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nyheder2019maj15

Bristol academic cracks Voynich code, solving century-old mystery of medieval text

A University of Bristol academic has succeeded where countless cryptographers, linguistics scholars and computer programs have failed—by cracking the code of the 'world's most mysterious text', the Voynich manuscript.

13h

Bristol academic cracks Voynich code, solving century-old mystery of medieval text

A University of Bristol academic has succeeded where countless cryptographers, linguistics scholars and computer programs have failed – by cracking the code of the 'world's most mysterious text', the Voynich manuscript.

16h

Ny lov: Arbejdsløse skal dataprofileres og samkøres i landsdækkende register

Arbejdsløse skal testes for risiko for langtidsledighed. Men ekspert mener, at øvelsen er svær, og Datatilsynet afgrænsede høringssvar til områder i loven uden for profileringsværktøjet.

15h

Master machine learning and data analysis with this MATLAB training

Grab five certified courses for $35. Grab five certified courses for $35 and master machine learning and data analysis with this MATLAB training.

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SAEM 2019:Gun safety, over testing and more

Michigan Medicine experts highlighted new research during the keynote address and plenary session at the annual Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Annual Meeting.

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How Tiger Woods Won the Back Surgery Lottery

Surgeons cured Tiger Woods’s back on the fourth try — with plenty of help from Woods himself. But fusion surgery provides no guarantees of success.

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Quantum cloud computing with self-check

With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists have opened the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics. In a new study, researchers report how they simulated particle physics phenomena on 20 quantum bits and how the quantum simulator self-verified the result for the first time.

18min

Ways to give an effective seminar about your research project

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01574-z Grab your audience’s attention by using slides as a roadmap and focusing on your role as a presenter, recommends Ananya Sen.

19min

What's causing your vertigo? Goggles may help with diagnosis

Vertigo is a form of severe dizziness that can result in a loss of balance, a feeling of falling, trouble walking or standing, or nausea. There is more than one type of vertigo, each with a different cause, and sometimes requiring different treatment. Now a proof-of-concept study has found that special goggles that measure eye movements during an episode of vertigo may help more accurately diagnos

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Celebrity biohacker Josiah Zayner is under investigation for practicing medicine without a license

He taunted the health authorities. Now he stands accused of pretending to be one.

28min

Wear a wristband if you can't pay for lunch? The dilemma of school lunch shaming.

Students in the Warwick school district were informed that unpaid debts would result in cold sandwiches for lunch. An uproar ensued from irate parents and celebrities, accusing the district of lunch shaming. 76 percent of American school districts currently have school lunch debt. None As of 2019, American borrowers owe $1.5 trillion in student debt loans. A total of 44.7 million citizens, over 1

30min

100 Years Ago in Photos: A Look Back at 1919

A century ago, the Versailles Treaty was signed, as much of the world was still recovering from the devastation of World War I. Rebuilding was just beginning, refugees were returning home, orphans were being cared for, and a global influenza outbreak was being battled. In other news, the Lincoln Memorial was nearing completion in Washington, D.C., Vladimir Lenin was working to solidify the Soviet

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A new way of diagnosing and treating disease — without cutting skin

Researchers have developed a specialized microscope that has the potential ability to both diagnose diseases that include skin cancer and perform incredibly precise surgery — all without cutting skin.

32min

New AI sees like a human, filling in the blanks

Computer scientists have taught an artificial intelligence agent how to do something that usually only humans can do — take a few quick glimpses around and infer its whole environment, a skill necessary for the development of effective search-and-rescue robots that one day can improve the effectiveness of dangerous missions.

32min

Scientific reproducibility does not equate to scientific truth, mathematical model finds

Reproducible scientific results are not always true and true scientific results are not always reproducible, according to a mathematical model.

32min

Jawless fish take a bite out of the blood-brain barrier

A jawless parasitic fish could help lead the way to more effective treatments for multiple brain ailments, including cancer, trauma and stroke. Researchers borrowed molecules from the immune system of the parasitic sea lamprey to deliver anti-cancer drugs directly to brain tumors.

32min

The World’s Last Coal Plant Will Soon Be Built

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Amazon warehouse robots will pack 700 boxes an hour

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Jeff Bezos's Plan for an O'Neillian Future

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How Much Do Babies’ Skulls Get Squished During Birth? A Whole Lot, 3D Images Reveal

Human birth canals are a tight fit for infants' big heads.

42min

Don’t Do It

The Iraq War of 2003 was undone by blithe assumptions, cultural ignorance, and careless planning. But compared with the accelerating drive to confront Iran, the Iraq War looks like a masterpiece of meticulous preparation. The project of a war with Iran is so crazy, it remains incredible that Donald Trump’s administration could truly be premeditating it. But on the off, off chance that it is, here

50min

A new way of diagnosing and treating disease — without cutting skin

Researchers have developed a specialized microscope that has the potential ability to both diagnose diseases that include skin cancer and perform incredibly precise surgery — all without cutting skin.

54min

China’s Rover Collects First-Ever Samples From Under Lunar Crust

Digging In Yutu 2, the Chinese rover that landed on the far side of the Moon earlier this year, just examined the first-ever samples of the Moon’s mantle. The samples are believed to have been dug out by a meteorite impact so strong that it crashed through the Moon’s crust, according to research published in the journal Nature on Wednesday. With further study, these subsurface rocks could reveal

55min

Vanishing Bering Sea ice threatens one of the richest U.S. seafood sources

But just why the ice is disappearing remains a puzzle

1h

Experimental brain-controlled hearing aid decodes, identifies who you want to hear

Our brains have a remarkable knack for picking out individual voices in a noisy environment, like a crowded coffee shop or a busy city street. This is something that even the most advanced hearing aids struggle to do. But now engineers are announcing an experimental technology that mimics the brain's natural aptitude for detecting and amplifying any one voice from many.

1h

Six pregnancy facts that will make you think twice about recent abortion bills

Science Correcting some misconceptions about, well, conception. When it comes to anatomical facts, there’s no room for disagreement. Here’s what you need to know to understand the latest laws.

1h

People with greater intellectual humility have superior general knowledge

In the era of social media and rolling news there's a constant pressure to be in the know, always on hand with an aperçus or two. Today, intellectual humility therefore feels more important than ever – having the insight and honesty to hold your hands up and say you're ignorant or inexpert about an issue. Psychologists are responding by taking an increasing interest in intellectual humility, incl

1h

Helping robots remember: Hyperdimensional computing theory could change the way AI works

A paper by University of Maryland researchers just published in the journal Science Robotics introduces a new way of combining perception and motor commands using the so-called hyperdimensional computing theory, which could fundamentally alter and improve the basic artificial intelligence (AI) task of sensorimotor representation — how agents like robots translate what they sense into what they do

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Tech Hub San Francisco First US City to Ban Facial Recognition

Just Say “No” San Francisco is preemptively shooting down the use of facial recognition. On Tuesday, the California metropolis’ Board of Supervisors voted 8-to-1 to ban its government agencies from using facial recognition tech despite the fact that none of the agencies currently use the technology. That makes San Francisco the first city in the United States to pass such a ban — and the decision

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Ted Cruz: We Need a Space Force to Defend Against Space Pirates

Space Pirates Shiver me timbers! During a hearing Tuesday of the Subcommittee on Aviation and Space U.S. Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) argued that a Space Force is necessary to ward off space pirates. “Pirates threaten the open seas, and the same is possible in space,” he said during his opening statements. Since “the ancient Greeks first put to sea,” Cruz argued, we’ve recognized the “necessity to pro

1h

Can sound protect eagles from wind turbine collisions?

Every year, bald and golden eagles are killed when they inadvertently fly into wind turbine blades. One possible way to prevent these deaths is to chase the birds away with acoustic signals—sound. To determine what types of sounds are most effective in deterring the birds, researchers at the University of Minnesota and their colleagues tested the behavioral responses of bald eagles to a battery of

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Can sound protect eagles from wind turbine collisions?

Every year, bald and golden eagles are killed when they inadvertently fly into wind turbine blades. One possible way to prevent these deaths is to chase the birds away with acoustic signals—sound. To determine what types of sounds are most effective in deterring the birds, researchers at the University of Minnesota and their colleagues tested the behavioral responses of bald eagles to a battery of

1h

From Earth's deep mantle, scientists find a new way volcanoes form

Far below Bermuda's pink sand beaches and turquoise tides, geoscientists have discovered the first direct evidence that material from deep within Earth's mantle transition zone — a layer rich in water, crystals and melted rock — can percolate to the surface to form volcanoes.

1h

Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, research on teeth shows

Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, substantially earlier than indicated by most DNA-based estimates, according to new research.

1h

From Earth's deep mantle, scientists find a new way volcanoes form

Far below Bermuda's pink sand beaches and turquoise tides, geoscientists have discovered the first direct evidence that material from deep within Earth's mantle transition zone—a layer rich in water, crystals and melted rock—can percolate to the surface to form volcanoes.

1h

New study shows climate change, maternal care, parasitic infection all connected in South American fur seals

South American fur seal pups with high levels of hookworm infection spend more time in the water, but that's not necessarily a good thing, report Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Georgia.

1h

Senators Ask FCC to Rethink 5G Spectrum Auction to Protect Weather Forecasts

The FCC began a new round of auctions earlier this year focusing on the upper microwave band, which could be valuable for delivering 5G mobile service. The post Senators Ask FCC to Rethink 5G Spectrum Auction to Protect Weather Forecasts appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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New study shows climate change, maternal care, parasitic infection all connected in South American fur seals

South American fur seal pups with high levels of hookworm infection spend more time in the water, but that's not necessarily a good thing, report Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Georgia.

1h

The Teeth of Early Neanderthals May Indicate the Species' Lineage Is Older Than Thought

Some of the oldest known Neanderthal remains include teeth that could push back the split with modern human lineages, but not all scientists are convinced

1h

Attention Young People: This Narcissism Study Is All About You

New research found that those aged 18 to 25 believe theirs is the most narcissistic and entitled living generation. But that doesn’t make it true.

1h

Transfer of EU powers leads to silent erosion of UK pesticide regulation

New analysis by the UK Trade Policy Observatory is warning that what should have been the technical formality of transferring EU powers into national law when the UK leaves the European Union, could instead open the gates for the widespread use of outlawed carcinogenic pesticides that have been shown to alter human reproductive, neurological, and immune systems.

1h

How climate change will affect the rural northeast: Expect three weeks of heat

While extreme cold and snow often make headlines in the Northeast, by 2060, there will be far more record heat. Imagine the most sweltering day of the year. By 2060, you will experience that type of hot day for approximately three weeks of the year, assuming we don't substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. According to a Dartmouth study, of the rural Northeast counties represented, those in

1h

As bumblebee diets narrow, ours could too

There has been a lot of buzz about honeybees' failing health because they pollinate our produce. Less well known is how critical bumblebees are for some of our favorite foods. And their numbers are also rapidly declining.

1h

China blocks all language editions of Wikipedia

Beijing has broadened its block of online encyclopedia Wikipedia to include all language editions, an internet censorship research group reported just weeks ahead of China's most politically explosive anniversary.

1h

Transfer of EU powers leads to silent erosion of UK pesticide regulation

New analysis by the UK Trade Policy Observatory is warning that what should have been the technical formality of transferring EU powers into national law when the UK leaves the European Union, could instead open the gates for the widespread use of outlawed carcinogenic pesticides that have been shown to alter human reproductive, neurological, and immune systems.

1h

As bumblebee diets narrow, ours could too

There has been a lot of buzz about honeybees' failing health because they pollinate our produce. Less well known is how critical bumblebees are for some of our favorite foods. And their numbers are also rapidly declining.

1h

FAA chief defends handling of Boeing Max safety approval

The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday that Boeing should have done more to explain an automated flight-control system on its 737 Max aircraft before two deadly crashes, but he defended his agency's safety certification of the plane and its decision not to ground the jet until other regulators around the world had already done so.

1h

Flying cars mooted for Paris' public transport network

European aerospace giant Airbus and Paris underground operator RATP will study the viability of adding flying vehicles to the city's urban transport network, the companies said Wednesday.

1h

Ex-Tropical Cyclone Ann moving over Australia's Cape York Peninsula

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Ann moving over Queensland's Cape York Peninsula. Despite the storm weakening below tropical cyclone status, warnings remain active for strong winds and flooding potential.

1h

Cellular rivalry promotes healthy skin development

Not all cells are destined for greatness. Deemed unfit to serve in the body, some are killed off during early development through a process called cell competition. This phenomenon has previously been documented in flies and is now turning out to occur in mammals as well.

1h

How loud is too loud when it comes to sports whistles?

How loud is too loud when it comes to whistle tweets? Referees and others using whistles on the job need a simple way to determine whether it's harmful to their hearing, so a group of researchers set out to put it to the test and to provide some clarity and damage risk criteria for impulse noise exposures.

1h

Experimental brain-controlled hearing aid decodes, identifies who you want to hear

Our brains have a remarkable knack for picking out individual voices in a noisy environment, like a crowded coffee shop or a busy city street. This is something that even the most advanced hearing aids struggle to do. But now engineers are announcing an experimental technology that mimics the brain's natural aptitude for detecting and amplifying any one voice from many.

1h

Cellular rivalry promotes healthy skin development

Not all cells are destined for greatness. Deemed unfit to serve in the body, some are killed off during early development through a process called cell competition. This phenomenon has previously been documented in flies and is now turning out to occur in mammals as well.

1h

How a new father views his relationship with his partner

A new father's views on his changing relationship with his wife or partner may depend in part on how much support he feels from her when he is caring for their baby, a new study suggests.Researchers found that a first-time father tended to feel closer to the mother both as a co-parent and as a romantic partner when he believed he had her confidence when he was involved in child care.

1h

Video: Fly over Mount Sharp on Mars

Ever wanted to visit Mars? A new animated video shows what it would be like to soar over Mount Sharp, which NASA's Curiosity rover has been climbing since 2014.

1h

The latest recommendations for preventing dementia are good advice for everyone

Health What the WHO has to say about staying cognitively fit. Each year, 10 million new people show symptoms of dementia and Alzheimer’s. On Tuesday, the World Health Organization released new guidelines for reducing the risk of…

1h

The Knowns and Unknowns of What’s Happening With Iran

“Reports that say that something hasn’t happened are always interesting to me, because as we know, there are known knowns; there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns—the ones we don’t know we don’t know.” That was Donald Rumsfeld speaking from the Pentagon podium in 2002

1h

On the way to fighting staph infections with the body's immune system

Researchers identify exact cells mediating the mouse's defense against Staphylococcus infection (MRSA).

1h

Applying precious metal catalysts economically

Researchers have developed a new method of using rare and expensive catalysts as sparingly as possible.

1h

Google recalls some Titan security keys after finding Bluetooth vulnerability

Google is recalling its Bluetooth Titan security keys due to a vulnerability that could allow attackers to connect to your device. No need to panic — the bug only seems to apply to …

1h

Climate change, maternal care & parasitic infection all connected in SA fur seals

South American fur seal pups with high levels of hookworm infection spend more time in the water, but that's not necessarily a good thing, report Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Georgia.

2h

From Earth's deep mantle, scientists find a new way volcanoes form

Far below Bermuda's pink sand beaches and turquoise tides, geoscientists have discovered the first direct evidence that material from deep within Earth's mantle transition zone — a layer rich in water, crystals and melted rock — can percolate to the surface to form volcanoes.

2h

New clinical pathway for cancer patients leads to better outcomes, lower health care costs

A new clinical pathway for cancer patients at Christiana Care Health System's Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute is improving their quality of life, providing better health outcomes and delivering lower heath care costs, according to a study published in the May 2019 issue of the Journal of Clinical Pathways.

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Strengthened global partnerships needed to end hunger and malnutrition –

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Brain-Controlled Hearing Aids Could Cut through Crowd Noise

A prototype detects whom you are listening to and amplifies only that speaker’s voice; a potential solution to the “cocktail party problem” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

New AI sees like a human, filling in the blanks

Computer scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have taught an artificial intelligence agent how to do something that usually only humans can do — take a few quick glimpses around and infer its whole environment, a skill necessary for the development of effective search-and-rescue robots that one day can improve the effectiveness of dangerous missions.

2h

A new way of diagnosing and treating disease — without cutting skin

University of British Columbia researchers have developed a specialized microscope that has the potential ability to both diagnose diseases that include skin cancer and perform incredibly precise surgery — all without cutting skin.

2h

Yale study identifies how cancer drug inhibits DNA repair in cancer cells

According to researchers at Yale Cancer Center, a cancer drug thought to be of limited use possesses a superpower of sorts: It is able to stop certain cancer cells from repairing their DNA in order to survive. The study, published today in the journal Science Translational Medicine, suggests that combining this drug, cediranib, with other agents could potentially deliver a lethal blow in cancer th

2h

Hearing device separates simultaneous voices, amplifies the 'target' speaker

Picking out one voice from many at a crowded party is a challenge for assistive hearing devices. Now, Cong Han and colleagues have developed a new speech separation system that automatically separates audio from different speakers in a crowded environment and compares these voices to the listener's brainwaves, so that the voice of the speaker who is the center of the listener's attention sounds th

2h

User-friendly smartphone platform sounds out possible ear infections in children

Scientists have created a user-friendly smartphone-based platform that can quickly detect the presence of fluid in the middle ear — a likely indicator of ear infections — in children.

2h

Jawless fish take a bite out of the blood-brain barrier

A jawless parasitic fish could help lead the way to more effective treatments for multiple brain ailments, including cancer, trauma and stroke. A team of biomedical engineers and clinician-scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Texas at Austin borrowed molecules from the immune system of the parasitic sea lamprey to deliver anti-cancer drugs directly to brain tumor

2h

Calling attention to gender bias dramatically changes course evaluations

With growing evidence of gender bias on student course evaluations, a new intervention developed by Iowa State University researchers may help reduce bias against women instructors. They added language aimed at making students aware of potential biases, which yielded significantly higher scores for women instructors.

2h

Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago

Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, substantially earlier than indicated by most DNA-based estimates, according to new research by a UCL academic.

2h

Experimental brain-controlled hearing aid decodes, identifies who you want to hear

Our brains have a remarkable knack for picking out individual voices in a noisy environment, like a crowded coffee shop or a busy city street. This is something that even the most advanced hearing aids struggle to do. But now Columbia engineers are announcing an experimental technology that mimics the brain's natural aptitude for detecting and amplifying any one voice from many.

2h

First smartphone app that can hear ear infections in children

Researchers at the University of Washington have created a new smartphone app that can detect fluid behind the eardrum by simply using a piece of paper and a smartphone's microphone and speaker.

2h

University of Idaho study finds scientific reproducibility does not equate to scientific truth

Reproducible scientific results are not always true and true scientific results are not always reproducible, according to a mathematical model produced by University of Idaho researchers.

2h

Ancient fish ponds in the Bolivian savanna supported human settlement

A network of fish ponds supported a permanent human settlement in the seasonal drylands of Bolivia more than one thousand years ago, according to a new study published May 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Gabriela Prestes-Carneiro of Federal University of Western Para, Brazil, and colleagues.

2h

Captive chimpanzees spontaneously use tools to excavate underground food

Chimpanzees in captivity can successfully work out how to use tools to excavate underground food, even if they've never been presented with an underground food scenario before, according to a study published May 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alba Motes-Rodrigo and colleagues and directed by Adriana Hernandez-Aguilar from the University of Oslo.

2h

3D images reveal how infants' heads change shape during birth

Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), scientists have captured 3D images that show how infants' brains and skulls change shape as they move through the birth canal just before delivery. Olivier Ami of Auvergne University in Clermont Ferrand, France, and colleagues present these findings in the open access journal PLOS ONE on May 15, 2019.

2h

Young adults distressed by labels of narcissism, entitlement

Young adults both believe and react negatively to messages that members of their age group are more entitled and narcissistic than other living generations, suggests new research presented by Joshua Grubbs of Bowling Green State University, Ohio, and colleagues in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on May 15, 2019.

2h

Do you trust politicians? Depends on how you define trust

For decades, political scientists have measured the public's trust in the federal government consistently, using measures that are largely unchanged since the 1960s — despite the momentous changes happening over the last five decades in the United States. The new research tested a definition of trust and revealed three assessments that lead to one trusting in the government.

2h

Brain-Controlled Hearing Aids Could Cut through Crowd Noise

A prototype detects whom you are listening to and amplifies only that speaker’s voice; a potential solution to the “cocktail party problem” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

How climate change will affect the rural northeast: Expect three weeks of heat

While extreme cold and snow often make headlines in the Northeast United States, by 2060, there will be far more record heat. Imagine the most sweltering day of the year.

2h

Women's gut microbiomes appear to mature earlier than men's

A recent study found that the age and sex of an individual strongly influences the bacterial diversity of the gut microbiome.

2h

The Army Wants to Outfit Soldiers With Powered Exoskeletons

Robotic Enhancements The U.S. Army is taking a serious look at robotic exoskeletons that would enhance soldiers’ physical capabilities on the battlefield by lessening the strain of heavy loads or helping them move faster. Several contractors have developed exoskeletons, which range from mechanized ankle supports to full-body suits that look like one of Tony Stark’s prototypes. The Army is still e

2h

Neanderthals and modern humans parted company earlier than thought

Tooth study pushes back the last common ancestor by around 400,000 years. Andrew Masterson reports.

2h

Google Will Replace Titan Security Key Over a Bluetooth Flaw

Google will replace any Titan BLE branded security key, after disclosing that a nearby attacker could use it to compromise your accounts.

2h

Trilobites: Alone, They Stink. Together They Create Dark Chocolate’s Alluring Aroma.

With the help of a trained panel of sniffers, chemists uncovered the molecules that give a rich treat its scents.

2h

Matter: Scientists Created Bacteria With a Synthetic Genome. Is This Artificial Life?

In a milestone for synthetic biology, colonies of E. coli thrive with DNA constructed from scratch by humans, not nature.

2h

Scientists create mind-controlled hearing aid

Development could transform ability of hearing-impaired to cope with noisy environments A mind-controlled hearing aid that allows the wearer to focus on particular voices has been created by scientists, who say it could transform the ability of those with hearing impairments to cope with noisy environments. The device mimics the brain’s natural ability to single out and amplify one voice against

2h

The 2020 Presidential Candidates’ Families Look Like Americans’

A particular variety of nuclear family has become recognizable as the “presidential” kind of family: a married father and mother, the kids they’ve begotten together, a handful of household pets. In the 20th century and beyond, such families have dominated the White House, from the Tafts to the (Franklin Delano) Roosevelts to the Kennedys to the Obamas, with only a few exceptions. But a look back

2h

Virutally energy-free superfast computing invented by scientists using light pulses

A new invention uses magnets to record computer data which consume virtually zero energy, solving the dilemma of how to create faster data processing speeds without high energy costs.

2h

'Striking' differences in rates of HIV/AIDS within African nations

Despite the rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) since 2000, HIV/AIDS is still the most common cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa, according to data from the Global Burden of Disease.

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Blood biopsy: New technique enables detailed genetic analysis of cancer cells

A new way to cleanly separate out cancer cells from a blood sample enables comprehensive genetic profiling of the cancer cells, which could help doctors target tumors and monitor treatments more effectively.

2h

As bumblebee diets narrow, ours could too

A new study reveals the loss of plant diversity harms the humble bumblebee at a critical stage in its development from egg to adult.

2h

Enhanced anticancer compound may allow precise activation and tracking of treatment

Researchers have advanced a novel compound that specifically targets the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response that is frequently hyperactivated in cancer and promotes survival of cancer cells during stressful conditions.

2h

Opioid-exposed newborns may react to pain differently after birth

Babies exposed to opioids while their mothers were pregnant with them may need special care even before they start to experience withdrawal symptoms, according to new research.

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When Google Serves Ads in Iran, Advertisers Pay the Price

Advertisers say that Google makes it far too easy to accidentally run ads in countries under US sanctions like Iran, North Korea, or Syria.

2h

Hearing aids that read your brain will know who you want to hear

If you have difficulty hearing, it can be tricky to make out a single speaker in a noisy room. A system that amplifies the voice you want to listen to could help.

2h

Hearing device picks out right voice from a crowd by reading your mind

An experimental hearing aid can detect which voice someone wants to listen to in a crowded room by reading their mind

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Smartphone app that chirps in your ear could diagnose ear infections

Parents could use an app to check if their children have an ear infection. It works by making a soft chirping sound and analysing the echoes

2h

Did we split from Neanderthals 400,000 years earlier than we thought?

An analysis of fossil teeth suggests that the shared ancestor of modern humans and our Neanderthal cousins may have lived more than 800,000 years ago

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We need to rediscover the wonder of space exploration to save Earth

Going into space invites us to consider our position as the dominant species on a fragile planet, and how hard we must fight for it, says Richard Webb

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Working hypothesis: From deepfake Dali to black toothpaste

Our regular column sorting the week's supernovae from the absolute zeros

2h

Precise closure of single blood vessels via multiphoton absorption-based photothermolysis

We report a novel approach to selectively close single blood vessels within tissue using multiphoton absorption–based photothermolysis (multiphoton photothermolysis) without the need of exogenous agents. The treatment process is monitored by in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy in real time. Closure of single targeted vessels of varying sizes ranging from capillaries to venules was demonstrate

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Identification of variable lymphocyte receptors that can target therapeutics to pathologically exposed brain extracellular matrix

Diseases that lead to blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption will pathologically expose normally inaccessible brain extracellular matrix (ECM) to circulating blood components. Therefore, we hypothesized that brain ECM-targeting moieties could specifically target the disrupted BBB and potentially deliver therapies. Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) that preferentially associate with brain ECM wer

2h

Global pattern of phytoplankton diversity driven by temperature and environmental variability

Despite their importance to ocean productivity, global patterns of marine phytoplankton diversity remain poorly characterized. Although temperature is considered a key driver of general marine biodiversity, its specific role in phytoplankton diversity has remained unclear. We determined monthly phytoplankton species richness by using niche modeling and >540,000 global phytoplankton observations t

2h

PES1 is a critical component of telomerase assembly and regulates cellular senescence

Telomerase defers the onset of telomere shortening and cellular senescence by adding telomeric repeat DNA to chromosome ends, and its activation contributes to carcinogenesis. Telomerase minimally consists of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the telomerase RNA (TR). However, how telomerase assembles is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PES1 (Pescadillo), a protein overexpr

2h

Loss of PRC1 activity in different stem cell compartments activates a common transcriptional program with cell type-dependent outcomes

Polycomb repressive complexes are evolutionarily conserved complexes that maintain transcriptional repression during development and differentiation to establish and preserve cell identity. We recently described the fundamental role of PRC1 in preserving intestinal stem cell identity through the inhibition of non–lineage-specific transcription factors. To further elucidate the role of PRC1 in adu

2h

Multiplexed single-cell RNA-seq via transient barcoding for simultaneous expression profiling of various drug perturbations

The development of high-throughput single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) has enabled access to information about gene expression in individual cells and insights into new biological areas. Although the interest in scRNA-seq has rapidly grown in recent years, the existing methods are plagued by many challenges when performing scRNA-seq on multiple samples. To simultaneously analyze multiple sampl

2h

Mutualistic interactions reshuffle the effects of climate change on plants across the tree of life

Climatically induced local species extinctions may trigger coextinction cascades, thus driving many more species to extinction than originally predicted by species distribution models. Using seven pollination networks across Europe that include the phylogeny and life history traits of plants, we show a substantial variability across networks in climatically predicted plant extinction—and particul

2h

Titi monkeys combine alarm calls to createprobabilistic meaning

Previous work suggested that titi monkeys Callicebus nigrifrons combine two alarm calls, the A- and B-calls, to communicate about predator type and location. To explore how listeners process these sequences, we recorded alarm call sequences of six free-ranging groups exposed to terrestrial and aerial predator models, placed on the ground or in the canopy, and used multimodel inference to assess t

2h

Macrophage centripetal migration drives spontaneous healing process after spinal cord injury

Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) brings numerous inflammatory cells, including macrophages, from the circulating blood to lesions, but pathophysiological impact resulting from spatiotemporal dynamics of macrophages is unknown. Here, we show that macrophages centripetally migrate toward the lesion epicenter after infiltrating into the wide range of spinal cord, depending on the gradient of chemo

2h

Speaker-independent auditory attention decoding without access to clean speech sources

Speech perception in crowded environments is challenging for hearing-impaired listeners. Assistive hearing devices cannot lower interfering speakers without knowing which speaker the listener is focusing on. One possible solution is auditory attention decoding in which the brainwaves of listeners are compared with sound sources to determine the attended source, which can then be amplified to faci

2h

ALBA protein complex reads genic R-loops to maintain genome stability in Arabidopsis

The R-loop, composed of a DNA-RNA hybrid and the displaced single-stranded DNA, regulates diverse cellular processes. However, how cellular R-loops are recognized remains poorly understood. Here, we report the discovery of the evolutionally conserved ALBA proteins (AtALBA1 and AtALBA2) functioning as the genic R-loop readers in Arabidopsis . While AtALBA1 binds to the DNA-RNA hybrid, AtALBA2 asso

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Layer-specific activation of sensory input and predictive feedback in the human primary somatosensory cortex

When humans perceive a sensation, their brains integrate inputs from sensory receptors and process them based on their expectations. The mechanisms of this predictive coding in the human somatosensory system are not fully understood. We fill a basic gap in our understanding of the predictive processing of somatosensation by examining the layer-specific activity in sensory input and predictive fee

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Dental evolutionary rates and its implications for the Neanderthal-modern human divergence

The origin of Neanderthal and modern human lineages is a matter of intense debate. DNA analyses have generally indicated that both lineages diverged during the middle period of the Middle Pleistocene, an inferred time that has strongly influenced interpretations of the hominin fossil record. This divergence time, however, is not compatible with the anatomical and genetic Neanderthal affinities ob

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Fossil teeth push the human-Neandertal split back to about 1 million years ago

A study of fossilized teeth shifts the age of the last common ancestor between Neandertals and humans.

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Captive chimpanzees spontaneously use tools to excavate underground food

Chimpanzees in captivity can successfully work out how to use tools to excavate underground food, even if they've never been presented with an underground food scenario before, according to a study published May 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alba Motes-Rodrigo and colleagues and directed by Adriana Hernandez-Aguilar from the University of Oslo.

2h

Study finds scientific reproducibility does not equate to scientific truth

Reproducible scientific results are not always true and true scientific results are not always reproducible, according to a mathematical model produced by University of Idaho researchers. Their study, which simulates the search for that scientific truth, will be published Wednesday, May 15, in the journal PLOS ONE.

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Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago

Neanderthals and modern humans diverged at least 800,000 years ago, substantially earlier than indicated by most DNA-based estimates, according to new research by a UCL academic.

2h

Ancient fish ponds in the Bolivian savanna supported human settlement

A network of fish ponds supported a permanent human settlement in the seasonal drylands of Bolivia more than one thousand years ago, according to a new study published May 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Gabriela Prestes-Carneiro of Federal University of Western Para, Brazil, and colleagues. The study is the first to document the full range of fish species likely kept in these cons

2h

Calling attention to gender bias dramatically changes course evaluations

With growing evidence of gender bias on student course evaluations, a new intervention developed by Iowa State University researchers may help reduce bias against women instructors.

2h

Do you trust politicians? Depends on how you define trust

There's more to trust than credence and faith, especially as it comes to politics. Research from Michigan State University and North Carolina State University presents new evidence to suggest that there are more layers to political trust than the public—and politicians themselves—previously thought.

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Young adults distressed by labels of narcissism, entitlement

Young adults both believe and react negatively to messages that members of their age group are more entitled and narcissistic than other living generations, suggests new research presented by Joshua Grubbs of Bowling Green State University, Ohio, and colleagues in the open access journal PLOS ONE on May 15, 2019.

2h

Forget Grocery Store Yogurt and Kombucha, Get Real Probiotics Backed By Actual Science

More and more scientists and medical professionals are stressing the importance of probiotics for improved gut health. However, the category has been drastically oversimplified by food companies, TV doctors, and celebrity health bloggers who hawk all sorts of “probiotic” supplements, foods, and beverages that don’t actually provide any known health benefits. Fortunately, despite the proliferation

2h

Captive chimpanzees spontaneously use tools to excavate underground food

Chimpanzees in captivity can successfully work out how to use tools to excavate underground food, even if they've never been presented with an underground food scenario before, according to a study published May 15, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Alba Motes-Rodrigo and colleagues and directed by Adriana Hernandez-Aguilar from the University of Oslo.

2h

Neanderthals and modern humans parted company earlier than thought

Tooth study pushes back the last common ancestor by around 400,000 years. Andrew Masterson reports.

2h

Monkey calls are complex and probabilistic, research reveals

Primate study offers clues to the evolution of human speech. Tanya Loos reports.

2h

Chang'e-4: Chinese rover 'confirms' Moon crater theory

The Chinese Chang'e-4 rover may have confirmed a longstanding idea about the origin of a vast crater on the Moon's far side.

2h

Toy transformers and real-life whales inspire biohybrid robot

Researchers create a remote-controlled soft robot that can transform itself to conduct targeted drug delivery against cancer cells.

2h

New drug could help treat neonatal seizures

A new drug that inhibits neonatal seizures in rodent models could open up new avenues for the treatment of epilepsy in human newborns.

2h

James Charles, Tati Westbrook, and the Future of Beauty YouTube

Fans are setting their Charles-branded makeup on fire, but his feud with Westbrook is about public loyalties—not business.

2h

Cellular rivalry promotes healthy skin development

Scientists have discovered a curious phenomenon taking place in mouse skin: cells compete with one another for the chance to develop into mature tissue. The findings indicate that this antagonism is key to creating healthy skin.

2h

Coherent? Voice disorders significantly affect listeners, too

Researchers conducted a study to see if there are differences in speech intelligibility (a listener's ability to recover a speaker's message) in healthy voices compared to those who have voice disorders like hoarseness. They also wanted to know if using listener strategies such as paying close attention to the words or using other words to try to figure out the message would increase speech intell

2h

A new way to wind the development clock of cardiac muscle cells

A study published in the journal Stem Cells describes a new and unexpected way to accelerate the maturation of induced pluripotent stem cells into cardiac muscle cells.

2h

How ocean melts Antarctic Ice Sheet

An innovative use of instruments that measure the ocean near Antarctica has helped scientists to get a clearer picture of how the ocean is melting the Antarctic ice sheet. Until now, most measurements in Antarctica were made during summer, leaving winter conditions, when the sea freezes over with ice, largely unknown.

2h

Clean and effective electronic waste recycling

E-waste recycling is far below what it should be to reduce its impact on the environment and human health simply because it is not economically feasible. Researchers from Japan are working on a way to change that using pulsed power technology.

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How climate change will affect the rural northeast: Expect three weeks of heat

While extreme cold and snow often make headlines in the Northeast, by 2060, there will be far more record heat. Imagine the most sweltering day of the year. By 2060, you will experience that type of hot day for approximately three weeks of the year, assuming we don't substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. According to a Dartmouth study, of the rural Northeast counties represented, those in

3h

Transfer of EU powers leads to silent erosion of UK pesticide regulation

New analysis by the UK Trade Policy Observatory is warning of a significant weakening of enforcement arrangements covering the approval of pesticides as part of legislative changes carried out under the EU Withdrawal Act.

3h

Can sound protect eagles from wind turbine collisions?

Every year, bald and golden eagles are killed when they inadvertently fly into wind turbine blades. One possible way to prevent these deaths is to chase the birds away with acoustic signals. To determine what types of sounds are most effective in deterring the birds, researchers tested the behavioral responses of bald eagles to a battery of both natural and synthetic acoustic stimuli.

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How loud is too loud when it comes to sports whistles?

Referees and others using whistles on the job need a simple way to determine whether it's harmful to their hearing, so researchers set out to put it to the test and to provide some clarity and damage risk criteria for impulse noise exposures. To do this, the group carefully measured and analyzed the acoustic signature of 13 brands of whistles identified as the 'most commonly used' by 300 sports of

3h

Brain stimulation improves working memory in adults

Magnetic stimulation of the brain improves working memory, offering a new potential avenue of therapy for individuals living with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia.

3h

What are the neurological side effects of CAR T-cell therapy?

A team recently cataloged the neurological symptoms of patients who had received CAR T-cell therapy to better understand its neurotoxic side effects. While neurological symptoms were prevalent — 77 percent of patients experienced at least one symptom — they were also temporary.

3h

Report: Trump’s Space Force Could Cost Billions More Than Expected

Space Force Conundrum According to a report submitted by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) last week, the U.S. military’s proposed Space Force could rack up $1.3 billion in additional costs per year — far higher, Space.com points out , than the $500 million a year previously projected by the Department of Defense. The Pentagon however, challenged the report’s estimates. A Department of Defens

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China's Moon Lander Just Revealed a Secret on the Far Side of the Moon

China's lunar rover may have found pieces of the moon's elusive mantle.

3h

Climatic controls of decomposition drive the global biogeography of forest-tree symbioses

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1128-0 A spatially explicit global map of tree symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi reveals that climate variables are the primary drivers of the distribution of different types of symbiosis.

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The Moon’s mantle unveiled

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01479-x An in situ investigation on the far side of the Moon has identified materials that might have originated from the lunar mantle. The results could lead to improved models of how the Moon formed and evolved.

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Targeting the CBM complex causes Treg cells to prime tumours for immune checkpoint therapy

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1215-2 Disruption of the CARMA1–BCL10–MALT1 (CBM) signalosome causes Treg cells to produce IFNγ and develop dominant anti-tumour activity in synergy with anti-PD-1 treatment, and in the absence of autoimmunity.

3h

Sampling the volatile-rich transition zone beneath Bermuda

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1183-6 The formation of Bermuda sampled a previously unknown mantle reservoir that is characterized by silica-undersaturated melts enriched in volatiles and by a unique lead isotopic signature, which suggests that the source is young.

3h

An apical hypoxic niche sets the pace of shoot meristem activity

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1203-6 Hypoxia in the shoot meristem of Arabidopsis links the regulation of metabolic activity to development by inhibiting proteolysis of a substrate of the N-degron pathway, which controls class-III homeodomain-leucine zipper transcription factors.

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Transcriptional cofactors display specificity for distinct types of core promoters

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1210-7 A screen of 23 transcriptional cofactors for their ability to activate 72,000 candidate core promoters in Drosophila melanogaster identified distinct compatibility groups, providing insight into mechanisms that underlie the selective activation of transcriptional programs.

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Temporal and spectral fingerprints of ultrafast all-coherent spin switching

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1174-7 Antenna-enhanced terahertz pulses ballistically switch spins in antiferromagnetic TmFeO3 with minimal energy dissipation between metastable minima of the anisotropy potential, as characterized by unique temporal and spectral fingerprints.

3h

Mitochondrial fragmentation drives selective removal of deleterious mtDNA in the germline

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1213-4 An in situ hybridization approach is used to visualize mitochondrial DNA germline selection in Drosophila, revealing the role of mitochondrial fragmentation in the selection against deleterious mutations.

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Indonesia tops open-access publishing charts

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01536-5 Countries in southeast Asia, Africa and South America lead the way on free-to-read literature.

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Epigenetic evolution and lineage histories of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1198-z A single-cell approach is used to follow the heritable stochastic changes to DNA methylation that occur in primary chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and healthy B cells, allowing the tracing of cell lineage histories and evolution during treatment with ibrutinib.

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Chang’E-4 initial spectroscopic identification of lunar far-side mantle-derived materials

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1189-0 Initial spectral observations by China’s Chang’E-4 far-side lunar rover suggest the presence of materials that may originate from the Moon’s mantle.

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Self-verifying variational quantum simulation of lattice models

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1177-4 Quantum-classical variational techniques are combined with a programmable analogue quantum simulator based on a one-dimensional array of up to 20 trapped calcium ions to simulate the ground state of the lattice Schwinger model.

3h

Cavity quantum electrodynamics with atom-like mirrors

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1196-1 An array of superconducting qubits in an open one-dimensional waveguide is precisely controlled to create an artificial quantum cavity–atom system that reaches the strong-coupling regime without substantial decoherence.

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First probe on the Moon’s far side uncovers hints of lunar interior

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01541-8 China’s Chang’e-4 mission has detected material that was probably stirred up during an impact event.

3h

Nerve cells from the brain invade prostate tumours

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01461-7 Prostate cancer contains nerve cells that are linked to disease progression, but their source was unknown. A mouse study reveals that cells from the brain invade prostate tumours and give rise to this nerve-cell population.

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Distinct modes of cell competition shape mammalian tissue morphogenesis

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1199-y Cell competition in the developing mouse epithelium involves apoptosis and engulfment when the epithelium has only one layer, but switches to involve asymmetric cell division and differentiation of ‘loser’ cells as the epithelium becomes stratified.

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Podcast: Recoding genomes, and material from the Moon's far side

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01556-1 Listen to the lastest science news, brought to you by Shamini Bundell and Nick Howe.

3h

Transcription factors and 3D genome conformation in cell-fate decisions

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1182-7 Three-dimensional genome architecture has important roles in the regulation of gene expression and is therefore a key determinant of cell identity in normal development and in disease states.

3h

Progenitors from the central nervous system drive neurogenesis in cancer

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1219-y In a mouse model of prostate cancer, neural progenitors from the central nervous system that express doublecortin infiltrate tumours and metastases, and can generate new adrenergic neurons in tumours.

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Scaling up quantum simulations

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01483-1 It is difficult to carry out and verify digital quantum simulations that use many quantum bits. A hybrid device based on a digital classical computer and an analog quantum processor suggests a way forward.

3h

Total synthesis of Escherichia coli with a recoded genome

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1192-5 High-fidelity convergent total synthesis is used to produce Escherichia coli with a 61-codon synthetic genome that uses 59 codons to encode all of the canonical amino acids.

3h

Terror deaths, primate research and nuclear deal falters

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01495-x T he week in science: 10–16 May 2019.

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Tracing the origin of adult intestinal stem cells

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1212-5 Lineage tracing, biophysical modelling and intestinal transplantation approaches are used to demonstrate that, in the mouse fetal intestinal epithelium, cells are highly plastic with respect to cellular identity and, independent of LGR5 expression and cell position, can contribute to the adult stem cell compartment.

3h

Mapping HIV prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2017

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1200-9 Fine-scale estimates of the prevalence of HIV in adults across sub-Saharan Africa reveal substantial within-country variation and local differences in both the direction and rate of change in the prevalence of HIV between 2000 and 2017.

3h

Lenovo built a laptop with a folding screen and it could be the future of portable PCs

Gadgets The 13.3-inch display is very interesting, even at a time when folding displays are in flux. Lenvovo's laptop with a folding screen is coming in 2020.

3h

Refrigeration Research Seeks to Ditch Toxic, Polluting Gases

Refrigeration Research Seeks to Ditch Toxic, Polluting Gases So-called plastic crystals could open new avenues in the quest to make refrigerators with only solid components. OldRefrigerators_topNteaser.jpg Used refrigerators and freezers stored in a waste station. The gases from standard fridges can harm the environment when they escape. Image credits: Imfoto/Shutterstock Technology Wednesday, Ma

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rTMS improves memory in younger and older adults

Magnetic stimulation of the brain improves working memory, offering a new potential avenue of therapy for individuals living with Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, according to new research from the Duke University School of Medicine.

3h

Cellular rivalry promotes healthy skin development

Scientists have discovered a curious phenomenon taking place in mouse skin: cells compete with one another for the chance to develop into mature tissue. The findings indicate that this antagonism is key to creating healthy skin.

3h

China's Chang'E 4 mission discovers new 'secrets' from far side of the moon

A lunar lander named for the Chinese goddess of the moon may have lessened the mystery of the far side of the moon. The fourth probe of Chang'E (CE-4) was the first mission to land on the far side of the moon, and it has collected new evidence from the largest crater in the solar system, clarifying how the moon may have evolved.

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Physicists create prototype superefficient memory for future computers

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and their colleagues from Germany and the Netherlands have achieved material magnetization switching on the shortest timescales, at a minimal energy cost. They have thus developed a prototype of energy-efficient data storage devices.

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Energy-free superfast computing invented by scientists using light pulses

The invention uses magnets to record computer data which consume virtually zero energy, solving the dilemma of how to create faster data processing speeds without high energy costs.Today's data center servers consume between 2 to 5% of global electricity consumption, producing heat which needs more power to cool the servers. The problem is so acute services in the ocean in an effort to keep them c

3h

'Striking' differences in rates of HIV/AIDS within African nations

Despite the rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) since 2000, HIV/AIDS is still the most common cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa, according to data from the Global Burden of Disease.

3h

Quantum cloud computing with self-check

With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics. The research groups led by Rainer Blatt and Peter Zoller report in the journal Nature how they simulated particle physics phenomena on 20 quantum bits and how the quantum simulator self-verified the r

3h

Mapping microbial symbioses in forests

Data collected from over 1 million forest plots reveals patterns of where plant roots form symbiotic relationships with fungi and bacteria.

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How egg cells choose their best powerhouses to pass on

Developing egg cells conduct tests to select the healthiest of their energy-making machines to be passed to the next generation.

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New strategy of reprogramming regulatory T cells may improve cancer therapies

Therapies that harness the power of the immune system against cancer have made remarkable progress against certain tumors but still remain ineffective in most cancer patients. A new study from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases describes a method of reprogramming regulatory T cells that usually suppress immune responses into inflammatory cells that n

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‘Wood wide web’—the underground network of microbes that connects trees—mapped for first time

Global census of forest fungi suggests warming could trigger soil carbon bomb

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China’s Government Just Blocked the Entirety of Wikipedia

Language Barrier Wikipedia is no longer welcome in China. On May 4, an internet censorship initiative called the Open Observatory of Network Interference reported that China had extended its ban of the free online encyclopedia to include all available languages, not just the Chinese version. And on Tuesday, the Wikimedia foundation confirmed the Wikipedia ban with BBC News — meaning China has mad

3h

Researchers have swapped the genome of gut germ E. coli for an artificial one

By creating a new genome, scientists could create organisms tailored to produce desirable compounds.

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Cambridge scientists create world’s first living organism with fully redesigned DNA

Researchers create altered synthetic genome, in move with potential medical benefits Scientists have created the world’s first living organism that has a fully synthetic and radically altered DNA code. The lab-made microbe, a strain of bacteria that is normally found in soil and the human gut, is similar to its natural cousins but survives on a smaller set of genetic instructions. Continue readin

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Forget Sats – find a true measure of education | Letters

Clive Stafford Smith says Sats are irrelevant to his son’s life and Mary Bousted defends Labour’s proposed assessment reforms, while Ann Moore and Richard Wetherell highlight the negative effects of tests Amanda Spielman may be warning the wrong people about exam anxiety, certainly as far as younger kids are concerned ( Ofsted chief says teachers can cause ‘subliminal’ exam anxiety , May 14). My

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China's rover peeks under the crust of the far side of the moon

China's Yutu 2 rover on the far side of the moon has found material from deep under the satellite's crust, which we have never been able to study before

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Blood flow command center discovered in the brain

Researchers have discovered a group of cells in the brain that may function as a 'master-controller' for the cardiovascular system, orchestrating the control of blood flow to different parts of the body.

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Chinese lander offers clues to the inside of the moon

Chang’E-4 mission identifies possible rocks from deep below the surface. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Researchers map symbiotic relationships between trees and microbes worldwide

In and around the tangled roots of the forest floor, fungi and bacteria grow with trees, exchanging nutrients for carbon in a vast, global marketplace. A new effort to map the most abundant of these symbiotic relationships—involving more than 1.1 million forest sites and 28,000 tree species—has revealed factors that determine where different types of symbionts will flourish. The work could help sc

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Energy-free superfast computing invented by scientists using light pulses

Superfast data processing using light pulses instead of electricity has been created by scientists.

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How egg cells choose their best powerhouses to pass on

Developing egg cells conduct tests to select the healthiest of their energy-making machines to be passed to the next generation. A new study in fruit flies, published online May 15 in Nature, shows how the testing is done.

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China's Chang'E 4 mission discovers new 'secrets' from the far side of the moon

A lunar lander named for the Chinese goddess of the moon may have lessened the mystery of the far side of the moon. The fourth Chang'E probe (CE-4) was the first mission to land on the far side of the moon, and it has collected new evidence from the largest crater in the solar system, clarifying how the moon may have evolved. The results were published on May 16, 2019, in Nature.

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From the Lunar Far Side, China's Rover Reveals Moon's Hidden Depths

The Chang’e-4 mission appears to have found material excavated from a frozen magma ocean far below the lunar surface — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Army researcher defends dissertation, pursues safeguarded technology

An electronics engineer at the Army's corporate research laboratory successfully defended his doctoral dissertation, while working to safeguard fielded technology for the Soldiers of today and tomorrow.

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Enhanced anticancer compound may allow precise activation and tracking of treatment

Wistar and University of South Florida researchers have advanced a novel compound that specifically targets the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response that is frequently hyperactivated in cancer and promotes survival of cancer cells during stressful conditions.

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Brown undergraduate researcher teaches robots handwriting and drawing

Working with a Brown University faculty member, an undergraduate student developed an algorithm that enables robots to reproduce human-like pen strokes just by looking at images of handwriting or sketches.

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As bumblebee diets narrow, ours could too

A new study from the University of California, Riverside, reveals the loss of plant diversity harms the humble bumble at a critical stage in its development from egg to adult.

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China’s lunar rover may have found minerals from the moon’s mantle

The Chang’e-4 mission spotted material on the lunar surface that appears to contain bits originating from the moon’s interior.

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How egg cells choose their best powerhouses to pass on

Developing egg cells conduct tests to select the healthiest of their energy-making machines to be passed to the next generation. A new study in fruit flies, published online May 15 in Nature, shows how the testing is done.

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Wood wide web: Trees' social networks are mapped

Research has shown that beneath every forest and wood there is a complex underground web of roots and fungi, connecting trees and plants to one another.

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From the Lunar Far Side, China's Rover Reveals Moon's Hidden Depths

The Chang’e-4 mission appears to have found material excavated from a frozen magma ocean far below the lunar surface — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Proustian draw of sexy hawthorn | Brief letters

Scapegoats | Gorbachev | Timpson | Hawthorn | Danny Drinkwater It is surprising that your stimulating and relevant supplement ( Age of rage: the ultimate guide to anger , 11 May) appears to overlook a major effect of anger: scapegoating, ie the displacement of anger from its authentic cause to another target, an innocent or uninvolved victim of the displaced emotion. It is surely key to say someth

3h

SpaceX Was Secretly Building a Second Starship in Florida

Doubling Down In a bid to reach the Moon as quickly as possible, SpaceX is building a second Starship. The company is already building and testing one Starship in Texas, but decided to build another in Florida to determine which site is better suited for the task, according to Engadget . By developing a second construction site for Starships, SpaceX is effectively racing against itself to figure

3h

Ex-Tropical Cyclone Ann moving over Australia's Cape York Peninsula

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of the remnants of Tropical Cyclone Ann moving over Queensland's Cape York Peninsula. Despite the storm weakening below tropical cyclone status, warnings remain active for strong winds and flooding potential.

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Blood biopsy: New technique enables detailed genetic analysis of cancer cells

A new way to cleanly separate out cancer cells from a blood sample enables comprehensive genetic profiling of the cancer cells, which could help doctors target tumors and monitor treatments more effectively.

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What are the neurological side effects of CAR T-cell therapy?

A team at Brigham and Women's Hospital recently cataloged the neurological symptoms of patients who had received CAR T-cell therapy to better understand its neurotoxic side effects. While neurological symptoms were prevalent — 77 percent of patients experienced at least one symptom — they were also temporary. The findings are published in Brain.

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Coherent? Voice disorders significantly affect listeners, too

Researchers conducted a study to see if there are differences in speech intelligibility (a listener's ability to recover a speaker's message) in healthy voices compared to those who have voice disorders like hoarseness. They also wanted to know if using listener strategies such as paying close attention to the words or using other words to try to figure out the message would increase speech intell

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Stoic, resourceful — and at risk for suicide

A new study led by a University of Georgia researcher, in collaboration with epidemiologists from the Georgia Department of Public Health, has identified some common factors associated with farmer suicide that may help health providers develop strategies to reduce suicide risk.

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Some LGBT employees feel less supported at federal agencies

Workplace inequality is visible when it involves gender and race, but less so with sexual identity and gender expression.

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Kid Climate Educators Open Adult Eyes

A study finds that kids, especially daughters, are effective at teaching their parents about climate issues.

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Microsoft’s First Windows XP Patch in Years Is a Very Bad Sign

A very bad vulnerability in Windows XP could have serious ramifications, even with a patch.

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Planetary scientists unravel mystery of Egyptian desert glass

A Curtin University researcher has solved a nearly 100-year-old riddle by discovering that glass found in the Egyptian desert was created by a meteorite impact, rather than atmospheric airburst, in findings that have implications for understanding the threat posed by asteroids.

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Exxon and Energy Department Team Up on Biofuels, Plastics Research

The oil and gas giant aims to help the National Renewable Energy Laboratory scale up cleaner forms of energy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Can the UK avoid having a lethal opioid crisis like the one in the US?

Doctors in the UK are concerned that it could follow the US into an opioid crisis, yet measures to prevent this could go too far and leave people in pain

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Chronic insomnia and memory problems: A direct link is established

The Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging, involving almost 30,000 adults aged 45 and over, has concluded that chronic insomnia disorder has a direct negative impact on cognitive functions, independent of other health issues.

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Same computer password for the last 10 years? You might need a vibrating cybernudge

Technology used in exercise and lifestyle apps may hold the key to answering that most difficult of challenges — getting people to change their passwords and better protect their online privacy and data.

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Flat-Earthery, British Style

A new poll estimates flat-Earth belief in the U.K. at 1 percent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Honeywell Leaps Into Quantum Computing in Race With Google, IBM

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America just had its lowest number of births in 32 years

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Tech giants vow to step up fight against online extremism

Major tech firms on Wednesday pledged to come up with new measures for stamping out violent extremist content on the internet, amid growing pressure from governments pushing for action in the wake of the massacres at two New Zealand mosques in March.

4h

What artificial intelligence can teach us about proteins

Proteins are vital parts of all living organisms and perform essential tasks in our bodies. They build and repair tissues, supply components of the immune and hormone systems, regulate metabolism, and transmit signals. Researchers in Berlin and Heidelberg have now developed an intelligent neural network that can predict the functions of proteins in the human body. The team used a "trick" to observ

4h

Nursing home cameras pose ethics dilemma

Security cameras in nursing homes aim to protect residents, but new research suggests they come with a variety of legal and moral ethics issues. With reports of crimes against nursing home residents gaining media attention around the country, it’s understandable that families would want to protect their loved one and attempt to establish accountability for care, says Clara Berridge, an assistant

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Springer Nature journals unify their policy to encourage preprint sharing

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01493-z Recognizing the benefits, we move from merely supporting the use of preprint servers to promoting it.

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What artificial intelligence can teach us about proteins

Proteins are vital parts of all living organisms and perform essential tasks in our bodies. They build and repair tissues, supply components of the immune and hormone systems, regulate metabolism, and transmit signals. Researchers in Berlin and Heidelberg have now developed an intelligent neural network that can predict the functions of proteins in the human body. The team used a "trick" to observ

4h

Iceland volcano eruption in 1783-84 did not spawn extreme heat wave

An enormous volcanic eruption on Iceland in 1783-84 did not cause an extreme summer heat wave in Europe. But, as Benjamin Franklin speculated, the eruption triggered an unusually cold winter, according to a Rutgers-led study.

4h

Excitonic radiative decay faster than thermal dephasing in ZnO thin films

A team of researchers from Osaka University, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka City University, and The University of Shiga Prefecture have found excitonic radiative decay faster than thermal dephasing at room temperature in zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. These results, published recently in Physical Review Letters, will greatly reduce the thermal energy loss in optical operations.

4h

The world is in danger of blowing its sand budget

There are grave environmental consequences from the plundering of lakes, rivers and coastal areas

4h

Researchers identify faster, more effective drug combinations to treat tuberculosis

A new study describes a way to reduce the duration of tuberculosis treatment by using an approach called 'artificial intelligence-parabolic response surface' that allows researchers to quickly identify three or four drug combinations among billions of possible combinations to treat TB up to five times faster than current therapies.

4h

Molecular basis of brain dysfunction and embryo malformation associated with thalidomide

Scientists have identified the molecule involved in thalidomide-related dysfunctions associated with in utero brain and organ development. Their in vivo results using a zebrafish model of mammalian development showed that thalidomide binds to a protein named cereblon, a subunit of an enzyme complex responsible for the creation of neurons, thereby inhibiting normal brain development. Their results

4h

New doctors' DNA ages six times faster than normal in first year

Every summer, tens of thousands of newly minted doctors start the most intense year of their training: the first year of residency, also called the intern year. A new study suggests that the experience will make their DNA age six times faster than normal. And the effect will be largest among those whose training programs demand the longest hours.

4h

Chewing gums reveal the oldest Scandinavian human DNA

The first humans who settled in Scandinavia more than 10,000 years ago left their DNA behind in ancient chewing gums, which are masticated lumps made from birch bark pitch.

4h

Dolphin ancestor's hearing was more like hoofed mammals than today's sea creatures

Paleontologists are looking into the evolutionary origins of the whistles and squeaks that dolphins and porpoises make — part of the rare echolocation ability that allows them to effectively navigate their dark environment.

4h

Se den okända bakterien som syresätter planeten

Den är pytteliten, grön och världshaven är fulla av dem. Den kan knappt ses i ett mikroskåp, men tillverkar sammanlagt lika mycket syre som alla odlade grödor på land. Idag prisas Sallie Chisholm som upptäckte bakterien prochlorococcus med det stora svenska forskningspriset.

4h

Ragweed compounds could protect nerve cells from Alzheimer's

As spring arrives in the northern hemisphere, many people are cursing ragweed, a primary culprit in seasonal allergies. But scientists might have discovered a promising new use for some substances produced by the pesky weed. In ACS' Journal of Natural Products, researchers have identified and characterized ragweed compounds that could help nerve cells survive in the presence of Alzheimer's disease

4h

Opioid-exposed newborns may react to pain differently after birth

Babies exposed to opioids while their mothers were pregnant with them may need special care even before they start to experience withdrawal symptoms, according to Penn State research.

4h

Twitter image colors and content could help identify users with depression, anxiety

Penn study shows users who score high on a depression and anxiety survey often post photos that are less aesthetically appealing, less vivid in color or display little depth of field

4h

Faster walkers more likely to live longer

People who report that they have a slower walking pace have a lower life expectancy than fast walkers, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre — a partnership between Leicester's Hospitals, the University of Leicester and Loughborough University.

4h

Flat-Earthery, British Style

A new poll estimates flat-Earth belief in the U.K. at 1 percent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Software locates sugarcane genes of interest

Plants have larger and more complex genomes than all animals, be they mammals, birds, reptiles or amphibians. Fish are the exception to the rule.

4h

San Francisco ban highlights facial recognition fears

A ban on facial recognition for law enforcement in San Francisco highlights growing public concerns about technology which is seeing stunning growth for an array of applications while provoking worries over privacy.

4h

Russia to release killer whales in new habitat, despite expert advice

Russia is to free captured killer whales over the next month, but will not return them to their original habitat despite expert advice, a scientist said Wednesday.

4h

Der er noget galt Danmark – det ses tydeligt i psykiatrien

Den psykiatriske indsats halter gevaldigt bagefter – vi, der følger med fra første række, ønsker mere tid, flere hænder, flere senge og større faglige ambitioner.

4h

Something Strange Punched a Hole in the Milky Way. But What Exactly Is It?

We can't see it. It might not be made of normal matter. Our telescopes haven't directly detected it at all. But it sure seems like it's out there.

4h

NASA Just Gave the New Moon Program an Epic Name

Name Game If it succeeds, NASA’s upcoming lunar mission will the first time in history that a woman astronaut walks on the surface of the Moon. To commemorate the occasion, NASA has named the mission Artemis — after the Greek goddess of the Moon, according to Ars Technica . The new mission is also a homage: In Greek mythology, Artemis is the sister of the god Apollo, which was the name of the mis

4h

Software locates sugarcane genes of interest

Plants have larger and more complex genomes than all animals, be they mammals, birds, reptiles or amphibians. Fish are the exception to the rule.

4h

Russia to release killer whales in new habitat, despite expert advice

Russia is to free captured killer whales over the next month, but will not return them to their original habitat despite expert advice, a scientist said Wednesday.

4h

Ragweed compounds could protect nerve cells from Alzheimer's

As spring arrives in the northern hemisphere, many people are cursing ragweed, a primary culprit in seasonal allergies. But scientists might have discovered a promising new use for some substances produced by the pesky weed. Researchers have identified and characterized ragweed compounds that could help nerve cells survive in the presence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) peptides.

4h

New insights on the control of dicamba-resistant kochia

Kochia is a highly invasive weed that is common in the Great Plains, where it has developed resistance to multiple herbicides. Now new dicamba-resistant strains are adding to grower worries.

4h

What artificial intelligence can teach us about proteins

Proteins are vital parts of all living organisms and perform essential tasks in our bodies. They build and repair tissues, supply components of the immune and hormone systems, regulate metabolism, and transmit signals. Researchers have now developed an intelligent neural network that can predict the functions of proteins in the human body. The team used a 'trick' to observe how the network makes i

4h

Robot therapists need rules

Interactions with artificial intelligence (AI) will become an increasingly common aspect of our lives. A team has now completed the first study of how 'embodied AI' can help treat mental illness. Their conclusion: Important ethical questions of this technology remain unanswered. There is urgent need for action on the part of governments, professional associations and researchers.

4h

Researchers block protein that plays a key role in Alzheimer's disease

In recent years, it has become increasingly clear to researchers that the protein galectin-3 is involved in inflammatory diseases in the brain. A study now shows the de facto key role played by the protein in Alzheimer's disease. When the researchers shut off the gene that produces this protein in mice, the amount of Alzheimer's plaque and the inflammatory load both decreased.

4h

Technique Improves Use of Hair for Drug Tests

Researchers develop a washing method that is better at removing drugs that have contaminated hair from the outside than existing protocols.

4h

The New Abortion Bills Are a Dare

Late Tuesday night, Alabama legislators passed a bill that would outlaw abortion at any stage in a woman’s pregnancy . They’re in good company: Earlier in May, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp signed a law making abortion illegal after a fetal heartbeat can be detected , or roughly six weeks after conception. Ohio, Mississippi, and Kentucky have all passed similar bills this year. The state legislator

4h

New insights on the control of dicamba-resistant kochia

Kochia is a highly invasive weed that is common in the Great Plains, where it has developed resistance to multiple herbicides. Now new dicamba-resistant strains are adding to grower worries.

4h

Overfed bacteria make people sick

Since the end of the Second World War, along with the growing prosperity and the associated changes in lifestyle, numerous new and civilisation-related disease patterns have developed in today's industrialised nations. Examples of the so-called "environmental diseases" are different bowel diseases like Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Common causes include disruptions to the human microbiome

4h

New insights on the control of dicamba-resistant kochia

Kochia is a highly invasive weed that is common in the Great Plains, where it has developed resistance to multiple herbicides. Now new dicamba-resistant strains are adding to grower worries.

4h

Overfed bacteria make people sick

Since the end of the Second World War, along with the growing prosperity and the associated changes in lifestyle, numerous new and civilisation-related disease patterns have developed in today's industrialised nations. Examples of the so-called "environmental diseases" are different bowel diseases like Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Common causes include disruptions to the human microbiome

4h

A recent study confirms the new trend in feminist reggaeton music

Reggaeton has traditionally been considered as a sexist music genre and the lyrics and choreographies usually associated with it are seen as a way of promoting the objectification of women. This trend is losing popularity due to the recent appearance of young women who have changed these sexist messages through lyrics with a feminist message. This phenomenon has been the core of an investigation l

4h

New research finds unprecedented weakening of Asian summer monsoon

Rainfall from the Asian summer monsoon has been decreasing over the past 80 years, a decline unprecedented in the last 448 years, according to a new study.

4h

Iceland volcano eruption in 1783-84 did not spawn extreme heat wave

An enormous volcanic eruption on Iceland in 1783-84 did not cause an extreme summer heat wave in Europe. But, as Benjamin Franklin speculated, the eruption triggered an unusually cold winter, according to a Rutgers-led study. The study, in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, will help improve predictions of how the climate will respond to future high-latitude volcanic eruptions.

5h

When biodegradable plastic isn't

The ubiquitous plastic bag is handy for transporting groceries and other items home from the store. However, this convenience takes a toll on the environment, with plastic debris littering land and waterways. Manufacturers offer biodegradable or compostable plastic bags, but in many cases, these claims have not been tested in natural environments. Now, researchers report in ACS' Environmental Scie

5h

Excitonic radiative decay faster than thermal dephasing in ZnO thin films

A team of researchers from Osaka University, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka City University, and The University of Shiga Prefecture have found excitonic radiative decay faster than thermal dephasing at room temperature in zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. These results, published recently in Physical Review Letters , will greatly reduce the thermal energy loss in optical operations.

5h

Researchers pinpoint why lymphoma patients may become resistant to specific therapy

Researchers from Moffitt Cancer Center and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have discovered a mechanism of drug resistance to Venetoclax®, also known as ABT-199, a BCL-2 targeting drug commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia. Their findings, published in the journal Cancer Cell, also suggest a possible co-treatment strategy to overcome this resistance.

5h

Software locates sugarcane genes of interest

Brazilian researchers develop a program for high-performance computers to map specific portions of plant DNA faster and less expensively for use in breeding more productive and stress-resistant varieties.

5h

Liquid biopsy could identify cancer patients at risk of metastatic disease

Analyzing fragments of DNA that are shed by tumors into the bloodstream, could indicate early on whether patients are at risk of their cancer spreading, according to new research presented today.

5h

Over-fed bacteria make people sick

In a new hypothesis, a CRC 1182 research team suggests that inflammatory diseases are caused by an over-supply of food, and the associated disturbance of the intestine's natural bacterial colonization.

5h

New surface treatment could improve refrigeration efficiency

Unlike water, liquid refrigerants and other fluids that have a low surface tension tend to spread quickly into a sheet when they come into contact with a surface. But for many industrial process it would be better if the fluids formed droplets, which could roll or fall off the surface and carry heat away with them. Now, researchers have made significant progress in promoting droplet formation and

5h

Machine learning predicts mechanical properties of porous materials

Machine learning can be used to predict the properties of a group of materials which, according to some, could be as important to the 21st century as plastics were to the 20th.

5h

Feeling healthy: A good start, but not always a good indicator of heart disease risk

Most people feel they have a general idea of how healthy they are based on their diet and exercise regimen and how often they get sick. But a new study adds to evidence that how healthy people think they are isn't always an accurate indicator of their risk for cardiovascular disease.

5h

In guppy courtship, the unusual male wins

In a new study, researchers found that female guppies often choose a mate that physically stands out from the rest of the pack because of a common type of learning called habituation. Through habituation, animals — in this case guppies — stop responding to a stimulus after prolonged exposure.

5h

Amount of carbon stored in forests reduced as climate warms

Accelerated tree growth caused by a warming climate does not necessarily translate into enhanced carbon storage, an international study suggests.

5h

New technique prepares 2-D perovskite single crystals for highest photodetectivity

A research group led by Prof. Liu Shengzhong from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Dr. Xu Zhuo at Shaanxi Normal University (SNNU) developed a technique to prepare large 2-D perovskite single crystals to achieve the highest photodetector performance among this type. Their findings were published in Matter.

5h

Ragweed compounds could protect nerve cells from Alzheimer's

As spring arrives in the northern hemisphere, many people are cursing ragweed, a primary culprit in seasonal allergies. But scientists might have discovered a promising new use for some substances produced by the pesky weed. In ACS' Journal of Natural Products, researchers have identified and characterized ragweed compounds that could help nerve cells survive in the presence of Alzheimer's disease

5h

Kulmule, makrel eller lygtefisk? Norsk maskinlæring bestemmer arter

Havforskningen automatiseres i Norge, hvor 90 pct. af fisk nu kan identificeres korrekt af en maskine.

5h

‘Serial Killers Are a Uniquely American Phenomenon’

In 1979, the American discourse on serial killers was irrevocably changed. Ted Bundy’s serial-murder-and-rape trial, which was nationally televised, ushered in a new era of live entertainment. Fifteen years later, O. J. Simpson’s trial became the next national obsession. Today, the true-crime genre reached new heights with the podcast Serial. The proliferation of successful murder-centric content

5h

What Happens When You Always Wear Headphones

I own three pairs of noise-canceling headphones. Two go over my ears, enveloping them in cozy tombs of silence. One pair consists of earbuds, one of which I jam into my ear to block out the world while I use my other ear for phone interviews. Besides the noise-canceling kind, I have headphones for basically every activity I do. In fact, I recently came to the disturbing realization that there’s r

5h

Avstängd produktion av protein hejdade Alzheimers

På senare år har forskare blivit alltmer klara över att proteinet galectin-3 är involverat vid inflammationssjukdomar i hjärnan. Studien som alzheimersforskare vid Lunds universitet gjort, tillsammans med kolleger i Spanien och England, visar att det aktuella proteinet också spelar en nyckelroll vid Alzheimers sjukdom. Vid Alzheimers sjukdom ansamlas bland annat amyloida plack utanför celler och

5h

Daily briefing: San Francisco bans facial-recognition technology

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01559-y “We have an outsize responsibility to regulate the excesses of technology precisely because they are headquartered here.” Plus: ghostwritten peer reviews and mysterious ‘Loki’ microbes.

5h

Mindfulness smoking-cessation app can change the brain

Brown University researchers have found that a mindfulness-based smartphone app designed to help people stop smoking was effective at reducing study participants' self-reported daily cigarette consumption. And those who reduced their cigarette consumption the most also showed decreased reactivity to smoking-related images in a brain region known to be activated when someone experiences a craving.

5h

Weight loss medicines underutilized by veterans

Despite the availability of new weight management medications and several clinical guidelines recommending their use as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for obesity, a new study has found that their use is extremely low (about one percent) among eligible Veterans.

5h

Framework improves 'continual learning' for artificial intelligence

Researchers have developed a new framework for deep neural networks that allows artificial intelligence (AI) systems to better learn new tasks while 'forgetting' less of what it has learned regarding previous tasks. The researchers have also demonstrated that using the framework to learn a new task can make the AI better at performing previous tasks, a phenomenon called backward transfer.

5h

Feeling healthy: A good start, but not always a good indicator of heart disease risk

Most people feel they have a general idea of how healthy they are based on their diet and exercise regimen and how often they get sick. But a new study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers adds to evidence that how healthy people think they are isn't always an accurate indicator of their risk for cardiovascular disease.

5h

New technique prepares 2D perovskite single crystals for highest photodetectivity

A research group led by Professor Liu Shengzhong from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Dr. XU Zhuo at Shaanxi Normal University (SNNU) developed a technique to prepare large size 2D perovskite single crystals to achieve highest photodetector performance among this type.

5h

Association between benzodiazepine use in early pregnancy, miscarriage risk

Benzodiazepines are a class of drugs used to treat anxiety, insomnia and mood disorders. This observational study examined the risk of miscarriage associated with their use in early pregnancy by drug class, specific agent and short- or long-acting formulation in about 442,000 pregnancies in Canada from 1998 through 2015.

5h

Does fracture risk differ between 2 common types of weight-loss surgery?

This study used Medicare claims data to compare risk of fracture among about 42,000 patients who had weight-loss surgery. Nearly 30,000 patients (average age 51) who had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) were compared with nearly 13,000 patients (average age 55) who had adjustable gastric banding.

5h

End-of-career transitions for older surgeons

A special communication article focuses on end-of-career transitions for older surgeons. The goal is to support an aging workforce while ensuring patient safety.

5h

Legal marijuana reduces chronic pain, but increases injuries and car accidents

The legalization of recreational marijuana is associated with an increase in its abuse, injury due to overdoses, and car accidents, but does not significantly change health care use overall, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

5h

New surface treatment could improve refrigeration efficiency

Unlike water, liquid refrigerants and other fluids that have a low surface tension tend to spread quickly into a sheet when they come into contact with a surface. But for many industrial process it would be better if the fluids formed droplets, which could roll or fall off the surface and carry heat away with them. Now, researchers at MIT have made significant progress in promoting droplet formati

5h

Machine learning predicts mechanical properties of porous materials

Machine learning can be used to predict the properties of a group of materials which, according to some, could be as important to the 21st century as plastics were to the 20th.

5h

Sentry Mode Just Busted Two Cackling Tesla Vandals

Threat Detected On Thursday, two men vandalized a Tesla Model 3 in a parking lot in Old Sacramento, Calif — and we only know what they look like because the Tesla had Sentry Mode engaged. This recently deployed system uses the car’s external cameras to watch for potential threats. And if it detects that something’s amiss, it starts to record — which is why footage of the cackling vandals keying t

5h

Tech giants vow to step up fight against online extremism

Major tech firms on Wednesday pledged to pursue a range of new measures aimed at stamping out violent extremist content on the internet, amid growing pressure from governments in the wake of …

5h

Machine learning predicts mechanical properties of porous materials

Machine learning can be used to predict the properties of a group of materials which, according to some, could be as important to the 21st century as plastics were to the 20th.

5h

Plastics are hurting the planet in another unexpected way

Nexus Media News Production of the stuff is on pace to become more damaging than 600 coal-fired power plants. A new report on the production of plastics — from extraction to manufacture to disposal and steps in between — is a significant source of carbon pollution and set to…

5h

Kid Climate Educators Open Adult Eyes

A study finds that kids, especially daughters, are effective at teaching their parents about climate issues. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

New study discovers the trajectory of optimism in life

Researchers studied over a 1,000 people during the course of 7 years. They found that levels of optimism change throughout life. Optimism grows through the 30s and 40s and peaks in mid-fifties. None How do levels of optimism change throughout our life? Researchers at the University of California, Davis, figured out the answer. They analyzed a relatively large sample of 1,169 Mexican-Americans bet

5h

Ragweed compounds could protect nerve cells from Alzheimer's

As spring arrives in the northern hemisphere, many people are cursing ragweed, a primary culprit in seasonal allergies. But scientists might have discovered a promising new use for some substances produced by the pesky weed. In ACS' Journal of Natural Products, researchers have identified and characterized ragweed compounds that could help nerve cells survive in the presence of Alzheimer's disease

5h

New insights on the control of dicamba-resistant kochia are featured by Weed Technology

Kochia is a highly invasive weed that is common in the Great Plains, where it has developed resistance to multiple herbicides. Now new dicamba-resistant strains are adding to grower worries.

5h

Over-fed bacteria make people sick

In a new hypothesis, a CRC 1182 research team suggests that inflammatory diseases are caused by an over-supply of food, and the associated disturbance of the intestine's natural bacterial colonisation.

5h

Tracking symptoms: New Regenstrief and IU tool helps providers identify underlying causes

An easy to use, brief, inexpensive new tool that tracks symptoms such as pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, memory problems, anxiety and depression in older adults, developed and validated by researchers at the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University, will help healthcare providers potentially identify early onset of more complex, serious underlying issues that could otherwise go undetected.

5h

New surface treatment could improve refrigeration efficiency

Unlike water, liquid refrigerants and other fluids that have a low surface tension tend to spread quickly into a sheet when they come into contact with a surface. But for many industrial process it would be better if the fluids formed droplets, which could roll or fall off the surface and carry heat away with them.

5h

Machine learning predicts mechanical properties of porous materials

Machine learning can be used to predict the properties of a group of materials which, according to some, could be as important to the 21st century as plastics were to the 20th.

5h

The next storage revolution, up close and personal

Machine-learning helps identify weaknesses in next-gen materials.

5h

Another Day, Another Tesla Car Fire. This One in Hong Kong.

Three Tesla fires in three weeks. None of them were involved in accidents. All were parked in public or home garages. The post Another Day, Another Tesla Car Fire. This One in Hong Kong. appeared first on ExtremeTech .

5h

In Ecology Studies and Selfless Ants, He Finds Hope for the Future

No one else in biology has ever had a career quite like that of Edward O. Wilson. One of the world’s leading authorities on ants, an influential evolution theorist and an author who is at once prolific, bestselling and highly honored, E. O. Wilson — his first name comes and goes from bylines but the middle initial is ever-present — has over several decades been at the center of scientific controv

5h

Tiny Spies: This Insect-Like Flying Robot is Smaller Than a Penny

Tiny Dancer A team of engineers from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles built a four-winged flying robot called Bee+, which weighs just 95 grams and sports a footprint smaller than a penny. https://www.uscamsl.com/resources/IROS2019/S1.mp4 Harvard researchers built another tiny flying robot, called RoboBee, in 2013. It weighed only 75 grams. But RoboBee featured just two wings,

5h

What you should know about vaping and e-cigarettes | Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin

E-cigarettes and vapes have exploded in popularity in the last decade, especially among youth and young adults — from 2011 to 2015, e-cigarette use among high school students in the US increased by 900 percent. Biobehavioral scientist Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin explains what you're actually inhaling when you vape (hint: it's definitely not water vapor) and explores the disturbing marketing tactics b

5h

Alibaba results beat analyst estimates

Chinese e-commerce leader Alibaba on Wednesday announced revenue for the latest quarter that beat analyst estimates, indicating that the Sino-US trade tiff and a slowing domestic economy were …

5h

Combination therapy advisable for bowel disorder IBS

The more abnormalities in intestinal and brain function that IBS sufferers have, the more severe their symptoms of this functional bowel disorder, and the more adversely their everyday life is affected. This is shown by a study indicating that patients with IBS should get treatments for different abnormalities simultaneously, to improve both bowel function and signaling from the brain to the gut.

5h

For-profit dialysis provider charges private insurers 4 times more than government payers

Private insurers covering people receiving treatment for dialysis paid four times more than government insurance programs such as Medicare paid for the same service. Government programs paid, on average, $248 per dialysis session, compared with $1,041 per session for people with private insurance.

5h

Unprecedented weakening of Asian summer monsoon

Rainfall from the Asian summer monsoon has been decreasing over the past 80 years, a decline unprecedented in the last 448 years, according to a new study.

5h

Unexplored neural circuit modulates memory strength

The fruit fly mushroom body contains three groups of neurons that produce dopamine. Two of them work together to process aversive memories, a new study shows.

5h

Researchers demystify centralization in cryptocurrency mining

Researchers have developed a novel approach to untangle the centralization phenomena in blockchain mining by employing the rich economic theory of Oceanic Games. The application of this theory in the blockchain ecosystem unveiled incentives for both active and newly entering miners to merge and act as single entities and provides an alternative justification of the centralization and concentration

5h

Century-scale deep-water circulation dynamics in the North Atlantic Ocean

Dr. Moriaki Yasuhara, Dr. Hisayo Okahashi, and Dr. Huai-Hsuan May Huang from School of Biological Sciences and Swire Institute of Marine Science of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), in collaboration with scientists from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Duke University, and US Geological Survey have recently reported their discovery on a key driver of past and perhaps f

5h

Målrettet efteruddannelse fik teknoantropolog ud af ledighed

PLUS. It-efteruddannelse af ledige akademikere kan give pote, viser nyt projekt, der efter afslutningen i 2018 havde bragt 40 procent af deltagerne i job. 38-årig teknoantropolog var én af dem.

6h

Molecular basis of brain dysfunction and embryo malformation associated with thalidomide

Scientists at the Tokyo Medical University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology identified the molecule involved in thalidomide-related dysfunctions associated with in utero brain and organ development. Their in vivo results using a zebrafish model of mammalian development showed that thalidomide binds to a protein named cereblon, a subunit of an enzyme complex responsible for the creation of neu

6h

Robot therapists need rules

Interactions with artificial intelligence (AI) will become an increasingly common aspect of our lives. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now completed the first study of how 'embodied AI' can help treat mental illness. Their conclusion: Important ethical questions of this technology remain unanswered. There is urgent need for action on the part of governments, professional ass

6h

Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes

Washable, wearable 'batteries': based on cheap, safe and environmentally-friendly inks and woven directly into fabrics, have been developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge.

6h

Researchers block protein that plays a key role in Alzheimer's disease

In recent years, it has become increasingly clear to researchers that the protein galectin-3 is involved in inflammatory diseases in the brain. A study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden now shows the de facto key role played by the protein in Alzheimer's disease. When the researchers shut off the gene that produces this protein in mice, the amount of Alzheimer's plaque and the inflam

6h

Scientists develop ultrasensitive organic phototransistors based on novel hybrid-layered architecture

Professor Li Jia and Gao Yuanhong from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators developed a novel hybrid-layered architecture to improve the overall photodetection performance of organic phototransistors by simultaneously taking advantages of the charge-trapping effect and efficient carrier transport.

6h

Researchers identify faster, more effective drug combinations to treat tuberculosis

Study describes a way to reduce the duration of tuberculosis treatment by using an approach called 'artificial intelligence-parabolic response surface' that allows researchers to quickly identify three or four drug combinations among billions of possible combinations to treat TB up to five times faster than current therapies.

6h

Five rules to tackle antibiotic resistance

Current efforts to tackle antibiotic resistance are 'not nearly radical enough,' a leading scientist says.

6h

Can Knowing Your Genetic Risk Change Your Physiology?

We now have unprecedented amounts of information on our own genetics, thanks to at-home DNA testing kits. But what does all of this information do to us? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Can Knowing Your Genetic Risk Change Your Physiology?

We now have unprecedented amounts of information on our own genetics, thanks to at-home DNA testing kits. But what does all of this information do to us? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Offentlig sektor behöver bli bättre på digitalisering

Regeringen har högt ställda mål att Sverige ska bli bäst i världen på att dra nytta av digitaliseringens möjligheter. Men studien Digital mognad i offentlig förvaltning 2019, visar att offentlig sektor har stora problem med att nyttja digitaliseringen. – Stora delar av svensk offentlig sektor dras med en hög digital skuld. Det betyder att tidigare digitala investeringar och inköp som finns kvar i

6h

Help coming on blocking scam calls for robocall-plagued US

New measures by U.S. regulators could help thwart some of the billions of robocalls received in the U.S.

6h

Tencent profit climbs as it emerges from gaming quagmire

Chinese internet giant Tencent said Wednesday net profit soared nearly 17 percent in the first quarter as the company appeared set to emerge from the battering it received from Beijing's crackdown on gaming.

6h

Alibaba results beat analyst estimates

Chinese e-commerce leader Alibaba on Wednesday announced revenue for the latest quarter that beat analyst estimates, indicating that the Sino-US trade tiff and a slowing domestic economy were having little impact on the bottom line.

6h

Tech giants vow to double number of women managers by 2022

Forty-five tech giants committed Wednesday to doubling the number of women on their management boards to 30 percent by 2022, the French presidency said.

6h

Ice-sheet variability during the last ice age from the perspective of marine sediment

By using marine sediment cores from northwestern Australia, a Japanese team led by National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) and the University of Tokyo revealed that the global ice sheet during the last ice age had changed in a shorter time scale than previously thought. This study was published on May 10 in the journal Scientific Reports.

6h

New research finds unprecedented weakening of Asian summer monsoon

Rainfall from the Asian summer monsoon has been decreasing over the past 80 years, a decline unprecedented in the last 448 years, according to a new study in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters.

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A recent study confirms the new trend in feminist reggaeton music

Reggaeton has traditionally been considered as a sexist music genre and the lyrics and choreographies usually associated with it are seen as a way of promoting the objectification of women. This trend is losing popularity due to the recent appearance of young women who have changed these sexist messages through lyrics with a feminist message. This phenomenon has been the core of an investigation l

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Combination therapy advisable for bowel disorder IBS

The more abnormalities in intestinal and brain function that IBS sufferers have, the more severe their symptoms of this functional bowel disorder, and the more adversely their everyday life is affected. This is shown by a Sahlgrenska Academy study indicating that patients with IBS should get treatments for different abnormalities simultaneously, to improve both bowel function and signaling from th

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Membrane madness: The ins and outs of moving materials through the cell

The cell membrane is a fatty layer that forms a border between the inside of the cell, its various structures and the outside world. Embedded in these layers of fat, like tiles in a mosaic, are proteins that allow the cell to communicate with its neighbors, remove waste, regulate its composition and create energy.

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Scientists suss out the secrets of human screams

Screaming is well-studied in animals, but much less is known about how human screams function in communication, or how similar or different human screams are from those of other species. To help unlock the secrets of human screaming, researchers at Emory University have studied human vocal sounds, representing a broad acoustical range and array of emotional contexts, and studied what makes a sound

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'Smart' molecules that selectively target abnormal cell growth in blood vessels may reduce reoccurring blockage after stenting

Artificial 'smart' molecules that selectively target certain blood-vessel cells and prevent abnormal growth, appear to reduce reoccurring blockages in blood vessels previously opened by stents, while sparing healthy endothelial cells lining the blood vessel.One molecule studied prevented vascular smooth muscle cells from overgrowing and blocking blood vessels, and the other caused these cells to d

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Pelvic exercises may beat bedroom blues

Physiotherapists from James Cook University in Australia say simple pelvic floor exercises may be a cure for some common problems men experience in the bedroom.

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For-profit dialysis provider charges private insurers 4 times more than government payers

Private insurers covering people receiving treatment for dialysis paid four times more than government insurance programs such as Medicare paid for the same service. Government programs paid, on average, $248 per dialysis session, compared with $1,041 per session for people with private insurance.

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US seeks new tools to counter unrelenting wave of robocalls

U.S. regulators are proposing new tools to counter the unrelenting waves of robocalls received each year in America.

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A Massive 'Blob' of Rock Stretching Under Asia Might Be Triggering Hundreds of Earthquakes

A massive, underground "blob" might be triggering hundreds of earthquakes in the Hindu Kush mountains.

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Two Massive Eruptions in the Americas Hiding in Plain Sight

I am always amazed how much we are still discovering about massive volcanic eruptions that happened as little as a few thousand years ago. Geologically speaking, that is something that happened yesterday, yet even that small slice of time can obscure some giant volcanic events whose effects could have spread across the globe. Two recent studies have improved our understanding of two truly enormous

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Clean and effective electronic waste recycling

As the number of electronics devices increases around the world, finding effective methods of recycling electronic waste (e-waste) is a growing concern. About 50 million tons of e-waste is generated each year and only 20% of that is recycled. Most of the remaining 80% ends up in a landfill where it can become an environmental problem. Currently, e-waste recycling involves mechanical crushers and c

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Facebook's 'transparency' efforts hide key reasons for showing ads

Facebook's advertising platform was not built to help social media users understand who was targeting them with messages, or why. It is an extremely powerful system, which lets advertisers target specific users according to a detailed range of attributes. For example, in 2017, there were 3,100 people in Facebook's database who lived in Idaho, were in long-distance relationships and were thinking a

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The contrasting fortunes of the planet's greatest apes

Many eloquent commentators have waxed lyrical about their first encounter with mountain gorillas—most notably Sir David Attenborough, vice-president of Fauna & Flora International (FFI) since 1979, the same year that those iconic scenes from Life on Earth were first broadcast.

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New material could unlock potential for hydrogen powered vehicle revolution

An international team of researchers has discovered a new material made from manganese hydride that would be used to make molecular sieves within fuel tanks – which store the hydrogen and work alongside fuel cells in a hydrogen powered 'system'. The material would enable the design of tanks that are far smaller, cheaper, more convenient and energy dense than existing hydrogen fuel technologies, an

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What's So Special About Human Screams? Ask a Screamologist

A better understanding of the acoustics of screaming could help scientists understand how and why humans shriek—and add a new dimension to the surveillance state!

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American Express buys restaurant reservation service Resy

American Express is buying the online reservation startup Resy, the companies announced Wednesday, the latest move by AmEx to establish and maintain a foothold for its card members in some of the world's most desired restaurants.

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New whistle alerts bats to steer clear of wind turbines

Wind turbines are a critical component in the strategy for energy independence, but these massive structures are also killing bats. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that the more than 52,000 wind turbines operating in the United States kill tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of bats in North America annually.

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The contrasting fortunes of the planet's greatest apes

Many eloquent commentators have waxed lyrical about their first encounter with mountain gorillas—most notably Sir David Attenborough, vice-president of Fauna & Flora International (FFI) since 1979, the same year that those iconic scenes from Life on Earth were first broadcast.

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New whistle alerts bats to steer clear of wind turbines

Wind turbines are a critical component in the strategy for energy independence, but these massive structures are also killing bats. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that the more than 52,000 wind turbines operating in the United States kill tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of bats in North America annually.

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A hydrogel that can stop bleeding from an artery

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has developed a hydrogel that can stop bleeding from a punctured artery. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes how the hydrogel was made and how well it worked on test animals.

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Datatilsynet vil se nærmere på profilerings-værktøj i ny beskæftigelseslov

»Ærgerligt for alle parter, at Datatilsynet ikke i første omgang blev gjort opmærksom på alle de relevante dele af lovforslaget,« siger Datatilsynets direktør.

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Definition of kilogram, amp, and kelvin set to change forever

A shift from physical artefact to natural constant marks a huge shake-up in how the world defines units of measurement. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Contested study shows appendectomy lifts risk of Parkinson’s

Critics question the study results – and their statistical import. Kevin McConway from the UK’s Open University explains.

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Orchids shun the sun, sacrificing genes

Not all plants rely on photosynthesis for nutrition, genetic research reveals. Stephen Fleischfresser reports.

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The conspicuous absence of women in India's labour force

India's rapid economic growth has been accompanied by falling fertility rates and higher educational attainment among women. These advances often lead to an increase in women entering the labour force, but there has been a surprising decline on this front in India. Less than 30% of working-age women are currently in work compared to nearly 80% of men in India.

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The Hunt for a CRISPR Antidote Just Heated Up

When scientists behind the Manhattan Project heard of the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, their earlier exuberance gradually turned into morose regret. What began as a physics revolution had mutated into a weapon of mass destruction—with no feasible “off switch” to cripple its power. For biology, CRISPR has that same nuclear-scale destructive power. And scientists are not willing to let hi

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Clinicians could prescribe fitness apps to help cancer survivor's exercise

Fitness apps could be prescribed by clinicians to help patients recovering from cancer increase their physical activity levels, new research in the Journal of Cancer Survivorship reports.

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Century-scale deep-water circulation dynamics in the North Atlantic Ocean

Dr Moriaki Yasuhara, Dr Hisayo Okahashi, and Dr Huai-Hsuan May Huang from School of Biological Sciences and Swire Institute of Marine Science of the University of Hong Kong (HKU), in collaboration with scientists in Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Duke University, and US Geological Survey have recently reported their discovery on a key driver of past and perhaps future abr

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Insect behavior, miniature blimps may unlock the key to military swarming technology

Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory flew a fleet of 30 miniature autonomous blimps in unison to test the swarming behavior of autonomous systems. The blimps responded to each other while in flight and responded to changing conditions.

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Maunakea observatories shed new light on obscured infant solar system

Astronomers using the combined power of two Hawaii telescopes have taken groundbreaking, sharp new images of a distant planetary system that likely resembles a baby version of our solar system.

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Capturing single photons to explore fundamental physics and quantum information science

Quantum optics, where light and matter interactions are examined at the microscopic level, has earned Nobel prizes—including three awarded since 2001—for some of science's biggest names. However, even in this mature field, some interesting physics remains largely unexplored. An international team of scientists from Technische Universität Wien (Austria), Duke University, Università degli Studi di P

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The entire internet can now fit in a milkjug

submitted by /u/ShinyKaoslegion [link] [comments]

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U.S. Births Fall to Lowest Rates Since 1980s

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Additive Manufacturing and Its Impact on a $12 Trillion Industry

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Many species could be even more likely to go extinct than we realise

More than a million species are at risk of extinction according to a new report on biodiversity. But even some species that aren't considered endangered may be less safe than people think. A new study published in the Journal of Applied Ecology found that some methods for measuring a species' generation time might underestimate the likelihood that some species will die out.

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Social psychology experiment!

submitted by /u/etthusmedkossor [link] [comments]

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Many species could be even more likely to go extinct than we realise

More than a million species are at risk of extinction according to a new report on biodiversity. But even some species that aren't considered endangered may be less safe than people think. A new study published in the Journal of Applied Ecology found that some methods for measuring a species' generation time might underestimate the likelihood that some species will die out.

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Retired oil rigs off the California coast could find new lives as artificial reefs

Offshore oil and gas drilling has been a contentious issue in California for 50 years, ever since a rig ruptured and spilled 80,000 to 100,000 barrels of crude oil off Santa Barbara in 1969. Today it's spurring a new debate: whether to completely dismantle 27 oil and gas platforms scattered along the southern California coast as they end their working lives, or convert the underwater sections into

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Your internet data is rotting

Many MySpace users were dismayed to discover earlier this year that the social media platform lost 50 million files uploaded between 2003 and 2015.

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Washable, wearable battery-like devices could be woven directly into clothes

Wearable electronic components incorporated directly into fabrics have been developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The devices could be used for flexible circuits, healthcare monitoring, energy conversion, and other applications.

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Video: Water cycle wrapped

As our climate changes, the availability of freshwater is a growing issue for many people around the world. Understanding the water cycle and how the climate and human usage is causing shifts in natural cycling processes is vital to safeguarding supplies. While numerous satellites measure individual components of the water cycle, it has never been described as a whole over a particular region – un

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Why the Indian Ocean is spawning strong and deadly tropical cyclones

The Indian Ocean has made its mark on the global news cycle this year. In March, tropical cyclone Idai made headlines as one of the most severe storms to have made landfall in Mozambique. Current estimates indicate that more than 1,000 people died. This makes it the most deadly tropical cyclone ever to have made landfall on the southern African subcontinent.

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A hydrogel that can stop bleeding from an artery

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has developed a hydrogel that can stop bleeding from a punctured artery. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes how the hydrogel was made and how well it worked on test animals.

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Big data helps identify better way to research breast cancer's spread

Researchers are analyzing large volumes of data, often referred to as big data, to determine better research models to fight the spread of breast cancer and test potential drugs. Current models used in the lab frequently involve culturing cells on flat dishes, or cell lines, to model tumor growth in patients.

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New material could unlock potential for hydrogen powered vehicle revolution

An international team of researchers has discovered a new material made from manganese hydride that would be used to make molecular sieves within fuel tanks – which store the hydrogen and work alongside fuel cells in a hydrogen powered 'system'. The material would enable the design of tanks that are far smaller, cheaper, more convenient and energy dense than existing hydrogen fuel technologies, an

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What artificial intelligence can teach us about proteins

Proteins are vital parts of all living organisms and perform essential tasks in our bodies. They build and repair tissues, supply components of the immune and hormone systems, regulate metabolism, and transmit signals. Researchers in Berlin and Heidelberg have now developed an intelligent neural network that can predict the functions of proteins in the human body. The team used a 'trick' to observ

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Blood flow command center discovered in the brain

An international team of researchers has discovered a group of cells in the brain that may function as a 'master-controller' for the cardiovascular system, orchestrating the control of blood flow to different parts of the body.

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Ice-sheet variability during the last ice age from the perspective of marine sediment

By using marine sediment cores from Northwestern Australia, a Japanese team led by National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) and the University of Tokyo revealed that the global ice sheet during the last ice age had changed in shorter time scale than previously thought. This study was published on May 10 in the journal Scientific Reports .

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Magic numbers make nickel nucleus stronger

Researchers provide the first direct evidence for a rare kind of atomic nucleus. The special nickel nucleus (78Ni) is an isotope of typical nickel (58Ni), meaning they share the same number of protons but a different number of neutrons. Usually more neutrons make isotopes less stable, but this isotope is special. 78Ni is more tough or rigid than other nickel isotopes with similar numbers of neutro

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Clean and effective electronic waste recycling

E-waste recycling is far below what it should be to reduce its impact on the environment and human health simply because it is not economically feasible. Researchers from Japan are working on a way to change that using pulsed power technology.

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How to use your favorite smart assistant on your computer

DIY The assistant is IN the computer!? Smart assistants can be found on your Windows or macOS computer as well as your smart speakers and smartphone.

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Researchers find widely 'inconsistent' use of antibodies in lab experiments

Scientists say they have affirmed widespread inconsistencies in the use of a common laboratory procedure called immunohistochemical staining, and say the variations are making many laboratory experiments unreliable.

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Artificial intelligence tool vastly scales up Alzheimer's research

Researchers have found a way to teach a computer to precisely detect one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease in human brain tissue, delivering a proof of concept for a machine-learning approach to distinguishing critical markers of the disease.

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New Video Details NASA’s Plan to Return Humans to the Moon

We Are Going NASA is confident it’s going back to the Moon — and this time, it plans to stay there. On Tuesday, the agency released “ We Are Going ,” a new video narrated by Star Trek actor William Shatner. In the clip, NASA details precisely how it plans to send a crewed mission to the Moon by 2024 — touching on everything from the development of brand-new spacecraft to the hunt for mission-supp

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The Air Force Wants to Rescue Troops Using Autonomous Aircraft

Air Rescue Evacuating troops from enemy territory is difficult and dangerous. But futuristic autonomous aircraft that generate almost no noise could make rescuing personnel far safer in the future. According to Aviation Week , the U.S. Air Force is interested in technology that could one day rescue downed pilots and wounded soldiers with autonomous aircraft. Personal Air The War Zone found a requ

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Poor moms of color need holistic postpartum depression care

Treating low-income women of color for postpartum depression should expand beyond the individual, research suggests. Specifically, it should include and draw upon community realities and resources, according to social work researcher Robert Keefe. “Social workers need to do more than simply work with the mother,” says Keefe, an associate professor in the University at Buffalo’s School of Social W

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Biodiversity is key to kelp forest health

An ecosystem is made up of species, populations, communities, and a network of communities across a region.

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Holographic imaging of electromagnetic fields using electron-light quantum interference

In conventional holography a photographic film can record the interference pattern of monochromatic light scattered from the object to be imaged with a reference beam of un-scattered light. Scientists can then illuminate the developed image with a replica of the reference beam to create a virtual image of the original object. Holography was originally proposed by the physicist Dennis Gabor in 1948

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Researchers discover new security flaws in Intel processors

ZombieLoad and Store-to-Leak Forwarding are two new exploits that have just been announced by TU Graz security researchers Daniel Gruss, Moritz Lipp, Michael Schwarz and an international team.

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Tropical Pacific is major player in global ocean heat transport

Far from the vast, fixed bodies of water oceanographers thought they were a century ago, oceans today are known to be interconnected, highly influential agents in Earth's climate system.

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How your clothes influence the air you breathe

Dusan Licina, a tenure-track assistant professor at the Smart Living Lab, EPFL Fribourg, has taken a critical look at how much we really know about our exposure to particles and chemicals transported by our clothing. His study concludes that further research is needed and opens up new areas of investigation.

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Biodiversity is key to kelp forest health

An ecosystem is made up of species, populations, communities, and a network of communities across a region.

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Quantum physicists shining new light on cave art

Leslie Van Gelder, a well-known American-born archeologist has been working with Dr. Harald Schwefel, and other physicists at Otago University to develop a lamp that mimics the flickering torch light that paleolithic cave artists worked by many thousands of years ago. The lamps will help Leslie and other archeologists reveal intimate details of these ancient people.

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Not just activists, 9 out of 10 people are concerned about animal welfare in Australian farming

Recent protests by animal welfare activists on Australian abattoirs and farms and city streets triggered a backlash from meat-lovers and MPs. The activists were labelled "un-Australian" by the Prime Minister and others, and the protests prompted calls for tougher trespass laws and penalties.

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Applying precious metal catalysts economically

Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the Fritz Haber Institute Berlin have developed a new method of to conserve rare and expensive catalysts and use them sparingly. They enclosed a precious metal salt in tiny micelles, and struck them against a carbon electrode, thus coating the surface with nanoparticles of the precious metal contained in the micelles. At the same time, the team precisely

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Cars will change more in the next decade than they have in the past century

Dan Lewis, Staffordshire University; Claude C. Chibelushi, Staffordshire University, and Debi Roberts, Staffordshire University

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Does sugar dampen sweet tooth to cause overeating?

New research with fruit flies suggests how a high-sugar diet can promote overeating and obesity. After researchers fed fruit flies a high-sugar diet, the flies’ taste neurons triggered a molecular chain-reaction that hampered their ability to taste sweets, which in turn fueled overeating and obesity. Further, eating sugar caused the taste changes, not the metabolic consequences of obesity or the

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Not just activists, 9 out of 10 people are concerned about animal welfare in Australian farming

Recent protests by animal welfare activists on Australian abattoirs and farms and city streets triggered a backlash from meat-lovers and MPs. The activists were labelled "un-Australian" by the Prime Minister and others, and the protests prompted calls for tougher trespass laws and penalties.

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New Car Safety Technology Could Cause Confusion, Accidents if Drivers Aren't Trained

New Car Safety Technology Could Cause Confusion, Accidents if Drivers Aren't Trained The problem could be particularly bad in rental cars. Autonomouscars.jpg Image credits: Zapp2Photo/ Shutterstock Technology Wednesday, May 15, 2019 – 09:15 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — Automakers are putting safety technology into new cars that drivers may not understand or respond to — and that

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Optimizing device implantation in patients with atrial fibrillation and risk of stroke

According to clinical studies, about a third of patients with atrial fibrillation will suffer a stroke during their lifetime. Between 70 and 90% of these strokes are caused by a thrombus formed in the left atrial appendage.

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Applying precious metal catalysts economically

Researchers have developed a new method of using rare and expensive catalysts as sparingly as possible. They enclosed a precious metal salt in outer shells, tiny micelles, and had them strike against a carbon electrode, thus coating the surface with nanoparticles of the precious metal contained in the micelles. At the same time, the team was able to precisely analyse how much of the metal was depo

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On the way to fighting staph infections with the body's immune system

Researchers have gained a greater understanding of the biology of staphylococcus skin infections in mice and how the mouse immune system mobilizes to fight them. A study appears this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. Community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) typically causes skin infections but can spread thr

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New whistle alerts bats to steer clear of wind turbines

Wind turbines are a critical component in the strategy for energy independence, but these massive structures are also killing bats. Now, researchers from Texas A&M University are exploring a unique passive acoustic whistle mounted on turbine blades to warn bats of the deadly turbines using a sound they can easily hear and recognize. They will present the team's research findings at the 177th ASA M

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Enzyme PHLPP2 could be a viable drug target for treating prostate cancer

Researchers propose a new druggable target that can put a damper on the spread of prostate cancer. Containing the threat at its origin organ greatly increases the survival rates of patients who suffer from the disease.

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Researchers identify new therapeutic target for metastatic prostate cancer

Researchers in New York have found that treating human prostate cancer cells with a drug that targets a protein called PHLPP2 may prevent the cancer cells from spreading to other organs in the body. The study, which will be published May 15 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that inhibiting PHLPP2 lowered the levels of MYC, an oncogenic protein that causes many different types of cancer that

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Like a lot of things, women's gut microbiomes appear to mature earlier than men's

A recent study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego State University and the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology found that the age and sex of an individual strongly influences the bacterial diversity of the gut microbiome.

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Boosted's next electric ride is the Rev scooter

When Boosted launched a new series of boards in 2018, including the Stealth and Mini options, it claimed its mission was to redefine transportation — at least from the electric rideable …

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Myth: Healthy food is more expensive than unhealthy food

The idea that healthy food costs more than junk food is something I hear a lot. Students tell me they'd like to eat better but can't afford to. There is a strong belief that cooking from scratch costs a fortune, and with takeaway meals priced as low as £1 , they have little incentive to change their behaviour. The past decade has seen increased media attention on healthy diets, and stories about

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Hun vil printe sensorer med inspiration fra biologien

PLUS. Flere danske forsknings­projekter undersøger, hvordan man kan printe elektriske komponenter til trådløse sensorer. Printet elektronik giver nemlig både fleksible strukturer og kan fremstilles billigere.

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Myth: Healthy food is more expensive than unhealthy food

The idea that healthy food costs more than junk food is something I hear a lot. Students tell me they'd like to eat better but can't afford to. There is a strong belief that cooking from scratch costs a fortune, and with takeaway meals priced as low as £1 , they have little incentive to change their behaviour. The past decade has seen increased media attention on healthy diets, and stories about

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Tiger sharks revealed as lazy predators

One of the ocean's most feared predators – the tiger shark—has been revealed as a relaxed and sometimes lazy hunter by scientists studying their behaviour.

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My Dad Wrote a Porno Is an Ode to Bad Sex

While watching the HBO comedy special My Dad Wrote a Porno recently, I recognized the look on Jamie Morton’s face as he read passages aloud from his father’s self-published erotica series, Belinda Blinked . The furrowed brow, the pursed-lip grimace, the eyes narrowing as the brain wrestles with the appalling imagery it’s processing—that look is the specific countenance of someone who’s encountere

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VCAM1 As a Player in the Aging Brain

Possible intervention targets for age-related degeneration are always welcome, particularly when they come bearing experimental evidence, and even more so when they relate to the central nervous system. That’s the case with this new paper , from a multicenter team led out of Stanford. Interestingly, this also ties in with the well-publicized (and from what I can see, well-established) evidence th

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Tiger sharks revealed as lazy predators

One of the ocean's most feared predators – the tiger shark—has been revealed as a relaxed and sometimes lazy hunter by scientists studying their behaviour.

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Singapore passes ‘fake news’ law following researcher outcry

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01542-7 Academics say the regulation could stifle scholarly debate.

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A guide to the Nature Index

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01443-9 A description of the terminology and methodology used in this supplement, and a guide to the functionality available free online at natureindex.com.

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New tools for new treatments

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01439-5 From antibiotics and organoids to CRISPR, improved biomedical methods and apparatus are enabling new therapies.

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Companies persist with biomedical papers

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01441-x Corporate research in the life sciences endures, despite diminishing in other fields of science.

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Small advances amount to big changes in biomedical sciences

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01437-7 The United States’ lead is shrinking in the race to extend human life.

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Stem-cell and genetic therapies make a healthy marriage

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01442-w This scientific partnership could fight everything from blood diseases to HIV.

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Rapid progress transforms ideals of health

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01438-6 Ethical and equity challenges become more urgent.

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Lili Milani banks Estonia’s genomic potential

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01440-y At the Estonian Genome Centre, the geneticist and her team are investigating the impact of genetic variations on drug metabolism and adherence to prescriptions.

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Boosted Rev Scooter: Price, Specs, Details

In the sharing versus ownership debate, this new electric scooter makes a convincing argument for buying one.

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Astro C40 TR Controller Review (PS4 and PC): Almost Perfect

Astro's pro controller works wonderfully on PC, but lacks basic functionality on PS4.

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Small, but well-formed. The new home deposit scheme will help, and it's unlikely to push up prices

The new First Home Loan Deposit Scheme announced the Coalition, and instantly backed by Labor, is likely to be popular among those on the cusp of buying their first home.

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Study finds open cluster NGC 2682 at least two times larger than previously thought

Based on new data from ESA's Gaia satellite, astronomers have provided more insights into properties of the nearby open cluster NGC 2682, revealing that its size is at least two times greater than previously believed. The findings are detailed in a paper published May 6 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

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A new way to wind the development clock of cardiac muscle cells

A study published in the journal Stem Cells describes a new and unexpected way to accelerate the maturation of induced pluripotent stem cells into cardiac muscle cells.

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It's time we stopped human evolution – geneticist

Measles cases in the US have hit a 25-year high, with 78 new infections in the past week alone. In a sign of the times, a cruise ship with hundreds of Scientologists on board was quarantined in St Lucia after one passenger was diagnosed with the disease. It's the sort of news you can expect when parents stop vaccinating their children, which many did from the 1990s onwards for fear that scientist

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Bumps on peacock spider make dark spots super-dark

A team of researchers with members from Harvard University, the University of Bonn, the University of Denmark and Yale University has identified bumps on the abdomens of male peacock spiders that make their dark-colored patches look even darker. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the bumps and what they learned about them.

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With drought over, Dallas Zoo helps release flamingo chicks back into wild in South Africa

After months of helping rehabilitate a group of lesser flamingo chicks abandoned in South Africa, the Dallas Zoo has released dozens of the birds back into the wild.

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Digital quantum simulators can be astonishingly robust

In solving quantum-physical problems in many-body systems, such as predicting material properties, conventional computers rapidly reach the limits of their capacity. Digital quantum simulators might help, but until now they are drastically limited to small systems with few particles and only short simulation times. Now, Heidelberg University physicist Dr. Philipp Hauke and colleagues from Dresden

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Bumps on peacock spider make dark spots super-dark

A team of researchers with members from Harvard University, the University of Bonn, the University of Denmark and Yale University has identified bumps on the abdomens of male peacock spiders that make their dark-colored patches look even darker. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the bumps and what they learned about them.

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With drought over, Dallas Zoo helps release flamingo chicks back into wild in South Africa

After months of helping rehabilitate a group of lesser flamingo chicks abandoned in South Africa, the Dallas Zoo has released dozens of the birds back into the wild.

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Microsoft Pushes Rare Windows XP Patch For WannaCry-Style Wormable Exploit

For the few of you who are still clinging to Windows XP, there is a new security update available. That's right, Microsoft has issued a rare patch for the defunct operating system, along with …

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Researching the kingfisher's hydrodynamic design

Renowned for their noiseless dive, the kingfisher's iconic beak-shape has inspired the design of high speed bullet trains. Now scientists have tested beak-shape among some of the birds' 114 species found world-wide, to assess which shape is the most hydrodynamic.

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Researcher predicts future in which humans subsist on bugs

Insects are a healthy and environmentally friendly food source. But how can people in the Western world be convinced to eat them?

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Researching the kingfisher's hydrodynamic design

Renowned for their noiseless dive, the kingfisher's iconic beak-shape has inspired the design of high speed bullet trains. Now scientists have tested beak-shape among some of the birds' 114 species found world-wide, to assess which shape is the most hydrodynamic.

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How to transition from coal: 4 lessons for Australia from around the world

With 12 coal power stations in Australia closed since 2013, a full transition out of coal is coming.

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How potatoes could become sun worshippers

If there's one thing potato plants don't like, it's heat. If the temperature is too high, potato plants form significantly lower numbers of tubers, or sometimes none at all. Biochemists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered the reason why. If the temperature rises, a so-called "small RNA" blocks the formation of tubers. The scientists have now successfully

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Symbionts as lifesavers

When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. But where do these pathogens come from, and how do they thrive in the environment before the infection occurs? An international team led by Matthias Horn from the Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science at the University of Vienna has tackled this question using an important bacterial patho

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A combination of two bacteria genera improves plants' health

For the first time researchers of BacBio Laboratory of the University of Malaga have evidenced that the combination of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas bacteria can improve plant health.

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How potatoes could become sun worshippers

If there's one thing potato plants don't like, it's heat. If the temperature is too high, potato plants form significantly lower numbers of tubers, or sometimes none at all. Biochemists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered the reason why. If the temperature rises, a so-called "small RNA" blocks the formation of tubers. The scientists have now successfully

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Symbionts as lifesavers

When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. But where do these pathogens come from, and how do they thrive in the environment before the infection occurs? An international team led by Matthias Horn from the Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science at the University of Vienna has tackled this question using an important bacterial patho

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A combination of two bacteria genera improves plants' health

For the first time researchers of BacBio Laboratory of the University of Malaga have evidenced that the combination of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas bacteria can improve plant health.

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The Central Andes had the largest volcanic eruption of the last 5000 years

Cerro Blanco Volcanic Complex, located in the south of the Altiplano-Puna plateau, erupted around 4,200 years ago. But it was not an ordinary event. It was the largest eruption of the last 5,000 years in the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes according to a new study published in the journal Estudios Geológicos. The estimated volume of ejected ash places this eruption amongst the largest eruptions

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90% of Virginia's early childhood educators face challenging behavior by children, survey finds

A survey of 918 early childhood teachers across Virginia found that the vast majority—90 percent—reported having at least one child with challenging behavior in their classroom or childcare facility.

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Five questions you can use to cut through AI hype

Here’s a checklist for assessing the quality and validity of a company’s machine-learning product.

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Johns Hopkins researchers find widely 'inconsistent' use of antibodies in lab experiments

Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Center say they have affirmed widespread inconsistencies in the use of a common laboratory procedure called immunohistochemical staining, and say the variations are making many laboratory experiments unreliable.

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Our love of starch changed our genes (and our spit)

A new study clarifies how the pursuit of starch may have driven evolutionary adaptations in mammals. Starch, a complex carbohydrate, is a vital source of nutrition for many mammals. Humans farm it in the form of rice, wheat, corn, potatoes, and oats. Rats comb our garbage piles for scraps of pizza and bread. Wild boars root for tubers. The research, which includes 46 mammal species, focuses on a

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Carpenter Technology adds new additive manufacturing unit

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Preschool education can benefit generations of families

Early childhood education programs can impact life outcomes in ways that span generations, according to new research from Nobel laureate James Heckman.

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5G Is Coming

The imminent roll out of 5G technology has again sparked media coverage of the possible risks of EMF exposure, but the scientific consensus remains that the technology is safe.

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The Bloody, Thrilling Legend of John Wick Continues

John Wick’s reputation has always preceded him. When the moody, retired assassin (played by Keanu Reeves) first emerged in the 2014 cult hit John Wick , a mob boss called him “Baba Yaga,” recalling, “I once saw him kill three men in a bar … with a pencil.” Back then, Wick was still a shadowy presence—a folk villain whispered about by petty criminals, the last thing you saw before you got whacked.

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Mireya’s Third Crossing

In January of last year, Mireya called me to say she was going to Juárez. She had been living undocumented in the United States for 25 years, but now she was applying for permanent residency. The final step in the years-long process could be done only at the U.S. consulate in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. To hear more feature stories, see our full list or get the Audm iPhone app. There, Luz Mirella Zamo

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Living on the wrong end of a time zone could hurt your health

Health When morning starts before sunrise, circadian rhythms suffer. A buzzkill new study has just reported health problems with a later clock time of sunset.

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Remember

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01507-w A fresh start.

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Cambridge foreslår Lomborg-løsning på klimaet

Et nyt forskningscenter på Cambridge vil undersøge, hvordan vi gennem geoengineering kan redde klimaet. På idélisten finder vi bl.a. et forslag, der tidligere har været promoveret af Bjørn Lomborg.

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Image of the Day: Lefties

Snails with a gene knocked out by CRISPR grow with their shells coiling in the opposite direction.

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En 2000 år gammal nova kan ha återfunnits

År 48 f.Kr. observerade kinesiska astronomer en ny stjärna i det vi kallar för stjärnbilden Skytten – en tillfällig lysande punkt som sedan bleknade bort igen. Nu har astronomer i en europeisk forskargrupp hittat resterna av en nova, som skulle kunna vara just den som kineserna dokumenterade då för mer än 2000 år sedan.

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A.I. translation increases global eBay trade

New research draws a direct connection between artificial-intelligence-driven language translation and an increase in international trade. Machine learning and artificial intelligence offer the hope of greater business efficiency. And yet, researchers have found virtually no empirical evidence supporting the promised strides in labor productivity and economic activity. That is, until now. The new

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Predator exposure can help vulnerable species survive in the wild

Bilbies vs. feral cats—a Hunger Games-style experiment conducted in a South Australian desert has produced fascinating results with important implications for the conservation of our endangered species.

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Why don't whales develop cancer, and why should we care?

Whales have a minimal risk of developing cancer, despite factors that may lead us to think otherwise. Why is this, and how can this knowledge help us?

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Predator exposure can help vulnerable species survive in the wild

Bilbies vs. feral cats—a Hunger Games-style experiment conducted in a South Australian desert has produced fascinating results with important implications for the conservation of our endangered species.

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Erfaren diabetesforsker vil være formand for Diabetesforeningen

Der bliver kampvalg til formandsposten i Diabetesforeningen 25. maj, hvor professor Torsten Lauritzen stiller op over for den nuværende formand Truels Schultz.

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Steno Diabetes Center Odense modtager prestigefyldt bevilling

Morten Frost, klinisk lektor og speciallæge ved Steno Diabetes Center Odense har modtaget den prestigefyldte bevilling fra Novo Nordisk Fonden til forskning i behandling af knogleskørhed hos patienter med osteoporose eller diabetes.

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Lægepolitiker: Mange ryster på hovedet af, at jeg gider

Frem mod valget 5. juni bringer Dagens Medicin interviews med de seks læger, der stiller op til Folketinget. Læge og phd.-studerende Søren Valgreen Knudsen er socialdemokrat og stiller op i det nordjyske.

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Antarctic revealed in sharper 3D view

The European satellite measuring the shape of the White Continent is now working at higher resolution.

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Largest sea-surface salinity dataset to date helps researchers map salty waters

The length and precision with which climate scientists can track the salinity, or saltiness, of the oceans is set to improve dramatically according to researchers working as part of ESA's Climate Change Initiative.

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Amid India elections, study aligns data with constituencies

The legal age for women to marry in India is 18, but a recent review of data showed that more than half of marriages in more than half of parliamentary constituencies—the equivalent of U.S. Congressional districts—involved an underage bride.

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Video: Visualizing the global thaw

One of the causalities of climate change is the diminishing ice cover, affecting our planet in a number of ways.

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First-ever constructed image of a terrestrial gamma-ray flash

Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes occur above some thunderstorms and propagate out into space. These high-energy discharges of photons were only discovered less than 25 years ago when a NASA spacecraft designed to observe cosmic gamma-ray bursts from outer space detected flashes that seemed to come from Earth itself.

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The Telltale Signs of a Fake Atlantic Article

There is a very small chance that you came across what appeared to be an Atlantic article about the war in Yemen in September 2017. The author, according to the byline, was Aria Bendix , a regular global-news writer. Every link in the story went to other Atlantic stories. It even included the module shilling lowbrow content slurry that used to appear on Atlantic articles, at the bottom of the pag

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Oldest Scandinavian human DNA found in ancient chewing gum

The first humans who settled in Scandinavia more than 10,000 years ago left their DNA behind in ancient chewing gum, masticated lumps made from birch bark pitch. This is shown in a new study conducted at Stockholm University and published in Communications Biology.

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Impact of carbon dioxide leakage through North Sea wells

Realistic estimates show that global warming can only be kept below 1.5 or two degrees Celsius if carbon dioxide is actively removed from the atmosphere. Storage beneath the seafloor is an option that has been investigated intensively by an international team of scientists led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel. An assessment of opportunities and risks has now been published in

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Researchers demystify centralization in cryptocurrency mining

Blockchain technology has been considered as the most revolutionizing invention since the internet. Due to its immutable nature and the associated security and privacy benefits, it has attracted the attention of banks, governments, technology corporations, as well as venture capital.

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How to Become a Scientist-Communicator

Opportunities are everywhere, and training opens the way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Next ‘South China Sea’ Is Covered in Ice

In a perfect world, the Arctic Council would meet around a massive spruce table in a castle of ice. It would include Erik the Red, Superman, several Inuit elders, Justin Trudeau, and Magnus Byrnison, King of the Polar Bears, and they would discuss villainous threats to the North. In fact, it is just another committee meeting for diplomats, and at the most recent meeting, Trudeau wasn’t even there

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How the War on Drugs Kept Black Men Out of College

The War on Drugs locked up thousands of black men, and a new study finds that it may have also locked many out of the college classroom—and all the benefits that come with a college degree. There was a time when black men’s college enrollment was gaining ground, as compared to white men’s. From 1980 to 1985, college enrollment among black men ages 18 to 24 grew slightly faster than it did for the

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Female authors listed on just 30% of recent UK academic research

Progress rate ‘disheartening’, says expert as 2014-17 figure is small improvement on 2006-09 Women are listed as authors of just 30% of academic research from British universities, according to a major new ranking of higher education institutions. Although the number of women named as authors is gradually increasing, the slow pace was described by one expert as “disheartening”. The 30% figure is

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Science, Sensationalism, and the Lessons of ‘Insectageddon’

When a recent review of studies published in the journal Biological Conservation charted a catastrophic decline of insect populations worldwide, I was primed to take it at face value. Apparently other journalists were, too, with sensational — and misleading — headlines ricocheting around the globe.

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"Bomb Carbon" Has Been Found in Deep-Ocean Creatures

The detection of this radioactive relic of nuclear weapons tests in a remote environment shows humanity’s far-reaching environmental impact — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to Become a Scientist-Communicator

Opportunities are everywhere, and training opens the way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bill Nye Brings Out the F-Bombs and a Blowtorch to Talk Climate Change

Science popularizer Bill Nye told viewers of a popular late-night show that Earth is "on [expletive] fire" while lighting a globe with a blowtorch.

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Critically endangered Hawaiian crows build first nest in the wild in decades

Two Hawaiian crows, or alala, have done something momentous in the struggle to save the critically endangered species.

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Producing food while preserving biodiversity

In nature conservation and agriculture, there are two opposing views of how to combine high biodiversity and sustainable food production: Nature conservation should either be integrated into agricultural land, or segregated into protected areas in order to enable maximum yields in the food production areas. Researchers at the University of Göttingen advocate coordinated approaches that combine nat

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Compositional design of multi-component alloys by high-throughput screening

Multi-component materials are among the most promising materials in the engineering and biomedical applications. Compared with traditional alloys, the composition design of multi-component materials is more complicated, and lots of alloys with different compositions need to be prepared and tested. In addition, the relationship between the mixing entropy and performance of multi-component materials

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Critically endangered Hawaiian crows build first nest in the wild in decades

Two Hawaiian crows, or alala, have done something momentous in the struggle to save the critically endangered species.

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Producing food while preserving biodiversity

In nature conservation and agriculture, there are two opposing views of how to combine high biodiversity and sustainable food production: Nature conservation should either be integrated into agricultural land, or segregated into protected areas in order to enable maximum yields in the food production areas. Researchers at the University of Göttingen advocate coordinated approaches that combine nat

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Kunstig intelligens vækker kunstneren Salvador Dalí til live

På Dalí-museet i Florida kan du nu tage en selfie med den berømte surrealist fra Spanien.

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Nuclear Energy is Renewable Energy

submitted by /u/sanem48 [link] [comments]

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Eating insects makes sense. So why don’t we?

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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In fight to shield coral reefs from warming oceans, U.S. and Australian experts join forces

Marine biologists in Australia and the United States are joining forces to resuscitate two of the world's major coral reef systems along their coastlines threatened by rising ocean temperatures and extreme weather.

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Best Buy extends reach into booming health care market with GreatCall

The man at the other end of the phone line was confused. But Daina Blackmon, with the same certification as a 911 dispatcher, calmly probed for signs of trouble.

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"Bomb Carbon" Has Been Found in Deep-Ocean Creatures

The detection of this radioactive relic of nuclear weapons tests in a remote environment shows humanity’s far-reaching environmental impact — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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"Bomb Carbon" Has Been Found in Deep-Ocean Creatures

The detection of this radioactive relic of nuclear weapons tests in a remote environment shows humanity’s far-reaching environmental impact — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The northern lights, aka 'aurora borealis,' could be coming to a sky near you this week

Thanks to a geomagnetic storm from the sun, skywatchers across the far northern U.S. and most of Canada later this week could see the aurora borealis, aka the northern lights.

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Britisk politi kritiseres for ansigtsgenkendelse – San Francisco forbyder det

Britisk ansigtsgenkendelse fejler med sort hudfarve. San Francisco sætter bremsen i.

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Ancient Romans Used Molten Iron to Repair Streets Before Vesuvius Erupted

How the Romans introduced liquefied iron into the streets at Pompeii remains a mystery.

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5G kan give problemer for vejrudsigten

I USA er der kamp om frekvenserne, da 5G kan give problemer og interferens for jordobservationer fra rummet. Problemet kan blive globalt.

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US Birth Rates Hit Another Record Low in 2018

The U.S. birth rate continues to fall, reaching another record low in 2018, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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Joint sequencing of human and pathogen genomes reveals the genetics of pneumococcal meningitis

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09976-3 Streptococcus pneumoniae is a causative agent of meningitis and bacteremia. In a combined pathogen and host GWAS, Lees et al. find that host genetic variation is associated with both susceptibility and severity of pneumococcal meningitis, and specific bacterial genetic variation associated with susceptibility.

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Declines in mental health associated with air pollution and temperature variability in China

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10196-y Recent efforts to link mental health to environmental factors have focused on single predictors such as pollution or temperature anomalies. Here, the authors show that declines in self-assessed mental health scores were linked to increases in air pollution and temperature variability.

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Dynamic assembly of ribbon synapses and circuit maintenance in a vertebrate sensory system

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10123-1 Ribbon synapses in our sensory nervous system are central to hearing and sight, yet little is known about how these synapses are assembled and maintained during development. In this study, authors use live imaging techniques to monitor ribbon appearance, loss and maintenance in a retinal circuit during developmen

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Biomimetic electromechanical stimulation to maintain adult myocardial slices in vitro

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10175-3 Cultured adult cardiac tissue undergoes rapid dedifferentiation, which hinders chronic in vitro studies. Here the authors investigate biomimetic electromechanical stimulation of adult myocardial slices applying different preload conditions, identifying the optimum sarcomere length for prolonged culturing, and inv

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Publisher Correction: Microwave photons emitted by fractionally charged quasiparticles

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10199-9 Publisher Correction: Microwave photons emitted by fractionally charged quasiparticles

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Antidiabetic and cardiovascular beneficial effects of a liver-localized mitochondrial uncoupler

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09911-6 Mitochondrial uncoupling is a treatment strategy for metabolic diseases that reduces the efficiency of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and ATP generation. Here the authors characterize the pharmacokinetic and therapeutic properties of the liver-localized mitochondrial uncoupler OPC-163493, which leads to

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Bridging the gap between transition metal- and bio-catalysis via aqueous micellar catalysis

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09751-4 Chemo-enzymatic tandem processes allow access to more complex non-racemic products. Here, the authors show that non-ionic surfactants, especially the tailor-made surfactant TPGS-750-M, enhance the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase to afford stereopure products in a 1-pot reaction.

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Evaluating cell lines as models for metastatic breast cancer through integrative analysis of genomic data

Nature Communications, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10148-6 While cell lines and organoids are extensively used to study cancer, how closely they resemble the disease in patients remains unclear. Here, Liu et al. shed light on this issue by comparing the genomic and transcriptomic profiles of different breast cancer cell lines and organoids to data from patient-derived br

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Chewing gums reveal the oldest Scandinavian human DNA

The first humans who settled in Scandinavia more than 10,000 years ago left their DNA behind in ancient chewing gums, which are masticated lumps made from birch bark pitch. This is shown in a new study conducted at Stockholm University and published in Communications Biology.

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Older adults expect to lose brainpower, but most don't ask doctors how to prevent dementia

Many Americans in their 50s and early 60s are worried about declining brain health, especially if they have loved ones with memory loss and dementia, a new national poll finds. But while the majority of those polled say they take supplements or do puzzles in an effort to stave off brain decline, very few of them have talked with their doctors about evidence-based ways to prevent memory loss.

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Uber's new 'quiet mode' lets you avoid small talk with drivers – CNET

If you want to catch a nap on your next ride, this Uber Black feature is for you.

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Can you own an electric car without a home charger?

A popular selling point for electric vehicles is the notion that you never have to stop for gas. Your "gas station" is in your garage—simply plug in your vehicle to charge it overnight.

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There’s Still Hope for South Sudan

JUBA, South Sudan—Virtually everything in South Sudan appears rigged in favor of the few. It begins with the economy, with so much oil revenue and so little to show for it. The capital, Juba, has few paved streets and scant signs of development or even basic infrastructure. There is wealth, but unseen, lost to graft, misused to build private armies and buy off potential rivals. The war, too, belo

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The Anti-monopoly Backlash Reaches the Supreme Court

On Monday, the Supreme Court stymied an effort by Apple to protect its monopoly over sales of iPhone apps. Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s decision in Apple v. Pepper turned on an arcane bit of antitrust law, and it provided the first small hope that the antitrust establishment may finally turn against Big Tech. But the odds remain formidable. The story begins during an almost unimaginably remote time

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Harvard’s Feast of Grievance

In 1926, after giving a lecture on literature, Gertrude Stein was asked, “What about the woman issue?” She replied, dryly enough to start a forest fire, “Not everything can be about everything.” The ousting of Ronald Sullivan, the first black faculty dean to preside over a dorm at Harvard, is one of those scandals that aspires to be about everything, and in the process becomes about nothing at al

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If Congress Won’t Act, Trump Will

It took Rudy Giuliani less than a month after the release of the Mueller report to begin colluding. In a buoyant interview with The New York Times on May 9, President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer unveiled his plans to push the incoming Ukrainian government to kick-start an inquiry that, Giuliani hoped, would be politically damaging to the former vice president turned Democratic presidential can

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‘Let’s Keep This a Casual Enough Conversation That We Can Find the Humor in Things’

Wyatt Cenac’s HBO show, Problem Areas , is funny—but it doesn’t do traditional comedy. Yes, it has an opening monologue with jokes. Yes, it has Cenac’s stand-up-esque, laid-back vibe. But, in many ways, Cenac veers closer to doing the news than in the parodies he did as a Daily Show correspondent. Where Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, and decades of anchors on Saturday Night Live ’s Weekend Update

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Deploy diverse renewables to save tropical rivers

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01498-8 A strategic mix of solar, wind and storage technologies around river basins would be safer and cheaper than building large dams, argue Rafael J. P. Schmitt, Noah Kittner and colleagues.

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Chinese investments fuel growth in African science

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01398-x Africa has emerged as a major partner in China’s Belt and Road Initiative, and that is paying dividends for science.

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Free speech: The history every American should know

There's a reason you're free to wear clothing with protest statements on them today. In 1968, 19-year-old Paul Robert Cohen was arrested for disturbing the peace by wearing a jacked that read "F*ck the Draft" in a California courthouse. His case went to the U.S. Supreme Court, which decided that being offended by the jacket did not merit censorship. Jonathan Zimmerman argues that the history of d

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Study of autism and vitamin D earns retraction after questions about reliability

A pediatrics journal has retracted a 2016 article purporting to be the first randomized controlled trial on the effects of vitamin D supplements on autism over concerns about the reliability of the findings. The paper, “Randomized controlled trial of vitamin D supplementation in children with autism spectrum disorder,” appeared in the Journal of Child Psychology … Continue reading Study of autism

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Store partier afviser dansk flyafgift: Teknologien skal standse flyenes klimasynder

En lang række mindre partier er åbne over for ideen om en flyafgift, mens Venstre, Socialdemokratiet og Dansk Folkeparti er skeptiske og i stedet vil have en teknologisk løsning på flyproblematikken.

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Teachers grapple with climate change: 'A pretty scary topic'

When science teacher Diana Allen set out to teach climate change, a subject she'd never learned in school, she fell into a rabbit's hole of misinformation: Many resources presented online as educational material were actually junk.

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A Keystone-Like Pipeline Opens Fierce Battle Over New York’s ‘Energy Future’

The Cuomo administration must decide before Thursday whether to approve a new natural gas pipeline that environmentalists say would harm the area’s waters.

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Viktigt med behandling riktad mot hjärnan vid tarmsjukdomen IBS

Ju fler avvikelser i tarmens och hjärnans funktion en person med IBS har, desto svårare symtom ger den funktionella tarmstörningen, och desto mer negativt påverkas det dagliga livet. Det visar en studie från Sahlgrenska akademin. IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) är mycket vanligt. Uppemot tio procent av den vuxna befolkningen har den funktionella tarmstörningen i någon svårighetsgrad. För att få di

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Kolrester från industrier kan designas att rena avloppsvatten

För att hushålla med våra vattenresurser och förhindra spridning av miljöföroreningar krävs att vi har tillgång till effektiv vattenrening. Adsorption med aktivt kol är en vanlig vattenreningsteknik, men den höga kostnaden hos konventionella aktiva kol begränsar användningen av denna teknik. Samtidigt genereras ett stort antal avfallsflöden som i dag inte används optimalt, exempelvis från livsmed

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Climate change may make trees live fast and die young

A warmer world with more carbon dioxide may make trees grow faster, but this could mean they live shorter lives and lock away carbon for less time

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Researchers discover new security flaws in Intel processors

ZombieLoad and Store-to-Leak Forwarding are two new exploits that have just been announced by TU Graz security researchers Daniel Gruss, Moritz Lipp, Michael Schwarz and an international team.

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Hvad vil du spørge politikerne om? Bland dig i Ingeniørens valgmøde om forskning

Skal vi investere mere i basis eller strategisk forskning? Skal vi stille flere krav til de studerende? Og hvor meget bør vi egentlig investere i forskning fremover? Der er mange store spørgsmål på spil, når Ingeniøren inviterer toppolitikerne indenfor til valgmøde.

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The quest to replace natural rubber car tyres

Some experts are predicting shortages as soon as the 2030s

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Vestjysk firma skal drive endnu en udbudsklinik

Et år efter at MedAssist fik ansvaret for driften af sin første udbudsklinik i Holstebro, er den vestjyske virksomhed nu klar til at overtage endnu én – få husnumre derfra.

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Big data helps identify better way to research breast cancer's spread

Michigan State University researchers are analyzing large volumes of data, often referred to as big data, to determine better research models to fight the spread of breast cancer and test potential drugs. Current models used in the lab frequently involve culturing cells on flat dishes, or cell lines, to model tumor growth in patients.

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Inflammation induces anhedonia in women but not men

Inflammation reduces the brain's response to rewards in women, but not in men, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier.

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Artificial intelligence tool vastly scales up Alzheimer's research

Researchers at UC Davis and UC San Francisco have found a way to teach a computer to precisely detect one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease in human brain tissue, delivering a proof of concept for a machine-learning approach to distinguishing critical markers of the disease.

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Protection by the malaria vaccine: not only a matter of quantity but also of quality

The quantity and quality of antibodies recognizing the end region of the malaria parasite's CSP protein is a good marker of protection by the RTS,S/AS01E vaccine, shows a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa.' The results provide valuable information for guiding the design of future, more effective vaccines.

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Amount of carbon stored in forests reduced as climate warms

Accelerated tree growth caused by a warming climate does not necessarily translate into enhanced carbon storage, an international study suggests.

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Ignoring Trump’s Orders, Hoping He’ll Forget

On March 29, during a weekend jaunt to Mar-a-Lago, Donald Trump announced a major policy decision that surprised top-ranking officials in several government agencies. The United States was cutting off aid to Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, the president said. Never mind that Trump lacked the authority to unilaterally scrap and redirect the funds in question; his decision was sure to please

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Aquaporin 4 inhibition alters chemokine receptor expression and T cell trafficking

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43884-2 Aquaporin 4 inhibition alters chemokine receptor expression and T cell trafficking

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Computed tomography porosity and spherical indentation for determining cortical bone millimetre-scale mechanical properties

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43686-6 Computed tomography porosity and spherical indentation for determining cortical bone millimetre-scale mechanical properties

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Red Blood Cell Membrane Bioengineered Zr-89 Labelled Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanosphere for Overcoming Phagocytosis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43969-y Red Blood Cell Membrane Bioengineered Zr-89 Labelled Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanosphere for Overcoming Phagocytosis

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Enhanced metastatic potential in the MB49 urothelial carcinoma model

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43641-5 Enhanced metastatic potential in the MB49 urothelial carcinoma model

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Degradation of D-2-hydroxyglutarate in the presence of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43891-3 Degradation of D-2-hydroxyglutarate in the presence of isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations

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Reconstructed Skin Models Revealed Unexpected Differences in Epidermal African and Caucasian Skin

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43128-3 Reconstructed Skin Models Revealed Unexpected Differences in Epidermal African and Caucasian Skin

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Single-molecule pull-out manipulation of the shaft of the rotary motor F1-ATPase

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43903-2 Single-molecule pull-out manipulation of the shaft of the rotary motor F 1 -ATPase

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Third BIR domain of XIAP binds to both Cu(II) and Cu(I) in multiple sites and with diverse affinities characterized at atomic resolution

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42875-7 Third BIR domain of XIAP binds to both Cu(II) and Cu(I) in multiple sites and with diverse affinities characterized at atomic resolution

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Olive tree killer disease still poses risk to Europe

A disease posing a "very serious threat" to the EU's olive industry still poses a real threat to southern European producers, say experts.

11h

Being a PhD student shouldn’t be bad for your health

Nature, Published online: 15 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01492-0 The first international meeting on postgraduate mental health opens this week, but much more is needed to solve academia’s crisis.

11h

A tiny four-winged robotic insect flies more like the real thing

Flying robots are more agile with four wings than two. Engineers halved the weight of a crucial component to make that possible.

11h

Amount of carbon stored in forests reduced as climate warms

Accelerated tree growth caused by a warming climate does not necessarily translate into enhanced carbon storage, an international study suggests.

11h

The Trump Admin Is Scrubbing Obamacare From Government Sites

A new report documents changes to government websites—some subtle, some sweeping—that researchers argue undermine the Affordable Care Act.

11h

Socialdemokratiet vil forlænge uddannelseslægers tid i almen praksis

Opholdet i almen praksis skal forlænges med et halvt år for hoveduddannelseslæger i almen medicin, mener Socialdemokratiet, der vil reducere opholdet på hospitalet tilsvarende. Partiet fastholder tjenestepligten i almen praksis.

11h

Japan space startup aims to compete US rivals within years

A Japanese startup that launched a rocket into space last month plans to provide low-cost rocket services and compete with American rivals such as SpaceX.

11h

US birth rate continues to fall

America's baby bust isn't over. The nation's birth rates last year reached record lows for women in their teens and 20s, a government report shows, leading to the fewest babies in 32 years.

11h

Fremtidens høreapparat oversætter i realtid

PLUS. Den danske høreapparatproducent GN Sound leder arbejdet med at udvikle næste generation af Bluetooth-protokoller, der forbinder høreapparater med smartphones, fjernsyn og snart også offentlig infrastruktur.

12h

Google settles Pixel class-action lawsuit, owners will receive up to $500

Soon after their launch in October 2016, hundreds of Pixel owners reported not being able to make calls, record audio with the camera app, or use Google Assistant because of a hardware fault …

12h

The House the Robots Built

submitted by /u/alexgmcm [link] [comments]

12h

Is fusion the answer to reverse climate change?

I was thinking with unlimited power we could just have always running carbon capture devices all around the globe. Energy would be pretty much free. I feel like there’s more possibilities that could be done with fusion to reverse climate change. I just can’t really think of anything at the moment. I just feel like this the key to survival for humanity. Any ideas of what else fusion could be used

12h

Ireland's first grass-fed biorefinery hits the road to help farmers go green

Along the windy west coast of Ireland a biorefinery on wheels is turning grass into a series of different green products that could give farmers a more diversified source of income.

12h

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Analyze this: Space station facility enables rapid biomedical analysis

In its role as a unique orbiting laboratory, the International Space Station provides a broad range of equipment for conducting health and life sciences research. However, the equipment available for cellular and molecular biology is limited compared to capabilities found in laboratories on Earth. To address this limitation, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) commissioned an innovative biomedical dev

12h

Dolphin ancestor's hearing was more like hoofed mammals than today's sea creatures

Vanderbilt University paleontologists are looking into the evolutionary origins of the whistles and squeaks that dolphins and porpoises make—part of the rare echolocation ability that allows them to effectively navigate their dark environment.

12h

Five rules to tackle antibiotic resistance

Current efforts to tackle antibiotic resistance are "not nearly radical enough", a leading scientist says.

12h

Dolphin ancestor's hearing was more like hoofed mammals than today's sea creatures

Vanderbilt University paleontologists are looking into the evolutionary origins of the whistles and squeaks that dolphins and porpoises make—part of the rare echolocation ability that allows them to effectively navigate their dark environment.

12h

Five rules to tackle antibiotic resistance

Current efforts to tackle antibiotic resistance are "not nearly radical enough", a leading scientist says.

12h

Species facing climate change could find help in odd place: Urban environments

When it comes to wildlife conservation efforts, urban environments could be far more helpful than we think, according to new research. A study published today in Ecology shows that animals move faster through 'low quality' habitats—evidence that could change the way conservationists think about managing landscapes to help species move in response to climate change. In light of the recent UN report

12h

In guppy courtship, the unusual male wins

When it comes to choosing a mate, female guppies often go for the mates with the flashiest, most interesting color patterns.

12h

Species facing climate change could find help in odd place: Urban environments

When it comes to wildlife conservation efforts, urban environments could be far more helpful than we think, according to new research. A study published today in Ecology shows that animals move faster through 'low quality' habitats—evidence that could change the way conservationists think about managing landscapes to help species move in response to climate change. In light of the recent UN report

13h

In guppy courtship, the unusual male wins

When it comes to choosing a mate, female guppies often go for the mates with the flashiest, most interesting color patterns.

13h

”Unga har svårt att sätta ord på känslorna”

Per Johnsson är psykologen och forskaren som menar att förmågan att samtala håller på att gå förlorad i vår tid.

13h

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Another day at the office: Sherpa completes record 23rd Everest climb

For the hardy few, climbing Everest is a bucket-list feat of endurance, danger and wonder. But Kami Rita Sherpa's 23rd record summit of the world's highest peak on Wednesday was just another day at work.

13h

Sport and exercise science graduates contribute 4 billion to the UK economy every year

Sport and Exercise Science (SES) graduates contribute almost £4 billion a year to the UK economy, supporting almost 150,000 jobs, a new report to be launched in Parliament on Wednesday reveals.

13h

Online complaint system used by Google and Twitter is like the 'Wild West'

The online complaint system used by web giants like Google and Twitter is a 'Wild West' with evidence of abuse by complainants, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

13h

Where there's waste there's fertilizer

We all know plants need nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus. To give crops a boost, they are often put on fields as fertilizer. But we never talk about where the nutrients themselves come from.

13h