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nyheder2019maj13

18h

Miljøstyrelsen har givet dispensation til 17 forbudte pesticider år efter år

PLUS. EU’s regler for dispensationer gør det ellers klart, at der kun må gives dispensation til et forbudt pesticid, hvis der er tale om en nødsituation.

15h

Common food additive found to affect gut microbiota

Experts call for better regulation of a common additive in foods and medicine, as research reveals it can impact the gut microbiota and contribute to inflammation in the colon, which could trigger diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer.

3h

Signals to noise in acoustic vehicles alerting systems

If you've ever wished for a quieter commute, you may be in luck: The low-emission electric vehicles of tomorrow are expected to lower noise pollution as well as air pollution. In Europe, and across the world, the prospect of a future powered by environmentally friendly electric vehicles is leading experts to consider the benefits—and the risks—of quieter traffic.

5min

Uber gets hit again; shares below $40

Uber shares are down 7% and trading below $40 before the opening bell.

9min

Psychologists once linked autism to schizophrenia—and blamed moms for both

Science Excerpt: Mind Fixers A new industry of psychoanalytic parent blaming grew up in the 1960s and ’70s, alongside the new biochemistry work that was supposed to put it out of business. It was…

16min

A step for a promising new battery to store clean energy

Researchers have built a more efficient, more reliable potassium-oxygen battery, a step toward a potential solution for energy storage on the nation's power grid and longer-lasting batteries in cell phones and laptops.

31min

Brain researchers seek 'fingerprints' of severe mental diseases

McLean Hospital investigates brain network connectivity in patients with psychotic disorders.

31min

Flu virus' best friend: Low humidity

Yale researchers have pinpointed a key reason why people are more likely to get sick and even die from flu during winter months: low humidity.

31min

Bladder drug linked to atherosclerosis in mice

A drug used in the treatment of overactive bladder can accelerate atheroclerosis in mice, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). According to the researchers, the results suggest that in some cases the drug might potentially increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke in humans.

31min

A new treatment for stroke in mice reduces brain damage and promotes motor recovery

New research shows that brain fluids can be normalized with adrenergic receptor antagonists, a combination of drugs to block the activity of (nor)adrenaline in the brain. This experimental treatment for stroke aided motor recovery and reduced cell death in mice, as reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences om May 13, 2019.

31min

Measuring chromosome imbalance could clarify cancer prognosis

Researchers have found that higher levels of aneuploidy lead to much greater lethality among prostate cancer patients. This suggest a mechanism for how some prostate cancers become lethal, and could be used to alert doctors which patients might need to be treated more aggressively.

31min

Coastal organisms trapped in 99-million-year-old amber

Most amber inclusions are organisms that lived in the forest. It is very rare to find sea life trapped in amber. However, an international research group led by Professor WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) reported the first known ammonite trapped in amber.

31min

Echo chambers may not be as dangerous as you think, new study finds

Following the 2016 presidential election, echo chambers have oft been blamed for the polarization of contemporary American politics. But a new study found that even in homogeneous groups, social influence increases factual accuracy and decreases polarization. In fact, participants' beliefs became 35% more accurate after exchanging information with others in the group, and their beliefs became more

31min

Greening the chemical industry requires massive amount of renewables

To go green, the chemicals industry could use carbon dioxide from the air instead of fossil fuels, but this would require vast amounts of renewable energy

32min

Amber Preserves Rare Snapshot Of Coastal Life 99 Million Years Ago

Amber, being fossilized tree resin, usually preserves scenes from an ancient forest. The latest stunning find from Myanmar, however, is a souvenir from a day at the beach 99 million years ago, including the first ammonite, a marine animal, preserved in amber. The piece of amber is small — about the size of a standard pair of dice, and less than a quarter of an ounce — but it's jam-packed with anim

36min

Staining for Live-Cell Analysis: Improving Perception

Download this eBook from Biotium and The Scientist to learn about the importance of analyzing living cells, choosing a stain, staining subcellular structures, and fluorescence staining tips and tricks.

36min

Spiders Can Use Webs to Catapult Themselves at Prey

Spiders Can Use Webs to Catapult Themselves at Prey The webs store energy like a bow and can accelerate the spiders at up to 80 Gs. CatapultingSpider_topNteaser.jpg The Hyptiotes spider holding its web in tension. Image credits: S.I. Han Creature Monday, May 13, 2019 – 15:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Spiders can use webs like bows to catapult themselves at prey, a new study

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43min

Marijuana boosts couple intimacy, new research suggests

New studies suggest positive benefits of marijuana use by couples. Whether one or both use it, relationship intimacy can improve. Previous studies found that marijuana boosts sex lives. None Should you toke up to keep the fire going in your relationship? Science says "yes," with moderation, of course. A new study from researchers at the University of Buffalo and the University of Houston suggests

45min

Marijuana boosts intimacy, new research suggests

New studies suggest positive benefits of marijuana use by couples. Whether one or both use it, relationship intimacy can improve. Previous studies found that marijuana boosts sex lives. None Should you toke up to keep the fire going in your relationship? Science says "yes," with moderation, of course. A new study from researchers at the University of Buffalo and the University of Houston suggests

47min

This Spider Uses a Silk Slingshot to Hurl Itself at Prey

At first glance, the triangle-weaver spider builds a web like any other spider. But once an insect hits that web, something damn near logic-defying happens.

47min

The Curious Case of the Spring-Loaded Web

Almost 150 years ago, on an October afternoon, Burt Green Wilder was strolling through the woods outside Ithaca, when he stumbled across a strange spider web attached to a hemlock branch. It was triangular, as if a wedge had been cut from a full web. And “instead of hanging loosely from the twigs, it was upon the stretch , as if constantly drawn by a power at one or the other end,” Wilder later w

50min

Biochemical compound responsible for blood pressure drop in sepsis is discovered

International research group demonstrates the involvement of singlet molecular oxygen in vasodilation, causing a sharp decline in blood pressure in severe inflammatory processes such as sepsis.

53min

This spider turns its web into a slingshot, flinging itself at prey

Using stored energy in the silk, the spider shoots forward at extraordinary speeds

53min

Extinct squid relative entombed in amber for 100 million years

Ancient ammonite is one of the first sea creatures found trapped in amber

53min

Stem Cell Treatments Flourish With Little Evidence That They Work

The F.D.A. has taken an industry-friendly approach toward companies using unproven cell cocktails to treat people desperate for relief from aging or damaged joints.

53min

Echo chambers may not be as dangerous as you think, new study finds

In the wake of the 2016 American presidential election, western media outlets became almost obsessed with echo chambers. With headlines like "Echo Chambers are Dangerous" and "Are You in a Social Media Echo Chamber?" news media consumers have been inundated by articles discussing the problems with spending most of one's time around likeminded people.

53min

Coastal organisms trapped in 99-million-year-old amber

Most amber inclusions are organisms that lived in the forest. It is very rare to find sea life trapped in amber. However, an international research group led by Prof. Wang Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) reported the first known ammonite trapped in amber in a study in PNAS published on May 13.

53min

Found in New Mexico: A tiny cousin of the T-Rex

The bones he found in New Mexico remained unidentified for 20 years. Suskityrannus hazelae turns out to be a diminutive predecessor to the "king lizard." The tiny terror is the ultimate "citizen scientist" victory. None A fascination with dinosaurs typically starts young. If an adult needs a question answered, a little kid is often the best, most enthusiastic, and up-to-date resource. Going on a

58min

Human gut microbiome physiology can now be studied in vitro using Organ Chip technology

A research team has developed an approach to co-culture a complex human gut microbiome in direct contact with intestinal tissue for at least five days using 'organ-on-a-chip' (Organ Chip) microfluidic culture technology.

58min

The death of a close friend hits harder than we think

The trauma caused by the death of a close friend endures four times longer than previously believed, according to new research.

58min

Distracted driving more frequent among millennial than older parents

Investigators sought to understand and compare the texting and driving patterns of millennial parents versus older parents.

58min

Key mechanism that allows some of the deadliest viruses to replicate

Research uncovers key mechanism that allows some of the deadliest human RNA viruses to orchestrate the precise copying of the individual pieces of their viral genome and replicate. The findings identify new targets to inhibit viral replication and may inform the development of a novel class of antiviral drugs.

58min

Being bullied as a teen is associated with growing up in areas of income inequality

Growing up in areas with income inequality is associated with being bullied, according to a new study, which surveyed approximately 874,000 children in 40 medium and high income countries in Europe, North America and Israel. According to the study country level income inequality during the first four years of a child's life (rather than school age years) was associated with later bully victimizati

58min

Ancient Whiz Opens Archaeology Window

The residue of ancient urine can reveal the presence of early, stationary herder-farmer communities.

1h

Mini Museum Lets Science Lovers Own Priceless Artifacts for an Affordable Price

If you’re into science, nature, and history, you’ve probably spent countless hours of your life walking through museums, marveling at collections of rare and unique objects spanning billions of years of natural and human history. Maybe you’ve even fantasized about being insanely rich and having your very own collection of such objects. But now, thanks to Mini Museum , that fantasy can become a re

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NASA deploys 3D printing in satellite components

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Is high-fructose corn syrup worse than regular sugar?

Health Many of us believe some kinds of sugar are somehow healthier. High fructose corn syrup has long been the scapegoat for American obesity, so it’s understandable that most of us might think that the fructose itself is a problem.

1h

Twitter says it accidentally stored and shared some iOS location data

Twitter says it fixed a bug that caused it to inadvertently collect and share some users' location data. It affected some people who were logged in to more than one account on …

1h

Found in New Mexico: A tiny cousin of the T-Rex

The bones he found in New Mexico remained unidentified for 20 years. Suskityrannus hazelae turns out to be a diminutive predecessor to the "king lizard." The tiny terror is the ultimate "citizen scientist" victory. None A fascination with dinosaurs typically starts young. If an adult needs a question answered, a little kid is often the best, most enthusiastic, and up-to-date resource. Going on a

1h

A Lab Grew a “Mini Brain” From This Guy’s Cells. Then Things Got Weird.

Mini-Me When science writer Philip Ball donated some flesh from his arm to a neuroscience lab growing “mini brains,” he originally intended to contribute to research into the biological mechanisms of dementia. Instead, he ended up with a simplified genetic replica of his own brain growing in a petri dish — and found himself questioning what makes us human, according to a new review of Ball’s upco

1h

Treatment targets for men with advanced prostate cancers

A study outlines findings from the largest-ever prospective genomic analysis of advanced prostate cancer tumors. Using comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) to analyze thousands of tumor samples from men with advanced prostate cancers, the researchers identified that 57% of the samples evaluated had genomic characteristics that suggested the tumors were candidates for targeted therapies.

1h

Signals to noise in acoustic vehicles alerting systems

If you've wished for a quieter commute, you may be in luck: The low-emission electric vehicles of tomorrow are expected to lower noise pollution as well as air pollution. The prospect of a future powered by environmentally friendly electric vehicles is leading experts to consider the benefits — and the risks — of quieter traffic. Two experts, Klaus Genuit and Rene Weinandy, will present work stu

1h

United States Refuses to Join Plastic Waste Pact

Plastic Pact Since 1992, a treaty known as the Basel Convention has regulated how nations transport hazardous materials across borders. On Friday, the United Nations announced that the governments of more than 180 nations had agreed to add the plastic waste destroying our wildlife , our environment , and our health to the materials listed in the treaty — and while the United States was not one of

1h

The Trouble With Fathering 114 Kids

The official suitor bios of The Bachelorette , whose 15th season premieres Monday night, are studied attempts at masculine posturing: Chasen became a pilot to impress the ladies. Garrett once snuck into a football stadium to make out with his girlfriend. Connor ’s grandmother (but not Connor himself!) says he deserves a “sexy lady” to give her grandkids. So what should viewers make of Matteo, 25,

1h

Game of Thrones Failed Cersei

This article contains spoilers through Season 8 Episode 5 of Game of Thrones . In his A Song of Ice and Fire series, George R. R. Martin frames every chapter around the perspective of a single character. This strategy not only helps him build out his complex world, but also captures the conflicting, multifaceted interests of the story’s key players. Cersei Lannister, despite being one of those ke

1h

A Cisco Router Bug Has Massive Global Implications

Researchers have discovered a way to break one of Cisco's most critical security features, which puts countless networks at potential risk.

1h

Amazon’s New Robot Can Pack More Than 600 Boxes Per Hour

Amazon has been deploying robots in factories that can pack up to 700 boxes per hour, far more than any human. The company's success is also raising fears about what automation will mean for the company's warehouse employees. The post Amazon’s New Robot Can Pack More Than 600 Boxes Per Hour appeared first on ExtremeTech .

1h

Collagen fibers grow like a sunflower

Researchers have examined the patterns developed by collagen fibers, found in the tissues of virtually all animals. What is fascinating about the process is that one step in the fibers' formation is similar to the growth of sunflower petals.

1h

Bacterial communities for wastewater treatment system

A global study expands the understanding of activated sludge microbiomes for next-generation wastewater treatment and reuse systems enhanced by microbiome engineering. Wastewater treatment and reuse are critical to global health and sustaining a world population predicted to reach 10 billion by 2050.

1h

Marijuana use improves couple intimacy, shows research

New studies show positive benefits of marijuana use by couples. Whether one or both use it, relationship intimacy can improve. Previous studies found that marijuana boosts sex lives. None Should you toke up to keep the fire going in your relationship? Science says "yes," with moderation, of course. A new study from researchers at the University of Buffalo and the University of Houston shows that

1h

EXOSC10 is required for RPA assembly and controlled DNA end resection at DNA double-strand breaks

EXOSC10 is required for RPA assembly and controlled DNA end resection at DNA double-strand breaks Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10153-9 The exosome is a ribonucleolytic complex that plays part in RNA processing and degradation. Here, the authors reveal an RNA clearance event in homologous recombination and show the function of EXOSC10, a component of

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Plasmodium falciparum sexual differentiation in malaria patients is associated with host factors and GDV1-dependent genes

Plasmodium falciparum sexual differentiation in malaria patients is associated with host factors and GDV1-dependent genes Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10172-6 Here, the authors quantify early gametocyte-committed ring (gc-ring) stage Plasmodium falciparum parasites in 260 malaria patients 10 days before maturation to transmissible stage V gametocyte

1h

Circulating miR-103a-3p contributes to angiotensin II-induced renal inflammation and fibrosis via a SNRK/NF-κB/p65 regulatory axis

Circulating miR-103a-3p contributes to angiotensin II-induced renal inflammation and fibrosis via a SNRK/NF-κB/p65 regulatory axis Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10116-0 Angiotensin II is known to cause renal inflammation and fibrosis. Here Lu et al. show that levels of circulating miR-103a-3p are elevated in hypertensive nephropathy patients and in a

1h

Theoretical analysis of Polycomb-Trithorax systems predicts that poised chromatin is bistable and not bivalent

Theoretical analysis of Polycomb-Trithorax systems predicts that poised chromatin is bistable and not bivalent Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10130-2 Polycomb and Trithorax group proteins regulate silent and active gene expression states, but also allow poised states in pluripotent cells. Here the authors present a mathematical model that integrates d

1h

Highly sensitive CE-ESI-MS analysis of N-glycans from complex biological samples

Highly sensitive CE-ESI-MS analysis of N -glycans from complex biological samples Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09910-7 In-depth characterization of complex glycomes is complicated by the immense structural diversity of glycans. Here, the authors present a mass spectrometry-based strategy for untargeted, sensitive glycan profiling and identify 167 N-

1h

PFA ependymoma-associated protein EZHIP inhibits PRC2 activity through a H3 K27M-like mechanism

PFA ependymoma-associated protein EZHIP inhibits PRC2 activity through a H3 K27M-like mechanism Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09981-6 PFA tumours express high levels of EZHIP (also known as CXORF67). Here the authors find that EZHIP directly interacts with the active site of EZH2 and is a competitive inhibitor of PRC2 and that EZHIP gives rise to H3K

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Low temperature below 200 °C solution processed tunable flash memory device without tunneling and blocking layer

Low temperature below 200 °C solution processed tunable flash memory device without tunneling and blocking layer Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10142-y Realizing efficient non-volatile flash memories that do not require high temperature processing to create suitable charge trapping remains a challenge. Here, the authors report low-temperature solution

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Collagen-rich airway smooth muscle cells are a metastatic niche for tumor colonization in the lung

Collagen-rich airway smooth muscle cells are a metastatic niche for tumor colonization in the lung Nature Communications, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09878-4 Collagen is a dynamic component of both the tumor and metastatic niche. Here, the authors show that airway smooth muscle cells are a collagen III rich niche bladder cancer cells expressing CD167a, and Stat3 is a dow

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Skoltech researchers developed new perovskite-inspired semiconductors for electronic devices

The collaborative effort of researchers from Skoltech, SB RAS Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, and RAS Institute for Problems of Chemical Physics translated into the development of advanced lead-free semiconductors for solar cells, based on complex antimony and bismuth halides. The results of their study were published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A and showcased on the journal'

1h

25 US counties identified as most at risk for measles outbreaks

Twenty-five counties across the country have been identified to be most at risk for a measles outbreak due to low-vaccination rates compounded by a high volume of international travel, according to an analysis by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Johns Hopkins University.

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New tool to predict epileptic seizures in pregnancy could save lives

A new risk calculator for pregnant women with epilepsy, developed by researchers from Queen Mary University of London, has been found to accurately predict the risk of seizures during pregnancy and up to six weeks after delivery, and could save the lives of mothers and babies.

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Home-based cardiac rehabilitation is an option to overcome barriers of traditional cardiac rehabilitation

Home-based cardiac rehabilitation may be an option for many who would benefit from cardiac rehabilitation after a heart attack or other heart procedure but can't attend medical center-based programs.New strategies for delivering cardiac rehabilitation are urgently needed, as only a small percentage of those who need cardiac rehabilitation are receiving it.

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Blazing Supersonic Plane Could Zoom From NY to Paris in 90 Min

Going Supersonic An American aerospace startup called Hermeus has revealed an early concept of a supersonic commercial airplane that could breeze over the Atlantic in just 90 minutes at speeds of up to Mach 5 (almost 4,000 mph) — or twice as fast as the iconic Concorde. It’s unlikely we will see a working prototype any time soon, but Hermeus has just closed a first round of funding, according to

1h

Photos of Huawei’s European-Themed Campus in China

China’s Huawei Technologies is the largest telecommunications-equipment manufacturer in the world, with production and development centers in more than a dozen countries. One of its newest facilities, located in Dongguan, China, is being built as a collection of replicas of European landmarks. The 3.5-square-mile Ox Horn research and development campus is being developed as 12 separate “towns,” w

1h

Explorer Reaches Bottom of the Mariana Trench, Breaks Record for Deepest Dive Ever

It was chilly; it was quiet; and "it was so very peaceful"

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Ancient Whiz Opens Archaeology Window

The residue of ancient urine can reveal the presence of early, stationary herder-farmer communities. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We Must Defend Science in the Face of Political Attacks

To make that happen, a powerful and diverse coalition must arise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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“Biobots” Will Serve Alongside South Korean Soldiers by 2024

Recruiting Robots Military robots inspired by birds, snakes, and insects will soon support South Korea’s human soldiers. On Sunday, South Korea’s Defence Acquisition Programme Administration (DAPA), the agency tasked with acquiring the nation’s military weapons, published a document announcing plans to incorporate “biomimetics” equipment into military operations by 2024 — another sign robots will

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6 simple ways to get the most out of your workout

Whether you're a person who can't wait for their next trip to the gym or 5K run, or someone who is still working to make working out a priority, we all want to make sure that every minute we spend exercising counts. It's also important to recognize that not everyone wants the same thing out of a workout session. While some are looking to improve their health, others may want to build their streng

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We Must Defend Science in the Face of Political Attacks

To make that happen, a powerful and diverse coalition must arise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Today's Floods Occur Along "a Very Different" Mississippi River

Floods come faster, last longer and are less predictable than in the past — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New Jersey Makes Streptomyces griseus Its Official State Microbe

Governor Phil Murphy signs a bill honoring the bacterium discovered in his state's soil, now known for its antibiotic compounds used to treat tuberculosis.

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Acidic blood isn’t to blame for rare disease

Acidic blood is not the cause of a rare disease called proximal renal tubular acidosis, according to new research. The disease, pRTA, is associated with loss of a sodium bicarbonate transporter (NBCe1) and is extremely rare, with only about 15 known cases worldwide. In addition to low blood pH, the disease causes developmental impairments and may lead to tooth loss and vision loss. “The only trea

2h

Why might smoking and drinking alcohol raise the risk of osteoporosis?

Study uncovers a stress signaling cell mechanism through which damage to mitochondria can disrupt bone creation-resorption balance to promote osteoporosis.

2h

Facebook Caves, Increases Salaries and Benefits for Contractors

After years of critical coverage citing the emotional distress experienced by Facebook’s contractors, particularly those who review often upsetting and violent content on the platform day in …

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New recommendations for a thyroid and cardiovascular disease research agenda

New Recommendations for a Thyroid and Cardiovascular Disease Research Agenda have been co-published in Thyroid® and Circulation.

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Scientists bioengineer a cellular speedometer

Researchers have discovered that Pseudomonas bacteria can detect the speed (shear rate) of flow regardless of the force. By linking the flow-detecting gene to one responsible for illumination, they have bioengineered a real-time visual speedometer: The faster the flow, the brighter the glow.

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Evolutionary backing found in analysis of mammalian vertebrae

Differences in numbers of vertebrae are most extreme in mammals which do not rely on running and leaping, such as those adapted to suspensory locomotion like apes and sloths, a team of anthropologists has concluded.

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Bacteria's role in recurrent urinary tract infections

A new finding shows that several species of bacteria reside in bladder tissue of postmenopausal women who experience recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs). The results represent the first systematic analysis of biopsies from patients in this population.

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Underwater power generation

Underwater vehicles, diving robots, and detectors require their own energy supply to operate for long periods independent of ships. A new, inexpensive system for the direct electrochemical extraction of energy from seawater offers the advantage of also being able to handle short spikes in power demand, while maintaining longer term steady power. To do so, the system can autonomously switch between

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New data platform illuminates history of humans' environmental impact

Animal remains found at archaeological sites tell the millennia-long story of how humans have hunted, domesticated and transported wildlife, altered landscapes and responded to environmental changes such as shifting temperatures and sea levels. Now, that story is available digitally through a new open-access data platform known as ZooArchNet, which links records of animals across biological and ar

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Goro Shimura, 89, Mathematician With Broad Impact, Is Dead

His insights provided the foundation for the proof of Fermat’s Last Theorem and led to tools widely used in modern cryptography.

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Junior researchers are losing out by ghostwriting peer reviews

Junior researchers are losing out by ghostwriting peer reviews Nature, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01533-8 Graduate students and postdocs who produce reviews under a senior colleague’s name receive no credit or acknowledgement for their work, and miss a chance to become acquainted with journal editors.

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Doctors Use Genetically Engineered Viruses to Fight Drug-Resistant Superbug

A teenager in the UK was at death's door following complications from a lung transplant, but a last-ditch effort using genetically engineered viruses has saved her life. Doctors say this is a watershed moment for the use of so-called bacteriophages in medicine. The post Doctors Use Genetically Engineered Viruses to Fight Drug-Resistant Superbug appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Why do we like bitter drinks? Not taste, genes suggest

Sweet beverages or bitter ones? Our preference between them results from variation in genes related to their psychoactive properties, not those related to taste, research finds. Scientist Marilyn Cornelis searched for variations in our taste genes that could explain our beverage preferences, because understanding those preferences could indicate ways to intervene in people’s diets. “The genetics

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Rare gene mutations may prevent heart disease

A kind of rare gene mutation may prevent heart disease, according to a new study. The study finds that protein-truncating variants in the apolipoprotein B (APOB) gene are linked to lower triglyceride and LDL cholesterol levels, and lower the risk of coronary heart disease by 72 percent.

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Common food additive found to affect gut microbiota

Experts call for better regulation of a common additive in foods and medicine, as research reveals it can impact the gut microbiota and contribute to inflammation in the colon, which could trigger diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer.

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Long-term consequences of Zika virus infection

Mice exposed to the Zika virus during later stages of gestation present behaviors reminiscent of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, according to a study of genetically diverse animals. The findings, published in JNeurosci, suggest children exposed to the virus during the 2015-16 epidemic may harbor increased risk for developmental disorders.

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Wireless movement-tracking system could collect health and behavioral data

We live in a world of wireless signals flowing around us and bouncing off our bodies. MIT researchers are now leveraging those signal reflections to provide scientists and caregivers with valuable insights into people's behavior and health. The system, called Marko, transmits a low-power radio-frequency (RF) signal into an environment. The signal will return to the system with certain changes if

2h

Apple revamps TV app for direct subscriptions to channels

Apple users will be able to subscribe to HBO, Showtime and a handful of other channels directly through Apple's new TV app, bypassing the need to download or launch a separate app.

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Why some climate scientists are saying no to flying

Limiting air travel to reduce carbon footprint works for some academics, but not everyone is onboard

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'Game of Thrones' Recap, Season 8 Episode 5: How to Ruin Every Beloved Character

Perhaps the only insight into this careless and nihilistic episode comes from Jamie: It doesn't matter.

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We cannot evict birds with netting, say MPs

A petition signed by 350,000 people calls for "netting" of trees and hedges to be a criminal offence.

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Supreme Court Deals Blow to Apple in Antitrust Case

In Apple v. Pepper, the Supreme Court ruled in a 5–4 decision that Apple's App Store customers have standing to sue the company for antitrust violations.

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Apple revamps TV app for direct subscriptions to channels

Apple users will be able to subscribe to HBO, Showtime and a handful of other channels directly through Apple's new TV app, bypassing the need to download or launch a separate app.

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Study expands understanding of bacterial communities for global next-generation wastewater treatment and reuse systems

A University of Oklahoma-led interdisciplinary global study expands the understanding of activated sludge microbiomes for next-generation wastewater treatment and reuse systems enhanced by microbiome engineering. Wastewater treatment and reuse are critical to global health and sustaining a world population predicted to reach 10 billion by 2050.

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Anti-Social Media: The Hot New App Trend of 2019

submitted by /u/MrDubious [link] [comments]

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An AI Has Spontaneously Developed a Human-Like 'Sense' For Numbers

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Rolls-Royce Is Selling a Power System for Lethal Laser Weapons

Luxury Lasers Luxury automaker Rolls-Royce is making a hard pivot to the death ray industry, according to Defense News : The company just unveiled a new hybrid power source intended to continuously power 100-kilowatt laser weapons. The power system combines a battery — that could instantly fire the laser without needing to charge up — with a helicopter engine that can take over the battery once i

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Study expands understanding of bacterial communities for global next-generation wastewater treatment and reuse systems

A University of Oklahoma-led interdisciplinary global study expands the understanding of activated sludge microbiomes for next-generation wastewater treatment and reuse systems enhanced by microbiome engineering. Wastewater treatment and reuse are critical to global health and sustaining a world population predicted to reach 10 billion by 2050.

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Trump Is Angry That the FBI Won’t Endorse His Theory of Victimhood

On March 24, Attorney General William Barr released a summary of the findings of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report that stressed positive news for President Donald Trump. The redacted text of the report would not be released until April 18, more than four weeks later. Over those four weeks, Trump and his supporters made the most of their one-sided information advantage. They blared “No coll

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NASA-NOAA satellite catches Tropical Cyclone Ann threatening Queensland

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Ann in the Coral Sea, off the east coast of Queensland, Australia.

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New insights into treatment targets for men with advanced prostate cancers

A study published recently in the Journal of Clinical Oncology Precision Oncology, an American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) journal, outlines findings from the largest-ever prospective genomic analysis of advanced prostate cancer tumors. Using comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) to analyze thousands of tumor samples from men with advanced prostate cancers, the researchers identified that

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NASA-NOAA satellite catches Tropical Cyclone Ann threatening Queensland

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Ann in the Coral Sea, off the east coast of Queensland, Australia.

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OU study expands understanding of bacterial communities for wastewater treatment system

A University of Oklahoma-led interdisciplinary global study expands the understanding of activated sludge microbiomes for next-generation wastewater treatment and reuse systems enhanced by microbiome engineering. Wastewater treatment and reuse are critical to global health and sustaining a world population predicted to reach 10 billion by 2050.

2h

Being bullied as a teen is associated with growing up in areas of income inequality

Growing up in areas with income inequality is associated with being bullied, according to a new study, which surveyed approximately 874,000 children in 40 medium and high income countries in Europe, North America and Israel. According to the study country level income inequality during the first four years of a child's life (rather than school age years) was associated with later bully victimizati

2h

NASA funds aviation research on a new fuel concept

Researchers at the University of Illinois are leading a newly funded project from NASA to develop a novel approach for all-electric aircraft.

2h

Glassy menagerie of particles in beach sands near Hiroshima is fallout debris, study concludes

A years-long study concludes that an odd assortment of particles found in beach sands in Japan are most likely fallout debris from the 1945 Hiroshima A-bomb blast.

3h

Collagen fibres grow like a sunflower

Collagen fibrils are a major component of the connective tissues found throughout the animal kingdom. The cable-like assemblies of long biological molecules combine to form tissues as varied as skin, corneas, tendons or bones. The development of these complex tissues is the subject of a variety of research efforts, focusing on the steps involved and the respective contributions of genetics and phy

3h

Uber is testing PIN-based pickup at the Portland airport

Finding your Uber at a crowded arrivals curb while several other passengers are doing the same can be daunting. To help alleviate that pain, Uber is piloting a PIN feature today at …

3h

Bayer admits Monsanto may have other 'watch lists'

German chemical giants Bayer admitted Monday its subsidiary Monsanto could have kept lists of key figures—for or against pesticides—"in other European countries", and not just in France.

3h

Bayer admits Monsanto may have other 'watch lists'

German chemical giants Bayer admitted Monday its subsidiary Monsanto could have kept lists of key figures—for or against pesticides—"in other European countries", and not just in France.

3h

Tomato pan-genome makes bringing flavor back easier

Do you find that most store-bought tomatoes don't have much flavor? Scientists may have spotlighted the solution by developing the tomato pan-genome, mapping almost 5,000 previously undocumented genes, including genes for flavor.

3h

Shrinking moon may be generating moonquakes

A new analysis suggests that the moon is actively shrinking and producing moonquakes along thousands of cliffs called thrust faults spread over the moon's surface. The faults are likely the result of the moon's interior cooling and shrinking, causing the surface crust to shrivel and crack like a raisin's skin.

3h

Just like toothpaste: Fluoride radically improves the stability of perovskite solar cells

Solar cells made of perovskite hold much promise for the future of solar energy. However, the material degrades quickly, severely limiting its efficiency and stability over time. Researchers have discovered that adding a small amount of fluoride to the perovskite leaves a protective layer, increasing stability of the materials and the solar cells significantly.

3h

Collagen fibres grow like a sunflower

In a new study published in EPJ E, two researchers at the Universite Paris-sud in Orsay, France, examine the patterns developed by collagen fibers, found in the tissues of virtually all animals. What is fascinating about the process is that one step in the fibers' formation is similar to the growth of sunflower petals.

3h

CDC concurs with panel led by Regenstrief scientist on misapplication of opioid guidelines

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is clarifying its guidelines on opioid prescribing, citing the findings of a review panel led by Regenstrief Institute Research Scientist Kurt Kroenke, M.D. Dr. Kroenke and his colleagues found that many clinicians, policymakers and payers are misapplying the CDC's guidelines, and those actions are negatively affecting patients.

3h

Ekspert om lokomotiv-brand: Naturen må gerne futtes af

Der bliver plads til nyt liv, når naturen bliver brændt af, siger naturvejleder.

3h

Mini’s Urban-X Accelerator Imagines the Brooklyn You’ve Always Dreamed Of

It's not quite Amazon HQ2, but Mini's Urban-X incubator brings more tech to New York City. The startups' goals: Make cities more fun and livable. Even if that means displacing some of the cars. The post Mini’s Urban-X Accelerator Imagines the Brooklyn You’ve Always Dreamed Of appeared first on ExtremeTech .

3h

Energy from seawater: Power generator autonomously switches between two functional modes

Underwater vehicles, diving robots, and detectors require their own energy supply to operate for long periods independent of ships. A new, inexpensive system for the direct electrochemical extraction of energy from seawater offers the advantage of also being able to handle short spikes in power demand, while maintaining longer term steady power. To do so, the system can autonomously switch between

3h

Facebook removes fake Italian accounts ahead of EU election

Facebook shut down phony Italian accounts and pages spreading fake news ahead of European Union parliamentary elections, prompting opposition lawmakers to call Monday for tougher laws to curb online misinformation.

3h

415.26 parts per million: CO2 levels hit historic high

Scientists in the United States have detected the highest levels of planet-warming carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere since records began, sounding new alarm over the relentless rise of man-made greenhouse gas emissions..26

3h

Moonquakes Hint at Tectonic Life on the Moon

Some seismic readings from the lunar surface couldn’t be explained — until now.

3h

3h

New research accurately predicts Australian wheat yield months before harvest

Topping the list of Australia's major crops, wheat is grown on more than half the country's cropland and is a key export commodity. With so much riding on wheat, accurate yield forecasting is necessary to predict regional and global food security and commodity markets. A new study shows machine-learning methods can accurately predict wheat yield for the country two months before the crop matures.

3h

New Supercomputer Will Span Continents, Outrace World's Fastest

Paired processors on two continents will power a new computer "brain."

3h

30 percent off a pellet grill and other smoking hot deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

3h

Lenovo launches ThinkReality AR and VR headset for enterprises

Lenovo is continuing its expansion into new, unexpected categories outside of its PC business and today the company announced it's launching a new AR-and-VR system targeted at …

3h

Perceived union support buoys 'meaningfulness of work' measures

While it has long been thought that the "union premium" extends to a labor union's ability to provide higher wages, better benefits and increased job security to workers, new research from a …

3h

1 in 5 civil monetary penalties due to EMTALA violations involved psychiatric emergencies

Nearly one in five civil monetary penalty settlements related to Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) violations involved psychiatric emergencies. Settlements related to psychiatric emergencies were costlier and more often associated with failure to stabilize than for nonpsychiatric emergencies.

3h

Half of all patients with syncope have CT head performed with a yield of 1.2% to 3.8%

More than half of patients with syncope underwent CT head with a diagnostic yield of 1.1% to 3.8%.

3h

BU finds rare gene mutations may prevent heart disease

A kind of rare gene mutation may prevent heart disease, according to a new study co-led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher. Published in the journal Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine, the study finds that protein-truncating variants in the apolipoprotein B (APOB) gene are linked to lower triglyceride and LDL cholesterol levels, and lower the risk of coronar

3h

BU finds screenings for social determinants of health need to be tailored to clinics

An estimated 70 percent of the variation in healthcare outcomes is attributable to social determinants—-but it is only in recent years that healthcare settings have begun formally looking at these factors to better understand and treat patients. A new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers and published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Me

3h

When Possible, Upper and Lower GI Endoscopies Should Be Done on Same Day

If your car needs work on its front and rear axles, it's obviously more convenient, efficient and cost effective to have both repairs done at the same time. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have shown similar benefits from "bundling" upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopies on the same day to remedy what they say is the "disturbingly" large number of older Americans currently being s

3h

The moon is a lot more seismically active than we thought

When humans return to the moon, they’ll want to choose their landing site carefully.

3h

Större skillnader i skydd vid arbetslöshet

Enligt Januariavtalet, eller fyrpartiuppgörelsen, ska den allmänna arbetslöshetsförsäkringen ses över. För att det ska lyckas måste politikerna bredda bilden och även se till andra faktorer som styr inkomstskyddet vid arbetslöshet. Det menar Jayeon Lindellee som skrivit en avhandling om den svenska arbetslöshetsförsäkringen. – Grundtanken att staten garanterar en hög täckningsgrad av arbetslöshet

3h

New research accurately predicts Australian wheat yield months before harvest

Topping the list of Australia's major crops, wheat is grown on more than half the country's cropland and is a key export commodity. With so much riding on wheat, accurate yield forecasting is necessary to predict regional and global food security and commodity markets. A new study published in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology shows machine-learning methods can accurately predict wheat yield for

3h

Research sheds light on UK's new unsustainable viewing habits

A new study looks behind closed doors to reveal how UK viewing habits are shifting away from traditional broadcasting with more data-intensive streaming options now the default for many.

3h

AI doesn't see the world like us which is why it is so easily confused

AI can easily be fooled into mistaking a rifle for a turtle, but now we may have an explanation for why these blunders happen and how to stop them

3h

Underwater power generation

Underwater vehicles, diving robots, and detectors require their own energy supply to operate for long periods independent of ships. A new, inexpensive system for the direct electrochemical extraction of energy from seawater offers the advantage of also being able to handle short spikes in power demand, while maintaining longer term steady power. To do so, the system can autonomously switch between

3h

Domestic policy driven by intergovernmental bodies not citizens, research finds

Citizens are increasingly being marginalized by intergovernmental organizations for the attention of national politicians and influence over domestic policies, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

3h

Researchers find evolutionary backing in analysis of mammalian vertebrae

Differences in numbers of vertebrae are most extreme in mammals which do not rely on running and leaping, such as those adapted to suspensory locomotion like apes and sloths, a team of anthropologists has concluded in a study appearing in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.

3h

Study uncovers key mechanism that allows some of the world's deadliest viruses to replicate

Viruses are masterful invaders. They cannibalize host cells by injecting their genetic material, often making thousands of copies of themselves in a single cell to ensure their replication and survival.

3h

Study explores privatization of public systems of justice

Since the 1980s, federal and local governments have increasingly used public money to hire private firms to house and manage people who are incarcerated. In the last few years, the number of incarcerated individuals held in privately operated institutions has risen sharply. A new study sought to determine the points at which individuals who encounter public systems of justice are charged by privat

3h

Perceived union support buoys 'meaningfulness of work' measures

While it has long been thought that the "union premium" extends to a labor union's ability to provide higher wages, better benefits and increased job security to workers, new research from a University of Illinois expert who studies identity and meaning in occupations and organizations suggests that being a member of a labor union that's perceived as supportive fosters work meaningfulness—an unexp

3h

Researchers find evolutionary backing in analysis of mammalian vertebrae

Differences in numbers of vertebrae are most extreme in mammals which do not rely on running and leaping, such as those adapted to suspensory locomotion like apes and sloths, a team of anthropologists has concluded in a study appearing in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution.

4h

Study uncovers key mechanism that allows some of the world's deadliest viruses to replicate

Viruses are masterful invaders. They cannibalize host cells by injecting their genetic material, often making thousands of copies of themselves in a single cell to ensure their replication and survival.

4h

New data platform illuminates history of humans' environmental impact

The human environmental footprint is not only deep, but old.

4h

Fibromyalgia: Is insulin resistance 'the missing link?'

A standard drug for insulin resistance can tackle fibromyalgia-related pain. Could this hallmark of prediabetes offer clues about fibromyalgia?

4h

Green energy nudges come with a hidden cost

Many US households receive energy bills comparing their use to that of similar neighbors to remind them to use less energy. Such policies aim to 'nudge' people toward making better choices, both for their future selves and for others. Nudges like these have become popular among policymakers, because they are virtually costless to implement. However, a new study finds these nudges have an unexplore

4h

Bone cells suppress cancer metastases

A subpopulation of bone cells releases factors that can halt the growth of breast cancer that's traveled to the bone, putting the cells in stasis.

4h

Artificial intelligence could select heart failure patients for expensive treatment

Artificial intelligence (AI) has shown promise to select heart failure patients for expensive treatments to prevent lethal arrhythmias, reports a new study. The study is the first to use a machine learning algorithm to predict sudden death in heart failure patients.

4h

People fail to recognize male postnatal depression

A new study shows that people are almost twice as likely to correctly identify signs of postnatal depression in women than in men.

4h

Study details bacteria's role in recurrent urinary tract infections

A new finding by researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and UT Southwestern Medical Center shows that several species of bacteria reside in bladder tissue of postmenopausal women who experience recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs). The results, published online April 17 in the Journal of Molecular Biology, represent the first systematic analysis of biopsies from patients in this po

4h

Study explores privatization of public systems of justice

A new study sought to determine the points at which individuals who encounter public systems of justice are charged by private entities. The study found that private firms that work with public entities in the justice system charge money for their services at numerous points, that some of the charges are mandated, and that there is little transparency into or oversight over how these public-privat

4h

Political controversies about marginalized groups increase bullying in youths

Scientists have uncovered new evidence that heated political discourse over proposed laws involving marginalized groups, such as debates about the rights of LGBT people, can contribute to an increase in bullying linked to students' identity in schools. It is the largest study to date to examine the link.

4h

Catch a virus by its tail

At a glance: Research uncovers key mechanism that allows some of the deadliest human RNA viruses to orchestrate the precise copying of the individual pieces of their viral genome and replicate. The findings identify new targets to inhibit viral replication and may inform the development of a novel class of antiviral drugs.

4h

Researchers find evolutionary backing in analysis of mammalian vertebrae

Differences in numbers of vertebrae are most extreme in mammals which do not rely on running and leaping, such as those adapted to suspensory locomotion like apes and sloths, a team of anthropologists has concluded.

4h

Fladdermusliknande dinosaurie upptäckt

En märklig, pytteliten dinosaurie har upptäckts i nordöstra Kina. Arten kunde av allt att döma flyga, men inte med fjädrar som man kunde vänta sig, utan med fladdermusliknande vingar. Upptäckten visar att dinosaurierna var mer diversifierade än någon kunnat ana.

4h

The English Word That Hasn’t Changed in Sound or Meaning in 8,000 Years – Facts So Romantic

The word lox was one of the clues that eventually led linguists to discover who the Proto-Indo-Europeans were, and where they lived. Photograph by Helen Cook / Flickr One of my favorite words is lox ,” says Gregory Guy, a professor of linguistics at New York University. There is hardly a more quintessential New York food than a lox bagel—a century-old popular appetizing store, Russ & Daughters, c

4h

Apollo-era moonquakes suggest lunar colonies must be shake-proof

Seismometers deployed by Apollo astronauts on the moon measured 28 moonquakes, which have now been linked to cracks on the surface

4h

4h

The Challenge of Building a Self-Driving Car

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

4h

SpaceX’s Starlink Satellites Could Make Space a Minefield

Watch Your Step On Wednesday, SpaceX plans to launch its first batch of Starlink satellites , an artificial constellation intended to beam down high-speed internet service from orbit. It’s an aspirational mission, but there’s an unfortunate downside, according to Scientific American . The satellites could also, in a worst-case scenario, trigger a deadly cascade of space debris known as “Kessler s

4h

Watch a Gutsy CEO Fly His Company’s Iron Man-Style Suit

Flying High Being an entrepreneur means being willing to take some risks. But Richard Browning doesn’t just put money on the line for his company — he risks his own life. In 2017, Browning founded Gravity Industries . And since then, he’s served as the chief test pilot for the company’s flagship product , an Iron Man-style jet suit. In a newly released video , Browning dons the latest version of

4h

Spørg Fagfolket: Er kapsler med fiskeolie lige så nyttige som fisk?

En læser vil gerne høre, om omega-3-kapsler er en god substitut for rigtig fisk, da undersøgelser har været skeptiske. Professor fra DTU Fødevareinstituttet kigger på tingene.

4h

Perceived union support buoys 'meaningfulness of work' measures

When employees think of their labor union as supportive and caring, says new research, they are more likely to rate their union as fulfilling their psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness – all of which are related to enhanced work meaningfulness.

4h

Why Hodgkin's lymphoma cells grow uncontrollably

Although classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is generally easily treatable today, many aspects of the disease still remain a mystery. A team has now identified an important signaling molecule in the biology of this lymphoma: LTA. It helps the cancer to grow unimpeded – for example, by activating genes for immune checkpoint ligands that protect tumor cells from the body's built-in defense system.

4h

'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to those underrepresented in the field

Over the course of a school year, elementary school children lose confidence that they can 'be scientists,' but remain more confident that they can 'do science.'

4h

A late-night disco in the forest reveals tree performance

Researchers have found a groundbreaking new method to facilitate the observation of photosynthetic dynamics in vegetation. This finding brings us one step closer to remote sensing of terrestrial carbon sinks and vegetation health.

4h

Out of a Magic Math Function, One Solution to Rule Them All

Three years ago, Maryna Viazovska , of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, dazzled mathematicians by identifying the densest way to pack equal-sized spheres in eight- and 24-dimensional space (the second of these in collaboration with four co-authors). Now, she and her co-authors have proved something even more remarkable : The configurations that solve the sphere-packing probl

4h

Biomarker could spot chemobrain early

Researchers may have discovered a biomarker for the cognitive impairment associated with cancer, called chemobrain. Chemobrain can be subtle yet persistent, with some cancer patients reporting difficulties related to memory and attention even months after completing their treatment. Given the extent of impact of chemobrain on patients, it will be useful if doctors could preemptively identify pati

4h

Domestic policy driven by intergovernmental bodies not citizens, research finds

Citizens are increasingly being marginalized by intergovernmental organizations for the attention of national politicians and influence over domestic policies, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

4h

Research sheds light on UK's new unsustainable viewing habits

A team of computing researchers at Lancaster University has taken the closest look yet at the nature and extent of how household viewing habits have changed — providing valuable new evidence for the researchers, who are interested in our changing viewing habits and how this links to the huge increases in Internet data traffic

4h

How to starve triple negative breast cancer

A team of Brazilian researchers has developed a strategy that slows the growth of triple negative breast cancer cells by cutting them off from two major food sources.

4h

New research accurately predicts Australian wheat yield months before harvest

Topping the list of Australia's major crops, wheat is grown on more than half the country's cropland and is a key export commodity. With so much riding on wheat, accurate yield forecasting is necessary to predict regional and global food security and commodity markets. A new study published in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology shows machine-learning methods can accurately predict wheat yield for

4h

Just like toothpaste: fluoride radically improves the stability of perovskite solar cells

Solar cells made of perovskite hold much promise for the future of solar energy. However, the material degrades quickly, severely limiting its efficiency and stability over time. Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology, energy research institute DIFFER, Peking University and University of Twente have discovered that adding a small amount of fluoride to the perovskite leaves a protectiv

4h

Trade could be key to balancing conservation of freshwater sources and food security

An IIASA study published in the journal Nature Sustainability today, evaluated whether water for the environment could be prioritized under growing competition from other sectors. The results indicate that this could be achieved by shifting crop production from water scarce — to water abundant regions and tripling international food trade.

4h

Preventing cell death as novel therapeutic strategy for rheumatoid arthritis

A collaborative study by research groups from the University of Cologne, VIB, Ghent University, the Βiomedical Sciences Research Center 'Alexander Fleming' in Athens and the University of Tokyo identified a new molecular mechanism causing rheumatoid arthritis. The researchers found that death of macrophages, an immune cell type, can trigger the disease. Moreover, they discovered how the protein A2

4h

Study: Glassy menagerie of particles in beach sands near Hiroshima is fallout debris

A years-long study that involved scientists and experiments at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley concludes that an odd assortment of particles found in beach sands in Japan are most likely fallout debris from the 1945 Hiroshima A-bomb blast.

4h

Green energy nudges come with a hidden cost

Many US households receive energy bills comparing their use to that of similar neighbors to remind them to use less energy. Such policies aim to 'nudge' people toward making better choices, both for their future selves and for others. Nudges like these have become popular among policymakers, because they are virtually costless to implement. However, a new study from researchers at Carnegie Mellon,

4h

The moon is quaking as it shrinks

A new analysis suggests that the moon is actively shrinking and producing moonquakes along thousands of cliffs called thrust faults spread over the moon's surface. The faults are likely the result of the moon's interior cooling and shrinking, causing the surface crust to shrivel and crack like a raisin's skin. The research, published in Nature Geoscience, combines data from NASA's Apollo and Lunar

4h

Stopping inflammation in its tracks: A leap forward for new anti-inflammatory drugs

Treatments for chronic inflammatory diseases are one step closer as University of Queensland researchers discover a way to stop inflammation in its tracks. This study will inform the design of new drugs to stop the formation of a protein complex, called the inflammasome, which drives inflammation. Associate Professor Schroder said the team's exciting discovery gave new insight into how to stop inf

4h

Distracted driving more frequent among millennial than older parents

Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital sought to understand and compare the texting and driving patterns of millennial parents versus older parents.

4h

Quantum world-first: researchers reveal accuracy of two-qubit calculations in silicon

After being the first team to create a two-qubit gate in silicon in 2015, UNSW Sydney engineers are breaking new ground again: they have measured the accuracy of silicon two-qubit operations for the first time — and their results confirm the promise of silicon for quantum computing.

4h

Cost-effectiveness analysis of 12 cervical cancer screenings

This cost-effectiveness analysis incorporates women's preferences and estimates quality of life and economic outcomes for 12 cervical cancer screening strategies.

4h

Is being bullied as teen associated with growing up in areas of income inequality?

A survey study of about 874,000 adolescents from 40 European and North American countries suggests growing up in areas with income inequality was associated with being bullied after accounting for some other mitigating factors.

4h

Could locking all household guns reduce youth suicides, unintentional firearm deaths?

An increase in the number of firearm owners who live with children who lock up all their household guns could be associated with a reduction in youth firearm deaths by suicide and unintentional injury.

4h

Human gut microbiome physiology can now be studied in vitro using Organ Chip technology

A research team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has developed an approach to co-culture a complex human gut microbiome in direct contact with intestinal tissue for at least five days using 'organ-on-a-chip' (Organ Chip) microfluidic culture technology.

4h

Texting while driving common among millennial, older parents

A distracted driving survey of millennial parents (ages 22 to 37) and older parents (37 and up) shows that most parents had read and written texts while driving in the part 30 days but millennial parents had higher survey scores that reflected more reckless driving behavior, including the use of email, social media and maps plus speed of travel.

4h

Princeton scientists bioengineer a cellular speedometer

Princeton researchers have discovered that Pseudomonas bacteria can detect the speed (shear rate) of flow regardless of the force. By linking the flow-detecting gene to one responsible for illumination, they have bioengineered a real-time visual speedometer: The faster the flow, the brighter the glow.

4h

Weighing up trade-offs between food security and climate mitigation

IIASA researchers collaborated with colleagues in Japan to clarify the impacts of stringent climate mitigation policies on food security. The team identified smart and inclusive climate policy designs where the risk of food-security for hundreds of millions of people could be addressed at a modest cost.

4h

Tomato pan-genome makes bringing flavor back easier

Store-bought tomatoes don't have much flavor. Now, scientists from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI) may have spotlighted the solution by developing the tomato pan-genome, mapping almost 5,000 previously undocumented genes, including genes for flavor.

4h

BTI scientists create new genomic resource for improving tomatoes

Tomato breeders have traditionally emphasized production traits, like larger and more fruits per plant. As a result, some quality traits — like flavor and disease resistance — were lost. Researchers from Boyce Thompson Institute and colleagues published a tomato pan-genome in Nature Genetics, establishing a resource that promises to help breeders develop more flavorful and sustainable varieties.

4h

Room for thought: Brain region that watches for walls identified

To move through the world, you need a sense of your surroundings, especially of the constraints that restrict your movement: the walls, ceiling and other barriers that define the geometry of the navigable space around you. And now, a team of neuroscientists has identified an area of the human brain dedicated to perceiving this geometry. This brain region orients us in space, so we can avoid bumpin

4h

Speech recognition technology is not a solution for poor readers

Could artificial intelligence be a solution for people who cannot read well (functional illiterates) or cannot read at all (complete illiterates)? According to psycholinguists, speech technology should never replace learning how to read. In an opinion article, Falk Huettig from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and Radboud University in Nijmegen and Martin Pickering from the Universit

4h

Molecular recording of mammalian embryogenesis

Molecular recording of mammalian embryogenesis Nature, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1184-5 A multi-channel molecular recording technique is applied as a lineage tracer to assemble cell-fate maps from fertilization through gastrulation in the mouse, providing insights into ontogeny in a complex multicellular organism.

4h

Fidelity benchmarks for two-qubit gates in silicon

Fidelity benchmarks for two-qubit gates in silicon Nature, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1197-0 Two-qubit logic gates in a silicon-based system are shown (using randomized benchmarking) to have high gate fidelities of operation and are used to generate Bell states, a step towards solid-state quantum computation.

4h

Aeolus: Wind-mapping space laser is losing power

Europe's Aeolus spacecraft is gathering fantastic new data on global winds – but it's also got a problem.

4h

Epic’s store continues to absorb PC gaming exclusives large and small

Ghost Recon, Outer Wilds are the latest games to avoid Steam.

4h

Maybe you'll buy coffee with cryptocurrency after all – CNET

Startup Flexa's cryptocurrency payment network get big names like Crate and Barrel, Nordstrom, Whole Foods, Barnes & Noble — and yes, Caribou Coffee.

4h

Daily briefing: How to master science’s latest technologies

Daily briefing: How to master science’s latest technologies Nature, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01526-7 Our six-part tech podcast, a new defence against speech-recognition hackers and the scientist striving to save his son.

4h

Mobilspelet som man kan spela även som blind

Majoriteten av alla spel behöver du kunna se för att spela. Det är få som är anpassade för att även kunna spelas av personer med nedsatt syn eller andra funktionsvariationer. Frequency Missing är ett undantag. Den inkluderande designen innebär att alla ska kunna spela, även de som är blinda eller har annan synrelaterad funktionsvariation. De med nedsatt syn spelar genom att dra fingret över touch

4h

Moon is tectonically active, Apollo-era instruments reveal

Seismometers left by moon-landing missions reveal frequent and powerful quakes. Richard A Lovett reports.

4h

Millennials most likely to text and drive

US study finds younger parents often read and send texts from behind the wheel. Andrew Masterson reports.

4h

Hiroshima’s sands contain atomic bomb glass

Unusual tiny spheres were forged when the Japanese city bore the brunt of nuclear explosion. Nick Carne reports.

4h

For The First Time, Engineers Measure Accuracy of 2 Qubits in Silicon – And It Works

We just got a big step closer to a scalable quantum computer.

4h

Apollo-era Tremors Reveal a Dynamic, Active Moon

Moonquakes still shake and reshape the lunar surface in ways that could threaten future astronauts and habitats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Amazon Now Has Machines to Automatically Box Up Orders

Box Bots According to a Reuters exclusive , Amazon is rolling out specially-made machines that are capable of boxing up orders — a job currently held by thousands of human workers. The CartonWrap robots build cardboard boxes around orders as they come down an assembly line, according Reuters’ sources. Each one processes 600 to 700 boxes per hour — roughly five times as many as a human packer, acc

4h

City life damages mental health in ways we’re just starting to understand

Health Urban dwellers are particularly at risk from the impacts of air pollution and other hazards on mental health. Scientists are just beginning to probe how air pollution and other physical aspects of the world around us contribute to psychiatric problems.

4h

New Jean-Luc Picard 'Star Trek' Series Is Coming to Amazon. Sorta

It'll premiere on CBS All Access in the US, then go to Prime Video internationally.

4h

Apollo-era moonquakes reveal that the moon may be tectonically active

Moonquakes recorded decades ago suggest the moon is tectonically active. Knowing more about that activity could help scientists identify where to land future spacecraft.

4h

Scientists bioengineer a cellular speedometer

An all-Princeton research team has identified bacteria that can detect the speed of flowing fluids.

4h

Human gut microbiome physiology can now be studied in vitro using Organ Chip technology

The human microbiome, the huge collection of microbes that live inside and on our body, profoundly affects human health and disease. The human gut flora in particular, which harbor the densest number of microbes, not only break down nutrients and release molecules important for our survival but are also key players in the development of many diseases including infections, inflammatory bowel diseas

4h

Scientists create new genomic resource for improving tomatoes

Tomato breeders have traditionally emphasized traits that improve production, like larger fruits and more fruits per plant. As a result, some traits that improved other important qualities, such as flavor and disease resistance, were lost.

4h

Adjust your language to encourage kids in science

Over the course of a school year, elementary school children lose confidence that they can “be scientists,” but not that they can “do science,” according to a new study. Researchers also found that children think more adults in their community can “do science” than “are scientists,” which suggests they have more inclusive views of who can do science, even while they might hold stereotypes about w

4h

Bacteria could identify month-old suspicious stains at crime scenes

Forensic investigators may be able to use a suspicious stain’s microbiome to determine its origin, even after a month of being exposed to air

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Make a shape-shifting tablet with touchscreens that click together

Smartphones could one day have screens that can break apart and be put together in different shapes, forming physical passwords or game controllers

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New data platform illuminates history of humans' environmental impact

Animal remains found at archaeological sites tell the millennia-long story of how humans have hunted, domesticated and transported wildlife, altered landscapes and responded to environmental changes such as shifting temperatures and sea levels.Now, that story is available digitally through a new open-access data platform known as ZooArchNet, which links records of animals across biological and arc

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Perceived union support buoys 'meaningfulness of work' measures

When employees think of their labor union as supportive and caring, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor professor M. Teresa Cardador, they are more likely to rate their union as fulfilling their psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness – all of which are related to enhanced work meaningfulness.

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Reviews highlight new advances in our understanding of focal and sclerotic bone diseases

A new special edition of 'Calcified Tissue International' provides expert commentary and insight into the advances in the knowledge of several rare focal and sclerotic bone diseases including Paget's disease of bone and related syndromes, fibrous dysplasia of bone and McCune-Albright syndrome, Melorheostosis and Osteopoikilosis, chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis, as well as Camurati-Engelmann di

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Apollo-era Tremors Reveal a Dynamic, Active Moon

Moonquakes still shake and reshape the lunar surface in ways that could threaten future astronauts and habitats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Digital humans that look just like us | Doug Roble

In an astonishing talk and tech demo, software researcher Doug Roble debuts "DigiDoug": a real-time, 3-D, digital rendering of his likeness that's accurate down to the scale of pores and wrinkles. Powered by an inertial motion capture suit, deep neural networks and enormous amounts of data, DigiDoug renders the real Doug's emotions (and even how his blood flows and eyelashes move) in striking deta

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Scientists bioengineer a cellular speedometer

An all-Princeton research team has identified bacteria that can detect the speed of flowing fluids.

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Glassy menagerie of particles in beach sands near Hiroshima is fallout debris: study

Mario Wannier, a career geologist with expertise in studying tiny marine life, was methodically sorting through particles in samples of beach sand from Japan's Motoujina Peninsula when he spotted something unexpected: a number of tiny, glassy spheres and other unusual objects.

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Human gut microbiome physiology can now be studied in vitro using Organ Chip technology

The human microbiome, the huge collection of microbes that live inside and on our body, profoundly affects human health and disease. The human gut flora in particular, which harbor the densest number of microbes, not only break down nutrients and release molecules important for our survival but are also key players in the development of many diseases including infections, inflammatory bowel diseas

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Quantum world-first—researchers reveal accuracy of two-qubit calculations in silicon

For the first time ever, researchers have measured the fidelity—that is, the accuracy—of two-qubit logic operations in silicon, with highly promising results that will enable scaling up to a full-scale quantum processor.

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The moon is quaking as it shrinks

A 2010 analysis of imagery from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) found that the moon shriveled like a raisin as its interior cooled, leaving behind thousands of cliffs called thrust faults on the moon's surface.

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Speech recognition technology is not a solution for poor readers

About one in five people is considered to be low literate or illiterate, unable to read or write simple statements. Low literacy can be due to reading impairments such as dyslexia or little or no reading practice. For developing countries with low literacy rates, voice recognition has been hailed as a solution by companies such as Google. But is speech technology really the solution?

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Green energy nudges come with a hidden cost

All across the United States, many households receive energy bills comparing their use to that of similar neighbors to remind them to use less energy. At most companies, employees are automatically enrolled in 401(k) plans unless they choose to opt-out, helping employees easily save for retirement. Such policies aim to "nudge" people toward making better choices, both for their future selves and f

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Scientists create new genomic resource for improving tomatoes

Tomato breeders have traditionally emphasized traits that improve production, like larger fruits and more fruits per plant. As a result, some traits that improved other important qualities, such as flavor and disease resistance, were lost.

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Weighing up trade-offs between food security and climate mitigation

IIASA researchers collaborated with colleagues in Japan to clarify the impacts of stringent climate mitigation policies on food security. The team identified smart and inclusive climate policy designs where the risk of food-security for hundreds of millions of people could be addressed at a modest cost.

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Supreme Court rules against Apple, allowing lawsuit targeting App Store to proceed

The 5-4 decision could spell serious repercussions for one of Apple’s most lucrative lines of business, and open the door for similar legal action targeting other tech giants in Silicon Valley.

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Amazon to employees: We'll pay you to quit and haul packages

Amazon, which is racing to deliver packages faster, is turning to its employees with a proposition: Quit your job and we'll help you start a business delivering Amazon package.

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US environment agency cuts funding for kids’ health studies

US environment agency cuts funding for kids’ health studies Nature, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01491-1 The Environmental Protection Agency's decision leaves fate of more than a dozen decades-long projects in doubt.

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New water cycle on Mars discovered

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Addressing Gender Bias in Medicine for National Women’s Health Week

Yesterday marked the first day of National Women’s Health Week (May 12-18, 2019), and as such it is important to discuss the inherent gender bias in medical research and treatment and the ways in which the medical community are attempting to rectify said bias. Many women, particularly women of color, often report feeling dismissed or undermined by medical professionals regarding a variety of phys

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Software library to serve for faster chemical reaction processing

Big Data has become ubiquitous in recent years, and especially so in disciplines with heterogeneous and complex data patterns. This is particularly true for chemistry.

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Study shows people fail to recognise male postnatal depression

A new study shows that people are almost twice as likely to correctly identify signs of postnatal depression in women than in men.

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Bone cells suppress cancer metastases

A subpopulation of bone cells releases factors that can halt the growth of breast cancer that's traveled to the bone, putting the cells in stasis.

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New Ohio University study profiles the changing face of suicide within the state

According to a new study released by The Ohio Alliance for Innovation in Population Health (The Alliance), suicide's identity is increasingly comprised of individuals both young and old, with suicide rates rising more than 36 percent for those ages 20 to 29 and approximately 57 percent for those aged 60 or older in the last 10 years.

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Artificial intelligence could select heart failure patients for expensive treatment

Artificial intelligence (AI) has shown promise to select heart failure patients for expensive treatments to prevent lethal arrhythmias, reports a study presented today at ICNC 2019. The study is the first to use a machine learning algorithm to predict sudden death in heart failure patients.

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Physicists discover new type of spin waves

Advances in IT technologies are hampered by the ever increasing demand for energy and by fundamental limits on miniaturization. Energy dissipation mostly going into heating up the environment is also a challenge. A new type of spin waves may serve to overcome these obstacles.

5h

How mutations lead to neurodegenerative disease

Scientists have discovered how mutations in DNA can cause neurodegenerative disease. The discovery is an important step towards better treatment to slow the progression or delay onset in a range of incurable diseases such as Huntington's and motor neurone disease – possibly through the use, in new ways, of existing anti-inflammatory drugs.

5h

Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef

Unravelling the secrets of the relationship between coral and the algae living inside it will help prevent coral bleaching, researchers believe. By using genomic data to look for genes that enhance resilience in the algae, researchers hope to help coral adapt to the environmental shifts created by climate change.

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Role of cover crops in slowing herbicide resistance

A new article shows that cover crops can play an important role in slowing the development of herbicide-resistant weeds.

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Political controversies about marginalized groups increase bullying in youths

Scientists have uncovered new evidence that heated political discourse over proposed laws involving marginalized groups, such as debates about the rights of LGBT people, can contribute to an increase in bullying linked to students' identity in schools. It is the largest study to date to examine the link.

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Maternal microbes mediate diet-derived damage

New research has found, using a mouse model, that microbes in the maternal intestine may contribute to impairment of the gut barrier during pregnancy.

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We are more envious of things that haven't happened yet

We are more envious of someone else's covetable experience before it happens than after it has passed, according to new research.

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The Current State of Neuromorphic Computing

submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]

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Mariana Trench: Record-breaking journey to the bottom of the ocean

Victor Vescovo descended almost 11km in a submersible to the deepest part of the Pacific Ocean.

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'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to those underrepresented in the field

Over the course of a school year, elementary school children lose confidence that they can "be scientists," but remain more confident that they can "do science," finds a new psychology study by researchers at New York University and Princeton University.

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Supreme Court allows consumers antitrust suit against Apple

A divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that consumers can pursue an antitrust lawsuit that claims Apple has unfairly monopolized the market for the sale of iPhone apps.

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How to Teach Students to Think

The only thing traditional about Thomas Easterling’s 11th-grade English class at the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science (MSMS) was his short quiz at the start of the class. It was the last of the year, he told his students, and I guessed that this was his way to keep the kids focused on their final assignment. It may also have been a nudge toward the good habit of reading, for a gener

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Turning off growth to make flowers grow

Researchers report the final epigenetic events that terminate stem cell growth for proper flower development. They show the series of steps the binding of the transcription factor KNUCKLES initiates to suppress the gene expression of WUSCHEL in Arabidopsis. The ability to control flower growth has implications on seed productivity and food technology.

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Receiving weekend food improves school attendance among children living with hunger

Children living in food-insecure households are more likely to attend school on Fridays if they're participating in a food-distribution program that provides them with backpacks of meals for the weekend, researchers found in a new study.

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Whole grain can contribute to health by changing intestinal serotonin production

Adults consuming whole grain rye have lower plasma serotonin levels than people eating low-fiber wheat bread, according to a recent study.

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Alzheimer's therapy passes another important test

The Alzheimer drug candidate PRI-002 has successfully completed Phase I of clinical research involving healthy volunteers. When administered daily over a period of four weeks, the active substance proved to be safe for use in humans. The next milestone will be the proof of efficacy in patients in clinical Phase II.

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Smallest pixels ever created could light up color-changing buildings

The smallest pixels yet created — a million times smaller than those in smartphones, made by trapping particles of light under tiny rocks of gold — could be used for new types of large-scale flexible displays, big enough to cover entire buildings.

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Neuromorphic computing: Fremtidens computer skal arbejde som en menneskehjerne

Energiforbruget bliver den største udfordring for fremtidens computere til kunstig intelligens. Derfor forsøger forskere på Aarhus Universitet at udvikle teknologi, der er i stand til at fungere som den menneskelige hjerne: Med enorm kraft og lille energiforbrug.

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Why Hodgkin's lymphoma cells grow uncontrollably

Although classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is generally easily treatable today, many aspects of the disease still remain a mystery. A team at the Max Delbrück Center led by Professor Claus Scheidereit has now identified an important signaling molecule in the biology of this lymphoma: LTA. It helps the cancer to grow unimpeded – for example, by activating genes for immune checkpoint ligands that protect

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A late-night disco in the forest reveals tree performance

A group of researchers from the University of Helsinki has found a ground breaking new method to facilitate the observation of photosynthetic dynamics in vegetation. This finding brings us one step closer to remote sensing of terrestrial carbon sinks and vegetation health.

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Nipple reconstruction techniques could be improved with 3D scaffolds

Nipple and areola reconstruction is a common breast reconstruction technique, especially for breast cancer patients after mastectomy. However, tissue for grafting is a limiting factor, and there is no gold standard method. Correspondingly, researchers are continuously exploring new methods for the expansion of patient-matched tissue samples and the improvement of cosmetic outcome.

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'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to those underrepresented in the field

Over the course of a school year, elementary school children lose confidence that they can 'be scientists,' but remain more confident that they can 'do science.'

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Radioisotope couple for tumor diagnosis and therapy

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in ACS Omega a promising combination of radioisotope-carrying molecules for use in radiotheranostics — a diagnosis-and-treatment approach based on the combination of medical imaging and internal radiation therapy with radioactive elements.

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Families with a higher socioeconomic position have a greater risk of exposure to chemicals

A European study analyses the exposure of 1,300 mothers and their children to 41 different chemical contaminants

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Older fatherhood may add risks for moms and children

Becoming an older dad may carry health consequences for partners and children, research suggests. The study, which reviews 40 years of research on the effect of parental age on fertility, pregnancy, and the health of children, appears in the journal Maturitas . “While it is widely accepted that physiological changes that occur in women after 35 can affect conception, pregnancy, and the health of

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In flocks of birds, couples stick together

In a flock of birds, mated pairs are loyal, first and foremost, to each other, not to the group as a whole, according to new research. In addition, this bonded behavior in flight has implications for the flight pattern of the entire flock, researchers found. Put a bit differently, birds of a feather don’t exactly all flock together. Moving as one Engineers and computer scientists envision a futur

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A late-night disco in the forest reveals tree performance

In 2017, the group from the Optics of Photosynthesis Lab (OPL) developed a new method to measure a small but important signal produced by all plants, and in this case trees. This signal is called chlorophyll fluorescence and it is an emission of radiation at the visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Chlorophyll fluorescence relates to photosynthesis and the health status of plants, and it can be

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A late-night disco in the forest reveals tree performance

In 2017, the group from the Optics of Photosynthesis Lab (OPL) developed a new method to measure a small but important signal produced by all plants, and in this case trees. This signal is called chlorophyll fluorescence and it is an emission of radiation at the visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Chlorophyll fluorescence relates to photosynthesis and the health status of plants, and it can be

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Acoustics researchers discover link between Nigerian music and watermelon ripeness

The sounds produced when tapping the fruit are echoed in a traditional drum. Phil Dooley reports.

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Decisions, decisions

Researchers pinpoint brain area critical for coming to conclusions.

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Fracking can cause earthquakes a long way from its site

New research links distant earthquakes to fracking, suggesting the risks have been under-estimated. Geophysicist Gillian Foulger from the UK’s Durham University explains.

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A Dystopian Vision of the Future: Toxic but Candy Sweet

Photographer Fernando Montiel Klint imagines a world where technology has gone amok.

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Turning wastewater sludge into energy and mineral salts

A system developed by EPFL spin-off TreaTech can turn sludge from wastewater treatment plants into mineral salts – which could be used in fertilizer, for example – and biogas. The firm's research is being funded by several private- and public-sector entities, and a large-scale pilot plant is now being built. The system is scheduled to be installed at a wastewater treatment plant in 2022.

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Mariana Trench: Deepest-ever sub dive finds plastic bag

An American explorer finds plastic waste on the seafloor while breaking the record for the deepest ever dive.

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Turning off growth to make flowers grow

Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report the final epigenetic events that terminate stem cell growth for proper flower development. They show the series of steps the binding of the transcription factor KNUCKLES initiates to suppress the gene expression of WUSCHEL in Arabidopsis. The ability to control flower growth has implications on seed productivity and food te

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Lead from Roman mines pollutes ancient Alpine ice

Lead from Roman mines pollutes ancient Alpine ice Nature, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01514-x A Mont Blanc glacier core also contains antimony from smelting carried out two millennia ago.

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12 Ways Big Tech Can Take Big Action on Climate Change

Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg have invested $1 billion in Breakthrough Energy to fund next-generation solutions to tackle climate. But there is a huge risk that any successful innovation will only reach the market as the world approaches 2030 at the earliest. We now know that reducing the risk of dangerous climate change means halving global greenhouse gas emissions by that date—in just 11 years

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Spider Spins Web in Man's Ear (Cue the Nightmares)

An itchy feeling had an eight-legged source.

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Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef

Unravelling the secrets of the relationship between coral and the algae living inside it will help prevent coral bleaching, University of Queensland researchers believe.

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Private equity firm buys Canada's WestJet airline

Private equity firm Onex announced Monday its purchase of Canada's second-largest airline WestJet for about Can$5 billion (US$3.7 billion) including assumed debt.

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Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef

Unravelling the secrets of the relationship between coral and the algae living inside it will help prevent coral bleaching, University of Queensland researchers believe.

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Kvinnor har högre skolbetyg – män är bättre på högskoleprovet

En ny rapport från Institutet för Arbetsmarknads- och utbildningspolitisk utvärdering (IFAU) visar att kvinnor har högre avgångsbetyg från gymnasiet medan män har bättre resultat på högskoleprovet. Rapporten visar också att betyg och högskoleprov delvis fångar olika saker, och att de med goda betyg oftare slutför en högskoleexamen. Rapportförfattarna finner alltså i likhet med tidigare forskning a

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Quieter intensive care units may translate to better outcomes for infants in new study

Excessive noise is widely known to have negative effects on health, and children in neonatal intensive care units are among the most vulnerable. To help preterm infants make a smooth transition …

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Wild pigs invade Canadian provinces—an emerging crisis for agriculture and the environment

Wild pigs—a mix of wild boar and domestic swine—are spreading rapidly across Canada, threatening native species such as nesting birds, deer, agricultural crops, and farm livestock, research …

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Forskere kritiserer politikeres »tilbagestående« trafik-planlægning

Flere transportforskere opfordrer politikerne til at stoppe med at love vælgerne årelange investeringsplaner, hvor milliarder af kroner er bundet til transportprojekter uden sammenhængende planlægning.

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Understanding relationship break-ups to protect the reef

Unravelling the secrets of the relationship between coral and the algae living inside it will help prevent coral bleaching, University of Queensland researchers believe.By using genomic data to look for genes that enhance resilience in the algae, researchers hope to help coral adapt to the environmental shifts created by climate change.

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How viable is your liver after you die?

In a paper to be published in a forthcoming issue of TECHNOLOGY, a group of researchers from Harvard Medical School have done a study on the viability of donated livers and its correlation with donor demographics. The results of this study could reduce the number of livers that are discarded and facilitate development of novel therapeutics and bioengineering for clinical research applications.

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How mutations lead to neurodegenerative disease

Scientists have discovered how mutations in DNA can cause neurodegenerative disease. The discovery is an important step towards better treatment to slow the progression or delay onset in a range of incurable diseases such as Huntington's and motor neurone disease – possibly through the use, in new ways, of existing anti-inflammatory drugs.

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Alzheimer therapy from Jülich passes another important test

The Alzheimer drug candidate PRI-002 developed at Forschungszentrum Jülich has successfully completed Phase I of clinical research involving healthy volunteers. When administered daily over a period of four weeks, the active substance proved to be safe for use in humans. The next milestone will be the proof of efficacy in patients in clinical Phase II.

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Physicists discover new type of spin waves

Advances in IT technologies are hampered by the ever increasing demand for energy and by fundamental limits on miniaturization. Energy dissipation mostly going into heating up the environment is also a challenge. A new type of spin waves recently discovered by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Lanzhou University in China may serve to overcome these obstacles.

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Brain in a dish, babies by design: what it means to be human

Brain in a dish, babies by design: what it means to be human Nature, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01502-1 Natalie Kofler is engrossed by a book that examines what cutting-edge biotechnology means for our sense of self.

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Wild pigs invade Canadian provinces—an emerging crisis for agriculture and the environment

Wild pigs—a mix of wild boar and domestic swine—are spreading rapidly across Canada, threatening native species such as nesting birds, deer, agricultural crops, and farm livestock, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.

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Wild pigs invade Canadian provinces—an emerging crisis for agriculture and the environment

Wild pigs—a mix of wild boar and domestic swine—are spreading rapidly across Canada, threatening native species such as nesting birds, deer, agricultural crops, and farm livestock, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.

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Fyringer i Aarhus skaber bekymringer blandt ansatte

De 43 fyringer på på afdelingen Røntgen og Skanning Aarhus Universitetshospital skaber bekymringer blandt de ansatte. De frygter, at det vil påvirke arbejdspresset og kvaliteten af behandlingen, siger talsmænd og tillidsrepræsentanter.

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Locating a shooter from the first shot via cellphone

In the past several decades, militaries have worked hard to develop technologies that simultaneously protect infantry soldiers' hearing and aid in battlefield communication. However, these advanced Tactical Communication and Protective Systems, or TCAPS—earmuffs or earplugs with built-in microphones allowing active hearing protection—don't help if a soldier takes them off to assess the location of

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Delhi hit by rare summer air pollution alert

New Delhi suffered a rare summer air pollution alert Monday as dust storms and heat over northern India took smog to hazardous levels.

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Techathlon podcast: Google's new goods, the food delivery derby, and internet outrage

Technology When you play the game of lunch, you either win or you pay for lunch. Learn about tech and play along with the most fun technology podcast around.

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The Downside of Chemistry Automation

Automation in chemistry (especially industrial chemistry) is so pervasive that we hardly even notice it any more. (I have a whole talk that I give that’s partly on that very subject). But what is automation for? That’s the subject of this short piece in ACS Med. Chem. Letters by Jeffrey Pan of AbbVie. The answer would seem obvious, and fits into my rule of thumb that any question that can be phra

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Researchers present new direct-detection constraints on Sub-GeV dark matter

In a recent study, a team of researchers has presented new direct-detection constraints on eV-to-GeV dark matter interacting with electrons, using a new prototype detector developed as part of the Sub-Electron-Noise Skipper-CCD Experimental Instrument (SENSEI) project. The SENSEI collaboration is comprised of researchers from several institutions, including the Fermi National Accelerator Laborator

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Teachers predict pupil success just as well as exam scores

New research finds that teacher assessments are equally as reliable as standardized exams at predicting educational success.

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Heart failure deaths rising in younger adults

Death rates due to heart failure are now increasing, and this increase is most prominent among younger adults under 65, considered premature death, reports a new study. The increase was highest among black men. This study shows for the first time that death rates due to heart failure have been increasing since 2012. The increase is likely due to the obesity and diabetes epidemics. About 6 million

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Uber shares continue sliding in first full day of trading

Uber shares were down 8% in morning trading and dipped below $38 after the opening bell.

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Alternative Education: Rigor Redefined

Our society should offer multiple routes to high school graduation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Family dynamics: Molecules from the same family have different effects in cancer prognosis

Researchers at Hiroshima University have found that different levels of two molecules of the same family — TIMP-1 and TIMP-4 — can influence prognosis of liposarcoma.

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Whole grain can contribute to health by changing intestinal serotonin production

Adults consuming whole grain rye have lower plasma serotonin levels than people eating low-fibre wheat bread, according to a recent study by the University of Eastern Finland and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

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Quieter intensive care units may translate to better outcomes for infants in new study

Excessive noise is widely known to have negative effects on health, and children in neonatal intensive care units are among the most vulnerable. Researchers have conducted one of the first studies linking the quiet time soundscape inside NICUs with infant health. The study examined the effects of quiet time implementation in multiple NICUs on infants up to 18 months after implementation. They will

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Locating a shooter from the first shot via cellphone

Militaries have worked hard to develop technologies that simultaneously protect soldiers' hearing and aid in battlefield communication. However, these don't help if a soldier takes it off to assess the location of incoming gunfire. A French researcher has developed a proof of concept that uses the microphones in a TCAPS system to capture a shooter's acoustic information and transmit this to a sold

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Autophagy in dendritic cells helps anticancer activity

Autophagy contributes to the homeostasis of a cell and recently another function of autophagy has been reported. A KAIST research team found that the autophagy of dendritic cells supports T-cell anticancer activity.

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Optical security: Tunable-resonator upconverted emission color printing

Scientists have demonstrated a new optical security element that not only combines microprints with invisible inks, but also makes them colorful. This is done using a single type of material for the ink, and another for the microprint. This so-called tunable resonator?upconverted emission (TRUE) color printing is demonstrated by embedding a monolayer of nanocrystals in close proximity with aluminu

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Tamagotchi On is connected, cute and cacophonous

Beep. Beep. Beep! The constant refrain of an unhappy Tamagotchi. Or any Tamagotchi, really. '90s kids learned to both love and dread that sound when the egg-shaped Japanese toy …

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Nu bliver det sværere at eksportere dårlig plast til u-lande

Regeringer fra 187 lande har besluttet, at eksport af blandet plast skal kræve godkendelse fra myndighederne.

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How power-hungry politicians divide and conquer

People seeking to win an election often use emotional words to trigger voters. These emotional words tend to trigger people into four different groups: loyalists, riled-up resisters, mild moderates, and disenchanted drop-outs. What we see today is people getting into power with less than a majority of people because they're able to divide this four-way voter split. Why We Elect Narcissists and So

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Hospitals look to computers to predict patient emergencies – STAT

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Study unveils detailed properties of the eclipsing binary KOI-3890

By combining transit photometry, radial velocity observations, and asteroseismology, astronomers have gathered important information about the properties of a highly eccentric, eclipsing binary system known as KOI-3890. The new findings are presented in a paper published April 30 on arXiv.org.

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Virus pic could lead to treatment for chikungunya arthritis

High-res pictures of the chikungunya virus could speed efforts to design therapies to prevent or treat the arthritis that the virus causes, researchers say. Chikungunya virus, once confined to the Eastern Hemisphere, has infected more than 1 million people in the Americas since 2013, when mosquitoes carrying the virus showed up in the Caribbean. Most people who become infected develop fever and j

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The death of a close friend hits harder than we think

The trauma caused by the death of a close friend endures four times longer than previously believed, according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU).

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Wild pigs invade Canadian provinces

Wild pigs — a mix of wild boar and domestic swine — are spreading rapidly across Canada, threatening native species such as nesting birds, deer, agricultural crops, and farm livestock, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.

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Data sharing and how it can benefit your scientific career

Data sharing and how it can benefit your scientific career Nature, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01506-x Open science can lead to greater collaboration, increased confidence in findings and goodwill between researchers.

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Tamagotchi Have Returned to Bewitch a New Generation

The new Tamagotchi On goes on sale today for $59.99.

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How cryptocurrency scams work

Millions of cryptocurrency investors have been scammed out of massive sums of real money. In 2018, losses from cryptocurrency-related crimes amounted to US$1.7 billion. The criminals use both old-fashioned and new-technology tactics to swindle their marks in schemes based on digital currencies exchanged through online databases called blockchains.

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Researchers find patterns associated with extreme floods

Extreme floods across the continental United States are associated with four broad atmospheric patterns, a machine-learning based analysis of extreme floods found.

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Mangrove forests trap floating litter

Mangrove forests on the coasts of Saudi Arabia act as litter traps, accumulating plastic debris from the marine environment, according to new research from KAUST. The study offers an explanation for the fate of missing marine plastic litter and highlights the threat it poses to coastal ecosystems.

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Alternative Education: Rigor Redefined

Our society should offer multiple routes to high school graduation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why We're Still Fighting Over Freud

A debate over the relevance of psychoanalysis to brain research highlights science’s lack of progress in understanding the mind. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Older fathers put health of partners, unborn children at risk

Men who delay starting a family have a ticking 'biological clock' — just like women — that may affect the health of their partners and children, according to Rutgers researchers.

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Advancement in driverless aircraft could direct the future of drones, flight

Billions of dollars are being spent by aviation giants and aerospace startups to create driverless flying vehicles that can meet the growing need for rapid and flexible travel and delivery. Anyone who has tried to navigate major metro areas like New York City or Los Angeles knows the hassles associated with sharing the roads and air with millions of other people.

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Comparison of global climatologies confirms warming of the global ocean

The global ocean represents the most important component of the Earth climate system. The oceans accumulate heat energy and transport heat from the tropics to higher latitudes, responding very slowly to changes in the atmosphere. Digital gridded climatologies of the global ocean provide helpful background information for many oceanographic, geochemical and biological applications. Because both the

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The use of science in environmental decision making

The level of scientific literacy in the United States is low by so many measures there isn't a reason to rollout the data on science education in the United States to make the point. With a determined effort, we could overcome our science literacy problem, but I see no sign of deep concern about the state of science education. The impact of our lack of science literacy can be seen in decision maki

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How acoustics detected artillery in WWI

During World War I, William Lawrence Bragg led a team of engineers in the development of an acoustic method to locate enemy artillery, work that was so successful that it was soon used widely throughout the British army.

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Worried about sexual harassment – or false allegations? Our team asked Americans about their experiences and beliefs

Since the launch of #MeToo, there's been a lot of attention on problems of sexual harassment and assault in the U.S.

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Two types of mid-latitude wave trains lead to extreme heat in South Korea and southern-central Japan

Global climate change has strongly increased the worldwide frequency of extreme heat (EH) in recent decades. South Korea and southern-central Japan are also frequently affected by extreme heat, and the extreme heat in these two regions tend to occur simultaneously. A scientific collaboration of climatologists examined the large-scale circulation leading to the concurrent extreme heat over South Ko

7h

Researchers outline the current state of potassium-ion battery technology

A trio of researchers with the University of Wollongong, in Australia, has published an outline of the current state of potassium-ion battery technology. In their Review piece published in the journal Science Advances, Wenchao Zhang, Yajie Liu, and Zaiping Guo highlight the current roadblocks that are preventing widespread use of the battery technology and possible workarounds for them.

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How to pop open soft nanoparticles using sound waves

Ultrasound has long been an important tool for medical imaging. Recently, medical researchers have demonstrated that focused ultrasound waves can also improve the delivery of therapeutic agents such as drugs and genetic material. The waves form bubbles that make cell membranes—as well as synthetic membranes enclosing drug-carrying vesicles—more permeable. However, the bubble-membrane interaction i

7h

WVU researcher studies incurable blood disease usually diagnosed in children

Most people with Fanconi anemia are diagnosed before they turn 12 but don't live past 30. Wei Du — a researcher in the WVU School of Pharmacy and the WVU Cancer Institute — is exploring the metabolic processes the underlie this form of anemia. Her findings may lead to new gene therapies that help patients live better, longer.

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How acoustics detected artillery in WWI

During WWI, William Lawrence Bragg led the development of an acoustic method to locate enemy artillery, work that was so successful that it was soon used widely throughout the British army. The method, known as sound ranging, was also adopted by the US Army when they joined the war, and earned Bragg a military decoration from the British armed forces. Bragg's story will be presented at the 177th A

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Paul Greengard (1925–2019)

Paul Greengard (1925–2019) Nature, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01532-9 Nobel laureate who traced signals through the brain.

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New approach uses magnetic beads to treat preeclampsia

A new proof of concept study shows that functionalized magnetic beads reduced blood levels of a harmful molecule by 40%, which doubled the effect of a different molecule that aids blood vessel function, opening new perspectives for the treatment of preeclampsia.

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Machine learning overtakes humans in predicting early death or heart attack

Machine learning is overtaking humans in predicting death or heart attack.

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The building blocks for astronomically literate citizens

What does it mean for a citizen to be literate in astronomy? Astronomers who participate in outreach to the general public experience various degrees of astronomical knowledge among people. But so far, there had not been a systematic evaluation and definition of what astronomical literacy actually means. Astronomers including Pedro Russo from the Leiden Observatory therefore published the first gl

7h

Dual-action 'slippery' catheter fights bacteria

A super-slippery coating being developed at a University of Wisconsin–Madison lab could benefit medical catheters, factory equipment, and even someday, oil tankers.

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Dear Therapist: Do I Need to Have ‘the Talk’ Again With My Daughter?

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, As a parent, I firmly believe that it is my duty to prepare my kids to be positive, healthy, and productive people both in the world and in personal relationships. So when my 12-year-old daughter announced tha

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Dual-action 'slippery' catheter fights bacteria

A super-slippery coating being developed at a University of Wisconsin–Madison lab could benefit medical catheters, factory equipment, and even someday, oil tankers.

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Avoid the politics and let artificial intelligence decide your vote in the next election

If trust in our politicians is at an all time low, maybe it's time to reconsider how we elect them in the first place.

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Electric cars: Current trends make for a shocking change

While vehicle manufacturers invest in research, authorities are working to improve charging infrastructure to support consumers' growing interest in the sector. The day when electric cars dominate the passenger transport market no longer seems quite so distant.

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Drilling for oil in the Great Australian Bight would be disastrous for marine life and the local community

The Great Australian Bight is home to a unique array of marine life. More than 85% of species in this remote stretch of rocky coastline are not found anywhere else in the world. It's also potentially one of "Australia's largest untapped oil reserves," according to Norwegian energy company Equinor.

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Crowded trains? City planning focus on cars misses new apartment impacts

Wondering why you can't get a seat on the train? Perhaps it's because we don't actually know how many extra people will use public transport when new building developments are planned. As a result, you're probably in for a bit of a crush.

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An Oral History of Trump’s Bigotry

The first quotation from Donald Trump ever to appear in The New York Times came on October 16, 1973. Trump was responding to charges filed by the Justice Department alleging racial bias at his family’s real-estate company. “They are absolutely ridiculous,” Trump said of the charges. “We have never discriminated, and we never would.” To hear more feature stories, see our full list or get the Audm

7h

The Ending of Game of Thrones

I always knew, deep down, that Game of Thrones (GOT) would not have a happy ending. Once Ned Stark got his head cut off at the end of the first book/season, I think everyone knew this was a different kind of fantasy story. I read the books first, and as I did it became clear that I was reading a tragedy and a horror story, not heroic fantasy. I have a few thoughts I would like to share as the las

7h

Image of the Day: 3-D Tissues

Scientists create an atlas of Arabidopsis cell and tissue reconstructions in three dimensions.

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The Chernobyl Disaster Might Have Also Built a Paradise

An HBO show tells the story of the nuclear explosion, but some scientists think that radioactive, human-free landscape might now be a haven for plants and animals.

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Street food vendors resist and adapt to changing society

Street food vendors are ubiquitous in low- and middle-income countries. They offer up quick, cheap and diverse food and drink, while also serving as sources of employment and socialization. Yet because the stalls block sidewalks and supposedly drag down real estate values, urbanization projects commonly try to ban or relocate them.

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A metal sheet stamping simulation promises improved car part production

The process of stamping metal sheets to create parts used in automotive products such as car doors has received a virtual upgrade in the form of a simulation method devised by Kanazawa University-based researchers. Their simulation can be used to optimize a metal stamping press in its conceptual design stage, thus reducing the costs of physically trialing designs. This method is not only cost-effe

7h

First international blockchain for science: Bloxberg

Securing scientific information online and worldwide with no risk of manipulation is now possible, thanks to the decentralized blockchain infrastructure Bloxberg.

7h

Mosquito protein controls blood feeding

Biting insects use a range of tools when sucking blood from hosts to maximize their chances of a good meal. Only female mosquitos feed on blood, which provides a high level of nutrients for egg production. The saliva of biting insects contains proteins that stop host blood from clotting, keep blood vessels dilated and easily accessible, and prevent inflammatory reactions.

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Mosquito protein controls blood feeding

Biting insects use a range of tools when sucking blood from hosts to maximize their chances of a good meal. Only female mosquitos feed on blood, which provides a high level of nutrients for egg production. The saliva of biting insects contains proteins that stop host blood from clotting, keep blood vessels dilated and easily accessible, and prevent inflammatory reactions.

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An AI Pioneer Explains the Evolution of Neural Networks

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Polarizing the Data Center: Spin Lasers Deliver 240 Gigabits Per Second

submitted by /u/DefsNotQualified4Dis [link] [comments]

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Meta-Post: Posts on Mental Illness

Cross-Check columns on efforts to explain and treat mental disorders. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sökande efter en kräm mot snällare typ av hudcancer

I dag skrapar, bränner, opererar eller fryser man bort hudtumörerna vid basalcellscancer. – Vi önskar att det fanns en enklare metod att behandla basalcellscancer. Det vore jättebra om det fanns en kräm att använda, säger Sara Prosén, specialistläkare på hudkliniken vid Universitetssjukhuset Örebro. Varje år drabbas mer än 50 000 personer, och enligt prognosen riskerar ännu fler att utveckla sjuk

8h

Recreating ancient minerals

When it comes to making a lasting impression in geological history, the medium makes all the difference, especially in the Earth's paleo-oceans. Here, during the Archean Eon (4,000-2,500 million years ago) and at times during the Proterozoic (2,500-541 million years ago), when oxygen in the atmosphere and oceans was much lower than today, sedimentary minerals preserved signatures of biological act

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If At First You Don't Succeed

The benefits of failure — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Bomb Carbon' from Cold War Nuclear Tests Found in the Ocean's Deepest Trenches

Long-ago nuclear tests left their mark on deep-sea animals alive today.

8h

Swedish authorities want to extradite Julian Assange for rape

Two women accused the Wikileaks founder of sexually assaulting them in 2010.

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Tim Halliday obituary

Ambassador for amphibians who warned of global decline The recent shocking UN report on the threatened extinction of one million species has focused global attention on the crucial role of biodiversity in the health of the planet. Almost exactly 30 years ago, the first warning sounded that amphibian species were already in potentially catastrophic freefall. Tim Halliday, who has died aged 73, was

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The Trade War Threatens Beijing's Ambitions in Technology

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Iain Mitchell: The use of AI gives rise to huge potential legal issues

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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IDA-lister efter konstituering: Processen var lukket og svær

Flertallet var ikke åbne nok over for mindretallets ønsker, da IDAs nyvalgte repræsentantskabe skulle vælge formand og sætte kursen for de kommende tre år, lød kritikken fra flere lister på IDA-politikernes konstituerende møde i lørdags.

8h

Calculating the Ecological Impact of Game of Thrones' Dragons

In a prestigious math competition earlier this year, contestants ran the numbers on raising dragons.

8h

Why Uber Is Fighting Cities Over Data About Scooter Trips

Los Angeles and other cities want detailed data on the shared scooters on their streets. Uber, Lyft and other companies fear a Trojan horse that could affect ride-hailing.

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An AI Pioneer Explains the Evolution of Neural Networks

Google's Geoff Hinton was a pioneer in researching the neural networks that now underlie much of artificial intelligence. He persevered when few others agreed.

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Technology That Could End Humanity—and How to Stop It

Oxford philosopher Nick Bostrom says technology often has unintended consequences, and that we may have to choose between totalitarianism and annihilation.

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How soil carbon can help tackle climate change

Maintaining soil organic matter is critical to tackling climate change because soil organic matter is rich in carbon. Soil carbon is also the keystone element controlling soil health, which enables soils to be resilient as droughts and intense rainfall events increasingly occur.

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How financial initiatives that tackle global warming can make a real impact

Awareness and concern over climate change and its impacts has risen sharply in recent years. According to a December 2018 survey by Yale University, 73 percent of Americans now say that global warming is real, up 10 percentage points in just three years. Investors have followed, with more than 525 with assets above US $96 trillion signing the United Principles for Responsible Investment (UN PRI).

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A new AI acquired humanlike ‘number sense’ on its own

A new artificial intelligence seems to share our intuitive ability to estimate numbers at a glance.

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Forecasting the hunt for the first supermassive black holes

It is believed that the formation and growth of most galaxies across the history of the universe has been fueled by supermassive black holes growing together with their host galaxy as they collect matter to attain millions of solar masses. Chasing the early stages of these extreme objects is among the missions of future powerful telescopes.

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If At First You Don't Succeed

The benefits of failure — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Archaeologists Discovered a Hidden Chamber in Roman Emperor Nero's Underground Palace

Archaeologists have uncovered a hidden vault, which has sat untouched for nearly 2,000 years, in Emperor Nero's Palace.

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Game of Thrones' 'sicansíos': not the first word to be lost in translation | David Shariatmadari

There’s a long history of phrases being garbled as they cross from one language to another – and some of them stick Game of Thrones is known for its linguistic inventiveness. The TV adaptation of George RR Martin’s fantasy cycle has gone way further than the original novels ever did, with linguist David J Peterson fleshing out the languages of Essos and Westeros, Dothraki and Valyrian, from one o

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Amazon to employees: We'll pay you to quit and haul packages

Amazon, which is racing to deliver packages faster, is turning to its employees with a proposition: Quit your job and we'll help you start a business delivering Amazon package.

9h

This Is What The Apple Card Looks Like In Real Life

Back in March, Apple announced the Apple Card. This is Apple’s take on a credit card and according to the company, it’s not just a regular credit card as it will actually be made …

9h

Forsker var en tur på genbrugspladsen: Umuligt at reparere moderne støvsugere

Danmark er blandt verdens bedste til at producere elektronikskrot, der shreddes og sejles til store lossepladser i udlandet. Ofte er elektronikken kasseret på grund af småfejl, der ikke kan repareres.

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SpaceX's Starlink Could Cause Cascades of Space Junk

Plans for thousands of new communications satellites would revolutionize global telecommunications but also raise risks of disaster in Earth orbit — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This Is the Earliest Known Christian Burial in England. It's Finally Revealing Its Secrets.

A repaired lyre and a pristine gold belt buckle are among the treasures in a 1,400-year-old tomb.

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In Photos: Stunning Treasures from the Burial of an Anglo-Saxon Prince

Take a look at photos of the earliest Christian burial in England. The tomb once held the remains of an adolescent or adult Christian man of aristocratic lineage.

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SpaceX's Starlink Could Cause Cascades of Space Junk

Plans for thousands of new communications satellites would revolutionize global telecommunications but also raise risks of disaster in Earth orbit — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Faroe Islands 'close down' as tourists fly in to repair them

The Faroe Islands declared themselves shut down as foreign volunteers came to take part in sustainable tourism.

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Just how common is positive publication bias? Here’s one researcher who’s trying to figure that out

While the presence of publication bias – the selective publishing of positive studies – in science is well known, debate continues about how extensive such bias truly is and the best way to identify it. The most recent entrant in the debate is a paper by Robbie van Aert and co-authors, who have published a … Continue reading Just how common is positive publication bias? Here’s one researcher who’s

9h

The Methane Detectives: On the Trail of a Global Warming Mystery

The uptick was so unexpected that it was not considered in pathway models ahead of the 2015 climate talks in Paris. Meanwhile, understanding the sudden rise in methane levels is not simply an academic exercise; it's crucial to knowing just what humanity might be facing as the planet continues to warm.

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How to Really Honor the Troops

Two letters, two numbers. The email to me, inviting me to dinner, began with two seemingly random letters, followed by two numbers. My assistant was the first one who read the email and was confused. But I wasn’t. I smiled. Once upon a time, I didn’t wear any visible rank or insignia, but if a ranger or another special operator saw those two letters and two numbers on a Velcro patch on my sleeve

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Democrat Steve Bullock Won a Red State in 2016. Can He Beat Trump in 2020?

HELENA, Mont.—Yes, another Democrat running for president. Another white guy. Another politician most of the country has never heard of. Another candidate who doesn’t have a lot of money to start with, or any real hopes of meeting the low bar to make the stage for the first debates next month. Another dude whose last name begins with B who thinks that entering the 2020 race after 21 others makes

9h

After 30 Years, I Spoke With Viktor Orbán Again

We first met almost 30 years ago, right after the Berlin Wall came down, at a meeting of dissidents held in France’s embassy in Budapest. President François Mitterrand had asked me to prepare a report on how France could contribute to the reconstruction of the countries of Central Europe after the lifting of the Communist yoke. At the time, Viktor Orbán was one of the brightest figures in the vic

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Home of the Future Will Withstand Whatever Wild Weather Comes

submitted by /u/SlipSlamMammaJamma [link] [comments]

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When do you think the first human will live on Mars will happen?

I think late 2060's. submitted by /u/DimLight90 [link] [comments]

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Techtopia #104: Astronaut Andreas tror på Danmark som rumfartsnation

Den danske astronaut Andreas Mogensen sidder hos NASA i Houston og arbejder med den næste månemission. Han håber selv at komme til Månen indenfor de næste fem år via den nye rumstation Lunar Gateway.

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KU brugte 18 mio. kroner, fem år og seks konsulenthuse på kuldsejlet HR-projekt

Københavns Universitet skrottede sidste år HR-systemet Epos efter fem års udvikling. Universitetet har hidtil mørklagt al økonomi i projektet, men en aktindsigt viser, at HR-systemet kostet millioner af kroner og tusindvis af mandetimer.

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Google Play Store Now Suggesting Users To Uninstall Unused Apps

We all have a ton of apps on our phone, some more than others. However, like most people, there is a chance that at the end of the day, there are only a handful of apps that we might use on …

10h

Flere pesticider risikerer at ende i grundvandet: Alligevel får de dispensation igen og igen

PLUS. Flere dispenserede sprøjtegifte risikerer ifølge Rigsrevisionen at udvaske til grundvandet, når landmænd bruger dem til deres kartofler, raps og andre afgrøder. Alligevel undlader Miljøstyrelsen at stille særlige krav til pesticiderne, når styrelsen giver dispensationerne.

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De har fået penge til sundhedshuse: Sådan vil tre kommuner bruge dem

En række kommuner har fået penge til at etablere eller forny sundhedshuse. Kommunal Sundhed har spurgt tre sundhedsudvalgsformænd, hvad pengene skal gå til.

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China auto sales slump continues in April

China car sales fell 14.6 percent in April, an official industry association said on Monday, extending a slump in a massive auto market that has long been a cash cow for the industry.

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Game of Thrones stream websites offering new Season 8 episodes for free trick users into scams

In addition to risk of malware attacks, torrent and free streaming websites may not offer what they claim to

10h

The Morning After: Germany starts testing its 'electric highway'

Hey, good morning! We're back. SpaceX's internet satellites are ready for launch, Germany starts testing its electric highway and the best coding kits for little ones. Phew. …

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New approach uses magnetic beads to treat preeclampsia

A new proof of concept study shows that functionalized magnetic beads reduced blood levels of a harmful molecule by 40%, which doubled the effect of a different molecule that aids blood vessel function, opening new perspectives for the treatment of preeclampsia.

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Amygdala activation during unconscious visual processing of food

Amygdala activation during unconscious visual processing of food Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43733-2 Amygdala activation during unconscious visual processing of food

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Individual differences in working memory capacity and cue-guided behavior in humans

Individual differences in working memory capacity and cue-guided behavior in humans Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43860-w Individual differences in working memory capacity and cue-guided behavior in humans

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Systemic inflammation contributes to impairment of quality of life in chronic pancreatitis

Systemic inflammation contributes to impairment of quality of life in chronic pancreatitis Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43846-8 Systemic inflammation contributes to impairment of quality of life in chronic pancreatitis

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Efficacy and safety of drug-eluting stenting compared with bypass grafting in diabetic patients with multivessel and/or left main coronary artery disease

Efficacy and safety of drug-eluting stenting compared with bypass grafting in diabetic patients with multivessel and/or left main coronary artery disease Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43681-x Efficacy and safety of drug-eluting stenting compared with bypass grafting in diabetic patients with multivessel and/or left main coronary artery disease

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Regulating response and leukocyte adhesion of human endothelial cell by gradient nanohole substrate

Regulating response and leukocyte adhesion of human endothelial cell by gradient nanohole substrate Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43573-0 Regulating response and leukocyte adhesion of human endothelial cell by gradient nanohole substrate

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Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in Cambodia during 2016–2017

Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in Cambodia during 2016–2017 Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43785-4 Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in Cambodia during 2016–2017

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Downregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the Down syndrome hippocampus

Downregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the Down syndrome hippocampus Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43820-4 Downregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling in the Down syndrome hippocampus

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Identification of influential invaders in evolutionary populations

Identification of influential invaders in evolutionary populations Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43853-9 Identification of influential invaders in evolutionary populations

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Climate change is an emergency we can solve

The UK parliament has declared a “climate emergency”. Urgent action is absolutely necessary, but it needs to be carried out with calm hope, not panicked despair

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Car using a flow battery has completed 200k miles in testing

submitted by /u/NjalBorgeirsson [link] [comments]

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Trial of new generation of surgical robots claims success

High-tech arms used on 30 patients who required keyhole or minimally invasive surgery

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Hjemmebatteri reducerer elregningen hos Ølstykke-familie: Flere danskere anskaffer batterier

Ligesom mange andre familier har familien Olsen valgt et solcelleanlæg med batterilagring, der kan udjævne forskellen mellem produktion og forbrug. En leverandør melder, at over halvdelen af de solgte anlæg i dag med batteri.

11h

Scientology ship remains under measles quarantine in Caribbean scare

Twenty-eight people required to stay on Freewinds after female crew member came down with virus Authorities in the Caribbean island of Curacao have announced that 17 crew members and 11 passengers must stay on board a ship owned by the Church of Scientology that is under quarantine following a confirmed case of measles. Dr Izzy Gerstenbluth said the group was required to stay on the 440-feet Free

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Working out in the future

submitted by /u/TheKarlBertil [link] [comments]

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Treat-programmet var meget tidskrævende

Torben Mogensen er forkert på den, når han skriver, at programmet blev lagt ned på grund af modstand fra lægegruppen.

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Går det att sola säkert?

Den här veckan, 13-10 maj, pågår en hudcancerkampanj. Syftet är att göra människor uppmärksamma på hudförändringar och söka vård i tid. Kampanjen sprider också kunskap om hur vi bäst skyddar oss och hur vi kan bäst förebygga så att vi inte drabbas.

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Titan’s seas may be coated in organic goop that stops waves forming

Saturn’s moon Titan has liquid methane seas that are remarkably calm, which may be because a layer of organic “snow” fallen from the atmosphere kills any waves

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Give 'em shell: turtles stick neck out for Japan rice forecast

In an ancient ceremony that occurs only once every imperial era, Japanese palace courtiers in traditional robes and hats decided on Monday where best to grow royal rice—using shells from endangered turtles.

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Give 'em shell: turtles stick neck out for Japan rice forecast

In an ancient ceremony that occurs only once every imperial era, Japanese palace courtiers in traditional robes and hats decided on Monday where best to grow royal rice—using shells from endangered turtles.

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The NORI protocol: An unproven fruit-based nutritional treatment for cancer sold by a self-proclaimed “expert”

Mark Simon is the founder of the Nutritional Oncology Research Institute. He has neither an MD, DO, nor PhD. (He doesn't even have an ND!) Yet he claims to have discovered a dietary protocol that can cure cancer. Can it? (I think you know the answer to this question.)

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How biotech went from “no way” to payday in the cannabis business

Genetic engineers want to make bio-pot, for fun and health, but their venture could backfire if they help create a public health menace.

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Teachers predict pupil success just as well as exam scores

New research from King's College London finds that teacher assessments are equally as reliable as standardised exams at predicting educational success.

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Indigenous Australians take government to UN over climate change

Indigenous residents of low-lying islands off northern Australia will submit a landmark complaint with the United Nations on Monday accusing the government of violating their human rights by failing to tackle climate change.

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Strong 6.1 magnitude earthquake hits Panama: USGS

A 6.1 magnitude earthquake hit Panama on Sunday near the border with Costa Rica, the US Geological Survey said, but there were no immediate reports of damage or casualties.

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Toshiba net profit up on chip business sale

Struggling Japanese engineering firm Toshiba on Monday reported improved full-year net profit thanks to the sale of its chip business, but said operating profit was sharply down.

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San Francisco may ban police, city use of facial recognition

San Francisco is on track to become the first U.S. city to ban the use of facial recognition by police and other city agencies, reflecting a growing backlash against a technology that's creeping into airports, motor vehicle departments, stores, stadiums and home security cameras.

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Teachers predict pupil success just as well as exam scores

New research from King's College London finds that teacher assessments are equally as reliable as standardised exams at predicting educational success.

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Michio Kaku: "The Future of Humanity" | Talks at Google

submitted by /u/beer118 [link] [comments]

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What could exist inside and between the walls of a Dyson Sphere?

Acording to FutureTimeline.net , A Dyson sphere could be built around the solar system around the year 3100 when the world reach the Kardashev type 2 scale. This is what id writen there about the issue: ​ 3100 AD Humanity is becoming a Type 2 civilisation on the Kardashev scale The exponential growth of AI has allowed the manipulation of matter on scales barely dreamed of before. The largest stru

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It's Time We Put a Stop to Human Evolution, Says Geneticist

Evolution isn't necessarily all it's cracked up to me.

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Becoming a modern-day cyborg: Chips with Everything podcast

Jordan Erica Webber talks to the co-host of Grindfest, a festival for which dozens of fans of a type of body modification called ‘grinding’ travelled to the Tehachapi mountains in California Humans have been using technology to alter their bodies for decades. Many women have medical devices implanted in their arms as a form of contraception, and people with heart problems can be helped with pacem

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A British Town’s Novel Solution to Austerity

PRESTON, England—For years, almost all of Britain’s political energy has been consumed by the country’s withdrawal from the European Union. The issue has dominated evening news programs, front pages, and conversation in London. Yet beyond Brexit, and outside the British capital, a great change is taking place, one that is refashioning Britons’ relationship to their government, and what they can e

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Dyb og rytmisk: Vi foretrækker politikere med bestemte stemmer

Dyb stemme kan være en fordel for en politiker på valg, siger forsker.

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We are more envious of things that haven't happened yet

We are more envious of someone else's covetable experience before it happens than after it has passed, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

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New Mexico cancer patients have lower survival rate, study finds

Researchers at the Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine (BCOM) have found that cancer patients in New Mexico have lower chances of survival when compared to the rest of the nation.

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Political controversies about marginalized groups increase bullying in youths

Scientists have uncovered new evidence that heated political discourse over proposed laws involving marginalized groups, such as debates about the rights of LGBT people, can contribute to an increase in bullying linked to students' identity in schools. It is the largest study to date to examine the link.

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Five things to know about melanoma

'Five things to know about … melanoma' in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides a brief overview of this malignant skin cancer for physicians and patients.

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Physician procedure volume linked to outcomes after surgical abortion

Although surgically induced abortion is a low-risk procedure, women whose physician infrequently performs it have almost twice the risk of severe complications, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

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The first AI fashion line ever created.

submitted by /u/william123qw [link] [comments]

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Game of Thrones Delivers Its Most Cataclysmic Episode

Every week for the eighth and final season of Game of Thrones , three Atlantic staffers will be discussing new episodes of the HBO drama. Because no screeners were made available to critics in advance this year, we’ll be posting our thoughts in installments. David Sims: A crucial part of the lore of Game of Thrones —and the George R. R. Martin novels the show is based upon—is the sack of King’s L

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Bad Update Crashes Hundreds Of Police Ankle Monitors

Ankle monitors are useful for keeping track of people who are under house arrest. It means that police will know at all times where the person is, and is much more efficient than sticking a …

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Skal cpr-nummer kobles direkte med DNA på Nationalt Genom Center?

Nationalt Genom Center går i produktion i juli, men det er endnu ikke afklaret, om cpr-nummer skal opbevares sammen med genomdata.

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PM's claim Coalition saved reef from nonexistent 'endangered list' condemned as 'ridiculous'

Scott Morrison says government took reef ‘off the endangered list’ – despite no such list existing Scott Morrison has credited his government with having “saved” the Great Barrier Reef, a claim rejected as “ridiculous” by scientists, environmental groups and the Queensland government. At the Liberal party’s campaign launch in Melbourne on Sunday, Morrison thanked the former environment ministers

16h

13 Awesome Science Facts You Probably Didn't Learn in High School

This would have made science class so much cooler.

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17h

Digital Wellbeing feature reportedly slowing down Pixel phones

Similar to Apple's Screen Time, Google's Digital Wellbeing is designed to monitor your smartphone usage habits and help in achieving a healthier digital lifestyle. It runs in the background …

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17h

Maternal microbes mediate diet-derived damage

New research in The Journal of Physiology has found, using a mouse model, that microbes in the maternal intestine may contribute to impairment of the gut barrier during pregnancy.

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How likely is it humans will give prosthetic hands to intelligent animals like dolphins, ravens and elephants in the next 100 years and teach/train them how to use them?

Example Raven: "Ravens are fucking smart. Their limitation is, that they got these feet and wings. If you gave them like … fingers … and have them like problem solve .. they might be able to do that!" – Joe Rogan – Ravens Are Smarter Than Chimps! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6YCtwnYM2U (@5:54) My question is: How likely is it humans will give animal species prosthetic body parts, like han

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A surprising experiment opens the path to new particle manipulation methods

Unexpected result from an acoustics experiment could have applications in biomedical and microsystems research.

19h

Uncovering a 5000-year-old family tragedy

Researchers have shed light on a mysterious 5,000-year-old mass grave in Poland. Despite being killed brutally, the victims were buried carefully. Ancient DNA has revealed the mass murder to be that of a large family. The new research results shed light on a particularly violent era in European prehistory of which little is known.

19h

Voltage shows when neurons are ‘out of whack’

Researchers have discovered that a neuron’s own electrical signal, or voltage, can indicate whether it is functioning normally. If that voltage is absent, scientists say everything is “out of whack.” Nerve cells, or neurons—the “workhorse cells” involved in walking, breathing, and chewing—can adjust to changes in the body, but they never stop working unless there is a fatal injury. What exactly s

20h

With tweaks, smartwatches know what you do with your hands

With a few tweaks, smartwatches can detect a surprising number of things your hands are doing. Researchers have used a standard smartwatch to figure out when a wearer was typing on a keyboard, washing dishes, petting a dog, pouring from a pitcher, or cutting with scissors. By making a few changes to the watch’s operating system, the researchers could use its accelerometer to recognize hand motion

20h

Penguins and Seals Create Invertebrate Hotspots On Antarctica…With Poop

In Antarctica, researchers have found patches of life, sustained in large part by droppings from seals and penguins. Changes in those populations could have ripple effects down the ecosystem. (Image credit: Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images)

20h

Why Elon Musk, Facebook and MIT Are Betting On Mind-Reading Technology

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Teachers predict pupil success just as well as exam scores

New research from King's College London finds that teacher assessments are equally as reliable as standardised exams at predicting educational success.

20h

GPs need training to tackle chronic opioid use

GPs must be better-equipped to support patients to manage the psychological challenge of reducing their opioid use — according to new research from the University of East Anglia.The recommendation is part of a toolkit being launched today to help GPs reduce the amount of opioids they prescribe.The toolkit outlines seven areas of best practice to tackle chronic opioid use — based on international

20h

Why super-Earths orbit super close to their stars

New research improves our understanding of how large super-Earth planets with small, quick orbits form. The galaxy is littered with planetary systems vastly different from ours. In the solar system, the planet closest to the Sun—Mercury, with an orbit of 88 days—is also the smallest. But NASA’s Kepler spacecraft has discovered thousands of systems full of super-Earths in very small orbits that zi

20h

Complex rules for businesses are easier to break

Greater complexity in business regulation increases the chances that businesses will violate those rules, but doesn’t necessarily make those violations harder to fix, according to new research. In every type of business, there are rules and regulations guiding a variety of practices and processes to ensure the business operates safely, fairly, ethically, and so on. Virtually all research into why

20h

Some biologic treatments for psoriasis may be safer for patients

Dermatologists found a decreased risk of infection in patients with psoriasis using some of the newer, more targeted medications compared to those taking methotrexate, a drug widely used since the 1960s as a first line treatment for moderate-to-severe psoriasis.

21h

Good sleep quality and good mood lead to good working memory with age

A team of psychologists has found strong associations between working memory — a fundamental building block of a functioning mind — and three health-related factors: sleep, age, and depressed mood. The team also reports that each of these factors is associated with different aspects of working memory. Working memory is the part of short-term memory that temporarily stores and manages information

21h

Apollo Moon landing: The 13 minutes that defined a century

The Apollo 11 landing: What did it take to pull off one of the greatest achievements in human history?

21h

Publisher Correction: Viral and metazoan poxins are cGAMP-specific nucleases that restrict cGAS–STING signalling

Publisher Correction: Viral and metazoan poxins are cGAMP-specific nucleases that restrict cGAS–STING signalling Nature, Published online: 13 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1207-2 Publisher Correction: Viral and metazoan poxins are cGAMP-specific nucleases that restrict cGAS–STING signalling

21h

Study sheds new light on urinary tract infections in postmenopausal women

A new study suggests why urinary tract infections (UTIs) have such a high recurrence rate in postmenopausal women: several species of bacteria can invade the bladder walls.

21h

Starwatch: time to take a good look at the lunar maria

The full moon on Saturday gives an opportunity (weather permitting) to study the “seas” that form the dark markings on the moon’s surface The moon will reach full on 18 May. This is a good opportunity to take the time to really look at its bright disc. The dark markings are called lunar maria, named after the Latin word for seas because early astronomers thought they were seeing bodies of water.

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