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nyheder2019maj16

A Fatal Tesla Autopilot Crash, Rising Methane Levels, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in two minutes or less.

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Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'

Researchers have defined for the first time what children mean when they say technology is 'creepy.'

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All immature gut cells have same chance at stem cell status

Contrary to previous assumptions about stem cell development, all cells in the fetal gut have the potential to develop into stem cells, according to a new study. The development of immature intestinal cells is not predetermined. Instead, the cells’ immediate surroundings in the intestines affect their development, the researchers report. This discovery may ease the path to effective stem cell the

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Current vaccination policies may not be enough to prevent measles resurgence

Current vaccination policies may not be sufficient to achieve and maintain measles elimination and prevent future resurgence in Australia, Ireland, Italy, the UK and the US, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Medicine.

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Most Extensive Synthetic Genome Project to Date

Study shows the viability of bacteria with human-made, recoded DNA.

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The Atlantic Daily: Consider the Magic Mushroom

What We’re Following Denver is the first city in the United States to virtually decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms (though the city still hasn’t actually made it legal to sell or even possess them), a loosening of restrictions that might expand the use of psychedelics for medical purposes. Some research suggests that psychedelic mushrooms—though extremely tightly regulated—aren’t addictive and m

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O'Neill Colonies: A Decades-Long Dream for Settling Space

Last week, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos revealed his spaceship company's new lunar lander, dubbed Blue Moon, and he spelled out a bold and broad vision for humanity's future in space. Faced with the limits of resources here on Earth, most fundamentally energy, he pointed to life in space as a solution. "If we move out into the solar system, for all practical purposes, we have unlimited resources," Be

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Beyond Harmful Gas: The Future of Refrigeration May Rely on 'Plastic Crystals'

(Inside Science) — Refrigeration has been around for about 100 years, but hasn’t changed much in that time. A time traveller from the early 1900s would still recognize the big box full of chilled food in your kitchen. But soon, researchers say, new materials could replace refrigeration as we know it, making it more adaptable, efficient and environmentally friendly. Standard fridges work using a p

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Frenchie Breathing Problems Run Deeper Than Smushed Faces

Who can resist a smooshed nose, wrinkly wide grin, and buggy eyes? Flat-faced dog breeds like bulldogs and pugs have become the popular “it” pets of the moment. But the iconic looks that make Frenchies and the like so photogenic can also be harmful to their health and wellbeing. Veterinarians have long known that brachycephalic breeds – or dogs bred to have condensed snouts – are prone to breathin

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SpaceX to Launch Starlink Internet Satellites Tonight After Postponement

To make enough money for interplanetary journeys, Elon Musk’s company hopes to provide high-speed internet all over the world.

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Documents Suggest Google Did Not Investigate Major Leaks

Google has been known to fire employees for leaking company information. But it hasn't investigated several recent high-profile leaks.

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Study examines consequences of workplace bullying

New research reveals how frequently being the target of workplace bullying not only leads to health-related problems but can also cause victims to behave badly themselves. The study, led by the University of East Anglia (UEA) in collaboration with Uninettuno Telematic International University in Italy, found that in some cases this is characterised by a lack of problem solving and high avoidance c

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Is air pollution behind 80-year decline in monsoon rain?

Human-made air pollutants are likely the reason for a drop in precipitation from the Asian summer monsoon, according to new research. Rainfall from the Asian summer monsoon has been decreasing for the past 80 years, a decline unprecedented in the last 448 years, the researchers report. The recent 80-year decline in the monsoon coincides with increases in particulate emissions from the post-World

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Scientists fighting sexual harassment urge stronger action by US biomedical agency

Nature, Published online: 16 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01602-y Survivors of harassment recounted their experiences at a meeting organized by the National Institutes of Health.

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Watch what happens when vaccinations drop by 10%

Universities of South Florida and Pittsburgh publish an online immunization simulator. The simulator shows the stunning effect of even small drops in vaccination rates. It's not just anti-vaxxers threatening community health. There are economic and geographical factors as well. None While vaccinations are administered to individuals, the benefit they provide extends beyond the recipient to the en

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Listen to a haunting song composed using climate data

Environment Hear the world burn. Lucy Jones thinks we’re not hearing the message about climate change well enough—so she set it to music.

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The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology: Colorectal cancer incidence on the rise among young adults in several high-income countries

The incidence of colon and rectal cancer in adults younger than 50 years has increased substantially over the latest available 10-year period in several high-income countries, going against a decline or stabilisation trend in the incidence of colorectal cancers within the overall populations of high-income countries.

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Stigma deterring elite athletes with mental health issues from seeking help

Stigma is the main reason why elite athletes with mental health issues don't seek the help they need, finds a summary of the available evidence, published in a special issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine devoted to the topic.

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Bowel cancer rising among young adults in Europe

The rate of bowel cancer — otherwise known as colorectal cancer or CRC — is rising among adults aged 20-49 in Europe, suggests research published online in the journal Gut today.

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Teen pregnancy still a major challenge in India, strongly linked to child stunting

Children born to teenage mothers are more likely to be undernourished than children of adult mothers. The study found that stunting and underweight prevalence were 10 percentage points higher in children born to adolescent mothers than in children born to adult mothers. A new study, the first to comprehensively examine links between teenage pregnancy and child undernutrition in India, by researche

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In India, teenage pregnancy and stunted children strongly linked

Study highlights the generational challenges of poor nutrition and early marriage. Biplab Das reports.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Caution Ahead

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, May 16. ‣ Donald Trump’s administration is pitching a new plan to overhaul the U.S.’s legal immigration system, focused on prioritizing “high-skilled workers.” (The plan has no real path to passage in Congress.) Here’s what else we’re watching: (Drew Angerer / Getty) Is Kamala Harris too cautious?: The presidential hopeful tends to swerve when asked about

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Publisher Correction: Non-Toxic Gold Nanoclusters for Solution-Processed White Light-Emitting Diodes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43788-1 Publisher Correction: Non-Toxic Gold Nanoclusters for Solution-Processed White Light-Emitting Diodes

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Author Correction: Combination of KIR2DS4 and FcγRIIa polymorphisms predicts the response to cetuximab in KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43809-z Author Correction: Combination of KIR2DS4 and FcγRIIa polymorphisms predicts the response to cetuximab in KRAS mutant metastatic colorectal cancer

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Publisher Correction: Cdh2 coordinates Myosin-II dependent internalisation of the zebrafish neural plate

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43789-0 Publisher Correction: Cdh2 coordinates Myosin-II dependent internalisation of the zebrafish neural plate

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Author Correction: Plasma Aβ analysis using magnetically-labeled immunoassays and PET 18F-florbetapir binding in non-demented patients with major depressive disorder

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43800-8 Author Correction: Plasma Aβ analysis using magnetically-labeled immunoassays and PET 18 F-florbetapir binding in non-demented patients with major depressive disorder

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Author Correction: TMEM16F activation by Ca2+ triggers plasma membrane expansion and directs PD-1 trafficking

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43808-0 Author Correction: TMEM16F activation by Ca 2+ triggers plasma membrane expansion and directs PD-1 trafficking

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Author Correction: Association between fasting Triglyceride levels and the Prevalence of Asymptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis in a Chinese Community-based Study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42890-8 Author Correction: Association between fasting Triglyceride levels and the Prevalence of Asymptomatic Intracranial Arterial Stenosis in a Chinese Community-based Study

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Publisher Correction: Precancer antiviral treatment reduces microvascular invasion of early-stage Hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43791-6 Publisher Correction: Precancer antiviral treatment reduces microvascular invasion of early-stage Hepatitis B-related hepatocellular carcinoma

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Author Correction: Unsupervised Scalable Statistical Method for Identifying Influential Users in Online Social Networks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43803-5 Author Correction: Unsupervised Scalable Statistical Method for Identifying Influential Users in Online Social Networks

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Watch this electric air taxi take off vertically, thanks to 36 swiveling 'jet' engines

Technology It has a range of 186 miles and is optimized to cruise. A German company tested their five-seat vertical-take-off-and-landing electric "jet" earlier this month.

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Tesla’s Latest Autopilot Death Looks Just Like a Prior Crash

A Florida man was killed March 1 when his Tesla collided with a tractor trailer that was crossing its path. A government report says the Autopilot feature was activated.

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Scientists develop technology to capture tumor cells

Instead of searching for a needle in a haystack, what if you were able to sweep the entire haystack to one side, leaving only the needle behind? That's the strategy researchers followed in developing a new microfluidic device that separates elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a sample of whole blood.

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Smartphone App And Paper Funnel Could Help Diagnose Ear Infections

Researchers have developed a smartphone app that can help diagnose an ear infection. Parents will be able to use it at home, pending further tests and Food and Drug Administration approval.

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This Prehistoric Fish Makes a Great White Look Like a Goldfish

Meet Dunkleosteus, perhaps the fiercest fish that ever existed

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New Horizons Reveals Ultima Thule's Quiet, Lonesome Past

After New Horizons streaked past Pluto in 2015, its main task was over, but it still had work to do. On New Year’s Day of 2019, it made a flyby of another, even more distant object named 2014 MU69, more commonly called Ultima Thule. Since then, the spacecraft has been slowly but steadily sending streams of information back across the increasingly vast gulf of space between it and Earth. From that

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How To See The Future (No Crystal Ball Needed)

When disaster strikes, we want to know, who screwed up? This week we explore the psychology of warnings: Why some warnings get heard, and why some of us are better at seeing what lies ahead. (Image credit: Angela Hsieh/NPR)

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Facebook shuts down Israel-based disinformation campaigns as election manipulation increasingly goes global

Facebook said it shut down 265 fake accounts run by an Israeli social media company on Thursday for engaging in “coordinated inauthentic behavior” as it sought to affect politics in African, …

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Partial breast irradiation effective treatment option for low-risk breast cancer

Partial breast irradiation produces similar long-term survival rates and risk for recurrence compared with whole breast irradiation for many women with low-risk, early stage breast cancer, according to new clinical data from a national clinical trial involving researchers from The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Ins

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Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not

Customers who feel afraid in the wake of a data breach care more about the size and scope of the breach than do angry customers, according to new research.

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Mining 25 years of data uncovers a new predictor of age of onset for Huntington disease

Investigators have examined more than 25 years of data to reveal new insights into predicting the age of onset for Huntington disease.

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Scientists develop technology to capture tumor cells

Instead of searching for a needle in a haystack, what if you were able to sweep the entire haystack to one side, leaving only the needle behind? That's the strategy researchers followed in developing a new microfluidic device that separates elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a sample of whole blood.

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New Horizons team publishes first Kuiper Belt flyby science results

NASA's New Horizons mission team has published the first profile of the farthest world ever explored, a planetary building block and Kuiper Belt object called 2014 MU69.

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This Robot Beats the Crap out of You While You Play Video Games

Holodeck When you’re plugged into a good virtual reality experience, you might talk about how it “feels real.” That’s apparently not good enough for engineer James Bruton, who built a robot to punch him while he brawls with a virtual automaton in a VR game. The setup isn’t commercially available — the game and robot were custom made, The Verge reports , but it represents an impressive attempt to

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Investigators Urge E.P.A. to Pursue Scott Pruitt for $124,000 in ‘Excessive’ Travel Costs

The E.P.A.’s inspector general found that Mr. Pruitt, the former head of the agency, had spent funds “without sufficient justification.”

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Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'

Many parents express concerns about privacy and online safety in technology designed for their children. But we know much less about what children themselves find concerning in emerging technologies.

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Scientists develop technology to capture tumor cells

Instead of searching for a needle in a haystack, what if you were able to sweep the entire haystack to one side, leaving only the needle behind? That's the strategy researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering followed in developing a new microfluidic device that separates elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a sample of whole blood.

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Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not

Customers who feel afraid in the wake of a data breach care more about the size and scope of the breach than do angry customers, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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The False Promise of “Lawful Access” to Private Data

Opinion: As online extremism migrates to real-world violence, some suggest letting law enforcement intercept encrypted messages. But that’s a dangerous proposition.

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Children who use asthma tracking app have better disease control and fewer hospital visits

An app that allows parents and doctors to monitor a child's asthma has a big impact on managing the disease. When families monitored symptoms with eAsthma Tracker and adjusted care accordingly, children had better asthma control and made fewer visits to the emergency department.

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Brain's insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain

Neuroscientists have discovered an area of the brain, the insular cortex, that processes painful experiences and thereby drives learning from aversive events.

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Protecting rare species can benefit human life

Preserving rare species for the sake of global biodiversity has long been the primary focus for conservationists.

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SpaceX set to launch first satellites of its internet network

SpaceX is targeting Thursday night for the launch of 60 satellites into low-Earth orbit, the first of potentially thousands in its Starlink project to beam broadband internet across the planet.

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Protecting rare species can benefit human life

Preserving rare species for the sake of global biodiversity has long been the primary focus for conservationists.

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Children describe technology that gives them a sense of ambiguity as 'creepy'

University of Washington researchers have defined for the first time what children mean when they say technology is 'creepy.'

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Scientists develop technology to capture tumor cells

Instead of searching for a needle in a haystack, what if you were able to sweep the entire haystack to one side, leaving only the needle behind? That's the strategy researchers in the University of Georgia College of Engineering followed in developing a new microfluidic device that separates elusive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a sample of whole blood.

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CosmoGAN: Training a neural network to study dark matter

As cosmologists and astrophysicists delve deeper into the darkest recesses of the universe, their need for increasingly powerful observational and computational tools has expanded exponentially. From facilities such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument to supercomputers like Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Cori system at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) faci

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Researchers create washable sensor that can be woven into materials

Forget the smart watch. Bring on the smart shirt.

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Pinterest reports smaller 1Q loss but guidance drags stock

Pinterest, fresh off its initial public offering, posted a loss for the first three months of the year that was larger than analysts were expecting, though revenue was slightly stronger. Its revenue outlook, though, was below expectations and its shares slumped in after-hours trading.

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Imaging black hole like listening to broken piano, says scientist

US computer scientist Katie Bouman, who became a global sensation over her role in generating the world's first image of a black hole, has described the painstaking process as akin to listening to a piano with broken keys.

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Boeing says 737 MAX software update is complete

Boeing said Thursday that it completed its software update on the 737 MAX after two deadly crashes resulted in a global grounding of the aircraft.

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Video game rivals Microsoft and Sony team up in cloud

Longtime video game console rivals Microsoft and Sony on Thursday announced an alliance to improve their platforms for streaming entertainment from the internet cloud.

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Spacewatch: Nasa wants $1.6bn next year to get astronauts to moon by 2024

The space agency says it intends to send both a woman and a man on Artemis programme’s first mission Nasa needs an additional $1.6bn next year if they are to stand any chance of getting humans to the moon again by 2024, as the US president, Donald Trump, has requested. The money would be on top of the $21.5bn already agreed by the agency. Most of the additional funding is needed to begin developi

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This huge Python learning bundle helps you build programs and analyze data

Get 85 hours of certified training for $34.99. Get 85 hours of certified training for $34.99 and access this huge Python learning bundle helps you build programs and analyze data.

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Mining 25 years of data uncovers a new predictor of age of onset for Huntington disease

Investigators at the University of British Columbia (UBC)/Centre for Molecular Medicine & Therapeutics (CMMT) and BC Children's Hospital have examined more than 25 years of data to reveal new insights into predicting the age of onset for Huntington disease.

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'Smart' insulin could prevent hypoglycemia during diabetes treatment

UCLA bioengineers and their colleagues have developed a new type of insulin that could help prevent hypoglycemia in people who use the drug to manage diabetes.

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Can Schools ‘Teach Students to Think’?

Last week I wrote about what Jim and I had seen on another visit to the (exceptional) Mississippi School for Mathematics and Science (MSMS), a public, residential two-year school for juniors and seniors. We’ve been reporting on the school over the past five years. In the latest dispatch, I described the way a committed English teacher at MSMS, Thomas Easterling, was “teaching students to think” t

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3D printers will make better implants

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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3D printing makes it easier to create tissue for medical research

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Could solving our climate and ecological crises lay the foundations for sciences like terraforming other planets?

With the knowledge we've gained over the past half century of climate and environmental science, do you think that we will have more experience about how climates change, allowing us to study methods of altering the climates of other planets to make them more habitable? I'm aware that in order to terraform Mars, we will need to create an artificial magnetic field, likely through sticking somethin

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How we make complex decisions

Neuroscientists have identified a brain circuit that helps break complex decisions down into smaller pieces. The study sheds light on how the brain reasons about probable causes of failure after a hierarchy of decisions.

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Students Taking the SAT Will Now Get a Secret “Adversity Score”

Fair Shot The SAT is adding another score alongside Verbal and Math — and it’s one students won’t be able to raise with a little extra test prep. Every year, about two million students take the SAT as part of the college admissions process, and students’ scores tend to reflect their socio-economic backgrounds — those raised in upper-income families often score higher than those from lower-income

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Tør du ta' en tur uden fører? Flyvende el-taxi lover grøn luftfart

En succesfuld testflyvning kan bane vej for en transportrevolution.

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Does eating ultraprocessed food affect weight gain? It’s complicated

Laying off ultraprocessed foods and switching to whole foods may help some people manage their weight, a small study finds.

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Species may disappear faster than anticipated, according to new data models

A new study in Journal of Applied Ecology equips scientists to more accurately predict whether, and when, a species will go extinct by being more realistic about how long it takes populations to establish each new generation.

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Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not

Customers who feel afraid in the wake of a data breach care more about the size and scope of the breach than do angry customers, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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What do they mean by 'stem cells'? Recommended guidelines for reporting on cell therapies

Cell therapies including so-called 'stem cells' are increasingly being marketed and used for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders — despite questions about these treatments and their effectiveness. A new tool for standardizing communication about cell therapies is presented in the May 15, 2019 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio

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Meet the tenrecs

Researchers reviewed the conservation priorities for the 31 species of tenrec — a poorly understood family of small mammals superficially resembling hedgehogs, found only on the island of Madagascar.

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Space Engineer: We Could Move Earth’s Orbit to Escape a Dying Sun

Ticking Clock In about five billion years, the Sun will begin to die, rapidly expanding and incinerating the Earth in its death throes. That’s not for a while, but any humans left will need to plan well in advance if they want to escape cosmic obliteration. Humanity’s best bet is migrating to another planet, according to an essay by Glasgow space engineer Matteo Ceriotti in The Conversation . But

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3D-printed 'hyperelastic bone' may help generate new bone for skull reconstruction

Defects of the skull and facial bones can pose difficult challenges for plastic and reconstructive surgeons. A synthetic material called hyperelastic bone — readily produced by 3D-printing — could offer a powerful new tool for use in reconstructing skull defects.

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Protecting rare species can benefit human life

Preserving rare species for the sake of global biodiversity has long been the primary focus for conservationists. To better protect rare animals, insects and plants, and to prepare for an uncertain future influenced by climate change, a team of researchers is aiming to merge this conventional wisdom with a new way of thinking: arguing researchers needs to better understand how rare species benefit

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Early weight-loss surgery may improve type 2 diabetes, blood pressure outcomes

Despite similar weight loss, teens who had gastric bypass surgery were significantly more likely to have remission of both type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, compared to adults who had the same procedure. Previously, no treatment has shown longer-term effectiveness at reversing type 2 diabetes in youth, which tends to advance more quickly than in adults.

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How plants are working hard for the planet

As the planet warms, plants are working to slow the effect of human-caused climate change — and new research has assessed how plants are responding to increasing carbon dioxide (CO2).

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Brain changes in autism traced to specific cell types

Changes in gene activity in specific brain cells are associated with the severity of autism in children and young adults with the disorder, according to a new study.

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How a member of a family of light-sensitive proteins adjusts skin color

A team of Brown University researchers found that opsin 3 — a protein closely related to rhodopsin, the protein that enables low-light vision — has a role in adjusting the amount of pigment produced in human skin, a determinant of skin color.

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Using information technology to promote health equity — update in Medical Care

An innovative health information technology (IT) program helps primary care providers to detect and manage depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in traumatized refugees, reports a study in a special June supplement to Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Ocean skeletons reveal historical climate impacts

Researchers studied skeletal stress bands on corals to reconstruct the history of bleaching on eight reefs in the central equatorial Pacific and use this information to better understand the thermal thresholds of their coral communities.

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Research brief: Protecting rare species can benefit human life

Preserving rare species for the sake of global biodiversity has long been the primary focus for conservationists.To better protect rare animals, insects and plants, and to prepare for an uncertain future influenced by climate change, a team of researchers is aiming to merge this conventional wisdom with a new way of thinking: arguing researchers needs to better understand how rare species benefit

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3D-printed 'hyperelastic bone' may help generate new bone for skull reconstruction

Defects of the skull and facial bones can pose difficult challenges for plastic and reconstructive surgeons. A synthetic material called hyperelastic bone — readily produced by 3D-printing — could offer a powerful new tool for use in reconstructing skull defects, reports a study in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plast

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UN Head: Atomic Waste “Coffin” May Be Leaking Into the Ocean

Testing Grounds Between 1946 and 1958, the U.S. government tested 67 nuclear weapons in the Marshall Islands. It later dumped radioactive waste from the tests into a crater on one of the islands, placing an 18-inch-thick concrete dome over the horrifying sludge . Because the crater was only supposed to be a temporary storage solution, the bottom of it was unlined. That’s led to recent concerns th

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Learning another language should be compulsory in every school

In the 1960s, in our public schools in California along the border with Mexico, Spanish language-learning was a requirement, beginning in sixth grade. I couldn't wait to get to sixth grade to start learning Spanish. Our school was more than 50 per cent Mexican-Americans, and I was keen to understand them as they switched back and forth from fluent English to fluent Spanish (or, as they called it,

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Will choosing between too many presidential candidates paralyze voters?

The Democratic primary field has grown to be one of the largest in history, partially due to a desire to take down Donald Trump. But this may backfire; social behaviorists warn that presenting people with too many choices can produce choice overload, resulting in paralysis and regret. What are the negative effects of being offered too many choices? Are there any benefits to be had from this huge

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Here's exactly how restricting abortion harms public health

Health The recent abortion bills don't align with what health experts know about abortion safety. This week, Alabama’s governor signed the most extreme anti-abortion bill in the country, effectively banning the procedure. It’s just one of a host of new laws…

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Lumina Prize awarded for innovation in post-high school education

Winners announced for Lumina Prize In January, Big Think and Lumina Foundation called for innovative ideas in post-high school training and education with an emphasis on an entrepreneurial approach. Today, we are pleased to announce that we have selected two winners. The Judges' Choice Award The Judge's Choice Award goes to PeerForward , an organization dedicated to increasing the education and c

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Smartphone App Screens Kids for Ear Problems

Parents can use a digital tool at home to detect fluid behind the eardrum — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Smartphone App Screens Kids for Ear Problems

Parents can use a digital tool at home to detect fluid behind the eardrum — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Extreme heat — and maybe a virus — wiped out Cambodian bats

A mass mortality event involving two bat species, the wrinkle-lipped free-tailed bat (Chaerephon plicatus) and Theobold's bat (Taphozous theobaldi) occurred during a heat wave in April 2016 in Cambodia.

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Study proposes new standards for safely performing 'Brazilian butt lift'

A new anatomic study highlights critical technical issues to ensure safe performance of the increasingly popular 'Brazilian butt lift' — a procedure using the patient's own fat to augment and improve the appearance of the buttocks. The study appears in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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Study may help prevent relapse in cocaine use disorder patients

Brazilian researchers combined cognitive dysfunction tests with an analysis of drug use patterns to identify patients at high risk of relapse after treatment.

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These are the world’s most fragile states in 2019

There are some rankings no nation wants to lead. Yemen has just been named most fragile nation in the Fund For Peace's 2019 Fragile States Index . The least fragile state is Finland. Between these two countries lies the whole spectrum of national stability. The good news is that conditions for most of the world's people are slowly improving, says JJ Messner, Executive Director of the Fund for Pea

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The ‘Broken Windows’ Debate Survives Its Creators

“Consider a building with a few broken windows,” wrote James Q. Wilson, a government professor at Harvard University, and George L. Kelling, a criminal-justice professor at Rutgers University, in a 1982 article for The Atlantic . “If the windows are not repaired, the tendency is for vandals to break a few more windows. Eventually, they may even break into the building, and if it’s unoccupied, per

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Natural compound found in broccoli reawakens the function of potent tumor suppressor

Long associated with decreased risk of cancer, broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables — the family of plants that also includes cauliflower, cabbage, collard greens, Brussels sprouts and kale — contain a molecule that inactivates a gene known to play a role in a variety of common human cancers. A new study demonstrates that targeting the gene, known as WWP1, with the ingredient found in brocc

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Scientists find new type of cell that helps tadpoles' tails regenerate

Researchers have uncovered a specialized population of skin cells that coordinate tail regeneration in frogs. These 'Regeneration-Organizing Cells' help to explain one of the great mysteries of nature and may offer clues about how this ability might be achieved in mammalian tissues.

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Scientists Release Latest Findings on Ancient Object at the Solar System's Edge

Scientists Release Latest Findings on Ancient Object at the Solar System's Edge The tiny world of Ultima Thule, which lies at the outer edges of the solar system, is flattened like a pancake, with few craters. UltimaThule_topNteaser.jpg Artist's impression of NASA's New Horizons spacecraft encountering 2014 MU69, otherwise known as Ultima Thule. Image credits: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applie

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Ramte en asteroide Månen engang? Kinesisk månebil finder nye spor

En asteroide har ramt månen med så stor kraft, at den gik gennem det øverste jordlag.

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Video game rivals Microsoft and Sony team up in cloud

Longtime video game console rivals Microsoft and Sony on Thursday announced an alliance to improve their platforms for streaming entertainment from the internet cloud.

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Training a neural network to study dark matter

A research group is using a deep learning method known as generative adversarial networks to enhance the use of gravitational lensing in the study of dark matter.

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Researchers create washable sensor that can be woven into materials

Researchers have developed a low-cost sensor that can be interlaced into textiles and composite materials. While the research is still new, the sensor may pave the way for smart clothing that can monitor human movement.

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Designing biological movement on the nanometer scale

Synthetic proteins have now been created that can move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways. These proteins can use their movement to disrupt lipid membranes in cells. They show promise as tools for drug delivery, and might eventually rival the efficiency of virus vehicles, but without some of their drawbacks.

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Children who use asthma tracking app have better disease control and fewer hospital visits

An app that allows parents and doctors to monitor a child's asthma has a big impact on managing the disease. When families monitored symptoms with eAsthma Tracker and adjusted care accordingly, children had better asthma control and made fewer visits to the emergency department. Using the app also meant that children missed fewer days of school and parents took fewer days off work, improving quali

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How host-cell enzymes combat the coronavirus

Host-cell enzymes called PARP12 and PARP14 are important for inhibiting mutant forms of a coronavirus, according to a new study.

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Preventive measures can reduce foot parasite in children

Tungiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by penetrated sand fleas which burrow into the skin of the feet. Public health policies such as sealing house and classroom floors and daily feet washing with soap could cut the number of tungiasis cases in school-aged children, researchers now report.

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Could better tests help reverse the rise of drug-resistant infections?

Faster, more accurate tests for drug-resistant infections are hailed as a promising tool in the fight against antibiotic resistance, so much so that the US and Britain are offering millions in prize money for their development. A modeling study shows that better tests could, in theory, change the game and put drug-resistant bacteria at a reproductive disadvantage relative to more easily-treated st

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Mutation makes bulldogs and Norwich terriers more susceptible to breathing problems

The discovery of a new mutation associated with breathing difficulties in popular dog breeds suggests that shortened skulls causing flat faces is not the only factor that contributes to the condition, but that swelling around the airways from edema may also play a role.

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Why the Writing in Season 8 of 'Game of Thrones' Feels Off

A philosophy professor explains that it all comes down to the machinations of two very different types of writers: plotters and pantsers.

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Google’s Street View cars are helping build a giant map of global air pollution

submitted by /u/ChickenTeriyakiBoy1 [link] [comments]

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Energy Storage Breakthroughs

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Here Are The First Findings From New Horizons' Historic Flyby of Ultima Thule

Our first close-up with the farthest named single object in the Solar System.

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The National Further Complicates Its Sadness

There oughta be a word for whatever emotion that The National has homed in on over eight excellent albums of gravel-voiced poetry and delicate-ferocious rock. Consulting Mental Floss ’s 2016 guide “How to Tell Whether You’ve Got Angst, Ennui, or Weltschmerz,” one might hear all three highbrow, non-anglophone feelings on the band’s latest release, I Am Easy to Find : Angst , that sourceless dread?

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Boston Medical Center develops EHR-based social needs screener to improve patient outcomes

Boston Medical Center (BMC) has implemented a social determinants of health screener for primary care patients in order to better identify and address patients' unmet social needs. Clinician researchers developed the electronic health record-based (EHR) model, THRIVE, which facilitates an automatic print out of referral information for resources based at the hospital and in the community when the

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CosmoGAN: Training a neural network to study dark matter

A Berkeley Lab-led research group is using a deep learning method known as generative adversarial networks to enhance the use of gravitational lensing in the study of dark matter.

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Neural Cell Types Tied to Autism Identified in Single-Cell Study

An RNA analysis of human brain cells reveals gene expression changes in cortical neurons and microglia linked to autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

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Add-on text cuts gender bias in course evaluations

A new intervention could help reduce bias against women college instructors in course evaluations. End-of-semester surveys evaluate teaching effectiveness and often influence tenure and promotion, but research has shown women face more critical evaluation than their male peers, says Dave Peterson, a professor of political science at Iowa State University. Having worked on committees tasked with t

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Study finds 24% of West Antarctic ice is now unstable

In only 25 years, ocean melting has caused ice thinning to spread across West Antarctica so rapidly that a quarter of its glacier ice is now affected, according to a new study.

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Tesla Releases Software Update to Stop Cars From Catching Fire

Fire Guy After more reports of Tesla vehicles bursting into flames emerged this week, the electric automaker has released a software update to ensure that batteries stay safe, have a long shelf life — and don’t erupt into fireballs. “Although fire incidents involving Tesla vehicles are already extremely rare and our cars are 10 times less likely to experience a fire than a gas car, we believe the

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Squished faces aren’t the only cause of bulldog breathing difficulties

A gene mutation present in English and French bulldogs may be partly responsible for their breathing problems

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Science Museum plans 200 hectare site to show off lost treasures

Huge range of objects little seen for decades will be exhibited in facility near Swindon from 2023 A site under development by the Science Museum will give the public a chance to see hundreds of thousands of items that have been in storage for decades. Among highlights is a 1947 passenger aircraft that was used as an Australia and Asia tour plane by the Rolling Stones in 1973 and a year later was

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Naturally pink chocolate is finally here. But how is it made?

Science This rosy treat remains shrouded in mystery. Barry Callebaut, creators of the coveted “ruby chocolate,” says they’re finally bringing the pink-hued sweet stateside. But how exactly the manufacturer produces such…

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Improving health outcomes with a little help from our friends — and artificial intelligence

The National Academy of Medicine has called for physicians to document social isolation in the electronic health record (EHR), because it can affect health outcomes. However, social isolation cannot be entered as coded data in current EHRs but only mentioned in clinical notes, which have historically been unintelligible to computers. Medical University of South Carolina investigators have trained

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When science and politics collide: Support for enhancing FDA independence

A new paper by Eli Y. Adashi, Rohit Rajan, and I. Glenn Cohen appears in Science this week and picks up where those papers left off. Adashi, Rajan, and Cohen write that the crucial mission of the FDA, which has been to make science-based decisions about drug and medical device safety since 1938, has recently been undermined and threatened by politically motivated interference from congressional le

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How we make complex decisions

MIT neuroscientists have identified a brain circuit that helps break complex decisions down into smaller pieces. The study sheds light on how the brain reasons about probable causes of failure after a hierarchy of decisions.

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The insular cortex processes pain and drives learning from pain

Neuroscientists at EPFL have discovered an area of the brain, the insular cortex, that processes painful experiences and thereby drives learning from aversive events.

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Policy makers must attend to menstrual stigma to improve wellbeing, study finds

Researchers have found that addressing attitudes to menstruation may be necessary to improve well-being in low and middle-income countries, far more than simply better access to sanitary products.

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Brain changes in autism traced to specific cell types

Changes in gene activity in specific brain cells are associated with the severity of autism in children and young adults with the disorder, according to a UC San Francisco study of postmortem brain tissue. The study's new insights into how specific changes in gene expression contribute to the disease's symptoms by altering the function of brain circuits provides an important foundation for the dev

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FDA independence in an age of partisan politics

Unlike other federal agencies, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) — the oldest federal consumer protection agency — has been increasingly subjected to creeping politicization and a progressive loss of independence under the glare of partisan politics.

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Brain cell genomics reveals molecular pathology of autism

Molecular changes in specific types of neural cells and brain circuits correlate with the clinical severity of autism spectrum disorder, a new single-cell analysis of brain cells from autism patients finds.

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Moving the needle on nanoscale imaging with single-molecule magnets

Amid intense research focus on magnetic single atoms and molecules — which could serve as the smallest possible memory elements in quantum computing — researchers report creating a sensor capable of measuring and imaging magnetic structures and interactions at the atomic scale, in unprecedented detail.

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Initial results from New Horizon's exploration of distant Kuiper Belt Object 2014 MU69

On Jan. 1, 2019, the New Horizons Spacecraft conducted a flyby of (486958) 2014 MU 69 — a distant object orbiting in the outer reaches of the solar system.

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Dog DNA find could aid quest to help breeds breathe more easily

Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have discovered a DNA mutation linked to breathing problems in popular dog breeds. The finding raises the future possibility of genetic tests that could help vets identify animals at risk and could one day help breeders avoid producing affected pups.

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Scientists find new type of cell that helps tadpoles' tails regenerate

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have uncovered a specialised population of skin cells that coordinate tail regeneration in frogs. These 'Regeneration-Organizing Cells' help to explain one of the great mysteries of nature and may offer clues about how this ability might be achieved in mammalian tissues.

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Natural compound found in broccoli reawakens the function of potent tumor suppressor

Long associated with decreased risk of cancer, broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables — the family of plants that also includes cauliflower, cabbage, collard greens, Brussels sprouts and kale — contain a molecule that inactivates a gene known to play a role in a variety of common human cancers. A new study demonstrates that targeting the gene, known as WWP1, with the ingredient found in brocc

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Designing biological movement on the nanometer scale

Synthetic proteins have now been created that can move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways. These proteins can use their movement to disrupt lipid membranes in cells. They show promise as tools for drug delivery, and might eventually rival the efficiency of virus vehicles, but without some of their drawbacks.

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How host-cell enzymes combat the coronavirus

Host-cell enzymes called PARP12 and PARP14 are important for inhibiting mutant forms of a coronavirus, according to a study published May 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Stanley Perlman of the University of Iowa, Anthony Fehr of the University of Kansas, and colleagues.

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Preventive measures can reduce foot parasite in children, study says

Tungiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by penetrated sand fleas which burrow into the skin of the feet. Public health policies such as sealing house and classroom floors and daily feet washing with soap could cut the number of tungiasis cases in school-aged children, researchers now report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

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Could better tests help reverse the rise of drug-resistant infections?

Faster, more accurate tests for drug-resistant infections are hailed as a promising tool in the fight against antibiotic resistance, so much so that the US and Britain are offering millions in prize money for their development. A modeling study led by Duke University game theorist David McAdams shows that better tests could, in theory, change the game and put drug-resistant bacteria at a reproduct

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Mutation makes bulldogs and Norwich terriers more susceptible to breathing problems

The discovery of a new mutation associated with breathing difficulties in popular dog breeds suggests that shortened skulls causing flat faces is not the only factor that contributes to the condition, but that swelling around the airways from edema may also play a role. Jeffrey Schoenebeck of the University of Edinburgh and colleagues report these findings in a new study published May 9 in PLOS Ge

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Measuring plant improvements to help farmers boost production

Today, scientists have shown a new technology can more quickly scan an entire field of plants to capture improvements in their natural capacity to harvest energy from the sun.

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Formula 1 racing teams have intense recruitment programs for engineers

Technology The Renault Formula One team and Infiniti have a unique program for recruiting talent. Work your way up into the big leagues.

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Bedbugs date back to the time of the dinosaurs, new family tree suggests

Every half-million years, a new species switches to human hosts

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The Global Helium Shortage Is Real, but Don’t Blame Party Balloons

It’s not just Party City. Everyone is running out of helium. Part of the problem is that it’s so difficult to store.

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Flexibility of working memory from random connections

Working memory is your ability to hold things 'in mind.' It acts as a workspace in which information can be held, manipulated, and used to guide behavior. It plays a critical role in cognition, decoupling behavior from the immediate sensory world. One remarkable thing about working memory is its flexibility — you can hold anything in mind. In their new manuscript, researchers present the first mo

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A tale of two skeeters

A native mosquito in Missouri has fewer parasites when it shares its waters with an interloper, according to new research.

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Measuring plant improvements to help farmers boost production

Today, scientists have shown a new technology can more quickly scan an entire field of plants to capture improvements in their natural capacity to harvest energy from the sun.

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Nearly a quarter of West Antarctic ice is now unstable

In only 25 years, ocean melting has caused ice thinning to spread across West Antarctica so rapidly that a quarter of its glacier ice is now affected, according to a new study.

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Watch a Five-Seater Air Taxi’s Maiden Flight

Jet Setter German startup Lilium doesn’t just want to fly you around in an air taxi — it wants to fly you and your squad. While many companies in the same space have focused on developing flying cars with just two seats , the startup has spent the past two years working on the Lilium Jet , an air taxi that seats five. And the effort seems to have paid off, because the company just shared a video

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Transport control

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Bonding's outer limit

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Dynamic metasurfaces

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Excising an olefin

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Reactivation of PTEN tumor suppressor for cancer treatment through inhibition of a MYC-WWP1 inhibitory pathway

Activation of tumor suppressors for the treatment of human cancer has been a long sought, yet elusive, strategy. PTEN is a critical tumor suppressive phosphatase that is active in its dimer configuration at the plasma membrane. Polyubiquitination by the ubiquitin E3 ligase WWP1 (WW domain–containing ubiquitin E3 ligase 1) suppressed the dimerization, membrane recruitment, and function of PTEN. Ei

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News at a glance

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Transport control

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Bonding's outer limit

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Dynamic metasurfaces

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Excising an olefin

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Identification of a regeneration-organizing cell in the Xenopus tail

Unlike mammals, Xenopus laevis tadpoles have a high regenerative potential. To characterize this regenerative response, we performed single-cell RNA sequencing after tail amputation. By comparing naturally occurring regeneration-competent and -incompetent tadpoles, we identified a previously unrecognized cell type, which we term the regeneration-organizing cell (ROC). ROCs are present in the epid

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De novo design of tunable, pH-driven conformational changes

The ability of naturally occurring proteins to change conformation in response to environmental changes is critical to biological function. Although there have been advances in the de novo design of stable proteins with a single, deep free-energy minimum, the design of conformational switches remains challenging. We present a general strategy to design pH-responsive protein conformational changes

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Quantum gas microscopy of Rydberg macrodimers

The subnanoscale size of typical diatomic molecules hinders direct optical access to their constituents. Rydberg macrodimers—bound states of two highly excited Rydberg atoms—feature interatomic distances easily exceeding optical wavelengths. We report the direct microscopic observation and detailed characterization of such molecules in a gas of ultracold rubidium atoms in an optical lattice. The

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Electron diffraction determines molecular absolute configuration in a pharmaceutical nanocrystal

Determination of the absolute configuration of organic molecules is essential in drug development and the subsequent approval process. We show that this determination is possible through electron diffraction using nanocrystalline material. Ab initio structure determination by electron diffraction has so far been limited to compounds that maintain their crystallinity after a dose of one electron p

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Probing and imaging spin interactions with a magnetic single-molecule sensor

Magnetic single atoms and molecules are receiving intensifying research focus because of their potential as the smallest possible memory, spintronic, and qubit elements. Scanning probe microscopes used to study these systems have benefited greatly from new techniques that use molecule-functionalized tips to enhance spatial and spectroscopic resolutions and enable new sensing capabilities. We demo

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Conformationally supple glucose monomers enable synthesis of the smallest cyclodextrins

Cyclodextrins (CDs) are cyclic oligomers of α-1,4–glucopyranoside and are known mainly as hexamers to octamers. The central cavities of CDs can retain small molecules, enabling diverse applications. The smallest members, CD3 and CD4, have ring sizes too small to permit the most stable conformations of glucopyranose and have not been accessible synthetically. In this study, we present methods to

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Constrained sialic acid donors enable selective synthesis of {alpha}-glycosides

Sialic acid is a sugar residue present in many biologically significant glycans of mammals, commonly as a terminal α-glycoside. The chemical structure of sialic acid, which features an anomeric center with carboxyl and methylene substituents, poses a challenge for synthesis of the α-glycoside, thus impeding biological and therapeutic studies on sialic acid–containing glycans. We present a robust

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Hydrodealkenylative C(sp3)-C(sp2) bond fragmentation

Chemical synthesis typically relies on reactions that generate complexity through elaboration of simple starting materials. Less common are deconstructive strategies toward complexity—particularly those involving carbon-carbon bond scission. Here, we introduce one such transformation: the hydrodealkenylative cleavage of C(sp 3 )–C(sp 2 ) bonds, conducted below room temperature, using ozone, an ir

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Single-cell genomics identifies cell type-specific molecular changes in autism

Despite the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of autism, bulk gene expression studies show that changes in the neocortex of autism patients converge on common genes and pathways. However, direct assessment of specific cell types in the brain affected by autism has not been feasible until recently. We used single-nucleus RNA sequencing of cortical tissue from patients with autism to identify auti

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Mechanism of allosteric modulation of P-glycoprotein by transport substrates and inhibitors

The ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein plays a central role in clearance of xenobiotics in humans and is implicated in cancer resistance to chemotherapy. We used double electron electron resonance spectroscopy to uncover the basis of stimulation of P-glycoprotein adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis by multiple substrates and illuminate ho

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Spatiotemporal light control with active metasurfaces

Optical metasurfaces have provided us with extraordinary ways to control light by spatially structuring materials. The space-time duality in Maxwell’s equations suggests that additional structuring of metasurfaces in the time domain can even further expand their impact on the field of optics. Advances toward this goal critically rely on the development of new materials and nanostructures that exh

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Local protein synthesis is a ubiquitous feature of neuronal pre- and postsynaptic compartments

There is ample evidence for localization of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and protein synthesis in neuronal dendrites; however, demonstrations of these processes in presynaptic terminals are limited. We used expansion microscopy to resolve pre- and postsynaptic compartments in rodent neurons. Most presynaptic terminals in the hippocampus and forebrain contained mRNA and ribosomes. We sorted fluorescentl

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Hierarchical reasoning by neural circuits in the frontal cortex

Humans process information hierarchically. In the presence of hierarchies, sources of failures are ambiguous. Humans resolve this ambiguity by assessing their confidence after one or more attempts. To understand the neural basis of this reasoning strategy, we recorded from dorsomedial frontal cortex (DMFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of monkeys in a task in which negative outcomes were ca

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Initial results from the New Horizons exploration of 2014 MU69, a small Kuiper Belt object

The Kuiper Belt is a distant region of the outer Solar System. On 1 January 2019, the New Horizons spacecraft flew close to (486958) 2014 MU 69 , a cold classical Kuiper Belt object approximately 30 kilometers in diameter. Such objects have never been substantially heated by the Sun and are therefore well preserved since their formation. We describe initial results from these encounter observatio

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Designing biological movement on the nanometer scale

Synthetic proteins have been created that move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways. These motile molecules were designed from scratch on computers, then produced inside living cells.

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Citizen sleuths exposed pollution from a century-old Michigan factory, with nationwide implications

Discoveries have helped fuel national debate over nonstick chemical contamination

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Could better tests help reverse the rise of drug-resistant infections?

A growing number of infections—such as pneumonia, gonorrhea and tuberculosis—are becoming harder to treat, as bacteria evolve defenses against antibiotics faster than we can develop new drugs to replace them.

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Dog DNA find could aid quest to help breeds breathe more easily

Scientists have discovered a DNA mutation linked to breathing problems in popular dog breeds.

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How host-cell enzymes combat the coronavirus

Host-cell enzymes called PARP12 and PARP14 are important for inhibiting mutant forms of a coronavirus, according to a study published May 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Stanley Perlman of the University of Iowa, Anthony Fehr of the University of Kansas, and colleagues.

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When science and politics collide: Support for enhancing FDA independence

Earlier this year, twin papers authored by seven former Food and Drug Administration commissioners, published by Health Affairs and the Aspen Institute on the same day, suggested that the FDA should become an independent agency.

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Scientists find new type of cell that helps tadpoles' tails regenerate

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have uncovered a specialised population of skin cells that coordinate tail regeneration in frogs. These 'Regeneration-Organizing Cells' help to explain one of the great mysteries of nature and may offer clues about how this ability might be achieved in mammalian tissues.

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Designing biological movement on the nanometer scale

Synthetic proteins have been created that move in response to their environment in predictable and tunable ways. These motile molecules were designed from scratch on computers, then produced inside living cells.

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UBC researchers create washable sensor that can be woven into materials

Forget the smart watch. Bring on the smart shirt.Researchers at UBC Okanagan's School of Engineering have developed a low-cost sensor that can be interlaced into textiles and composite materials. While the research is still new, the sensor may pave the way for smart clothing that can monitor human movement.

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True identity of imposter 'pigs' on 17th century map overturns early colonial history of Barbados

Which came first, the pigs or the pioneers? In Barbados, that has been a historical mystery ever since the first English colonists arrived in 1627 to encounter what they thought was a herd of wild European pigs. Research is shedding new light on the mystery and the altering of New World environments.

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Could better tests help reverse the rise of drug-resistant infections?

A growing number of infections—such as pneumonia, gonorrhea and tuberculosis—are becoming harder to treat, as bacteria evolve defenses against antibiotics faster than we can develop new drugs to replace them.

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Dog DNA find could aid quest to help breeds breathe more easily

Scientists have discovered a DNA mutation linked to breathing problems in popular dog breeds.

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How host-cell enzymes combat the coronavirus

Host-cell enzymes called PARP12 and PARP14 are important for inhibiting mutant forms of a coronavirus, according to a study published May 16 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Stanley Perlman of the University of Iowa, Anthony Fehr of the University of Kansas, and colleagues.

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Scientists find new type of cell that helps tadpoles' tails regenerate

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have uncovered a specialised population of skin cells that coordinate tail regeneration in frogs. These 'Regeneration-Organizing Cells' help to explain one of the great mysteries of nature and may offer clues about how this ability might be achieved in mammalian tissues.

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Solution: ‘The Bulldogs That Bulldogs Fight’

Our April Insights puzzle explored the magical concept of recursion, a self-referencing process that can create unending complexity from simple beginnings. Recursion, which commonly appears in mathematics, computer science and linguistics, seems especially head-spinning and brain-straining when identical elements are involved, as in our first problem. Puzzle 1: The Fighting Bulldogs One type of r

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These Are the Planets That Survive the Deaths of Their Stars

Lonely Planet When stars explode and die, they tend to swallow and incinerate everything around them. But sometimes exoplanets survive, left to drift the galaxy as celestial orphans. Now, a team of astronomers from the U.S. and Europe determined which planets are most likely to survive the deaths of the white dwarf stars they orbit, according to research published in the journal Monthly Notices o

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Bland, no moons, no craters, no atmosphere. Welcome to Ultima Thule

The Kuiper Belt Object looks dull, but that’s what make it exciting. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Bloodthirsty bedbugs have feasted on prey for 100 million years

Research sheds light on the evolutionary history of the bloodsucking bedbugs. The first species evolved at least as early as the Cretaceous, scientists say.

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The Hair Puzzle No Product Can Solve

I began to lose hope in my hair’s future while watching Friends in 2003. During a series of episodes in which the whole gang took a trip to Barbados, the expanding frizz of Monica Geller’s hair in the Caribbean humidity garnered its own narrative arc. The character, known for her exacting, control-freak tendencies, was powerless against her follicular shortcomings. What this meant for my then-tee

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Italian p hysicists to stand trial for conditions in underground lab

Nature, Published online: 16 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01552-5 The Gran Sasso National Laboratories have seen no major accidents so far, but prosecutors charge that environmental controls were lax.

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Police Catch Woody Harrelson Look-Alike Using Facial Recognition

True Detective We already knew police were running photos of unconscious suspects and dead bodies through their facial recognition systems. Now, we can add another strange type of input to that list: images of acclaimed actor Woody Harrelson. According to a newly released report , New York Police Department detectives noticed that a suspected shoplifter resembled Harrelson , so when the grainy su

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LG's V50 ThinQ 5G is up for pre-order tomorrow from Sprint

Starting tomorrow, customers in select cities can preorder Sprint's first two 5G devices — the LG V50 ThinQ 5G and HTC 5G Hub. They'll be available in Sprint's first …

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Flexibility of working memory from random connections

Working memory is your ability to hold things 'in mind.' It acts as a workspace in which information can be held, manipulated, and used to guide behavior. It plays a critical role in cognition, decoupling behavior from the immediate sensory world. One remarkable thing about working memory is its flexibility — you can hold anything in mind. In their new manuscript, Bouchacourt and Buschman present

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Small, Rocky Planets Are Most Likely to Survive the Death of a Star

New research from the University of Warwick points out that some planets may survive and have a greater impact on the solar remnant that remains. The post Small, Rocky Planets Are Most Likely to Survive the Death of a Star appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Notre Dame rebuild proposal would bring solar glass, urban farm to cathedral roof

Shortly after a fire destroyed Notre Dame's roof and spire in April, France announced it'd be accepting rebuild proposals from architects around the world. One Paris firm has proposed a "green" design that would rebuild the Gothic cathedral's roof with a mixture of glass, oak and carbon fiber. There's an ongoing debate in France as to whether the cathedral should be rebuilt exactly as it was, or

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Tea Accounts Are Fueling Influencer Feuds

In 2016, James Charles was a high-school student in upstate New York. He was an aspiring makeup artist who’d do his friend’s faces for practice and small amounts of money, and brought a ring light to his senior photo shoot so his pictures looked perfect. Two years later, he had racked up more than 16 million subscribers on YouTube, launched his own makeup line, and become an icon in the online be

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Can You Prevent Pregnancy with the Pullout Method?

An investigation into one of the biggest misconceptions in male fertility — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Global invasion routes of the red swamp crayfish, described based on genetics

Researchers have identified the main introduction routes of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, during its global-scale invasion. This North American species is the most widely spread freshwater crayfish worldwide and is one of the worst invasive species due to its impact on the structure and functioning of freshwater ecosystems.

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Automatic neurological disease diagnosis using deep learning

A team of researchers has developed MNet, an automatic diagnosis system for neurological diseases using magnetoencephalography (MEG), demonstrating the possibility of making automatic neurological disease diagnoses using MEG.

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New way to beat the heat in electronics

Researchers combine a polymer nanofiber layer with boron nitride to make a strong, foldable dielectric separator for high-temperature batteries and other applications.

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Improving carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks

Chemical engineers have designed an easy method to achieve commercially attractive carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks.

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Can You Prevent Pregnancy with the Pullout Method?

An investigation into one of the biggest misconceptions in male fertility — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Trial set for Italian underground lab chiefs accused of endangering water supplies

Gran Sasso lab plans to shut down two of its large experiments in 2020

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Electric car switch on for health benefits

Could the health benefits and reduced costs to healthcare systems be enough to justify subsidizing charging infrastructure to allow society to switch from the internal combustion engine to electric vehicles faster than current trends predict?

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Malnourished fruit flies preserve genital size to ensure reproductive success

In most animals, body size shrinks when food becomes scarce, but some parts are protected from shrinkage. In humans without enough food, the body becomes small, but the size of the head stays the same, hinting at biological mechanisms that act to preserve the all-important brain.

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Study reports breakthrough to measure plant improvements to help farmers boost production

An international team is using advanced tools to develop crops that give farmers more options for sustainably producing more food on less land. To do this, thousands of plant prototypes must be carefully analyzed to figure out which genetic tweaks work best. Today, in a special issue of the journal Remote Sensing of Environment, scientists have shown a new technology can more quickly scan an entir

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Wikipedia 'doing very well financially': co-founder

Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales said Thursday that the free online encyclopedia is in good financial shape, although increasing mobile phone use may cut into future donations.

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Electric car switch on for health benefits

Could the health benefits and reduced costs to healthcare systems be enough to justify subsidizing charging infrastructure to allow society to switch from the internal combustion engine to electric vehicles faster than current trends predict?

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Study reports breakthrough to measure plant improvements to help farmers boost production

Today, scientists have shown a new technology can more quickly scan an entire field of plants to capture improvements in their natural capacity to harvest energy from the sun.

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Malnourished fruit flies preserve genital size to ensure reproductive success

In most animals, body size shrinks when food becomes scarce, but some parts are protected from shrinkage. In humans without enough food, the body becomes small, but the size of the head stays the same, hinting at biological mechanisms that act to preserve the all-important brain.

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First strict test shows why a junk-food diet packs on weight

Nature, Published online: 16 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01523-w A steady repast of pancakes, packaged snacks and processed meats prompted people to consume more calories.

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Improving carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks

Chemical engineers have designed an easy method to achieve commercially attractive carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks.

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Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago

Bedbugs — some of the most unwanted human bed-mates — have been parasitic companions with other species aside from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same time as dinosaurs.

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Patients with both schizophrenia and epilepsy die alarmingly early

More than one in four patients with schizophrenia and epilepsy die before reaching the age of fifty.

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Study paves way for better treatment of lingering concussion symptoms

The results of the studyshow that significant levels of fatigue and poorer brain function can persist for months, or even years, following concussion.

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Research links civic engagement to resilience

Flowers, home-cooked meals and time were among the items donated in the aftermath of the Christchurch terror attacks. A new study has found these simple acts of kindness not only benefited victims, but strengthened the well-being and resilience of those giving them.

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On Islands, Tons of Plastic Trash Is Likely Buried Beneath the Sands

We all know our plastic problem is out of control. So far, humans have produced more than 8.3 billion metric tons of plastic, and that number is only growing. Now, a new study in Scientific Reports claims that the problem goes deeper than we thought — literally. The Plastic Beneath An Australian team of researchers traveled to the Cocos (Keeling) Islands (CKI), a remote archipelago in the Indian O

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Unread Books at Home Still Spark Literacy Habits

Growing up in a home filled with books enhances enhances intellectual capacity in later life, even if you don't read them all.

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How Artificial Intelligence Is Already Disrupting Financial Services

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Doctor DNA ages 6X faster during 1st residency year

A new doctor’s first year of residency, also called the intern year, makes their DNA age six times faster than normal, according to a new study. The study also shows that the effect will be largest among those whose training programs demand the longest hours. The findings about the effect of residency focus on the stretch of DNA called telomeres—which keep the ends of chromosomes intact like the

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Malnourished fruit flies preserve genital size to ensure reproductive success

Researchers report that male 'genital sparing' in fruit flies during times of inadequate nutrition is due to lower levels of a negative growth factor called FOXO in the genitals and that this phenomenon helps preserve reproductive success.

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Teens with obesity find artificial intelligence coach helpful in weight-loss program

Researchers at Nemours Children's Health System have found that an artificial intelligence (AI) behavioral coach, nicknamed Tess (X2ai, Inc), is feasible and useful for behavioral counseling of adolescent patients in a weight management program. The study, published today in the journal Translational Behavioral Medicine, demonstrates adolescents' willingness and positive reaction to engaging in SM

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New study reveals that some over reported stress after 2016 election to support political party

In a new study, researchers found that many Democrats may have over reported mental stress after the 2016 election. By comparing personal online searches made by Democrats, Republicans and Spanish-Speaking Latinos with public surveys, their study claims those not directly targeted by Trump's campaign claimed more stress than experienced.

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Scientists Created an Organism With an Entirely Synthetic Genome

We Can Rebuild It For the first time, scientists have created life with genetic code that was developed from scratch. A University of Cambridge team created living, reproducing E. coli bacteria with DNA coded entirely by humans, according to The New York Times . The new bacteria look a little wonky, but they behave more or less the same as natural E. coli . Learning to rebuild genomes from scratc

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Årsagssammenhæng har også sine mørke sider

PLUS. Både i naturen og på finansmarkedet findes årsagssammenhænge af mere kompleks natur, end vi normalt er vant til. De betegnes mørk kausalitet.

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CO2 Levels Just Hit Another Record—Here’s Why It Matters

Atmospheric carbon dioxide recently reached 415 parts per million for the first time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Mushrooms Are Slowly Taking Effect

If you’re looking to be convicted of crimes, don’t go eating psychedelic mushrooms in Denver. Today the city is expected to officially decriminalize possession of the mind-altering fungus. Based on a ballot measure decided last week, citizens of Denver can more confidently grow and eat mushrooms that contain psilocybin, the perception-altering compound found in some 200 species. Though only 11 pe

7h

The Souvenir Is a Masterly Coming-of-Age Portrait

In Joanna Hogg’s new film, The Souvenir , the 21-year-old protagonist, Julie (played by Honor Swinton Byrne), lives in a bubble. She strains against this fact, telling her film-school professors and the interesting people she meets at parties that she wants to venture beyond her sphere, to capture real life on her camera, to document the economic hardships gripping 1980s Britain. But Hogg, who’s

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Octopuses May Go Blind As Climate Change Sucks Oxygen Out of the Ocean

When the oceans lose oxygen, squids lose their vision.

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Heavily processed foods cause overeating and weight gain, study finds

People eating ultra-processed foods ate more calories and gained more weight than when they ate a minimally processed diet, according to results from a new study. The difference occurred even though meals provided to the volunteers in both the ultra-processed and minimally processed diets had the same number of calories and macronutrients.

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Human antibody reveals hidden vulnerability in influenza virus

The ever-changing 'head' of an influenza virus protein has an unexpected Achilles heel, report scientists. The team discovered the structure of a naturally occurring human antibody that recognizes and disrupts a portion of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein that the virus uses to enter and infect cells. The investigators determined that the antibody, FluA-20, binds tightly to an area on the head of th

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Key step in cell protein production

Scientists have discovered how genes create proteins in research which could aid the development of treatments for human diseases.

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Warming climate threatens microbes in alpine streams

Changes to alpine streams fed by glaciers and snowfields due to a warming climate threaten to dramatically alter the types of bacteria and other microbes in those streams, according to new research. But streams that are fed by underground ice insulated by rock — called 'icy seeps' — offer some hope that the impact of climate change will be less severe in some areas.

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Construction of an Escherichia coli genome with fewer codons sets records

Nature, Published online: 16 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01584-x The biggest synthetic genome so far has been made, with a smaller set of amino-acid-encoding codons than usual — raising the prospect of encoding proteins that contain unnatural amino-acid residues.

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New study reveals that some over reported stress after 2016 election to support political party

In a new study, researchers found that many Democrats may have over reported mental stress after the 2016 election. By comparing personal online searches made by Democrats, Republicans and Spanish-Speaking Latinos with public surveys, their study claims those not directly targeted by Trump's campaign claimed more stress than experienced.

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Peasants in medieval England ate a diet of meat stew and cheese

Medieval peasants mainly ate stews of meat and vegetables, along with dairy products such as cheese, according to a study of old cooking pots

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The U.S. Military Is Buying a $130 Million Laser Weapon

Truck Laser A team of Lockheed Martin and Dynetics engineers just won a $130 million contract to provide a 100-kilowatt laser weapon for the U.S. Army. The High Energy Laser Tactical Vehicle Demonstrator — evocatively abbreviated HEL TVD — laser system is slated to be tested at a missile range in New Mexico in 2022, Defense News reports . “High energy laser weapons have been a system that the Uni

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Scientists: We’ll Grow Babies in Artificial Wombs “In a Decade”

Outsourcing In coming years, scientists plan to grow human embryos in a lab using high-tech artificial wombs. Doctors at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia are in talks with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to begin testing artificial wombs on human embryos within the next two years, according to Metro . If they’re successful, the research could radically change the way we view pr

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Daily briefing: Biggest-ever synthetic genome recodes E. coli without redundant bits

Nature, Published online: 16 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01600-0 Who needs 64 codons anyway? Plus: the first samples from the far side of the Moon and Australia’s climate-change election.

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Chemists ID possible addiction-free pain reliever

An estimated 1.7 million Americans suffer from substance abuse disorders related to opioid use for pain relief, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. This causes an economic burden of more than $78 billion per year in health care and addiction treatment costs, as well as loss of worker productivity and increased criminal activity. In 2017, more than 47,000 people died as a result of d

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Blame fainting on this gene

Researchers have identified a gene associated with an increased risk of fainting. Heat, dehydration, and anxiety can cause people to faint, which has the potential to be fatal if it happens while driving or cycling. Now researchers have come closer to explaining the phenomenon. The researchers analyzed data from the UK Biobank containing information on approximately 400,000 Britons. Out of the 40

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Bio-inspired material targets oceans' uranium stores for sustainable nuclear energy

Scientists have demonstrated a new bio-inspired material for an eco-friendly and cost-effective approach to recovering uranium from seawater. The low-cost polymer adsorbent could help push past bottlenecks in the cost and efficiency of extracting uranium resources from oceans for sustainable energy production.

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Atomic 'wave function': Research sheds new light

Physicists have demonstrated a new way to obtain the essential details of an isolated quantum system through direct observation. The method gives information about the likelihood of finding atoms at specific locations in the system with unprecedented spatial resolution far better than an optical microscope can provide. With this technique, scientists can obtain details on a scale of tens of nanome

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Fecal microbiota transplant found safe and effective in children with C. difficile

Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), or the transfer of stool from a healthy donor to a patient, has been found effective in reversing severe, recurring diarrheal infections from Clostridiodes difficile in adults by restoring a normal microbiome. Now, the largest study to date of FMT in children finds the procedure to be safe and effective in eradicating an infection that is on the rise among childr

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These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership

Transformational leadership is considered one of the most effective ways to motivate and inspire employees. However, new research finds cultural values significantly limit its effectiveness.

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Antibody responses vs. Ebola keep evolving in survivors, months after recovery

Antiviral antibodies produced by survivors of Ebola infection continue to evolve and improve after recovery, according to a study of immune responses in four people who received care at Emory University Hospital in 2014. High levels of neutralizing antibodies- thought to be key to protecting someone against deadly infection — didn't appear in patients' blood until months after they left the hospi

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Nutrition: Substantial benefit from replacing steak with fish

Consumers will gain a health benefit from substituting part of the red and processed meat in their diet with fish, according to new calculations. Men over 50 and women of childbearing age in particular would benefit from such a change in diet.

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ALMA discovers aluminum around young star

Researchers have discovered an aluminum-bearing molecule for the first time around a young star. The discovery provides a crucial chance to study the early formation process of meteorites and planets like Earth.

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Australian islands home to 414 million pieces of plastic pollution

A survey of plastic pollution on Australia's Cocos (Keeling) Islands has revealed the territory's beaches are littered with an estimated 414 million pieces of plastic debris. The study estimated beaches on the Indian Ocean islands are littered with 238 tons of plastic, including 977,000 shoes and 373,000 toothbrushes.

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Brain Scans Reveal Potential Biomarker of Suicidal Thoughts in People with PTSD

Researchers may have found a biomarker for suicidal thoughts in the brains of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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Autism May Be Diagnosed by Age Two

New study suggests that early screening may benefit some children — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Autism May Be Diagnosed by Age Two

New study suggests that early screening may benefit some children — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Video: How do plants communicate with each other?

Spring is in the air! It's time to mow the lawn and breathe in the smell of freshly cut grass.

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NTSB: Autopilot was in use before Tesla hit semitrailer

A Tesla Model S involved in a fatal crash with a semitrailer in Florida March 1 was operating on the company's semi-autonomous Autopilot system, federal investigators have determined.

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Chemists ID possible addiction-free pain reliever

An estimated 1.7 million Americans suffer from substance abuse disorders related to opioid use for pain relief, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. This causes an economic burden of more than $78 billion per year in health care and addiction treatment costs, as well as loss of worker productivity and increased criminal activity. In 2017, more than 47,000 people died as a result of d

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The New 'Black Mirror' Trailer Has 'Mortal Kombat'-Style Fighting

The next season comes to Netflix on June 5. Also, Fox has a new show about a wicked Alexa device.

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University of Virginia chemist IDs possible addiction-free pain reliever

Pain medication addiction is a major problem in the United States. UVA's Ken Hsu is seeking ways to treat pain and control inflammation without dangerous side effects.

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Obesity medicine association announces major updates to its adult obesity algorithm

The Obesity Medicine Association (OMA) announced the immediate availability of the 2019 OMA Adult Obesity Algorithm, with new information for clinicians including the relationship between Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, Dyslipidemia, and Cancer; information on investigational Anti-Obesity Pharmacotherapy; treatments for Lipodystrophy; and Pharmacokinetics and Obesity.

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Particulate matter from aircraft engines affects airways

In a unique, innovative experiment, researchers have investigated the effect of exhaust particles from aircraft turbine engines on human lung cells. The cells reacted most strongly to particles emitted during ground idling. It was also shown that the cytotoxic effect is only to some extent comparable to that of particles from gasoline and diesel engines.

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Ritter Island gives new insights into the dynamics of volcanic landslides

The flanks of many island volcanoes slide very slowly towards the sea. Whether these landslides are forewarnings of a catastrophic collapse or, on the contrary, even reduce its risk, is not yet understood. Geophysicists now show that sporadic, slow landslides on the small volcanic island of Ritter Island in New Guinea preceded a catastrophic collapse.

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Long-term decline in stroke greater in older adults

Although the occurrence of first-ever ischemic stroke (strokes due to a blood clot that blocks a blood vessel in the brain) at middle age has been decreasing over time, researchers have found that the decline is not as steep as seen in older adults.

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Early exposure to banking may influence life-long financial health

Growing up in a community with or without banks has a long-term effect on how you build and manage credit, according to a new study. The research shows individuals who grow up in what are essentially 'financial deserts' are slow to apply for credit and as adults have lower credit scores and more delinquent accounts.

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Algal blooms in Lake Erie's central basin could produce neurotoxins

Harmful algal blooms pose a unique toxic threat in Lake Erie's central basin, new research has found. Not only do blooms routinely occur in this area, which previously was not thought to be an area of concern, they can also produce types of cyanobacterial toxins that aren't typically detected through routine water-safety monitoring, according to a new study.

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Galaxy blazes with new stars born from close encounter

The irregular galaxy NGC 4485 shows all the signs of having been involved in a hit-and-run accident with a bypassing galaxy. Rather than destroying the galaxy, the chance encounter is spawning a new generation of stars, and presumably planets.

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Shedding light on the key determinants of global land use projections

Land use is at the core of various sustainable development goals. An international research group has endeavored to disentangle the key determinants of global land use projections.

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Surprising research result: All immature cells can develop into stem cells

A new study challenges traditional knowledge of stem cell development. The study reveals that the destiny of intestinal cells is not predetermined, but instead determined by the cells' surroundings. The findings may make it easier to manipulate stem cells for stem cell therapy.

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Precursors of a catastrophic collapse

On the morning of the 13th of March 1888, the inhabitants of the Finschhafen trading post on the east coast of New Guinea were awakened by a dull rumbling sound. An eyewitness later reported that the water in the port had receded at the same time. A short time later, several two- to three-metre high waves hit the coast. It was a tsunami on that fateful morning that devastated the surrounding coast

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Archaeological discovery upends a piece of Barbados history

Which came first, the pigs or the pioneers? In Barbados, that has been a historical mystery ever since the first English colonists arrived on the island in 1627 to encounter what they thought was a herd of wild European pigs.

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SpaceX has packed 60 satellites onto one rocket to advance its big internet plan

SpaceX's plan to provide broadband access will take a big step forward Thursday night as the Elon Musk-led firm prepares to launch five dozen small satellites on a single rocket. They will eventually become part of a network of potentially thousands of internet-beaming spacecraft.

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Soviets Tried So, So Hard to Eliminate the Plague

The ancestral home of the plague, most infamous for causing Europe’s Black Death, has likely always been much farther east, in Central Asia. There, it lives in rodents, such as the marmots that make their burrows in the vast, open grasslands. For thousands of years, the fleas that bite those rodents have also been biting people. There are 5,000-year-old Bronze Age skeletons in the region that con

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Bedbugs Scurried the Earth Alongside the Dinosaurs 100 Million Years Ago

Researchers calculate that the pests evolved long before bats, which were thought to be their first hosts

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Unread Books at Home Still Spark Literacy Habits

Growing up in a home filled with books enhances enhances intellectual capacity in later life, even if you don't read them all. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Galaxy blazes with new stars born from close encounter

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has taken a new look at the spectacular irregular galaxy NGC 4485, which has been warped and wound by its larger galactic neighbour. The gravity of the second galaxy has disrupted the ordered collection of stars, gas and dust, giving rise to an erratic region of newborn, hot, blue stars and chaotic clumps and streams of dust and gas.

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Unread Books at Home Still Spark Literacy Habits

Growing up in a home filled with books enhances enhances intellectual capacity in later life, even if you don't read them all. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Climate Change Poses a Threat to Cultural Heritage

When people are forced to uproot in the face of catastrophe, they risk losing a link with their past — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A simplified method to categorize olive oil

Olive oil classification is currently very costly and slow. In order to categorize oil into extra virgin (EVOO), virgin (VOO) and lampante olive oil (LOO), an offical method is used, consisting of a physicochemical analysis and a sensory analysis in the end. This last part is based on the work of a panel of expert tasters who try each olive oil one by one in order to determine its category. This p

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Algal blooms in Lake Erie's central basin could produce neurotoxins

Harmful algal blooms pose a unique toxic threat in Lake Erie's central basin, new research has found.

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Researchers shed new light on atomic 'wave function'

Physicists have demonstrated a new way to obtain the essential details that describe an isolated quantum system, such as a gas of atoms, through direct observation. The new method gives information about the likelihood of finding atoms at specific locations in the system with unprecedented spatial resolution. With this technique, scientists can obtain details on a scale of tens of nanometers—small

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These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership

Transformational leadership is considered one of the most effective ways to motivate and inspire employees. However, new research finds cultural values significantly limit its effectiveness.

8h

Bio-inspired material targets oceans' uranium stores for sustainable nuclear energy

Scientists have demonstrated a new bio-inspired material for an eco-friendly and cost-effective approach to recovering uranium from seawater.

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Goznym Takedown Shows the Anatomy of a Modern Cybercriminal Supply Chain

Charges against 10 men across Eastern Europe associated with the Goznym malware crew reveal global law enforcement's reach—and its limits.

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Our pick of Venice Biennale 2019's most scientific artworks

Venice’s Biennale is colourful, brash, and full of exciting tech and digital media experiments, including Ryoji Ikeda’s astounding dataverse-1

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Alabama’s extreme new law could lead to an end of US abortion rights

A wave of extreme abortion laws in the US has started a fight that could end with federal courts overturning abortion protections in place for nearly 50 years

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A tale of two skeeters

A native mosquito in Missouri has fewer parasites when it shares its waters with an interloper, according to new research from biologists at Tyson Research Center, the environmental field station for Washington University in St. Louis.

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Archaeological discovery upends a piece of Barbados history

Which came first, the pigs or the pioneers? In Barbados, that has been a historical mystery ever since the first English colonists arrived in 1627 to encounter what they thought was a herd of wild European pigs. A Simon Fraser University researcher is shedding new light on the mystery and the altering of New World environments.

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Leveraging information technology to address health disparities

Within the supplement are 12 original research papers and five editorials and commentaries.

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Early weight-loss surgery may improve type 2 diabetes, blood pressure outcomes

Despite similar weight loss, teens who had gastric bypass surgery were significantly more likely to have remission of both type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, compared to adults who had the same procedure. Results are from an NIH-funded study comparing outcomes in the two groups five years after surgery. Previously, no treatment has shown longer-term effectiveness at reversing type 2 diabetes

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Here’s What Could Happen If You Get Measles While Pregnant

The measles can be dangerous for people of all ages, but the highly contagious virus poses a particular threat to pregnant women.

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Climate Change Poses a Threat to Cultural Heritage

When people are forced to uproot in the face of catastrophe, they risk losing a link with their past — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The global invasion routes of the red swamp crayfish

Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) researchers have reconstructed the invasion routes followed by the red swamp crayfish during its human-driven expansion based on the analysis of a mitochondrial gene (COI), which was sequenced from 1,412 crayfishes from 122 populations across the Northern Hemisphere.

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Shedding light on the key determinants of global land use projections

Land use is at the core of various sustainable development goals. An international research group consisting of researchers from several institutions including PBL Netherlands, IIASA, and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, endeavored to disentangle the key determinants of global land use projections in a study published in Nature Communications this week.

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A new iron-based superconductor stabilized by inter-block charger transfer

Iron-based superconductors (IBSCs) have attracted sustained research attention over the past decade, partly because new IBSCs were discovered one after another in the earlier years. At present, however, exploration of IBSCs becomes more and more challenging. A research team from Zhejiang University developed a structural design strategy for exploration from which they succeeded in finding a series

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The global invasion routes of the red swamp crayfish

Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) researchers have reconstructed the invasion routes followed by the red swamp crayfish during its human-driven expansion based on the analysis of a mitochondrial gene (COI), which was sequenced from 1,412 crayfishes from 122 populations across the Northern Hemisphere.

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Dude Who Gene-Hacked Himself With CRISPR Is Under Investigation

Let’s Talk Josiah Zayner rose to internet fame after performing various biohacking stunts on himself — including a livestreamed attempt to edit his own genes using CRISPR . Those antics are coming to haunt Zayner. Now, the California Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA) is investigating a “complaint of unlicensed practice of medicine” filed against him — a strange development that could have impl

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Political disinformation campaigns not as threatening as you think

When foreign powers try to interfere with the politics of another country by spreading strategic disinformation, research suggests there is no real effect on policies or the balance of power in the targeted country.

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24 percent of West Antarctic ice is now unstable: study

By combining 25 years of European Space Agency satellite altimeter measurements and a model of the regional climate, the UK Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM) have tracked changes in snow and ice cover across the continent.

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Instagram Might Be Killing Its Direct Messaging App Soon

You might not be able to slide into anyone’s DMs soon: Instagram is reportedly killing its standalone direct messaging app. Matt Navarra, a social media industry commentator, along with …

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These four values lessen the power of transformational leadership

Transformational leadership is considered one of the most effective ways to motivate and inspire employees. However, new research finds cultural values significantly limit its effectiveness.

8h

Political disinformation campaigns not as threatening as you think

When foreign powers try to interfere with the politics of another country by spreading strategic disinformation, research suggests there is no real effect on policies or the balance of power in the targeted country.

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24% of West Antarctic ice is now unstable

In only 25 years, ocean melting has caused ice thinning to spread across West Antarctica so rapidly that a quarter of its glacier ice is now affected, according to a new study.

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Why Do I Care So Damn Much About Game of Thrones?

Spoiler Alert. Although the neuroscientific, psychological, and cinematic concepts explored in this piece are relevant to all kinds of fiction beyond Game of Thrones, this post will be examining these concepts through the lens of the global obsession surrounding the final season of Game of Thrones, which wraps up in just a few days. So […]

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China's lunar rover finds proof the moon has a mantle

submitted by /u/DumbPeople76 [link] [comments]

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Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) new issue, Volume 4 Issue 1

Beijing, 1 May 2019: the journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published a major new issue, Volume 4 Issue 1. This is a Special Issue on Imaging with Guest Editor Dr David Winchester .

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To win online debates, social networks worth a thousand words

According to Cornell researchers, social interactions are more important than language in predicting who is going to succeed at online debating. However, the most accurate model for predicting successful debaters combines information about social interactions and language, the researchers found.

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Algal blooms in Lake Erie's central basin could produce neurotoxins

Harmful algal blooms pose a unique toxic threat in Lake Erie's central basin, new research has found. Not only do blooms routinely occur in this area, which previously was not thought to be an area of concern, they can also produce types of cyanobacterial toxins that aren't typically detected through routine water-safety monitoring, according to a study published in the Journal of Great Lakes Rese

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Fecal microbiota transplant found safe and effective in children with C. difficile

Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), or the transfer of stool from a healthy donor to a patient, has been found effective in reversing severe, recurring diarrheal infections from Clostridiodes difficile in adults by restoring a normal microbiome. Now, the largest study to date of FMT in children finds the procedure to be safe and effective in eradicating an infection that is on the rise among childr

8h

JQI researchers shed new light on atomic 'wave function'

Physicists have demonstrated a new way to obtain the essential details of an isolated quantum system through direct observation. The method gives information about the likelihood of finding atoms at specific locations in the system with unprecedented spatial resolution far better than an optical microscope can provide. With this technique, scientists can obtain details on a scale of tens of nanome

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Bio-inspired material targets oceans' uranium stores for sustainable nuclear energy

Scientists have demonstrated a new bio-inspired material for an eco-friendly and cost-effective approach to recovering uranium from seawater. The low-cost polymer adsorbent could help push past bottlenecks in the cost and efficiency of extracting uranium resources from oceans for sustainable energy production.

8h

Study uncovers key step in cell protein production

Scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered how genes create proteins in research which could aid the development of treatments for human diseases.

8h

Human antibody reveals hidden vulnerability in influenza virus

The ever-changing 'head' of an influenza virus protein has an unexpected Achilles heel, report NIAID-funded scientists. The team discovered the structure of a naturally occurring human antibody that recognizes and disrupts a portion of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein that the virus uses to enter and infect cells. The investigators determined that the antibody, FluA-20, binds tightly to an area on t

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NIH study finds heavily processed foods cause overeating and weight gain

People eating ultra-processed foods ate more calories and gained more weight than when they ate a minimally processed diet, according to results from a National Institutes of Health study. The difference occurred even though meals provided to the volunteers in both the ultra-processed and minimally processed diets had the same number of calories and macronutrients. The results were published in Ce

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Antibody responses vs. Ebola keep evolving in survivors, months after recovery

Antiviral antibodies produced by survivors of Ebola infection continue to evolve and improve after recovery, according to a study of immune responses in four people who received care at Emory University Hospital in 2014. High levels of neutralizing antibodies- thought to be key to protecting someone against deadly infection — didn't appear in patients' blood until months after they left the hospi

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Novel tool used to mine clinical data and identify causative gene in childhood epilepsy

Researchers systematically compared phenotypes, or clinical data, of patients with severe childhood epilepsies through a novel analysis strategy and looked for common genetic causes in patients who had similar clinical presentations. This is the first time that such an analysis of clinical data has been used to identify novel genetic causes of neurological disorders.

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How plants are working hard for the planet

As the planet warms, plants are working to slow the effect of human-caused climate change — and research published today in Trends in Plant Science has assessed how plants are responding to increasing carbon dioxide (CO2).

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Controlled study links processed food to increased calorie consumption

On May 16, 2019 in the journal Cell Metabolism, researchers report results from the first randomized, controlled trial that directly compared differences in calorie consumption and weight gain between an ultra-processed and an unprocessed diet. The team found that even when the two diets were matched for the amount of presented carbohydrates, fat, sugar, salt, and calories, people consumed more fo

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Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago — and walked the earth with T. rex

Bedbugs – some of the most unwanted human bed-mates — have been parasitic companions with other species aside from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same time as dinosaurs.

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Balancing the beam: Thermomechanical micromachine detects terahertz radiation

Radiation from many parts of the electromagnetic spectrum has been harnessed for extremely beneficial uses, in fields as diverse as medicine, imaging and photography, and astronomy. However, the terahertz (THz) region of the spectrum, situated between microwaves and infrared light, has been relatively underutilized owing to difficulties in generating such radiation artificially and in building dev

8h

The Agony and the Ecstasy of Fleabag

In the opening scene of Fleabag ’s second season, the protagonist (Phoebe Waller-Bridge), elegant in a backless black jumpsuit, is washing her hands with delicate care in a chic, Art Deco restaurant bathroom. Jazzy Muzak plays. So far, so seemly. But then the camera cuts to Fleabag’s face in the mirror which is covered in blood, the shot a Kubrick-esque contrast of gore and geometric wallpaper. U

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KAL’s cartoon

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Bloodthirsty bedbugs have feasted on prey for 100 million years

Research sheds light on the evolutionary history of the bloodsucking bedbugs. The first species evolved at least as early as the Cretaceous, scientists say.

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New Study Finds Bedbugs Have Pestered the World for 115 Million Years

Looks like bedbugs annoyed the dinosaurs, too.

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Organic farmers’ fields are faeces-free

Because what lives in them is coprophagic

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The world is about to get a new way to measure itself

The Système International d’Unités is being overhauled

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3D printing makes it easier to create tissue for medical research

Drugs can be tested this way, and whole organs may one day be grown

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3D printers will make better implants

They create a special surface that fuses with bone

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Jeff Bezos’s ambition to colonise space is straight from the 1970s

Big, spinning habitats would support millions

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How to train rare animals to avoid predators

Those that do not learn, die

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NTSB: Autopilot was in use before Tesla hit semitrailer

A Tesla Model S involved in a fatal crash with a semitrailer in Florida March 1 was operating on the company's semi-autonomous Autopilot system, federal investigators have determined.

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Early exposure to banking influences life-long financial health

Growing up in a community with or without banks or financial institutions has a long-term effect on how you build and manage credit, according to a new Iowa State University study.

9h

Drexel-developed safety climate scale helps fire departments reach safety goals

A new safety scale, that effectively measures the safety climate of a fire department, has been developed by researchers from Drexel's Dornsife School of Public Health, according to a paper published today in the journal Safety Science. The tool helps fire departments gauge their management and supervisor support for safety initiatives that prevent burnout, poor engagement and low job satisfaction

9h

People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes

Researchers from Penn State University and Boston College published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing, which finds that helping consumers think about how recyclables become new products inspires consumers to recycle more.

9h

First gene that increases the risk of fainting identified

Fainting is not solely caused by external factors. Your genes also play a part. Based on data from more than 400,000 individuals they have identified the first gene that predisposes to fainting.

9h

People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes

A new study shows that consumers recycle more when they think about how their waste can be transformed into new products. Change the conversation from 'Where does this go?' to 'What does this create?' to increase recycling rates.

9h

Black Hawk helicopters have a flight plan to go autonomous

Technology Self-flying helicopters could be in the Army's future. A Black Hawk down to fly itself.

9h

New data on underwater volcanoes in Bransfield Strait, Antarctica

Scientists from the University of Granada (UGR) have successfully obtained images of the structure of two of the most important submarine volcanoes in the Bransfield Strait, Antarctica. The study was part of the 2018-19 Spanish Antarctic Expedition, which has just been completed.

9h

As Planet Discoveries Pile Up, a Gap Appears in the Pattern

After the sun formed, the dust and gas left over from its natal cloud slowly swirled into the eight planets we have today. Small, rocky things clung close to the sun. Gigantic gas worlds floated in the system’s distant reaches. And around countless stars in the galaxy, a version of this process repeated itself, forging plentiful planets in a spectrum of sizes — except, apparently, worlds just a t

9h

It's Not Just Salt, Sugar, Fat: Study Finds Ultra-Processed Foods Drive Weight Gain

"Landmark" study finds a highly processed diet spurred people to overeat compared with an unprocessed diet, about 500 extra calories a day. That suggests something about processing itself is at play. (Image credit: Hall et al./Cell Metabolism)

9h

Bedbugs survived the dinosaur extinction event

The much-maligned bedbug has been around for 115 million years – since dinosaurs ruled the Earth.

9h

‘Ultraprocessed’ foods may make you eat more, clinical trial suggests

In a monthlong study, people ate more calories on a processed diet, but the reasons are unclear

9h

Why the south of Westeros is the north of Ireland

The fantasy world of Game of Thrones was inspired by real places and events But the map of Westeros is a good example of the perplexing relation between fantasy and reality Like Britain, it has a Wall in the North, but the map only really clicks into place if you add Ireland A world of "goblin porn" Warning: if you haven't caught up, mild spoiler ahead. "Hell is other people talking about Game of

9h

Befriend your ideological opposite. It’s fun.

Former president of the ACLU Nadine Strossen and Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia were unlikely friends. They debated each other at events all over the world, and because of that developed a deep and rewarding friendship – despite their immense differences. Scalia, a famous conservative, was invited to circles that were not his "home territory", such as the ACLU, to debate his views. Here, St

9h

Some dog breeds may have trouble breathing because of a mutated gene

Norwich terriers don’t have flat snouts, but can suffer the same wheezing as bulldogs. It turns out that a gene mutation tied to swelling could be to blame.

9h

Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago—and walked the earth with T. rex

Bedbugs—some of the most unwanted human bed-mates—have been parasitic companions with other species aside from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same time as dinosaurs.

9h

Study uncovers key step in cell protein production

Scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered how genes create proteins in research which could aid the development of treatments for human diseases.

9h

Cryptocurrencies are finally going mainstream – the battle is on to bring them under global control

The 21st-century revolutionaries who have dominated cryptocurrencies are having to move over. Mainstream financial institutions are adopting these assets and the blockchain technology that enables them, in what is perhaps the most profound development since the birth of cryptocurrencies through the launch of bitcoin a decade ago.

9h

How plants are working hard for the planet

As the planet warms, plants are working to slow the effect of human-caused climate change—and research published today in Trends in Plant Science has assessed how plants are responding to increasing carbon dioxide (CO2).

9h

SpaceX is About to Launch a Solar Sail Inspired by Carl Sagan

Solar Sailing After months of delays , an 11 pound spacecraft propelled by the power of sunlight is finally launching aboard a SpaceX Falcon Heavy this summer from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The shoebox-sized LightSail 2 is the result of ten years of research and engineering by the Planetary Society — and it could pave the way for a radical new method of off-world propulsion that doesn’t re

9h

Common diarrhea pathogen unknown to many people

Salmonella, genetically modified foods and microplastics in food head the awareness scale of health and consumer topics in Germany. Despite this, more than three quarters of Germans regard food as safe. This is the result of the latest Consumer Monitor — a representative population survey carried out by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). Most people are concerned about antimi

9h

Particulate matter from aircraft engines affects airways

In a unique, innovative experiment, researchers under the leadership of the University of Bern have investigated the effect of exhaust particles from aircraft turbine engines on human lung cells. The cells reacted most strongly to particles emitted during ground idling. It was also shown that the cytotoxic effect is only to some extent comparable to that of particles from gasoline and diesel engin

9h

Early exposure to banking influences life-long financial health

Growing up in a community with or without banks has a long-term effect on how you build and manage credit, according to a new Iowa State University study. The research shows individuals who grow up in what are essentially 'financial deserts' are slow to apply for credit and as adults have lower credit scores and more delinquent accounts.

9h

Galaxy blazes with new stars born from close encounter

The irregular galaxy NGC 4485 shows all the signs of having been involved in a hit-and-run accident with a bypassing galaxy. Rather than destroying the galaxy, the chance encounter is spawning a new generation of stars, and presumably planets.

9h

Long-term decline in stroke greater in older adults

Although the occurrence of first-ever ischemic stroke (strokes due to a blood clot that blocks a blood vessel in the brain) at middle age has been decreasing over time, researchers have found that the decline is not as steep as seen in older adults.

9h

Precursors of a catastrophic collapse

The flanks of many island volcanoes slide very slowly towards the sea. Whether these landslides are forewarnings of a catastrophic collapse or, on the contrary, even reduce its risk, is not yet understood. Geophysicists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel have now published a study in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, which shows that sporadic, slow landslide

9h

The University of Cordoba has simplified the method to categorize olive oil

A research group has developed an analytical methodology to go along with sensory tasting and is working towards putting it into effect at businesses.

9h

The global invasion routes of the red swamp crayfish, described based on genetics

A study led by researchers at the Doñana Biological Station of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), in collaboration with institutions in Europe, America and Asia, has identified the main introduction routes of the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, during its global-scale invasion. This North American species is the most widely spread freshwater crayfish worldwide, and is one of th

9h

Bedbugs evolved more than 100 million years ago—and walked the earth with T. rex

Bedbugs—some of the most unwanted human bed-mates—have been parasitic companions with other species aside from humans for more than 100 million years, walking the earth at the same time as dinosaurs.

9h

Study uncovers key step in cell protein production

Scientists at the University of Sheffield have discovered how genes create proteins in research which could aid the development of treatments for human diseases.

9h

This Crafty Spider Doesn't Have Venom…But It Does Have a 'Slingshot'

Does the idea of a spider using its web to catapult itself at high speeds give you the willies? Then be forewarned: the triangle weaver spider (Hyptiotes cavatus) does just that.

9h

Mangler 60 millioner: Banedanmark overvejer at udskyde eltog til Holbæk

Det blev uventet dyrt at beskytte de eksisterende signaler langs jernbanen mod magnetfelter fra nye køreledninger. Det problem har sendt Banedanmark i tænkeboks og nu risikerer pendlerne i Nordvestsjælland at vente længe på nye lokomotiver.

9h

Rapport: Investeringer i olie, kul og gas steg i 2018

Tallene er et globalt katastrofetegn, siger dansk professor.

9h

Samsung Unveils 3nm Gate-All-Around Design Tools

Samsung held its foundry forum event and detailed upcoming process nodes and improvements, including new nanosheet GAAFETs ariving for the 3nm node. The post Samsung Unveils 3nm Gate-All-Around Design Tools appeared first on ExtremeTech .

9h

Why parents should think twice about tracking apps for their kids

The use of self-tracking and personal surveillance technologies has grown considerably over the last decade. There are now apps to monitor people's movement, health, mindfulness, sleep, eating habits and even sexual activity.

9h

A breakthrough device that combines mind and machine | Arnav Kapur

Try talking to yourself without opening your mouth, by simply saying words internally. What if you could search the internet like that — and get an answer back? In the first live public demo of his new technology, TED Fellow Arnav Kapur introduces AlterEgo: a wearable AI device with the potential to let you silently talk to and get information from a computer system, like a voice inside your head

9h

Shedding light on the key determinants of global land use projections

Land use is at the core of various sustainable development goals. An international research group consisting of researchers from several institutions including PBL Netherlands, IIASA, and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, endeavored to disentangle the key determinants of global land use projections in a study published in Nature Communications this week.

9h

Drexel-developed safety climate scale helps fire departments reach safety goals

A new safety scale, that effectively measures the safety climate of a fire department, has been developed by researchers from Drexel's Dornsife School of Public Health, according to a paper published today in the journal Safety Science. The tool helps fire departments gauge their management and supervisor support for safety initiatives that prevent burnout, poor engagement and low job satisfaction

9h

ALMA discovers aluminum around young star

Researchers using ALMA data discovered an aluminum-bearing molecule for the first time around a young star. Aluminum rich inclusions found in meteorites are some of the oldest solid objects formed in the Solar System, but their formation process and stage is still poorly linked to star and planet formation. The discovery of aluminum oxide around a young star provides a crucial chance to study the

9h

Improving carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks

EPFL chemical engineers have designed an easy method to achieve commercially attractive carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks.

9h

DGIST agreed on Energy Research Cooperation with CNR-ITAE in Italy

DGIST agreed on Energy Research Cooperation with CNR-ITAE in Italy. Held a joint symposium on the latest energy research. Agreed to share research performance and conduct joint research in new and renewable energy materials.

9h

Automatic neurological disease diagnosis using deep learning

A team of researchers from Osaka University and The University of Tokyo developed MNet, an automatic diagnosis system for neurological diseases using magnetoencephalography (MEG), demonstrating the possibility of making automatic neurological disease diagnoses using MEG. Their research results were published in Scientific Reports.

9h

Balancing the beam: Thermomechanical micromachine detects terahertz radiation

Researchers have developed a microelectromechanical device that detects terahertz radiation at room temperature. This device is easy to use, much faster than conventional thermal sensors, highly sensitive, and can be incorporated into detector arrays. It detects radiation using the shift in mechanical resonance frequency of a tiny suspended beam caused by the thermal expansion generated by THz rad

9h

Why adults at risk for Huntington's choose not to learn if they inherited deadly gene

As many as 90 percent of individuals who have a parent with Huntington's disease (HD) choose not to take a gene test that reveals if they will also develop the fatal disorder — and a new study details the reasons why. Understanding the "why" matters as new clinical trials testing therapies for people who haven't yet developed symptoms of Huntington disease requires participants to be tested for

9h

Biomarkers to diagnose serious kidney allergic reaction

Researchers say they have identified two protein biomarkers in urine that may one day be used to better diagnose acute interstitial nephritis (AIN), an underdiagnosed but treatable kidney disorder that impairs renal function in the short term and can lead to chronic kidney disease, permanent damage or renal failure if left unchecked.

9h

Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer's disease symptoms in male mice

Researchers have demonstrated that the type of bacteria living in the gut can influence the development of Alzheimer's disease symptoms in mice. The study shows that, by altering the gut microbiome, long-term antibiotic treatment reduces inflammation and slows the growth of amyloid plaques in the brains of male mice, though the same treatment has no effect on female animals.

9h

Revision to common view on how retinal cells in mammals process light

Scientists say that new experiments with mouse eye tissues strongly suggest that a longstanding 'textbook concept' about the way a mammal's retina processes light needs a rewrite.

9h

How to overcome a fear of maths

It's fair to say maths is not everyone's favourite subject. In fact, for many people, the feelings of tension and anxiety that arise when trying to solve a mathematical problem can be all consuming. This is known as maths anxiety – and this feeling of being a failure at maths can affect people's self-worth for years to come.

9h

Studies Show: How Much Alcohol Can You Drink Safely?

That depends on how you do the research — and then on how you read the results. Here’s what studies show.

9h

Tour 4 Businesses Championing Innovation at “Your Clouds Can 2019″

Futurism and IBM have planned something new. Your Clouds Can 2019 is an immersive, mobile, day-long experience in New York City on June 5th. Applications are now open, but space is limited. IBM and Futurism are excited to share the companies that will be joining us on our exclusive journey into the workspace, culture, and mindset of some of the city’s most innovative companies and leadership. Tog

9h

Wandering Earth: Rocket scientist explains how we could move our planet

In the Chinese science fiction film The Wandering Earth, recently released on Netflix, humanity attempts to change the Earth's orbit using enormous thrusters in order to escape the expanding sun – and prevent a collision with Jupiter.

9h

Skandinaviens äldsta mänskliga DNA hittat i tuggummi

Det finns få mänskliga ben som är så gamla som nära 10 000 år bevarade i Skandinavien, och än färre har bevarat tillräckligt med DNA för arkeogenetiska studier. Gamla tuggummin är nu en alternativ källa för att utvinna mänskligt DNA och kan vara ett bra komplement till mänskliga ben i arkeogenetiska studier. – Efter en tids arbete blev vi överväldigade av resultaten, att vi lyckades få ut DNA frå

9h

Bättre prognoser för extremt rymdväder

– Vi bidrar med en viktig pusselbit för att förutsäga hur bland annat elledningar i Sverige påverkas vid extremt rymdväder, säger Lisa Rosenqvist, förste forskare på avdelningen för försvars- och säkerhetssystem i Kista. En solstorm är ett utbrott på solen där strålning och elektriskt laddade partiklar slungas ut. I sällsynta fall sker extrema solstormar som kan leda till mycket allvarliga konsek

9h

Organic animal farms benefit birds nesting in agricultural environments

Environmental subsidies for agriculture awarded by the European Union aim to improve biodiversity in agricultural environments. A recently completed Finnish study indicates that the proximity of organic animal farms increases bird numbers, and this has enabled environmental subsidies to positively impact bird populations.

9h

Evolution in the gut

Evolution and dietary habits interact and determine the composition of bacteria in the digestive tract. Many microorganisms in the intestine seem to have developed in sync with their host animals over millions of years.

9h

Fynsk robotklynge får sit eget kursusakademi

PLUS. De første efteruddannelsesforløb i ledelse og projektledelse går i gang efter sommerferien. Kurserne er målrettet hurtigtvoksende højteknologiske robotvirksomheder.

9h

Miro2 is a Parkin receptor for selective removal of damaged mitochondria

Mitophagy plays a central role in the mitochondrial quality control system, and defective mitophagy is linked to a variety of human diseases. At present, how the damaged mitochondria are selectively recognized and removed to ensure the accuracy of mitophagic clearance remains unclear.

9h

Mapping the global distribution of phytoplankton

Researchers at ETH have charted the distribution of phytoplankton in the world's oceans for the first time and investigated the environmental factors that explain this distribution. They concluded that plankton diversity is only partially congruent with previous theories of biodiversity for the seas between the equator and the poles.

9h

Miro2 is a Parkin receptor for selective removal of damaged mitochondria

Mitophagy plays a central role in the mitochondrial quality control system, and defective mitophagy is linked to a variety of human diseases. At present, how the damaged mitochondria are selectively recognized and removed to ensure the accuracy of mitophagic clearance remains unclear.

9h

Mapping the global distribution of phytoplankton

Researchers at ETH have charted the distribution of phytoplankton in the world's oceans for the first time and investigated the environmental factors that explain this distribution. They concluded that plankton diversity is only partially congruent with previous theories of biodiversity for the seas between the equator and the poles.

9h

People recycle more when they know what recyclable waste becomes

A new study shows that consumers recycle more when they think about how their waste can be transformed into new products. Change the conversation from 'Where does this go?' to 'What does this create?' to increase recycling rates.

9h

Danish research team identifies the first gene that increases the risk of fainting

Fainting is not solely caused by external factors. Your genes also play a part. This has recently been documented by research team from the University of Copenhagen, Statens Serum Institut and Rigshospitalet. Based on data from more than 400,000 individuals they have identified the first gene that predisposes to fainting.

9h

Why adults at risk for Huntington's choose not to learn if they inherited deadly gene

As many as 90 percent of individuals who have a parent with Huntington's disease (HD) choose not to take a gene test that reveals if they will also develop the fatal disorder — and a new study details the reasons why. Understanding the "why" matters as new clinical trials testing therapies for people who haven't yet developed symptoms of Huntington disease requires participants to be tested for t

9h

New way to beat the heat in electronics

Rice University researchers combine a polymer nanofiber layer with boron nitride to make a strong, foldable dielectric separator for high-temperature batteries and other applications.

9h

A new iron-based superconductor stabilized by inter-block charger transfer

A research team from Zhejiang University report the discovery of an iron-based superconductors (IBSC) BaTh2Fe4As4(N0.7O0.3)2, an intergrowth compound between BaFe2As2 and ThFeAsN0.7O0.3, on basis of a block-layer design. The result also indicates an essential role of inter-block charge transfer for stabilizing the intergrowth structure. Dominant electron-type conduction was confirmed, and bulk sup

9h

Mapping global impervious surface area and green space within urban environments

What the spatial pattern of global urban surface area that human depends on is the important issue, which is widely concerned at present. A recent study has developed the datasets of global intro-urban impervious surface and green space fraction, effectively characterizing the spatial pattern of global urban surface area. The findings are reported in the English edition of the Science China Earth

9h

Balancing the beam: Thermomechanical micromachine detects terahertz radiation

Researchers at The University of Tokyo developed a microelectromechanical device that detects terahertz radiation at room temperature. This device is easy to use, much faster than conventional thermal sensors, highly sensitive, and can be incorporated into detector arrays. It detects radiation using the shift in mechanical resonance frequency of a tiny suspended beam caused by the thermal expansio

9h

Research links civic engagement to resilience

Flowers, home-cooked meals and time were among the items donated in the aftermath of the Christchurch terror attacks. A new University of Otago, New Zealand, study has found these simple acts of kindness not only benefited victims, but strengthened the well-being and resilience of those giving them.

9h

Study paves way for better treatment of lingering concussion symptoms

The results of the study, released in Neuroscience journal, show that significant levels of fatigue and poorer brain function can persist for months, or even years, following concussion.

9h

What’s Artificial Life, Anyway?

Do you know the Ship of Theseus problem ? That one was first stated in its canonical form by Plutarch in his Parallel Lives , speaking of the ship that the hero used to return to Athens from Crete after slaying the Minotaur. Here we go: The ship on which Theseus sailed with the youths and returned in safety, the thirty-oared galley, was preserved by the Athenians down to the time of Demetrius Pha

9h

Homeless people aren't just sitting around – they actively strive to improve their lives

When I first met Daniel in front of Shoreditch High Street station in London, I didn't know how exhausting begging was. He was constantly moving, often through cold and rain. He addressed random passers-by all day long, mostly facing ignorance from their side if not verbal and physical aggression. He told me: "Many people think, that if they give, that keeps me on the street – but it really makes

9h

Evolution in the gut

Evolution and dietary habits interact and determine the composition of bacteria in the digestive tract. Many microorganisms in the intestine seem to have developed in sync with their host animals over millions of years.

10h

New research reveals what was on the menu for medieval peasants

Scientists from the University of Bristol have uncovered, for the first time, definitive evidence that determines what types of food medieval peasants ate and how they managed their animals.

10h

Have you got the right personality for Facebook?

How do personality traits affect one's use of the online social networking site, Facebook? That is the question researchers from Greece hope to answer in a paper in the International Journal of Internet Marketing and Advertising. The team surveyed 367 university students and analysed their answers concerning Facebook with the backdrop of different personality traits: extraversion, neuroticism, agr

10h

Dutch probe China's Huawei for possible spying: report

Dutch intelligence services are investigating Huawei for possibly spying for the Chinese government by leaving a "back door" to data of customers of major telecoms firms, a report said Thursday.

10h

How to break our bad online security habits – with a flashing cyber nudge

The number of cyber attacks is estimated to have risen by 67% over the last fivee years, with the majority of these data breaches being traced back to human error.

10h

Evolution in the gut

Evolution and dietary habits interact and determine the composition of bacteria in the digestive tract. Many microorganisms in the intestine seem to have developed in sync with their host animals over millions of years.

10h

Map shows lynching went far beyond the U.S. south

An interactive map of lynching in the US from 1883 to 1941 reveals the surprising extent of mob violence. It also underscores how the economy, topography, and law enforcement infrastructure paved the way for these brutal, violent crimes, according to researchers. Although often thought of as unique to states in the southern US, Americans practiced lynching across the country and, although Souther

10h

Aaaaahh! Researchers probe the acoustics of screams

Work is under way to precisely define the most primal of human vocalisations. Richard A Lovett reports.

10h

New power supply unit lets electrical devices live longer

From the charging unit for smartphones to the power supply of the laptop or washing machine to LED lights or charging stations of electric cars – switching power supplies are omnipresent in electrical devices. They convert the alternating current from the house line into the direct current needed by the device. The problem: power supplies are susceptible to errors, which also reduces the service l

10h

New Balance 5280 Review: The Faster You Go, the Better They Feel

The New Balance 5280 shoe is designed to deliver top performance in a particular type of competitive event: a high-speed, one-mile road race.

10h

Hong Kong Meets Scandinavia in These Multiple-Exposure Photos

Working entirely in-camera, Christoffer Relander juxtaposes neon-lit street scenes with pristine wilderness.

10h

Older and poorer communities are left behind by the decline of cash

A future without cash seems almost inevitable. Recent statistics paint a damning picture: while cash accounted for 62% of all payments by volume in 2006, this dropped to 40% in just a decade and is predicted to fall yet further to 21% by 2026.

10h

Analysis of the Palaeolithic diet shows no social divisions in food consumption

Biochemical analysis of human remains has become a key feature in our understanding of past peoples. Ancient DNA and stable isotope analysis are now considered primary sources of information in the study of the geographic mobility of populations, their genetic affinities, and their diets.

10h

Analyzing brain waveforms using neuroimaging big data to improve diagnosis

A team of researchers from Osaka University and The University of Tokyo developed MNet, an automatic diagnosis system for neurological diseases using magnetoencephalography (MEG), demonstrating the possibility of making automatic neurological disease diagnoses using MEG. Their research results were published in Scientific Reports.

10h

Rare copper oxide exhibits unusual magnetic properties and spin-orbit interactions

The scientists of Ural Federal University conducted a study in which they found that one of the copper oxides with a structure of a rare mineral spinel—CuAl2O4—is a material with unusual magnetic properties and structure due to significant spin-orbit interactions.

10h

Could Artificial Photosynthesis Help Tackle the Climate Crisis?

Plants are the planet’s lungs, but they’re struggling to keep up due to rising CO2 emissions and deforestation . Engineers are giving them a helping hand, though, by augmenting their capacity with new technology and creating artificial substitutes to help them clean up our atmosphere. Imperial College London, one of the UK’s top engineering schools, recently announced that it was teaming up with

10h

Patients with both schizophrenia and epilepsy die alarmingly early

More than one in four patients with schizophrenia and epilepsy die before reaching the age of fifty. This is shown by research from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital. The results, which have been published in the journal Epilepsia, aim to contribute to ensuring patients will receive the correct treatment in time.

10h

Evolution in the gut

Evolution and dietary habits interact and determine the composition of bacteria in the digestive tract. Many microorganisms in the intestine seem to have developed in sync with their host animals over millions of years.

10h

Concerns as MPs' links to organization backed by tobacco industry revealed

No fewer than 25 serving Conservative MPs, including several leadership candidates, are connected to an organization part-funded by the tobacco industry and responsible for a series of attacks on public health initiatives, reveals an investigation by The BMJ.

10h

Ancient chewing gum provides DNA clues to early Scandinavians

Masticated birch bark points to two waves of hunter-gatherer migrations. Andrew Masterson reports.

10h

A very early bird

Archaeopteryx was not alone in the skies.

10h

What is quantum entanglement?

It’s a common and much misunderstood term, but there are ways to make its meaning clear. Amar Vutha from Canada’s University of Toronto explains.

10h

In government we trust? It’s complicated

People’s willingness to be vulnerable in the face of power provides a useful definition of attitudes to those in power. Anna Kosmynina reports.

10h

Captain Keith Plays Medic on the Wizard | Deadliest Catch

When one of his deckhands encounters a knife injury, Keith puts on his medic hat to help stitch him up. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Deadlie

10h

Researchers replace the genes of E. coli bacteria with synthesized genome

A team of researchers at Cambridge University has replaced the genes of E. coli bacteria with genomes they synthesized in the lab. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes replacing the genome and removing redundant genetic codes.

10h

The American Birth Rate Just Fell to a 32-Year Low

Childfree Nation On Wednesday, the National Center for Health Statistics, an agency of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released its provisional birth rate data for 2018. And based on its research, Americans gave birth to 3,788,235 babies in 2018, the fewest in 32 years. That downward trend isn’t a fluke, either. In fact, for 10 of the past 11 years , the number of births in the U.

10h

Why America Needs Its HBCUs

A question that leads most conversations about historically black colleges goes something like this: The purpose of black colleges was clear before Brown v. Board of Education , but now that black students can attend any college, why are these schools still necessary? A few statistics give a rather clear answer. Despite the fact that black colleges (often referred to as HBCUs, or historically bla

10h

In an Echo of the Iraq War, the U.S. and Europe Are Split on Iran

When France and Germany opposed the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, the George W. Bush administration dismissed them as representing “ old Europe ,” even as it prosecuted the war with Britain by its side. More than a decade later, Washington and all its major partners across the Atlantic find themselves on opposing sides again—this time, over how to deal with Iran. These differences came to a

10h

Could geoengineering really help us solve the climate crisis?

With increasing public concern over climate change, interest is turning to geoengineering again. Is it time to take a serious look at engineering our climate?

10h

Researchers replace the genes of E. coli bacteria with synthesized genome

A team of researchers at Cambridge University has replaced the genes of E. coli bacteria with genomes they synthesized in the lab. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes replacing the genome and removing redundant genetic codes.

10h

Officials in US, Europe charge 10 in malware attacks

Ten people have been charged in connection with malicious software attacks that infected tens of thousands of computers and caused more than $100 million in financial losses, U.S. and European …

10h

Study points to 'policy blueprint' for AI and machine-learning

At a time of rapidly changing industry, with potentially huge consequences for society, governments face a dilemma of how to incentivise entrepreneurship and innovation while at the same time ensuring that innovation benefits society as a whole.

10h

How To Help A Kid Survive Early Puberty

Around 15% of girls begin menstruation by age 7. The challenges of puberty can rock anybody, but being the first of your friends to go through it can be especially stressful. Good parenting helps. (Image credit: Paige Vickers for NPR)

10h

Why it's worth carrying more than one gadget

DIY Your phone can do everything… but should it? From gaming on the go to reading e-books without eye strain, your phone isn't always the only gadget you should pack.

10h

National Stuttering Awareness Week: May 13-19

In 1988, an act of Congress established National Stuttering Awareness Week . This year, the observance runs from May 13-19, and is geared towards getting the 70 million people worldwide who stutter to “speak out, fluently or not” and to help spread more information about the communication disorder. In the US, about three million people are affected; many have struggled with the disorder since chi

10h

5G: Five things to know

It is heralded as an essential step to a brave new world of technology, but in the here and now, super-fast 5G networking is already pitting China against the West.

10h

Discovering unusual structures from exception using big data and machine learning techniques

Machine learning (ML) has become a widely used technique in materials science study. Recently, a research team led by Prof. Feng Pan from Peking University, Shenzhen Graduate School, has trained an ML model for the relationship between atomic structures and band gaps of crystals. After analyzing structures whose band gap deviates much from the prediction made by the model, some structures with unu

10h

Miro2 is a Parkin receptor for selective removal of damaged mitochondria

Defects in mitophagy are linked to a variety of human diseases including Parkinson's and cardiac disorders. At present, how the damaged mitochondria are selectively recognized and targeted by Parkin is not fully understood. Miro2, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, has been identified as a platform for Parkin translocation to damaged mitochondria. Miro2 senses both the depolarization and the

10h

Brain activity of Spanish Popular Party voters triggered by rivals

Scientists from the University of Granada (UGR), the Distance Learning University of Madrid (UDIMA) and Temple University (United States) have analyzed the brain response of supporters of Spain's Popular Party (PP) and the Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) when exposed to information about corruption or positive news from the rival party

10h

Organic animal farms benefit birds nesting in agricultural environments

Environmental subsidies for agriculture awarded by the European Union aim to improve biodiversity in agricultural environments. A recently completed Finnish study indicates that the proximity of organic animal farms increases bird numbers, and this has enabled environmental subsidies to positively impact bird populations.

10h

How a new father views his relationship with his partner

A new father's views on his changing relationship with his wife or partner may depend in part on how much support he feels from her when he is caring for their baby, a new study suggests. Researchers found that a first-time father tended to feel closer to the mother both as a co-parent and as a romantic partner when he believed he had her confidence when he was involved in child care.

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Excitonic radiative decay faster than thermal dephasing in ZnO thin films

Researchers have found excitonic radiative decay faster than thermal dephasing at room temperature in zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films. The findings will greatly reduce the thermal energy loss in optical operations.

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Synthesis of helical ladder polymers

Researchers at Kanazawa University synthesized helical ladder polymers with a well-defined cyclic repeating unit and one-handed helical geometry, as they reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

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Entangled-photon gyroscope overcomes classical limit

Fiber optic gyroscopes, which measure the rotation and orientation of airplanes and other moving objects, are inherently limited in their precision when using ordinary classical light. In a new study, physicists have experimentally demonstrated for the first time that using entangled photons overcomes this classical limit, called the shot-noise limit, and achieves a level of precision that would n

10h

Officials in US, Europe charge 10 in malware attacks

Ten people have been charged in connection with malicious software attacks that infected tens of thousands of computers and caused more than $100 million in financial losses, U.S. and European authorities announced Thursday.

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Hubble astronomers assemble wide view of the evolving universe

Astronomers have put together the largest and most comprehensive "history book" of galaxies into one single image, using 16 years' worth of observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

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NASA Found The Impact From Israel’s Crashed Moon Lander

Found Footage Last month, Israel’s SpaceIL very nearly became the first private company to land a spacecraft on the Moon. Unfortunately, Beresheet — that’s the lunar lander — suffered a last-minute engine failure and crashed. Now, CNET reports that NASA managed to snap a photo of the crash site using the camera on its Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and has begun to study the impact, which cou

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New study analyzes tweets to reveal how ISIS still inspires low-level attacks

By analyzing 26.2 million Twitter comments in the Arabic language, researchers found that despite losing territory, ISIS remains successful at inspiring low-level attacks because of its messaging for a "call for lone jihad." The study, "ISIS at its apogee: The Arabic discourse about support for ISIS on Twitter and what we can learn from that," was recently published in SAGE Open.

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Organic animal farms benefit birds nesting in agricultural environments

The abundance of bird species living in agricultural environments has decreased both in Finland and elsewhere in Europe. Attempts to rectify the situation have been made with the help of agri-environment-climate subsidies. They are granted to agricultural producers by the EU for implementing measures that are presumed to be beneficial to the environment. There is a range of such subsidies, but the

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Israeli spacecraft Beresheet crash site spotted on moon

SpaceIL, an Israeli nonprofit organization, is dedicated to landing the first Israeli spacecraft on the Moon. Beresheet was their first attempt at meeting this goal. While the spacecraft did land, it first touched the surface about 1000 meters per second faster than intended. The mishap occurred late in the descent profile when the main engine failed—resulting in a very low-angle (

10h

Organic animal farms benefit birds nesting in agricultural environments

The abundance of bird species living in agricultural environments has decreased both in Finland and elsewhere in Europe. Attempts to rectify the situation have been made with the help of agri-environment-climate subsidies. They are granted to agricultural producers by the EU for implementing measures that are presumed to be beneficial to the environment. There is a range of such subsidies, but the

10h

Artificial life form given 'synthetic DNA'

UK scientists have created an artificial version of the stomach bug E. coli that is based on an entirely synthetic form of DNA.

10h

Tesla is updating its battery software after a car caught fire

Tesla is upgrading the software on the Model S and Model X in light of two reported fires in Hong Kong and Shanghai.

10h

Flexible insulator offers high strength and superior thermal conduction

A nanocomposite invented at Rice University's Brown School of Engineering promises to be a superior high-temperature dielectric material for flexible electronics, energy storage and electric devices.

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Visualizing microglia in brain tissue with a fluorescence turn-on substrate

Part of the immune system in the brain is made up of so-called microglia cells. Korean and Singaporean researchers have now developed a fluorescent probe that specifically labels this type of macrophage. The cells were visualized in cell culture and in the live brains of rodents. As detailed in the journal Angewandte Chemie, a gene product expressed in microglia triggers the probe into a fluoresci

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3-D printer makes peacekeeping missions cheaper and repair of defense systems faster

Peacekeeping missions often take place at remote locations, requiring the army to have a large supply of spare parts on site to keep everything running. Dutch researcher Bram Westerweel comes to the conclusion that taking a 3-D printer on a mission to print parts can save hundreds of thousands of euros and, at the same time, reduce the downtime of defense equipment. The savings on operational cost

10h

Elliptical galaxies shed new light on dark matter

In the 1930s, it was first noticed that the dynamics of astrophysical objects (galaxies, galaxy clusters and the universe itself) required an invisible and unknown form of mass, known now as dark matter. Strong mass discrepancies in spiral galaxies measured in the 1970s gave new weight to the concept of dark matter and motivated physicists to propose a number of dark matter particle candidates.

10h

Improving engine performance and fuel efficiency

A study conducted in part at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan suggests reformulating lubricating oils for internal combustion engines could significantly improve not only the life of the oil but the life of the engine too.

10h

Surprising research result: All immature cells can develop into stem cells

New sensational study conducted at the University of Copenhagen disproves traditional knowledge of stem cell development. The study reveals that the destiny of intestinal cells is not predetermined, but instead determined by the cells' surroundings. The new knowledge may make it easier to manipulate stem cells for stem cell therapy. The results have just been published in Nature.

11h

A substantial benefit from replacing steak with fish

The average Dane will gain a health benefit from substituting part of the red and processed meat in their diet with fish, according to calculations from the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark. Men over 50 and women of childbearing age in particular would benefit from such a change in diet.

11h

Research suggests revision to common view on how retinal cells in mammals process light

Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say that new experiments with mouse eye tissues strongly suggest that a longstanding 'textbook concept' about the way a mammal's retina processes light needs a rewrite.

11h

Australian islands home to 414 million pieces of plastic pollution

A survey of plastic pollution on Australia's Cocos (Keeling) Islands has revealed the territory's beaches are littered with an estimated 414 million pieces of plastic debris.The study led by IMAS researcher Dr. Jennifer Lavers and published in the journal Scientific Reports estimated beaches on the Indian Ocean islands are littered with 238 tonnes of plastic, including 977,000 shoes and 373,000 to

11h

Hopkins-led team finds biomarkers to diagnose serious kidney allergic reaction

A team led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers says it has identified two protein biomarkers in urine that may one day be used to better diagnose acute interstitial nephritis (AIN), an underdiagnosed but treatable kidney disorder that impairs renal function in the short term and can lead to chronic kidney disease, permanent damage or renal failure if left unchecked.

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Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer's disease symptoms in male mice, study reveals

Researchers at The University of Chicago have demonstrated that the type of bacteria living in the gut can influence the development of Alzheimer's disease symptoms in mice. The study, which will be published May 16, 2019 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that, by altering the gut microbiome, long-term antibiotic treatment reduces inflammation and slows the growth of amyloid plaques i

11h

New study analyzes tweets to reveal how ISIS still inspires low-level attacks

By analyzing 26.2 million Twitter comments in the Arabic language, researchers found that despite losing territory, ISIS remains successful at inspiring low-level attacks because of its messaging for a 'call for lone jihad.' The study, 'ISIS at its apogee: The Arabic discourse about support for ISIS on Twitter and what we can learn from that,' was recently published in SAGE Open.

11h

CRISPR catches out critical cancer changes: New drug target for multiple cancers

In the first large-scale analysis of cancer gene fusions, researchers used CRISPR to uncover which gene fusions are critical for the growth of cancer cells. The team also identified a new gene fusion that presents a novel drug target for multiple cancers, including brain and ovarian cancers. The results give more certainty for the use of specific gene fusions to diagnose and guide the treatment of

11h

Axions may or may not exist – but we're not just making things up

Everything theoretical physicists do is speculative, and likely wrong, except for the things we get right, says Chanda Prescod-Weinstein

11h

How Our Toothbrushes Are Littering Paradise

A new survey of remote islands off the coast of Australia found mountains of plastic weighing as much as a blue whale.

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Newly discovered fossil footprints force paleontologists to rethink ancient desert inhabitants

An international team of paleontologists has united to study important fossil footprints recently discovered in a remote location within Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. A large sandstone boulder contains several exceptionally well-preserved trackways of primitive tetrapods (four-footed animals) which inhabited an ancient desert environment. The 280-million-year-old fossil tracks date to almos

11h

West Africa warms but airborne dust keeps the Red Sea cool

The Red Sea is located between North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, the world's largest dust source regions. Summer winds pump dust from the Sahara and Arabian deserts down a narrowing mountain-fringed passage, causing it to accumulate over the southern Red Sea. Dust suspended as aerosol particles in the atmosphere can influence climate by altering the balance between sunlight absorbed at the E

11h

Judge: Use of GPS data in robbery case unconstitutional

A federal judge has ruled that suburban Chicago police violated constitutional protections against unreasonable searches by accessing weeks of GPS data indicating a suspect's car had been outside a jewelry store when it was robbed.

11h

Red Cross website hacked in latest Singapore cyber attack

The Singapore Red Cross said Thursday its website had been hacked and the personal data of more than 4,000 potential blood donors compromised in the latest cyber attack on the city-state.

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Cancer drugs promote stem cell properties of colorectal cancer

Scientists have now discovered that a certain group of cancer drugs (MEK Inhibitors) activates the cancer-promoting Wnt signalling pathway in colorectal cancer cells. This can lead to the accumulation of tumor cells with stem cell characteristics that are resistant to many therapies and can lead to relapses. The researchers thus provide a possible explanation for why these drugs are not effective

11h

Creating high-capacity long-life batteries

Engineers continually pioneer new ways to improve battery technology. Scientists recently developed a material which could significantly extend the life of batteries and afford them higher capacities as well.

11h

Regular crosswords and number puzzles linked to sharper brain in later life

Older adults who regularly take part in word and number puzzles have sharper brains, according to the largest online study to date.

11h

A tale of two skeeters—biologists discover something positive about an invasive mosquito species

It's rare that scientists see the good in the presence of an invasive species. But Washington University in St. Louis researchers discovered that a native mosquito in Missouri has fewer parasites when it shares its waters with an interloper.

11h

Plastic pollution: Flip-flop tide engulfs 'paradise' island

Up to a million shoes are among the tide of plastic debris washed up on an Australian island say scientists.

11h

Yes, the United States Certainly DID Land Humans on the Moon

Moon-landing deniers, says space scholar and former NASA chief historian Roger Launius, are full of stuff and nonsense

11h

Warming climate threatens microbes in alpine streams, new research shows

Changes to alpine streams fed by glaciers and snowfields due to a warming climate threaten to dramatically alter the types of bacteria and other microbes in those streams, according to a research team that included a University of Wyoming scientist.

11h

A tale of two skeeters—biologists discover something positive about an invasive mosquito species

It's rare that scientists see the good in the presence of an invasive species. But Washington University in St. Louis researchers discovered that a native mosquito in Missouri has fewer parasites when it shares its waters with an interloper.

11h

Companies benefit from giving congressional testimony, study finds

Firms looking to boost their market value and make a favorable impression on investors might consider opportunities to testify before Congress, according to a new study by management researchers at the University of Arkansas.

11h

Research links civic engagement to resilience

Flowers, home-cooked meals, and time were among the items donated in the aftermath of the Christchurch terror attacks. A new University of Otago study has found these simple acts of kindness not only benefited victims, but strengthened the well-being and resilience of those giving them.

11h

Remote Island Chain Has Few People — But Hundreds Of Millions Of Pieces Of Plastic

The Cocos Keeling Islands make up barely 6 square miles in the Indian Ocean. It's a good place to measure plastic waste as almost no one lives there. Scientists were flabbergasted by what they found. (Image credit: Courtesy of Silke Stuckenbrock)

11h

TSU physicists are investigating the effects of radiation on DNA

Scientists from TSU's Laboratory of Experimental High Energy Physics and their colleagues from the University of Bordeaux are studying new ways of modeling the effects of low doses of radiation at the cellular level. For the first time, physicists will simulate the effects of radiation on DNA and calculate the probability of developing cancer in various chemical and biological environments.

11h

Researchers find little evidence for 'broken windows theory,' say neighborhood disorder doesn't cause crime

More than 35 years ago, researchers theorized that graffiti, abandoned buildings, panhandling, and other signs of disorder in neighborhoods create an environment that leads people to commit more crime.

11h

Remote island beach plastics point to greater waste problem

The world may be seriously underestimating the amount of plastic waste along its coastlines, researchers said Thursday as they unveiled findings showing hundreds of millions of plastic fragments on a remote Indian Ocean archipelago.

11h

New nitrogen fertilizer texture may reduce nitrate levels, make water safer

Nitrate levels in water resources have increased in many areas of the world, largely because of applications of some types of fertilizers in agricultural areas. Since the mid-1920s, the deposits of nitrogen into land has more than doubled, leading to higher levels of nitrate in water resources.

11h

CAM and cancer: Who uses CAM, and why?

Many patients with cancer use complementary and alternative medicine.

11h

Holland vil fjerne kræftfremkaldende asbesttage: Danmark tøver stadig

De gamle tage nedbrydes med stigende hast og frigiver farlige fibre til luften og omgivelserne. Myndighederne tøver.

11h

Her er evalueringen af Medicinrådet

Den med spænding ventede evaluering af Medicinrådet konkluderer, at rådet fungerer. »Vi glæder os,« siger Stephanie Lose (V), mens Lif er kritisk.

11h

Millions of pieces of plastic waste found on remote islands

Beaches on Cocos Islands in the Indian Ocean covered with litter

11h

Companies benefit from giving congressional testimony, study finds

Researchers studied the effect of congressional testimony given by representatives of large companies and found that investors responded favorably to several aspects of testimony. Firms represented by witnesses experienced positive returns following testimony.

11h

Warming climate threatens microbes in alpine streams, new research shows

Changes to alpine streams fed by glaciers and snowfields due to a warming climate threaten to dramatically alter the types of bacteria and other microbes in those streams, according to new research. But streams that are fed by underground ice insulated by rock — called 'icy seeps' — offer some hope that the impact of climate change will be less severe in some areas.

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More than 7K robots to take on construction work by 2025

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Student uses AI to diagnose plant diseases

For some, a rose is a symbol of beauty or love. For Shaza Mehdi, it is a connection to her mother, but also a gateway to innovation.

11h

Drilling the seabed below Earth's most powerful ocean current

The Antarctic Circumpolar Current is the planet's most powerful and arguably most important. It is the only one to flow clear around the globe without getting diverted by any landmass, sending up to 150 times the flow of all the world's rivers clockwise around the frozen continent. It connects all the other oceans, and is thought to play a key role in regulating natural climate swings that have re

11h

Frog fungus fights back

Amphibian populations have been declining around the world for more than 40 years. One culprit is the fungus B. dendrobatidis, which causes the disease chytridiomycosis.

11h

Frog fungus fights back

Amphibian populations have been declining around the world for more than 40 years. One culprit is the fungus B. dendrobatidis, which causes the disease chytridiomycosis.

11h

Better policies needed for dealing with workplace cyber abuse

While workplace cyber abuse is a growing challenge for many organisations, most still struggle to deal with it effectively, say researchers from Massey University's Healthy Work Group.

11h

Breakthrough technique for studying gene expression takes root in plants

An open-source RNA analysis platform has been successfully used on plant cells for the first time — a breakthrough that could herald a new era of fundamental research and bolster efforts to engineer more efficient food and biofuel crops. The technology, called Drop-seq is a method for measuring the RNA present in individual cells, allowing scientists to see what genes are being expressed and how

11h

How our current thinking can sway our memories of love

As our memories fade, we rely on our current assessment of a person to remember how we felt about them in the past, and new research suggests this extends to some of the most central figures in our lives: our parents.

11h

CRISPR catches out critical cancer changes: New drug target for multiple cancers

In the first large-scale analysis of cancer gene fusions, researchers used CRISPR to uncover which gene fusions are critical for the growth of cancer cells. The team also identified a new gene fusion that presents a novel drug target for multiple cancers, including brain and ovarian cancers. The results give more certainty for the use of specific gene fusions to diagnose and guide the treatment of

11h

Why is even a small cough a big problem in a racehorse?

Coughing is really common in horses, but it's not normal. That's true for all horses, but racehorses demand a different level of respiratory excellence than other horses. If you look at the way racehorses use oxygen and the demands they put on their body, they are living on a cliff edge—it's phenomenal that they can even survive a race.

11h

Protecting children's data privacy in the smart city

The devices that we use have unique identifiers. With cross-browser fingerprinting, the data we generate as users isn't as anonymized as we believe it is. The tracking of our online activity is extensive, comprehensive and persistent, and generates marketable data shadows that do not need our personal information in order to target us as consumers.

11h

Why is even a small cough a big problem in a racehorse?

Coughing is really common in horses, but it's not normal. That's true for all horses, but racehorses demand a different level of respiratory excellence than other horses. If you look at the way racehorses use oxygen and the demands they put on their body, they are living on a cliff edge—it's phenomenal that they can even survive a race.

11h

Texas A&M student identifies unique 5-million-year-old rhino species

Rhinoceros don't roam the prairies of Texas today, and some might not even know they once roamed the Great Plains. But one Texas A&M University student knows about rhinos: she's identified unique specimens from fossilized remains found in the mountains of Tennessee dating back almost 5 million years.

11h

Worrying gap between young and old revealed

A new poll has shown one in two people aged 75 or over think the younger generation 'don't have it bad, they just complain more,' while 52 per cent of the UK population believe Brexit has widened the gap between the old and the young.

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Mystery of deadly Indonesian tsunami cracked using social-media videos

Nature, Published online: 16 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01544-5 The findings expose the deficiencies of tsunami warning systems, as well as highlighting the power of citizen science.

11h

NASA Spots Remains of Beresheet Spacecraft on the Moon

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) passed over the intended landing site on April 22, and the agency just released images of Beresheet's final resting place. The post NASA Spots Remains of Beresheet Spacecraft on the Moon appeared first on ExtremeTech .

11h

Titi monkeys use probabilistic predator calls to alert others in their group

A team of researchers with the University of Neuchâtel in Switzerland and the University of St Andrews in the U.K., has found evidence of titi monkeys using probabilistic predator calls to alert others in their group to the presence of different kinds of danger. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of several groups of titi monkeys in the wild a

11h

Five Reasons Pundits Underestimated Joe Biden

Joe Biden is much more popular among voters than the left’s intelligentsia anticipated, with staggering leads in every poll of Democratic presidential candidates. Why did so many journalists and Twitter pundits fail to foresee his success? One reason, Jonathan Chait argues , is that the social democrats who support Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and the conservatives who find them u

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Titi monkeys use probabilistic predator calls to alert others in their group

A team of researchers with the University of Neuchâtel in Switzerland and the University of St Andrews in the U.K., has found evidence of titi monkeys using probabilistic predator calls to alert others in their group to the presence of different kinds of danger. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of several groups of titi monkeys in the wild a

11h

Lasers aim to replace scalpels in cutting-edge biopsy technique

To a patient, the analysis of a tissue biopsy sample to check for something like cancer may seem like a relatively simple process, even if it does mean giving up a small piece of flesh to be tested. The sample heads off to a lab, the patient heads home, and in several days the doctor calls with the results.

11h

Improving carbon-capturing with metal-organic frameworks

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are versatile compounds hosting nano-sized pores in their crystal structure. Because of their nanopores, MOFs are now used in a wide range of applications, including separating petrochemicals, mimicking DNA, and removing heavy metals, fluoride anions, hydrogen, and even gold from water.

11h

Notorious astrology doctors' 400-year-old case notes transcribed and released online

Simon Forman and his protégé Richard Napier were infamous in early 17th-century England for their apparent ability to diagnose and even cure all kinds of ailments – from bewitchment to the "bloody flux" – by consulting the planets and stars.

11h

Yngre læge: Jeg duer ikke til at løbe rundt i et hamsterhjul og slukke ildebrande

Hvis politikerne gør noget nu, kan vi måske vende udviklingen, inden de mange nyuddannede læger rammer muren og vælger det offentlige sundhedsvæsen fra.

11h

Give bees a chance: We can't afford to lose our wild native pollinators

A quintessential sign of spring is a busy bee happily buzzing from blossom to blossom. While spring is now in full swing across Canada, the presence of those dependable pollinators is becoming more and more uncertain.

11h

New research finds cane toads use poison as a last resort

Cane toads are exhausted by releasing their deadly toxin and will go to great lengths not to release it. They far prefer to run or freeze when a predator approaches.

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Pharma industry improves access to medicines

Number of drugs in pipeline to treat priority diseases double in 4 years

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Give bees a chance: We can't afford to lose our wild native pollinators

A quintessential sign of spring is a busy bee happily buzzing from blossom to blossom. While spring is now in full swing across Canada, the presence of those dependable pollinators is becoming more and more uncertain.

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U.S. methane emissions flat since 2006 despite increased oil and gas activity

Natural gas production in the United States has increased 46 percent since 2006, but there has been no significant increase of total US methane emissions and only a modest increase from oil and gas activity, according to a new NOAA study.

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New research finds cane toads use poison as a last resort

Cane toads are exhausted by releasing their deadly toxin and will go to great lengths not to release it. They far prefer to run or freeze when a predator approaches.

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More mysterious jars of the dead unearthed in Laos

ANU Archaeologists have discovered 15 new sites in Laos containing more than one hundred 1000-year-old massive stone jars possibly used for the dead.

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Climate change is putting even resilient and adaptable animals like baboons at risk

Baboons are large, smart, ground-dwelling monkeys. They are found across sub-Saharan Africa in various habitats and eat a flexible diet including meat, eggs, and plants. And they are known opportunists – in addition to raiding crops and garbage, some even mug tourists for their possessions, especially food.

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Climate change is putting even resilient and adaptable animals like baboons at risk

Baboons are large, smart, ground-dwelling monkeys. They are found across sub-Saharan Africa in various habitats and eat a flexible diet including meat, eggs, and plants. And they are known opportunists – in addition to raiding crops and garbage, some even mug tourists for their possessions, especially food.

11h

Dog pee on the sidewalk does more than just piss off your neighbors

Environment Puppy potty breaks could mess with the city's microbiome. Turns out, canine bathroom breaks may have more of an impact on the environment than you might think.

12h

Desus and Mero Give a Crash Course in Wokeness

John Cuneo Desus and Mero are sitting and talking and making each other laugh. This is what they do, for hours on end, for growing audiences and rapidly increasing sums of money. The rooms change, the chairs change, but the basic idea remains. They sit. They talk. They laugh. They also drink: Desus takes slugs from a beer that’s been relabeled D+M, while Mero keeps a bottle of rum between his fee

12h

Atmospheric Methane Levels Are Going Up—And No One Knows Why

Levels of heat-trapping methane are rising faster than climate experts anticipated, triggering intense debate about why it's happening.

12h

Dyson V11 Review (Torque Drive, Animal): Dream Vac

Dyson's V11 Torque Drive and Animal cordless vacuums will plow through your home's dust bunnies like Furiosa through a pack of hapless War Boys.

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