing arms race with humans and their antibiotics on one side, and bacteria with their ability to evolve defenses to antibiotics on the other, humans have enlisted a new ally—other bacteria.

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28 years old and closer than ever to the solving of the mistery of the Majorana particles

Gazibegović, Ph.D. candidate in the group of prof. Erik Bakkers at the department of Applied Physics, developed a device made of ultrathin networks of nanowires in the shape of "hashtags." This device allows pairs of Majorana particles to exchange position and keep track of the changes occurred, in a phenomenon known as "braiding." This event is considered as a striking proof of the existence of M

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How life on Earth affected its inner workings

It is well known that life on Earth and the geology of the planet are intertwined, but a new study provides fresh evidence for just how deep—literally—that connection goes. Geoscientists at Caltech and UC Berkeley have identified a chemical signature in igneous rocks recording the onset of oxygenation of Earth's deep oceans—a signal that managed to survive the furnace of the mantle. This oxygenati

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Nuclear conflict researchers want you to play this game

A new online game called SIGNAL lets you satisfy your appetite for virtual global domination while also helping researchers understand the risks of real-world nuclear conflict. Researchers designed the game to explore how various weapons capabilities, such as low-yield, high precision nuclear weapons, may affect the behavior of different actors in an escalating global conflict. Starting May 15, S

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Why the world needs a carbon tax

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Korroderede bærejern gør altaner livsfarlige

PLUS. De bærende dele af altaner opført i første halvdel af 1900-tallet kan være isoleret så dårligt, at altanerne risikerer at kollapse. Det viser erfaringerne fra en andelsboligforening i Vanløse.

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Project Mainline Is Google’s Latest Attempt to Fix Android Updates

If Google had known the mess Android updates would become, it probably would have taken a different approach to distribution. The post Project Mainline Is Google’s Latest Attempt to Fix Android Updates appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Drugs or no, ‘God encounters’ can ease fear of death

New research compares the effects of spontaneous God encounter experiences with those associated with psychedelic substances. Psilocybin-containing mushrooms and the Amazonian brew ayahuasca, for example, have both associated with triggering religious experiences. In a survey of thousands of people who reported having experienced personal encounters with God, researchers report that more than two

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Like submicroscopic spacecrafts: Graphene flakes to control neuron activity

Like in a science fiction novel, miniscule spacecrafts able to reach a specific site of the brain and influence the operation of specific types of neurons or drug delivery: Graphene flakes, the subject matter of the new study of the group of SISSA professor Laura Ballerini, open up truly futuristic horizons. With the researcher Rossana Rauti, Ballerini is responsible for the study recently publish

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Your Uber has arrived, on Wall Street

Uber's next stop is the stock market, where it hopes to pick up more investors willing to bet on a ride-hailing market brimming with potential and conspicuously lacking in profits.

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China’s One Belt, One Road plan carries environmental risks

China’s One Belt, One Road Initiative is a massive infrastructure project that aims to link countries along the old Silk Road routes with Europe. And it has immense implications for the environment, according to Alexander Pfaff. In this episode of the Policy 360 podcast, Pfaff, a professor in the economics department at Duke University, explains the potential environmental risks of the BRI and di

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The Way We Eat Now by Bee Wilson — quantity of quality

From the poverty-obesity link to how supply chains push for a dietary monoculture, it’s harder than ever to eat healthy

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Was Shakespeare a Woman?

On a spring night in 2018, I stood on a Manhattan sidewalk with friends, reading Shakespeare aloud. We were in line to see an adaptation of Macbeth and had decided to pass the time refreshing our memories of the play’s best lines. I pulled up Lady Macbeth’s soliloquy on my iPhone. “Come, you spirits / That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,” I read, thrilled once again by the incantatory pow

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Coca-Cola funds health research—and can kill the studies it doesn’t like

Health Companies use science to their advantage in both subtle and extreme ways. Coca-Cola and academic researchers often includes provisions that allow the company to review and exert varying amounts of control over the results of the studies they…

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How the Climate Plans of Presidential Hopefuls Stack Up

Scientists warn that governments have about 11 years to enact large-scale changes to stop global warming. The next administration will have even less time.

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Instagram is attempting to crack down on misinformation about vaccines

Instagram is trying to prevent misinformation about vaccinations spreading on the app by blocking hashtags that include "verifiably false" information

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'Fire streaks' ever more real in the collisions of atomic nuclei and protons

Collisions of lead nuclei take place under extreme physical conditions. Their course can be described using a model which assumes that the transforming, extremely hot matter—the quark-gluon plasma—flows in the form of hundreds of streaks. Until now, the "fire streaks" seemed to be purely theoretical structures. However, the latest analysis of collisions of individual protons reinforces the hypothe

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Patients blinded by stem cell therapy: an update

An update on the tragic results of unproven stem cell treatments to treat macular degeneration.

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Image of the Day: More Ribosomes

An increased production of ribosomes may underlie cell migration and relate to cancer metastasis, according to a new study.

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A Star in the Big Dipper Is an Alien Invader

The stellar oddball likely joined the Milky Way during a long-ago galaxy merger.

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Hummingbird robot uses AI to soon go where drones can't

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Wild red deer contribute to the preservation of open landscapes

Similar to farm animals such as cattle or sheep, wild red deer grazing in open landscapes can also contribute to the conservation of protected habitats. This was demonstrated by a research team from the University of Göttingen and the Institute for Wildlife Biology of Göttingen and Dresden. The results were published in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

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Study questions current regulations on light pollution and calls for paradigm shift

An international study involving researchers from the University of Granada (UGR), Spain, and the University of Krakow (Poland) has found that Spain's current regulations on light pollution are inadequate, as they fail to take into account all the necessary factors—including the key factor of human vision itself.

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Wild red deer contribute to the preservation of open landscapes

Similar to farm animals such as cattle or sheep, wild red deer grazing in open landscapes can also contribute to the conservation of protected habitats. This was demonstrated by a research team from the University of Göttingen and the Institute for Wildlife Biology of Göttingen and Dresden. The results were published in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

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Survival of the Grossest: 8 Disgusting Animal Behaviors

Poop-eating! Butt-gouging! Belly bombs! Snot spew!

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Apparently Medicine is Sorcery

According to Texas House Representative Jonathan Stickland, Texas pediatricians should mind their own business when it comes to vaccines, which, by the way, are sorcery. That some state representative is completely clueless should come as no surprise, nor that he exposes his cluelessness on Twitter . Here is the now infamous exchange: Prof Peter Hotez MD PhD @PeterHotez · May 7, 2019 New # vaccin

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Why the Area Around Notre Dame Is Now Coated with Toxic Levels of Lead

French officials warn that lead levels are sky-high around the burnt cathedral.

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An Herbal Sex Supplement Sent a Man's Blood Pressure Through the Roof

A man's blood pressure skyrocketed to dangerous levels after he took an herbal supplement touted for sexual enhancement.

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Europe 'takes too much of Earth resources'

Europeans are emitting too much carbon and using too much food and timber, a report says.

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The bird that came back from the dead

New research has shown that the last surviving flightless species of bird, a type of rail, in the Indian Ocean had previously gone extinct but rose from the dead thanks to a rare process called …

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Odyssey's three views of Martian moon Phobos

For the first time, NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter has caught the Martian moon Phobos during a full moon phase. Each color in this new image represents a temperature range detected by Odyssey's infrared camera, which has been studying the Martian moon since September of 2017. Looking like a rainbow-colored jawbreaker, these latest observations could help scientists understand what materials make up P

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Rare-Earth metals in the atmosphere of a glowing-hot exoplanet

KELT-9 b is the hottest exoplanet known to date. In the summer of 2018, a joint team of astronomers from the universities of Bern and Geneva found signatures of gaseous iron and titanium in its atmosphere. Now these researchers have also been able to detect traces of vaporized sodium, magnesium, chromium, and the rare-Earth metals scandium and yttrium.

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New water cycle on Mars discovered

Approximately every two Earth years, when it is summer on the southern hemisphere of Mars, a window opens: Only in this season can water vapor efficiently rise from the lower into the upper Martian atmosphere. There, winds carry the rare gas to the north pole. While part of the water vapor decays and escapes into space, the rest sinks back down near the poles. Researchers from the Moscow Institute

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Trump’s Bet on Kim Might Not Pay Off

President Donald Trump claimed his deal-making prowess and great relationship with Kim Jong Un had averted a devastating war and neutralized the threat from North Korea’s nuclear weapons. South Korean President Moon Jae In said he was building an “irreversible and lasting peace” on the Korean peninsula. What’s become glaringly obvious, however, is that all this progress was as provisional as Kim

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Jeff Bezos Has Plans to Extract the Moon’s Water

Between the shipping and handling, the web servers, the groceries, and the newspapers, Jeff Bezos never stopped thinking about the moon. He was 5 years old when Americans first walked on the lunar surface, and he remembers the grainy black-and-white footage from that historic moment. “It had a huge impact on me,” Bezos said. “And it hasn’t changed.” Bezos, in addition to leading Amazon and owning

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Copper oxide photocathodes: Laser experiment reveals location of efficiency loss

Solar cells and photocathodes made of copper oxide could theoretically attain high efficiencies for solar energy conversion. In practice, however, large losses occur. Now, a team at the HZB has been able to use a sophisticated femtosecond laser experiment to determine where these losses take place—not so much at the interfaces, but instead, far more in the interior of the crystalline material. The

8h

Only a third of Earth’s longest rivers still run free

Mapping millions of kilometers of waterways shows that just 37 percent of rivers longer than 1,000 kilometers remain unchained by human activities.

8h

Svenske S vil have et EU-center for cybersikkerhed

Svenske Socialdemokraterna vil arbejde for at få et samlet europæisk center for cybersikkerhed.

8h

Genomics uncovers the mystery of the magic drumstick tree—Moringa oleifera

The moringa (drumstick) tree has medicinal value and is a rich source of nutrients and minerals. Traditionally, its parts are known to confer multiple benefits, including anti-diabetic (leaves), cardio-protective (roots), anti-fertility (roots), anti-inflammatory (roots), anti-microbial (roots), anti-oxidative (leaves, flowers), anti-obesity (leaves) effects. Additionally, the seeds have been used

8h

Genomics uncovers the mystery of the magic drumstick tree—Moringa oleifera

The moringa (drumstick) tree has medicinal value and is a rich source of nutrients and minerals. Traditionally, its parts are known to confer multiple benefits, including anti-diabetic (leaves), cardio-protective (roots), anti-fertility (roots), anti-inflammatory (roots), anti-microbial (roots), anti-oxidative (leaves, flowers), anti-obesity (leaves) effects. Additionally, the seeds have been used

8h

Every country worldwide is now using the most effective polio vaccine

We may be on the brink of eradicating polio at last, now that Mongolia and Zimbabwe have added the inactivated polio vaccine to routine immunisations

8h

New to Blockchain: Turning In-Game Virtual Goods into Assets

Companies like Forte and Animoca want to use blockchain technology to allow players to trade skins and other in-app purchases.

8h

3 Mirrorless Cameras Tested: Canon EOS R, Sony A7III, Nikon Z6

Recent innovations—and several new entries—make mirrorless cameras a category worth watching.

8h

*Tolkien* Proves the Hobbits Are More Important Than the Man

In his new biopic, Dome Karukoski tells the story of J.R.R. Tolkien's early life, straining for connections that might be irrelevant.

8h

The Obsessive, Tumultuous Lives of SpaceX Rocket Chasers

In 2017 Ryan Chylinski quit his job and hit the road in a camper to photograph rockets. A full-time rocket chaser, he's helping dig up details on how SpaceX really works.

8h

Scientists discover a new class of single-atom nanozymes

Nanozymes—catalytic nanomaterials with enzyme-like characteristics—offer the advantage of low cost, high stability, tunable catalytic activity and ease of mass production. For these reasons, they have been widely applied in biosensing, therapeutics and environmental protection.

8h

Here Be Dragons

They appear across times and cultures—and our fascination with them may have both evolutionary and paleontological origins — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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People are calling for Zuckerberg’s resignation. Here are just five of the reasons why.

Facebook has been beset by scandals over the last year and many believe that nothing will change until its founder and CEO is gone.

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Robotic Traffic Cops

submitted by /u/kungfuchess [link] [comments]

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U.N. General Assembly President Sets Her Sights on Plastic Pollution

María Fernanda Espinosa Garcés is pushing internal action as well as changes within the U.N. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

U.N. General Assembly President Sets Her Sights on Plastic Pollution

María Fernanda Espinosa Garcés is pushing internal action as well as changes within the U.N. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

När utbildning blev en vara på marknaden

Sverige har länge varit känt utomlands för sitt goda utbildningssystem, som bland annat bidragit till social rörlighet och jämlikhet. I boken ”Neoliberalism and Market Forces in Education” presenterar dock forskare från olika vetenskapliga discipliner en mörkare bild av det svenska utbildningssystemet. – OECD har kritiserat Sverige för att utbildningssystemet är för marknadsorienterat och att det

9h

Bezos om sin nye månelander: Vi jagter mere energi til kloden

Verdens rigeste mand vil lande mennesker på månen i 2024 med sin nye lander Blue Moon. Et skridt i jagten på mere energi til menneskeheden, lød det.

9h

My liver, your kidney: the world's first non-identical organ swap

To get her mother a new kidney, Aliana Deveza instigated the world’s first swap of different organs between living donors, donating half her liver to a stranger

9h

Rare Asian black bear spotted in Korean DMZ

A rare Asiatic black bear has been photographed in the Demilitarized Zone dividing the two Koreas, Seoul's environmental ministry said.

9h

Minister promises clean Delhi air in three years

A top Indian minister has made an ambitious promise that the government will clean New Delhi's toxic air in the next three years.

9h

Ha Long heli: Vietnam launches chopper rides in famous bay

Most visitors to Vietnam's famed Ha Long Bay opt for cruise views of the UNESCO heritage site but from Friday tourists can hop on a helicopter to see the area's famous karst rock formations from the skies.

9h

Rare Asian black bear spotted in Korean DMZ

A rare Asiatic black bear has been photographed in the Demilitarized Zone dividing the two Koreas, Seoul's environmental ministry said.

9h

The Hustle Is a Lazy Gender Swap

What is the opposite of inspiration? I refer not to a simple lack of inspiration, mind you, but to a quality antithetical to ingenuity and originality. Whatever that quality is—I presume there must be a word for it in German— The Hustle is brimming with it. The movie is not merely uninspired, but sub-inspired, de-inspired, anti-inspired. It feels at times like the consummation of some wicked dare

9h

Trump’s Allies Want to Clintonize Joe Biden

Donald Trump is clearly spooked by Joe Biden —but some of the president’s supporters say there’s an easy solution: Make Biden out to be Hillary Clinton, just older and with a longer record of not getting things done in Washington. Go ahead and try , Biden and his advisers say, offering a list of reasons why they believe that strategy won’t work. Though an old white man is not a history-making can

9h

America’s Biggest Newspaper 70 Years Ago Sounded a Lot Like Trump Today

When Donald Trump was growing up in the 1950s, roughly half of the families in the New York metropolitan area read the New York Daily News . The tabloid was at the time the highest-circulation newspaper in America by far, selling more than 2 million copies each weekday and as many as 4 million on Sundays. In fact, no American newspaper has ever surpassed those numbers. But the News ’ dominance wa

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Does life feel too short? Get off your ass.

Explorer Erling Kagge is the first person to have completed the Three Poles Challenge on foot: the North Pole, the South Pole, and the summit of Mount Everest. The average American spends 4 hours each day on their phone. Imagine that 20% of it is productive. That still means that at the end of your life you'll have spent a cumulative 4,000 days on what Kagge calls "bullshit". Walking is the engin

9h

Forensic Friday: Can you spot the problem with this image?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the first of a new series, Forensic Friday. Take a look at the image … Continue reading Forensic Friday: Can you sp

9h

Ants, Humans, and the Warrior Instinct

Only humans and social insects like ants have populations that can explode into the millions. And the larger the population, the greater the capacity for warfare, from occasional raids and skirmishes among smaller groups to full-blown conflicts that can reach epic proportions and wipe out entire groups.

9h

How the University of Iowa Recovered From the ‘Unfathomable’ Flood That Ruined It

In 2008, the University of Iowa suffered a devastating flood. In a changing world, what happened next has lessons that go far beyond the Hawkeye state.

9h

He Crossed the Atlantic in a Barrel. We Asked Him About Dodging Ships and Using ‘La Toilette.’

The French adventurer Jean-Jacques Savin spent over four months alone, floating across the Atlantic Ocean. “It’s freedom,” he said.

9h

Times Insider: To Tell the Story of Biodiversity Loss, Make It About Humans

The authors of a sweeping United Nations report on species in danger of extinction faced the same question I often do in reporting: Why should anyone care about the loss of nature?

9h

Regionshospitalet Horsens får ny ledende overlæge

1. september tiltræder Martin Rostgaard-Knudsen som ledende overlæge på Regionshospitalet Horsens afdeling for Bedøvelse, Operation og Intensiv.

10h

42.000 års DNA afslører, at hesten er i genetisk krise

Forskere opdagede også en forhistorisk bestand af heste, vi ikke vidste eksisterede.

10h

Helge Ingstads skrog kan reddes

Den skandaleombruste fregat Helge Ingstad, der forliste i november, har ikke fået skader på skrogets form under hævningen. Dermed lader skroget til at kunne reddes.

10h

Magnonic Floquet Quantum Spin Hall Insulator in Bilayer Collinear Antiferromagnets

Magnonic Floquet Quantum Spin Hall Insulator in Bilayer Collinear Antiferromagnets Magnonic Floquet Quantum Spin Hall Insulator in Bilayer Collinear Antiferromagnets, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43702-9 Magnonic Floquet Quantum Spin Hall Insulator in Bilayer Collinear Antiferromagnets

10h

Predicting the decision making chemicals used for bacterial growth

Predicting the decision making chemicals used for bacterial growth Predicting the decision making chemicals used for bacterial growth, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43587-8 Predicting the decision making chemicals used for bacterial growth

10h

Dynamic Evaluation Indices in Spatial Learning and Memory of Rat Vascular Dementia in the Morris Water Maze

Dynamic Evaluation Indices in Spatial Learning and Memory of Rat Vascular Dementia in the Morris Water Maze Dynamic Evaluation Indices in Spatial Learning and Memory of Rat Vascular Dementia in the Morris Water Maze, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43738-x Dynamic Evaluation Indices in Spatial Learning and Memory of Rat Vascular Dementia in the Morris Water Maze

10h

New approach to investigate Common Variable Immunodeficiency patients using spectrochemical analysis of blood

New approach to investigate Common Variable Immunodeficiency patients using spectrochemical analysis of blood New approach to investigate Common Variable Immunodeficiency patients using spectrochemical analysis of blood, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43196-5 New approach to investigate Common Variable Immunodeficiency patients using spectrochemical analysis of blood

10h

Genetic inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation at serine 522 promotes axonal regeneration after optic nerve injury

Genetic inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation at serine 522 promotes axonal regeneration after optic nerve injury Genetic inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation at serine 522 promotes axonal regeneration after optic nerve injury, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43658-w Genetic inhibition of CRMP2 phosphorylation at serine 522 promotes axonal regeneration after optic nerve injury

10h

Graphene Quantum Dots Decorated Gold-Polyaniline Nanowire for Impedimetric Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen

Graphene Quantum Dots Decorated Gold-Polyaniline Nanowire for Impedimetric Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen Graphene Quantum Dots Decorated Gold-Polyaniline Nanowire for Impedimetric Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43740-3 Graphene Quantum Dots Decorated Gold-Polyaniline Nanowire for Impedimetric Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antig

10h

Assessing matrix quality by Raman spectroscopy helps predict fracture toughness of human cortical bone

Assessing matrix quality by Raman spectroscopy helps predict fracture toughness of human cortical bone Assessing matrix quality by Raman spectroscopy helps predict fracture toughness of human cortical bone, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43542-7 Assessing matrix quality by Raman spectroscopy helps predict fracture toughness of human cortical bone

10h

Populations of the coral species Montastraea cavernosa on the Belize Barrier Reef lack vertical connectivity

Populations of the coral species Montastraea cavernosa on the Belize Barrier Reef lack vertical connectivity Populations of the coral species Montastraea cavernosa on the Belize Barrier Reef lack vertical connectivity, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43479-x Populations of the coral species Montastraea cavernosa on the Belize Barrier Reef lack vertical connectivity

10h

Nye diabetesmidler bidrager til ­væsentlig stigning i omsætning

Stigende salg af lægemidler som semaglutid og empagliflozin er årsag til, at diabetesmidler er blandt de lægemiddelgrupper, der har haft den største stigning i omsætning.

10h

Sjællandsk tilbud til psykisk syge diabetespatienter

Samarbejde mellem psykiatere og endokrinologer på en fælles klinik skal styrke indsatsen over for psykiatriske patienter med diabetes og forstadier til diabetes. Indsatsen skal øge sundheden for en meget udsat gruppe borgere, mener Christina A. Buchholt, der skal lede den kommende klinik

10h

Mere fokus på kroniske sygdomme skal ­hjælpe patienter med svær ­psykisk sygdom

Forskningsprojekt vil undersøge muligheden for at reducere overdødeligheden blandt personer med svær psykisk sygdom ved at sætte ind over for underdiagnosticering og underbehandling af kroniske sygdomme som diabetes.

10h

Rekordmycket storspigg i Östersjön

Tidigare har storspiggens roll i Östersjöns ekosystem varit relativt okänd. Flera studier under senare år har dock visat att arten kan påverka rekryteringen av rovfiskar som gädda och abborre längs kusten, dels genom att spiggen äter rovfiskens ägg och yngel, och dels genom att storspigg, unga abborrar och unga gäddor konkurrerar om samma föda. Storspiggen kan också förstärka övergödningens effek

10h

Selvkørende busser og pessimistisk Femern-prognose

Mens selvkørende busser og lastbiler er på vej ud i trafikken i flere nabolande, er et dansk projekt på DTU blevet indstillet. Ministerium indrømmer, at systemet til digitale vælgererklæringer er fejldesignet. Ny prognose rejser tvivl om Femern-trafiktal.

10h

Seks skarpe til Peder Hvelplund

Sundhedsvæsenet er så presset at det nærmer sig et kollaps, siger Peder Hvelplund (Ø). Se hvordan han ville fordele 10 mia. kr. ekstra til sundhedsvæsenet.

11h

Forskere: Månen kan stamme fra et flydende magmaocean på Jorden

PLUS. Japanske forskere lancerer ny forklaring på, hvorfor Månen ligner Jorden næsten alt for meget

11h

Crowdfunding brings life-saving water to Myanmar's deer

A herd of endangered deer wait under the shade of one of the sparse trees in this parched central Myanmar landscape, watching as rangers dispatch drinking water—a life-saving resource funded by wellwishers across the country.

11h

Why does Facebook fail to fix itself? It's partly humans

The question comes up over and over, with extremist material, hate speech, election meddling and privacy invasions. Why can't Facebook just fix it?

11h

Crowdfunding brings life-saving water to Myanmar's deer

A herd of endangered deer wait under the shade of one of the sparse trees in this parched central Myanmar landscape, watching as rangers dispatch drinking water—a life-saving resource funded by wellwishers across the country.

11h

Seks skarpe til Liselott Blixt

Arbejdsmiljøet er i bund i sundhedsvæsenet, vurderer Liselott Blixt (DF). Se hvem hendes yndlingslæge og hadelæge er.

12h

»Jeg ville ønske, at vi kunne tilbyde det samme til alle de hårdest ramte patienter i psykiatrien«

Når psykiatrien bliver nævnt, er det sjældent for det gode. Alligevel har Dansk Folkepartis sundhedsordfører, Liselott Blixt, inviteret Dagens Medicin med på Sct. Hans for vise, hvordan et sundhedsvæsen – skabt i hendes billede – skal tage sig ud.

12h

12h

Forskere genfinder glemt islamisk litteratur i Afrikas Horn

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har gennem de sidste fem år opsporet flere end 2.000 manuskripter…

12h

The race to beat antibiotic resistance is on – so where do phages fit in? | Richard James

The GM virus treatment that saved Isabelle Holdaway is a start, at least, in the fight against drug resistance The first antibiotic was discovered by Paul Ehrlich in 1909 and cured syphilis-infected rabbits. At that time about 10% of the population of London were infected with syphilis and there were no effective treatments. Despite the tedious injection procedure and side effects, Salvarsan, toge

12h

Färgseende i svagt ljus

Vi har i våra ögon färgkänsliga celler (tappar) av tre olika slag, med vilka vi kan se färger i starkt ljus, och dessutom en celler av en ljuskänsligare sort (stavar) med vilkas hjälp vi kan se också i svagare belysning, men utan att kunna skilja på färger. Enligt en artikel i tidskriften Science av Zuzana Musilova m.fl. kan en del djuphavsfiskar särskilja färger i svagt ljus med hjälp av olika sl

12h

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Initial plans for moon colonization have started.

submitted by /u/perldawg [link] [comments]

12h

How the creators of a database are stamping out all-male panels

How the creators of a database are stamping out all-male panels How the creators of a database are stamping out all-male panels, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01500-3 Developers of ‘Request a Woman Scientist’ hope that its 10,000 participants can help to boost gender diversity in scientific talks and in the media.

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12h

Python patrols stalk Florida swamps to staunch marauding serpents

Along with the venomous lionfish, the Burmese python is perhaps the least welcome invasive species in Florida: lacking any natural predators, it has happily chomped its way through the state's wildlife.

12h

Python patrols stalk Florida swamps to staunch marauding serpents

Along with the venomous lionfish, the Burmese python is perhaps the least welcome invasive species in Florida: lacking any natural predators, it has happily chomped its way through the state's wildlife.

12h

Japanese man jailed for smuggling insects from Ecuador

A Japanese man was sentenced to two years in prison in Ecuador for attempting to smuggle a massive haul of creepy crawlies out of the country, officials said Thursday.

13h

News Corp shows third quarter profit

Rupert Murdoch's mass media and publishing company News Corp posted a third quarter net profit of $23 million Thursday, boosted by its HarperCollins book division.

13h

Mexico's prized beaches threatened by smelly algae invasion

Tourists looking for sun and sand in Mexican resorts like Cancun, Playa del Carmen and Tulum have been disgusted by foul-smelling mounds of sargassum—a seaweed-like algae—piling up on beaches and turning turquoise waters brown, and experts are warning that it may be the new normal.

13h

Student 'geek squads' maintain school devices, help teachers

Buffalo kindergarten teacher Maria Spurlock was still struggling after trying for more than a week to get a reading app working on all of her classroom iPads. When she learned her building had a new team of technical experts, she put in a request for help.

13h

Japanese man jailed for smuggling insects from Ecuador

A Japanese man was sentenced to two years in prison in Ecuador for attempting to smuggle a massive haul of creepy crawlies out of the country, officials said Thursday.

13h

You May Not Need to Have Sex to Transmit Gonorrhea, New Study Suggests

"Additional treatment options are urgently needed."

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Study explores the use of robots and artificial intelligence to understand the deep-sea

Artificial intelligence (AI) could help scientists shed new light on the variety of species living on the ocean floor, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth.

13h

Lunar tunnel engineers excited by boring Moon colonies

As space agencies prepare to return humans to the Moon, top engineers are racing to design a tunnel boring machine capable of digging underground colonies for the first lunar inhabitants.

13h

Study explores the use of robots and artificial intelligence to understand the deep-sea

Artificial intelligence (AI) could help scientists shed new light on the variety of species living on the ocean floor, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth.

13h

Ulven er kommet

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13h

Ung læge vil være stifinder i sundheds­junglen

PORTRÆT. Som læge, forsker, kommunikatør og podcastvært er hun overalt. Sundhedsformidler og bogaktuelle Ida Donkin er en ung, kvindelig læge, der kæmper mod misinformation og vil gøre verden bedre.

13h

Overflytning af diabetespatienter er langt fra målet

Regionerne og PLO aftalte i 2017, at 25.000 patienter med type 2-diabetes skal overflyttes til almen praksis inden 1. juli 2020, men der er langt til målet. Efteruddannelse og nye måder at arbejde på i almen praksis kan fremme overflytningen, mener Diabetesforeningen.

13h

Om fodbold og sundhedspolitik

KRONIK. Hvordan får man politikerne til at stole på lægevidenskaben? Det gælder om at gøre videnskabelig tænkning populær. Hvis politikerne fornemmer, at folk vil have videnskabsbaseret sundhedspolitik, så skal det nok komme. Tillæring af kritisk tænkning kan med fordel starte i folkeskolen.

13h

UCLA hunts whistleblowers as student accuses dentistry dean of sexual harassment

A UCLA dentistry student writes in a leaked letter: " I was having disagreements with my research mentor, and thought that Dr. Tetradis could help. Instead, he distorted the issues to attack my mentor, and sexually harassed me. When I filed the Title IX complaint, his powerful colleagues discouraged me from filing."

13h

Climate change responsible for severe infectious disease in UK frogs

Climate change has already increased the spread and severity of a fatal disease caused by Ranavirus that infects common frogs (Rana temporaria) in the UK, according to research led by ZSL's Institute of Zoology, UCL and Queen Mary University of London published today in Global Change Biology.

13h

Climate change responsible for severe infectious disease in UK frogs

Climate change has already increased the spread and severity of a fatal disease caused by Ranavirus that infects common frogs (Rana temporaria) in the UK, according to research led by ZSL's Institute of Zoology, UCL and Queen Mary University of London published today in Global Change Biology.

13h

New method developed to detect and trace homemade bombs

Researchers at King's College London, in collaboration with Northumbria University, have developed a new way of detecting homemade explosives which will help forensic scientists trace where it came from.

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Climate change responsible for severe infectious disease in UK frogs

Climate change has already increased the spread and severity of a fatal disease caused by Ranavirus that infects common frogs (Rana temporaria) in the UK, according to research led by ZSL's Institute of Zoology, UCL and Queen Mary University of London published today in Global Change Biology.

14h

Climate change: How frogs could vanish from ponds

Climate change is having an impact on British wildlife, say scientists mapping a deadly frog disease.

14h

Nation Building at Gunpoint

SAMARRA, Iraq—There’s only one way in and out of this predominantly Sunni Muslim city: through the checkpoints of the Saraya al-Salam, one of Iraq’s most fearsome Shia militias. Samarra gained notoriety in 2006 as ground zero of Iraq’s sectarian civil war, and more recently as the hometown of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the leader of the Islamic State. In recent years, however, a remarkable calm has ta

14h

Fox News made the US a hotbed of climate denial. Kids are the cure.

A new 23-country survey conducted by the YouGov-Cambridge Globalism Projec t found that America has the highest percentage of climate denial among first-world nations, behind only Indonesia and Saudi Arabia in all the countries surveyed. A total of 13 percent of Americans responded that “human activity is not responsible at all” for climate change, 5 percent denied that the climate is even changi

14h

Nature’s Dangerous Decline ‘Unprecedented’; Species Extinction Rates ‘Accelerating’

This is a media release from ipbes Nature is declining globally at rates unprecedented in human history — and the rate of species extinctions is accelerating, with grave impacts on people around the world now likely, warns a landmark new report from the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services ( IPBES ), the summary of which was approved at the 7th session

14h

Former climate 'denier' regrets 'how wrongheaded but certain I was'

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Karin Kirk John Kaiser wheeled a cart with a TV and VCR into the lobby of an academic building on the campus of the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, popped in a well-worn VHS cassette, and played a video extolling the virtues of an atmosphere rich in CO2. “It was a video that was made to look like a news show; there were people who looked

14h

The problem with sex – Science Weekly podcast

Access to help for sexual problems is patchy and many fear the consequences of cuts to sexual health services could be profound. Nicola Davis investigates Please note: this podcast contains discussion of sexual abuse In the UK, sexual dysfunction is far from rare: 42% of men and 51% of women reported having at least one sexual problem that lasted three months or more in the past year. Access to h

14h

The problem with sex – Science Weekly podcast

Access to help for sexual problems is patchy and many fear the consequences of cuts to sexual health services could be profound. Nicola Davis investigates Please note: this podcast contains discussion of sexual abuse. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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Climate change: Scientists test radical ways to fix Earth's climate

Researchers plan for new centre to explore refreezing the poles, sucking out CO2 and ocean greening.

14h

Country diary: the emperor moth homes in on a potential mate

Allendale, Northumberland: Less than a minute from setting out the lure, there’s a rustling like crumpled dry paper and a blur of wings The sun-warmed heather of Dryburn Moor stretches away, rust-coloured and hummocky, to a soft horizon of uplands, woods and fields. There’s little breeze and clouds barely move in a hazy sky. The right conditions for seeing emperor moths . Related: Hunting for mot

15h

Unpacking the links: Chronic stress, fertility and the 'hunger hormone'

A new study suggests high levels of the hormone ghrelin, which stimulates appetite and is also released during stress, could be harmful to some aspects of reproductive function.

15h

Study explores the use of robots and artificial intelligence to understand the deep-sea

Artificial intelligence (AI) could help scientists shed new light on the variety of species living on the ocean floor, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth.

15h

»Et sundhedshus skal ikke være et bofællesskab for læger«

Integrerede sundhedshuse og permanente regionsklinikker er en del af løsningen for et sundhedsvæsen, der er blevet mindre effektivt af de senere års produktivitetspres, mener Enhedslisten. Partiets sundhedsordfører, Peder Hvelplund, har inviteret Dagens Medicin med til Skive for at vise, hvilket sundhedsvæsen han vil skabe.

15h

Here Be Dragons

They appear across times and cultures—and our fascination with them may have both evolutionary and paleontological origins — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Skal krypteringsfolk frygte kvantecomputere?

Eksisterende krypteringsteknologi kan være nem at bryde, når kvantecomputerne er klar. Men hvornår er det?

16h

Tusindvis af altaner kan være livsfarlige

PLUS. En københavnsk bolig­forening fandt så graverende rust og korrosion på deres altaner, at de måtte afspærres og siden rives ned. Både rådgiveren og Byggeskadefonden siger, at det er nødvendigt at kontrollere tilsvarende altaner.

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Just add water: Salt battery could help renewable energy use

submitted by /u/ChickenTeriyakiBoy1 [link] [comments]

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Jeff Bezos wants to save Earth by moving industry to space

submitted by /u/Aeromarine_eng [link] [comments]

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Global Health: Gilead Will Donate Truvada to U.S. for H.I.V. Prevention

The manufacturer will provide enough of the drug to supply 200,000 patients annually for more than a decade. Critics said it would not be enough to end the AIDS epidemic and questioned the company’s motives.

18h

Suppressor screening reveals common kleisin-hinge interaction in condensin and cohesin, but different modes of regulation [Genetics]

Cohesin and condensin play fundamental roles in sister chromatid cohesion and chromosome segregation, respectively. Both consist of heterodimeric structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits, which possess a head (containing ATPase) and a hinge, intervened by long coiled coils. Non-SMC subunits (Cnd1, Cnd2, and Cnd3 for condensin; Rad21, Psc3, and Mis4…

18h

Objecting to experiments that compare two unobjectionable policies or treatments [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Randomized experiments have enormous potential to improve human welfare in many domains, including healthcare, education, finance, and public policy. However, such “A/B tests” are often criticized on ethical grounds even as similar, untested interventions are implemented without objection. We find robust evidence across 16 studies of 5,873 participants from three…

18h

Applying causal models to explore the mechanism of action of simvastatin in progressive multiple sclerosis [Neuroscience]

Understanding the mode of action of drugs is a challenge with conventional methods in clinical trials. Here, we aimed to explore whether simvastatin effects on brain atrophy and disability in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) are mediated by reducing cholesterol or are independent of cholesterol. We applied structural equation models…

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Structure of lipoprotein lipase in complex with GPIHBP1 [Biochemistry]

Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) plays a central role in triglyceride (TG) metabolism. By catalyzing the hydrolysis of TGs present in TG-rich lipoproteins (TRLs), LPL facilitates TG utilization and regulates circulating TG and TRL concentrations. Until very recently, structural information for LPL was limited to homology models, presumably due to the propensity…

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Emergence of stable striatal D1R and D2R neuronal ensembles with distinct firing sequence during motor learning [Neuroscience]

The dorsolateral striatum (DLS) is essential for motor and procedure learning, but the role of DLS spiny projection neurons (SPNs) of direct and indirect pathways, as marked, respectively, by D1 and D2 receptor (D1R and D2R) expression, remains to be clarified. Long-term two-photon calcium imaging of the same neuronal population…

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Self-assembly of biological networks via adaptive patterning revealed by avian intradermal muscle network formation [Developmental Biology]

Networked structures integrate numerous elements into one functional unit, while providing a balance between efficiency, robustness, and flexibility. Understanding how biological networks self-assemble will provide insights into how these features arise. Here, we demonstrate how nature forms exquisite muscle networks that can repair, regenerate, and adapt to external perturbations using…

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Elasticity of individual protocadherin 15 molecules implicates tip links as the gating springs for hearing [Neuroscience]

Hair cells, the sensory receptors of the inner ear, respond to mechanical forces originating from sounds and accelerations. An essential feature of each hair cell is an array of filamentous tip links, consisting of the proteins protocadherin 15 (PCDH15) and cadherin 23 (CDH23), whose tension is thought to directly gate…

18h

RNA ligands activate the Machupo virus polymerase and guide promoter usage [Microbiology]

Segmented negative-sense (SNS) RNA viruses initiate infection by delivering into cells a suite of genomic RNA segments, each sheathed by the viral nucleocapsid protein and bound by the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRP). For the orthomyxovirus influenza and the bunyavirus La Crosse, the 5′ end of the genomic RNA binds as a…

18h

Crystal structures of Ca2+-calmodulin bound to NaV C-terminal regions suggest role for EF-hand domain in binding and inactivation [Biochemistry]

Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) and calcium channels (CaV) form targets for calmodulin (CaM), which affects channel inactivation properties. A major interaction site for CaM resides in the C-terminal (CT) region, consisting of an IQ domain downstream of an EF-hand domain. We present a crystal structure of fully Ca2+-occupied CaM, bound to…

18h

Activation of PASK by mTORC1 is required for the onset of the terminal differentiation program [Cell Biology]

During skeletal muscle regeneration, muscle stem cells (MuSCs) respond to multiple signaling inputs that converge onto mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathways. mTOR function is essential for establishment of the differentiation-committed progenitors (early stage of differentiation, marked by the induction of myogenin expression), myotube fusion, and, ultimately,…

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Serotonin regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and function in rodent cortical neurons via the 5-HT2A receptor and SIRT1-PGC-1{alpha} axis [Neuroscience]

Mitochondria in neurons, in addition to their primary role in bioenergetics, also contribute to specialized functions, including regulation of synaptic transmission, Ca2+ homeostasis, neuronal excitability, and stress adaptation. However, the factors that influence mitochondrial biogenesis and function in neurons remain poorly elucidated. Here, we identify an important role for serotonin…

18h

Generation, transcriptome profiling, and functional validation of cone-rich human retinal organoids [Cell Biology]

Rod and cone photoreceptors are light-sensing cells in the human retina. Rods are dominant in the peripheral retina, whereas cones are enriched in the macula, which is responsible for central vision and visual acuity. Macular degenerations affect vision the most and are currently incurable. Here we report the generation, transcriptome…

18h

Multiscale poromechanics of wet cement paste [Applied Physical Sciences]

Capillary effects, such as imbibition drying cycles, impact the mechanics of granular systems over time. A multiscale poromechanics framework was applied to cement paste, which is the most common building material, experiencing broad humidity variations over the lifetime of infrastructure. First, the liquid density distribution at intermediate to high relative…

18h

Possible observation of quantum spin-nematic phase in a frustrated magnet [Physics]

Water freezes into ice in winter and evaporates into vapor in summer. Scientifically, the transformations between solid, liquid, and gas are called phase transitions and can be classified through the changes in symmetry which occur in each case. A fourth phase of matter was discovered late in the 19th century:…

18h

Humans adapt to social diversity over time [Social Sciences]

Humans have evolved cognitive processes favoring homogeneity, stability, and structure. These processes are, however, incompatible with a socially diverse world, raising wide academic and political concern about the future of modern societies. With data comprising 22 y of religious diversity worldwide, we show across multiple surveys that humans are inclined…

18h

Effects of {alpha}-tubulin acetylation on microtubule structure and stability [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Acetylation of K40 in α-tubulin is the sole posttranslational modification to mark the luminal surface of microtubules. It is still controversial whether its relationship with microtubule stabilization is correlative or causative. We have obtained high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions of pure samples of αTAT1-acetylated and SIRT2-deacetylated microtubules to visualize

18h

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Jeff Bezos unveils Moon lander concept

Blue Origins claims that the lunar lander will be able to take humans to the Moon's south pole by 2024.

19h

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New method developed to detect and trace homemade bombs

Researchers at King's College London, in collaboration with Northumbria University, have developed a new way of detecting homemade explosives which will help forensic scientists trace where it came from.

19h

From space, spring storminess looks like a boiling cauldron of atmospheric stew

And the stew is now boiling more vigorously: Heavy precipitation events have grown stronger and more frequent over the long run With big, boiling thunderstorms spewing hail and spawning tornadoes in the Southern Plains and beyond even as snow once again falls elsewhere, the weather sure does seem wild and weird this week. Spring often brings a meteorological roller coaster ride, thanks to the tens

19h

In Antarctica, Where Penguins Poop, Life Blooms

Penguins love company — some colonies of the flightless bird boast numbers over 1 million. And with squads that can run that deep, you can be sure they make a mess of things, if you know what I mean. (Hint: I’m talking about poop.) But penguin waste isn’t just messy, it can be useful, too. Researchers have used it to help spot colonies in the past. Now, it seems that poop might be good for somethi

19h

Bezos Unveils Bold Plans for Human Spaceflight, Plus a 'Blue Moon' Lander

On Thursday, Blue Origin founder and Amazon owner Jeff Bezos unveiled the Blue Moon lander, a spacecraft that can deliver up to 6.5 tons of cargo – and possibly crew – to the lunar surface. The announcement was made at a news conference in Washington, D.C. Along with Blue Moon, he revealed his new BE-7 rocket for the lander, which he says has been in development for three years. If all goes accord

19h

Tiny Spacecraft Tested As Part of Breakthrough Starshot Plan For Interstellar Travel

The first human-made spacecraft to reach another star system might fit in the palm of your hand. That’s the design engineers from the University of California, Santa Barbara are working on. The tiny craft, which weighs about as much same as a stick of gum, had its first test flight in April, where it soared more than 100,000 feet in the air. Its creators hope its successor will one day fly in spac

19h

Justice Department charges Chinese hacking group for Anthem breach

On Thursday, the Justice Department charged a Chinese hacking group with carrying out one of the largest criminal hacks in United States health care history that resulted in 79 …

19h

Bad Air Linked To Dementia, Bezos' Lunar Lander, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

19h

New analysis predicts top U.S. counties at risk for measles outbreaks

A new analysis identified 25 United States counties that are most likely to experience measles outbreaks in 2019. The analysis combined international air travel volume, non-medical exemptions from childhood vaccinations, population data and reported measles outbreak information.

19h

Bagsiden: Piet Hein opfandt ikke superellipsen

Ugens Old News: En 1.750 mio år gammel idé

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Fewer years of ‘healthy life’ for older adults with obesity

Older adults with obesity may have fewer years of remaining life without limits in physical function or daily living activities, research finds. “Among older adults, physical function of the upper and lower extremities and the ability to perform activities of daily living are key for their day to day functioning, and thus important indicators of health,” says Rahul Malhotra, an assistant professo

19h

Secrets of fluorescent microalgae could lead to super-efficient solar cells

Tiny light-emitting microalgae, found in the ocean, could hold the secret to the next generation of organic solar cells, according to new research.

19h

Finnish researchers discover a new moth family

Two moth species new to science belonging to a previously unknown genus and family have been found in Kazakhstan, constituting an exceptional discovery.

19h

Secrets of fluorescent microalgae could lead to super-efficient solar cells

Tiny light-emitting microalgae, found in the ocean, could hold the secret to the next generation of organic solar cells, according to new research.

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Jeff Bezos launches plan for moon vehicle

Amazon founder plots multigenerational bid to build colonies for humans in space

20h

The Atlantic Daily: Should One Platform Have All That Power?

What We’re Following (Stephen Lam / Reuters) What would breaking up Facebook actually accomplish? Chris Hughes, who co-founded the social-media platform with his Harvard roommate Mark Zuckerberg, called for the government to break up the company in a New York Times op-ed. Hughes’s proposal is a gargantuan one in scope, suggesting that the company’s staggering amount of power can be curtailed by s

20h

A.I. ‘QuizBot’ beats flashcard apps for learning

A chatbot researchers have dubbed “QuizBot” can be significantly more effective than flashcards in helping students learn and retain information. In a study with 36 students learning with either a flashcard app or a QuizBot, the team found that students correctly recalled over 25 percent more right answers for content covered in QuizBot and spent more than 2.6 times longer studying with QuizBot v

20h

The elite soldiers protecting the Amazon rainforest

The Amazon is at risk from mining in French Guiana and it is the French Foreign Legion's job to protect it.

20h

Plush toys with tendons bend and move

Researchers have used computationally controlled knitting machines to create plush toys and other objects that bend and move with tendons. It’s an approach they say might someday help to cost-effectively make soft robots and wearable technologies. Software the researchers developed makes it possible for the objects to emerge from the knitting machines in their desired shapes and with tendons alre

20h

Hummingbird robot uses AI to soon go where drones can't

Researchers have engineered flying robots that behave like hummingbirds, trained by machine learning algorithms based on various techniques the bird uses naturally every day.

20h

To cheat or not to cheat? Researchers uncover the moral dilemmas of doping

Elite athletes are less likely to take banned substances if they consider the morality of what they are doing, and not just the health consequences of doping, according to a new study led by the University of Birmingham and funded by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA).

20h

Jeff Bezos just unveiled a giant lunar lander that he says is 'going to the moon'

submitted by /u/running_with_swords [link] [comments]

20h

Jeff Bezos reportedly set to unveil Moon plans today

submitted by /u/stevestgermain [link] [comments]

20h

Hummingbird robot uses AI to soon go where drones can't

Researchers have engineered flying robots that behave like hummingbirds, trained by machine learning algorithms based on various techniques the bird uses naturally every day.

20h

You'll Soon Be Able to Run Linux Apps on Any Chromebook

Google's ChromeOS has its roots in Linux, but until now you could only run some Linux apps on some Chromebooks.

20h

‘Daywake’ gene keeps flies from napping

Researchers found a gene—called “daywake”—in fruit flies that, in cool weather, suppresses the flies’ tendency to take a daytime nap. The gene presumably activates in cool weather so they can spend additional time seeking food or mates. The discovery shed light on the biology that helps many creatures, including humans, balance the benefits of a good nap against those of getting important activit

20h

If You Still Aren’t Using A VPN, This is The Deal You’ve Been Waiting For

If you know anything about online privacy and security, you probably know you should already be using a VPN to protect yourself and your family from online threats. And yet if you’re reading this right now, chances are you haven’t gotten around to it for one reason or another. Luckily, with the deal you’re about to get from NordVPN , you are officially out of excuses. Take a moment to think about

20h

Uncle Syd and His Worms

Anybody, who does biological research using a model organism, especially those using an invertebrate, has quite invariably come across a certain prevalent hotchpotch of disbelief, cynicism and a reasonably uncomfortable amount of derision in the minds of their peers about the tiny creatures that they use to study biology. “So, these flies really have brains?” […]

20h

Meditation needs more research: Study finds 25 percent suffer unpleasant experiences

More than a quarter of people who regularly meditate have had a 'particularly unpleasant' psychological experience related to the practice, including feelings of fear and distorted emotions, a new study has found.

20h

Do most Americans believe in human-caused climate change?

A survey of more than 7,000 U.S. adults finds that three format changes produce significant changes in estimates of acceptance of human-caused climate change.

20h

Copper oxide photocathodes: Laser experiment reveals location of efficiency loss

Solar cells and photocathodes made of copper oxide might in theory attain high efficiencies for solar energy conversion. In practice, however, large losses occur. Now researchers has been able to use a sophisticated femtosecond laser experiment to determine where these losses take place: not so much at the interfaces, but instead far more in the interior of the crystalline material. These results

20h

The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology and The Lancet Respiratory Medicine: Whole body MRI may help to detect spread of cancers more quickly

Trials with people with newly-diagnosed colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer suggest that whole body MRI could reduce the time it takes to diagnose the stage of cancers. The results are from two prospective trials with nearly 500 patients across 16 UK hospitals, published in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology and The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journals.

21h

New analysis predicts top 25 US counties at risk for measles outbreaks

A new analysis co-led by The Johns Hopkins University identified 25 United States counties that are most likely to experience measles outbreaks in 2019. The analysis combined international air travel volume, non-medical exemptions from childhood vaccinations, population data and reported measles outbreak information.

21h

Jeff Bezos announces plans for delivery service to the moon by 2024

Space flight company Blue Origin unveiled a new lunar lander that the firm says will deliver scientific instruments, rovers and astronauts to the moon

21h

Kissing may be a neglected route for passing on throat gonorrhoea

Australian study reveals risks for gay and bisexual men. Andrew Masterson reports.

21h

Jeff Bezos wants to solve all our problems by shipping us to the moon

Space But Blue Origin has a lot of work to do before its lander can touch down. “This vehicle is going to the moon.” Bezos told the event’s attendees. But whether the company can make good on those declarations in the next five years remains to be…

21h

Publisher Correction: Resonant electro-optic frequency comb

Publisher Correction: Resonant electro-optic frequency comb Publisher Correction: Resonant electro-optic frequency comb, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1220-5 Publisher Correction: Resonant electro-optic frequency comb

21h

Publisher Correction: Electron magnetic reconnection without ion coupling in Earth’s turbulent magnetosheath

Publisher Correction: Electron magnetic reconnection without ion coupling in Earth’s turbulent magnetosheath Publisher Correction: Electron magnetic reconnection without ion coupling in Earth’s turbulent magnetosheath, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1208-1 Publisher Correction: Electron magnetic reconnection without ion coupling in Earth’s turbulent magnetosheath

21h

A sea-level plateau preceding the Marine Isotope Stage 2 minima revealed by Australian sediments

A sea-level plateau preceding the Marine Isotope Stage 2 minima revealed by Australian sediments A sea-level plateau preceding the Marine Isotope Stage 2 minima revealed by Australian sediments, Published online: 10 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42573-4 A sea-level plateau preceding the Marine Isotope Stage 2 minima revealed by Australian sediments

21h

Jeff Bezos Unveils Blue Origin's Prototype of a Lunar Lander

The Amazon founder today revealed the details of Blue Moon, the lander he will use to ferry supplies—and eventually humans—to the lunar surface.

21h

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