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nyheder2019maj20

High-quality jadeite tool discovered in underwater ancient salt works in Belize

Anthropologists discovered a tool made out of high-quality translucent jadeite with an intact rosewood handle at a site where the ancient Maya processed salt in Belize. The discovery of these high-quality materials—jadeite and rosewood—used as utilitarian tools, demonstrates that salt workers played an important role in the Classic Maya marketplace economy more than 1,000 years ago.

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Eksperter revser bygningers enorme udledninger: »Vi ligger og roder rundt sammen med Ungarn og Bulgarien«

Der er behov for et endnu større fokus på energieffektivisering i byggeriet og driften af vores bygninger. I de seneste år er indsatsen på området stagneret, og de nuværende initiativer er ikke nok til at rette op, fortæller to forskere og en interesseorganisation.

18h

Global Health: Measles Outbreak Now at 880 Cases, With Fastest Growth Still in New York

Warming weather usually slows transmission of the virus, but it is not clear that this outbreak is fading, experts said.

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Bad moods could be contagious among ravens

Ravens may pick up and share their compatriots’ negativity, a study on the social intelligence of these animals suggests.

6min

Violent Tornadoes and Flooding Are Expected in Oklahoma and Texas Tonight

Oklahoma, northwest Texas and the Texas panhandle are bracing for a day of extreme weather, including dangerous tornadoes, flooding and thunderstorms.

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Little Caesars Adds Impossible Foods’ Meatless Sausage to Menu

Pizza Pizza Impossible Foods’ meatless burgers are already cropping up on menus across the nation. Now, the company has announced its second product — meatless sausage — as well as the fast food partner helping test it out: Little Caesars . On Monday, the pizza chain announced plans to begin offering a pizza topped with Impossible Foods’ meatless sausage in Florida, New Mexico, and Washington sta

8min

Why are gels elastic?

They're in a range of consumer products — everything from toothpaste and yogurt to fabric softeners and insoles for shoes. But what puts the spring, the elasticity in gels? New research has found the answer.

11min

Better understanding of the effect of melting ice sheets: Experts weigh in

Using a technique called structured expert judgment, researchers asked 22 ice sheet experts to estimate plausible ranges for future sea level rise due to the projected melting of each of the Greenland, West Antarctic and East Antarctic ice sheets under low and high future global temperature rise scenarios.

11min

People with benign skin condition willing to trade time, money to cure disorder

People with benign hyperpigmentation (the darkening or increase in the natural color of the skin), are willing to pay (WTP) nearly 14 percent of their monthly income and approximately 90 minutes a day to cure their condition.

11min

People in higher social class have an exaggerated belief that they are better than others

People who see themselves as being in a higher social class may tend to have an exaggerated belief that they are more adept than their equally capable lower-class counterparts, and that overconfidence can often be misinterpreted by others as greater competence in important situations, such as job interviews, according to new research.

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Teens with ADHD get more traffic violations for risky driving, have higher crash risk

Teen drivers diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are significantly more likely to crash, be issued traffic and moving violations, and engage in risky driving behaviors than their peers without ADHD.

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Protein that hinders advancement of prostate cancer identified

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that blocking a specific protein, may be a promising strategy to prevent the spread of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

32min

Hyperspectral camera captures wealth of data in an instant

Scientists and engineers develop a portable spectrometer able to capture far more data much quicker than other fiber-based systems. The TuLIPSS camera will be useful for quick analysis of environmental and biological data.

32min

Preparing low-income communities for hurricanes begins with outreach

Governments seeking to help their most vulnerable residents prepare for hurricanes and other disasters should create community-based information campaigns ahead of time, according to a study of economically disadvantaged New Jerseyans in the areas hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy.

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Ultra-thin superlattices from gold nanoparticles for nanophotonics

Researchers are creating ultra-thin, highly ordered layers of spherical hydrogel beads that encapsulate gold or silver particles. These structures are of interest for applications in optoelectronics — light-based information and communication technology — and nanophotonics.

32min

New method to predict the vulnerability of ecosystems

The susceptibility of ecosystems to disruption depends on a lot of factors that can't all be grasped. A new method provides good results with only limited information about the properties of predators. The model confirms that a large body mass index between predator and prey creates stable systems. It can also predict which predator species play a key role.

32min

Cement as a climate killer: Using industrial waste to produce carbon neutral alternatives

Producing cement takes a big toll on our climate: Around eight per cent of annual global carbon dioxide emissions can be attributed to this process. A team of geoscientists has found a way to produce more environmentally friendly and sustainable alternatives.

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Potential new therapy takes aim at a lethal esophageal cancer's glutamine addiction

Medical University of South Carolina investigators have exploited a metabolic quirk of certain cancers known as glutamine addiction to identify a potential new therapy for esophageal cancer. After characterizing the pathway involved in cancer progression, they tested a new combination treatment in both cells and animal models, with promising results. The next step is to secure funding to bring the

43min

Rocky mountain spotted fever risks examined

In Mexicali, Mexico, an uncontrolled epidemic of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, one of the deadliest tickborne diseases in the Americas, has affected more than 1,000 people since 2008. A binational team of researchers led by the University of California, Davis, has conducted the first comprehensive study to examine risk factors for the disease in Mexicali. Researchers examined dogs, ticks, and surv

43min

Putin: Russian Military Has “Science Fiction” Laser Weapons

Laser Focus Russian President Vladimir Putin is singing the praises of the country’s experimental laser weapons. The armaments “until just recently only figured in science fiction,” Putin said during a meeting with top officials, according to the Associated Press . He added that the high-tech weapons “will determine the combat potential of the Russian army and navy for decades ahead.” Diss Putin

44min

30 percent off Cuisinart grilling gear and other sizzlin' deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

44min

DNA-templated synthesis of biomimetic cell wall for nanoencapsulation and protection of mammalian cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10231-y The creation of protective barriers around cells is of interest for a range of applications. Here, the authors report on the creation of DNA templated alginate-polylysine biomimetic cell walls for encapsulating and shielding cells, demonstrating protection against physical assaults and immune reactions.

50min

Superconductor's magnetic persona unmasked

In the pantheon of unconventional superconductors, iron selenide is a rock star. But new experiments by physicists have found the material's magnetic persona to be unexpectedly mundane.

57min

'Spider-like senses' could help autonomous machines see better

Researchers are building 'spidey senses' into the shells of autonomous cars and drones so that they could detect and avoid objects better.

57min

Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors

Synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs.

57min

Synthesis of helical ladder polymers

Researchers have synthesized helical ladder polymers with a well-defined cyclic repeating unit and one-handed helical geometry.

57min

The Manta Blackout Mask puts your eyes in total darkness for a better sleep

Get this sleeping aid now for $29.99. The Manta Blackout Mask puts your eyes in total darkness for better sleep and you can get this sleeping aid now for $29.99.

59min

Is there a problem with salmon farming?

Marine biologist and diver David Ainsley is concerned about the effect fish farms have on marine life.

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Air pollution affects tree growth in São Paulo

Researchers in Brazil find that high levels of heavy metals and particulate matter suspended in the atmosphere restrict the growth of tipuana trees, which are ubiquitous in São Paulo, the largest Brazilian city.

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Staying in shape: How rod-shaped bacteria grow long, not wide

A team from Harvard University, Marine Biological Laboratory, and collaborators show how the rod-shaped bacteria Bacillus subtilis maintains its precise diameter while growing end to end.

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Thin Insulation Layer May Prevent Pluto's Underground Ocean From Freezing

Pluto’s Sputnik Planitia may be insulating its underground ocean. (Credit: NASA/JHU-APL/SwRI) Pluto has left astronomers puzzled ever since the world was discovered in 1930. And its mysteries only grew in the aftermath of NASA’s New Horizons probe, which cruised by the dwarf planet in 2015. One point of confusion is Sputnik Planitia, part of the now-familiar heart-shaped region on Pluto’s northern

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The Definition Of a Kilogram Changes Today — What That Means

As of today, new standard defines the kilogram. (Credit: Shutterstock/Piotr Wytrazek) We measure stuff all the time – how long, how heavy, how hot, and so on – because we need to for things such as trade, health and knowledge. But making sure our measurements compare apples with apples has been a challenge: how to know if my kilogram weight or meter length is the same as yours. Attempts have been

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Britain’s Right-Wing Politicians Cry Over Spilt Milkshakes

When Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage was doused Monday with a milkshake while campaigning for the European Parliament elections in the English city of Newcastle, it was unclear who he was more angry with—the protester who threw the drink at him, or the security team that didn’t see it coming. “It’s a complete failure,” Farage told his security detail as the banana-and-salted-caramel concoction d

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Scientists Went to One of the World's Most Remote Island Atolls. They Found 414 Million Pieces of Plastic

Researchers dug holes in the sand. The holes were filled with plastic.

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There's a Brand-New Kilogram, And It's Based on Quantum Physics

The kilogram isn't a thing anymore. Instead, it's an abstract idea about light and energy and fundamental universal constants.

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SpaceX Is Building a 'Starship' Rocket Prototype in Florida, Too

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The Couples Using Magic Mushrooms as Relationship Therapy

submitted by /u/EinarrPorketill [link] [comments]

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Microsoft Officially Extends Chromium Edge Preview Availability to macOS

Earlier this month, links to the Microsoft Edge Canary and Dev Channels for macOS leaked early. The spread of the Chromium-based Edge browser to macOS came months after the browser was first …

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Free-standing emergency departments in Texas' big cities are not reducing congestion at hospitals

Free-standing emergency departments (EDs) in Texas' largest cities have not alleviated emergency room congestion or improved patient wait times in nearby hospitals, according to a new paper by experts at Rice University. That finding contradicts arguments made by proponents of free-standing EDs, who have claimed the proliferation of stand-alone emergency rooms would speed care in overcrowded hospi

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Ancient Egyptians Built This 4-Towered Fortress More Than 2,600 Years Ago

Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered the ruins of an ancient fortress dating to the 26th Dynasty, the last dynasty in which native Egyptians ruled before the Persians conquered the country in 525 B.C.

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Professor rethinks living spaces for refugee camps

New technologies have made the world smaller. A professor of interior architecture asks how architects respond to shifting perspectives of space for displaced people.

1h

'Spider-like senses' could help autonomous machines see better

Researchers are building 'spidey senses' into the shells of autonomous cars and drones so that they could detect and avoid objects better.

1h

Dog-like robot made by students jumps, flips and trots

Students developed a dog-like robot that can navigate tough terrain — and they want you to make one too.

1h

Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors

Synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs.

1h

Synthesis of helical ladder polymers

Researchers have synthesized helical ladder polymers with a well-defined cyclic repeating unit and one-handed helical geometry.

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Why Tuesday’s City Primary Could Mean the End of Philadelphia’s Soda Tax

The tax isn’t on the ballot, but the beverage industry has spent more than $600,000 to back City Council and mayoral candidates who want to strike it down.

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Giving rural Indians what they want increases demand for cookstoves

Global health efforts to design and deliver improved cookstoves don't always catch on. Experience has shown poor households in rural settings will rarely pay for or use these new stoves, which are intended to lower firewood demands and improve indoor and outdoor air quality.

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New research shows how clustered particles determine elasticity of some gels

From the toothpaste you squeeze on your brush first thing in the morning to the yogurt you slurp down to the fabric softener that keeps your pajamas cozy and soft, gels are ubiquitous in consumer products, foods, and in industrial applications, too.

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Ultra-processed food causes weight gain – firm evidence at last

We know we should eat less junk food, such as crisps, industrially made pizzas and sugar-sweetened drinks, because of their high calorie content. These “ultra-processed" foods, as they are now called by nutritionists, are high in sugar and fat, but is that the only reason they cause weight gain? An important new trial from the US National Institute of Health (NIH) shows there's a lot more at work

1h

Why are gels elastic?

They're in a range of consumer products — everything from toothpaste and yogurt to fabric softeners and insoles for shoes. But what puts the spring, the elasticity in gels? New research from the University of Delaware has found the answer.

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Giving rural Indians what they want increases demand for cookstoves

Adopting common business practices, such as robust supply chains, market analysis and rebates, can increase the adoption of improved cookstoves by as much as 50% in rural India, according to a new study led by Duke University researchers. Electric stoves were very popular, highlighting India's need to continue rural electrification.

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Watch a Real Pastor Baptize an Anime Girl in Virtual Reality

New Religion A YouTuber going by the name Drumsy just got baptized — without even leaving the house. Also known as christening, baptism typically involves submerging an individual in water as part of their transition into the Christian religion. On Sunday, Drumsy posted a new video in which Pastor D.J. Soto of the VR Church baptized their pink-haired, anime-style avatar in virtual reality — a str

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'Spidey senses' could help autonomous machines see better

What if drones and self-driving cars had the tingling "spidey senses" of Spider-Man?

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Researchers develop new lens manufacturing technique

Researchers from Washington State University and Ohio State University have developed a low-cost, easy way to make custom lenses that could help manufacturers avoid the expensive molds required for optical manufacturing.

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Professor rethinks living spaces for refugee camps

With every touch of a screen, new technologies including smartphones and social media have made the world smaller. Rana Abudayyeh, Robin Klehr Avia Professor of Interior Design in UT's College of Architecture and Design, asks how architects respond to shifting perspectives of space, particularly for displaced people, in this age of hyperconnectivity.

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Cutting the time on early disease diagnoses with extracellular vesicles

When an individual has cancer, or any number of other diseases, early detection can make a huge difference in the outcome. A research team led by the University of Notre Dame is working to cut the test time for disease biomarkers. The new timeline—30 minutes instead of 13 hours—uses even smaller sample sizes to offer a new liquid biopsy option.

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Cutting the time on early disease diagnoses with extracellular vesicles

When an individual has cancer, or any number of other diseases, early detection can make a huge difference in the outcome. A research team led by the University of Notre Dame is working to cut the test time for disease biomarkers. The new timeline—30 minutes instead of 13 hours—uses even smaller sample sizes to offer a new liquid biopsy option.

1h

'Game of Thrones' Recap, Season 8 Episode 6: The Endings We Choose to Believe

HBO's drama will always have alternative interpretations, debates about its meaning, and revisionist histories—especially now that it's over.

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FCC Chair Backs T-Mobile and Sprint Deal, Clearing Hurdle for Merger

Ajit Pai said he's satisfied with the companies' promises to build a 5G network and spin off a subsidiary brand. The Justice Department still has doubts.

1h

Superconductor's magnetic persona unmasked

In the pantheon of unconventional superconductors, iron selenide is a rock star. But new experiments by physicists have found the material's magnetic persona to be unexpectedly mundane.

1h

New lens manufacturing technique

Researchers have developed a low-cost, easy way to make custom lenses that could help manufacturers avoid the expensive molds required for optical manufacturing.

1h

The Disturbing Resilience of Scientific Racism

A new book explores how racist biases continue to maintain a foothold in research today

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The Trade War Is Just the Beginning

“I have been talking about China for many years. And you know what? Nobody listened,” Donald Trump told a crowd outside Pittsburgh in 2016. “But they are listening now.” If China’s leaders didn’t notice a campaign speech then, the president has their attention now. In office, President Trump and his administration have taken a series of escalating measures against China in hopes they would coerce

2h

What I Found in My Grandfather’s Hundreds of Journals

When Byron Levy died at 94, he left something of himself behind. Years later, his grandson Colin Levy would discover it—and, in turn, get to meet his grandfather again. The younger Levy came to call it the “memory book.” But it wasn’t just one journal—it was hundreds, filled to the brim with thousands of illustrations, anecdotes, inventions, thoughts, dreams, adventures, misadventures, and histor

2h

Game of Thrones’ Final Rebuke of Anger

This article contains spoilers for the series finale of Game of Thrones . It went, roughly, like this: The queen who had sold herself as a reformer and a savior revealed herself to be, in the final countdown, the opposite. Airborne and seated on her dragon, Daenerys looked down at the populace of King’s Landing, at all those people caught in the crosshairs of political intrigue. She heard the bel

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My Chicago Synagogue Was Firebombed—But We’re Not Leaving

“There are four primary causes of injury: the ox and the pit and the crop-destroying beast and fire.” Those are the opening words of Bava Kamma, the tractate of the Mishnah—the first authoritative compendium of rabbinic Jewish law—that deals with the laws of damages. The deeper meaning of the Mishnah is that there is one primary cause of injury: people living in proximity to one another. Human pr

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Pandora launches desktop app for macOS

Pandora listeners might be happy to learn that they will soon be able to ditch the Flash-based browser player for a native desktop app. The streaming service announced on Monday that it already …

2h

Sony Launches Studio To Create Movies Out Of PlayStation Games Itself

Sony has had to work with other media companies when it wanted to make shows based on its vast library of PlayStation games. The company is now switching gears by setting up its own studio …

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June's SLAS technology special collection now available

The June issue of SLAS Technology features the article, 'Next Generation Compound Delivery to Support Miniaturized Biology,' which focuses on the challenges of changing the established screening paradigm to support the needs of modern drug discovery.

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Iron selenide revealed as 'garden-variety iron-based superconductor'

In the pantheon of unconventional superconductors, iron selenide is a rock star. But new experiments by U.S., Chinese and European physicists have found the material's magnetic persona to be unexpectedly mundane.

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US tech firms to take hit from Huawei sanctions

The tough sanctions imposed on Huawei by President Donald Trump could deal a blow to the many US firms that make up the Chinese tech giant's supply chain.

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This AI Shows What You’d Look Like as a Fluffy Puppy, Cute Kitty

Deepfake Doggos We already have algorithms that can create pictures of people that don’t really exist and perfectly mirror the voices of people who do — and now there’s an algorithm to turn you into fluffy dogs and cats. A new algorithmic tool developed by Nvidia called “PetSwap” can take a photograph and morph its subject into a variety of dogs, cats, and other species . In other words, it can t

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Startup Hermeus Wants to Build a Hypersonic Jet That Flies at 5 Times the Speed of Sound

At Mach 5, flight times from New York to London would be reduced from 7 hours to 90 minutes.

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Progress in family planning in Africa accelerating

A new study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows that women in eight sub-Saharan African countries are gaining access to and using modern contraception at a faster rate than previously projected.

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Overweight adolescents are as likely to develop heart disorders as obese adolescents

Brazilian researchers arrived at this conclusion after conducting cardiovascular fitness tests with boys and girls aged 10-17. The results were published in Cardiology in the Young.

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Resilience of Yellowstone's forests tested by unprecedented fire

The University of Wisconsin-Madison's Monica Turner and her team describe what happens when Yellowstone — adapted to recurring fires every 100 to 300 years — instead burns twice in fewer than 30 years. Yellowstone as we know it faces an uncertain future, the researchers say, and one of the big questions they hope to answer is whether the forests can recover.

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New computer-based predictive tool more accurately forecasts outcomes for respiratory patients

Are electronic health records and computer calculations a better, more accurate way to predict clinical outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? According to the results of a new study by researchers at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City, the answer is yes.

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Circadian mechanism may not be driver behind compound linked to obesity and diabetes

SR9009 is a compound that can lead to a wide range of health benefits in animals, including reduced risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Until now, researchers have attributed the effects to SR9009's role in altering the body's circadian clock. However, in a first-of-its-kind study from Penn Medicine, researchers found that SR9009 can effect cell growth and metabolic function without the involveme

2h

Expert judgement provides better understanding of the effect of melting ice sheets

Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic, and subsequent sea level rise (SLR) this will cause, is widely recognised as posing a significant threat to coastal communities and ecosystems.

2h

Mount Sinai discovers placental stem cells that can regenerate heart after heart attack

Study identifies new stem cell type that can significantly improve cardiac function.

2h

Reverse-engineered computer model provides new insights into larval behavior

Scientists have developed a new approach to describe the behaviors of microscopic marine larvae, which will improve future predictions of how they disperse and distribute.

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Do family members belong in ICU during procedures? Study finds clinicians mixed on practice

Do family members of loved ones who are critically ill and being treated in an intensive care unit at a hospital belong there when clinicians are performing bedside procedures? A new study from Intermountain Healthcare researchers finds many critical care clinicians have conflicting feelings about the practice.

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Bacteria change behavior to tackle tiny obstacle course

It's not exactly the set of TV's 'American Ninja Warrior,' but a tiny obstacle course for bacteria has shown researchers how E. coli changes its behavior to rapidly clear obstructions to food. The work by scientists at Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies holds implications for not only biology and medicine, but also robotic search-

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Gas insulation could be protecting an ocean inside Pluto

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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A.I. Took a Test to Detect Lung Cancer. It Got an A.

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Huge concrete blocks as energy storage system.

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How Earth's mantle is like a Jackson Pollock painting

New research paints an intricate picture of Earth's mantle as a geochemically diverse mosaic, far different from the relatively uniform lavas that eventually reach the surface.

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Virulence factor of the influenza A virus mapped in real-time

Researchers have used high-speed microscopy to investigate native structure and conformational dynamics of hemagglutinin in influenza A.

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If You’re Curious About Nootropics, It’s Time to Try This Clinically Proven Brain Booster

Most of us use a psychoactive drug on a daily basis in order to maximize our mental alertness and wakefulness. That drug, of course, is caffeine . About 90 percent of Americans consume it in one form or another every single day, while at least 50 percent consume more than 300 milligrams. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Doctors and scientists aren’t sounding the alarms about a caffeine epidemi

2h

Zapping moon dust produces water

Experiment suggests source for lunar liquid – and a possible resource for colonisers. Richard A Lovett reports.

2h

The Unchecked Corruption of Trump’s Cabinet

It would have been easy to miss the stories late last week, what with a trade war in progress, a hot war with Iran threatened, and the president accusing his critics of treason. But on Thursday, a report from the Government Accountability Office concluded that Ben Carson, the secretary of housing and urban development, broke the law in lavishly re-furnishing his office. The same day, the inspecto

2h

Expert judgement provides better understanding of the effect of melting ice sheets

Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic, and subsequent sea level rise (SLR) this will cause, is widely recognised as posing a significant threat to coastal communities and ecosystems.

2h

Reverse-engineered computer model provides new insights into larval behavior

Scientists have developed a new approach to describe the behaviours of microscopic marine larvae, which will improve future predictions of how they disperse and distribute.

2h

Bacteria change behavior to tackle tiny obstacle course

It's not exactly the set of TV's "American Ninja Warrior," but a tiny obstacle course for bacteria has shown researchers how E. coli changes its behavior to rapidly clear obstructions to food. Their work holds implications for not only biology and medicine, but also robotic search-and-rescue tactics.

2h

Resilience of Yellowstone's forests tested by unprecedented fire

In August 2016, areas of Yellowstone National Park that burned in 1988 burned again. Shortly after, in October 2016, ecologist Monica Turner and her team of graduate students visited the park to begin to assess the landscape.

2h

Researchers develop new lens manufacturing technique

Researchers from Washington State University and Ohio State University have developed a low-cost, easy way to make custom lenses that could help manufacturers avoid the expensive molds required for optical manufacturing.

2h

Why do women military vets avoid using VA benefits?

Many women military veterans turn to the Veterans Administration (VA) for health care and social services only as a 'last resort' or 'safety net,' typically for an emergency or catastrophic health event, or when private health insurance is unaffordable.

2h

'Spidey senses' could help autonomous machines see better

Purdue University researchers are building 'spidey senses' into the shells of autonomous cars and drones so that they could detect and avoid objects better.

2h

Like the emperor’s new clothes, DNA kits are a tailored illusion

Most people remember the emperor: a vain ruler, swindled into paying for a nonexistent magical garment, parades in public, only to be embarrassed by a little boy. To me, the story is really about the swindling tailors. Audacious, imaginative, their true product is a persuasive illusion, one keyed to the vulnerabilities of their target audience. In contemporary terms, the story is about marketing;

2h

Reverse-engineered computer model provides new insights into larval behavior

Scientists have developed a new approach to describe the behaviours of microscopic marine larvae, which will improve future predictions of how they disperse and distribute.

2h

Bacteria change behavior to tackle tiny obstacle course

It's not exactly the set of TV's "American Ninja Warrior," but a tiny obstacle course for bacteria has shown researchers how E. coli changes its behavior to rapidly clear obstructions to food. Their work holds implications for not only biology and medicine, but also robotic search-and-rescue tactics.

2h

Farming is much harder work than foraging

The adoption of agriculture doesn’t mean an easier life, a modern study confirms. Nick Carne reports.

2h

NASA’s Plan for a Lunar Outpost Just Leaked

Lunar Outpost An extraordinary scoop from Ars Technica : senior space editor Eric Berger has obtained an internal NASA plan for the next 37 rocket launches to the Moon — and it includes sending human astronauts in 2024 and establishing a permanent lunar base in 2028. In sum, the schedule for Artemis is ambitious , and the program’s goal isn’t just sending Americans back to the Moon, but moving to

2h

Dietary cholesterol or egg consumption do not increase the risk of stroke, Finnish study finds

A new study Finland shows that a moderately high intake of dietary cholesterol or consumption of up to one egg per day is not associated with an elevated risk of stroke. Furthermore, no association was found in carriers of the APOE4 phenotype, which affects cholesterol metabolism and is remarkably common among the Finnish population.

2h

Virulence factor of the influenza A virus mapped in real-time

Researchers have used high-speed microscopy to investigate native structure and conformational dynamics of hemagglutinin in influenza A.

2h

Room-temperature polariton nano-laser

Researchers have developed a polariton nano-laser operating at room temperature.

2h

Trade Dispute Delays Game Of Thrones Finale In China

Yesterday’s Game of Thrones finale was perhaps the most highly anticipated episode in TV history. You can imagine how disappointed fans of the show in China would have been when they …

2h

Students Sue University of Alaska over Professor's Misconduct

Twenty current and former students claim anthropologist David Yesner sexually harassed them and that the college didn't take action until years after the complaints started.

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We’re finally studying how to combat the anti-vax movement, but the methods may surprise you

Health Researchers are beginning to understand how to talk to parents who are concerned about vaccines. America in 2019 isn’t exactly a picture of cohesion, and the measles comeback is no exception.

2h

Buddha Day Celebrations in Photos

Buddhists around the world recently celebrated Vesak, or Buddha Day, a festival that marks the birth, enlightenment, and death of Gautama Buddha, observed on the full moon in May or June. Devotees, monks, and nuns gathered in temples and sacred areas to pray and rededicate themselves to the teachings of Buddha. Vesak is observed in varying ways from country to country, and some of these can be se

3h

MedStar Franklin Square to offer new treatment option for qualified emphysema patients

MedStar Franklin Square is the first medical facility in the state to offer endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR), using a new FDA-approved lung valve that is positioned in damaged lung airways without surgery, and allows patients with severe emphysema to breathe easier.

3h

Professor rethinks living spaces for refugee camps

New technologies have made the world smaller. Rana Abudayyeh, a professor of interior architecture, asks how architects respond to shifting perspectives of space for displaced people. 'A Syrian refugee living in a Jordanian camp, or an immigrant to the US, will have multiple associations with place,' said Abudayyeh. 'They carry archival images of their home with them on smart devices, and that wil

3h

Study identifies enzymes that prevent diabetic kidney disease

A new study from Joslin Diabetes Center has proven that certain biological protective factors play a large role in preventing diabetic kidney disease in certain people. The study was published today in Diabetes Care.

3h

Cutting the time on early disease diagnoses with extracellular vesicles

A research team led by the University of Notre Dame is working to cut the test time for disease biomarkers.

3h

Author Correction: Dynamic fibroblast contractions attract remote macrophages in fibrillar collagen matrix

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10344-4 Author Correction: Dynamic fibroblast contractions attract remote macrophages in fibrillar collagen matrix

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A systems biology approach uncovers cell-specific gene regulatory effects of genetic associations in multiple sclerosis

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09773-y Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have so far uncovered more than 200 loci for multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, the authors integrate data from various sources for a cell type-specific pathway analysis of MS GWAS results that specifically highlights the involvement of the immune system in disease pathogenesis.

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Inactivation of nuclear histone deacetylases by EP300 disrupts the MiCEE complex in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10066-7 Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal disease with insufficient treatment strategies. Here the authors show that reduction of the microRNA MIRLET7D and hyperactivation of EP300 contribute to impaired epigenetic silencing by the MiCEE complex in pulmonary fibroblasts of IPF patients, and demonstrate the

3h

Tracking carrier protein motions with Raman spectroscopy

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10184-2 Acyl carrier proteins (ACPs), a universal and highly conserved carrier of acyl intermediates during fatty acid and polyketide synthesis, are difficult to visualise. Here, the authors developed a facile, Raman spectroscopy-based method to detect ACP-substrate interactions.

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Imaging gigahertz zero-group-velocity Lamb waves

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10085-4 Zero-group-velocity Lamb waves, which are surface waves with reduced losses and high Q factor, have many potential applications. The authors image such waves in 2 dimensions, and in the GHz range, with a bilayer using a time-resolved imaging technique with an ultra-short-pulse laser.

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Phase evolution of conversion-type electrode for lithium ion batteries

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09931-2 Conversion electrodes possess high energy density but suffer a rapid capacity loss over cycling compared to their intercalation equivalents. Here the authors reveal the microscopic origin of the fading behavior, showing that the formation and augmentation of passivation layers are responsible.

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Child abuse linked to elder abuse of Chinese Americans

Chinese Americans abused as children and those who experienced intimate partner violence face an increased risk of abuse when they are elderly, according to a new study. Researchers surveyed 3,157 Chinese American adults over age 60 and found that those who reported a history of child abuse were twice as likely to experience domestic violence in adult romantic relationships and elder abuse later

3h

Trump’s Immigration Proposal Is a Step in the Right Direction

In an address last week , President Donald Trump offered an immigration proposal that, in his words, “establishes a new legal immigration system that protects American wages, promotes American values, and attracts the best and brightest from all around the world.” As just about every news outlet that’s covered it has made clear, the proposal is very unlikely to make its way through Congress . But

3h

Firefighter Suicides Rise in the Wake of Deadly Wildland Blazes

The stress of battling repeated, massive wildfires is taking a toll on the mental health of first responders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sea level rise could hit 2 metres by 2100 – much worse than feared

There is a 1 in 20 chance that runaway carbon emissions could result in a 2-metre sea level rise, which would have "profound consequences for humanity"

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Novel technique reduces obstruction risk in heart valve replacement

Researchers at the National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, have developed a novel technique that prevents the obstruction of blood flow, a common fatal complication of transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR). The new method, called LAMPOON, may increase treatment options for high-risk patients previously ineligible for heart valve proced

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For Neil, Apollo Was the First Step in Humanity's Cosmic Migration

Neil Armstrong saw himself as an engineer first. But he also knew he was part of a long chain of human migration.

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Legacy of Lunar Data: How Apollo Revealed our Moon

The mission data gathered remain the most valuable information we have about the history of the moon — and the solar system.

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Training Apollo's First Lunar Scientists

Geologists played a key role in the Apollo program.

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Rising Seas Swallowed Countless Archaeological Sites. Scientists Want Them Back

From Doggerland to Beringia, the sea took some of prehistory’s most important archaeological sites. All over the world, scientists are beginning to find them again.

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Apollo Astronauts, in Their Own Words

The astronauts who flew to the moon reflect on legacies, comfort and loneliness.

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Meet the Mercury 13: Women Fight for Spaceflight

The Mercury 13 aced the same tests as male astronauts, but decades would pass before American women flew in space.

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Researchers Mimic Biology to Make a Better, 'Buggy' Microphone

Technology Insect hearing systems are inspiring new microphone designs that can better identify the direction a sound comes from. 05/20/2019 Bailey Bedford, Contributor To read more…

3h

I Hate the Month of May

It will forever remind me that ALS took my mom away — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Firefighter Suicides Rise in the Wake of Deadly Wildland Blazes

The stress of battling repeated, massive wildfires is taking a toll on the mental health of first responders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

'Game of Thrones': The Fans Were the Biggest Losers

The series finale was better than some expected—but still wildly disappointing.

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Researchers outline vision for profitable climate change solution

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I Hate the Month of May

It will forever remind me that ALS took my mom away — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A compound in broccoli and kale helps suppress tumor growth

A compound present in broccoli, kale, and other cruciferous plants restored an underperforming tumor suppressor in a mouse model of cancer, study reveals.

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Quantum gases show flashes of a supersolid

Nature, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01585-w Supersolids are highly sought-after structures whose atoms can simultaneously support frictionless flow and form a crystal. Hallmarks of a supersolid have now been observed in three experiments that involve quantum gases of dipolar atoms.

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Q&A: I Have the Tree. Where’s the Grapefruit?

Grapefruit trees need light, bees — and a temperature gradient.

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Facebook Finally Unveils Secret Robotics Projects

Robot, Teach Thyself Facebook has lifted the curtain on its robotics research. On Monday, the company published a blog post detailing three of its robotics projects. Each focuses on finding ways for robots to teach themselves from experience rather than data prepared for training purposes — a skill Facebook believes could have implications beyond the field of robotics. “This work will lead to mor

3h

5 cheap and easy ways to upgrade your old tech

DIY Breathe new life into those dusty old machines. Give your laptop, smartphone, TV, speakers or console a new lease on life with these inexpensive, simple upgrades.

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Can AI escape our control and destroy us?

Technology Skype cofounder Jaan Tallinn bankrolls efforts to keep superintelligent AI under control. Can superintelligent AI escape our control and destroy us? Skype cofounder Jaan Tallinn puts money on it—and on finding a solution.

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Thinking outside the box: 'Seeing' clearer and deeper into live organs

Scientists using a unique approach have developed a new biomedical imaging contrast agent. They say the breakthrough overcomes a major challenge to 'seeing' deeper into live tissue, and opens the way for significant improvements in optical imaging technology.

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SABER tech gives DNA and RNA visualization a boost

A collaborative research team has now developed 'Signal Amplification by Exchange Reaction' (SABER), a highly programmable and practical method that significantly enhances the sensitivity as well as customization and multiplexing capabilities of FISH analysis.

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Air conditioner ‘in a patch’ provides portable cooling

Nature, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01576-x Device exploits semiconductors to whisk heat away from a polymer skin patch.

4h

Evolutionary Biologist: Mars Colonists Will Mutate Really Fast

Martian Pioneers Scientists have set their sights on getting humans to Mars — and maybe even terraforming the Red Planet. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk’s goal is to send humans to Mars by 2024 , and NASA plans to launch astronauts there after the Moon. But despite the resources being funneled into technology to transport us to the Red Planet, we don’t yet understand the evolutionary implications the move

4h

Counter-intuitive climate change solution

A seemingly counterintuitive approach — converting one greenhouse gas into another — holds promise for returning the atmosphere to pre-industrial concentrations of methane, a powerful driver of global warming.

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Gas insulation could be protecting an ocean inside Pluto

Computer simulations provide compelling evidence that an insulating layer of gas hydrates could keep a subsurface ocean from freezing beneath Pluto's icy exterior.

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Thinking outside the box: 'Seeing' clearer and deeper into live organs

Scientists using a unique approach have developed a new biomedical imaging contrast agent. They say the breakthrough overcomes a major challenge to 'seeing' deeper into live tissue, and opens the way for significant improvements in optical imaging technology.

4h

Artificial intelligence becomes life-long learner with new framework

Scientists have developed a new framework for deep neural networks that allows artificial intelligence systems to better learn new tasks while forgetting less of what they have learned regarding previous tasks.

4h

NASA Fires Up ‘Astrobee’ Space Station Robots

Last month, several small cube-shaped robots arrived, and now NASA has released an image of the Astrobee robot working aboard the space station. The post NASA Fires Up ‘Astrobee’ Space Station Robots appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Supersymmetric 'Sleptons' Might Exist. But They'd Have to Be Huge

The biggest, most expensive science experiment in the world might be losing all its dark matter. But physicists are looking on the bright side.

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The Hidden Heroines of Chaos

A little over half a century ago, chaos started spilling out of a famous experiment. It came not from a petri dish, a beaker or an astronomical observatory, but from the vacuum tubes and diodes of a Royal McBee LGP-30. This “desk” computer — it was the size of a desk — weighed some 800 pounds and sounded like a passing propeller plane. It was so loud that it even got its own office on the fifth f

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Superconductor's magnetic persona unmasked

In the pantheon of unconventional superconductors, iron selenide is a rock star. But new experiments by US, Chinese and European physicists have found the material's magnetic persona to be unexpectedly mundane.

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Noninvasive biomarker for Parkinson's disease possibly found in EEG data

Specific angles and sharpness of brain waves seen in unfiltered raw data from scalp electroencephalograms have been tied to Parkinson's disease. The findings, researchers say, may provide easily detectable electrophysiological biomarkers to aid the diagnosis and fine-tune therapeutic treatments for the disease and other motor disorders.

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Noninvasive electrophysiological biomarker for Parkinson's disease

Novel measures of brain activity associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) can be detected with scalp electrodes, according to a new analysis published in eNeuro. Such a marker of PD — detected using a noninvasive, affordable approach — could improve management of the disease by doctors and patients, particularly in rural areas.

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Giant impact caused difference between Moon's hemispheres

The stark difference between the Moon's heavily-cratered farside and the lower-lying open basins of the Earth-facing nearside has puzzled scientists for decades. Now, new evidence about the Moon's crust suggests the differences were caused by a wayward dwarf planet colliding with the Moon in the early history of the solar system.

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Anxious people quicker to flee danger

By better understanding anxiety circuits in our brain, researchers may one day learn what goes awry in people with anxiety disorders.

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How plant viruses can be used to ward off pests and keep plants healthy

Imagine a technology that could target pesticides to treat specific spots deep within the soil, making them more effective at controlling infestations while limiting their toxicity to the environment. Researchers have taken a step toward that goal. They discovered that a particular plant virus can deliver pesticide molecules deeper below the ground, targeting places normally beyond their reach.

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SABER tech gives DNA and RNA visualization a boost

A collaborative research team has now developed 'Signal Amplification by Exchange Reaction' (SABER), a highly programmable and practical method that significantly enhances the sensitivity as well as customization and multiplexing capabilities of FISH analysis.

4h

Benralizumab not effective reducing exacerbations in moderate to very severe COPD

New research shows that the asthma drug benralizumab failed to decrease annual COPD exacerbation rates for patients with moderate to very severe COPD, a history of frequent moderate and/or severe exacerbations, and eosinophilic inflammation.

4h

New measurement device: Carbon dioxide as geothermometer

For the first time it is possible to measure, simultaneously and with extreme precision, four rare molecular variants of carbon dioxide using a novel laser instrument. As a new type of geothermometer, the laser-spectroscopy-based measurement device is significant for scientific disciplines investigating, for example, climatic conditions in Earth's history.

4h

In Celebration of 50 Years Since the Moon Landing, Neil Armstrong's Spacesuit Set to Return to Public View

Duplicates of the 3D scanned historic Apollo artifact will also tour Major League ballparks this summer

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Ancient Pollen Links Cannabis Origins to Tibetan Plateau

Fossil pollen pinpointed the earliest evidence of cannabis and its cultivation.

4h

Why So Many Women Choose Abortion Over Adoption

Along the highways of states where support for abortion is at its lowest, it’s not uncommon to see road signs that say “choose adoption” and similar messages. The signs capture a preferred anti-abortion retort to outcries over abortion restrictions, like the kind Georgia and Alabama just passed : Women with unwanted pregnancies should find adoptive families. Adoption is a choice certain women who

4h

National Cancer Institute Will Stop Funding Nanotechnology Centers

The Centers of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence were established in 2005 through several phases of funding, which are reported to end next year.

4h

Hyperspectral camera captures wealth of data in an instant

Rice University scientists and engineers develop a portable spectrometer able to capture far more data much quicker than other fiber-based systems. The TuLIPSS camera will be useful for quick analysis of environmental and biological data.

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You weren't born just to be 'useful,’ Irish president tells students

President of Ireland Michael D. Higgins calls for students to be thought of as more than tools made to be useful. Higgins believes that philosophy and history should be a basic requirement forming a core education. The Irish Young Philosopher Awards is one such event that is celebrating this discipline among the youth. While attending the Irish Young Philosopher Awards 2019, the President of Irel

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Physical kilogram is officially dead

Nature, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01614-8 Definitions of four basic scientific units, including the kilogram and the kelvin, now rely on fundamental constants rather than arbitrary measures.

4h

Juno finds changes in Jupiter's magnetic field

NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter made the first definitive detection beyond our world of an internal magnetic field that changes over time, a phenomenon called secular variation. Juno determined the gas giant's secular variation is most likely driven by the planet's deep atmospheric winds.

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Protein that hinders advancement of prostate cancer identified

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that blocking a specific protein, may be a promising strategy to prevent the spread of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

5h

Scientists succeed in testing potential brain-based method to diagnose autism

Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have taken the first step in developing an objective, brain-based test to diagnose autism.

5h

SLAS Discovery announces its June cover article

The June cover of SLAS Discovery features cover article 'A Perspective on Extreme Open Science: Companies Sharing Compounds without Restriction,' by Timothy M. Willson, Ph.D.

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These tiny microbes are munching away at plastic waste in the ocean

The organisms could be making a small dent in ocean pollution

5h

Who should I vote for in the 2019 European elections?

Populist parties look set to make big gains in the European elections – but think twice about voting for them if you care about climate and the environment

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Impossible Foods debuts meatless sausage at Little Caesars

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Amazon Faces Investor Pressure Over Facial Recognition

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California researcher debuts penny sized drone modelled on a fly

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5h

Trilobites: Peering Beneath a Source of El Capitan’s Deadly Rockfalls

Thermal imaging reveals surprisingly little “glue” between the famous rock’s face and sheets that are peeling off it.

5h

Researchers demonstrate double-lock protection mechanism in crucial cellular switches

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have used CRISPR technology to probe the mechanisms that guide the developmental trajectories of stem cells in the brain. The results show that crucial cellular switches are doubly protected against unintended activation.

5h

The return of the wolves

The current return of wolves to human-dominated landscapes poses a major challenge for the protection of this species, says conservation biologist and private lecturer (PD) Dr. Marco Heurich from the University of Freiburg. He emphasizes that conflicts arise around the conservation of wolves in these landscapes due to farm animal slaughter, competition with hunters and human protection. The questi

5h

High-tech Estonia votes online for European Parliament

Estonia was crippled by cyberattacks on government networks during a dispute with Russia in 2007. Today the tiny tech-savvy nation is so certain of its cyber defenses that it is the only country in the world to allow internet voting for the entire electorate, in every election, and thousands have already done so in the European Parliament elections.

5h

Drunk Tesla Driver Relies on Autopilot, Gets Busted by Police

Sleep Driving Yet another drunk Tesla owner has decided to use Autopilot as a designated driver. On Thursday, police in the Netherlands noticed a Tesla driving closely behind a slower-moving truck on a mostly empty freeway, according to an Instagram post by a Dutch police agency. When they pulled alongside it, they saw that the driver appeared to be asleep with his hands on the wheel while the ca

5h

Researchers demonstrate double-lock protection mechanism in crucial cellular switches

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have used CRISPR technology to probe the mechanisms that guide the developmental trajectories of stem cells in the brain. The results show that crucial cellular switches are doubly protected against unintended activation.

5h

The return of the wolves

The current return of wolves to human-dominated landscapes poses a major challenge for the protection of this species, says conservation biologist and private lecturer (PD) Dr. Marco Heurich from the University of Freiburg. He emphasizes that conflicts arise around the conservation of wolves in these landscapes due to farm animal slaughter, competition with hunters and human protection. The questi

5h

Dog-like robot made by students jumps, flips and trots

Stanford students developed a dog-like robot that can navigate tough terrain — and they want you to make one too.

5h

Fiber-based imaging spectrometer captures record amounts of data

Researchers have developed a new compact, fiber-based imaging spectrometer for remote sensing that can capture 30,000 sampling points each containing more than 60 wavelengths. This rich spectral information combined with high spatial resolution provides valuable insight into the chemical makeup of a scene or sample.

5h

Google Glass Gets a Fresh Update With More Powerful Guts—Still Look Dorky as Hell

Almost two years ago, Google parent Alphabet reminded the world that Google Glass wasn’t dead—it just wasn’t for regular consumers. Rebranding Google Glass as an enterprise tool for blue-collar …

5h

Why High-Class People Get Away With Incompetence

People who came from higher social classes were more likely to have an inflated sense of their skills, a new study found. This overconfidence was interpreted by strangers as competence.

5h

Health Researchers Must Work with Communities, Not onThem

So how should they go about it? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

New measurement device: Carbon dioxide as geothermometer

For the first time, it is now possible to measure, simultaneously and with extreme precision, four rare molecular variants of carbon dioxide (CO2) using a novel laser instrument. It is thus able to measure the temperature during the formation of CO2-binding carbonates and carbonaceous fossils completely independently of other parameters. As a new type of geothermometer, the laser-spectroscopy-base

5h

Zebrafish help researchers explore alternatives to bone marrow donation

Blood diseases such as leukemia and lymphoma are currently treated with bone marrow transplants—a transfer of blood stem cells from a healthy person to a patient in need. But the demand for patient-matched blood stem cells far exceeds their availability, and many patients go without. To bypass the need for donations, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers are using zebra

5h

Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors

Rice University synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs. The technology has wide-ranging implications for medical diagnostics, the study of deadly pathogens, environmental monitoring and more.

5h

Google’s AI can now translate your speech while keeping your voice

Researchers trained a neural network to map audio “voiceprints” from one language to another.

5h

Did you solve it? The Zorro puzzle

The solution to today’s teaser In my puzzle column earlier today I set you these problems about slicing through a square grid: 1) What is the least number of straight lines you need to draw across a 3×3 square grid so that every cell in the grid has at least one of the lines passing through it. Continue reading…

5h

Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors

Rice University synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs. The technology has wide-ranging implications for medical diagnostics, the study of deadly pathogens, environmental monitoring and more.

5h

Why progressive candidates should talk like conservatives

In political messages, values can be more persuasive than policies, research finds. When political candidates talk about progressive economic policies in language consistent with traditionally conservative values—such as patriotism, the American dream, family, and respect for tradition—they gain support among conservative and moderate Americans, according to the new study. While progressive econo

5h

Zebrafish help researchers explore alternatives to bone marrow donation

Blood diseases such as leukemia and lymphoma are currently treated with bone marrow transplants—a transfer of blood stem cells from a healthy person to a patient in need. But the demand for patient-matched blood stem cells far exceeds their availability, and many patients go without. To bypass the need for donations, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers are using zebra

5h

Size is everything, ecologist finds

Natural ecosystems are as vulnerable as they are diverse. Environmental changes such as climate change, pollution or the spread of alien species can easily throw an ecosystem off balance. Researchers are therefore investigating how susceptible ecosystems are to disruption. But in their search for answers they face the problem that the complex network of relationships includes innumerable interacti

5h

SpaceX Is Now Suing the United States Government

On the DL SpaceX is suing the U.S. government — and it doesn’t want anyone to know why. In addition to filing a lawsuit with the Court of Federal Claims on Friday, SpaceX also filed a motion requesting that the details of the suit be kept private. According to GeekWire , SpaceX made the request to protect “confidential and proprietary information and source selection information not appropriate f

5h

Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors

Synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs.

5h

Zebrafish help researchers explore alternatives to bone marrow donation

UC San Diego researchers discover new role for epidermal growth factor receptor in blood stem cell development, a crucial key to being able to generate them in the laboratory, and circumvent the need for bone marrow donation.

5h

Russian scientists make discovery that can help remove gypsy moths from forests

The caterpillars of Lymantria dispar or Gypsy Moth are voracious eaters capable of defoliating entire forests. Sometimes they can even make harm for coniferous forests. Gypsy Moths are widely spread in Europe, Asia and Northern America.

5h

Size is everything, ecologist finds

Natural ecosystems are as vulnerable as they are diverse. Environmental changes such as climate change, pollution or the spread of alien species can easily throw an ecosystem off balance. Researchers are therefore investigating how susceptible ecosystems are to disruption. But in their search for answers they face the problem that the complex network of relationships includes innumerable interacti

5h

Health Researchers Must Work with Communities, Not onThem

So how should they go about it? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

SABER tech gives DNA and RNA visualization a boost

Researchers have been using "Fluorescence in situ hybridization" (FISH) analysis for decades to literally fish for specific DNA and RNA sequences in intact cells and tissues within their vast seas of nucleic acid molecules. Because of its ability to light specific sequences up under the microscope at the exact locations at which they reside, FISH has come to be a go-to method in the diagnosis of c

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Preparing low-income communities for hurricanes begins with outreach

Governments seeking to help their most vulnerable residents prepare for hurricanes and other disasters should create community-based information campaigns ahead of time, according to a Rutgers study of economically disadvantaged New Jerseyans in the areas hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy.

5h

SABER tech gives DNA and RNA visualization a boost

Researchers have been using "Fluorescence in situ hybridization" (FISH) analysis for decades to literally fish for specific DNA and RNA sequences in intact cells and tissues within their vast seas of nucleic acid molecules. Because of its ability to light specific sequences up under the microscope at the exact locations at which they reside, FISH has come to be a go-to method in the diagnosis of c

5h

Artificial intelligence becomes life-long learner with new framework

A project of the US Army has developed a new framework for deep neural networks that allows artificial intelligence systems to better learn new tasks while forgetting less of what they have learned regarding previous tasks.

6h

New measurement device: Carbon dioxide as geothermometer

For the first time it is possible to measure, simultaneously and with extreme precision, four rare molecular variants of carbon dioxide (CO2) using a novel laser instrument. As a new type of geothermometer, the laser-spectroscopy-based measurement device is significant for scientific disciplines investigating, for example, climatic conditions in Earth's history. It was developed by a German-French

6h

Preparing low-income communities for hurricanes begins with outreach, Rutgers study finds

Governments seeking to help their most vulnerable residents prepare for hurricanes and other disasters should create community-based information campaigns ahead of time, according to a Rutgers study of economically disadvantaged New Jerseyans in the areas hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy.

6h

High-quality jadeite tool discovered in underwater ancient salt works in Belize

Anthropologists discovered a tool made out of high-quality translucent jadeite with an intact rosewood handle at a site where the ancient Maya processed salt in Belize. The discovery of these high-quality materials — jadeite and rosewood — used as utilitarian tools, demonstrates that salt workers played an important role in the Classic Maya marketplace economy more than 1,000 years ago.

6h

Size is everything

The susceptibility of ecosystems to disruption depends on a lot of factors that can't all be grasped. Ulrich Brose from University of Jena (Germany) has therefore developed a new method that provides good results with only a few information about the properties of predators. The model confirms that a large body mass index between predator and prey creates stable systems. It can also predict which

6h

SABER tech gives DNA and RNA visualization a boost

A collaborative research team from Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Medical School (HMS) has now developed 'Signal Amplification by Exchange Reaction' (SABER), a highly programmable and practical method that significantly enhances the sensitivity as well as customization and multiplexing capabilities of FISH analysis.

6h

Studies: Benralizumab not effective reducing exacerbations in moderate to very severe COPD

New research published online May 20, 2019 by the New England Journal of Medicine and co-led by Temple's Gerard J. Criner, M.D., FACP, FACCP shows that the asthma drug benralizumab failed to decrease annual COPD exacerbation rates for patients with moderate to very severe COPD, a history of frequent moderate and/or severe exacerbations, and eosinophilic inflammation.

6h

Climate change has long-term impact on species adaptability

Historic climate change events can have a lasting impact on the genetic diversity of a species, reveals a new study published in Current Biology. This unexpected finding emerged from an analysis of the alpine marmot's genome.

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Climate change has long-term impact on species adaptability

Historic climate change events can have a lasting impact on the genetic diversity of a species, reveals a new study published in Current Biology. This unexpected finding emerged from an analysis of the alpine marmot's genome.

6h

Daily briefing: Huge study finds no evidence of a ‘depression gene’

Nature, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01622-8 “How on Earth could we have spent 20 years and hundreds of millions of dollars studying pure noise?” Plus: China set to regulate against another CRISPR baby and how to build your own lab equipment.

6h

You Can’t ‘Starve’ Cancer, but You Might Help Treat It With Food

Cancer cells grow in distinctive patterns that defy normal limitations. That growth activity requires energy, and so, cancer cells metabolize nutrients in different ways from the healthy cells around them. In attempt to kill the tumor without killing the normally functioning cells, chemotherapy drugs target these pathways inside of cancer cells. This is notoriously difficult, expensive, and prone

6h

Baylor Scott & White gastroenterology researchers share key takeaways from DDW 2019

Dr. Stuart J. Spechler among researchers from Baylor Scott & White Research Institute available to provide key takeaways from Digestive Disease Week 2019.

6h

Ultra-thin superlattices from gold nanoparticles for nanophotonics

The group of Prof. Dr. Matthias Karg at the Institute of Physical Chemistry at Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf (HHU) in Germany is creating ultra-thin, highly ordered layers of spherical hydrogel beads that encapsulate gold or silver particles. These structures are of interest for applications in optoelectronics — light-based information and communication technology — and nanophotonics. Th

6h

Pseudohermaphrodite snails can help to assess how polluted the Arctic seas are

Ivan Nekhaev, a postdoc at St. Petersburg University, studied snails of the genus Boreocingula — tiny gastropods as small as half a centimeter — and first discovered that Arctic micromolluscs can show signs of pseudohermaphroditism. Boreocingula martyni adult females grow underdeveloped male genital organs.

6h

Key drug target shown assembling in real-time

Over one-third of all FDA-approved drugs act on a specific family of proteins: G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Drugs to treat high blood pressure, asthma, cancer, diabetes and myriad other conditions target GPCRs throughout the body–but a recent study shows what happens next. In results published in Cell, researchers outline the timeline of events, including precisely when and how different

6h

People with benign skin condition willing to trade time, money to cure disorder

People with benign hyperpigmentation (the darkening or increase in the natural color of the skin), are willing to pay (WTP) nearly 14 percent of their monthly income and approximately 90 minutes a day to cure their condition.

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Shedding light on cancer metabolism in real-time with bioluminescence

Cancerous tumors can be made to bioluminesce, like fireflies, according to the level of their glucose uptake, giving rise to a technique for quantifying metabolite absorption. The firefly imaging technique for sugar can be translated from cancer to many other metabolic diseases.

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Discovery in mice could remove roadblock to more insulin production

A new discovery made mainly in mice could provide new options for getting the insulin-making 'factories' of the pancreas going again when diabetes and obesity have slowed them down. It could offer new pathways to ramping up insulin supply to get metabolism back on track in people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and obesity.

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Bonobo mothers help their sons to have more offspring

In many social animal species individuals share child-rearing duties, but new research from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, finds that bonobo mothers go the extra step and actually take action to ensure their sons will become fathers. This way bonobo mothers increase their sons' chance of fatherhood three-fold.

6h

Withering away: How viral infection leads to cachexia

Many patients with chronic illnesses such as AIDS, cancer, autoimmune diseases, suffer from an additional disease called cachexia. The complex, still poorly understood syndrome, with uncontrollable weight loss and shrinkage of both fat reserves and muscle tissue is thought to contribute to premature death. Researchers at CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Scienc

6h

New single vaccination approach to killer diseases

Scientists from the University of Adelaide's Research Centre for Infectious Diseases have developed a single vaccination approach to simultaneously combat influenza and pneumococcal infections, the world's most deadly respiratory diseases.

6h

More detailed picture of Earth's mantle

The chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is a lot more variable and diverse than previously thought, a new study has revealed.

6h

Anxious people quicker to flee danger

By better understanding anxiety circuits in our brain, researchers may one day learn what goes awry in people with anxiety disorders.

6h

Artificial intelligence system spots lung cancer before radiologists

Artificial intelligence was able to detect malignant lung nodules on low-dose chest computed tomography scans with a performance meeting or exceeding that of expert radiologists, reports a new study from Google and Northwestern Medicine.This deep-learning system provides an automated image evaluation system to enhance the accuracy of early lung cancer diagnosis that could lead to earlier treatment

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How plant viruses can be used to ward off pests and keep plants healthy

Imagine a technology that could target pesticides to treat specific spots deep within the soil, making them more effective at controlling infestations while limiting their toxicity to the environment. Researchers at the University of California San Diego and Case Western Reserve University have taken a step toward that goal. They discovered that a particular plant virus can deliver pesticide molec

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Statin use associated with reduced risk of dementia after concussion in older adults

Concussion is a common brain injury. This observational study of nearly 29,000 adults (66 and older) diagnosed with concussion examined whether statin use was associated with risk of long-term dementia after a concussion.

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Farmers have less leisure time than hunter-gatherers, study suggests

Hunter-gatherers in the Philippines who adopt farming work around ten hours a week longer than their forager neighbours, a new study suggests, complicating the idea that agriculture represents progress. The research also shows that a shift to agriculture impacts most on the lives of women.

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Gas insulation could be protecting an ocean inside Pluto

Computer simulations provide compelling evidence that an insulating layer of gas hydrates could keep a subsurface ocean from freezing beneath Pluto's icy exterior, according to a study published in the journal Nature Geoscience.

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Thinking outside the box: 'Seeing' clearer and deeper into live organs

Scientists using a unique approach have developed a new biomedical imaging contrast agent. They say the breakthrough overcomes a major challenge to 'seeing' deeper into live tissue, and opens the way for significant improvements in optical imaging technology.

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New method simplifies the search for protein receptor complexes, speeding drug development

A a new method of assessing the actions of medicines by matching them to their unique protein receptors has the potential to greatly accelerate drug development and diminish the number of drug trials that fail during clinical trials.

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Counter-intuitive climate change solution

A seemingly counterintuitive approach — converting one greenhouse gas into another — holds promise for returning the atmosphere to pre-industrial concentrations of methane, a powerful driver of global warming.

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How Earth's mantle is like a Jackson Pollock painting

To geologists, the mantle is so much more than that. It's a region that lives somewhere between the cold of the crust and the bright heat of the core. It's where the ocean floor is born and where tectonic plates die. A new paper published today in Nature Geoscience paints an even more intricate picture of the mantle as a geochemically diverse mosaic, far different than the relatively uniform lavas

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Bolstering biopsies: Testing individual cells to guide treatment

In research that could make biopsies more useful for many diseases, scientists have used a powerful new tool to zero in on individual cells in a patient's diseased organ and reveal the cells' underlying glitches in gene expression — information that may allow for more precise and effective treatment. The findings, by scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicin), Montefiore Health System, and

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Chinese-Americans abused earlier in life face greater abuse risk as elders

Chinese-Americans who were victims of child abuse or intimate partner violence are at a greater risk of abuse when they are elderly, according to a Rutgers study in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Lupus treatments can be tailored to patient's individual cells, study shows

A new report shows how tissue samples from some lupus patients can accurately predict those more likely than not to respond to therapy.

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Researchers link new protein to Parkinson's

Cells depend on a protein called Parkin, which is mutated in some forms of Parkinson's disease, to get rid of damaged mitochondria. Recent research shows that a protein called MITOL helps Parkin find its way to those mitochondria.

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Bonobo moms play an active role in helping their sons find a mate

Many social animals share child-rearing duties, but research publishing May 20 in the journal Current Biology finds that bonobo moms go the extra step and actually take action to ensure their sons will become fathers. From physically preventing other males from mating to bringing their sons in close proximity to ovulating females, bonobo moms bring new meaning to the notion of being overbearing —

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Bonobo mothers stand guard and chase off rivals while their sons mate

Bonobo mothers help their sons with hook-ups, guard the young lovers while they mate, and even haul rival males off females mid-sex

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Pluto has an underground ocean kept warm by a layer of gassy ice

Pluto may harbour an ocean that’s kept liquid by an extra layer of gas molecules trapped in the ice at the base of its frigid shell

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DNA database opts a million people out from police searches

GEDMatch, a site which has helped solve around 25 cold criminal cases, has changed its terms and conditions to opt its users out from searches by law enforcement

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Key acid-activated protein channel identified

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a long-sought protein, the proton-activated chloride channel (PAC), that is activated in acidic environments and could protect against the tissue-damaging effects of stroke, heart attack, cancer and inflammation. The researchers believe the discovery of this protein could provide a new drug target for potential therapies for stroke and other health issues.

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Bonobo mothers stand guard and chase off rivals while their sons mate

Bonobo mothers help their sons with hook-ups, guard the young lovers while they mate, and even haul rival males off females mid-sex

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Ford to cut 7,000 jobs, 10% of global staff

Ford plans to cut 7,000 jobs, or 10 percent of its global workforce, as part of a reorganization as it revamps its vehicle offerings, the company said Monday.

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Will Earth’s shifting magnetic poles push the Northern Lights too?

Science Scientists are studying the aurora's every move. The magnetic north pole has started moving swiftly at 31 miles per year. It has long been unclear whether the northern lights will move too.

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Key acid-activated protein channel identified

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a long-sought protein, the proton-activated chloride channel (PAC), that is activated in acidic environments and could protect against the tissue-damaging effects of stroke, heart attack, cancer and inflammation. The researchers believe the discovery of this protein could provide a new drug target for potential therapies for stroke and other health issues.

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Teknologisk koldkrig: Amerikansk Android-forbud kan skyde Huawei i sænk

Verdens tredjestørste smartphone-producent er havnet på USA's sorte liste og går nu en usikker fremtid i møde.

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Ape 'Wingmoms' Highly Motivated for Grandchildren

Ape 'Wingmoms' Highly Motivated for Grandchildren Scientists observe intense matchmaking behaviors from bonobo mothers on behalf of their sons. BonoboMomandSon_topNteaser.jpg A young juvenile male bonobo is groomed by his mom in the Kokolopori Bonobo Reserve in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Image credits: Martin Surbeck Creature Monday, May 20, 2019 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Insid

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Vestas tjekker støbeprocesser med neutroner

PLUS. Med neutronstråling kan man måle deformationer i krystalgitre, som kan omregnes til rest-spændinger i materialer. Metoden er dog endnu ikke fuldt anvendelig.

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Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms

An important class of drug used to treat cancer patients could be used to treat brain aneurysms, according to new research.

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Good leadership and values key to staff satisfaction

Tourism and hospitality firms that score highly for leadership and cultural values see higher staff satisfaction, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed almost 298,000 online review ratings by employees for 11,975 firms in the US to find the key elements of job satisfaction and employee turnover in high-contact services.

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A massive white-dwarf merger product before final collapse

Nature, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1216-1 The merger of two white dwarfs created a massive, hot, luminous, rotating and magnetized star with a lifetime of several thousand years, which will collapse into a type Ic supernova.

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Late steps in bacterial translation initiation visualized using time-resolved cryo-EM

Nature, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1249-5 Late steps in bacterial translation initiation visualized using time-resolved cryo-EM

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Bonobo ‘helicopter’ moms stand guard while their sons mate

Mothers introduce them to fertile females, then break up the mating attempts of other males

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Computer program designed to calculate the economic impact of forest fires

High temperatures and low humidity—summer is approaching and with it the fire season. The lack of precipitation also makes 2019 a year characterised by risk, so some Spanish regions, such as the Balearic Islands, have taken swift action and already begun their prevention operations. According to a report from the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, every year there are an average of 12,00

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Giant impact caused difference between Moon's hemispheres

The stark difference between the Moon's heavily-cratered farside and the lower-lying open basins of the Earth-facing nearside has puzzled scientists for decades.

6h

Want to curb your robocall agony? Try these 3 things now

We all hate robocalls and spam calls, but there's an easy solution for answering the phone with ease.

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Nationwide soda tax would mean $7B in net benefits

Soda taxes offer a “net good,” according to an analysis of health benefits and consumer behavior. The two working papers point to advantages similar to those of long-standing cigarette taxes, also offers policy parameters more effective than many existing soda taxes. “The research is clear that sugary drinks are bad for our health,” according to Hunt Allcott, associate professor of economics at N

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Pushy bonobo mothers help sons find sexual partners, scientists find

High-ranking mothers lead sons to groups of females and keep guard while they mate Their mothers are so keen for them to father children that they usher them in front of promising partners, shield them from violent competitors and dash the chances of other males by charging them while they are at it. For a bonobo mother, it is all part of the parenting day, and analysis finds the hard work pays o

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Being bilingual doesn’t improve cognitive strength

Children who speak two languages have many blessings – but better executive function isn’t one of them. Andrew Masterson reports.

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The US Air Force is enlisting MIT to help sharpen its AI skills

The Air Force Artificial Intelligence Incubator aims to develop technologies that serve the “public good,” not weapons development.

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Gas insulation could be protecting an ocean inside Pluto

A gassy insulating layer beneath the icy surfaces of distant celestial objects could mean there are more oceans in the universe than previously thought. Computer simulations provide compelling evidence that an insulating layer of gas hydrates could keep a subsurface ocean from freezing beneath Pluto's icy exterior, according to a study published in the journal Nature Geoscience.

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Farmers have less leisure time than hunter-gatherers, study suggests

Hunter-gatherers in the Philippines who adopt farming work around ten hours a week longer than their forager neighbours, a new study suggests, complicating the idea that agriculture represents progress. The research also shows that a shift to agriculture impacts most on the lives of women.

6h

Bonobo moms play an active role in helping their sons find a mate

Many social animals share child-rearing duties, but research publishing May 20 in the journal Current Biology finds that bonobo moms go the extra step and actually take action to ensure their sons will become fathers. From physically preventing other males from mating to bringing their sons in close proximity to ovulating females, bonobo moms bring new meaning to the notion of being overbearing—bu

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Researchers outline vision for profitable climate change solution

A relatively simple process could help turn the tide of climate change while also turning a healthy profit. That's one of the hopeful visions outlined in a new Stanford-led paper that highlights a seemingly counterintuitive solution: converting one greenhouse gas into another.

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Thinking outside the box: 'Seeing' clearer and deeper into live organs

Scientists using a unique approach have developed a new biomedical imaging contrast agent. They say the breakthrough overcomes a major challenge to "seeing" deeper into live tissue, and opens the way for significant improvements in optical imaging technology.

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How Earth's mantle is like a Jackson Pollock painting

In countless grade-school science textbooks, the Earth's mantle is a yellow-to-orange gradient, a nebulously defined layer between the crust and the core.

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New method simplifies the search for protein receptor complexes, speeding drug development

For a drug to intervene in cells or entire organs that are not behaving normally it must first bind to specific protein receptors in the cell membranes. Receptors can change their molecular structure in a multitude of ways during binding—and only the right structure will "unlock" the drug's therapeutic effect.

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How plant viruses can be used to ward off pests and keep plants healthy

Imagine a technology that could target pesticides to treat specific spots deep within the soil, making them more effective at controlling infestations while limiting their toxicity to the environment.

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Bonobo Mothers Are Very Concerned About Their Sons’ Sex Lives

Martin Surbeck remembers the episode vividly. He was in the Congo’s LuiKotale rain forest , watching a group of bonobos, African apes that are closely related to chimpanzees. Two of them—Uma, a female, and Apollo, a young, low-ranking male—were trying to have sex. Camillo, the highest-ranked male in the group, caught wind of their liaison and tried to come between them. But Hanna, Apollo’s mother

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Only 40% of U.S. kids are flourishing

Less than half of school-aged children in the United States are flourishing, research finds. The new study also finds that the children most likely to flourish—across all levels of household income, health status, and exposure to adverse childhood experiences—are those who come from families with higher levels of resilience and connection. The findings, which appear in Health Affairs , call for m

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Infant deaths highlight danger of misusing car seats, other sitting devices

Car safety seats are vital to protect children while traveling, but a new infant death study underlines the need to follow the seats' instructions and to use them only for their intended purpose.

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Giant impact caused difference between moon's hemispheres

The stark difference between the moon's heavily-cratered farside and the lower-lying open basins of the Earth-facing nearside has puzzled scientists for decades. Now, new evidence about the moon's crust suggests the differences were caused by a wayward dwarf planet colliding with the moon in the early history of the solar system.

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Young children willing to punish misbehavior, even at personal cost, new research shows

Children as young as three years old are willing to punish others' bad behavior, even at personal cost, finds a new study by psychology researchers.

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Fiber-based imaging spectrometer captures record amounts of data

Researchers have developed a new compact, fiber-based imaging spectrometer for remote sensing that can capture 30,000 sampling points each containing more than 60 wavelengths. This rich spectral information combined with high spatial resolution provides valuable insight into the chemical makeup of a scene or sample.

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Estonian scientists took a big step forward in studying a widespread gynecological disease

Endometriosis is a women's disease that affects 10-15% of all reproductive-aged women. Although no cure has been found for the disease, researchers seek to find out why some women develop endometriosis and which may be its effective treatment. Researchers from Tartu have completed a study that helps to get closer to explaining the causes of endometriosis.

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Progress to restore movement in people with neuromotor disabilities

A study published in the advanced edition of April 12, 2019 in the journal Neural Computation shows that approaches based on Long Short-Term Memory decoders could provide better algorithms for neuroprostheses that employ Brain-Machine Interfaces to restore movement in patients with severe neuromotor disabilities.

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Sex sells: how masculinity is used as currency to buy sperm donors' time

Sperm banks in the United Kingdom and Australia use images and phrases associated with masculinity to attract donors because laws prohibit them from paying for sperm.

6h

Echolocation: Making the best of sparse information

New findings reported by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers challenge a generally accepted model of echolocation in bats. They demonstrate that bats require far less spatial information than previously thought to navigate effectively.

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Professor Anu Masso: e-residency contributes to the reproduction of digital inequalities

In a situation of rapid digitalisation of public and private sector services the methods for digital identity verification and authentication are also becoming increasingly important for citizens. E-residency is a form of digital authentication, which gives remote access to digital services without the need to actually live in the country.

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Computer program designed to calculate the economic impact of forest fires

Visual Seveif software measures the economic impact of a fire, taking into account both material resources and their utility for leisure and recreation, the landscape's value and, now, carbon fixation.

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Climate change has long-term impact on species adaptability

Historic climate change events can have a lasting impact on the genetic diversity of a species, reveals a new study on the alpine marmot.

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Neurobiology: Doubly secured

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have used CRISPR technology to probe the mechanisms that guide the developmental trajectories of stem cells in the brain. The results show that crucial cellular switches are doubly protected against unintended activation.

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New investigational therapy shows promise for asthma patients in Phase 2 trial

In a Phase 2 trial, RTB101, which belongs to a class of drugs known as TORC1 inhibitors, was observed to be well tolerated and to reduce the incidence of respiratory tract infections in adults age 65 and older when given once daily for 16 weeks during winter cold and flu season.

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Bonobo moms play an active role in helping their sons find a mate

Many social animals share child-rearing duties, but research publishing May 20 in the journal Current Biology finds that bonobo moms go the extra step and actually take action to ensure their sons will become fathers. From physically preventing other males from mating to bringing their sons in close proximity to ovulating females, bonobo moms bring new meaning to the notion of being overbearing—bu

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How to build your confidence — and spark it in others | Brittany Packnett

"Confidence is the necessary spark before everything that follows," says educator and activist Brittany Packnett. In an inspiring talk, she shares three ways to crack the code of confidence — and her dream for a world where revolutionary confidence helps turn our most ambitious dreams into reality.

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Chinese official hands over new panda to Vienna zoo

A senior Chinese official has officially handed over a 19-year-old male giant panda to Vienna's Schoenbrunn zoo.

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Hyperdimensional computing discovered to help AI robots create memories

To become autonomous, robots need to perceive the world around them and move at the same time. Researchers create a theory of hyperdimensional computing to help store robot movement in high-dimensional vectors. This improvement in perception will allow artificial intelligences to create memories. None Do androids dream of electric sheep? Philip K. Dick famously wondered that in his stories that e

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Chinese official hands over new panda to Vienna zoo

A senior Chinese official has officially handed over a 19-year-old male giant panda to Vienna's Schoenbrunn zoo.

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New Photonic Microchip Mimics Basic Brain Function

Our current computational architecture can't match the efficiency of our own minds, but researchers have discovered a way to begin narrowing that gap by creating a small artificial neurosynaptic network powered by light. The post New Photonic Microchip Mimics Basic Brain Function appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Ford to cut 7,000 jobs, 10% of global staff

Ford plans to cut 7,000 jobs, or 10 percent of its global workforce, as part of a reorganization as it revamps its vehicle offerings, the company said Monday.

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Structural and functional mechanisms of a new class of bacterial sigma/anti-sigma factors revealed

Transcription is the process of synthesizing messenger RNA by RNA polymerase based on the DNA sequence of a gene and is the initial step in gene expression. In bacteria, σ factor is a key component of RNA polymerase for promoter recognition and transcription initiation.

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Google dropper Huawei: Det betyder det for dig

Vi har spurgt DR's egen ekspert til råds.

6h

737 Max-simulator var fejlbehæftet: Viste ikke hvor hårdt det er at genoprette kontrol

Boeing har rettet i simulatorsoftware, så den nu bedre viser, hvor stor en kraftanstrengelse det er at bringe haleplanet i neutral position manuelt

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The return of the wolves

Researchers examine global strategies for dealing with predators.

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Eliminating extended work shifts improves sleep duration for senior resident physicians

A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital comparing the work hours and sleep obtained by pediatric resident physicians working extended shifts with those whose scheduled shift lengths were limited to no more than 16 consecutive hours found that hours of sleep per week increased under a modified schedule. The team's results are presented today at the American Thoracic Meeti

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Structural and functional mechanisms of a new class of bacterial sigma/anti-sigma factors revealed

Transcription is the process of synthesizing messenger RNA by RNA polymerase based on the DNA sequence of a gene and is the initial step in gene expression. In bacteria, σ factor is a key component of RNA polymerase for promoter recognition and transcription initiation.

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Hard carbon nanofiber aerogel becomes superelastic

Conductive and compressible carbon aerogels are useful in a variety of applications. In recent decades, carbon aerogels have been widely explored by using graphitic carbons and soft carbons, which show advantages in superelasticity. These elastic aerogels usually have delicate microstructures with good fatigue resistance but ultralow strength. Hard carbons demonstrate great advantages in mechanica

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Nearly 1 in 5 parents say their child never wears a helmet while riding a bike

Despite evidence that helmets are critical to preventing head injuries, not all children wear them while biking, skateboarding and riding scooters, a new national poll finds.

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Kavli and Nobel Laureates Tackle Science's Big Questions

Highlights from an hour-long panel of Kavli and Nobel prizewinners at the National Academy of Sciences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Strategy could turn CO2 emissions into useful chemicals

If the world can create enough renewable energy to make the effort worthwhile, there’s an opportunity to divert billions of tons of CO 2 from smokestacks into the chemical supply chain, according to new research. Chemical production emits staggering amounts of greenhouse gases via the energy it consumes and the carbon-based raw materials it uses. According to the findings, chemical production—whi

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Fates Intertwined: Vaquitas, Totoabas, and Fishing on the Sea of Cortez

The Mexican government is working to save the vaquita, but the endangered marine mammal continues to get caught and killed in illegal gillnets used to catch totoaba, a fish whose bladder fetches $2,500 per kilogram locally on the black market. The two species — and a fishing village — share a singular fate.

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Weird physical illusion makes you think objects are impossibly light

Around 90 per cent of people are fooled by this physical illusion. It tricks the mind into thinking that three objects together are lighter than one on its own

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'John Wick' Shot Down 'Avengers' at the Box Office

Also, here's your first look at the third season of 'Westworld'.

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Why inequality is a ticking time bomb – for poor and rich

How bad is wealth inequality in the United States? About 1 percent of Americans hold 80 percent of the money. In the United States, the correlation between the income of parents and the income of their children when they grow up is higher than in any other country in the world. One of the big underlying reasons for poverty is receiving a crummy education, which in turn leads to crummy jobs. When

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GM Gives All Its Vehicles a New Soul

GM's new "electronic platform" offers five times the bandwidth and compute power of its predecessor, to deliver better maps and new accessories.

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Klimatet styr symbioserna i skogen

I och runt trädens rötter finns i alla skogsekosystem svampar och bakterier som lever i symbios med träden, och byter näringsämnen mot kol. En satsning på att kartlägga de vanligaste symbiostyperna – baserad på data från mer än 1,1 miljoner provytor och 28 000 trädslag – har avslöjat faktorer som avgör var olika typer av mykorrhiza och kvävefixerande bakterier kommer att frodas. Arbetet kan hjälp

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Professor stiller op til demonstration for psykiatrien

Professor Poul Videbech ser initiativet, hvor læger og lægmænd 1. juni skal demonstrere for psykiatrien, som starten på en bevægelse. Han håber, at initiativet kan råbe politikerne op.

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Psykiater vil demonstrere for psykiatrien

En happening skal blot fire dage før valget få psykiatrien på den politiske dagsorden i valgkampen. Så er det frisk i hukommelsen, når vælgerne sætter krydset, siger initiativtager.

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Seasonal clock changing helps to synchronize human sleep/wake cycle across latitude

In winter, the sleep/wake cycle is dominated by sunrise. Wake-up times tend to occur during the winter twilight regulated by the circadian photorecpetive mechanism. Bedtimes tend to occur eight hours earlier or sixteen hours later, in the middle of the winter night, regulated by the homeostatic mechanism that make us feel tired after a prolonged wake. This setting delays the sleep/wake cycle as la

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Good leadership and values key to staff satisfaction, study finds

Tourism and hospitality firms that score highly for leadership and cultural values see higher staff satisfaction, according to a new study by the University of East Anglia (UEA).Researchers analysed almost 298,000 online review ratings by employees for 11,975 firms in the US to find the key elements of job satisfaction and employee turnover in high-contact services. The reviews were posted over a

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Strawberry tree honey inhibits cell proliferation in colon cancer lines

Spanish and Italian researchers have proven that when honey from strawberry trees, a product typical of Mediterranean areas, is added to colon cancer cells grown in the laboratory, cell proliferation is stopped. The authors hope that these promising results and the anti-tumour potential of this food will be confirmed in in vivo models.

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Mindfulness helps mothers with opioid use disorder combat depression

The discovery highlights alternative treatment options to pharmaceutical medications.

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Just released: Proceedings from inaugural Medical Summit on Firearm Injury Prevention

Proceedings from the first-ever Medical Summit on Firearm Injury Prevention have been released and published on the Journal of the American College of Surgeons website as an 'article in press' in advance of print publication.

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Cardiac MRI may lead to targeted PAH therapy

Patients at greatest risk of dying from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may be identified through cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the information the noninvasive scan provides about the functional level of the heart's right ventricle.

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Younger miners more likely to die from black lung disease than older generations

Black lung disease and other non-malignant respiratory diseases appear to account for a greater proportion of deaths in younger generations of coal miners.

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Enzyme may represent new target for treating asthma

An enzyme called diacylglycerol kinase zeta (DGKζ) appears to play an important role in suppressing runaway inflammation in asthma and may represent a novel therapeutic target.

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Long-term use of benralizumab appears safe, effective for severe asthma

Patients with severe eosinophilic asthma, who participated in three different Phase 3 trials of benralizumab (brand name Fasenra) and then enrolled in a long-term trial of the drug's efficacy and safety, continued to experience fewer exacerbations and improved pulmonary function and quality of life.

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Worst form of black lung disease is on the rise but the cause remains unknown

Progressive massive fibrosis (PMF), the worst form of black lung disease, is rising among coal miners, but the reasons for this trend remain unclear, according to research presented at ATS 2019.

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Australian drivers ready to embrace phone restriction apps—if they can still talk

Almost 70 per cent of drivers would be willing to install smartphone apps that block texting and browsing according to new QUT research—but only if they can still do hands-free calls and listen …

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Good leadership and values key to staff satisfaction, study finds

Tourism and hospitality firms that score highly for leadership and cultural values see higher staff satisfaction, according to a new study by the University of East Anglia (UEA).

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Cement as a climate killer: Using industrial waste to produce carbon neutral alternatives

Producing cement takes a heavy toll on our climate: Around eight per cent of annual global carbon dioxide emissions can be attributed to this process. However, the demand for cement continues to rise. A team of geoscientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has found a way to produce more environmentally friendly and sustainable alternatives. In the journal Construction and Bui

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Scientists develop polariton nano-laser operating at room temperature

A room temperature polariton nano-laser has been demonstrated, along with several related research findings, regarding topics such as polariton physics at the nanoscale and also applications in quantum information systems. The research was published in the journal, Science Advances.

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Tata Motors profits fall 47% amid Jaguar Land Rover China slowdown

Indian carmaker Tata Motors on Monday reported a 47 percent fall in quarterly profits after being hit by new struggles to sell its luxury Jaguar Land Rover cars in China and other key markets.

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Kavli and Nobel Laureates Tackle Science's Big Questions

Highlights from an hour-long panel of Kavli and Nobel prizewinners at the National Academy of Sciences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Boeing acknowledges flaw in 737 MAX simulator software

Boeing acknowledged Saturday it had to correct flaws in its 737 MAX flight simulator software used to train pilots, after two deadly crashes involving the aircraft that killed 346 people.

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Misreading the story of climate change and the Maya

Carbon dioxide concentrations in Earth's atmosphere have reached 415 parts per million—a level that last occurred more than three million years ago, long before the evolution of humans. This news adds to growing concern that climate change will likely wreak serious damage on our planet in the coming decades.

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Virulence factor of the influenza A virus mapped in real-time

The influenza A viruses, which are responsible for deadly pandemics in the past, still remain a major global public health problem today. Molecules known as virulence factors are produced by bacteria, viruses, and fungi to help them to infect host cells. One of virulence factors found in the influenza A viruses is hemagglutinin (HA). Researchers at Kanazawa University have recently studied the str

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The Physics of Mississippi Flood Control

Louisiana's Bonnet Carré Spillway diverts some of the Mississippi's floodwaters. But it also offers up a wealth of good physics questions.

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T-cells caught in the act

Immune cells are life-savers, as long as they know what to attack.

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Look to the ocean floor for Mars life analogues, researchers say

Forthcoming missions to Mars may miss crucial evidence without an igneous microfossil atlas. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Horns of plenty: concerns raised about electric car alert systems

EV engine might be silent, but an EV traffic jam could be deafening. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Coal burning blamed for monsoon weakening

Asian rain system deceasing despite global warming driving theoretical increase. Richard A Lovett reports.

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The New Secession

T he fight began with little subtlety. White, wealthy parents in the southeastern corner of East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, an area known as St. George, wanted their own school district. They argued that the schools in East Baton Rouge were routinely named as among the lowest performing in the state, and were unlikely to improve any time soon. So, in 2012, some of those parents went to the st

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How millennials are affecting the price of your home

It used to be that everyone wanted to buy a home, seeking pleasure and security, as well as the potential for future wealth.

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Behold the Bili-ruler: A novel, low-cost device for screening neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

A team from Brigham and Women's Hospital recently reported the creation and validation of a novel tool, the Bili-ruler, designed for use by frontline health workers to screen for hyperbilirubinemia in low-resource settings.

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Cement as a climate killer: Using industrial waste to produce carbon neutral alternatives

Producing cement takes a big toll on our climate: Around eight per cent of annual global carbon dioxide emissions can be attributed to this process. However, the demand for cement continues to rise. A team of geoscientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has found a way to produce more environmentally friendly and sustainable alternatives. In the journal "Construction and Buil

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Pyrrolizidine alkaloid levels in dried and deep-frozen spices and herbs too high

Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA) are natural constituents detected all over the world in more than 350 plant species and suspected to occur in more than 6,000. Plants produce them as a defence against predators. Out of more than 660 known PA and similar compounds, the 1,2-unsaturated PA in particular have a health-damaging potential. Consequently, they are undesired in foods and feeds.

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An AI for Image Recognition Spontaneously Gained a ‘Number Sense’

Many of us struggle with mathematical concepts, yet we’re all equipped with an innate “number sense,” or numerosity. Thanks to a strange group of “number neurons” buried in the visual cortex, human newborns, monkeys, cows, and other animals have the curious superpower to glance at a scene and intuitively gauge how much stuff is in it—long before knowing how to count. Now AI has learned to do the

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Virulence factor of the influenza A virus mapped in real-time

The influenza A viruses, which are responsible for deadly pandemics in the past, still remain a major global public health problem today. Molecules known as virulence factors are produced by bacteria, viruses, and fungi to help them to infect host cells. One of virulence factors found in the influenza A viruses is hemagglutinin (HA). Researchers at Kanazawa University have recently studied the str

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3-D technology looks into the distant past

Researchers from the University of Tübingen and their colleagues from Switzerland have studied hundreds of fossil carp teeth for the first time using 3-D technologies. In 4 million-year old lake sediments from what is now the Armenian highlands, they found evidence of an astonishing variety of carp. Thanks to "virtual palaeontology," the researchers identified four closely-related species of Mesop

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Sundhed i verdensklasse eller hvor lidt kan vi nøjes med?

Politikere taler gerne om prioritering i sundhedsvæsenet, men vil ikke selv stå på mål for disse prioriteringer. Forsøg på at bremse indførsel af nye, dyre behandlinger falder ofte til jorden

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3-D technology looks into the distant past

Researchers from the University of Tübingen and their colleagues from Switzerland have studied hundreds of fossil carp teeth for the first time using 3-D technologies. In 4 million-year old lake sediments from what is now the Armenian highlands, they found evidence of an astonishing variety of carp. Thanks to "virtual palaeontology," the researchers identified four closely-related species of Mesop

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Advanced civilizations could be communicating with neutrino beams

In 1960, famed theoretical physicist Freeman Dyson made a radical proposal. In a paper titled "Search for Artificial Stellar Sources of Infrared Radiation," he suggested that advanced extra-terrestrial intelligences (ETIs) could be found by looking for signs of artificial structures so large that they encompass entire star systems (also known as megastructures). Since then, many scientists have co

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Absolute Configuration With Electrons

When I first wrote about small-molecule structures obtained by microED (electron diffraction), I wondered if there were some way to get absolute stereochemistry out of the data (as you can with X-ray diffraction under the right conditions). Several groups have been working on just that problem, and this new paper now shows that it can be done ( commentary here at Science ). As usual, I Am Not a C

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How did pollsters get the Australian election result so wrong?

Polling companies will be doing some major self-reflection in the aftermath of the Australian Coalition’s surprise victory last weekend

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Researchers Mimic Biology to Make a Better, 'Buggy' Microphone

Researchers Mimic Biology to Make a Better, 'Buggy' Microphone Insect hearing systems are inspiring new microphone designs that can better identify the direction a sound comes from. Acoustic-Flow.jpg The protoype of Soundskrit's acoustic flow microphone mimics the way that insects hear. Image credits: Daren Zomerman Technology Monday, May 20, 2019 – 09:15 Bailey Bedford, Contributor (Inside Scien

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Crime fighting just got easier as burglars reveal all

The expertise of experienced burglars puts them streets ahead of householders, and even well ahead of other criminals, according to a new study.

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FCC chairman backs T-Mobile, Sprint merger

The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission says he plans to recommend the agency approve the $26.5 billion merger of wireless carriers T-Mobile and Sprint, saying it'll speed up 5G …

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FCC chairman backs T-Mobile, Sprint merger

The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission says he plans to recommend the agency approve the $26.5 billion merger of wireless carriers T-Mobile and Sprint, saying it'll speed up 5G deployment in the U.S.

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Crime fighting just got easier as burglars reveal all

The expertise of experienced burglars puts them streets ahead of householders, and even well ahead of other criminals, according to a new study.

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Biodiversity loss has finally got political — and this means new thinking on the left and the right

The world recently discovered that disastrous deterioration in the health of most of the planet's ecosystems means that a million species are threatened with extinction. This is among the findings of the most thorough ever survey of the state of the biosphere, carried out by the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES).

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People in higher social class have an exaggerated belief that they are better than others

People who see themselves as being in a higher social class may tend to have an exaggerated belief that they are more adept than their equally capable lower-class counterparts, and that overconfidence can often be misinterpreted by others as greater competence in important situations, such as job interviews, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Techathlon podcast: 1997’s hottest tech, surprising air-travel stats, the zombie in your computer

Technology Play along with our game show podcast and learn about the latest tech news. Check out the latest episode of the most fun tech podcast around.

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Biodiversity loss has finally got political — and this means new thinking on the left and the right

The world recently discovered that disastrous deterioration in the health of most of the planet's ecosystems means that a million species are threatened with extinction. This is among the findings of the most thorough ever survey of the state of the biosphere, carried out by the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES).

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SCAI releases multi-society endorsed consensus on the classification stages of cardiogenic shock

A newly released expert consensus statement proposes a classification schema for cardiogenic shock that will facilitate communication in both the clinical and research settings. The document was published online in SCAI's Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions journal, and is endorsed by the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, the Society of Critical Care Medicine

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SCAI and ACVP release consensus statement on cardiovascular catheterization laboratory economics

A newly released expert consensus statement provides recommendations for optimizing the financial operations of the cardiovascular catheterization laboratory (CCL) while providing cutting-edge patient care. It is intended for any physician, administrator, or CCL staff member who desires a fundamental understanding of finances and economics of CCLs in the United States. The document, sponsored by S

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Scientists at DGIST develop polariton nano-laser operating at room temperature

DGIST announced on May 8 that a polariton nano-laser operating at room temperature was developed by Professor Chang-Hee Cho's team in the Department of Emerging Materials Science, in collaboration with Professor Seong-Ju Park at GIST and Professor Ritesh Agarwal at University of Pennsylvania.

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Think You're rational ? Think again…

submitted by /u/thibault2ss [link] [comments]

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Research group uses supercomputing to target the most promising drug candidates from a daunting number of possibilities

Identifying the optimal drug treatment is like hitting a moving target. To stop disease, small-molecule drugs bind tightly to an important protein, blocking its effects in the body. Even approved drugs don't usually work in all patients. And over time, infectious agents or cancer cells can mutate, rendering a once-effective drug useless.

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Research group uses supercomputing to target the most promising drug candidates from a daunting number of possibilities

Identifying the optimal drug treatment is like hitting a moving target. To stop disease, small-molecule drugs bind tightly to an important protein, blocking its effects in the body. Even approved drugs don't usually work in all patients. And over time, infectious agents or cancer cells can mutate, rendering a once-effective drug useless.

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Water nanodroplets zip across graphene faster than a cheetah

In a new study, researchers have propelled water nanodroplets across a graphene surface at speeds of up to 250 km (155 miles) per hour—which, for comparison, is about twice as fast as a sprinting cheetah. The water droplets' ultrafast velocities don't require any pump, but instead occur simply due to the geometric patterns on the graphene surface, which create different contact angles at the front

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Managing mutations of a species: the evolution of dog breeding

In the first edition of On the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin mentions dogs 54 times. He does so mainly because the extraordinary variation between dog breeds provides a marvellous illustration of the power of selection. For most of the roughly 15,000 years since their domestication, dogs were selected by humans for their usefulness as hunters, retrievers, herders, guards or companions.

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Managing mutations of a species: the evolution of dog breeding

In the first edition of On the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin mentions dogs 54 times. He does so mainly because the extraordinary variation between dog breeds provides a marvellous illustration of the power of selection. For most of the roughly 15,000 years since their domestication, dogs were selected by humans for their usefulness as hunters, retrievers, herders, guards or companions.

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After augmented reality, the virtual world still affects you

New research digs into how augmented reality affects people’s behavior—in both the physical world and a digitally enhanced one. Researchers found that after people had an experience in augmented reality (AR)—which goggles that layer computer-generated content onto real-world environments simulated—their interactions in their physical world changed as well, even when they weren’t wearing the AR de

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Virulence factor of the influenza A virus mapped in real-time

In a recent study published in BBA — General Subjects, Kanazawa university researchers have used high-speed microscopy to investigate native structure and conformational dynamics of hemagglutinin in influenza A.

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Synthesis of helical ladder polymers

Researchers at Kanazawa University synthesized helical ladder polymers with a well-defined cyclic repeating unit and one-handed helical geometry, as they reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

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Australian drivers ready to embrace phone restriction apps — if they can still talk

Almost 70 per cent of drivers would be willing to install smartphone apps that block texting and browsing according to new Australian research from Queensland University of Technology — but only if they can still do hands-free calls and listen to Bluetooth music. The national survey of 712 drivers also found one in six admitted to texting, browsing and even writing emails while behind the wheel.

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New Finnish study: Dietary cholesterol or egg consumption do not increase the risk of stroke

A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a moderately high intake of dietary cholesterol or consumption of up to one egg per day is not associated with an elevated risk of stroke. Furthermore, no association was found in carriers of the APOE4 phenotype, which affects cholesterol metabolism and is remarkably common among the Finnish population.

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People in higher social class have an exaggerated belief that they are better than others

People who see themselves as being in a higher social class may tend to have an exaggerated belief that they are more adept than their equally capable lower-class counterparts, and that overconfidence can often be misinterpreted by others as greater competence in important situations, such as job interviews, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Hard carbon nanofiber aerogel becomes superelastic

a research team led by Shu-Hong Yu from the University of Science and Technology of China developed a simple and general method to fabricate superelastic and fatigue resistant hard carbon aerogels with nanofibrous network structure by using resorcinol-formaldehyde resin as a hard carbon source.

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Structural and functional mechanisms of a new class of bacterial sigma/anti-sigma factors revealed

Prof. FENG Yingang and his colleagues from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently revealed the structural and functional mechanism of the SigI/RsgI factors from C. thermocellum.

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Measures for cleaner air

Many measures have been introduced around the world with the aim of reducing outdoor air pollution and concomitantly improving public health. These efforts include, for example, the regulation of industrial emissions, the establishment of low emission zones and the subsidies for public transport, as well as restrictions on the use of wood and coal for heating in private households. The link betwee

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Researchers make a moving tectonic map of the Game of Thrones landscape

Scientists are among the millions of die-hard Game of Thrones fans digesting the show's finale today.

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Is dark matter made of axions? Black holes may reveal the answer

What is dark matter made of? It's one of the most perplexing questions of modern astronomy. We know that dark matter is out there, since we can see its obvious gravitational influence on everything from galaxies to the evolution of the entire universe, but we don't know what it is. Our best guess is that it's some sort of weird new particle that doesn't like to talk to normal matter very often (ot

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Vattenfall-ingeniør: Mentorordning giver nye perspektiver på karrieren

PLUS. Hos Vattenfall står 100 mentorer klar til at hjælpe medarbejderne med råd og vejledning. 42-årige Jacob Glæsner har fået mere mod og klarsyn over karrieren gennem mentorordningen.

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Sony Launches New XB900N Headphones To Compete With Beats

Sony’s XB or Extra Bass lineup of headphones has long been viewed as a competitor to Beats headphones. As the name suggests, they provide deeper bass with great sound quality. The company …

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Good leadership and values key to staff satisfaction, study finds

Tourism and hospitality firms that score highly for leadership and cultural values see higher staff satisfaction, according to a new study by the University of East Anglia (UEA).

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Female ex-combatants need help to improve post-conflict lives—study

Female ex-combatants need more help to integrate into society when conflicts end or they will continue to face major barriers in living 'normal' lives, according to research carried out in Guatemala.

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Quantum cloud computing with self-check

With a quantum coprocessor in the cloud, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, open the door to the simulation of previously unsolvable problems in chemistry, materials research or high-energy physics. The research groups led by Rainer Blatt and Peter Zoller report in the journal Nature how they simulated particle physics phenomena on 20 quantum bits and how the quantum simulator self-verified the r

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Rat poison now affects peri-urban wildlife in Cape Town, study finds

Urban rat poisons are spilling over into Cape Town's natural environment, threatening species such as caracal, mongoose, otter and owl, a team of University of Cape Town (UCT) researchers in the Institute for Communities and Wildlife in Africa (iCWild) has discovered.

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Smart device detects food contaminants in real time

Some consumers place importance on locally grown or organic food. Others want the products they purchase to look and taste good. Yet others focus on low prices. However, no matter what their other requirements, everyone would like their food to be free of contaminants, which makes it quite worrying that over 97 percent of European food products contain pesticide residues. The problem is that curre

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Not every school's anti-bullying program works—some may actually make bullying worse

School bullying can have serious consequences for victims including depression, psychosis, self-harm and suicide. With increasing evidence of harm, a groundswell of school anti-bullying programs and campaigns in Australia and internationally have vowed to stamp out bullying.

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Rat poison now affects peri-urban wildlife in Cape Town, study finds

Urban rat poisons are spilling over into Cape Town's natural environment, threatening species such as caracal, mongoose, otter and owl, a team of University of Cape Town (UCT) researchers in the Institute for Communities and Wildlife in Africa (iCWild) has discovered.

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Sabre-toothed cats bit rivals in the head and punctured their skulls

Two sabre-toothed cat skulls have holes in them that precisely match the cats’ famously long canine teeth, suggesting rival cats bit through the bone

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‘For-Now Parents’ and ‘Big Feelings’: How Sesame Street Talks About Trauma

ASTORIA, NEW YORK—Inside the Sesame Street studio in Queens, Elmo is playing “monsterball” with his friend, a new Muppet named Karli who has lime-green fur and two ponytails. (Monsterball, for what it's worth, appears to be the same as soccer, but with a furry ball.) Puppeteers, with their hands raised high and their heads cranked to the side to stay out of the camera’s shot, run around, making E

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Conservation agriculture isn’t one-size-fits-all

The kind of conservation agriculture that works in the United States isn’t necessarily a good fit elsewhere in the world, research finds. Because of its success in the US and other countries, conservation agriculture, or CA, has been widely promoted as a way for smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa to increase yields while also making those yields more resilient to changing climate condition

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Crime fighting just got easier as burglars reveal all

First study of burglars committing crime in virtual reality could change the way we protect our homes from burglars.

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Astronomers investigate peculiar outburst activity of AG Draconis

Using a set of various ground-based telescopes, European astronomers have conducted photometric and spectroscopic observations of a symbiotic binary known as AG Draconis. Results of this observational campaign, presented in a paper published May 10 on arXiv.org, unveil the system's peculiar outburst activity in recent years.

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These are the top 10 landmarks in the history of making measurements

Little appreciated but vastly important, metrology celebrates a long history with the adoption of new definitions for key units.

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Star Wars News: The 'Game of Thrones' Showrunners Are Helming the Next Movie

It'll come out in three years, which is about how long it'll take people to forgive them for that series finale.

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Blacklisting Huawei from Android upgrades will end up hurting Google

Huawei may end up making its own operating system, after Donald Trump put the company on a blacklist forcing Google to revoke its Android licence

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Stroke, cancer and heart disease: Key acid-activated protein channel

Researchers have discovered a long-sought protein, the proton-activated chloride channel (PAC), that is activated in acidic environments and could protect against the tissue-damaging effects of stroke, heart attack, cancer and inflammation. The researchers believe the discovery of this protein could provide a new drug target for potential therapies for stroke and other health issues.

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The healing power of a smile: A link between oral care and substance abuse recovery

A new study links the benefits of comprehensive oral care to the physical and emotional recovery of patients seeking treatment for substance use disorder.

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Economists find net benefit in soda tax

A team of economists has concluded that soda taxes serve as a 'net good,' an assessment based on an analysis of health benefits and consumer behavior.

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Can a hands-on model help forest stakeholders fight tree disease?

An aggressive new strain of sudden oak death, a disease that's killed millions of trees, has turned up in Oregon, posing a threat to timber production. Scientists are using a 3D model called Tangible Landscape to help stakeholders work together to find ways to contain the disease's spread.

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New recommendations for stroke systems of care to improve patient outcomes

To translate advances in scientific knowledge and innovations in stroke care into improvements in patient outcomes, comprehensive stroke systems of care must be in place to facilitate optimal stroke care delivery. New recommendations support policies that standardize the delivery of stroke care, lower barriers to emergency care for stroke, ensure stroke patients receive care at appropriate hospita

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Epidemiology: Measures for cleaner air

Worldwide, a broad range of measures have been introduced to reduce outdoor air pollution. A systematic review by epidemiologists takes stock of the evidence, and recommends a greater focus on improved evaluation methods and study design.

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Driverless cars working together can speed up traffic by 35%

A fleet of driverless cars working together to keep traffic moving smoothly can improve overall traffic flow by at least 35%, researchers have shown.

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Sedation and controlled paralysis do not improve survival of ICU patients with ARDS

Reversibly paralyzing and heavily sedating hospitalized patients with severe breathing problems do not improve outcomes in most cases, according to a clinical trial conducted at dozens of North American hospitals. The trial — which was stopped early due to futility — settles a long-standing debate in the critical care medicine community.

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The way we define kilograms, meters and seconds changes today

We measure stuff all the time—how long, how heavy, how hot, and so on—because we need to for things such as trade, health and knowledge. But making sure our measurements compare apples with apples has been a challenge: how to know if my kilogram weight or meter length is the same as yours.

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A way to determine the absolute stereochemistry of small, organic molecules

A team of researchers from several institutions in China has developed a way to determine the absolute stereochemistry (3-D spatial configuration) of small, organic molecules. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their new technique and how well it worked. Hongyi Xu and Xiaodong Zou with Stockholm University, have published a Perspective piece on the work done by th

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Why elephants munch more acacia in cool weather

Temperature strongly affects the give-and-take relationship between acacia trees on the African savanna and their carnivorous ant protectors, research finds. New research shows that these ant-protected plants are much more vulnerable to becoming the snack of herbivores during the cool hours of early morning and evening. “I only saw elephants feed from these acacia trees in the cold mornings,” say

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Seasonal monsoon rains block key ocean current

Our oceans and the complex "conveyer belt" system of currents that connects them play an important role in regulating global climate. The oceans store heat from the Sun, and ocean currents transport that heat from the tropics to the poles. They release the heat and moisture into the air, which moderates climate nearby. But what happens if part of that conveyer belt jams?

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Replace soil with foam to solve global food security crisis, say scientists

Specially developed foams could help avert a global food security crisis by replacing fast-degrading soils, according to scientists.

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Tackling the forensic unknowns of 3-D-printed firearms

In the summer of 2016, Transportation Security Administration screeners at Reno-Tahoe International Airport in Nevada confiscated an oddity: a 3-D-printed handgun in a man's carry-on baggage.

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Replace soil with foam to solve global food security crisis, say scientists

Specially developed foams could help avert a global food security crisis by replacing fast-degrading soils, according to scientists.

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Key acid-activated protein channel identified

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered a long-sought protein, the proton-activated chloride channel (PAC), that is activated in acidic environments and could protect against the tissue-damaging effects of stroke, heart attack, cancer and inflammation. The researchers believe the discovery of this protein could provide a new drug target for potential therapies for stroke and other health issues.

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The healing power of a smile: A link between oral care and substance abuse recovery

A new study links the benefits of comprehensive oral care to the physical and emotional recovery of patients seeking treatment for substance use disorder.

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Top Twitch streamers earning $50,000 per hour to play latest games

According to the Wall Street Journal, publishers understand the value of streaming when it comes to promoting their newly released games. Those whose Twitch channels attract more than 15,000 …

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Minister til valgmøde: Nedskæringer har ikke givet dårligere uddannelser

Bølgerne gik højt, da Ingeniøren holdt valgmøde om politikernes visioner for forskningens fremtid i Danmark. Der tegnede sig dog et billede af, at der var bred enighed om en national forskningsstrategi og om et øget fokus på teknisk forskning.

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Can Baze’s Blood Test Tell You Which Vitamins to Pop With Just a Prick?

A company called Baze is offering a bespoke mail-order vitamin service that crafts a plan just for you based on the results of an at-home blood test.

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The Rare Home-Improvement Show That Spotlights Skilled Workers

Now in its 40th season, the PBS home-improvement show This Old House feels like the TV equivalent of New England clam chowder: hearty, wholesome, and old-school. The cast—headed up by the master carpenter Norm Abram and rounded out by the contractor Tom Silva, gardener Roger Cook, plumber Richard Trethewey, and host Kevin O’Connor—returns autumn after autumn, as consistently as uncles you might s

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Image of the Day: Internal Restructuring

Juvenile eels break down bone tissue and rebuild it in preparation for mating.

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A DIY approach to automating your lab

Nature, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01590-z Do-it-yourself projects give researchers the equipment they need at bargain prices. But making your own technology requires commitment and time, and it is rarely easy.

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New Probe To Look For Life On Mars

One of the greatest scientific questions to remain unanswered so far concerns the existence of life outside of the Earth. So far the only place in the universe where life has been confirmed in on Earth itself. There is almost certainly life elsewhere, the universe being as big as it is, but we have not confirmed it. Looking in other stellar systems will not be easy. We will not be traveling to an

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The Future of A.I Predictions

Hey everyone! I have a podcast series dedicated all about the future, and my next topic is all about Artificial Intelligence! Wanting to know where you think A.I will take us in the future, and specifically what time frame (5, 50, 100 years?) Do you think the advancement of technology in the future will be a positive or negative? submitted by /u/emgski04 [link] [comments]

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Robots make waves in Chinese underwater challenge

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Some people develop an emotional response with their robots

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Robot Apple Pickers Could Change Farming as We Know It

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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EU wants to 'create AI that we can trust,' says commissioner

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Graphic design could be holding back action on climate change—here's how

Can the design of a climate change message change someone's beliefs? Absolutely, and with a surprisingly powerful correlation.

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Google v Huawei hits millions of smartphone users

Hundreds of millions of smartphone users will be affected by Google's decision to sever its Android operating system ties with Chinese handset maker Huawei.

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Satellites yield insight into not so permanent permafrost

Ice is without doubt one of the first casualties of climate change, but the effects of our warming world are not only limited to ice melting on Earth's surface. Ground that has been frozen for thousands of years is also thawing, adding to the climate crisis and causing immediate problems for local communities.

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A massive collision in the Milky Way's past

Our Milky Way galaxy has probably collided or otherwise interacted with other galaxies during its lifetime; such interactions are common cosmic occurrences. Astronomers can deduce the history of mass accretion onto the Milky Way from a study of debris in the halo of the galaxy left as the tidal residue of such episodes. The approach has worked particularly well for studies of the most recent event

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Researchers discover new transportation route for plant volatile compounds

Flowers use volatile compounds called terpenes to communicate with and protect themselves from the outside world. The aromas produced welcome pollinators while warding off pests and disease.

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Researchers discover new transportation route for plant volatile compounds

Flowers use volatile compounds called terpenes to communicate with and protect themselves from the outside world. The aromas produced welcome pollinators while warding off pests and disease.

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Producing F-18 radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging

Recently ANSTO researchers have made progress investigating improved ways to make life-saving radiopharmaceuticals using the fluorine-18 radioisotope so they can be available in more hospitals at lower cost.

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First look at NASA's completed spacecraft that will carry Mars 2020 rover

An engineer inspects the completed spacecraft that will carry NASA's next Mars rover to the Red Planet, prior to a test in the Space Simulator Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

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DTU-forsker taler til det tyske parti AfD's 'symposium mod CO2-hysteri'

Henrik Svensmark fra DTU Space var blandt talerne på et symposium, der var annonceret som et modstykke til konference om handlinger på klimaområdet. Arrangøren var det tyske klimaskeptiske parti Alternative für Deutschland.

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Producing F-18 radiopharmaceuticals for PET imaging

Recently ANSTO researchers have made progress investigating improved ways to make life-saving radiopharmaceuticals using the fluorine-18 radioisotope so they can be available in more hospitals at lower cost.

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Intensive silviculture accelerates Atlantic rainforest biodiversity regeneration

An experiment conducted in Brazil in an area of Atlantic Rainforest suggests that intensive silviculture, including the use of herbicide and substantial amounts of fertilizer, is a more effective approach to promoting the regeneration of tropical forest and biomass gain than the traditional method based on manual weeding and less fertilizer.

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Intensive silviculture accelerates Atlantic rainforest biodiversity regeneration

An experiment conducted in Brazil in an area of Atlantic Rainforest suggests that intensive silviculture, including the use of herbicide and substantial amounts of fertilizer, is a more effective approach to promoting the regeneration of tropical forest and biomass gain than the traditional method based on manual weeding and less fertilizer.

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KU-forskere har bygget en ny platform for fremtidens kvantecomputer

Fysikere fra Københavns Universitet har som del af universitetets samarbejde med Microsoft muligvis…

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The Casebooks of Elizabethan Astrologer Reveal Sketchy Cures for Cheating Spouses, Devils

Simon Forman, who lived between 1552 and 1611 in England, was a shady astrologist and healer.

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Conservation's Biggest Challenge? The Legacy of Colonialism (Op-Ed)

Today’s most dire conservation crises have a bloody past.

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When Chernobyl Blew, They Dumped Boron and Sand into the Breach. What Would We Do Today?

In 1986, the Soviets dumped sand and boron from helicopters onto the exposed Chernobyl uranium core. How would we handle it today?

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Dear Therapist: I’m Hiding Something From My Therapist

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, Last year, I started working at a company that has an employee-assistance program. I've taken advantage of it and have finally started seeing a counselor to address my anxiety and depression, which have worsen

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How to Reverse the Assault on Science

We need to let non-scientists know that science isn't based on "proof," but rather on the practice of testing and checking one another's work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Next Wave of Immuno-Oncology

A cutting-edge therapy currently used for blood cancers is now being adapted to fight solid tumors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The kilogram just got a revamp. A unit of time might be next

After years of preparation, new definitions for the basic units of mass, temperature and more have now gone into effect.

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How to Be a Data-Driven Parent

Economist Emily Oster explains how to make the best decisions for your particular child, using the scientific evidence at hand — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Problem with Using the Term “Fake News” in Medicine – Facts So Romantic

While misinformation can sway elections and threaten public institutions, medical falsehoods can threaten people’s health, or even their lives. Photograph by Ugo Cutilli / Flickr Here’s one way to rid society of “fake news”—abandon the term altogether. That’s what a U.K. committee recommended that Parliament do last fall. It argued that the concept has lost any clear meaning, since it has been us

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How to Reverse the Assault on Science

We need to let non-scientists know that science isn't based on "proof," but rather on the practice of testing and checking one another's work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Next Wave of Immuno-Oncology

A cutting-edge therapy currently used for blood cancers is now being adapted to fight solid tumors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Artificial intelligence creates real strategic dilemmas

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Future Catastrophe

Hey guys, not sure if this is the right place to ask this, but are you aware of any groups/think tanks that are focused on recovering society in the event of a catastrophic event? I don't mean preppers and the like, I mean technicians, engineers, deep thinkers who are concerned about recovering communication networks, production processes and the like. ​ Thank you submitted by /u/jaywalker76 [lin

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Meteorit lyste upp himlen i Australien

Vad som tros vara en meteorit fångades på film av övervakningskameror i Alice Springs i centrala Australien strax efter midnatt på måndagsmorgonen.

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How to Be a Data-Driven Parent

Economist Emily Oster explains how to make the best decisions for your particular child, using the scientific evidence at hand — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Inside Facebook's robotics lab where it teaches six-legged bots to walk and makes its AI smarter

Among the machines being developed are walking hexapods that resemble a spider, a robotic arm and a human-like hand complete with sensors to help it touch.

11h

Game of Thrones season 8 finale left plastic water bottles in view – CNET

Episode 4 had a coffee cup, the season finale had a rogue water bottle.

11h

How to Be a Data-Driven Parent

Economist Emily Oster explains how to make the best decisions for your particular child, using the scientific evidence at hand — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

E.P.A. Plans to Get Thousands of Deaths Off the Books by Changing Its Math

The E.P.A. plans to change the way air pollution health risks are calculated in a way that would sharply lower estimated deaths from new, looser rules for coal plants.

11h

Greenpeace activists inside boxes block BP headquarters

Those inside the containers have enough food and water to last them for a week, it is claimed.

11h

Inside Facebook's New Robotics Lab, Where AI and Machines Friend One Another

The social network has a plan to merge the worlds of artificial intelligence and real-world machines, so that both may grow more powerful.

11h

Epidemiology: Measures for cleaner air

Worldwide, a broad range of measures have been introduced to reduce outdoor air pollution. A systematic review by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich epidemiologists takes stock of the evidence, and recommends a greater focus on improved evaluation methods and study design.

11h

Some baby dinosaurs crawled before learning to walk on two legs

A dinosaur that walked on its two hind legs, may have started out crawling around on all fours whilst its body was still developing

11h

Mini universes could be constantly exploding at every point in space

If every point in space acts like a tiny universe, growing and then shrinking, it could explain our universe’s expansion and solve one of physics’ biggest problems

11h

A university requested retractions of eight papers. It took journals a year to yank four of them.

On March 30, 2018, The Ohio State University (OSU) released a 75-page report concluding that Ching-Shih Chen, a cancer researcher, had deviated “from the accepted practices of image handling and figure generation and intentionally falsifying data.” The report recommended the retraction of eight papers. By the end of August of 2018, Chen had had four … Continue reading A university requested retrac

11h

Altered minds: mescaline’s complicated history

Nature, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01571-2 A chronicle tracing the drug’s ancient roots and role in research grips Alison Abbott.

11h

What the College Scandal Shallowfakes Reveal About the Rich

The leisure class got tired of looking like jackasses in garish watches—they decided to spare no expense to seem like striving bourgeois warriors.

11h

Hearing Aids Get a Tech-Minded Upgrade

Spurred by regulations that will allow over-the-counter sales, hearing-aid companies are pushing the limits of what their products can be.

11h

It's the World Slime Convention! Let's Goo!

Welcome to the World Slime Convention, where fans and purveyors of the internet's gloppiest trend gather to network and talk shop—many with their parents in tow.

11h

The Quiet Power of Sound Design

Our lives are increasingly entangled with our devices; great sound design could make that a more perfect union.

11h

Why Software Needs to Escape from San Francisco

Think of every city as a platform—each new platform opens up the possibility to explore new ideas. It's time to give other platforms a chance to change the world.

11h

Inside the Hybrid Digital-Analog Lives of Children

For our kids, the digital world is as much their native environment as the physical world. It's up to parents to help them thrive in this often mystifying existence.

11h

Angry Nerd: Kickstarter Has Become No Fun at All

Unless you're Kickstarting a promise to stop bugging me—or the end of capitalism—I'm not interested in your relentless notifications.

11h

Inside Swamp Works, the NASA Lab Learning to Mine the Moon

NASA's Swamp Works may be humans' best hope for figuring out how to live and work on other planets.

11h

Build a Raspberry Pi GoBot With Your Kids

With just $60 worth of hardware and 10 lines of code, you and your child can build a simple wheeled droid that can drive around the house.

11h

Ingenious Audio Designs From Audeze, Bang & Olufsen, Devialet, and Cambridge Audio

Wireless technology is helping audio gear explore new horizons in form and functionality.

11h

Q Acoustics' Concept 300 Speakers Kill Sound-Smearing Vibrations

Errant sound waves can keep speakers from delivering their best performance. Q Acoustics neutralizes sonic invaders in three ways.

11h

Moondust Could Cloud Our Lunar Ambitions

It's superfine. It's sharp. It sticks to everything. Before we return to the moon, we'll have to conquer one of the weirdest substances in the solar system.

11h

What Online Chess Taught One Teen About Digital Life

High school is hard; the internet is messing with our self-esteem. Then my friends insisted I download Chess Time.

11h

Facing the Ubiquity of Fortnite in Our Kids' Lives

About a week after the *L* dance was decoded, and 72 hours after the carpool surveillance, my wife and I convened the Fortnite security council again.

11h

A Food Pyramid for Kids' Media Consumption

Researchers are beginning to study screen-based media in all its forms. We've distilled their findings into some handy recommendations.

11h

We Are Tenants on Our Own Devices

It's time to assert our sovereignty over our own stuff.

11h

5G Is Coming, and It’s Fortified With Fiber

Countless new wireless transmitters will relay all that data to your phone, and many will connect to the internet through endless miles of new fiber-optic cable.

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HobbyKidsTV, YouTube, and the New World of Child Stars

One family's video empire shows what it takes to shield young YouTube stars from the platform's dark side.

11h

What Congress Can Do When Trump Appointees Defy It

The fight for control of information from the Russia investigation is heading into uncharted legal territory. The House Judiciary Committee has voted to hold Attorney General William Barr in contempt of Congress for his refusal to provide the committee with the full, unredacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report. Earlier this month, House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff publicly

11h

Having a Library or Café Down the Block Could Change Your Life

As our political discourse generates derision and dissension, our time in the virtual world crowds out our time in the actual one, and trust in our institutions and one another has plummeted, local places such as markets, libraries, and coffee shops can help. A new study shows that living near community-oriented public and commercial spaces brings a host of social benefits, such as increased trus

11h

Does Trump Deserve Credit on China?

President Donald Trump declared a national emergency and banned equipment made by tech firms of “foreign adversaries” from operating in the United States. The Department of Commerce followed up, listing Huawei and dozens of other Chinese firms as risks to American national security, prohibiting them from selling or buying in the U.S. market. The actions were much broader and more bare-knuckle tha

11h

Single mum's Nasa internship funded by strangers

A single mother almost missed out on a coveted Nasa internship until strangers stepped in to help.

11h

Techtopia #105: Er dataetik god forretning?

Måske har du også lagt mærke til, at det danske sprog har fået et nyt ord: Data-etik. Hvad i alverden betyder det?

11h

Enhedslisten, Alternativet og Socialdemokratiet: Det er behov for et it-ministerium

Enhedslisten, Alternativet og Socialdemokratiet vil samle ansvaret for den offentlige digitalisering i et nyt ministerium.

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12h

Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation defect in the Heart of Subjects with Coronary Artery Disease

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43761-y Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation defect in the Heart of Subjects with Coronary Artery Disease

12h

Privacy-preserving Quantum Sealed-bid Auction Based on Grover’s Search Algorithm

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44030-8 Privacy-preserving Quantum Sealed-bid Auction Based on Grover’s Search Algorithm

12h

Social noise interferes with learning in a volatile environment

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44101-w Social noise interferes with learning in a volatile environment

12h

IL-1α promotes liver inflammation and necrosis during blood-stage Plasmodium chabaudi malaria

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44125-2 IL-1α promotes liver inflammation and necrosis during blood-stage Plasmodium chabaudi malaria

12h

A low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet promotes ganglioside synthesis via the transcriptional regulation of ganglioside metabolism-related genes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43952-7 A low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet promotes ganglioside synthesis via the transcriptional regulation of ganglioside metabolism-related genes

12h

Predictor of Early Remission of Diabetic Macular Edema under As-Needed Intravitreal Ranibizumab

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44078-6 Predictor of Early Remission of Diabetic Macular Edema under As-Needed Intravitreal Ranibizumab

12h

Specific heat capacity enhancement studied in silica doped potassium nitrate via molecular dynamics simulation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44132-3 Specific heat capacity enhancement studied in silica doped potassium nitrate via molecular dynamics simulation

12h

Molecular mechanisms of heterogeneous oligomerization of huntingtin proteins

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44151-0 Molecular mechanisms of heterogeneous oligomerization of huntingtin proteins

12h

Selfish motives must not imperil the new space age

As Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos and Donald Trump rush to return people to space, we need to make sure nationalism and rivalries don’t mortgage the solar system’s future

12h

Svenske lyntog får en overhaling: Skal sikre timedrift til København

PLUS. X2000-toget gennemgår i øjeblikket en omfattende modernisering, der skal sikre timedrift mellem København, Gøteborg og Stockholm.

12h

Nearly all states use drones for range of work

In Utah, drones are hovering near avalanches to watch roaring snow. In North Carolina, they're searching for the nests of endangered birds. In Kansas, they could soon be identifying sick cows through heat signatures.

12h

New recommendations for stroke systems of care to improve patient outcomes

To translate advances in scientific knowledge and innovations in stroke care into improvements in patient outcomes, comprehensive stroke systems of care must be in place to facilitate optimal stroke care delivery.New recommendations support policies that standardize the delivery of stroke care, lower barriers to emergency care for stroke, ensure stroke patients receive care at appropriate hospital

12h

Google says services on Huawei phone still will function

Google assured users of Huawei smartphones on Monday the American company's basic services will work on them following U.S. government curbs on doing business with the Chinese tech giant.

12h

Two-Dimensional-Like Amorphous Indium Tungsten Oxide Nano-Sheet Junctionless Transistors with Low Operation Voltage

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44131-4 Two-Dimensional-Like Amorphous Indium Tungsten Oxide Nano-Sheet Junctionless Transistors with Low Operation Voltage

12h

Author Correction: Specific microRNAs Regulate Heat Stress Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43688-4 Author Correction: Specific microRNAs Regulate Heat Stress Responses in Caenorhabditis elegans

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FABP1 controls hepatic transport and biotransformation of Δ9-THC

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44108-3 FABP1 controls hepatic transport and biotransformation of Δ 9 -THC

12h

Genetic Polymorphisms in the Open Reading Frame of the CCR5 gene From HIV-1 Seronegative and Seropositive Individuals From National Capital Regions of India

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44136-z Genetic Polymorphisms in the Open Reading Frame of the CCR5 gene From HIV-1 Seronegative and Seropositive Individuals From National Capital Regions of India

12h

GREIN: An Interactive Web Platform for Re-analyzing GEO RNA-seq Data

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43935-8 GREIN: An Interactive Web Platform for Re-analyzing GEO RNA-seq Data

12h

Genetic Diversity in Stomatal Density among Soybeans Elucidated Using High-throughput Technique Based on an Algorithm for Object Detection

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44127-0 Genetic Diversity in Stomatal Density among Soybeans Elucidated Using High-throughput Technique Based on an Algorithm for Object Detection

12h

Covalent-bonding-induced strong phonon scattering in the atomically thin WSe2 layer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44091-9 Covalent-bonding-induced strong phonon scattering in the atomically thin WSe 2 layer

12h

Annihilation of the Somali upwelling system during summer monsoon

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44099-1 Annihilation of the Somali upwelling system during summer monsoon

12h

Adieu, Le Grand K: The kilogram to be redefined for the first time in 130 years

In a subterranean vault in a suburb of Paris lies a small, rarely seen metal cylinder known as Le Grand K.

12h

This early sauropod went from walking on four legs to two as it grew

A new computer analysis shows how Mussaurus patagonicus’s weight shifted toward its hips as it grew, confirming fossil hints of how its gait changed.

12h

How The Brain Shapes Pain And Links Ouch With Emotion

Pain is more than an unpleasant sensation. When pain signals reach the brain, they interact with areas involved in thinking, memory and emotion. (Image credit: Chris Nickels for NPR)

12h

Turning one greenhouse gas into another could combat climate change

Sucking methane from the air might deliver a bigger bang for the buck than just removing carbon dioxide.

12h

Fem enkla sätt att bidra till biologisk mångfald

I Sverige är det bland annat skogsproduktion, storskaligt jordbruk, bekämpningsmedel och hårdbelagda stadsytor som gör att vilda växter får allt mindre utrymme. Detta leder i sin tur till att humlor och andra vildbin får allt svårare att hitta mat och bostad. – Men det går att vara med och göra skillnad. Privata trädgårdar utgör upp till en tredjedel av våra städers och tätorters yta, säger Anna

12h

‘Earthworm Dilemma’ Has Climate Scientists Racing to Keep Up

Worms are wriggling into Earth’s northernmost forests, creating major unknowns for climate-change models.

12h

Google just gave Huawei a wakeup call

It's been a tumultuous week for Huawei. Five days ago, President Trump declared a national emergency to ban the sales and use of telecom equipment that pose "unacceptable" …

13h

Why China's Social-Credit Systems Are Surprisingly Popular

submitted by /u/dopadelic [link] [comments]

13h

China's pig disease outbreak pushes up global pork prices

Pork lovers worldwide are wincing at prices that have jumped up to 40 percent as African swine fever in China's vast pig herds sends shockwaves through global meat markets.

13h

China's pig disease outbreak pushes up global pork prices

Hong Kong retiree Lee Wai-man loves pork fresh from the market but eats a lot less now that the price has jumped as China struggles with a deadly swine disease that has sent shockwaves through global meat markets.

13h

FÖRELÄSNING: Ökad risk för håravfall vid typ 2-diabetes

Personer med diabetes, i synnerhet typ 2-diabetes, har ökad risk för håravfall. Studier har även visat att tunnhåriga personer har större risk för hjärt- kärlsjukdom. Hör Pontus Dunér berätta om sin forskning som visar att det går att få tillbaka håret.

13h

Københavns Universitet og Microsoft tester ny platform for kvantecomputer

Google og IBM bruger allerede Josephson junctions i deres kvantecomputere. Disse kan muligvis også danne grundlag for de særlige topologiske kvantebit, som Microsoft satser på at bruge i deres kvantecomputer.

13h

Starwatch: a meeting between the moon and Jupiter

There will be two celestial encounters to savour this week Whereas our first lunar conjunction of the month (with Mars two weeks ago) took place when the moon was very young, this pairing with Jupiter takes place when the moon is just past full. Our natural satellite has begun this month’s waning phase but will still be 94.5% illuminated on Monday night, when the conjunction takes place. The char

13h

Revenge porn laws 'not working', says victims group

Victims should receive anonymity and laws need to include threats to share images, a victims group says.

13h

Ryanair profit slumps on cheaper fares

Ryanair's annual net profit slumped by almost one third as overcapacity in the European short-haul sector caused it to cut ticket prices, the Irish no-frills airline said Monday.

14h

Chronic Lyme disease: Fake diagnosis, not fake disease

Believe it or not, an encounter on Twitter actually changed Dr. Gorski's mind. Chronic Lyme disease is a fake diagnosis, not a fake disease.

14h

Scientists Might Have Just Found Where Cannabis Originally Came From

Hemp started out almost 30 million years ago.

14h

China set to introduce gene-editing regulation following CRISPR-baby furore

Nature, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01580-1 The draft rules mean that anyone who manipulates human genes in adults or embryos is responsible for adverse outcomes.

14h

Imaging tweak reveals chemical bonds inside bulky molecules

Nature, Published online: 20 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01537-4 An unconventional mode of operation allows atomic-force microscope to peer inside 3D shapes.

14h

Researchers develop new flying / driving robot

The first experimental robot drone that flies like a typical quadcopter, drives on tough terrain and squeezes into tight spaces using the same motors, has been developed by Ben-Gurion University …

14h

Driverless cars working together can speed up traffic by 35%

A fleet of driverless cars working together to keep traffic moving smoothly can improve overall traffic flow by at least 35 percent, researchers have shown.

14h

How allergens in pollen help plants do more than make you sneeze

A plant’s view of what humans call allergens in pollen grains involves a lot of crucial biology. And sex.

14h

Tech-analytiker: Huawei-telefoner uden Android er et problem for forbrugeren

Google indstiller dele af samarbejdet med Huawei, og det går ikke kun ud over den kinesiske telegigant, men også dig, lyder det fra DR's tech-analytiker.

14h

Economists find net benefit in soda tax

A team of economists has concluded that soda taxes serve as a "net good," an assessment based on an analysis of health benefits and consumer behavior. The work, which sees advantages similar to those of long-standing cigarette taxes, also offers policy parameters that it views as more effective than many existing soda taxes.

14h

Chicago Commits to 100 Percent Clean Energy

submitted by /u/POMCube [link] [comments]

14h

Can a hands-on model help forest stakeholders fight tree disease?

When a new, more aggressive strain of the pathogen that causes sudden oak death turned up in Oregon, scientists and stakeholders banded together to try to protect susceptible trees and the region's valuable timber industry.

14h

Can a hands-on model help forest stakeholders fight tree disease?

When a new, more aggressive strain of the pathogen that causes sudden oak death turned up in Oregon, scientists and stakeholders banded together to try to protect susceptible trees and the region's valuable timber industry.

14h

Scientists Have Created The Loudest Possible Sound Underwater

Like a rocket taking off inside a raindrop.

15h

15h

Can you solve it? The Zorro puzzle

Swordplay with lines and squares UPDATE: To read the solution click here Today you’re going to get the chance to prove a theorem no one has ever proved before. Continue reading…

15h

Traumatised by conflict, animals find haven in Jordan

For more than a year after being moved to a Jordanian wildlife reserve from war-hit Syria, two bears, Loz and Sukkar, would cower whenever planes flew by, traumatised by past bombardments.

15h

Traumatised by conflict, animals find haven in Jordan

For more than a year after being moved to a Jordanian wildlife reserve from war-hit Syria, two bears, Loz and Sukkar, would cower whenever planes flew by, traumatised by past bombardments.

15h

Sinking feeling: Philippine cities facing 'slow-motion disaster'

When Mary Ann San Jose moved to Sitio Pariahan more than two decades ago, she could walk to the local chapel. Today, reaching it requires a swim.

15h

Google and Android system start to cut ties with Huawei

US internet giant Google, whose Android mobile operating system powers most of the world's smartphones, said Sunday it was beginning to cut ties with China's Huawei, which Washington considers a national security threat.

15h

Scientists: Why we should appreciate wasps

Wasps are seen as 'bothersome and pointless' and not given the attention they deserve – researchers.

15h

Nearly 1 in 5 parents say their child never wears a helmet while riding a bike

Despite evidence that helmets are critical to preventing head injuries, not all children wear them while biking, skateboarding and riding scooters, a new national poll finds.

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16h

Macron and Salvini: Two Leaders, Two Competing Visions for Europe

PARIS—French President Emmanuel Macron and Matteo Salvini, Italy’s deputy prime minister and interior minister, are from the same generation, but more than the Alps divides them. Macron always wears a suit and tie, and has a penchant for lofty rhetoric and formal ceremonies . Salvini likes sweatshirts that say Italia , rails against illegal immigration, and tweets pictures of himself eating Nutel

16h

Ung og utilfreds med dit liv? Skyd ikke skylden på sociale medier

Familie, venner og skole betyder meget mere, viser ny forskning.

17h

Medical research lands £1bn from cancer drug sale

Charity will invest windfall in driving new treatments from lab to patients

17h

New flying/driving robot developed at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Possible commercial uses are package deliveries since it can quickly fly to a target zone and then drive using its wheels safely and quietly to reach the recipient's doorstep. FSTAR can also be used for search and rescue applications as it can fly over various obstacles and crawl between or underneath cracks where a regular drone cannot fly. The robot can also be used in agriculture, maintenance,

17h

Sexual minority cancer survivors face disparities in access to care and quality of life

Results from a study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, point to the need for improved access to medical care for sexual minority cancer survivors, in particular female survivors.

17h

Pinterest homemade sunscreens: A recipe for sunburn

A new study conducted by researchers at the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Brooks College of Health at University of North Florida examined how homemade sunscreens were portrayed on Pinterest.

17h

Teens with ADHD get more traffic violations for risky driving, have higher crash risk

Teen drivers diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are significantly more likely to crash, be issued traffic and moving violations, and engage in risky driving behaviors than their peers without ADHD.

17h

Economists find net benefit in soda tax

A team of economists has concluded that soda taxes serve as a 'net good,' an assessment based on an analysis of health benefits and consumer behavior.

17h

Did Viewers Win or Lose in the Game of Thrones?

Every week for the eighth and final season of Game of Thrones , three Atlantic staffers have been discussing new episodes of the HBO drama. Because no screeners were made available to critics in advance this year, we’ll be posting our thoughts on the series finale in installments. David Sims: Let me start this review by listing a few of Brandon Stark’s qualifications to hold the Iron Throne (or w

17h

Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Relationships

Do you think that humans will someday resort to having androids as romantic partners in lieu of human romantic partners? submitted by /u/DrewwwBjork [link] [comments]

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The next Game of Thrones? Epic books heading to the screen – CNET

Which of these novel adaptations will be your new TV or movie obsession?

17h

Valgmøde i dag: Forskningens rolle i fremtidens Danmark

Hvad vil toppolitikerne med forskningsområdet? Toppolitikere og repræsentanter fra forskningens verden debatterer forskningspolitik til Ingeniørens valgmøde.

18h

Westworld III teaser reveals a new direction for HBO's sci-fi series

Some have predicted a mass exodus of HBO subscribers now that Game of Thrones is finito. That very well could happen but HBO would prefer you check out the first teaser for the third season …

18h

Google study shows the importance of recovery phone numbers

The tech giant teamed up with researchers from New York University and the University of California, San Diego, for a year-long study on the effectiveness of basic account hygiene at preventing …

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As Seattle’s new hotels roll out automation to serve guests, workers worry

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

19h

Artificial Organs — The Future of Transplantation

submitted by /u/redditmastar1 [link] [comments]

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Game of Thrones stars say goodbye to their characters: 'I grew up with you' – CNET

"This woman has taken up the whole of my heart," Emilia Clarke says of Daenerys, while Sophie Turner writes of Sansa: "Thank you teaching me to be kind and patient and to lead with love."

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20h

Companies send confusing alerts about data breaches

The notifications that companies send consumers about data breaches lack clarity and may add to customer confusion about whether their data is at risk, according to new research. Building on their previous research that showed consumers often take little action when facing security breaches, researchers analyzed the data breach notifications companies sent to consumers to see if the communication

20h

Children who walk to school less likely to be overweight or obese, study suggests

Children who regularly walk or cycle to school are less likely to be overweight or obese than those who travel by car or public transport, a new study suggests.

21h

Diabetes patients at higher risk of deadly liver disease, finds study of 18 million people

Many patients with potentially deadly liver cirrhosis and liver cancer are being diagnosed at late advanced stages of disease, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London and the University of Glasgow.

21h

Sleep problems in teenagers reversed in just one week by limiting screen use

Sleep in teenagers can be improved by just one week of limiting their evening exposure to light-emitting screens on phones, tablets and computers, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019. The study indicates that by simply limiting their exposure to blue-light emitting devices in the evening, adolescents can improve their sle

21h

Environmental toxins can impair sexual development and fertility of future generations

Exposure to environmental pollutants can cause alterations in brain development that affect sexual development and fertility for several generations, according to findings to be presented in Lyon, at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2019.

21h

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Early detection could get ahead of dementia damage

Scientists might have found an early detection method for some forms of dementia, according to new research. Patients with a rare neurodegenerative brain disorder called primary progressive aphasia, or PPA, show abnormalities in brain function in areas that look structurally normal on an MRI scan, the study finds. “We wanted to study how degeneration affects function of the brain,” says lead auth

22h

Walking and strength training may decrease the risk of dying from liver disease

Physical activity, including walking and muscle-strengthening activities, were associated with significantly reduced risk of cirrhosis-related death, according to new research. Chronic liver disease is increasing, partly due to the obesity epidemic, and currently there are no guidelines for the optimal type of exercise for the prevention of cirrhosis-related mortality.

22h

Big data reveals hidden subtypes of sepsis

Much like cancer, sepsis isn't simply one condition, but rather many conditions with varying clinical characteristics that could benefit from different treatments, according to the results of a study involving more than 100,000 patients. These findings could explain why several recent clinical trials of treatments for sepsis, the number one killer of hospitalized patients, have failed.

22h

Driverless cars working together can speed up traffic by 35%

A fleet of driverless cars working together to keep traffic moving smoothly can improve overall traffic flow by at least 35%, researchers have shown.

22h

Can a hands-on model help forest stakeholders fight tree disease?

An aggressive new strain of sudden oak death, a disease that's killed millions of trees, has turned up in Oregon, posing a threat to timber production. Scientists are using a 3D model called Tangible Landscape to help stakeholders work together to find ways to contain the disease's spread.

22h

Should the government break up Facebook? Industry leaders disagree.

Experts, among them Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, argue the company has become a monopoly and should be broken up. Others argue Hughes and his supports have misread Facebook's position in the market. Despite these disagreements, a consensus agrees that Facebook and other Silicon Valley titans need to be better regulated. None It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. True for Dicke

22h

Cells have to battle for healthy skin development

Conflict between cells may be vital to the development of healthy skin in mammals, according to new research. Not all cells are destined for greatness. Deemed unfit to serve in the body, some are killed off during early development through a process called cell competition. Researchers have previously documented this phenomenon in flies, but it turns out to occur in mammals as well. In a study in

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