Search Posts

nyheder2019maj17

'Ant bridge'-inspired nanoparticle assembly fixes broken electrical circuits

Colonies of social insects are capable of self-organizing and accomplishing complex tasks through individual interactions. For example, to march across large gaps, ants grip the bodies of each other, forming a living bridge that allows the colonies to reach the other side. Inspired by this swarm behavior of ants, scientists from the Chinese University of Hong Kong developed a nanoparticle self-ass

4h

Scientists propose rethinking 'endangered species' definition to save slow-breeding giants

Conservation decisions based on population counts may fail to protect large, slow-breeding animals from irrevocable decline, according to new research coinciding with World Endangered Species Day.

11h

Flere unge danskere bliver ramt af tarmkræft

Antallet af danskere under 50 år, der får tyktarmskræft, stiger med mere end tre procent om året.

5h

Muscle stiffness can be an athletic superpower

Science Elite basketball players benefit from having less stretch. Athletes who appropriately use greater stiffness characteristics can take advantage of the elastic energy it creates.

15min

Study finds narrowing gender gap in youth suicides

New research from Nationwide Children's Hospital finds a disproportionate increase in youth suicide rates for females relative to males, particularly in younger youth aged 10-14 years. The report, which describes youth suicide trends in the United States from 1975 to 2016, appears this week in JAMA Network Open.

15min

Tobacco and e-cig promotions spark teens' use of nicotine products, Stanford study finds

Owning items that promote e-cigarettes and other alternative tobacco products doubles the likelihood that a young person will try these products, a new study led by the Stanford University School of Medicine has found. The finding illustrates the influence of such marketing on teenagers.

15min

For many HIV+ women, daily survival takes precedence over viral suppression

Georgetown researchers say that while a majority of the 1,989 HIV+ women they have been studying since 1994 have been able to control their virus — often on and off — challenges such as mental health, unstable housing, and lack of social support constitute ongoing barriers to effective and sustained viral suppression.

15min

Being sick in the morning can be different from being sick at night

In a review published May 17, 2019 in the journal Trends in Immunology, researchers discuss how time of day affects the severity of afflictions ranging from allergies to heart attacks.

15min

An experiment hints at quantum entanglement inside protons

Particles inside protons seem to be linked on a scale smaller than a trillionth of a millimeter.

16min

A Waste of 1,000 Research Papers

In 1996, a group of European researchers found that a certain gene, called SLC6A4, might influence a person’s risk of depression. It was a blockbuster discovery at the time. The team found that a less active version of the gene was more common among 454 people who had mood disorders than in 570 who did not. In theory, anyone who had this particular gene variant could be at higher risk for depress

20min

Earliest evidence of the cooking and eating of starch

New discoveries made at the Klasies River Cave in South Africa's southern Cape, where charred food remains from hearths were found, provide the first archaeological evidence that anatomically modern humans were roasting and eating plant starches, such as those from tubers and rhizomes, as early as 120,000 years ago.

24min

Processed Foods, Regardless Of Nutrition, Still Worse For You

You probably already had a feeling you should skip the vending machine for an afternoon snack. But it turns out ultra-processed foods are even worse than we already thought. A new study, out in Cell Metabolism, shows these foods cause weight gain even when they don’t have more fat, sugar, or carbohydrates than their healthier counterparts. There’s something about the processing itself that causes

25min

Ancient Wads of 'Chewing Gum' Hold the Oldest Human DNA in Scandinavia

Masticated Stone Age gums may be DNA goldmines.

26min

Earliest evidence of the cooking and eating of starch

New discoveries made at the Klasies River Cave in South Africa's southern Cape, where charred food remains from hearths were found, provide the first archaeological evidence that anatomically modern humans were roasting and eating plant starches, such as those from tubers and rhizomes, as early as 120,000 years ago.

27min

Now Ocean Plastics Could Be Killing Oxygen-Making Bacteria

The toxins that plastics leach into seawater severely affect the bacteria that provides perhaps 20 percent of Earth's oxygen. That's when things get complicated…

30min

Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms

An important class of drug used to treat cancer patients could be used to treat brain aneurysms, according to new research published this week.

37min

New “Minecraft” Game Will Let You Build Stuff in the Real World

Minecraft Earth “Minecraft,” one of the most popular video games in the world, is making a major augmented reality push later this year, courtesy of Microsoft. “Minecraft Earth,” announced today , will allow users to collect items, blocks, and creatures while roaming around in the real world with other real-world friends — think of it as a “Minecraft”-themed “Pokémon Go” experience, but with more

42min

5 Coming Breakthroughs in Energy and Transportation

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

47min

The difference between healthy and unhealthy love | Katie Hood

In a talk about understanding and practicing the art of healthy relationships, Katie Hood reveals the five signs you might be in an unhealthy relationship — with a romantic partner, a friend, a family member — and shares the things you can do every day to love with respect, kindness and joy. "While love is an instinct and an emotion, the ability to love better is a skill we can all build and imp

49min

Chip splits cancer cells from blood for better analysis

A new way to cleanly separate out cancer cells from a blood sample enables comprehensive genetic profiling of the cancer cells, according to a new study. Genetic profiling of cancer cells could help doctors target tumors and monitor treatments more effectively. The new method is a dramatic improvement over current approaches because it also encompasses the variation among cancer cells within a si

49min

Grocery bills can predict diabetes rates by neighborhood

Dietary habits are notoriously difficult to monitor. Now data scientists have analyzed sales figures from London’s biggest grocer to link eating patterns with local rates of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and high blood sugar.

50min

Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size

Working with bacteria, a multidisciplinary team at the University of California San Diego has provided new insight into a longstanding question in science: What are the underlying mechanisms that control the size of cells?

57min

Early dengue virus infection could "defuse" zika virus

The Zika virus outbreak in Latin America has affected over 60 million people up to now. The infection can have potentially fatal consequences for pregnant women and their unborn children: many children have subsequently been born with malformations of the head (microcephaly). A particularly high incidence of these Zika-associated malformations exists in northeastern Brazil. DZIF scientists from Ch

59min

Earliest evidence of the cooking and eating of starch

New discoveries made at the Klasies River Cave in South Africa's southern Cape, where charred food remains from hearths were found, provide the first archaeological evidence that anatomically modern humans were roasting and eating plant starches, such as those from tubers and rhizomes, as early as 120,000 years ago.

59min

Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size

Working with bacteria, a multidisciplinary team at the University of California San Diego has provided new insight into a longstanding question in science: What are the underlying mechanisms that control the size of cells?

1h

Researchers develop novel framework for tracking developments in optical sensors

Plasmonics and photonics have been drawing attention in both academia and industry due to their use in an extensive range of applications, one of which includes optical sensing. The development of optical sensing technology not only contributes to the scientific research community as a versatile tool, but also offers substantial commercial value for smart city and Internet of Things (IOT) applicat

1h

The Family Weekly: Gay Rats (And Gay Rights)

WGBH / PBS KIDS This Week in Family After 22 years, Mr. Ratburn, the feared but beloved schoolteacher on PBS’s Arthur , finally got married. What made this “very special episode” so special is the fact that a gay wedding wasn’t presented as an unusual or remarkable teaching moment. “The show treated it as a joyous celebration of a happy relationship, and so did viewers,” write Ashley Fetters and

1h

Ear infection app finds fluid behind eardrum

A new app uses a paper funnel and your phone’s microphone and speaker to detect fluid behind the eardrum, a sign of ear infections in children. Ear infections are the most common reason that parents bring their children to a pediatrician, according to the National Institutes of Health. The condition occurs when fluid builds up in the middle ear behind the eardrum and becomes infected. The fluid b

1h

Race Replay: Ryan vs. Murder Nova for the #3 Spot | Street Outlaws

#4 Murder Nova has his eyes set on Ryan's #3 spot but will a faulty shifter stop him from racing? Don't miss new episodes of Street Outlaws at Mondays 9p! Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follo

1h

Myristoylation Probes, Rethought

The need for good chemical probes continues, and (sadly) so does the use of crappy ones. That’s what I took away from this recent paper from a multicenter team out of London. They’re looking at commonly used probes for inhibition of N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) enzymes, and it’s one of those good-news/bad-news situations. N-myristoylation is another one of those funky residue modifications that m

1h

'Imagine…' — our attitudes can change solely by the power of imagination

Roland Benoit and Philipp Paulus together with Daniel Schacter from Harvard University have examined the question, how neutral places suddenly become valuable to us, in a study published in the journal Nature Communications.

1h

Museum volunteers discover new species of extinct heron at North Florida fossil site

When the bones of an ancient heron were unearthed at a North Florida fossil site, the find wasn't made by researchers but by two Florida Museum of Natural History volunteers.

1h

5 things about technology give kids the creeps

New research defines what kids mean when they say technology is “creepy.” Children in the study described creepy technology as something that is unpredictable or poses an ambiguous threat that might cause physical harm or threaten an important relationship. The researchers also pinpoint five aspects of emerging technologies that could contribute to this feeling of ambiguity. “Over the years of wo

1h

Two Boy Scouts Met in an Internment Camp, and Grew Up to Work in Congress

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week, she talks with two former members of Congress, a Democrat and a Republican, whose across-the-aisle friendship originated many years earlier, when one boy—Norman Mineta—was incarcerated in Wyoming with his fami

1h

The School Shooting America Forgot

Jason Tabor, the mayor of Santa Fe, Texas, wants you to know that his town cares about school prayer. When he attended Santa Fe High School, back in the late 1990s, the school district “took on the Supreme Court to keep prayer in school.” It lost. But “we fought for it,” Tabor told me, and this is how he wants to see Santa Fe remembered in history books some day. Being the mayor of a small town l

1h

The Real Reason Fans Hate the Last Season of Game of Thrones

It's not just bad storytelling—it’s because the storytelling style changed from sociological to psychological — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Why the universe's ancient galaxies were extra bright

Researchers using the Spitzer telescope were able to analyze some of the most distant and ancient galaxies in the universe. They discovered that these galaxies were far brighter than anticipated, shedding clues into how the universe first emerged from the "dark ages" that lasted until about a billion years after the Big Bang. This research serves as a stepping stone for future work to be conducte

1h

Sedimentary, dear Johnson: Is NASA looking at the wrong rocks for clues to Martian life?

In 2020, NASA and European-Russian missions will look for evidence of past life on Mars. But while volcanic, igneous rock predominates on the Red Planet, virtually the entire Earth fossil record comes from sedimentary rocks.

1h

Ernst Haeckel: Pioneer of modern science

"By ecology, we understand the whole science of the organism's relationship with the surrounding outside world, which includes in a broader sense all 'existential conditions'. These are partly organic and partly inorganic in nature; both the former and the latter are, as we have previously shown, of utmost importance for the form of the organisms, because they force them to adapt to them."

1h

No, koalas are not 'functionally extinct', but they are in trouble

A conservation group has claimed that koalas are "functionally extinct". That isn't true, but many populations are falling sharply due to habitat loss and global warming

1h

5 Coming Breakthroughs in Energy and Transportation

The energy and transportation industries are being aggressively disrupted by converging exponential technologies . In just five days, the sun provides Earth with an energy supply exceeding all proven reserves of oil, coal, and natural gas. Capturing just 1 part in 8,000 of this available solar energy would allow us to meet 100 percent of our energy needs. As we leverage renewable energy supplied

1h

Opposite pathways in forest recovery

Tropical forests are being deforested at an alarming rate to make way for agriculture; the good news is that they can regrow naturally when the fields are abandoned. An international research team including participation from the University of Göttingen found that regenerating wet and dry forests actually show opposite pathways. This implies a fundamental change in our understanding of how tropica

1h

Ernst Haeckel: Pioneer of modern science

"By ecology, we understand the whole science of the organism's relationship with the surrounding outside world, which includes in a broader sense all 'existential conditions'. These are partly organic and partly inorganic in nature; both the former and the latter are, as we have previously shown, of utmost importance for the form of the organisms, because they force them to adapt to them."

1h

You Can Now Play 'Fortnite' as John Wick

Ahead of the release of 'John Wick: Chapter 3—Parabellum' this weekend, players in the battle royale game can now play as the cinematic assassin.

1h

Ny dr.techn.: Doktordisputatsen er en akademisk ironman

PLUS. Ole Mark, forskningschef hos DHI, brugte seks-syv år på sin doktorgrad og anbefaler det gerne til andre.

1h

The Real Reason Fans Hate the Last Season of Game of Thrones

It's not just bad storytelling—it’s because the storytelling style changed from sociological to psychological — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Changes in subsistence hunting threaten local food security

Scientists with the Universidad San Francisco de Quito and WCS Ecuador Program publishing in the journal BioTropica say that subsistence hunting in Neotropical rain forests—the mainstay of local people as a source of protein and a direct connection to these ecosystems—is in jeopardy from a variety of factors.

1h

The Real Reason Fans Hate the Last Season of Game of Thrones

It's not just bad storytelling—it’s because the storytelling style changed from sociological to psychological — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Number crunching without fear

Maths anxiety can be made a thing of the past, as new research shows. Alexie Vernitski, Ian Daly and Jake Bourgaize, from the UK’s University of Essex, explain.

1h

Human capital benefits of military boost economy by billions

A recent study from North Carolina State University finds that U.S. government spending on military personnel has a positive impact on the nation's human capital—essentially improving the American workforce. Using a new computer model, the study estimates the economic impact of this human capital improvement to be $89.8 billion for 2019 alone.

1h

Changes in subsistence hunting threaten local food security

Scientists with the Universidad San Francisco de Quito and WCS Ecuador Program publishing in the journal BioTropica say that subsistence hunting in Neotropical rain forests—the mainstay of local people as a source of protein and a direct connection to these ecosystems—is in jeopardy from a variety of factors.

1h

'Brand Me' presentations increase students' confidence and enhance their employability

The University of Portsmouth is helping its students build a strong personal brand to increase their confidence and enhance their employability.

1h

Släktingar till forskare oftare psykisk sjuka

En dansk registerstudie visar att nära släktingar till forskare oftare lider av bipolär sjukdom eller schizofreni. Studien baseras på sjukvårds-information om nära 12 000 universitetsanställda och deras första och andra gradens anhöriga. Resultatet visar en signifikant ökad förekomst av schizofreni bland syskon, barn och syskonbarn till akademikerna jämfört med befolkningsgenomsnittet. För bipolär

1h

What's behind the belief in a soulmate?

The United States appears to be in a romantic slump. Marriage rates have plummeted over the last decade. And compared to previous generations, young single people today are perhaps spending more time on social media than actual dating. They are also having less sex.

1h

Need #plantshelfie inspiration? Here are the best submissions from PopSci readers

DIY A story about plant children to brighten your day. Popular Science was so impressed by its readers' #plantshelfie photos of their indoor plants that we decided to share some of our favorites with the world.

1h

‘Minecraft Earth’ Is The Next ‘Pokemon Go’

Three years ago Pokemon Go became a worldwide phenomenon, made more money than God, and solidified Pikachu’s grip on the planet even more by finally letting people live out the dream of capturing …

1h

Cyber attacks are rewriting the 'rules' of modern warfare—and we aren't prepared for the consequences

Governments are becoming ever more reliant on digital technology, making them more vulnerable to cyber attacks. In 2007, Estonia was attacked by pro-Russian hackers who crippled government servers, causing havoc. Cyber attacks in Ukraine targeted the country's electricity grid, while Iran's nuclear power plants were infected by malware that could have led to a nuclear meltdown.

1h

Making the best of sparse information

New findings reported by LMU researchers challenge a generally accepted model of echolocation in bats. They demonstrate that bats require far less spatial information than previously thought to navigate effectively.

1h

Making the best of sparse information

New findings reported by LMU researchers challenge a generally accepted model of echolocation in bats. They demonstrate that bats require far less spatial information than previously thought to navigate effectively.

1h

Ernst Haeckel: Pioneer of modern science

Evolutionary biologist Ernst Haeckel became the first person to define the term ecology in his work published in 1866, entitled 'General Morphology of Organisms'. Science historians and biologists from the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) have now worked out just how close his original classification is to our modern understanding of ecology — at the invitation of the renowned journal

1h

Sedimentary, dear Johnson: Is NASA looking at the wrong rocks for clues to Martian life?

In 2020, NASA and European-Russian missions will look for evidence of past life on Mars. But while volcanic, igneous rock predominates on the Red Planet, virtually the entire Earth fossil record comes from sedimentary rocks.Addressing the problem in Frontiers in Earth Science, Swedish scientists have begun compiling evidence of fossilized microbes in underexplored igneous rock environments on Eart

1h

'Brand Me' presentations increase students' confidence and enhance their employability

The University of Portsmouth is helping its students build a strong personal brand to increase their confidence and enhance their employability.

1h

Human capital benefits of military boost economy by billions

A recent study finds that US government spending on military personnel has a positive impact on the nation's human capital — essentially improving the American workforce. The study estimates the economic impact of this human capital improvement to be $89.8 billion for 2019 alone.

1h

Nivolumab with ipilimumab: Combination has added benefit in advanced renal cell carcinoma

There are advantages in overall survival, which are not offset by any disadvantages of similar importance. Extent of the added benefit depends on the patient risk scores.

1h

A Nazi Controversy Deep in the Solar System

Go beyond Earth and deeper into the solar system, past the craggy terrain of Mars and the shapeshifting storm of Jupiter, through the delicate rings of Saturn, beyond the silky clouds of Uranus and Neptune, and you will find a mysterious zone of small, icy objects. They number in the millions, some half the size of the continental United States, others as small as cities. They form a ring around

1h

Facebook’s A.I. Whiz Now Faces the Task of Cleaning It Up. Sometimes That Brings Him to Tears.

Facebook has heralded artificial intelligence as a solution to its toxic content problems. Mike Schroepfer, its chief technology officer, says it won’t solve everything.

2h

Engineered microbial production of grape flavoring

Researchers report a microbial method for producing an artificial grape flavor. Methyl anthranilate (MANT) is a common grape flavoring and odorant compound currently produced through a petroleum-based process that uses large volumes of toxic acid catalysts.

2h

2h

Fungus: The Plastic of the Future

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

2h

2h

2h

2h

New laws of robotics needed to tackle AI: expert

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

2h

Extraordinarily transparent compact metallic metamaterials

In materials science, achromatic optical components can be designed with high transparency and low dispersion. Materials scientists have shown that although metals are highly opaque, densely packed arrays of metallic nanoparticles with more than 75 percent metal by volume can become more transparent to infrared radiation than dielectrics such as germanium. Such arrays can form effective dielectric

2h

Earthquake in 2009 intensified American Samoa's rising sea levels

The 2009, magnitude-8.1 Samoa earthquake dealt a great deal of damage to the Samoan Islands: Tsunami waves as high as 14 meters (46 feet) wiped out multiple villages, claiming nearly 200 lives and severely damaging water and electrical systems.

2h

New computer program can help crack precision medicine

Researchers from ANU have helped develop a new computer program to find out a person's genetic make-up, bringing us a step closer to an era of precision medicine.

2h

Amazing Google AI Speaks Another Language In Your Voice

Tech Talk On Wednesday, Google unveiled Translatotron , an in-development speech-to-speech translation system. It’s not the first system to translate speech from one language to another, but Google designed Translatotron to do something other systems can’t: retain the original speaker’s voice in the translated audio. In other words, the tech could make it sound like you’re speaking a language you

2h

Tesla Model 3 in Fatal Accident Had Autopilot Engaged

Several Tesla crashes have resulted in fatalities, and another deadly crash occurred in March. According to a newly released report, the driver in that accident had Autopilot activated at the time. The post Tesla Model 3 in Fatal Accident Had Autopilot Engaged appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

Mission control 'saves science'

Every minute, ESA's Earth observation satellites gather dozens of gigabytes of data about our planet—enough information to fill the pages on a 100-metre long bookshelf. Flying in low-Earth orbits, these spacecraft are continuously taking the pulse of our planet, but it's teams on the ground at ESA's Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany, that keep these explorers afloat.

2h

New computer program can help crack precision medicine

Researchers from ANU have helped develop a new computer program to find out a person's genetic make-up, bringing us a step closer to an era of precision medicine.

2h

Healthcare, social media and a web of moral issues

"Ethics asks what we owe to one another and how we should treat one another. The internet has changed the landscape in which we, as humans, relate, and ethicists need to keep pace," explains Assistant Professor of Philosophy Moti Gorin.

2h

NIST team demonstrates heart of next-generation chip-scale atomic clock

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and partners have demonstrated an experimental, next-generation atomic clock—ticking at high "optical" frequencies—that is much smaller than usual, made of just three small chips plus supporting electronics and optics.

2h

Engineered microbial production of grape flavoring

Researchers report a microbial method for producing an artificial grape flavor. Methyl anthranilate (MANT) is a common grape flavoring and odorant compound currently produced through a petroleum-based process that uses large volumes of toxic acid catalysts.

2h

Ocean twilight zone scientists tackle the challenge of bringing light into darkness

Oceanographers studying creatures in the ocean twilight zone are facing an optical dilemma. They need to observe the fish in order to study them, but at ocean depths of 200 meters and beyond, there's very little natural light trickling down from the surface. This means that submersibles developed to image and track these animals need to be equipped with lights that can illuminate the animals—and d

2h

Blister packaging for drugs in nursing homes: Much discussed, but hardly investigated

Data are lacking for arguments on the pros and cons, as the available studies examine the outpatient sector. IQWiG proposes a design for a new study.

2h

NIST team demonstrates heart of next-generation chip-scale atomic clock

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and partners have demonstrated an experimental, next-generation atomic clock–ticking at high 'optical' frequencies — that is much smaller than usual, made of just three small chips plus supporting electronics and optics.

2h

Changes in subsistence hunting threaten local food security

Scientists with the Universidad San Francisco de Quito and WCS Ecuador Program publishing in the journal BioTropica say that subsistence hunting in Neotropical rain forests — the mainstay of local people as a source of protein and a direct connection to these ecosystems — is in jeopardy from a variety of factors.

2h

The science and technology of FAST

The Five hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), located in a radio quiet zone, with the targets (e.g., radio pulsars and neutron stars, galactic and extragalactic 21-cm HI emission). Now, FAST has already been completely tested and achieved the acceptance indices. In this special topic, we present a comprehensive review of FAST, from the dish to the receiver and the data systems;

2h

Museum volunteers discover new species of extinct heron at North Florida fossil site

When the bones of an ancient heron were unearthed at a North Florida fossil site, the find wasn't made by researchers but by two Florida Museum of Natural History volunteers.A previously unknown genus and species, the heron has been named Taphophoyx hodgei.

2h

Identifying the molecular structure of one of Alzheimer's stickier culprits

Researchers have mapped the molecular structure and dynamics of an aggressive protein modification that spurs on Alzheimer's disease. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences offers greater understanding of the microscopic, toxic protein fragments, called beta amyloids (Aβ), that cause rapid acceleration of Alzheimer's disease.

2h

Researchers unravel mechanisms that control cell size

A multidisciplinary team has provided new insight into underlying mechanisms controlling the precise size of cells. The researchers found that 'the adder,' a function that guides cells to grow by a fixed size from birth to division, is controlled by specific proteins that accumulate to a threshold.

2h

Researchers develop novel framework for tracking developments in optical sensors

SUTD researchers together with international researchers conduct develop a 3D technology map which systematically compares optical sensors, providing a much needed benchmark to define the standards and track developments in this rapidly growing industry.

2h

Ocean twilight zone scientists tackle the challenge of bringing light into darkness

Oceanographers studying creatures in the ocean twilight zone are facing an optical dilemma. They need to observe the fish in order to study them, but at ocean depths of 200 meters and beyond, there's very little natural light trickling down from the surface. This means that submersibles developed to image and track these animals need to be equipped with lights that can illuminate the animals—and d

2h

The Democrats’ Age Divide Is Defining the 2020 Primary

When the progressive tag team of Senator Bernie Sanders and Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez skirmished with Joe Biden this week over climate policy, the altercation pointed toward the former vice president’s most glaring vulnerability in the 2020 Democratic presidential race—while simultaneously underscoring the imperative for him to defend his greatest asset. Biden’s most obvious weaknes

2h

Germany green-lights e-scooters on roads, not pavements

Germany on Friday authorised battery-powered scooters on its streets and cycle paths but banned them from pavements to protect pedestrians as the two-wheeled craze continues to spread across Europe.

2h

China creates app to recognize Pandas

China has developed an app that allows conservationists to identify individual pandas using facial recognition technology, state-run Xinhua news agency reported Friday.

2h

Alibaba faces consumer complaints in Europe

Six European consumer rights associations said Friday they have asked national authorities to look into illegal practices by firms using the AliExpress site of Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba.

2h

China creates app to recognize Pandas

China has developed an app that allows conservationists to identify individual pandas using facial recognition technology, state-run Xinhua news agency reported Friday.

2h

Minecraft Earth Wants to Be the Next Pokémon Go—But Bigger

Ten years after the original Minecraft swept the planet, Microsoft unveils an ambitious, global, augmented-reality version.

2h

'Game of Thrones': Who's Died So Far in Season 8

A lot of blood has been shed, and surely there's more to come.

2h

Hydropower dams can harm coastal areas far downstream

Thousands of hydroelectric dams are under construction around the world, mainly in developing countries. These enormous structures are one of the world's largest sources of renewable energy, but they also cause environmental problems.

2h

Why decarbonizing marine transportation might not be smooth sailing

About 60,000 merchant ships sail the world's oceans, including container ships, oil tankers and dry bulk carriers loaded with everything from grain to coal. Most operate on carbon-rich fuels such as heavy diesel, and their emissions have negative environmental impacts, are harmful to human health and contribute to global warming.

2h

Scientists find 'molecular destruction code' for enzyme involved in cholesterol production

A team of UNSW scientists at the School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences led by Professor Andrew Brown have shown how a key enzyme that contributes to cholesterol production can be regulated—and destroyed—using a particular molecule.

2h

Selective application of contraceptives may be most effective pest control

Since the mid-20th century, the global human population has grown from 2.5 billion to 7.7 billion, according to the most recent United Nations estimate. Much of this growth was due to the unprecedented agricultural expansion made possible by the widespread use of synthetic pesticides starting in the 1950s.

2h

Cell polarity — An aurora over the pole

A recent research led by Assistant Professor Fumio Motegi, Principal Investigator at the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore, has identified the master switch that triggers the symmetry breaking process in the zygotes of the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans.

2h

Development of a displacement sensor to measure gravity of smallest source mass ever

One of the most unknown phenomena in modern physics is gravity. Its measurement and laws remain somewhat of an enigma. Researchers at Tohoku University have revealed important information about a new aspect of the nature of gravity by probing the smallest mass-scale.

2h

Selective application of contraceptives may be most effective pest control

Since the mid-20th century, the global human population has grown from 2.5 billion to 7.7 billion, according to the most recent United Nations estimate. Much of this growth was due to the unprecedented agricultural expansion made possible by the widespread use of synthetic pesticides starting in the 1950s.

2h

How Japan's renewables-powered Olympics could kick off a global race for clean energy

Japan is aiming to host the first Olympic Games powered solely by renewable sources. If successful, this could help the country carve a new niche in the global order as a champion of climate action and environmental protection – and set off a clean energy race in the process.

2h

Why is the Pentagon interested in UFOs?

U.S. Navy pilots and sailors won't be considered crazy for reporting unidentified flying objects, under new rules meant to encourage them to keep track of what they see. Yet just a few years ago, the Pentagon reportedly shut down another official program that investigated UFO sightings. What has changed? Is the U.S. military finally coming around to the idea that alien spacecraft are visiting our

2h

Climate a driver of language diversity

A region's climate has a greater impact than landscape on how many languages are spoken there, new research from The Australian National University (ANU) shows.

2h

Cell polarity: An aurora over the pole

Even before the fertilised egg or zygote can start dividing into daughter cells that form the future tissues and organs during the development of a multicellular organism, the symmetrical zygote needs to become asymmetrical or polarised in shape and molecular organisation. The master switch that triggers the symmetry breaking process in the zygotes of the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C.

2h

Cell polarity: An aurora over the pole

Even before the fertilised egg or zygote can start dividing into daughter cells that form the future tissues and organs during the development of a multicellular organism, the symmetrical zygote needs to become asymmetrical or polarised in shape and molecular organisation. The master switch that triggers the symmetry breaking process in the zygotes of the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans (C.

2h

Development of a displacement sensor to measure gravity of smallest source mass ever

One of the most unknown phenomena in modern physics is gravity. Its measurement and laws remain somewhat of an enigma. Researchers at Tohoku University have revealed important information about a new aspect of the nature of gravity by probing the smallest mass-scale.

2h

Yes, Trump Can Invoke the Insurrection Act to Deport Immigrants

One of the most interesting legal phenomena of the Trump administration has been the increased use of—and public focus on—previously obscure federal statutes that delegate surprisingly broad power to the president. From using the National Emergencies Act to build his border wall and the Federal Vacancies Reform Act to control the upper echelons of the executive branch, to using the Trade Expansio

2h

Laser of sound promises to measure extremely tiny phenomena

Most people are familiar with optical lasers through their experience with laser pointers. But what about a laser made from sound waves?

2h

Wild wheat relative genes to aid in battle against trio of pests

Wheat curl mite, greenbug and Hessian fly have long been troublemaker pests for Texas wheat, but a team of Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists is ready to go high tech to help control them.

2h

Scientists find 'molecular destruction code' for enzyme involved in cholesterol production

A team of UNSW scientists at the School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences led by Professor Andrew Brown have shown how a key enzyme that contributes to cholesterol production can be regulated—and destroyed—using a particular molecule.

2h

Record-shattering underwater sound

A team of researchers has produced a record-shattering underwater sound with an intensity that eclipses that of a rocket launch. The intensity was equivalent to directing the electrical power of an entire city onto a single square meter, resulting in sound pressures above 270 decibels. The team, which included researchers from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, publis

2h

AI-powered 'knowledge engine' a game-changer for antibiotic resistance

A groundbreaking project to tackle one of the world's most pressing and complex health challenges—antimicrobial resistance (AMR)—has secured a $1 million boost. UTS will lead a consortium of 26 researchers from 14 organisations in the development of an AMR 'knowledge engine' capable of predicting outbreaks and informing interventions, supported by a grant from the Medical Research Future Fund.

2h

Study reveals role of neonatal brain cells in early bonding in mammals

What drives the social bond between offspring and caregivers in the first few days of life? A Yale-led team of researchers has found clues in specific neurons in the brains of neonatal mice that are associated with feeding.

2h

Magnetic nanoparticles ease removal of microcontaminants from wastewater

Microcontaminants place a considerable burden on our water courses, but removing them from wastewater requires considerable technical resources. Now, ETH researchers have developed an approach that allows the efficient removal of these problematic substances.

2h

National report finds the promise of adolescence is largely untapped

A University of Virginia-led National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine report has found that adolescence, like infancy, is a critical period of development—and it is not being used to its full potential by society.

2h

Wild wheat relative genes to aid in battle against trio of pests

Wheat curl mite, greenbug and Hessian fly have long been troublemaker pests for Texas wheat, but a team of Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists is ready to go high tech to help control them.

2h

AI-powered 'knowledge engine' a game-changer for antibiotic resistance

A groundbreaking project to tackle one of the world's most pressing and complex health challenges—antimicrobial resistance (AMR)—has secured a $1 million boost. UTS will lead a consortium of 26 researchers from 14 organisations in the development of an AMR 'knowledge engine' capable of predicting outbreaks and informing interventions, supported by a grant from the Medical Research Future Fund.

2h

Study reveals role of neonatal brain cells in early bonding in mammals

What drives the social bond between offspring and caregivers in the first few days of life? A Yale-led team of researchers has found clues in specific neurons in the brains of neonatal mice that are associated with feeding.

2h

Opioid-exposed babies react more strongly to pain

Babies exposed to opioids while their mothers were pregnant may need special care even before they start to experience withdrawal symptoms, researchers say. A new study reports that as soon as 24 and 48 hours after birth, babies exposed to opioids prenatally reacted more strongly to pain and scored higher on a skin conductance test, which measures the electrical differences in skin in response to

2h

A more efficient way to cleave pendant olefins from terpenes and similar compounds

A team of chemists at the University of California has found a more efficient way to separate olefins from terpenes and similar compounds. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes the new approach and possible applications for its use. Seb Caille with Amgen has published a Perspective piece outlining the work by the team at UC in the same journal issue and explains why

2h

The Houston Rapper Taking the Industry by Storm

Megan Thee Stallion only takes big swings. Late in 2017, at age 22, the artist recorded “ Stalli Freestyle ,” a video of herself rapping in the middle of a street somewhere in a suburb of her native Houston. The backdrop of her deceptively simple video was prosaic, but Megan’s performance electrified. Switching up her flow about halfway into the track, she unleashed a cheeky, rapid-fire missive t

3h

Restaurant acoustics that schmeckt

Acoustics consultant Klaus Genuit says that new International Standards Organization guidelines for defining, measuring and evaluating soundscapes are a big step forward in guiding the creation of audibly fine restaurants.

3h

University backtracks on disputed Voynich manuscript theory

Bristol distances itself from academic who claims to have solved century-old mystery A university that breathlessly declared one of its academics had cracked the code of the celebrated Voynich manuscript has been forced into an embarrassing climbdown after medieval experts poured scorn on his theory. Bristol University said this week Dr Gerard Cheshire had “succeeded where countless cryptographer

3h

Restaurant acoustics that schmeckt

Acoustics consultant Klaus Genuit says that new ISO guidelines for defining, measuring and evaluating soundscapes are a big step forward in guiding the creation of audibly fine restaurants. 'A soup might be delicious or not, but you can't answer this by knowing the temperature of the soup. It is the same with restaurant soundscapes — you need a lot more information than just noise level,' he said

3h

Single molecule magnet used as a scanning magnetometer

A team of researchers from the University of California and Fudan University has developed a way to use a single molecule magnet as a scanning magnetometer. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group outlines their research which involved demonstrating their sensor scanning the spin and magnetic properties of a molecule embedded in another material.

3h

How one fern can soak up so much arsenic—and not die

Arsenic-contaminated soil and groundwater pose risks to millions of Americans and hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Cleaning up the toxic metal is a laborious and expensive process, with some remediations of arsenic reaching into the hundreds of millions of dollars.

3h

Exploring the scientific potential of the ATLAS Experiment at the High-Luminosity LHC

The High-Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) is scheduled to begin colliding protons in 2026. This major improvement to CERN's flagship accelerator will increase the total number of collisions in the ATLAS experiment by a factor of 10. To cope with this increase, ATLAS is preparing a complex series of upgrades including the installation of new detectors using state-of-the-art

3h

Researchers dish the dirt on soil microbes

Soil microbes are wild, unpampered and uncultured.

3h

Study dives deep into saving endangered shark

Mackerel sharks are large, fast-swimming apex predators that include Hollywood heavy-hitters like great whites (Jaws), mako (Deep Blue Sea) and the now-extinct Megalodon (The Meg). One of the smallest mackerel sharks is the porbeagle—on average less than two metres long—and it's one of the most critically endangered species of shark, too.

3h

How one fern can soak up so much arsenic—and not die

Arsenic-contaminated soil and groundwater pose risks to millions of Americans and hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Cleaning up the toxic metal is a laborious and expensive process, with some remediations of arsenic reaching into the hundreds of millions of dollars.

3h

Researchers dish the dirt on soil microbes

Soil microbes are wild, unpampered and uncultured.

3h

Study dives deep into saving endangered shark

Mackerel sharks are large, fast-swimming apex predators that include Hollywood heavy-hitters like great whites (Jaws), mako (Deep Blue Sea) and the now-extinct Megalodon (The Meg). One of the smallest mackerel sharks is the porbeagle—on average less than two metres long—and it's one of the most critically endangered species of shark, too.

3h

Cannabis plant evolved super high (on the Tibetan Plateau)

An analysis of pollen suggests cannabis evolved on the Tibetan Plateau, not far from a cave that was frequented by our ancient Denisovan cousins

3h

Robot copies Mona Lisa sketch just by looking at it

A new algorithm enables robots to put pen to paper, writing words using stroke patterns similar to human handwriting. It’s a step, the researchers say, toward robots that are able to communicate more fluently with human coworkers and collaborators. “Just by looking at a target image of a word or sketch, the robot can reproduce each stroke as one continuous action,” says Atsunobu Kotani, an underg

3h

Viceland’s Dark Side of the Ring Shows the Sleaze and Humanity of Wrestling

Pro wrestling: Is there a deeper homage to the innocence of the American character? Around these gifted performers, these godlike men with their huge and brilliantly crude personas, spreads the American public at its most medieval, its most pageantry-besotted and morally inflamed. Boo! Hiss! Hooray! Not everybody believes it’s real, of course. Maybe nobody believes it’s real. But many choose to b

3h

Planet-hunter CubeSat images Los Angeles

A small satellite designed to hunt for new planets beyond the solar system recently looked down at Earth to capture an image of California's "City of Stars."

3h

The USDA announces new vision for animal genomics

A new U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) blueprint, published today in Frontiers and Genetics, will serve as a guide for research and funding in animal genomics for 2018-2027 that will facilitate genomic solutions to enable producers to meet increasing future demands for animal products by a growing world population.

3h

The USDA announces new vision for animal genomics

A new U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) blueprint, published today in Frontiers and Genetics, will serve as a guide for research and funding in animal genomics for 2018-2027 that will facilitate genomic solutions to enable producers to meet increasing future demands for animal products by a growing world population.

3h

Where on Earth is the Salish Sea?

Less than half of the people in Washington and British Columbia have heard of the Salish Sea, even though they live alongside it.

3h

Is Dentistry Science Based?

In today’s social media laden climate, it is de rigueur for people to instantaneously react and become simultaneously defensive and offended when any of our sacred cows are challenged. It’s part of the human condition and we can’t help ourselves. We dentists had the opportunity to feel assaulted a couple of weeks ago when an article in The Atlantic by Ferris […]

3h

In Alabama, 'The Handmaid's Tale' Is a Haunting Metaphor

As the state passed its anti-abortion bill, protestors evoked Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel.

3h

Sony Alpha A7II Mirrorless Camera Deal: $600 Off Right Now

Sony's Alpha A7II is a mirrorless, full-frame workhorse of a camera, and a steal at less than $1,000.

3h

Climate Adaptation Isn’t Surrender. It’s Survival

Yes, the world needs to reduce carbon emissions, but that's not enough. Technologists need to step in and start developing work-arounds of all kinds.

3h

Plastic chemicals could harm the ocean bacteria that produce 10 percent of our oxygen

Environment Leachates are toxic to the most numerous photosynthesizing organisms in the world. The dangers plastic bags, bottles and other products pose to marine life are all too familiar. Discarded plastics can physically choke ocean creatures, or build up in…

3h

The Climate is Always Changing

Whenever the issue of climate comes up on this blog (or even just in the comments on unrelated articles), climate change deniers make an appearance. Consistently they use terrible arguments – relying on straw men, factually incorrect statements, deliberately confusing and blurring the lines, and committing just about every logical fallacy. They are also the same recycled arguments I see over and

3h

Image of the Day: To the Races

The roots of plants exposed to the hormone beta-cyclocitrical grew faster than roots not treated by the hormone.

3h

3h

3h

3h

3h

A 'high-heeled' dinosaur that walked on its tiptoes

A 24-tonne dinosaur may have walked in a 'high-heeled' fashion, according to University of Queensland research.

3h

Spain alarmed by French bear's attacks on sheep

France released two brown bears in the Pyrenees – but one has now killed eight sheep in Spain.

3h

Brazil's Vale warns another mining dam at risk of collapse

A mining dam could collapse as early as next week, months after a similar disaster killed 230 people.

3h

Aktion rädda bin och andra insekter i Norrland

Det pågår flera räddningsaktioner runt om i världen – både ideellt och kommersiellt, till exempel genom försäljning av insektshotell och speciella fröpåsar. Vid Umeå universitet funderar man bland annat på hur campus kan bli mer pollineringsvänligt. – Det finns flera anledningar till att det har gått så här långt, och även om det är lätt att ryckas med i snudd på desperata reaktioner så är det vi

4h

Five Questions for Susan Hockfield: The Dawn of the Biotech Revolution

The author of "The Age of Living Machines" argues that today's scientific innovation depends on the intersection of biology and engineering, whether it's biotech like aquaporin — water purified through the injection of a protein — or self-made biological viruses that can create natural batteries.

4h

4h

Humans and Neanderthals Evolved from a Mystery Common Ancestor, Huge Analysis Suggests

Modern humans and Neanderthals may have diverged a long, long time ago, at least 800,000 years back.

4h

Dutch aquifers bank rainwater to help farmers avoid going bust

Climate change is increasing the risk of water shortages across Europe, but researchers in the Netherlands are hoping to ease pressure by generating a steady supply of clean water and heat from deep underground reservoirs known as aquifers.

4h

Dutch aquifers bank rainwater to help farmers avoid going bust

Climate change is increasing the risk of water shortages across Europe, but researchers in the Netherlands are hoping to ease pressure by generating a steady supply of clean water and heat from deep underground reservoirs known as aquifers.

4h

Macroscopic electron quantum coherence in a solid-state circuit

A team of researchers at the Centre de Nanosciences et de Nanotechnologies (C2N, CNRS/Univ. Paris-Saclay) has experimentally achieved the coherent propagation of electrons in circuits over macroscopic distances through a novel nano-engineering strategy.

4h

Why Do Schools Read Everyone’s Name at Graduation?

It is a sacred academic tradition: Every year, before spring turns to summer, the relatives and loved ones of soon-to-be college graduates journey great distances and congregate in stadiums or on greens in order to … hear someone they don’t know recite the names of hundreds or even thousands of total strangers. These gatherings are known as graduation ceremonies, and they have gotten really, real

4h

Dansk chip skal træne nyt hjernevæv til at kurere epilepsi

Et EU-projekt med dansk deltagelse skal konstruere en nanochip, som ved hjælp af maskinlæring træner hjernen til at kompensere for skader.

4h

The Ethical Quandary in Health Care Reform

Freedom of choice is an American value—but people without resources don’t have much of a choice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Generna påverkar valet att skaffa hund

Forskarna har undersökt ärftlighet och hundägande med hjälp av över 35 000 tvillingpar från Svenska Tvillingregistret. – Vi blev överraskade att se hur mycket en persons genuppsättning bidrar till valet att skaffa hund. De här resultaten är viktiga för att förstå samspelet mellan hund och människa genom tiderna. Trots att hundar och andra husdjur är vanliga medlemmar i hushåll runt om i världen s

4h

What We Need From the 'Game of Thrones' Finale

It's a lot to ask of one episode, but here's what should happen.

4h

5G Networks Could Throw Weather Forecasting Into Chaos

The FCC is clashing with scientists who argue that 5G networks could interfere with weather sensors and compromise weather predictions.

4h

Some US Cities Are Moving Into Real-Time Facial Surveillance

Chinese authorities apply facial-recognition programs to surveillance videos to identify subjects. Now, a report says Chicago and Detroit have purchased their own systems.

4h

#YouKnowMe Is Hashtag Activism at Its Most Galvanizing

Thousands of women have joined actress Busy Phillips in sharing abortion stories on social media, fighting stigma by force of mass testimony.

4h

Digital camera sees around corners by guessing what's lurking behind

An algorithm allows digital cameras to photograph objects hidden around a wall by interpreting subtle patterns of light that reflect on the floor or walls

4h

Vaccines may help bats fight white nose syndrome

Researchers are developing an oral vaccine that helps little brown bats survive the fungal disease white nose syndrome.

4h

In Restricting Abortions, Lawmakers Skew Reproductive Science

Alabama’s ban is the latest in a spate of legislation passed this year to limit abortions. While other states have passed so-called “heartbeat laws” claiming fetal personhood begins at six weeks, when embryonic cardiac activity can be detected, many physicians say lawmakers are misinterpreting the science.

4h

The Ethical Quandary in Health Care Reform

Freedom of choice is an American value—but people without resources don’t have much of a choice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

App converts aerial crop photos into real-time metrics of plant growth and crop health

Agricultural researchers have long used small-plot trials to test a myriad of practices, such as selecting the best seeds, fertilizer and crop-control products, and depending on their eyes and opinions to determine what works best.

4h

Large Mound in Russia Reveals 2,500-Year-Old Skeletons of Elite Nomadic Tribesmen…And a Horse Head

A farmer in Russia noticed a bronze cauldron, which led to the discovery of the burials of elite Sarmatians in a town in Russia.

4h

Photos: Ancient Burial of Elite Members of Nomadic Tribe

Archaeologists describe the burial of three skeletons from a nomadic tribe in what is today Russia. The remains date back 2,500 years.

4h

Has the Mysterious Code of the Voynich Manuscript Been Cracked?

New findings suggest it was compiled by Dominican nuns as a reference for the Queen fo Aragon.

4h

Forensics Friday: How was this image manipulated?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the second in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our … Continue reading Fore

4h

What Ancient Romans Used Instead of Toilet Paper – Facts So Romantic

Our ancient Roman would simply wipe him- or herself, rinse the tersorium in whatever was available (running water and/or a bucket of vinegar or salt water), and leave it for the next person to use. Photograph by Kapustin Igor / Shutterstock We’ve all been caught unawares by our digestive tract at one time or another. It happened to the Nash family several months ago. We were nearing the end of an

4h

'The Big Bang Theory' finale: Sheldon and Amy's fictional physics parallels real science

After 12 successful seasons, "The Big Bang Theory" has finally come to a fulfilling end, concluding its reign as the longest running multicamera sitcom on TV.

4h

Are We More Attracted To People Who Look Like Our Parents?

Though we might be drawn to people who have physical commonalities with us and therefore our parents, findings say this claim is far from scientific — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Grumpy Cat dies at the age of seven

Grumpy Cat, the adorably grouchy-looking meme machine kitty, has passed away. The family of the dearly departed cat said she suffered complications from a urinary tract infection. She …

4h

Are We More Attracted To People Who Look Like Our Parents?

Though we might be drawn to people who have physical commonalities with us and therefore our parents, findings say this claim is far from scientific — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Are We More Attracted To People Who Look Like Our Parents?

Though we might be drawn to people who have physical commonalities with us and therefore our parents, findings say this claim is far from scientific — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Are alternative meats the key to a healthier life and planet? – Science Weekly podcast

How do protein substitutes compare with the real deal? Graihagh Jackson investigates by speaking to dietician Priya Tew , the Guardian’s Fiona Harvey and author Isabella Tree . Continue reading…

4h

Sea otters are bouncing back – and into the jaws of great white sharks

Decades of conservation work have boosted sea otter populations in many parts of the North Pacific, but the animals are now being killed by great white sharks

4h

Activists petition court to halt Japan dolphin hunt

Campaigners on Friday urged a court in Japan to halt so-called "drive hunting" of dolphins in the country as part of an unprecedented lawsuit that argues the practice violates Japanese law.

5h

Are alternative meats the key to a healthier life and planet? – Science Weekly podcast

How do protein substitutes compare with the real deal? Graihagh Jackson investigates by speaking to dietician Priya Tew, the Guardian’s Fiona Harvey and author Isabella Tree.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

5h

Activists petition court to halt Japan dolphin hunt

Campaigners on Friday urged a court in Japan to halt so-called "drive hunting" of dolphins in the country as part of an unprecedented lawsuit that argues the practice violates Japanese law.

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

In Brazil, ‘useful idiots’ protest cuts to research and education

Insults from Brazil's president help fuel massive demonstrations

5h

The Ins and Outs of Knit Theory

For physicist Elisabetta Matsumoto, “knitting is coding,” and yarn is a programmable material.

5h

The U.S. System for ‘Skilled’ Migrants Is Broken

Tamsyn Mahoney-Steel took a winding path to Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. She began by studying politics and philosophy in her native Britain, then trained as a singer, before getting a doctoral degree in medieval music and literature. Working with centuries-old French lyrics exposed her to systems that help digitally analyze manuscripts, poetry, and literature. In 2013, Mahoney-Steel wa

5h

America Needs a Permanent Anti-war Movement

My colleague David Frum, a supporter of the Iraq War who coined the phrase a xis of evil , issued a warning in a column this week: “The project of a war with Iran is so crazy, it remains incredible that Donald Trump’s administration could truly be premeditating it,” he wrote. “But on the off, off chance that it is, here’s a word of caution from a veteran of the George W. Bush administration: Don’

5h

Carly Rae Jepsen Is Getting Weirder—And It’s Brilliant

Update your glossary: Pop music no longer means “music that’s popular.” Clubby thump, breathy wails, mathematically engineered hooks, rhyming fire and desire and higher— the bundle may be going the way of big-band or nu metal, from central to niche. The latest sign of the shift is that Taylor Swift’s animatronic new single failed to dethrone a country-rap novelty from No. 1. Before that, The New

5h

Researchers Say Evidence Shows What You Eat Really Does Matter

Two new diet studies add to the evidence that when it comes to staying healthy, counting calories may not be enough. What really matters is what you choose to eat and the quality of your diet.

5h

Nanotechnology vs. cancer: How tiny particles sniff out the deadly disease

Cancer is an aberrant function of a normal cell, where the regulators of that cell's dividing are broken and the cell starts to divide without regulation. Left to its own devices, that dividing without regulation will overcome the entire body. Until we have a cure, early detection is the holy grail. MIT professor Sangeeta Bhatia is currently devising a simple urine test that works just like a pre

5h

Kühnau: Vi skal kunne hjælpe hinanden i regionen

Region Midtjyllands hospitaler skal løfte i samlet flok, når AUH skal gennemføre en stor spareplan, siger regionsformand Ander Kühnau (S).

5h

Why the Guardian is changing the language it uses about the environment

From now, house style guide recommends terms such as ‘climate crisis’ and ‘global heating’ The Guardian has updated its style guide to introduce terms that more accurately describe the environmental crises facing the world. Instead of “climate change” the preferred terms are “climate emergency, crisis or breakdown” and “global heating” is favoured over “global warming”, although the original term

5h

AUH-spareplan skaber usikkerhed i Region Midtjylland

En stor spareplan på Aarhus Universitetshospital med fyringer vil ramme alle regionens sygehuse hårdt, mener ledende overlæge fra Horsens Sygehus.

6h

Caster Semenya ruling: sports federation is flouting ethics rules

Nature, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01606-8 New eligibility requirements for elite female athletes violate principles designed to protect people from risky medical research, argues Roger Pielke, Jr, an expert witness in the athlete’s case.

6h

Author Correction: Evolutionary history resolves global organization of root functional traits

Nature, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1214-3 Author Correction: Evolutionary history resolves global organization of root functional traits

6h

Ett svart hål äter en neutronstjärna?

Under april återupptog nätverket Ligo-Virgo sitt sökande efter gravitationsvågor från enorma kollisioner i universum, efter en uppgradering av instrumenten. Efter bara några veckor fångade de något extra intressant: en signal som passar in på vad forskare förväntar sig att se när ett svart hål slukar en kompakt neutronstjärna.

6h

Owning a dog is influenced by our genetic make-up

A team of Swedish and British scientists have studied the heritability of dog ownership using information from 35,035 twin pairs from the Swedish Twin Registry. The new study suggests that genetic variation explains more than half of the variation in dog ownership, implying that the choice of getting a dog is heavily influenced by an individual's genetic make-up.

6h

New findings could lead to improved vaccinations against sexually transmitted infections

In a study published today in the Nature Communications, researchers from King's College London have shown how skin vaccination can generate protective CD8 T-cells that are recruited to the genital tissues and could be used as a vaccination strategy for sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

6h

Facebook Changes Algorithm, Promises More Personalized News Feed

Facebook’s News Feed is finally getting more personal. The social network on Thursday announced two ranking updates based on user surveys. One prioritizes the friends someone might want …

6h

On The Atlantic’s June Cover, James Carroll Urges the Catholic Church to“Abolish the Priesthood”

May 17, 2019 (Washington, D.C.)—The Catholic Church’s reputation and membership has suffered under the continued devastating revelations of rapmant sexual abuse, aided by priests, bishops, and cardinals who’ve protected each other over countless victims. James Carroll , who spent five years as a priest himself, harbored no illusions about the Church’s betrayal, and yet maintained his faith as he

6h

Affimer reagents as tools in diagnosing plant virus diseases

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43945-6 Affimer reagents as tools in diagnosing plant virus diseases

6h

Aminophospholipids are signal-transducing TREM2 ligands on apoptotic cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43535-6 Aminophospholipids are signal-transducing TREM2 ligands on apoptotic cells

6h

Cyclic magma recharge pulses detected by high-precision strainmeter data: the case of 2017 inter-eruptive activity at Etna volcano

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44066-w Cyclic magma recharge pulses detected by high-precision strainmeter data: the case of 2017 inter-eruptive activity at Etna volcano

6h

Loss of Disabled-2 Expression in Pancreatic Cancer Progression

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43992-z Loss of Disabled-2 Expression in Pancreatic Cancer Progression

6h

Synthesis of α-Fe2O3/Bi2WO6 layered heterojunctions by in situ growth strategy with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43917-w Synthesis of α-Fe 2 O 3 /Bi 2 WO 6 layered heterojunctions by in situ growth strategy with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity

6h

Systematic analysis of TruSeq, SMARTer and SMARTer Ultra-Low RNA-seq kits for standard, low and ultra-low quantity samples

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43983-0 Systematic analysis of TruSeq, SMARTer and SMARTer Ultra-Low RNA-seq kits for standard, low and ultra-low quantity samples

6h

Comparison of cytotoxicity and membrane efflux pump inhibition in HepG2 cells induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes with different length and functional groups

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43900-5 Comparison of cytotoxicity and membrane efflux pump inhibition in HepG2 cells induced by single-walled carbon nanotubes with different length and functional groups

6h

Expansion of different subpopulations of CD26−/low T cells in allergic and non-allergic asthmatics

Scientific Reports, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43622-8 Expansion of different subpopulations of CD26 −/low T cells in allergic and non-allergic asthmatics

6h

Big tech firms are racing to track climate refugees

Facebook, Palantir, Microsoft, and more see big money in migration caused by global warming—and they’re betting on everything from biometrics to blockchain.

6h

6h

Inflammatoriskt protein påverkar mängden alzheimerplack

Proteinet galectin-3 är involverat vid inflammationssjukdomar i hjärnan. Nu visar en studie som letts av forskare vid Lunds universitet vilken nyckelroll proteinet de facto har vid Alzheimers sjukdom. När forskarna stängde av genen som producerar detta protein hos möss, minskade såväl mängden alzheimerplack som inflammationsbördan.

7h

EasyJet losses deepen in first half

British low-cost airline EasyJet said Friday that first-half net losses more than quadrupled due to "tough" market conditions and high fuel costs.

7h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvad er fidusen ved en 'digitally remastered' LP?

Hvis en LP bliver manipuleret digitalt, kan man vel lige så godt streame sin musik? Eller hvad? Det svarer lydtekniker Jørgen Vad på.

7h

Where are we currently at with spinal vertebra replacement surgery?

I've begun to research spinal injuries recently after finding out I have an extremely badly fractured L1 myself, although it doesn't impinge upon the spinal cord and I'm going about day-to-day life more or less as normal. As far as I'm aware, kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty (injecting bone cement through a hole in the skin) are both strongly discouraged, and spinal fusion also seems rather imperfe

7h

UK Solar Output Hits Record Peak Of 9.55 Gigawatts

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

7h

WhatsApp, security and spyware: what happened

Facebook-owned WhatsApp's revelation of a security flaw allowing hackers to inject spyware on smartphones raised fresh concerns about the security of the mobile ecosystem.

7h

7h

Climate Breakdown Could Send Crabs And Octopuses Blind

This is just endlessly depressing.

7h

Will India energy pledges lead to CO2 rise?

India's political parties promise free electricity to farmers and ambitious infrastructure projects.

8h

North Korea seeing worst drought in a century: state media

North Korea is experiencing its worst drought in over a century, official media reported Friday, days after the World Food Programme expressed "very serious concerns" about the situation in the country.

8h

Crickets have hit the high street – can they save the planet?

A London food chain is now including insects on its menu but can eating insects help save the planet?

8h

8h

Could the fabled Orient Express take to the rails again?

It conjures up the atmosphere of rail travel from a bygone golden age, steaming through Europe experiencing top-notch cuisine and the company of fellow passengers who could be writers or spies.

8h

Amazon invests in British food courier Deliveroo

US online titan Amazon has taken a stake in Deliveroo, the British food delivery company said on Friday.

8h

The deadly odds of pigeon racing in the Philippines

It is a brutal 600-kilometre gauntlet during which competitors face searing heat, wild seas, vicious predators, and the threat of kidnapping.

8h

The deadly odds of pigeon racing in the Philippines

It is a brutal 600-kilometre gauntlet during which competitors face searing heat, wild seas, vicious predators, and the threat of kidnapping.

8h

Walmart reports jump in profit, warns on tariffs

Walmart reported a jump in first-quarter earnings on Thursday on increased US store sales and e-commerce growth but warned that higher US tariffs could hit its business.

8h

Amazon invests in British food courier Deliveroo

US online titan Amazon has taken a stake in Deliveroo, the British food delivery company said on Friday.

8h

SpaceX postpones launch of its first internet network satellites

SpaceX postponed a launch of 60 satellites into low-Earth orbit that was scheduled for Thursday night, possibly until next week, citing a need for software updates.

8h

Baidu posts first quarterly loss since IPO, top exec quits

Chinese internet giant Baidu has posted its first quarterly loss since going public in 2005, and the head of its core search business resigned as the company struggles to grow sales.

8h

Crisis-hit Nissan shakes up board, keeps boss

Japanese car giant Nissan shook up its executive board Friday, adding a top director from partner Renault as it battles the fallout from the Carlos Ghosn saga and disappointing results.

8h

Lyden fra Danmark: Historien om højttaleren der forsvandt

For 104 år siden byggede en dansker den første højttaler og lagde kimen til årtiers dansk lyddominans.

8h

Scientists propose rethinking 'endangered species' definition to save slow-breeding giants

Conservation decisions based on population counts may fail to protect large, slow-breeding animals from irrevocable decline, according to new research coinciding with Endangered Species Day.

8h

Forsker i valgsikkerhed: Digitale valg er endnu for usikre

Valg på papir har en entydig kilde. Mens ved internetvalgsystem kan det indtil videre være for vanskeligt at tjekke, om der har været et hackerangreb og dermed om valget er retvisende, lyder det fra forsker.

8h

Scientists propose rethinking 'endangered species' definition to save slow-breeding giants

Conservation decisions based on population counts may fail to protect large, slow-breeding animals from irrevocable decline, according to new research coinciding with Endangered Species Day.

8h

9h

9h

9h

Valgmøde på mandag: Forskningens rolle i fremtidens Danmark

Hvad vil toppolitikerne med forskningsområdet? Toppolitikere og repræsentanter fra forskningens verden debatterer forskningspolitik til Ingeniørens valgmøde.

9h

A Rocket Scientist Explains How We Could Hypothetically Relocate Earth

Anyone got a billion billion years and 85 percent of Earth to spare?

9h

VoFs partienkät inför EU-valet 2019, del 4: Desinformation

Vetenskap i Politik Vetenskap och Folkbildning (VoF) har som vision ”Ett samhälle där beslut baseras på evidens, förnuft och ett kritiskt tänkande”. VoF är en partipolitiskt obunden förening och tar därför inte ställning för eller emot någon enskild politisk inriktning. Däremot är det en självklar plikt att granska samhället och framhålla vad som stöder eller […] The post VoFs partienkät inför EU

9h

9h

Why collaborating with industry can provide a career boost

Nature, Published online: 17 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01572-1 Neuroscientist Blaine Roberts explains how partnering with companies, or a consortium of companies, can bring significant benefits to researchers — from funding and training to expanding professional networks.

9h

Schools should have one meat-free day a week, says charity

Soil Association calls for pupils in England to get ‘healthier and more climate-friendly’ meals All state schools in England should offer pupils a compulsory plant-based menu one day a week, under new recommendations to the government that aim to make school meals more environmentally friendly and reflect changing dietary advice. Given wide acceptance that diets need to change to address the clim

10h

New ERC President Mauro Ferrari was partner of Texas cheater Anil Sood

The new ERC President Mauro Ferrari used to closely collaborate with two very controversial cancer researchers at MD Anderson in Texas: Anil Sood and Gabriel Lopez-Beerestein. Will that experience affect ERC's already wanting stance on research integrity?

10h

Are there any sustainability technologies that don’t have enough awareness?

Any tech pointed towards creating green, sustainability etc. that do not get enough hype? submitted by /u/jokemachinegun [link] [comments]

10h

The prototype of the device with which you can feel objects at a distance

submitted by /u/iwannaknowwhoami [link] [comments]

10h

New research, May 6-12, 2019

A selection of new climate related research articles is shown below. This post has separate sections for: Climate Change, Climate Change Impacts, Climate Change Mitigation, and Other Papers. Climate change An example of principal component analysis application on climate change assessment Temperature, precipitation, wind An examination of temperature trends at high elevations across the Tibetan P

10h

IPCC Updates Methodology for Greenhouse Gas Inventories

KYOTO, Japan, May 13 – The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) released on Monday an update to its methodology used by governments to estimate their greenhouse gas emissions and removals. Governments are required to report their national greenhouse gas inventories — comprising estimates of greenhouse gas emissions and removals — to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate C

10h

Research reveals insulin-producing beta cells may change function in diabetes

A revolutionary new study using only materials derived from humans has revealed that insulin-producing beta cells can change their function in diabetes — and that this change may be reversible.

11h

12h

Fleet of Stars

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

12h

Instagram Adds IGTV, Shopping, Stories to Explore

Instagram’s Explore tab is a treasure trove of new accounts to follow—from the latest in style, beauty, and art to architecture, food, and entertainment. And it’s about to get a …

12h

You CAN Get Pregnant on Birth Control, And 9 Other Myths You Need to Stop Believing

Some important things you might not know about female reproduction.

13h

14h

14h

14h

14h

Adrenergic receptor antagonism induces neuroprotection and facilitates recovery from acute ischemic stroke [Neuroscience]

Spontaneous waves of cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) are induced in the setting of acute focal ischemia. CSD is linked to a sharp increase of extracellular K+ that induces a long-lasting suppression of neural activity. Furthermore, CSD induces secondary irreversible damage in the ischemic brain, suggesting that K+ homeostasis might constitute…

14h

Systematic evasion of the restriction-modification barrier in bacteria [Microbiology]

Bacteria that are recalcitrant to genetic manipulation using modern in vitro techniques are termed genetically intractable. Genetic intractability is a fundamental barrier to progress that hinders basic, synthetic, and translational microbiology research and development beyond a few model organisms. The most common underlying causes of genetic intractability are restriction-modification (RM)…

14h

Enhanced susceptibility to chemically induced colitis caused by excessive endosomal TLR signaling in LRBA-deficient mice [Immunology and Inflammation]

LPS-responsive beige-like anchor (LRBA) protein deficiency in humans causes immune dysregulation resulting in autoimmunity, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), hypogammaglobulinemia, regulatory T (Treg) cell defects, and B cell functional defects, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible are incompletely understood. In an ongoing forward genetic screen for N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-in

14h

Substrate inhibition imposes fitness penalty at high protein stability [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Proteins are only moderately stable. It has long been debated whether this narrow range of stabilities is solely a result of neutral drift toward lower stability or purifying selection against excess stability—for which no experimental evidence was found so far—is also at work. Here, we show that mutations outside the…

14h

Spontaneous and directed symmetry breaking in the formation of chiral nanocrystals [Chemistry]

Symmetry plays a crucial part in our understanding of the natural world. Mirror symmetry breaking is of special interest as it is related to life as we know it. Studying systems which display chiral amplification, therefore, could further our understanding of symmetry breaking in chemical systems, in general, and thus…

14h

Role for polo-like kinase 4 in mediation of cytokinesis [Cell Biology]

The mitotic protein polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4) plays a critical role in centrosome duplication for cell division. By using immunofluorescence, we confirm that PLK4 is localized to centrosomes. In addition, we find that phospho-PLK4 (pPLK4) is cleaved and distributed to kinetochores (metaphase and anaphase), spindle midzone/cleavage furrow (anaphase and telophase),…

14h

Molecular structure of an N-terminal phosphorylated {beta}-amyloid fibril [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The structural polymorphism in β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques from Alzheimer disease (AD) has been recognized as an important pathological factor. Plaques from sporadic AD patients contain fibrillar deposits of various amyloid proteins/peptides, including posttranslational modified Aβ (PTM-Aβ) subtypes. Although many PTM-Aβs were shown to accelerate the fibrillation process, increase neuronal cytotoxicity

14h

Developmental integration and evolution of labile plasticity in a complex quantitative character in a multiperiodic environment [Evolution]

Labile plasticity in a complex quantitative character is modeled, with multiple components contributing to net plasticity in the character. Each component has a specific development rate, norm of reaction, and cost of plasticity. For example, thermal adaptation in mammals includes seasonal fat deposition and fur growth, short-term shivering and sweating…

14h

Protective role for the N-terminal domain of {alpha}-dystroglycan in Influenza A virus proliferation [Medical Sciences]

α-Dystroglycan (α-DG) is a highly glycosylated basement membrane receptor that is cleaved by the proprotein convertase furin, which releases its N-terminal domain (α-DGN). Before cleavage, α-DGN interacts with the glycosyltransferase LARGE1 and initiates functional O-glycosylation of the mucin-like domain of α-DG. Notably, α-DGN has been detected in a wide variety…

14h

Activation of unliganded FGF receptor by extracellular phosphate potentiates proteolytic protection of FGF23 by its O-glycosylation [Medical Sciences]

Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 23 produced by bone is a hormone that decreases serum phosphate (Pi). Reflecting its central role in Pi control, serum FGF23 is tightly regulated by serum Pi alterations. FGF23 levels are regulated by the transcriptional event and posttranslational cleavage into inactive fragments before its secretion. For…

14h

Crossing the bridge from molecular catalysis to a heterogenous electrode in electrocatalytic water oxidation [Chemistry]

Significant progress has been made in designing single-site molecular Ru(II)-polypyridyl-aqua catalysts for homogenous catalytic water oxidation. Surface binding and transfer of the catalytic reactivity onto conductive substrates provides a basis for heterogeneous applications in electrolytic cells and dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells (DSPECs). Earlier efforts have focused on phosphonic

14h

Casein kinase 1 family regulates PRR5 and TOC1 in the Arabidopsis circadian clock [Plant Biology]

The circadian clock provides organisms with the ability to adapt to daily and seasonal cycles. Eukaryotic clocks mostly rely on lineage-specific transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs). Posttranslational modifications are also crucial for clock functions in fungi and animals, but the posttranslational modifications that affect the plant clock are less understood. Here,…

14h

Human nonvisual opsin 3 regulates pigmentation of epidermal melanocytes through functional interaction with melanocortin 1 receptor [Physiology]

Opsins form a family of light-activated, retinal-dependent, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that serve a multitude of visual and nonvisual functions. Opsin 3 (OPN3 or encephalopsin), initially identified in the brain, remains one of the few members of the mammalian opsin family with unknown function and ambiguous light absorption properties. We…

14h

TrxR1, Gsr, and oxidative stress determine hepatocellular carcinoma malignancy [Medical Sciences]

Thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1)-, glutathione reductase (Gsr)-, and Nrf2 transcription factor-driven antioxidant systems form an integrated network that combats potentially carcinogenic oxidative damage yet also protects cancer cells from oxidative death. Here we show that although unchallenged wild-type (WT), TrxR1-null, or Gsr-null mouse livers exhibited similarly low DNA damage indices, these..

14h

Circumventing kinetics in biogeochemical modeling [Environmental Sciences]

Microbial metabolism drives biogeochemical fluxes in virtually every ecosystem. Modeling these fluxes is challenged by the incredible diversity of microorganisms, whose kinetic parameters are largely unknown. In poorly mixed systems, such as stagnant water columns or sediments, however, long-term bulk microbial metabolism may become limited by physical transport rates of…

14h

Glucose transporter inhibitor-conjugated insulin mitigates hypoglycemia [Applied Biological Sciences]

Insulin therapy in the setting of type 1 and advanced type 2 diabetes is complicated by increased risk of hypoglycemia. This potentially fatal complication could be mitigated by a glucose-responsive insulin analog. We report an insulin-facilitated glucose transporter (Glut) inhibitor conjugate, in which the insulin molecule is rendered glucose-responsive via…

14h

Long-term neurocognitive benefits of FLASH radiotherapy driven by reduced reactive oxygen species [Medical Sciences]

Here, we highlight the potential translational benefits of delivering FLASH radiotherapy using ultra-high dose rates (>100 Gy⋅s−1). Compared with conventional dose-rate (CONV; 0.07–0.1 Gy⋅s−1) modalities, we showed that FLASH did not cause radiation-induced deficits in learning and memory in mice. Moreover, 6 months after exposure, CONV caused permanent alterations in…

14h

Epithelial retinoic acid receptor {beta} regulates serum amyloid A expression and vitamin A-dependent intestinal immunity [Immunology and Inflammation]

Vitamin A is a dietary component that is essential for the development of intestinal immunity. Vitamin A is absorbed and converted to its bioactive derivatives retinol and retinoic acid by the intestinal epithelium, yet little is known about how epithelial cells regulate vitamin A-dependent intestinal immunity. Here we show that…

14h

Ammonia generation by tryptophan synthase drives a key genetic difference between genital and ocular Chlamydia trachomatis isolates [Microbiology]

A striking difference between genital and ocular clinical isolates of Chlamydia trachomatis is that only the former express a functional tryptophan synthase and therefore can synthesize tryptophan by indole salvage. Ocular isolates uniformly cannot use indole due to inactivating mutations within tryptophan synthase, indicating a selection against maintaining this enzyme…

14h

Bacterial scattering in microfluidic crystal flows reveals giant active Taylor-Aris dispersion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The natural habitats of planktonic and swimming microorganisms, from algae in the oceans to bacteria living in soil or intestines, are characterized by highly heterogeneous fluid flows. The complex interplay of flow-field topology, self-propulsion, and porous microstructure is essential to a wide range of biophysical and ecological processes, including marine…

14h

Bacteria push the limits of chemotactic precision to navigate dynamic chemical gradients [Applied Physical Sciences]

Ephemeral aggregations of bacteria are ubiquitous in the environment, where they serve as hotbeds of metabolic activity, nutrient cycling, and horizontal gene transfer. In many cases, these regions of high bacterial concentration are thought to form when motile cells use chemotaxis to navigate to chemical hotspots. However, what governs the…

14h

Unconventional secretory pathway activation restores hair cell mechanotransduction in an USH3A model [Neuroscience]

The pathogenic variant c.144T>G (p.N48K) in the clarin1 gene (CLRN1) results in progressive loss of vision and hearing in Usher syndrome IIIA (USH3A) patients. CLRN1 is predicted to be an essential protein in hair bundles, the mechanosensory structure of hair cells critical for hearing and balance. When expressed in animal…

14h

15h

Compulsory vaccines are needed to keep measles under control in the UK

The UK should make measles vaccinations compulsory before children start school, according to an analysis of international measles data

15h

New Hearing Device Isolates Voices

An experimental hearing aid differentiates speakers and monitors the wearer's brain activity to amplify the one she is trying to listen to.

15h

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image