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nyheder2019maj14

Traces of crawling in Italian cave give clues to ancient humans' social behavior

Evidence of crawling in an Italian cave system sheds new light on how late Stone Age humans behaved as a group, especially when exploring new grounds, says a study published today in eLife.

1h

15h

Lækket EU-rapport: Afgifter på flybrændstof kan skære CO2-udledning 11 procent

Minimumafgifter på flybrændstof i EU kan sænke CO2-udledningen med 11 procent, uden at det vil få negative økonomiske konsekvenser. Det viser en lækket rapport fra EU-Kommissionen.

6h

New method enables 'photographing' of enzymes

Scientists have developed a method with which an enzyme at work can be 'photographed'. Their method makes it possible to better understand the function of important biomolecules. The researchers also hope to gain insights into the causes of certain enzyme disorders.

now

Breakthrough in new material to harness solar power

Physicists are pushing the performance of solar cells to levels never before reached. They have made a significant breakthrough in the chemical formula and process to make a new material. The ultra-high efficiency material called a tandem perovskite solar cell is being developed to help solve the world energy crisis.

now

Nudges to get a bit greener hinder real change

Policies that aim to nudge us into better choices actually decrease support for policies with far greater impact, research finds. For example, many households across the United States receive energy bills comparing their use to that of similar neighbors to remind them to use less energy. And most companies automatically enroll employees in 401(k) plans unless they choose to opt-out, helping emplo

2min

Plastic Is Killing the Bacteria That Make 10% of Earth’s Oxygen

New Consequences We’ve all seen heartbreaking pictures of dolphins trapped in plastic six-pack rings. But new research suggests that plastic pollution is hurting marine life in far subtler ways that could have dire consequences for the entire world ecosystem. A sea-dwelling, photosynthetic bacteria called Prochlorococcus generates ten percent of the oxygen we breathe, but according to research pu

3min

How proteins help influenza A bind and slice its way to cells

Researchers have provided new insight on how two proteins help influenza A virus particles fight their way to human cells.

3min

How proteins help influenza A bind and slice its way to cells

Researchers have provided new insight on how two proteins help influenza A virus particles fight their way to human cells.

6min

Shining a UV light on a special glue can repair heart wounds

Tests of a biodegradable glue reveals it can successfully stick wounds in heart tissue back together again and withstand high blood pressure

6min

You are what you eat: How the pursuit of carbs changed mammals' genes and saliva

A study of dozens of mammal species explores the evolutionary history of amylase, a compound that breaks down carbs.

12min

Small, hardy planets most likely to survive death of their stars

Small, hardy planets packed with dense elements have the best chance of avoiding being crushed and swallowed up when their host star dies, new research from the University of Warwick has found.

12min

A nerve cell serves as a 'single' for studies

Nerve cells derived from human stem cells often serve as the basis for research into brain diseases. However, these cells differ considerably in their quality and produce varying results. Scientists are therefore looking for simple cell models that lead to consistent results. Research teams from the University of Bonn, the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and the Max Planck Institute for Experimental

12min

First birds: Archaeopteryx gets company

Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich describe a hitherto unknown bird from the late Jurassic period. It is the second bird capable of flight, after the famous Archaeopteryx, to be identified from this era.

12min

New doctors' DNA ages six times faster than normal in first year

Every summer, tens of thousands of newly minted doctors start the most intense year of their training: the first year of residency, also called the intern year. A new study suggests that the experience will make their DNA age six times faster than normal. And the effect will be largest among those whose training programs demand the longest hours.

12min

Risk of cardiovascular complications post-surgery doubles for patients with sleep apnea

According to a new study published today in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), patients who have severe obstructive sleep apnea have a significantly higher risk of complications related to their heart in the first 30 days after major surgery.

12min

Philadelphia's sweetened drink sales drop 38% after beverage tax

One year after Philadelphia passed its beverage tax, sales of sugary and artificially sweetened beverages dropped by 38% in chain food retailers, according to Penn Medicine researchers who conducted one of the largest studies examining the impacts of a beverage tax. The results, published this week in JAMA, translate to almost one billion fewer ounces of sugary or artificially sweetened beverages

12min

Philadelphia beverage tax associated with higher prices, reduced sales

A few US cities have instituted beverage taxes on sweetened drinks to generate revenue and to reduce consumption of these drinks because of their association with obesity and poor health.

12min

Pitt study finds direct oxidative stress damage shortens telomeres

First causal evidence that oxidative stress works directly on telomeres to speed cellular aging.

12min

Rimac teams up with Hyundai and Kia to build electric sportscars

Rimac, maker of some of the most extreme electric sports cars the planet has ever seen, is about to get its fingers into the mass market pie through a US$90 million investment from Korean …

16min

Tio sätt att minska det svenska matsvinnet

Att minska matsvinnet i alla led är en av tre åtgärder som är avgörande för att hålla klimatpåverkan inom gränserna för vad jorden klarar av. Det är forskningsplattformen SLU Future Food som har givit ut en så kallad policy brief med forskares rekommendationer för hur Sverige ska få bukt med matsvinnet. Snabbguide till beslutsfattare Syftet med rekommendationerna är att ge beslutsfattare, såväl i

18min

Forskere vil erstatte Trumps mur med en energikorridor

Grænseområdet mellem USA og Mexico er velegnet til generere energi ud fra sol, vind og naturgas. Det kan skabe et nyt vækstområde.

18min

VIDEOS: Foraging

A wildly edible adventure into foraging with masters in the field.

19min

How proteins help influenza A bind and slice its way to cells

Researchers have provided new insight on how two proteins help influenza A virus particles fight their way to human cells.

21min

New factor influencing spread of Legionella

When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. An international team has tackled the question where do these pathogens come from using an important bacterial pathogen that causes lung disease.

21min

Injections of a novel protein reduced artery blockage by enhancing lymphatic vascular function in mice

Mice that received injections of a protein called VEGF-C experienced about a 30% reduction in artery blockage compared to untreated mice. The VEGF-C injections improved lymphatic transport, limited plaque formation and stabilized plaque even after mice were switched to a high-fat diet.

21min

Preschoolers who watch TV sleep less

Preschoolers who watch TV sleep significantly less than those who don't, according to new research.

21min

Impact of CO2 leakage through North Sea wells

Realistic estimates show that global warming can only be kept below 1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius if carbon dioxide is actively removed from the atmosphere. Storage beneath the seafloor is an option that has now been investigated intensively.

21min

New method enables 'photographing' of enzymes

Scientists have developed a method with which an enzyme at work can be 'photographed'. Their method makes it possible to better understand the function of important biomolecules. The researchers also hope to gain insights into the causes of certain enzyme disorders.

21min

Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale

An emerging suite of information technologies based on fundamental quantum physics has been given a boost by researchers who have invented a method to engineer single atomic defects in diamond using laser processing.

21min

Brain changes linked with Alzheimer's years before symptoms appear

In a records review of 290 people at risk for Alzheimer's disease, scientists say they have identified an average level of biological and anatomical brain changes linked to Alzheimer's disease that occur three to 10 years — some even more than 30 years — before the disease's first recognizable symptoms appear.

21min

Traces of crawling in Italian cave give clues to ancient humans' social behavior

Using multiple methods of analysis, researchers have identified the movements of a group of humans as they explored an Italian cave system during the late Stone Age.

21min

Producing food whilst preserving biodiversity

In nature conservation and agriculture, there are two opposing views of how to combine high biodiversity and sustainable food production: nature conservation should either be integrated into agricultural land, or segregated into protected areas in order to enable maximum yields in the food production areas. Researchers now advocate coordinated approaches that combine nature conservation and agricu

21min

Habitual coffee drinkers really do wake up and smell the coffee

Regular coffee drinkers can sniff out even tiny amounts of coffee and are faster at recognizing the aroma, which could open the door to new ways of using aversion therapy for addiction.

21min

Breakthrough in new material to harness solar power

Physicists are pushing the performance of solar cells to levels never before reached. They have made a significant breakthrough in the chemical formula and process to make a new material. The ultra-high efficiency material called a tandem perovskite solar cell is being developed to help solve the world energy crisis.

21min

Atlantic Readers Assess the Impact of the Political Generation Gap

The Coming Generation War Last week, Niall Ferguson and Eyck Freymann showed that the Democratic Party is rapidly becoming the party of the young—and that Republicans are leaning ever more heavily on retirees. Both parties, they argued, are already feeling the effects of this generation-based realignment. “America’s political future,” Ferguson and Freymann wrote, “will be determined by the outcom

21min

‘Small Towns, Big Ideas’

This was a fascinating session—I say, as the person who got to ask the questions, rather than having to give the answers. The hour-long YouTube video is here . The topic was “Small Towns, Big Ideas: Innovations From Rural America.” It was a discussion in Washington, D.C., on the evening of May 13, sponsored by the renowned social-entrepreneur organization Ashoka , with four of its Ashoka fellows

21min

SUTD researchers demystify centralization in cryptocurrency mining

SUTD researchers have developed a novel approach to untangle the centralization phenomena in blockchain mining by employing the rich economic theory of Oceanic Games. The application of this theory in the blockchain ecosystem unveiled incentives for both active and newly entering miners to merge and act as single entities and provides an alternative justification of the centralization and concentr

33min

Impact of CO2 leakage through North Sea wells

Realistic estimates show that global warming can only be kept below 1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius if carbon dioxide is actively removed from the atmosphere. Storage beneath the seafloor is an option that has been investigated intensively by an international team of scientists led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel. An assessment of opportunities and risks has now been published in t

33min

Preschoolers who watch TV sleep less

Preschoolers who watch TV sleep significantly less than those who don't, according to new research by University of Massachusetts Amherst neuroscientist Rebecca Spencer and developmental science graduate student Abigail Helm.

33min

How the Sun pumps out water from Mars into space

The study of a new water-cycle in the Martian summertime offers clues as to why Mars is a dusty barren land.

33min

How proteins help influenza A bind and slice its way to cells

Researchers have provided new insight on how two proteins help influenza A virus particles fight their way to human cells.

33min

Symbionts as lifesavers

When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. An international team led by Matthias Horn from the Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science at the University of Vienna has tackled the question where do these pathogens come from using an important bacterial pathogen that causes lung disease. The results of their study have been published

33min

Green New Deal: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

34min

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34min

France, New Zealand to launch a call to end online extremism

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

34min

34min

Surgical robots have performed 10,000 surgeries at Queen’s (and counting)

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

34min

Plaque in arteries may not all be the same; targeting specific immune cells in plaque may reduce heart attack and stroke risk

A specific type of immune cell is more commonly found in arterial plaque from patients suffering from a recent stroke or mini-stroke, according to preliminary research.

37min

Humanwide program uses data-driven, integrated team approach to predict, prevent disease

A pilot program combining cutting-edge tools of biomedicine with a collaborative, team-based method, offers a new approach to personalized health care that captures the promise of Precision Health: to predict, prevent and treat disease based on the individual patient.

37min

Early in vitro testing for adverse effects on embryos

Researchers have combined embryonic cells and liver cells in a new cell culture test. This combination lets them detect adverse effects that new medications may have on embryos early on in the drug development process.

37min

A new sensor for light, heat and touch

Inspired by the behavior of natural skin, researchers have developed a sensor that will be suitable for use with electronic skin. It can measure changes in body temperature, and react to both sunlight and warm touch.

37min

What happens when your picky eater becomes a teenager?

Toddlers who are picky about their food are not deficient in essential nutrients compared to their peers when they are teenagers.

37min

Historically 'safer' tramadol more likely than other opioids to result in prolonged use

Surgical patients receiving the opioid tramadol have a somewhat higher risk of prolonged use than those receiving other common opioids, new research finds. However, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) classifies tramadol as a Schedule IV controlled substance, meaning it's considered to have a lower risk of addiction and abuse than Schedule II opioids, such as oxycodone and hydrocodone.

37min

Protect protruding teeth from damage and long-term consequences

Children with their first or early adult set of teeth that stick out have an increased chance of damaging them, but the risk can be easily reduced without being prohibitively costly.

37min

Parents unknown: Mysterious larvae found in Panama's two oceans

Animals in hard-to-reach places, especially strange, 'unattractive,' animals, may completely escape our attention. We don't know what their role is in the environment. In fact, we don't even know they exist. New research may double the number of species of a little-known marine creature, based on DNA studies of its larvae.

37min

‘Next to zero’ chance that apelike fossil is our direct ancestor

It is unlikely that Australopithecus sediba , a nearly two-million-year-old, apelike fossil from South Africa, is the direct ancestor of Homo , the genus to which modern-day humans belong, according to new research. Instead, the research, which appear in Science Advances , concludes by suggesting that Australopithecus afarensis , of the famous “Lucy” skeleton, is still the most likely ancestor to

38min

When Americans go to the polls, they look to the past – not the future

There's one question that almost every American voter asks him- or herself when casting their vote for president.

38min

Could a tattoo help you stay healthy? | Carson Bruns

Can we make tattoos both beautiful and functional? Nanotechnologist Carson Bruns shares his work creating high-tech tattoos that react to their environment — like color-changing ink that can tell you when you're getting a sunburn — and shows exciting ways they can deliver real-time information about our health.

43min

Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale

'Quantum technologies' utilise the unique phenomena of quantum superposition and entanglement to encode and process information, with potentially profound benefits to a wide range of information technologies from communications to sensing and computing.

45min

The electric vehicle revolution will come from China, not the US

The electric vehicle revolution is coming, but it won't be driven by the U.S. Instead, China will be at the forefront.

45min

The gene that explains why some snails are ‘lefties’

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01515-w CRISPR helps to pinpoint DNA involved in establishing an embryo’s body plan.

48min

Sensorn som reagerar på ljus, värme och beröring

Inom robotik, för proteser med känsel och för hälsoövervakning arbetar forskare runt om i världen för att ta fram elektronisk hud – flexibel, töjbar och med någon form av känsel. Forskare vid Laboratoriet för organisk elektronik vid Linköpings universitet har slagit sina kloka huvuden ihop och kombinerat flera olika fysikaliska fenomen och material. Resultatet är en sensor som exempelvis applicer

48min

Why Amazon Is Giving Employees $10,000 to Quit

The retail giant needs more third-party delivery partners to bring packages to your door.

51min

Traces of crawling in Italian cave give clues to ancient humans' social behavior

Evidence of crawling in an Italian cave system sheds new light on how late Stone Age humans behaved as a group, especially when exploring new grounds, says a study published today in eLife.

51min

Arts education can provide creative counter narratives against hate speech

Hate, as an emotion, is not an efficient response to ideological hate speech. Instead, using tools that hate speakers cannot use may undermine hate speakers' credibility. The arts have the potential to provide a more positive means of communication.

51min

Treats might mask animal intelligence

Rewards are frequently used to encourage learning, but rewards may actually mask true knowledge, finds a new study with rodents and ferrets.

52min

Keeping things in proportion: Lem2 necessary for nuclear scaling

A research team has found that inner nuclear membrane protein Lem2, backed up by endoplasmic reticulum protein Lnp1, acts as a valve to control the flow of the membrane into and out of the nuclear envelope. The researchers showed that by controlling membrane flow, Lem2 forms part of a regulatory system responsible for nuclear scaling, maintaining a constant nucleus to cell volume ratio.

52min

Dead zones in circadian clocks

Circadian clocks of organisms respond to light signals during night but do not respond in daytime. The time window where circadian clocks are insensitive to light signals is referred to as the 'dead zone'. Researchers have proposed a mechanism for the daytime dead zone. They report that saturation of a single biochemical reaction in the gene regulatory network that controls circadian oscillations

52min

These Grotesque Pokémon Were Drawn By a Neural Network

Chererzerd Twitter user Michael Friesen taught a generative adversarial network (GAN) — a machine learning AI designed to dream up images of anything from human faces to Airbnbs — to generate new Pokémon. The neural network came up with its own lineup of pixel art Pokémon that look, well, quite a bit more disconcerting than the real thing. Just don’t examine them too closely. made me some #StyleG

53min

Student creates model to predict hotspots of reptile, amphibian road mortality

One of the leading causes of death for frogs, turtles and snakes is road mortality. A study in Denmark found that amphibians have a 34 to 61 percent chance of being struck when crossing a roadway, and slow-moving turtles in Florida had less than a 2 percent chance of surviving a road crossing.

54min

New threat revealed for baby turtles

New research has revealed that marine turtle hatchlings entering the ocean close to jetties have a high likelihood of being eaten.

54min

Taming defective porous materials for robust and selective heterogeneous catalysis

The production of 1-butene via ethylene dimerization is one of the few industrial processes that employs homogeneous catalysis due to their high selectivity. Now, a new paper by the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), in collaboration with the Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) and RTI International, shows a more sustainable alternative.

56min

Producing food whilst preserving biodiversity

In nature conservation and agriculture, there are two opposing views of how to combine high biodiversity and sustainable food production: nature conservation should either be integrated into agricultural land, or segregated into protected areas in order to enable maximum yields in the food production areas. Researchers at the University of Göttingen advocate coordinated approaches that combine nat

56min

Plaque in arteries may not all be the same; targeting specific immune cells in plaque may reduce heart attack and stroke risk

A specific type of immune cell is more commonly found in arterial plaque from patients suffering from a recent stroke or mini-stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Vascular Discovery Scientific Sessions 2019.

56min

Injections of a novel protein reduced artery blockage by enhancing lymphatic vascular function in mice

Mice that received injections of a protein called VEGF-C experienced about a 30% reduction in artery blockage compared to untreated mice.The VEGF-C injections improved lymphatic transport, limited plaque formation and stabilized plaque even after mice were switched to a high-fat diet.

56min

Blood and sweat take training app to the next level

Last year about 1,000 runners were forced to quit the Stockholm Marathon due to extreme hot temperatures and the difficulty in staying hydrated. Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology have developed a multifaceted measuring technology that is able to detect a number of conditions in the human body, from dehydration to renal failure. Future applications include both training apps and watc

57min

New potential for tracking severe storms

Even just within the last couple of months, Cyclones Fani, Idai and Kenneth have brought devastation to millions. With the frequency and severity of extreme weather like this expected to increase against the backdrop of climate change, it is more important than ever to forecast and track events accurately. And, an ESA satellite is helping with the task in hand.

57min

A new sensor for light, heat and touch

Inspired by the behaviour of natural skin, researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linkoping University, have developed a sensor that will be suitable for use with electronic skin. It can measure changes in body temperature, and react to both sunlight and warm touch.

57min

Student creates model to predict hotspots of reptile, amphibian road mortality

One of the leading causes of death for frogs, turtles and snakes is road mortality. A study in Denmark found that amphibians have a 34 to 61 percent chance of being struck when crossing a roadway, and slow-moving turtles in Florida had less than a 2 percent chance of surviving a road crossing.

57min

Researchers solve scientific puzzle that could improve solar panel efficiency

A Loughborough University Ph.D. student has helped shed light on a solar panel puzzle that could lead to more efficient devices being developed.

57min

New threat revealed for baby turtles

New research has revealed that marine turtle hatchlings entering the ocean close to jetties have a high likelihood of being eaten.

57min

Early in vitro testing for adverse effects on embryos

ETH researchers have combined embryonic cells and liver cells in a new cell culture test. This combination lets them detect adverse effects that new medications may have on embryos early on in the drug development process.

57min

Homegrown hydroponics project spreads around the world

The idea began when UConn junior Christian Heiden '20 (ENG) was working on his Eagle Scout project in high school. It has developed into a non-profit organization that is helping the poor of Haiti and inspiring the curiosity of students in the UConn Child Development Labs.

57min

Study unlocks secrets of an elusive genome compartment

Although much of the human genome has been sequenced and assembled, scientists have hit roadblocks trying to map unassembled regions of DNA that consist mostly of repetitive sequences, including the centromere.

57min

You are what you eat: How the pursuit of carbs changed mammals' genes and saliva

Starch, a complex carbohydrate, is a vital source of nutrition for many mammals. Humans farm it in the form of rice, wheat, corn, potatoes and oats. Rats comb our garbage piles for scraps of pizza and bread. Wild boars root for tubers.

57min

Early in vitro testing for adverse effects on embryos

ETH researchers have combined embryonic cells and liver cells in a new cell culture test. This combination lets them detect adverse effects that new medications may have on embryos early on in the drug development process.

1h

Homegrown hydroponics project spreads around the world

The idea began when UConn junior Christian Heiden '20 (ENG) was working on his Eagle Scout project in high school. It has developed into a non-profit organization that is helping the poor of Haiti and inspiring the curiosity of students in the UConn Child Development Labs.

1h

Study unlocks secrets of an elusive genome compartment

Although much of the human genome has been sequenced and assembled, scientists have hit roadblocks trying to map unassembled regions of DNA that consist mostly of repetitive sequences, including the centromere.

1h

You are what you eat: How the pursuit of carbs changed mammals' genes and saliva

Starch, a complex carbohydrate, is a vital source of nutrition for many mammals. Humans farm it in the form of rice, wheat, corn, potatoes and oats. Rats comb our garbage piles for scraps of pizza and bread. Wild boars root for tubers.

1h

Teknikken driller i Nordhavn: Blind vinkel tvinger Autonomous Mobility til at have en operatør til at overvåge kørslen

En operatør med joystick skal stå klar til at overtage styringen i tilfælde af, at den selvkørende bus fra Navya svigter, eller hvis farlige situationer opstår, når den efter planen skal køre i Nordhavn.

1h

Vector Laboratories: Is Your IHC as Easy as ABC?

With over 100K citations and counting, the avidin-biotin complex is the most popular immunhistochemistry method today.

1h

I Broke Breakfast

There’s no good reason you can’t eat a chicken-parmesan hoagie for breakfast. That’s what I decided last year when I woke up one morning, hungover and ravenous, craving the sandwich’s very specific combination of fried chicken cutlet, melted mozzarella, and tomato sauce. “Breakfast food,” as a category, suddenly felt like my middle school’s dress code: unnecessarily prim and preordained by people

1h

Vector Laboratories: Is Your IHC as Easy as ABC?

With over 100K citations and counting, the avidin-biotin complex is the most popular immunhistochemistry method today.

1h

New study finds people are using Twitter to bridge political divides

Given the current atmosphere of political polarization, conventional wisdom suggests that conversations about politics—especially those taking place online—are both unpleasant and unproductive. However, a new study finds the opposite: average citizens are participating in rich and engaging political conversations online that have the potential to bridge divides and push people beyond their informa

1h

Ingeniøren inviterer til valgmøde: Forskningens rolle for fremtidens Danmark

I forbindelse med det kommende folketingsvalg inviterer Ingeniøren til valgmøde, hvor en række toppolitikere fra forskellige partier vil diskutere forskningens rolle for fremtidens Danmark.

1h

1h

Brain-controlled, non-invasive muscle stimulation allows chronic paraplegics to walk

In another major clinical breakthrough of the Walk Again Project, a non-profit international consortium aimed at developing new neuro-rehabilitation protocols, technologies and therapies for spinal cord injury, two patients with paraplegia regained the ability to walk with minimal assistance, through the employment of a fully non-invasive brain-machine interface that does not require the use of an

1h

Brain changes linked with Alzheimer's years before symptoms appear

In a records review of 290 people at risk for Alzheimer's disease, scientists at Johns Hopkins say they have identified an average level of biological and anatomical brain changes linked to Alzheimer's disease that occur three to 10 years — some even more than 30 years — before the disease's first recognizable symptoms appear.

1h

IL-1 inhibitors may reduce radiation-induced vascular damage

Radiation therapy against cancer can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease much later in life, as the radiation causes chronic inflammation of the exposed blood vessels. In a new study published in the European Heart Journal, researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have shown that these inflammations can be treated with IL-1 inhibitors.

1h

Compositional design of multi-component alloys by high-throughput screening

Multi-component materials have become one of the most promising materials in the engineering and biomedical applications. However, the efficient screening is a huge challenge. A high-throughput method combining co-sputtering and physical mask was used to prepare the compositional gradient films, which will be used to screen in Zr-based alloys. This work not only offers novel alloys with prominent

1h

Accelerating quantum technologies with materials processing at the atomic scale

An emerging suite of information technologies based on fundamental quantum physics has been given a boost by researchers at the University of Oxford, who have invented a method to engineer single atomic defects in diamond using laser processing.

1h

Låg utbildning tung riskfaktor för hjärtinfarkt och stroke

Studien Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiologic study (PURE) har undersökt kvinnor och män från tjugo länder och funnit att låg utbildning medför ökad risk för hjärtinfarkt, stroke eller hjärtsvikt oavsett landets inkomstnivå. Skillnaden mellan låg- och högutbildade var dock betydligt mer märkbar i fattigare länder. Eftersom riskfaktorer som fetma, diabetes och högt blodtryck är mindre vanliga blan

1h

Optical security: Tunable-resonator upconverted emission color printing

Scientists have demonstrated a new optical security element that not only combines microprints with invisible inks, but also makes them colorful.

1h

Study: Treats might mask animal intelligence

Rewards are necessary for learning, but may actually mask true knowledge, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study with rodents and ferrets.

1h

How is climate change affecting fishes? There are clues inside their ears

Climate change affects all life on Earth, but it poses unique challenges for aquatic species. For example, as water warms it holds less dissolved oxygen than cooler water. As a result, the world's oceans, coastal seas, estuaries, rivers and lakes are undergoing a process known as "deoxygenation."

1h

Biostar Lists PCIe 4.0, DDR4-4000, 3x M.2 Slots for AMD X570 Racing GT8 Motherboard

A new Biostar leak — or inadvertent disclosure — highlights the features arriving with AMD's X570 chipset next month. PCIe 4.0, faster RAM clocks, and multiple M.2 slots, on this board at least, are all on tap. The post Biostar Lists PCIe 4.0, DDR4-4000, 3x M.2 Slots for AMD X570 Racing GT8 Motherboard appeared first on ExtremeTech .

1h

Study: Treats might mask animal intelligence

Rewards are necessary for learning, but may actually mask true knowledge, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study with rodents and ferrets.

1h

How is climate change affecting fishes? There are clues inside their ears

Climate change affects all life on Earth, but it poses unique challenges for aquatic species. For example, as water warms it holds less dissolved oxygen than cooler water. As a result, the world's oceans, coastal seas, estuaries, rivers and lakes are undergoing a process known as "deoxygenation."

1h

The future of genetic engineering, a treasure trove of insects, and a love letter to getting lost: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01504-z Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

1h

Turning off growth to make flowers grow

The beautiful colors and smells of flowers serve a much greater purpose than just decoration. Flowers contain the plant's reproductive organs, and those same colors and smells that make a room beautiful also attract bees and other animals for pollination. Floral stem cells are crucial for the growth of the flower and its organs. That growth must eventually terminate for the flower to fully develop

1h

Radioisotope couple for tumor diagnosis and therapy

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in ACS Omega a promising combination of radioisotope-carrying molecules for use in radiotheranostics—a diagnosis and treatment approach based on the combination of medical imaging and internal radiation therapy with radioactive elements.

1h

Glass skyscrapers—a great environmental folly that could have been avoided

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio has declared that skyscrapers made of glass and steel "have no place in our city or our Earth anymore". He argued that their energy inefficient design contributes to global warming and insisted that his administration would restrict glassy high-rise developments in the city.

1h

Revolutionary approach to storing and using carbon, and the impressive effort it will take to achieve

With global emissions continuing unabated, climate change is proceeding at a startling pace. But a team of scientists from UC Santa Barbara and RWTH Aachen University in Germany have a new—and novel—destination in mind for all the carbon dioxide spewing into the atmosphere: chemical products.

1h

1h

Blue moon, waxing

A beautiful lunar image, from 450 kilometres up.

1h

New water cycle discovered on Mars

Modelling solves mystery of continuing vapour loss. Andrew Masterson reports.

1h

Single gene controls snail shell coiling

Scientists close in on discovering the basis of left and right handedness. Andrew Masterson reports.

1h

Coral found growing at record depth

Discovery raises hopes for reef recovery strategies. Andrew Masterson reports.

1h

Turning off growth to make flowers grow

The beautiful colors and smells of flowers serve a much greater purpose than just decoration. Flowers contain the plant's reproductive organs, and those same colors and smells that make a room beautiful also attract bees and other animals for pollination. Floral stem cells are crucial for the growth of the flower and its organs. That growth must eventually terminate for the flower to fully develop

1h

Expert explains how breathing problems can quash a racehorse's chance at gold

The Kentucky Derby has come and gone, but there are still two races left in the fight for the Triple Crown. The horse favored to win the Derby, Omaha Beach, dropped out last-minute due to a breathing complication known as entrapped epiglottis. And Country House, the horse that won the Derby, won't run in the Preakness. He's developed a cough, according to his trainer.

1h

The redistribution of resources by unspoken policy and other means

Uruguay in 2002 is in an economic crisis that hits the poorest sectors of the population hardest, motivating people to steal en masse. In the slums of Montevideo, large numbers of people began illegally tapping electricity while the state electricity company and government merely look on, explains Laura Seelkopf. This is just one case among many contained in the volume "Social Policy by Other Mean

1h

Archaeopteryx gets company

Researchers at LMU Munich describe a hitherto unknown bird from the late Jurassic period. It is the second bird capable of flight, after the famous Archaeopteryx, to be identified from this era.

1h

LightSail 2 set to launch next month aboard SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket

The Planetary Society's LightSail 2 spacecraft is ready to embark on a challenging mission to demonstrate the power of sunlight for propulsion.

1h

Coming of Age in the Age of AI: The First Fully Digital Generation

The first generation to grow up entirely in the 21st century will never remember a time before smartphones or smart assistants. They will likely be the first children to ride in self-driving cars, as well as the first whose healthcare and education could be increasingly turned over to artificially intelligent machines. Futurists, demographers, and marketers have yet to agree on the specifics of w

1h

Hunting by humans takes huge toll in pristine forests

Research records massive drops in species numbers, raising destabilisation fears. Mark Bruer reports.

1h

Robots to decide on beer quality

Researchers look to AI to cut brewery product development time and costs. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

1h

Indian island settlers came from far and wide, genetics reveal

The people of the Lakshadweep archipelago carry evidence of a seafaring past. Biplab Das reports.

1h

Expert explains how breathing problems can quash a racehorse's chance at gold

The Kentucky Derby has come and gone, but there are still two races left in the fight for the Triple Crown. The horse favored to win the Derby, Omaha Beach, dropped out last-minute due to a breathing complication known as entrapped epiglottis. And Country House, the horse that won the Derby, won't run in the Preakness. He's developed a cough, according to his trainer.

1h

This Tiny Electric Car Is Made From 80 Percent Recycled Plastics

Green Light Milan-based design studio Mandalaki recently unveiled the Birò O2 , a concept car that puts a sustainable twist on Italian carmaker Estrima’s Birò, a tiny two-seater electric vehicle currently available for sale in Europe. According to Mandalaki , 80 percent of the Birò O2’s parts are made from recycled plastics, a higher percentage than any other vehicle on the market — and the innov

1h

Cell membrane as coating materials to better surface engineering of nanocarriers

Coating natural cell membranes on synthetic nanocarriers represents an innovative strategy of surface engineering. Cell membranes-coatings offer nanocarriers with proteins, antigens, lipids, and immunological moieties. Nanocarriers are turned into cell-like nanoparticles and hold immunosuppressive capability, long circulation time, and targeted recognition, presenting a good performance in vivo. H

1h

Arts education can provide creative counter narratives against hate speech

Hate, as an emotion, is not an efficient response to ideological hate speech. Instead, using tools that hate speakers cannot use may undermine hate speakers' credibility. The arts have the potential to provide a more positive means of communication.

1h

Cofilin may be early culprit in tauopathy process leading to brain cell death

Abnormal accumulations of amyloid plaques and tau neurofibrillary tangles are both needed to drive the death of brain cells, or neurons. But scientists still have a lot to learn about how amyloid impacts tau to promote widespread neurotoxicity, which destroys cognitive abilities like thinking, remembering and reasoning in patients with Alzheimer's. While investigating the molecular relationship be

1h

Early in vitro testing for adverse effects on embryos

ETH researchers have combined embryonic cells and liver cells in a new cell culture test. This combination lets them detect adverse effects that new medications may have on embryos early on in the drug development process.

1h

ASTRI-Horn is first Cherenkov telescope in dual-mirror configuration to detect the Crab Nebula at TeV energies

Exactly 30 years after the first historical observation of Crab nebula at TeV energies, which opened the era of TeV astronomy with the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Technique (IACT), another advancement in IACT technology has been achieved. The ASTRI-Horn Cherenkov Telescope, based on the innovative Schwarzschild-Couder dual-mirror configuration and equipped with an innovative camera, has detected

1h

Image: Antarctica detailed in 3-D

Unfortunately ice is a hot topic when it comes to understanding and monitoring how this fragile component of the Earth system is being affected by climate change. Scientists, therefore, go to great lengths to study changes happening in the remote icy reaches of our planet – a subject that is being discussed in detail at this week's Living Planet Symposium in Italy. Among the results being presente

1h

Small, hardy planets most likely to survive death of their stars

Small, hardy planets packed with dense elements have the best chance of avoiding being crushed and swallowed up when their host star dies, new research from the University of Warwick has found. The new research is published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

1h

New method enables 'photographing' of enzymes

Scientists at the University of Bonn have developed a method with which an enzyme at work can be "photographed". Their method makes it possible to better understand the function of important biomolecules. The researchers also hope to gain insights into the causes of certain enzyme disorders. The study will be published in the journal Chemistry – A European Journal.

1h

How Feynman Diagrams Revolutionized Physics

As one of the most famous physicists of the 20th century, Richard Feynman was known for a lot. Early in his career, he contributed to the development of the first atomic bomb as a group leader of the Manhattan Project. Hans Bethe, the scientific leader of the project who won a Nobel Prize in Physics in 1967 (two years after Feynman did), has been quoted on what set his protégé apart: “There are t

1h

Tool hunts for ‘power anomalies’ to find malware

A new method detects the presence of malware in large-scale embedded computer systems by monitoring power usage and identifying unusual surges as signs of unwelcome security threats. Malware is evasive, intelligent, and sneaky. No sooner than anti-virus software updates to combat the latest attacks, a computer virus will have already evolved into something harder to detect and potentially more da

1h

New Photos of Mars’ Moon Phobos “Look Like Candy.” Here’s Why.

Tasty Martian Moon NASA recently announced that its Mars Odyssey orbiter took a tasty snapshot of the Martian moon Phobos using its infrared camera. Since 2001 , Odyssey has been dutifully orbiting the Red Planet. Billed as looking “like a rainbow-colored jawbreaker,” the colorful images could help scientists determine more about the surface of Phobos and, perhaps, prepare to one day land a space

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Disney assumes full control of Hulu under deal with Comcast

Walt Disney Co. said Tuesday it had reached an agreement to take "full operational control" of the streaming television service Hulu, effective immediately, under a deal with Comcast, which holds a 33 percent stake.

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Software library to serve for faster chemical reaction processing

Big Data has become ubiquitous in recent years, and especially so in disciplines with heterogeneous and complex data patterns. This is particularly true for chemistry. In some ways, chemical compounds may be compared with synonyms in linguistics because one particular compound can be represented in various ways. To further complicate things, some of them don't even have a specific structure and on

1h

Lightroom gets skin-smoothing texture tool — and built-in tutorials – CNET

The texture slider is Adobe's first new editing control since 2015, while tutorials are designed to show exactly how others edited their photos.

1h

Så kan hemsjukvården jobba (ännu) mer med hela familjen

Det går att utbilda distriktssköterskor och sjuksköterskor i familjecentrerade samtal via webben. Det visar Susanna Pusa, i sin avhandling. Och en ökad medvetenhet om familjemedlemmarnas påverkan på och betydelse för varandra kan utveckla förhållningssättet gentemot familjer med ett ökat fokus på, och medvetenhet om, styrkor och resurser inom familjen. – Det är även nödvändigt att samhället, poli

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Majestic wild horses are being chased, bitten by unleashed dogs roaming Outer Banks

Free roaming dogs have become the latest threat facing the wild horses living on North Carolina's Outer Banks, according to the Corolla Wild Horse Fund.

1h

Is sea rise wrecking coastal home values? The answer: Maybe

For sale: waterfront property with sweeping views of the Atlantic Ocean. Waves erode beach regularly. Flooding gets worse every year. Saltwater damage to lawn.

1h

Signalprogrammets nye førstemand: »Der står ikke en ung ingeniør og siger, at hans største drøm er at arbejde med relæsikringsanlæg«

PLUS. Søren Boysen har over­taget styringen af Banedanmarks i særklasse dyreste og mest udskældte projekt: Det nye signal­system. Han har i næsten et årti stået i spidsen for vedligeholdelsen af de gamle og ser store fordele ved at gå over til digital teknologi.

1h

New method enables 'photographing' of enzymes

Scientists at the University of Bonn have developed a method with which an enzyme at work can be 'photographed'. Their method makes it possible to better understand the function of important biomolecules. The researchers also hope to gain insights into the causes of certain enzyme disorders. The study will be published in the journal Chemistry – A European Journal and is already available online.

1h

Solvent additive-free ternary polymer solar cells with 16.27% efficiency

Recently, ternary PSCs with 16.27% efficiency were reported by Fujun Zhang's group, which has been published on the Science Bulletin in the form of Short Communication.

1h

What happens when your picky eater becomes a teenager?

Toddlers who are picky about their food are not deficient in essential nutrients compared to their peers when they are teenagers.

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A new sensor for light, heat and touch

Inspired by the behaviour of natural skin, researchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linkoping University, have developed a sensor that will be suitable for use with electronic skin. It can measure changes in body temperature, and react to both sunlight and warm touch.

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Humanwide program uses data-driven, integrated team approach to predict, prevent disease

A Stanford Medicine pilot program combining cutting-edge tools of biomedicine with a collaborative, team-based method, offers a new approach to personalized health care that captures the promise of Precision Health: to predict, prevent and treat disease based on the individual patient.

1h

Majestic wild horses are being chased, bitten by unleashed dogs roaming Outer Banks

Free roaming dogs have become the latest threat facing the wild horses living on North Carolina's Outer Banks, according to the Corolla Wild Horse Fund.

1h

White House changes course, backs push for $200 million in Everglades funding

After receiving letters and prodding by Florida's state and federal lawmakers, President Donald Trump changed course Monday, announcing his support of a $200 million push to fund projects aimed at restoring Florida's Everglades via Twitter.

1h

An Intro to Deep Learning

I wanted to mention a timely new book, Deep Learning for the Life Sciences , that I’ve received a copy of. It’s by Bharath Ramsundar at Computable, Peter Eastman at Stanford, Pat Walters at Relay, and Vijay Pande at Andreessen Horowitz, and I’ve been using it to shore up my knowledge in this area. From what I can see, there are not too many people who have much understanding of what deep learning

2h

How Nigerian music can help you choose a ripe watermelon

The quickest way to decide if a watermelon is ripe or not is by tapping on it. And if you're having trouble detecting the subtleties of the sound, listen to some Nigerian traditional music to get your ears attuned, says an international group of physics and music researchers.

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Parents unknown—Mysterious larvae found in Panama's two oceans

Under the microscope, sea water reveals the larval stages of little-known marine creatures called phoronids (horseshoe worms), but finding their parents is another story. Although such fanciful larvae caught the eye of scientists studying plankton—the tiny, drifting plants and animals in the world's oceans—as long ago as the 1800s, there are only about 15 species of phoronids known worldwide, base

2h

Single-atom nanozymes

Nanozymes are catalytic nanomaterials with enzyme-like characteristics that have attracted enormous recent research interest. The catalytic nanomaterials offer unique advantages of low cost, high stability, tunable catalytic activity and ease of mass production and storage. These properties are highly desirable for a wide range of applications in biosensing, tissue engineering therapeutics and env

2h

Cambridge Researchers Want to Re-Freeze the Earth’s Poles

Geoengineering The former chief scientific adviser to the U.K. government, David King, is launching a new research center to investigate how to re-engineer the planet to prevent or reduce the worst effects of climate change. Some of the solutions that the Cambridge University-based research center will investigate are drastic, according to the BBC News . For example, the scientists will explore t

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Germany’s AfD turns on Greta Thunberg as it embraces climate denial

Rightwing populists to launch attack on climate science in vote drive before EU elections Germany’s rightwing populists are embracing climate change denial as the latest topic with which to boost their electoral support, teaming up with scientists who claim hysteria is driving the global warming debate and ridiculing the Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg as “mentally challenged” and a fraud

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Parents unknown—Mysterious larvae found in Panama's two oceans

Under the microscope, sea water reveals the larval stages of little-known marine creatures called phoronids (horseshoe worms), but finding their parents is another story. Although such fanciful larvae caught the eye of scientists studying plankton—the tiny, drifting plants and animals in the world's oceans—as long ago as the 1800s, there are only about 15 species of phoronids known worldwide, base

2h

Normerna fångas i formler

Pontus Strimling leder tillsammans med Kimmo Eriksson en forskargrupp på Institutet för framtidsstudier som använder matematiska modeller för att undersöka hur och varför normer förändras i samhället.

2h

Dead zones in circadian clocks

Circadian clocks of organisms respond to light signals during night but do not respond in daytime. The time window where circadian clocks are insensitive to light signals is referred to as the 'dead zone'. Researchers from Kanazawa University have proposed a mechanism for the daytime dead zone. They report that saturation of a single biochemical reaction in the gene regulatory network that control

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Study: Treats might mask animal intelligence

Rewards are necessary for learning, but may actually mask true knowledge, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study with rodents and ferrets. The findings, published May 14, 2019 in Nature Communications, show a distinction between knowledge and performance, and provide insight into how environment can affect the two.

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Historically 'safer' tramadol more likely than other opioids to result in prolonged use

Surgical patients receiving the opioid tramadol have a somewhat higher risk of prolonged use than those receiving other common opioids, new Mayo Clinic research finds. However, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) classifies tramadol as a Schedule IV controlled substance, meaning it's considered to have a lower risk of addiction and abuse than Schedule II opioids, such as oxycodone and hydroc

2h

How Nigerian music can help you choose a ripe watermelon

The quickest way to decide if a watermelon is ripe or not is by tapping on it. And if you're having trouble detecting the subtleties of the sound, listen to some Nigerian traditional music to get your ears attuned. Nigerian researcher Stephen Onwubiko has found a link between the sounds of drumming in traditional Nigerian music and the sound of fingers drumming on watermelons in the markets.

2h

New study finds people are using Twitter to bridge political divides

Given the current atmosphere of political polarization, conventional wisdom suggests that conversations about politics — especially those taking place online — are both unpleasant and unproductive. However, a new study finds the opposite: average citizens are participating in rich and engaging political conversations online that have the potential to bridge divides and push people beyond their i

2h

Workplace interventions may improve sleep habits and duration for employees

Simple workplace interventions, like educating employees about the importance of sleep and providing behavioral sleep strategies, may produce beneficial results, according to a new review.

2h

Keeping things in proportion: Lem2 necessary for nuclear scaling

A research team led by Hiroshima University found that inner nuclear membrane protein Lem2, backed up by endoplasmic reticulum protein Lnp1, acts as a valve to control the flow of the membrane into and out of the nuclear envelope. The researchers showed that by controlling membrane flow, Lem2 forms part of a regulatory system responsible for nuclear scaling, maintaining a constant nucleus to cell

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Understanding through Time: Early Life, Climate and Vaccines

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Lægeforeningens formand: Vigtigt at komme helt til bunds i Ringsted-sagen

Også af hensyn til de involverede lægers retssikkerhed skal alle fakta på bordet i sagen om eventuelle mangelfulde brystkræft-undersøgelser på Ringsted Sygehus, mener lægeformand.

2h

Prior eating disorders linked to long-term depression risk for mothers

A history of eating disorders and body image concerns before or during pregnancy are associated with future depressive symptoms among mothers, finds a new study.

2h

Detecting dementia's damaging effects before it's too late

Patients with a rare neurodegenerative brain disorder called Primary Progressive Aphasia, or PPA, show abnormalities in brain function in areas that look structurally normal on an MRI scan. This could mean that scientists could use this as an early detection method.

2h

Underwater Arctic forests are expanding with rapid warming

Did you know that there are forests in the Arctic?

2h

Landfill Mining

Lots of valuable resources from our past. I think we if had enough energy, recycling these resources would be pretty straight forward. Does anyone have any details regarding landfill/tip mining operations for resources? submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

2h

What vehicles of the future will look like.

submitted by /u/Olavi-R [link] [comments]

2h

Mel Gibson’s New Film Seems Designed to Outrage

The pitch for the newly announced satirical fiction film Rothchild , a comedy set in the world of the ultra-wealthy about a forgotten son trying to inherit the money of his influential family, already sounds like an elaborate piece of trolling. The real-life Rothschild family, a Jewish and European banking dynasty, has for centuries been the subject of anti-Semitic myths and conspiracy theories ,

2h

Underwater Arctic forests are expanding with rapid warming

Did you know that there are forests in the Arctic?

2h

From the archive

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01505-y How Nature reported restrictions on the use of DDT in 1969, and dubious evidence of life on Mars in 1919.

2h

The trickster microbes that are shaking up the tree of life

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01496-w Mysterious groups of archaea — named after Loki and other Norse myths — are stirring debate about the origin of complex creatures, including humans.

2h

Tram Bowling Is an Actual Sport. Let's Look at the Physics

Driving a tram into a ball such that it knocks down pins—tram bowling, naturally—raises some physics questions: What does the speed of the ball depend on? What's its change in momentum?

2h

To dage efter nedbrud: TDC-kunder kan stadig ikke tale på 4G-net

Det har ikke været muligt at ringe over en 4G-forbindelse hos TDC siden søndag. Al taletrafik er flyttet over på 2G og 3G-netværk, efter en konfigurationsfejl i forbindelse med en opgradering af core-netværket fejlede natten til søndag.

2h

Preventative antibiotics after assisted childbirth almost halve maternal infection rate and reduce overall antibiotic use

Giving a single dose of preventative antibiotics to all women after childbirth involving forceps or vacuum extraction could prevent almost half of maternal infections including sepsis — equivalent to over 7,000 maternal infections every year in the UK, and around 5,000 in the USA.

2h

Conquering cancer's infamous KRAS mutation

Scientists have shown that a compound called PHT-7.3 shrinks KRAS-driven tumors in mice. In contrast to directly targeting mutant KRAS, the potential drug candidate targets the protein's partner in crime: the cellular scaffold to which mutated KRAS attaches.

2h

Obesity: The key role of a brain protein revealed

Regardless of how much you exercise or how balanced your diet is, controlling your weight is more brain-related than you might have thought. Researchers show for the first time in mice that the acyl-CoA-binding protein, or ACBP, has a direct influence on the neurons that allow rodents and humans to maintain a healthy weight.

2h

Work experience poor predictor of future job performance

A common hiring philosophy used for generations is being flipped on its head by new research from Florida State University.

2h

Millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations detected in the X-ray binary EXO 0748−676

By analyzing data from NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite, astronomers have detected millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations from a low-mass neutron star X-ray binary designated EXO 0748−676. The finding is detailed in a paper published May 6 on the arXiv pre-print server.

2h

Cutting cities' emissions does have economic benefits – and these ultimately outweigh the costs

The politics of climate change in Australia has always been about the costs of change. It's often debated in terms of we can't afford or can afford to pay for the changes needed to our power, transport and building systems. However, the benefits can also be calculated and in general can be shown to outweigh the costs in the long term.

2h

WhatsApp urges update after 'serious' security breach

WhatsApp on Tuesday encouraged its users to upgrade the app to plug a security breach that allowed sophisticated attackers to sneak spyware into phones, in the latest trouble for its parent Facebook.

2h

Bitcoin Payments Now Accepted by Whole Foods, Other Big Retailers

Payment Plan On Monday, payment startup Flexa announced the release of a cryptocurrency app called SPEDN, which allows users to pay for goods with four cryptocurrencies: bitcoin, ethereum, bitcoin cash, and the Gemini dollar. Though far from being the first cryptocurrency payment app , SPEDN does have something unique going for it: a list of major companies, including Whole Foods, Nordstrom, and

2h

Protect protruding teeth from damage and long-term consequences

Children with their first or early adult set of teeth that stick out have an increased chance of damaging them, but the risk can be easily reduced without being prohibitively costly.

2h

Parents unknown

Animals in hard-to-reach places, especially strange, 'unattractive,' animals, may completely escape our attention. We don't know what their role is in the environment. In fact, we don't even know they exist. New research may double the number of species of a little-known marine creature, based on DNA studies of its larvae.

2h

Understanding through Time: Early Life, Climate and Vaccines

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

NASA Awards $700,000 in Prizes for 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge

Mars is a natural target for colonization, but what would the first human residents of Mars do for shelter? They might live in 3D printed habitats like the ones demoed at NASA's recent 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge. The post NASA Awards $700,000 in Prizes for 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

Racism alleged as Indigenous children taken from families – even though state care often fails them

The New Zealand state tried to remove a newborn Māori baby from his family last week.

2h

Stable housing in infancy nets lifelong benefits

Housing stability in the first thousand days of a child's development has a potential economic benefit of $3 billion annually, new research from PwC and the Strong Foundations collaboration has found.

2h

Study suggests imprisonment does not deter future crime

A team of researchers from the University of California, the University of Michigan, Kaiser Permanente Colorado Institute for Health Research, the State University of New York and the University of Colorado School of Medicine has found evidence that incarcerating people who commit serious crimes does not prevent them from committing more crimes once they are released. In their paper published in t

2h

Study finds income affects bus ridership in bad weather

Temperature extremes and heavy rain reduce weekday bus ridership in Lane County, except in low-income neighborhoods where residents have few alternatives for transportation, according to a University of Oregon study.

2h

Are we teaching children to be afraid of exams?

Some Australian students are reportedly shunning Year 12 exams in favour of more favourable, and less stressful, pathways to finishing school. These reports come amid warnings of rising rates of anxiety and depression among young people, with psychologists calling for better mental health support services in schools. Experts say exam stress could be making depression and anxiety worse for vulnerab

2h

Special backings on jewelry deliver birth control

A new proof-of-concept technique suggests special backings on jewelry could be a way to transfer birth control through the skin. Initial testing suggests the contraceptive jewelry—such as earrings, wristwatches, rings, or necklaces—could deliver sufficient amounts of hormone to provide contraception, though researchers have yet to test the device on humans. Researchers hope to improve user compli

2h

Having an STI could benefit male animals

Having a sexually transmitted infection and passing it on to a mate could benefit male animals, research from The Australian National University (ANU) has found.

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Physicists discover new type of spin waves

Current technologies for information transfer and processing are challenged by fundamental physical limits. The more powerful they become, the more energy they need, and the more heat is released to the environment. Also, there are physical limits on the smallness and efficiency of communication devices. The recent discovery by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Lanz

2h

How the snail's shell got its coil

If you look at a snail's shell, the chances are it will coil to the right. But, occasionally, you might find an unlucky one that twists in the opposite direction—as fans of Jeremy thelefty snail will remember, these snails struggle to mate with the more common rightward-coiling individuals.

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Having an STI could benefit male animals

Having a sexually transmitted infection and passing it on to a mate could benefit male animals, research from The Australian National University (ANU) has found.

3h

How the snail's shell got its coil

If you look at a snail's shell, the chances are it will coil to the right. But, occasionally, you might find an unlucky one that twists in the opposite direction—as fans of Jeremy thelefty snail will remember, these snails struggle to mate with the more common rightward-coiling individuals.

3h

Researchers find bone resorption and body reorganization result in transfer of toxic metals in anguillid eels

A team of researchers from several institutions in Germany and one in Belgium has found that as female anguillid eels undergo body reorganization prior to spawning, they transfer toxic metals to their ovaries. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of the eels and what they found.

3h

Trade could be key to balancing conservation of freshwater sources and food security

An IIASA study published in the journal Nature Sustainability today, evaluated whether water for the environment could be prioritized under growing competition from other sectors. The results indicate that this could be achieved by shifting crop production from water scarce- to water abundant regions and tripling international food trade.

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Researchers find bone resorption and body reorganization result in transfer of toxic metals in anguillid eels

A team of researchers from several institutions in Germany and one in Belgium has found that as female anguillid eels undergo body reorganization prior to spawning, they transfer toxic metals to their ovaries. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of the eels and what they found.

3h

Conquering cancer's infamous KRAS mutation

Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys and PHusis Therapeutics have shown that a compound called PHT-7.3 shrinks KRAS-driven tumors in mice. In contrast to directly targeting mutant KRAS, the potential drug candidate targets the protein's partner in crime: the cellular scaffold to which mutated KRAS attaches. The study was published in Cancer Research.

3h

Breakthrough in new material to harness solar power could transform energy

The UToledo physicist pushing the performance of solar cells to levels never before reached made a significant breakthrough in the chemical formula and process to make the new material.

3h

Meet the 'Oyster Wench'—a single mom fighting pollution with the power of clams and kelp

Nexus Media News “Women could be the architects of the blue economy.” Catherine Puckett drives a pink boat to her ocean farm, where she harvests food that's restoring the environment.

3h

Europe’s premier research funder appoints new president

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01534-7 Medical-research manager Mauro Ferrari will take over role at the European Research Council from mathematician Jean-Pierre Bourguignon.

3h

Put equity first in climate adaptation

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01497-9 Focusing on the bottom few per cent, not averages, is the best way to tackle poverty, argue Mark Pelling and Matthias Garschagen.

3h

Truth Decay

What is the greatest threat facing human civilization? This question is obviously meant to be provocative, and is probably inherently unanswerable. But I think there is a reasonable argument to be made that perhaps the greatest threat is the deterioration of fact-based political and social discussion. The argument is that this is a meta-problem that keeps us from effectively addressing all other

3h

Walk inside a plant cell or glide over a coral reef: Three ways virtual reality is revolutionising teaching

You've probably heard how Virtual Reality (VR) is going to change everything: the way we work, the way we live, the way we play. Still, for every truly transformative technology, there are landfills of hoverboards, 3-D televisions, Segways, and MiniDiscs – the technological scrap it turns out we didn't need.

3h

The New Long-Distance Relationship

T he love life of Stanley Davidge, a 25-year-old network administrator for a national restaurant chain, is absolutely extraordinary. Almost all day, Davidge, who lives in South Carolina, is in touch with his girlfriend, Angela Davila, who lives in Virginia and is job hunting. Despite being separated by a six-hour drive, they “shoot the bull and stuff” over FaceTime when Davidge has a break at wor

3h

NASA to get an extra $1.6 billion to put the first woman on the moon

NASA's mission to get humans, including the first woman, to the moon again in 2024 has been named Artemis, after a Greek goddess of the moon

3h

Extreme cold could reveal herpesvirus infection dynamics

The funny thing about the virus that causes chicken pox is that no one knows for sure how it or many of its herpesvirus cousins invade and infect cells. It's a bit of a problem: Without that knowledge, it's been hard to find better ways to treat and prevent not just chicken pox, but other diseases caused by closely related viruses, like cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and shingles – a painful

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Image of the Day: Growing Corals

A 3-D simulation shows corals growing into a community.

3h

Generating high-quality single photons for quantum computing

MIT researchers have designed a way to generate, at room temperature, more single photons for carrying quantum information. The design, they say, holds promise for the development of practical quantum computers.

3h

Microplastics in freshwaters

As small as a grain of dust—but of great global significance. The word microplastics is familiar to many, but the dangers are virtually unexplored. In recent years, plastic pollution has become an ever-increasing burden on the environment. Countless videos and media reports draw attention to this problem. While the dangers of large plastic pieces for animals are impossible to overlook, there is pr

3h

Laser-based technology helps doctors image full eye in 3-D

It is estimated that in 2015, 217 million people had moderate to severe vision impairment, while 36 million were blind, according to an article in the journal The Lancet Global Health. The World Health Organization predicts that about 80 % of vision impairment globally is preventable or curable. Early diagnosis is crucial for effective interventions.

3h

Daimler Plans to Make Its Cars Carbon Neutral by 2039

The carmaker's new climate plan is bold—for a company. But it falls short of recommended emissions cuts and shows the limits of corporate self-policing.

3h

How a declining environment affects populations

Stable ecosystems occasionally experience events that cause widespread death—for example, bacteria in the human gut may be wiped out by antibiotics, or ocean life may be depleted by overfishing. A new study from MIT physicists reveals how these events affect dynamics between different species within a community.

3h

Nuclear membrane Lem2 necessary for nuclear scaling

A study led by Hiroshima University finds that nuclear membrane protein Lem2 acts as a valve to control the size of the nucleus, keeping it in proportion to the size of the cell

3h

How a declining environment affects populations

Stable ecosystems occasionally experience events that cause widespread death—for example, bacteria in the human gut may be wiped out by antibiotics, or ocean life may be depleted by overfishing. A new study from MIT physicists reveals how these events affect dynamics between different species within a community.

3h

Nuclear membrane Lem2 necessary for nuclear scaling

A study led by Hiroshima University finds that nuclear membrane protein Lem2 acts as a valve to control the size of the nucleus, keeping it in proportion to the size of the cell

3h

Extreme cold could reveal herpesvirus infection dynamics

The funny thing about the virus that causes chicken pox is that no one knows for sure how it or many of its herpesvirus cousins invade and infect cells. It's a bit of a problem: Without that knowledge, it's been hard to find better ways to treat and prevent not just chicken pox, but other diseases caused by closely related viruses, like cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and shingles – a painful

3h

Imported spices and frozen vegetables tested for 'superbugs'

A University of Saskatchewan research team has found that some food imported to Saskatoon from certain Asian countries has tested positive for "superbugs"—strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria—but immediate health concerns are likely low.

3h

The superheroes of nutrient detection living in our oceans

y and large, marine bacteria have a fairly simple existence – eat, divide, repeat. But the first step isn't always straightforward. There are lots of nutrients in the ocean, but there's no Uber Eats for microscopic organisms. They must find their food, and it's not always at arm's reach.

3h

Imported spices and frozen vegetables tested for 'superbugs'

A University of Saskatchewan research team has found that some food imported to Saskatoon from certain Asian countries has tested positive for "superbugs"—strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria—but immediate health concerns are likely low.

3h

The superheroes of nutrient detection living in our oceans

y and large, marine bacteria have a fairly simple existence – eat, divide, repeat. But the first step isn't always straightforward. There are lots of nutrients in the ocean, but there's no Uber Eats for microscopic organisms. They must find their food, and it's not always at arm's reach.

3h

Virtual reality project gauges citizens' faith in law enforcement in the face of gang violence

To a resume rich in policy and security studies, work experience, and publications, Andrew Miller may now add the unlikely skill of video production. While investigating the impact of gang violence on Lagos, Nigeria, the sixth-year political science doctoral candidate came up with an innovative research tool: immersive, virtual reality (VR) videos.

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Groundbreaking driverless car project showcases vision for a connected transport future

The multi-organisational team behind the £5.5 million FLOURISH connected and autonomous vehicle (CAV) project is today [Monday 13 May] celebrating the completion of three years of collaborative research and development with the launch of its latest findings.

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HP’s new gaming laptop has more screens for more content

There’s something about gaming laptops that make manufacturers do weird things. It’s kind of wonderful, in a way. Companies tend to give their teams a much wider berth for strange and novel …

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Vodafone will launch the UK's first 5G service on July 3rd

The UK is finally getting 5G, and Vodafone will be the first network to provide it. The company says its 5G will go live on July 3rd, with 5G roaming following later this summer. And, …

3h

How Venus and Mars can teach us about Earth

One has a thick poisonous atmosphere, one has hardly any atmosphere at all, and one is just right for life to flourish – but it wasn't always that way. The atmospheres of our two neighbours Venus and Mars can teach us a lot about the past and future scenarios for our own planet.

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The moon is still geologically active, study suggests

We tend to think of the moon as the archetypal "dead" world. Not only is there no life, almost all its volcanic activity died out billions of years ago. Even the youngest lunar lava is old enough to have become scarred by numerous impact craters that have been collected over the aeons as cosmic debris crashed into the ground.

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Space Station science looking at Earth

In this edition of our bi-weekly update on European research run on the International Space Station, we're taking our cue from the Living Planet Symposium – the largest conference on Earth Observation taking place this week in Milan, Italy – and focusing on our own planet.

3h

No 'quick fix' available for effective risk management in organisations

A new report by Cass Business School for the ACCA (the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) uncovers how board-level risk management activities vary in organisations as a result of internal and external factors. The report, Risk and performance: Embedding risk management, highlights common challenges and good practices to overcome risk management difficulties.

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ATLAS experiment sets strong constraints on supersymmetric dark matter

Dark matter is an unknown type of matter present in the universe that could be of particle origin. One of the most complete theoretical frameworks that includes a dark matter candidate is supersymmetry. Many supersymmetric models predict the existence of a new stable, invisible particle called the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), which has the right properties to be a dark matter particle.

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Pale blue dot – or not?

Appearances can be deceiving. This thick, cloud-rich atmosphere rains sulphuric acid and below lie not oceans but a baked and barren lava-strewn surface. Welcome to Venus.

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Video: ESA's Earth Explorers surpassing expectations

Forging state-of-the-art space technologies, ESA's Earth Explorer satellite missions continue to surpass expectations with a range of interesting and complementary results that go beyond their original goals.

4h

How the snail's shell got its coil

Researchers from the Tokyo University of Science, Japan, have used CRISPR gene editing technology to make snails with shells that coil the 'wrong' way, providing insights into the fundamental basis of left-right asymmetry in animals. These findings are published in the journal Development.

4h

Should Scientists Keep Their Private Debates Private?

No—the give-and-take that happens behind the scenes is an essential part of the scientific process — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Spring on Pluto: An analysis over 30 years

Whenever it passes in front of a star, Pluto provides precious information about its atmosphere, precious because occultations by Pluto are rare. The survey achieved by researchers from Paris Observatory over several decades of observations appears in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics of May 10, 2019. Interpreted in the light of data collected in 2015 by the probe New Horizons, it allows them

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3-D printing to save dogs' day

3-D printed models of dog skulls are helping University of Queensland vets to save animals and educate tomorrow's veterinary students.

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Most snail shells coil to the right. This single gene may be the reason why

Snails with a mutated version of the gene have shells that coil to the left

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Research team leads the way in a green chemistry breakthrough for renewables

Electrolytic water splitting is widely understood to be the most feasible method for the production of green hydrogen fuel as a versatile means of storage and long-range transportation for the intermittent renewable energy.

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3-D printing to save dogs' day

3-D printed models of dog skulls are helping University of Queensland vets to save animals and educate tomorrow's veterinary students.

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Tweaking one gene with CRISPR switched the way a snail shell spirals

The first gene-edited snails confirm which gene is responsible for the direction of the shell’s spiral.

4h

Microsoft Wants to Protect Your Identity With Bitcoin

Microsoft announced plans to use the bitcoin blockchain to create a "digital identity" that could be used to access sites and apps across the internet.

4h

The Curious History of Crap—Human, Animal, and Chemical

We don't think much about where our waste goes, but the history of what we do with poop is also the history of how we grow food.

4h

Researchers discover an unexpected phase transition in the high explosive TATB

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists in collaboration with University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) have discovered a previously unknown pressure induced phase transition for TATB that can help predict detonation performance and safety of the explosive. The research appears in the May 13 online edition of the Applied Physics Letters and it is highlighted as a cover and featured ar

4h

As Swine Fever Roils Asia, Hogs Are Culled and Dinner Plans Change

An African swine fever outbreak that had been centered in China is rapidly spreading to neighboring countries, pushing up prices of pork, a staple in many Asian nations.

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Danske sukkerroefrø bliver bejdset med bidræber-pesticid: I Sverige sagde domstol nej

PLUS. I modsætning til i Danmark måtte svenske landmænd undvære at behandle årets sukkerroefrø med et af de forbudte neonikotinoider. En svensk miljødomstol underkendte nemlig myndighedernes dispensation.

4h

Should Scientists Keep Their Private Debates Private?

No: the give-and-take that happens behind the scenes is an essential part of the scientific process — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Butterfly temperature research 'could boost survival chances'

Conservationists hope the results will help them understand how butterflies survive in a warming climate.

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Space Mining Could Ruin Our Solar System If We Don't Establish Protected Places Now, Researchers Warn

If humans mine one-eighth of the solar system's extraterrestrial resources, we could be doomed.

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VoFs partienkät inför EU-valet 2019, del 1: Vetenskaplig grund i politiska beslut

Vetenskap i Politik Vetenskap och Folkbildning (VoF) har som vision ”Ett samhälle där beslut baseras på evidens, förnuft och ett kritiskt tänkande”. VoF är en partipolitiskt obunden förening och tar därför inte ställning för eller emot någon enskild politisk inriktning. Däremot är det en självklar plikt att granska samhället och framhålla vad som stöder eller […] The post VoFs partienkät inför EU

4h

KMD anmeldt til Datatilsynet efter landsdækkende server-hack

Datatilsynet har journaliseret 46 anmeldelser om brud på persondatasikkerheden i forbindelse med en sikkerhedshændelse vedrørende KMD Nexus.

4h

Höghus i trä – för klimatets skull

De flesta småhus är byggda i trä, men det allra första flerbostadshuset i trä i Sverige byggdes i Växjö för drygt 25 år sedan. Ett år tidigare, 1994, hade Boverkets nya byggnormer kommit, som gjorde det möjligt att bygga trähus i fler våningar än två. Tidigare var det inte tillåtet på grund av brandkraven. Numera finns det olika metoder för att göra trähus brandsäkra. Man kan bygga in träet, bran

4h

Simulating Evolution to Determine the Fastest Wing

Researchers combined laboratory and simulated experiments on 3-D-printed wings to find the ideal wing shape — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

How AI could save lives without spilling medical secrets

The first big test for a platform that lets AI algorithms learn from private patient data is under way at Stanford Medical School.

5h

Vescovo fandt en kløft … og så lavede han verdens dybeste dyk

Det lykkedes rigmanden Victor Vescovo at dykke 16 meter dybere end noget menneske har gjort før. På den 12 timer lange tur så han nye arter og muligvis en plasticpose.

5h

Lægefaglig direktør på AUH: Jeg forstår medarbejdernes bekymringer, men…

Lægefaglig direktør Claus Thomsen på Aarhus Universitetshospital nikker genkendende til de ansattes bekymringer, efter 43 stillinger er blevet nedlagt. Men ideen med at bygge et stort hospital er, at vi kan effektivisere, siger han.

5h

A bird-based game takes wing

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01503-0 Does a board game with an avian theme deliver on the biology? Stuart West and his team of testers think so.

5h

Vaccination lags behind in middle-income countries

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01494-y Poor children in relatively rich nations are being let down by immunization programmes, says Seth Berkley.

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Mindre städer speglar utvecklingen i Afrika bäst

Heather Mackay, forskare i geografi vid Umeå universitet, och har studerat hur urbaniseringen påverkar matförsörjning, kost och hälsa i två mindre städer i Uganda: Mbale och Mbarara. – Jag ville undersöka om det fanns en ökning av sjukdomar som diabetes, fetma och hypertoni och om man drabbades av felnäring, det vill säga samtidig över- och undernäring, i dessa städer. Stor tillväxt i mindre städ

5h

Jakobshavn Isbrae: Mighty Greenland glacier slams on brakes

Jakobshavn Isbrae – the likely originator of the Titanic iceberg – goes into an unexpected quiet mode.

5h

'Heartbeat' Bills Get the Science of Fetal Heartbeats All Wrong

Anti-abortion laws lean on the heartbeat as a defining moment of aliveness. But at six weeks, it indicates little more than cells and electrical activity.

5h

How Twitter Became My Sacred Space

I came for the hostility, then the social network offered me something I never expected.

5h

Why I (Still) Love Tech: In Defense of a Difficult Industry

Technology is just another human creation—like religion or government or sports or money. It's not perfect, and it never will be. But it's still a miracle.

5h

I Tweeted Out My Phone Number—and Rediscovered Humanity

After I was digitally shamed on Twitter, I posted my phone number. What I got in return was the kindness of strangers.

5h

Tech That Makes Us Better Humans: JavaScript, Shudder, Chat Apps, Concordia, Signia

We reached out to a bunch of experts to ask them about the tools they love. Here’s what we heard back.

5h

The Genius of Stephen Curry

I’ve been a sports fan my entire life, and for most of it my loyalties have not been geographic. What attracts me to athletes isn’t so much the team they play for but rather the qualities they embody: poise, discipline, courage, competitiveness; elegance, creativity, artistry. Sports at its best is a showcase for human excellence, an arena for human drama. When you witness certain athletes perfor

5h

Russia Has Americans’ Weaknesses All Figured Out

What are Americans supposed to think when their leaders contradict one another on the most basic question of national security—who is the enemy? This is happening every day on the floors of the House and the Senate, in committee hearing rooms, on television news programs, and in President Donald Trump’s Twitter feed. Is Russia the enemy, or was the investigation of Russia’s interference in the 20

5h

Democrats Need to Place China at the Center of Their Foreign Policy

As the 2020 presidential campaign gets under way, Democrats are beginning to think about what type of foreign-policy message they need to defeat President Donald Trump. A recent conference organized by National Security Action , a progressive group run by former Obama-administration officials, unveiled an early consensus—Democrats will promise to intervene less abroad, refocus on strengthening Am

5h

How Trump Thinks Tariffs Work (And How They Actually Work)

Last week, President Donald Trump increased tariffs on $200 billion worth of goods imported from China, the latest salvo in the administration’s months-long trade war with Beijing. On Monday, China said it would retaliate with tariffs on $60 billion worth of American products, warning that it would “never succumb to foreign pressure.” Trump argued that additional tariffs were necessary to force c

5h

The Damage That Harvard Has Done

Defense attorneys often arouse what John Adams called a “ clamor of popular suspicions and prejudices ” when representing reviled clients. Just last week, the attorney Christopher Darden stopped representing a California man charged with killing the rapper Nipsey Hussle because people were so upset with his choice of client that they demanded to know his fee and threatened the safety of his child

5h

The Supreme Court’s Worst Decision of My Tenure

District of Columbia v. Heller , which recognized an individual right to possess a firearm under the Constitution, is unquestionably the most clearly incorrect decision that the Supreme Court announced during my tenure on the bench. The text of the Second Amendment unambiguously explains its purpose: “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the peop

5h

“This is how science works:” Error leads to recall of paper linking Jon Stewart and election results

Jon Stewart is a powerful figure in American media. How powerful is he? So powerful that his departure in 2015 as host of The Daily Show on Comedy Central may have tipped the 2016 presidential election to Donald Trump. At least, that’s the hypothesis behind a paper published in late April in the journal Electoral … Continue reading “This is how science works:” Error leads to recall of paper linkin

5h

Healthy Coral Reefs Can Prevent Over a Billion Dollars of Flood Damage

In addition to fostering rich marine ecosystems, coral reefs in U.S. waters provide our country with more than $1.8 billion in flood protection benefits every year by acting as natural barriers. Scientists think putting an exact value to reef benefits could help mobilize resources to protect them.

5h

Walmart takes on Amazon Prime with free, next-day deliveries

Walmart has introduced its answer to Amazon's one-day shipping for Prime subscribers. The retail giant's NextDay delivery offering is rolling out in Phoenix and Las Vegas …

5h

Mind: Firing Up the Neural Symphony

Scientists are racing to treat brain disabilities with electrical stimulation. Here’s a metaphor to help make sense of the progress.

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Iceland turning carbon emissions into solid rock

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Indian Government Grants Over $600,000 to Cell-Based Meat Research

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Norsk politi jagter kriminelle med ansigtsgenkendelse

I Norge kan billeder optaget af politiet snart sammenlignes med billeder fra private overvågningskameraer til brug for efterforskning.

6h

You should update WhatsApp to avoid a surveillance vulnerability

WhatsApp has rushed to roll out a security fix for a surveillance vulnerability. The firm says people should upgrade to the latest version of the app

6h

Russia joins in global gene-editing bonanza

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01519-6 A US$1.7-billion programme aims to develop 30 gene-edited plant and animal varieties in the next decade.

6h

Preclinical study: Probiotic-derived molecule may suppress fatal brain inflammation

The existence of certain microorganisms in your gut may bolster the immune system's ability to fend off a herpes viral attack that can cause fatal brain inflammation. Researchers say the findings are the first to suggest that an envelope molecule from a bacterium called Bacteroides fragilis (B. fragilis) might be useful against viral inflammatory diseases. Called capsular polysaccharide A (PSA), t

6h

It's not just fish, plastic pollution harms the bacteria that help us breathe

Ten percent of the oxygen we breathe comes from just one kind of bacteria in the ocean. Now laboratory tests have shown that these bacteria are susceptible to plastic pollution, according to a study published in Communications Biology.'We found that exposure to chemicals leaching from plastic pollution interfered with the growth, photosynthesis and oxygen production of Prochlorococcus, the ocean's

6h

Temporal escalation of Pyrethroid Resistance in the major malaria vector Anopheles coluzzii from Sahelo-Sudanian Region of northern Nigeria

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43634-4 Temporal escalation of Pyrethroid Resistance in the major malaria vector Anopheles coluzzii from Sahelo-Sudanian Region of northern Nigeria

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Compensation of the trap-induced quadrupole interaction in trapped Rydberg ions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43865-5 Compensation of the trap-induced quadrupole interaction in trapped Rydberg ions

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Cathelicidins and the Onset of Labour

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43766-7 Cathelicidins and the Onset of Labour

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Parasympathetic activity correlates with subjective and brain responses to rectal distension in healthy subjects but not in non-constipated patients with irritable bowel syndrome

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43455-5 Parasympathetic activity correlates with subjective and brain responses to rectal distension in healthy subjects but not in non-constipated patients with irritable bowel syndrome

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High-Performance Copper Oxide Visible-Light Photodetector via Grain-Structure Model

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43667-9 High-Performance Copper Oxide Visible-Light Photodetector via Grain-Structure Model

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A de novo transcriptome assembly approach elucidates the dynamics of ovarian maturation in the swordfish (Xiphias gladius)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43872-6 A de novo transcriptome assembly approach elucidates the dynamics of ovarian maturation in the swordfish ( Xiphias gladius )

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Activation of Th lymphocytes alters pattern expression and cellular location of VIP receptors in healthy donors and early arthritis patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43717-2 Activation of Th lymphocytes alters pattern expression and cellular location of VIP receptors in healthy donors and early arthritis patients

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Features of the cervicovaginal microenvironment drive cancer biomarker signatures in patients across cervical carcinogenesis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43849-5 Features of the cervicovaginal microenvironment drive cancer biomarker signatures in patients across cervical carcinogenesis

6h

Stem education is becoming simplified and commoditised

Science is messy, it’s fraught with mistakes, it’s about trying and failing and finally getting there

6h

Stopping Key Tech Exports To China Could Backfire, Researchers And Firms Say

Some tech firms and researchers say plans to impose export restrictions on "emerging and foundational technology" would make it hard to thwart cyber threats and to cooperate globally in science. (Image credit: Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images)

6h

French cuts to research jobs could fuel brain drain

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01529-4 French cuts to research jobs could fuel brain drain

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EU must outlaw ivory trade before laxity derails other bans

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01531-w EU must outlaw ivory trade before laxity derails other bans

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Stats: a trillion P values and counting

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01527-6 Stats: a trillion P values and counting

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Don’t muddy Walter Munk’s legacy

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01528-5 Don’t muddy Walter Munk’s legacy

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Stats: P values akin to ‘beyond reasonable doubt’

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01530-x Stats: P values akin to ‘beyond reasonable doubt’

6h

It's not just fish, plastic pollution harms the bacteria that help us breathe

Ten per cent of the oxygen we breathe comes from just one kind of bacteria in the ocean. Now laboratory tests have shown that these bacteria are susceptible to plastic pollution, according to a study published in Communications Biology.

6h

It's not just fish, plastic pollution harms the bacteria that help us breathe

Ten per cent of the oxygen we breathe comes from just one kind of bacteria in the ocean. Now laboratory tests have shown that these bacteria are susceptible to plastic pollution, according to a study published in Communications Biology.

6h

Ny analyse: Næsten alle orale lægemidler indeholder allergifremkaldende stoffer

Laktose, majsstivelse, farvestoffer og andre potentielt allergifremkaldende stoffer forekommer hyppigt i mange lægemidler, viser amerikansk analyse. Allergi over for indholdsstoffer i medicin er et overset problem, siger dansk allergiforsker.

6h

Unga pojkar föreningsidrottar mindre

Pojkar i åldrarna 7–12 år sticker ut i CIF:s analys. Det är den yngsta ålderskategorin och vanligtvis mycket idrottsaktiv. Minskningen i antalet träningstillfällen per person och år i den gruppen var hela tolv procent mellan 2012 och 2017. För flickorna i samma ålder var motsvarande minskning drygt fem procent. – Det finns ännu inga svar på varför föreningsidrottandet minskar bland de allra yngst

6h

Lens: Documenting Climate Change by Air, Land and Sea

The New York Times photographer Josh Haner has spent the past four years capturing the effects of climate change around the world and under water.

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Electron microscope detector achieves record resolution

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Artificial intelligence is selecting grant reviewers in China

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01517-8 The country's major funding agency says the tool reduces the time it takes to find referees.

7h

Vodafone slashes dividend after vast annual loss

British telecoms giant Vodafone announced Tuesday that it recorded a vast annual net loss of 7.6 billion euros ($8.5 billion), hit partly by the sale of its Indian assets.

7h

30 særlige gener øger din risiko for at blive psykisk syg

Generne har en vigtig betydning for, om man udvikler bipolar lidelse.

7h

CO2-koncentrationen i atmosfæren når nye højder

Amerikanske forskere har målt mængder af CO2 i atmosfæren, som ikke er set i millioner af år.

7h

WhatsApp advarer 1,5 milliarder brugere efter sikkerhedsbrist

Et hul i sikkerheden hos WhatsApp betød, at hackere kunne installere spionprogram gennem et enkelt opkald.

7h

Amerikanere tester interstellar rumsonde i ballon

For første gang er en lille enhed, som skal skydes ud i rummet med solsejl, blevet testet. Indtil videre dog med en ballon som drivmiddel.

7h

The Ghostly Legacy of Hiroshima Has Finally Been Discovered in Physical Form

"You have a city, and a minute later you have no city."

8h

Coffee addicts really do wake up and smell the coffee

Regular coffee drinkers can sniff out even tiny amounts of coffee and are faster at recognising the aroma, which could open the door to new ways of using aversion therapy for addiction

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SmartJane Test of Vaginal Health: Clever Marketing, Questionable Science

uBiome claims that its SmartJane test's proprietary technology empowers customers to assess their own vaginal health. The company is being investigated for fraudulent billing practices, and the rationale for the test makes no sense.

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New Evidence Reveals There Can Be a Darker Side to Meditation

It's not calmness and light for everyone.

9h

Kronprinsessen belønner australske udvekslingsstuderende

Hendes Kongelige Højhed Kronprinsesse Mary uddelte den 13. maj The Crown Princess Mary Scholarship…

9h

Uber hits fresh headwinds as shares extend losses

Uber shares went into a fresh skid Monday—more bad news for the global ride-hailing giant, which endured steep declines in its hotly anticipated market debut last week.

9h

Edinburgh saves Bird men from clutches of Bulgarian Jezebel

Irina Stancheva was investigated in Edinburgh for fraud at least twice, in 2009 and 2017, yet retraction and correction decisions were not implemented. Apparently to protect the reputation of Nobel Prize candidate Sir Adrian Bird and his male mentees, primarily Richard Meehan. One wonders: how much of Bird research in past two decades was actually fabricated by Stancheva?

9h

San Francisco to vote on banning face recognition technology

San Francisco supervisors will vote on surveillance oversight legislation Tuesday that includes a ban on the use of facial recognition technology by police and other city departments.

9h

Monsanto ordered to pay $2 bn in new Roundup trial

A jury in California on Monday ordered Bayer-owned Monsanto to pay more than $2 billion damages to a couple that sued on grounds the weed killer Roundup caused their cancer, lawyers said.

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Monsanto ordered to pay $2 bn in new Roundup trial

A jury in California on Monday ordered Bayer-owned Monsanto to pay more than $2 billion damages to a couple that sued on grounds the weed killer Roundup caused their cancer, lawyers said.

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Brazilian giant's comeback shows preservation and development of Amazon is possible

Several meters long and weighing hundreds of kilograms, the Amazon's pirarucu was almost fished to extinction. But the creation of sustainable development reserves in Brazil has ensured the giant fish—and its indigenous hunters—are flourishing again.

9h

Vodafone sells New Zealand arm for $2.2bn

British telecoms giant Vodafone announced the sale of its wholly owned New Zealand subsidiary to an investment consortium Tuesday in a deal worth NZ$3.4 billion (US$2.2 billion).

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'Step-change' in energy investment needed to meet climate goals: IEA

The world must double spending on renewable power and slash investment in oil and coal by 2030 to keep the Paris climate treaty temperature targets in play, the International Energy Agency (IEA) said Tuesday.

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In robotics classes, Armenian teens dream of high-tech future

In a sleek classroom in Yerevan, the capital of Armenia, one of the poorest post-Soviet republics, 14-year-old Nazeli Ter-Petrosyan peers at the screen of her Apple Mac.

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Big Brother-style surveillance gives new insight into Amazon's hidden wildlife

Scientists are deploying ultra-sensitive sensors in the Amazon to collect images and sounds of the rainforest's rich biodiversity in real time, in an effort to track preservation efforts.

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NASA dubs 2024 Moon mission 'Artemis,' asks for $1.6 billion

NASA's next mission to the Moon will be called Artemis, the US space agency announced Monday, though it's still looking for the money to make the journey happen by its accelerated 2024 deadline.

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Scientists use historical data to create first assessment of human impacts on biodiversity

The way humans use land across the British Isles has changed beyond recognition during the past 8,000 years. But what impact has that had on biodiversity and are there lessons from the past that could enhance conservation practices now and in the future?

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Colonial policies can result in economic growth

A new study in the Review of Economic Studies suggests that areas where Dutch colonizers built sugar factories in the 19th century are more developed today.

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US journalism has become more subjective: study

U.S.-based journalism has gradually shifted away from objective news and offers more opinion-based content that appeals to emotion and relies heavily on argumentation and advocacy, according to a new RAND Corporation report.

9h

WhatsApp patches security flaw that allows attackers to deliver malware through calls

The messaging app is encouraging iPhone and Android users to update their software to protect themselves.

10h

China Has Been Running Global Influence Campaigns for Years

In the run-up to the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics, with the torch relay soon set to pass through San Francisco, an envoy from China met with the city’s then-mayor, Gavin Newsom. Riots had broken out the month before in Lhasa, Tibet, leading to a crackdown by Chinese security forces. The torch’s journey through London and Paris had been marred by anti-China protests and arrests. Pro-Tibet and pro-

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NASA 3D printer habitat competition winner has been announced

submitted by /u/ovirt001 [link] [comments]

10h

Nasa seeks $1.6bn to accelerate return to the moon

Plans follow Pence’s call to send astronauts to the moon by 2024

11h

Colonial policies can result in economic growth

A new study in the Review of Economic Studies suggests that areas where Dutch colonizers built sugar factories in the 19th century are more developed today.

11h

US journalism has become more subjective

US-based journalism has gradually shifted away from objective news and offers more opinion-based content that appeals to emotion and relies heavily on argumentation and advocacy, according to a new RAND Corporation report.

11h

Sikkerhedsfagmand: Få styr på den basale it-sikkerhed – det handler ikke primært om kinesiske hackere

Op mod 80 procent af virksomheder og organisationer har ikke styr på den helt basale it-sikkerhed, lyder det fra tidligere formand for Rådet for Digital Sikkerhed. Start med at få det mest basale på plads, og spis elefanten en bid ad gangen, lyder hans råd.

11h

Marijuana improves couple intimacy, new research suggests

New studies suggest positive benefits of marijuana use by couples. Whether one or both use it, relationship intimacy can improve. Previous studies found that marijuana boosts sex lives. None Should you toke up to keep the fire going in your relationship? Science says "yes," with moderation, of course. Indeed, research recently published in the journal Cannabis suggests that some amount of marijua

12h

Døde aber og gift i gedemælk: Kemigigant skjulte vigtig forskning i fluorstoffer

PLUS. Allerede i 1974 blev det tydeligt, at perfluorerede stoffer, også kendt som PFAS, er giftige for pattedyr. Men resultaterne blev holdt skjult, hvilket bidrog til alt for høje grænseværdier for stofferne i EU.

12h

Bill Nye: the planet is on fire

submitted by /u/POMCube [link] [comments]

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California Jury Awards $2 Billion To Couple In Roundup Weed Killer Cancer Trial

The verdict represents the third time a California jury has decided in favor of consumers who claimed their cancer was caused by the glyphosate-based Roundup weed killer. (Image credit: Haven Daley/AP)

13h

For Artemis Mission to Moon, NASA Seeks to Add Billions to Budget

The funds would help accelerate the agency’s schedule for returning astronauts to the lunar surface by 2024.

13h

Scientists Find Genetic Reason Why Store-Bought Tomatoes Taste So Bland

Store-bought tomatoes taste horrifically disgusting — err, bland. Now scientists have discovered a version of a gene that helps give tomatoes their flavor is actually missing in about 93 percent of modern, domesticated varieties. The discovery may help bring flavor back to tomatoes you can pick up in the produce section. "How many times do you hear someone say that tomatoes from the store just don

13h

Apollo-era Moon Quakes Hint That Moon is Still Active Today

A new analysis of Apollo-era quakes on the moon reveal that our satellite is probably still tectonically active. Detectors laid down by Apollo astronauts half a century ago revealed small shakes on the moon, but their causes weren’t well understood. Meteor strikes, like those that caused the moon’s most distinctive features, still rain down today, so astronomers couldn’t be sure whether the moon w

13h

Prior eating disorders linked to long-term depression risk for mothers

A history of eating disorders and body image concerns before or during pregnancy are associated with future depressive symptoms among mothers, finds a new UCL-led study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry.

14h

Silicon Valley 'Hackathon': Coders target deadly California wildfires

Silicon Valley is not going to stop the next California inferno with computer code, but a small army of software developers got together in Fremont, Calif., recently to brainstorm new technology to cut the losses.

14h

Adobe warns Creative Cloud users with older apps of legal problems

Adobe Creative Cloud subscribers who haven't updated their apps in a while may want to check their inboxes. The software company has sent out emails to customers warning them of …

14h

Echo chambers may not be as dangerous as you think, new study finds

New research shows that collective intelligence — peer learning within social networks — can increase belief accuracy even in politically homogeneous groups.

14h

Brain researchers seek 'fingerprints' of severe mental diseases

Findings from a new study of large-scale systems in the brain could improve understanding of the symptoms and causes of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression, and other mental illnesses. Researchers detail their investigation into brain network connectivity in patients with psychotic disorders.

14h

$2 Billion Verdict Against Monsanto Is Third to Find Roundup Caused Cancer

A state jury’s award for a Northern California couple followed awards in separate cases in March and August, and was the largest by far.

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If Nuclear Energy Is Replaced By Natural Gas, Say Goodbye To Climate Goals

submitted by /u/GlowingGreenie [link] [comments]

15h

Salad dressing explains the Earth’s magnetic fields

Researchers may have found a new factor to help explain the ebb and flow of Earth’s magnetic field—and it’s something familiar to anyone who has made a vinaigrette for their salad. Earth’s magnetic field, produced near the center of the planet, has long acted as a buffer from the harmful radiation of solar winds emanating from the sun. Without that protection, life on Earth would not have had the

15h

How passion for your job can backfire

If someone is passionate about what they do, we see it as more legitimate to exploit them, according to new research. The findings show that people see it as more acceptable to make passionate employees do extra, unpaid, and more demeaning work than they did for employees without the same passion. “It’s great to love your work,” says Aaron Kay, a professor from the Fuqua School of Business Duke U

15h

Couple with Cancer Wins $2 Billion in Case Against Monsanto

In determining that the illnesses came about from exposure to glyphosate in Roundup, a California jury delivers the biggest loss so far to the herbicide manufacturer in lawsuits about the product.

15h

Millions of Hacked Routers, Apple's Court Troubles, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

15h

Long-term antibiotics up heart risks for women over 40

Women who take antibiotics over a long period of time are at increased risk of heart attack or stroke, according to new research. The study in the European Heart Journal is one of the largest research efforts to investigate the link between antibiotic use and risk of heart disease and stroke. Researchers found that women aged 60 or older who took antibiotics for two months or more had the greates

15h

They call it a 'bat apocalypse.' The fungus causing it is spreading across Texas

The fungus that kills bats showed up in Texas only two years ago, but now it is marching across the state

15h

They call it a 'bat apocalypse.' The fungus causing it is spreading across Texas

The fungus that kills bats showed up in Texas only two years ago, but now it is marching across the state

15h

The Atlantic Daily: When China Strikes Back

What We’re Following (Remo Casilli / Reuters) The trade tit for tat between China and the U.S. led to an abysmal day on Wall Street. China raised tariffs on a slew of American goods after Trump had previously done the same on Chinese exports, and stocks suffered their biggest one-day loss since early January. The trade war isn’t new, and it’s unclear what exactly the U.S. president can accomplish

15h

Worms stuck in repeat could clarify human diseases

Scientists have identified a brain circuit that underlies repetition in roundworms—a finding that could one day shed light on similar behavior in humans. Repetition can be useful if you’re trying to memorize a poem, master a guitar riff, or just cultivate good habits. But when this kind of behavior becomes compulsive, it can get in the way of normal life—an impediment sometimes observed in psychi

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Paper wasps pass logic test that honey bees flunk

New research offers the first evidence of transitive inference—the ability to use known relationships to infer unknown relationships—in a nonvertebrate animal: the paper wasp. For millennia, transitive inference was considered a hallmark of human deductive powers, a form of logical reasoning used to make inferences: If A is greater than B, and B is greater than C, then A is greater than C. But in

16h

CBI calls for action to boost research and development

Britain will miss target for investment by 26 years on current trends

16h

15-foot great white shark is being tracked off the Carolinas. It weighs 2,137 pounds

Shark trackers say a 15-foot, 2,137-pound great white shark is traveling up the Carolinas coast on a path toward the Outer Banks.

16h

Geology drove decisions that led to Deepwater Horizon explosion

A new study takes in-depth look at the challenging geologic conditions the crew of the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig faced and the role those conditions played in the 2010 disaster. The well blowout killed 11 people and spewed oil for three months, spilling about 4 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico before crews successfully capped the well. Researchers and investigators since then h

16h

15-foot great white shark is being tracked off the Carolinas. It weighs 2,137 pounds

Shark trackers say a 15-foot, 2,137-pound great white shark is traveling up the Carolinas coast on a path toward the Outer Banks.

16h

The Lancet: Preventative antibiotics after assisted childbirth almost halve maternal infection rate and reduce overall antibiotic use

Giving a single dose of preventative antibiotics to all women after childbirth involving forceps or vacuum extraction could prevent almost half of maternal infections including sepsis–equivalent to over 7,000 maternal infections every year in the UK, and around 5,000 in the USA.

16h

'Foldable' PC? Lenovo ThinkPad laptop screen bends in half like a book

Samsung has gained a lot attention lately for its Galaxy Fold hybrid smartphone/tablet, though given the recent display snags that have prompted a delay in the product's release, not necessarily …

16h

Antibiotics after childbirth could avert dangerous infections

Thousands of women could be spared pain and long-term health problems, trial suggests Thousands of women every year could be spared painful and occasionally life-threatening infections if doctors administered preventive antibiotics after every assisted childbirth, a major trial has found. A single dose of antibiotics within six hours of childbirth nearly halved the number of infections in women w

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Exclusive: Amazon rolls out machines that pack orders and replace jobs

submitted by /u/thereisnotry_11 [link] [comments]

16h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Tariff Aperitif

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, May 13. ‣ China’s government raised tariffs on nearly $60 billion worth of American goods in retaliation for Donald Trump’s decision to hike tariffs on Chinese exports last week. ‣ Trump addressed rising tensions with Iran and warned that if the country targets U.S. interests, it will “suffer greatly.” Here’s what else we’re watching: (Sean Gallup / Getty /

17h

Lenovo Makes the Leap Into Foldable-Display Laptops

The still-to-be-named product will be a part of Lenovo’s ThinkPad X1 line of laptops.

17h

Essay: Why Apollo 10 Stopped Just 47,000 Feet From the Moon

In a year when we’ll celebrate Apollo 11’s 50th anniversary, it’s worth remembering the pathfinders who completed the same mission with one critical order: don’t actually land on the moon.

17h

A third of youth firearm deaths could be prevented without taking away a single gun

Health Locking up guns keeps kids safer. Research on gun violence is scant in the U.S., but one new study suggests an easy way to prevent many accidental deaths and suicides.

17h

Publisher Correction: p53 regulation of ammonia metabolism through urea cycle controls polyamine biosynthesis

Nature, Published online: 14 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1121-7 Publisher Correction: p53 regulation of ammonia metabolism through urea cycle controls polyamine biosynthesis

17h

How Tech Helped the NSC Change the US Way of War

The National Security Council has gained enormous influence over the last few decades—thanks in no small part to better tech.

17h

A Giant Hole in the Martian Atmosphere Is Venting All Its Water into Space

Why is Mars so dry? A new paper might have the explanation.

17h

Bike to Work Week: Are e-bikes the answer to health, traffic and environmental issues?

Melissa Wenzel got rid of her Toyota Prius in April 2018.

17h

Oxford: Teens' life satisfaction has 'nothing to do' with how much they use social media

Study finds that children's use of social media has a trivial effect on them. Satisfaction and happiness is not as connected to social media as originally thought. Only girls reduced their use of social media when they felt discontented. Social media is a scourge to some and a mere distraction for others. Much has been said about the negative consequences of unchecked social media use. It has eve

17h

NIH fears good-government bill would hamper peer review

White House and Congress square off, renewing a perennial battle over public scrutiny of expert advisory panels

18h

Flu virus' best friend: Low humidity

Researchers have pinpointed a key reason why people are more likely to get sick and even die from flu during winter months: low humidity.

18h

Bricks were always going to win the Game of Thrones

Technology An ode to the underrated construction material. Game of Thrones fans have been waiting for almost a decade to discover who will claim the Iron Throne. There have been many viable candidates, some still living and many…

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The rich are outliving the poor in both Norway and USA

Inequalities in life expectancy by income in Norway were substantial, and increased between 2005 and 2015, according to a study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in collaboration with the Institute For Health Metrics And Evaluation (IHME). Although considerable differences in life expectancy by income levels were found in both Norway and the USA, the shape of the association differed.

18h

T2Bacteria panel rapidly and accurately diagnoses common bloodstream infections

In a clinical trial, the T2Bacteria Panel showed promise for rapidly and accurately diagnosing bloodstream infections or sepsis caused by five common bacteria. The test could be used in a clinical setting in place of blood cultures, which are insensitive and can take a long time to show results. How these findings will affect clinical practice is not yet determined. Findings from a diagnostic accu

18h

Apple's new TV app lets users download this season's 'Game of Thrones' episodes

Furthering its push into the burgeoning streaming TV industry, Apple launched a new app that it hopes will help consumers navigate an increasingly cluttered world of direct-to-consumer platforms.

18h

Why ceasing to be creative is a mistake

Many of us stop making art at a young age, convinced, perhaps, that we just don't have the talent for it. This belief, however, may be wrong, and the benefits that producing art can bring aren't contingent on talent. Is creating art an activity that all of us should pursue? Can artistic skill be taught? None When we think of life skills , we usually think of things like learning to cook, becoming

18h

The Only Thing Worse Than a ‘Mad’ Daenerys

This post contains spoilers through Season 8, Episode 5 of Game of Thrones . Daenerys Targaryen, first of her name, has spent more than seven seasons of Game of Thrones accumulating power aided by a quirk of biology and magic: Her children have doubled as weapons of mass destruction . In “The Bells,” the penultimate episode of the series, the ruler who would be queen of the Seven Kingdoms brought

18h

Now You Can Experiment With OpenAI’s “Dangerous” Fake News AI

ChatBot When OpenAI, the AI research organization founded by Elon Musk, created a text-generating AI system called GPT-2, the group said it was too dangerous to be released lest it be used to create propaganda or fake news. Now, thanks to a website called “ TalkToTransformer.com ,” you can use a watered-down version of the algorithm to write your to-do list, draft a new screenplay, or write rambl

18h

Measuring chromosome imbalance could clarify cancer prognosis

Researchers have found that higher levels of aneuploidy lead to much greater lethality among prostate cancer patients. This suggest a mechanism for how some prostate cancers become lethal, and could be used to alert doctors which patients might need to be treated more aggressively.

18h

Richard Feynman's 9 enthralling science lessons (filmed in his living room!)

Richard Feynman was a renowned physicist who conducted legendary work on quantum physics, the Manhattan Project, and investigating the Challenger explosion. Later in life, however, he became best known for his education work, gaining the nickname "the Great Explainer." His series, Fun to Imagine , works as an excellent primer to Feynman's unique educational style. Here are 9 science lessons he co

18h

Highly endangered Florida grasshopper sparrows reared in captivity are released

Three of the rarest birds in Florida took an extraordinary adventure this week, slipping out of a large pen into the freedom of an expansive, treeless prairie south of Orlando.

18h

Highly endangered Florida grasshopper sparrows reared in captivity are released

Three of the rarest birds in Florida took an extraordinary adventure this week, slipping out of a large pen into the freedom of an expansive, treeless prairie south of Orlando.

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National Climate Assessment: How to deal with despair over climate change

submitted by /u/826throwaway826 [link] [comments]

18h

Wait, is that video real? The race against deepfakes and dangers of manipulated recordings

It used to take a lot of time and expertise to realistically falsify videos. Not anymore.

18h

Quantum world-first: Researchers reveal accuracy of two-qubit calculations in silicon

Engineers have measured the accuracy of silicon two-qubit operations for the first time — and their results confirm the promise of silicon for quantum computing.

18h

Get access to more than 1,000 coding and creative courses with StackSkills

Lifetime membership is now just $59. Get access to over 1000 coding and creative courses with StackSkills with a lifetime membership that is now just $59.

18h

Scientists: We Need to Protect the Solar System from Space Mining

Save the Solar System A group of scientists want to declare much of the solar system to be official “space wilderness” in order to protect it from space mining. As The Guardian reports , the proposal calls for more than 85 percent of the solar system to be protected from human development. “If we don’t think about this now, we will go ahead as we always have, and in a few hundred years we will fa

19h

Researchers successfully sent a simulated elementary particle back in time

The second law of thermodynamics states that order always moves to disorder, which we experience as an arrow of time. Scientists used a quantum computer to show that time travel is theoretically possible by reverting a simulated particle from an entropic to a more orderly state. While Einstein's general theory of relativity permits time travel, the means to achieve it remain improbable in nature.

19h

A step for a promising new battery to store clean energy

Researchers have built a more efficient, more reliable potassium-oxygen battery, a step toward a potential solution for energy storage on the nation's power grid and longer-lasting batteries in cell phones and laptops.

19h

Misapplication of opioid guidelines?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is clarifying its guidelines on opioid prescribing, citing the findings of a review panel that many clinicians, policymakers and payers are misapplying the CDC's guidelines, and those actions are negatively affecting patients.

19h

Room for thought: Brain region that watches for walls identified

To move through the world, you need a sense of your surroundings, especially of the constraints that restrict your movement: the walls, ceiling and other barriers that define the geometry of the navigable space around you. And now, a team of neuroscientists has identified an area of the human brain dedicated to perceiving this geometry. This brain region orients us in space, so we can avoid bumpin

19h

New unsustainable viewing habits

A team of computing researchers has taken the closest look yet at the nature and extent of how household viewing habits have changed — providing valuable new evidence for the researchers, who are interested in our changing viewing habits and how this links to the huge increases in Internet data traffic.

19h

How to starve triple negative breast cancer

Researchers have developed a strategy that slows the growth of triple negative breast cancer cells by cutting them off from two major food sources.

19h

Speech recognition technology is not a solution for poor readers

Could artificial intelligence be a solution for people who cannot read well (functional illiterates) or those who cannot read at all (complete illiterates)? According to psycholinguists, speech technology should never replace learning how to read. Researchers argue that literacy leads to a better understanding of speech because good readers are good at predicting words.

19h

Detecting dementia's damaging effects before it's too late

Patients with a rare neurodegenerative brain disorder called Primary Progressive Aphasia, or PPA, show abnormalities in brain function in areas that look structurally normal on an MRI scan. This could mean that scientists could use this as an early detection method.

19h

Obesity: The key role of a brain protein revealed

Regardless of how much you exercise or how balanced your diet is, controlling your weight is more brain-related than you might have thought. In a study published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers from the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) show for the first time in mice that the acyl-CoA-binding protein, or ACBP, has a direct influence on the neurons that

19h

Want to expand your toddler's vocabulary? Find another child

Children glean all kinds of information from the people around them. In particular, children mimic and learn speech patterns from their family. Previous work has shown that infants attend selectively to their mother's voice over another female's voice. But new research suggests that children learn new words best from other children. Yuanyuan Wang will present research findings from a collaborative

19h

NASA Is Working on Electric Planes Powered by Cryogenic Hydrogen

Fresh Air To clean up the aviation industry, NASA-funded scientists are working to develop an all-electric aircraft powered by cryogenically-liquified hydrogen fuel. The University of Illinois scientists behind the project nailed down $6 million over three years from NASA to develop the tech, according to a university-published press release — tech that could, if the project pans out, revolutioni

19h

Catapulting spider winds up web to launch itself at prey: study

Just when you thought spiders couldn't get any more terrifying.

19h

Catapulting spider winds up web to launch itself at prey: study

Just when you thought spiders couldn't get any more terrifying.

19h

This UK Fast Food Chain Wants People to Eat Crunchy Bugs

Crickets, Anyone? A London startup is on a mission to make eating bugs seem less weird — and a new partnership with a U.K. fast food chain could help it reach that goal. On Sunday, The Guardian published a story announcing that the Abokado fast food restaurant chain will become the first in the U.K. to feature edible insects on its regular menu. As of Tuesday, Abokado’s customers will have the op

19h

Facebook plans pay boost for content moderators

Facebook on Monday said it will boost pay and support programs for US contract workers hammered by the stress of having to review offensive content flagged at the social network.

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