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nyheder2019maj22

Civil War plant medicines blast drug-resistant bacteria in lab tests

During the height of the Civil War, the Confederate Surgeon General commissioned a guide to traditional plant remedies of the South, as battlefield physicians faced high rates of infections among the wounded and shortages of conventional medicines. A new study of three of the plants from this guide—the white oak, the tulip poplar and the devil's walking stick—finds that they have antiseptic proper

6h

Civil War plant medicines blast drug-resistant bacteria in lab tests

During the height of the Civil War, the Confederate Surgeon General commissioned a guide to traditional plant remedies of the South, as battlefield physicians faced high rates of infections among the wounded and shortages of conventional medicines. A new study of three of the plants from this guide—the white oak, the tulip poplar and the devil's walking stick—finds that they have antiseptic proper

6h

Verdens største flåde af brinttog skal køre fra Frankfurt om tre år

Transportmyndigheden i Rhein-Main har bestilt 27 tog drevet af brint-brændselsceller til en værdi af 3,7 milliarder kroner.

1h

Uber Is Preparing to Launch a Netflix-Like Food Delivery Service

Meals on Wheels A software engineer has found a secret hidden in the code of Uber’s Android app — and it could influence your diet. When Jane Manchun Wong isn’t blogging about tech, she likes to dig through the code of popular apps on the hunt for upcoming but unannounced features. On Tuesday, she tweeted her latest discovery: Uber Eats Pass, a new subscription service that will seemingly provide

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Cell division requires a balanced level of non-coding RNA for chromosome stability

Our genetic code is stored in chromosomes that are composed of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). To make sure the genetic code is maintained accurately in all the cells, our cells must replicate precisely and distribute its chromosomes equally to its two daughter cells during every cell cycle. Errors in chromosome separation result in cells with an abnormal number of chromosomes, which may cause sponta

2min

New approach for determining conservation threat for species with little data

University of British Columbia researchers have found a new way to identify which marine species are threatened and what is threatening them, even if these species lack data, a new study published in the journal Conservation Biology shows.

2min

Pilot study opens new possibilities for AI to enhance cognitive performance

In a recent pilot study, researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have shown that a powerful artificial intelligence (AI) platform known as CURATE.AI could potentially be used to customise training regimens for individuals to personalise learning and improve cognitive performance. Using performance data from a given person, CURATE.AI creates an individualised profile that enable

5min

Privacy-Centric Tor Browser Officially Lands For Android Devices

At long last, The Tor Project has officially ported its Tor browser to Android devices with the first stable release for Google's open source operating system. It is now available on Google …

9min

Being a Dog Lover May Be in Your Genes

A person's genetic makeup could play a part in their feelings about dogs.

15min

Study questions European Parliament's perception as champion of gender equality

The European Parliament is often viewed as the most democratic and gender equal decision-making institution of the European Union. A new Journal of Common Market Studies article critically scrutinizes this assumption through an analysis of female members' perceptions.

15min

Residential child care project addresses emotional pain without causing it

A model of care for children's residential agencies takes children's emotional pain into account and emphasizes the bond between the children and their caregivers.

15min

New data on ultrafast electron photoemission from metallic nanostructures obtained

Metallic nanoparticle ensembles are capable of emitting short bunches of electrons when irradiated by powerful laser pulses of femtosecond (1 fs = 10-15 s) duration. Scientists at Lobachevsky University have long been studying the plasmon effect — the excitation by light of collective electron oscillations in nanoparticles and the amplification of the light field associated with these oscillation

15min

Mapping the global distribution of phytoplankton

Researchers at ETH have charted the distribution of phytoplankton in the world's oceans for the first time and investigated the environmental factors that explain this distribution. They concluded that plankton diversity is only partially congruent with previous theories of biodiversity for the seas between the equator and the poles.

15min

Ancient toy inspires tool for state-of-the-art science

A 5,000-year-old toy still enjoyed by kids today has inspired an inexpensive, hand-powered scientific tool that could not only impact how field biologists conduct their research but also allow high-school students and others with limited resources to realize their own state-of-the-art experiments.

15min

Charging into the future — novel rock salt for use in rechargeable magnesium batteries

By synthesizing novel material for electrode that facilitates reversing of the chemistry of ions, a group of researchers led by Professor Idemoto from Tokyo University of Science combat the wasteful aspects of energy sources by laying an important foundation for the production of next-generation rechargeable magnesium secondary batteries.

15min

Ancient proteins offer clues to the past

Archeologists once relied solely on artifacts, such as skeletal remains, fossils and pottery sherds, to learn about past species and cultures. Today's scientists can also study ancient proteins to paint a more complete picture of the people who lived at archeological sites, and the plants and animals they raised and ate, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly new

15min

Octopus-inspired wearable sensor

Wearable electronics that adhere to skin are an emerging trend in health sensor technology for their ability to monitor a variety of human activities, from heart rate to step count. But finding the best way to stick a device to the body has been a challenge. Now, a team of researchers reports the development of a graphene-based adhesive biosensor inspired by octopus 'suckers.' They report their fi

15min

18 Earth-sized exoplanets discovered

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS), the Georg August University of Göttingen, and the Sonneberg Observatory have discovered 18 Earth-sized planets beyond the solar system. The worlds are so small that previous surveys had overlooked them. One of them is one of the smallest known so far; another one could offer conditions friendly to life. The researchers re-anal

15min

This robot watches you flex to learn to be a better teammate

An MIT robot collaborates with a person by tracking his or her muscles.

20min

Report: Tesla Autopilot “Far Less Competent” Than Human Driver

Not Quite Human In a biting new report , product testing nonprofit Consumer Reports found that the latest version of Tesla’s Autopilot is “far less competent” than a human motorist — and that its lane-changing functionality “doesn’t work very well and could create potential safety risks for drivers.” “It’s incredibly nearsighted,” said Jake Fisher, Consumer Reports ’ senior director of auto testi

22min

Simuleringsmodeller afslører komponenters levetid

PLUS. Især strømforsyninger er udsatte for elektromagnetiske impulser, fordi de er elektronikkens første bolværk mod elnettet.

26min

Third Gene-Hacked Baby’s Impending Birth Has Scientists Scrambling

Baby Shower When the now-infamous Chinese scientist He Jiankui brought twin gene-hacked baby girls into the world, the scientific community and world governments condemned his research and insisted on stronger safeguards to keep it from happening again. Now, CNBC reports that the next gene-hacked baby from He’s lab is due to be born this summer — and scientists are scrambling to make sense of wha

29min

Plastic straws will be banned in England from April 2020

The billions of plastic straws consumed in the UK each year will be banned from April 2020. The move will also cover plastic drinks stirrers and cotton buds

32min

Generation Z is just entering the workforce. Here's how to work with them.

Generational differences always pose a challenge for companies. How do you integrate the norms and expectations of the new generation with those of the old? Social psychologist Jonathan Haidt points out that Gen Z—the cohort born after 1995—differs sharply from the Millennial generation before it and offers some advice for understanding and working with a generation in some ways more sheltered an

33min

Tigers don’t want to eat humans, but we’re not giving them much choice

Animals Man-eating tigers are a by-product of the human-caused climate crisis. The reasons why big cats turn on humans are complex and can be specific to individuals. But they can no longer be explained outside the context of climate change.

35min

Pain management protocol sends 92 percent of cancer surgery patients home without opioids

A specialized pain management program for patients who underwent robotic surgery for urologic cancers resulted in just eight percent going home with narcotics after discharge, compared to 100 percent who would have received them without this enhanced recovery protocol.

37min

3D-printed device detects biomarkers of preterm birth

Preterm birth (PTB) — defined as birth before the 37 th week of gestation — is the leading complication of pregnancy. If doctors had a simple, accurate and inexpensive way to identify women at risk for the condition, they could develop better prevention strategies. Now researchers have created a 3D-printed microchip electrophoresis device that can sensitively detect three serum biomarkers of PTB

37min

Proton therapy lowers risk of side-effects compared to conventional radiation

Cancer patients getting proton therapy instead of traditional photon radiation are at a significantly lower risk of experiencing side-effects from their radiation therapy, while cure rates are almost identical between the two groups.

37min

New 3D-printed technology lowers cost of common medical test

A desire for a simpler, cheaper way to do common laboratory tests for medical diagnoses and to avoid 'washing the dishes' led University of Connecticut researchers to develop a new technology that reduces cost and time. The 3D-printed pipette-tip test developed by the researchers leverages what 'has long been the gold standard for measuring proteins, pathogens, antibodies and other biomolecules in

37min

Cell division requires a balanced level of non-coding RNA for chromosome stability

Assistant Professor Dr Karen Wing Yee Yuen and Postdoctoral Fellow Dr Yick Hin Ling from the School of Biological Sciences, University of Hong Kong (HKU), discovered that centromeric DNA is used as a template to produce a non-protein coding, centromeric RNA (ribonucleic acid), that is essential for chromosome stability. If there is too much or too little centromeric RNA (cenRNA), the centromere wi

37min

Electric hookahs might be no safer than traditional charcoal-based ones

Waterpipe tobacco smoking, otherwise known as 'hookah' or 'shisha,' is becoming increasingly popular worldwide, especially among youth. Traditional hookahs burn charcoal as a heat source, but recently, electrical heating elements (EHEs) have been introduced to the market. Reinforced by product advertising and package labeling, many hookah smokers believe that EHEs are less harmful than charcoal. N

37min

Genetic discovery may improve corn quality, yields

Researchers may be able to improve corn yields and nutritional value after discovering genetic regulators that synthesize starch and protein in the widely eaten grain, according to a Rutgers-led study. The research, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could benefit millions of people who rely on corn for nutrition in South America, Africa and elsewhere.

37min

New study shows crowdsourced traffic data could save lives

A new University of California, Irvine-led pilot study finds, on average, Waze 'crash alerts' occur two minutes and 41 seconds prior to their corresponding California Highway Patrol (CHP)-reported crash. These minutes could mean the difference between life and death.

37min

Hispanic and black children more likely to miss school due to eczema than white children

In a study that highlights racial disparities in the everyday impact of eczema, new research shows Hispanic and black children are more likely than white children to miss school due to the chronic skin disease.

37min

Can blood donation programs identify donors with genetic disorder for high cholesterol, coronary artery disease?

This study examined whether a blood donation program could help identify individuals with the often undiagnosed genetic disorder familial hypercholesterolemia, which results in high cholesterol and premature coronary artery disease. Blood donation programs already screen for infectious diseases and may be able to screen for other conditions.

37min

Parental use of prescription opioids associated with risk of suicide attempt by children

Opioid use by parents was associated with increased risk of suicide attempt by their children in a study that linked medical claims for opioid prescriptions for parents with medical claims for suicide attempts by their children. This observational study included 184,000 children whose parents used opioids and about 148,000 children whose parents didn't.

37min

Risk of suicide attempt by children doubles if parent uses opioids

In a tale of two epidemics, researchers from the University of Chicago and the University of Pittsburgh found that children of parents who use opioids have an increased risk of attempting suicide.

37min

A road map to stem cell development

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report they have created a method of mapping how the central nervous system develops by tracking the genes expressed in cells. The technique, demonstrated in mouse retinas for this study, follows the activity of the genes used by individual cells during development, allowing researchers to identify patterns in unprecedented detail. This precise kind of road map,

37min

Healthy brain development is a human right, argues Yale researcher

We know that the environment in which children and young adults are raised influences healthy brain development. Now, a psychologist at Yale is taking a stance against the negative effects of a particularly harrowing environment in her own backyard: the US prison system. In a paper published May 22, 2019 in the journal Neuron, the author declares that everybody, including young offenders, deserves

37min

Examining ethical issues surrounding wearable brain devices marketed to consumers

Wearable brain devices are now being marketed directly to consumers and often claim to confer benefits like boosting memory and modulating symptoms of depression. In a perspective being published in the journal Neuron on May 22, 2019, a team of neuroethicists looked at the range of products being sold online and questioned the claims made by companies about these products.

37min

Smoking unfiltered cigarettes appear to double risk of lung cancer death

People who smoke unfiltered cigarettes are nearly twice as likely to die from lung cancer and 30 percent more likely to die of all causes than those who smoke filtered cigarettes,

37min

Online identification is getting more and more intrusive

Phones can now tell who is carrying them from their users’ gaits

41min

Gender diversity good for businesses and economies: UN

Companies that improve gender diversity—especially at the top—perform better and rake in higher profits, while countries that increase women employment see better economic growth, the UN said Wednesday.

41min

Bangladesh tiger population rises after poaching crackdown

The number of wild tigers in Bangladesh's Sundarbans area has increased for the first time in 15 years after a major crackdown against poachers in the world's largest mangrove forest, officials said Wednesday.

53min

A cognitive neuroscientist warns that the U.S. justice system harms teen brains

The U.S. justice system holds adolescents to adult standards, and puts young people in situations that harm their development, a researcher argues.

54min

There's a happiness crisis in the modern workplace. Here's what to do about it.

There's a crisis in the workplace. According to a 2016 Gallup Poll, 70% of people are disengaged at work. And a whopping 18% are actively repulsed by what they do for a living. This is clearly no good for the workers themselves. But it's also no good for the companies they serve. What makes us happy is fairly well understood, as is the fact that happy workers work harder, make fewer mistakes, and

55min

Bangladesh tiger population rises after poaching crackdown

The number of wild tigers in Bangladesh's Sundarbans area has increased for the first time in 15 years after a major crackdown against poachers in the world's largest mangrove forest, officials said Wednesday.

56min

Chevrolet Buckle-to-Drive: Another Hassle for Teens, but It Could Save Lives

It's another step to help keep teens safer in cars, though we're still waiting for parental speed reporting based on the posted limit and not just not one top speed for all roads. The post Chevrolet Buckle-to-Drive: Another Hassle for Teens, but It Could Save Lives appeared first on ExtremeTech .

56min

The anti-CEO playbook | Hamdi Ulukaya

Profit, money, shareholders: these are the priorities of most companies today. But at what cost? In an appeal to corporate leaders worldwide, Chobani founder Hamdi Ulukaya calls for an end to the business playbook of the past — and shares his vision for a new, "anti-CEO playbook" that prioritizes people over profits. "This is the difference between profit and true wealth," he says.

56min

Plankton as a climate driver instead of the sun?

Fluctuations in the orbital parameters of the Earth are considered to be the trigger for long-term climatic fluctuations such as ice ages. This includes the variation of the inclination angle of the Earth's axis with a cycle of about 40,000 years. Kiel-based marine scientists lead by GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have shown by using a new model that biogeochemical interactions be

58min

The neural mechanisms that inhibit slow muscle activity during fast swimming in fish

Using zebrafish larvae, Assistant Professor Yukiko Kimura and Professor Shin-Ichi Higashijima of the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan have discovered neural mechanisms that suppress slow muscle activity in fish swimming at high speeds. The research results were published in the May 22, 2019 issue of Nature Communications.

58min

Chimpanzees at the crossroads: adapt to living outside protected areas

Chimpanzees at the crossroads: how they adapt to living outside protected areasResearch carried out into the impact of changes to chimpanzee habitats found they have adapted to human developments in a number of ways — including learning how to cross roads safely and the best times to visit human habitats — but their survival is still threatened.

58min

Monkey-infecting virus may provide part of future HIV vaccine

A protein from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV), which can infect monkeys and apes, has shown promise as a potential component of a vaccine against Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

59min

How augmented reality affects people's behavior

Researchers found that people's interactions with a virtual person in augmented reality, or AR, influenced how they behaved and acted in the physical world.

59min

Why some parasitic worms persist in people

A new study may explain why some people struggle to expel parasitic worms that infect their intestines. The research suggests that the phenomenon is primarily a numbers game: Large groups of worms can overwhelm the immune system and kick-start a self-perpetuating cycle that nearly guarantees their survival, whereas smaller groups and lone worms cannot.

59min

Exposing vaccine hesitant to real-life pain of diseases makes them more pro-vaccine

New research finds there is a better way to help increase support for vaccinations: Expose people to the pain and suffering caused by vaccine-preventable diseases instead of trying to combat people with vaccine facts.

59min

Newly discovered hybrid molecules could serve as a novel category of anti-cancer agent

Researchers have developed and studied the biological activity of five new, metal-organic hybrid knotted molecules, termed metal-organic trefoil knots (M-TKs). These molecules can effectively deliver metals to cancer cells, demonstrating the potential to act as a new category of anti-cancer agents.

59min

Exercise may help teens sleep longer, more efficiently

Getting more exercise than normal — or being more sedentary than usual — for one day is enough to affect sleep later that night. Researchers found that when teenagers got more physical activity than they usually did, they got to sleep earlier, slept longer and slept better that night.

59min

Doctoral dissertation: The Secret Gospel of Mark is not a fake

In his doctoral dissertation, Timo Paananen examines the letter by the early Christian philosopher Clement of Alexandria (ca. 150-215 CE) to Theodore. The identity of Theodore, recipient of the letter, remains a mystery. Clement instructs him, among other things, by quoting passages from the text known as The Secret Gospel of Mark.

59min

How DNA is read and copied

Two scientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have unraveled aspects of how DNA organizes and preserves genetic information. Newly published research by Cynthia Wolberger, Ph.D., and James Berger, Ph.D., whose labs sit side by side, takes a closer look at how the puzzle pieces of DNA machinery fit together.

59min

Chimpanzees at the crossroads: adapt to living outside protected areas

Research carried out into the impact of changes to chimpanzee habitats found they have adapted to human developments in a number of ways—including learning how to cross roads safely and the best times to visit human habitats—but their survival is still threatened.

59min

How DNA is read and copied

Two scientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have unraveled aspects of how DNA organizes and preserves genetic information. Newly published research by Cynthia Wolberger, Ph.D., and James Berger, Ph.D., whose labs sit side by side, takes a closer look at how the puzzle pieces of DNA machinery fit together.

1h

Chimpanzees at the crossroads: adapt to living outside protected areas

Research carried out into the impact of changes to chimpanzee habitats found they have adapted to human developments in a number of ways—including learning how to cross roads safely and the best times to visit human habitats—but their survival is still threatened.

1h

Lack of evaluation in countering violent extremism may boost terror threat

A lack of evaluation of the impact of countering violent extremism (CVE) and counter-terrorism (CT) efforts may actually be increasing the threat and risk of terrorism, a new study points out.

1h

Drone can transform into a tiny car to slide under small gaps

A shape-shifting drone can switch between flying and driving to fit through small gaps or get past rough terrain

1h

CRISPR-baby rules, fake-news law and kilogram retires

Nature, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01564-1 The week in science: 17–23 May 2019.

1h

The NASA engineer who helped Apollo astronauts catch their ride home

To get back from the lunar surface, the astronauts had to rendezvous in lunar orbit. Sheila Thibeault helped make that possible.

1h

When Fingers Changed Fins

A new study offers a surprising look at what happened when fishy fins evolved into arms and legs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Researchers seek answers to gray whale deaths after 57 are stranded this year

Gray whales are dying at twice the usual rate as a brutal migration unfolds, with whales washing up on Washington state beaches, apparently starved to death.

1h

Three exocomets discovered around the star Beta Pictoris

Just about a year after the launch of the NASA mission TESS, the first three comets orbiting the nearby star Beta Pictoris outside our solar system were discovered with data from the space telescope. The main goal of TESS is to search for exoplanets—planets orbiting other stars. The recognition of signals from much smaller exocomets compared to planets requires the analysis of a precise light curv

1h

Orlando company turns learning the elements into virtual reality game

A Central Florida company behind a virtual reality game that teaches students about the elements is in line for a $225,000 grant from the National Science Foundation.

1h

Three exocomets discovered around the star Beta Pictoris

Three extrasolar comets have been discovered around the star Beta Pictoris, 63 light years away, by the University of Innsbruck. Analysis of data from the current NASA mission TESS by Sebastian Zieba and Konstanze Zwintz from the Institute for Astro- and Particle Physics, together with colleagues from Leiden University (Netherlands) and the University of Warwick (UK) has revealed the objects for t

1h

NUS pilot study opens new possibilities for AI to enhance cognitive performance

Results of a pilot study conducted by researchers from the National University of Singapore provided evidence that an artificial intelligence known as CURATE.AI has the potential to enhance learning, and could pave the way for promising applications in personalized digital therapy, including the prevention of cognitive decline.

1h

Lack of evaluation in countering violent extremism may boost terror threat

A lack of evaluation of the impact of countering violent extremism (CVE) and counter-terrorism (CT) efforts may actually be increasing the threat and risk of terrorism, a new study points out.

1h

Help for youth who have experienced sexual or physical abuse

There have not been many scientifically evaluated therapies for teens and young adults who have suffered physical or sexual abuse until now. Psychologists at Goethe University have closed the gap by developing a psychotherapeutic approach designed specifically for this age group. Its effectiveness has now been proved in a nationwide study lasting four years.

1h

Long-lived roundworms helped identify new anti-aging compounds among FDA-approved drugs

Researchers from Gero, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences collaborated to derive a transcriptomic signature of aging, which they confirmed using large transcriptomic databases. They discovered that aging in nematodes is partially programmed and can be therapeutically reversed by a number of FDA-a

1h

Researchers seek answers to gray whale deaths after 57 are stranded this year

Gray whales are dying at twice the usual rate as a brutal migration unfolds, with whales washing up on Washington state beaches, apparently starved to death.

1h

EU court rejects historic citizen's climate case

The European Court of Justice threw out a landmark case brought by 10 families who sued the European Union over the threats climate change poses to their homes and livelihoods, lawyers said Wednesday.

1h

Israeli scientists brew beer with revived ancient yeasts

Israeli researchers raised a glass Wednesday to celebrate a long-brewing project of making beer and mead using yeasts extracted from ancient clay vessels —some over 5,000 years old.

1h

Antibody Design, Publicly Challenged

Comes now some rather disturbing news in the antibody field. These things are extremely important, both as therapeutics and as research reagents, and developing them for either purpose is no stroll down the garden walk. There are a number of techniques for raising and producing antibodies (see that first link), but they all have their complications and limitations. The two biggest branches of tha

1h

Switch 1 greenhouse gas for another to fight climate change?

New research outlines a seemingly counterintuitive solution to climate change: converting one greenhouse gas into another. The relatively simple process could help turn the tide of climate change while also turning a healthy profit. The study describes a potential process for converting the extremely potent greenhouse gas methane into carbon dioxide, which is a much less potent driver of global w

1h

Image: ESA's Large Diameter Centrifuge at full speed

ESA's Large Diameter Centrifuge at the Agency's technical heart in the Netherlands is seen running here at full speed. The 8-m diameter four-arm centrifuge gives researchers access to a range of hypergravity environments up to 20 times Earth's gravity for weeks or months at a time.

1h

In coal phase-out, Germany pledges billions to mining regions

As Germany plans to shutter its coal sector, the government pledged Wednesday to pour 40 billion euros ($45 billion) into mining regions over the coming years to stimulate growth and jobs.

1h

Space travel and your joints

A novel study of mice aboard a Russian spaceflight may raise an intriguing question for the astronauts of tomorrow: Could traveling in space be bad for your joints? Researchers found early signs of cartilage breakdown in the mice, suggesting that the reduced biomechanical forces of spaceflight are at play on the musculoskeletal system.

1h

Revolt on the horizon? How young people really feel about digital technology

As digital technologies facilitate the growth of both new and incumbent organisations, we have started to see the darker sides of the digital economy unravel. In recent years, many unethical business practices have been exposed, including the capture and use of consumers' data, anticompetitive activities and covert social experiments.

1h

New therapeutic target for depression identified

There are different pharmacological treatments for depression, mainly therapies that act on the serotonin system — the so-called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). However, it has been evidenced that these antidepressants take around two weeks to have an effect and, what's more, around 30% of patients are resistant to this drug.Researchers of the Department of Human Physiology of th

1h

Social networks and suicide prevention

Depression and mental health problems are increasing – and suicide and drug overdose rates are rising dramatically in the USA. In many US communities, traditional social networks — face-to-face contacts of daily life — are unraveling with the loss of social supports, Flinders University psychiatrists warn in a letter published in the international journal The Lancet. This is associated with incr

1h

New study: protecting against type 1 diabetes

A new study has investigated how exposure to certain triggers can increase the risk of type 1 diabetes.

1h

Proton therapy for cancer lowers risk of side effects

Proton therapy results in fewer side effects than traditional X-ray radiation therapy for many cancer patients, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania. Even with reduced side effects, proton therapy resulted in cure rates similar to those of X-ray radiation therapy.

1h

New approach for determining conservation threat for species with little data

University of British Columbia researchers have found a new way to identify which marine species are threatened and what is threatening them, even if these species lack data.

1h

Monkey-infecting virus may provide part of future HIV vaccine

A protein from Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV), which can infect monkeys and apes, has shown promise as a potential component of a vaccine against Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), in a new study from scientists at Scripps Research.

1h

Tip sheet: Recent research on how DNA is read and copied

Two scientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have unraveled aspects of how DNA organizes and preserves genetic information. Newly published research by Cynthia Wolberger, Ph.D., and James Berger, Ph.D., whose labs sit side by side, takes a closer look at how the puzzle pieces of DNA machinery fit together.

1h

Study finds lower ER triage scores associated with delayed antibiotics delivery for sepsis patients

in a new study, researchers at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City found that antibiotic delivery was significantly faster — by up to 32 minutes — for sepsis patients being treated in an emergency department if they were assigned a slightly higher score on a subjective one-to-five acuity scale commonly used for patient triage.

1h

COPD appears to cause more severe symptoms in women

Women who develop COPD report smoking fewer cigarettes than men; and yet, women experience greater breathing impairments, are subjected to more acute exacerbations of symptoms and report lower quality of life than men with the disease, according to research presented at ATS 2019.

1h

Violence exposure, depression, and poor health habits may increase asthma in adolescents

Exposure to violence, depression and poor health habits — including obesity, drinking soda, poor sleep and smoking marijuana — appear to be associated with asthma in high school students.

1h

UTSA political scientist analyzes the UN's Twitter feed to improve diplomatic relations

Through research by a political scientist at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), there is potential to see diplomacy between nations improve through the use of Twitter. UTSA researcher, Matthias Hofferberth, is exploring how the United Nations (UN), uses Twitter as a diplomacy tool, an approach that has been discussed as Twiplomacy.

1h

Study explains why some parasitic worms persist in people

A new study co-led by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln may explain why some people struggle to expel parasitic worms that infect their intestines. The research suggests that the phenomenon is primarily a numbers game: Large groups of worms can overwhelm the immune system and kick-start a self-perpetuating cycle that nearly guarantees their survival, whereas smaller groups and lone worms cannot.

1h

‘MissionRacer’: How Amazon turned the tedium of warehouse work into a game

Amazon’s experiment is part of a broader industry push to gamify low-skill work, particularly as historically low unemployment has driven up wages and attrition.

1h

Arctic lakes and rivers can lose the diversity of freshwater species

Climate change and its impacts threaten the health of Arctic freshwater ecosystems, with continued warming pushing cold-water species unique to the Arctic—such as the Arctic char—to the brink of regional loss. In addition, there is an increasing likelihood of toxic cyanobacteria blooms, according to the State of the Arctic Freshwater Biodiversity Report published in early May.

1h

Fishing hotspots show where sub-Antarctic seabirds at risk

A new study highlights that sub-Antarctic seabirds are most at risk from unsustainable fishing during the southern hemisphere winter and in the south Atlantic and Southwest Indian Oceans. The link between fishing and the steep decline in seabird populations is well established, but the identification of problem 'hotspots' will better help agencies to conserve a number of threatened species. The st

1h

New 3-D-printed technology lowers cost of common medical test

A desire for a simpler, cheaper way to do common laboratory tests for medical diagnoses and to avoid "washing the dishes" led University of Connecticut researchers to develop a new technology that reduces cost and time.

1h

Research on children's health risks in doubt over EPA funds

Long-running research projects credited with pivotal discoveries about the harm that pesticides, air pollution and other hazards pose to children are in jeopardy or shutting down because the Environmental Protection Agency will not commit to their continued funding, researchers say.

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'There's a huge shortage of lab space in Chicago': Sterling Bay to back life sciences startups

Chicago real estate developer Sterling Bay aims to make Lincoln Park on the city's North Side a center for life sciences research, an industry that the firm hopes will fill a lot of space in its $6 billion Lincoln Yards megadevelopment.

1h

Why crop yields aren’t the right fix for global hunger

Too much of the work to end global hunger focuses on increasing crop yields, researchers argue. Members of the University of Michigan’s Sustainable Food Systems Initiative reviewed recent academic papers that discuss the United Nations goal of ending hunger and malnutrition worldwide by 2030. They reviewed recent papers from three areas—ecology and agricultural sciences, nutrition and public heal

1h

Moms with multiple jobs have higher depression risk

New research finds a link between working multiple jobs and a 3-4 percentage points increase in the probability of depression among a sample of low-income working moms. The association is strongest for those mothers who work more than one job and have a nonstandard work schedule, work at least 45 hours per week, or have low earnings, the researchers say. “Understanding how these work arrangements

1h

Fishing hotspots show where sub-Antarctic seabirds at risk

A new study highlights that sub-Antarctic seabirds are most at risk from unsustainable fishing during the southern hemisphere winter and in the south Atlantic and Southwest Indian Oceans. The link between fishing and the steep decline in seabird populations is well established, but the identification of problem 'hotspots' will better help agencies to conserve a number of threatened species. The st

1h

The SAT's new 'adversity score' is a poor fix for a problematic test

The College Board recently revealed a new "adversity score" that it plans to use as part of the SAT in order to reflect students' social and economic background.

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Nanoscopic protein motion on a live cell membrane

Cellular functions are dictated by the intricate motion of proteins in membranes that span across a scale of nanometers to micrometers, within a time-frame of microseconds to minutes. However, this rich parameter or space is inaccessible using fluorescence microscopy, although it is within reach of interferometric scattering (iSCAT) particle tracking. The new iSCAT technique is, however, highly se

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How can spiders locate their prey?

A study published today by Dr. Beth Mortimer and colleagues at the Department of Zoology and University Carlos III of Madrid reveals that orb weaving spiders can compare 3-D vibrational inputs into their 8 legs from the web to locate prey.

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Analytics technology for your waste containers

Finnish SME Enevo is taking over the European market with a technology able to reduce the cost and environmental impact of waste collection, providing a highly welcome solution that could go a long way towards keeping our cities cleaner and healthier.

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Learning magnets could lead to energy-efficient data processing

The power consumption of data centers around the world is increasing. This creates a high demand for new technologies that could lead to energy-efficient computers. In a new study, physicists at Radboud University have demonstrated that this could also be achieved by using chips whose operation is inspired by that of the human brain. The study was published in the scientific journal Applied Physic

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How can spiders locate their prey?

A study published today by Dr. Beth Mortimer and colleagues at the Department of Zoology and University Carlos III of Madrid reveals that orb weaving spiders can compare 3-D vibrational inputs into their 8 legs from the web to locate prey.

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How to 3-D-print a bathroom in one day

Researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed the capability to 3-D print an unfurnished bathroom in less than a day.

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Skipping pills? Doctors should ask about med habits

A simple question at the doctor’s office could help people with medication adherence, a new study shows. A visit to the doctor’s office typically begins with a series of questions, including one about medications. New research recommends doctors ask a follow up to that question to make sure patients are taking their medications as prescribed. Medication adherence is vital to patient health and ou

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Climate change profoundly alters plankton populations

Sediment core data reveals big changes over the past 170 years. Nick Carne reports.

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An ancient red rodent

X-rays reveal pelt colour in three-million-year-old fossil

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NASA calls for names to go to Mars

One million people can have their name etched on a chip inside the Mars 2020 rover. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Gang culture appeals to disenfranchised young people – but 'social mixing' offers a way out

Over the past ten years, violence among young people involved in gangs has claimed hundreds of lives and dominated national debate in the UK. There have been many well-documented attempts to counter gang culture, ranging from early years intervention to zero tolerance policing.

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Here’s Where You Can Flirt With a Sexting AI Called Slutbot

Sex Robot To teach people how to responsibly and respectfully flirt and sext, an iOS app called Juicebox built an AI chatbot — aptly named Slutbot. Slutbot can break the ice with users before jumping into mechanically-stilted dirty talk speckled with questions and comments about comfort zones and consent, according to The New York Times . The idea of getting intimate with a chatbot might seem odd

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New Stanford research examines how augmented reality affects people's behavior

Stanford scholar Jeremy Bailenson and other researchers found that people's interactions with a virtual person in augmented reality, or AR, influenced how they behaved and acted in the physical world.

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How Realistic Are the Global Climate Change Targets? New Research Weighs In

In 1896, Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius pointed out that “the development of human industry” could introduce carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, trapping infrared radiation and warming the climate. It took until 2015, when CO2 concentration had increased from 295ppm to 400ppm since Arrhenius’ time, for the Paris Agreement to set a target for the upper limit of warming that would be allowed: two

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Japanese, UK carriers delay release of Huawei phones

Four major Japanese and British mobile carriers said Wednesday they will delay releasing new 5G handsets made by Huawei amid a US-led crackdown on the Chinese tech firm over security concerns.

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Two rare mammals, Chacoan peccaries, born in Prague zoo

Prague's zoo says two Chacoan peccaries have been born there for the first time, a vital step in efforts to save an endangered species that was once considered extinct.

1h

Judge rules Qualcomm violated antitrust law

Qualcomm's stock is tumbling before the opening bell after a federal judge ruled that the company unlawfully stifled cellphone chip market competition and charged excessive licensing fees.

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Skorstensisolering slukker batteri-brande

PLUS. Et nyt slukkemiddel kan bruges til at indkapsle uslukkelige brande i lithium-ion batterier i smartphones og andre små elektronikprodukter. Der er endnu ikke effektive slukningsmetoder til el-biler og solcelle-anlæg

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Plastic straws will be banned in the UK from April 2020

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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Ford Self-Driving Vans Will Use Legged Robots to Make Deliveries

submitted by /u/Hephaestus101 [link] [comments]

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Two rare mammals, Chacoan peccaries, born in Prague zoo

Prague's zoo says two Chacoan peccaries have been born there for the first time, a vital step in efforts to save an endangered species that was once considered extinct.

2h

Park-and-ride transit gives suburban commuters higher access to jobs

Park-and-ride facilities enable many suburban and exurban commuters in the Twin Cities metro area to reach roughly as many jobs as urban transit users, according to a first-of-its-kind study from the Accessibility Observatory at the University of Minnesota. The Observatory's new method, just published in Transportation Research Record, incorporates park-and-ride trips into transit accessibility ev

2h

Small-scale fisheries have unintended consequences on tropical marine ecosystems

Hundreds of millions of people in some of the world's poorest countries are supported by small scale fisheries. These are usually self-employed fishers who use relatively simple methods, primarily to feed the local community and generate income. Though the impact of one small fishery may seem negligible, collectively they catch millions of tonnes per year, from some of the most biodiverse and thre

2h

Big Data enables better urban transport networks

The SIADE SaaS (Spatial Decision Support System for Transportation Planning) project essentially marks a change in the positioning of Spanish SME Terrain Technologies. From a consultancy service built around an algorithm to infer passengers' destinations, the company requested support from Horizon 2020 to become a software supplier.

2h

Students impacted by inequality of their family's origins

The gender stereotypes and cultural norms of a child's family heritage impacts their academic performance in Australian schools, research led by the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre shows.

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Researchers find oil does not damage or clog whale baleen, but plastic does

A trio of researchers with Hampden-Sydney College has found that exposure to oil does not damage or clog whale baleen. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Alexander Werth, Shemar Blakeney and Adrian Cothren describe their study of baleen exposure to several types of oils and what they found.

2h

School readiness affected by poverty, research shows

The type of poverty children are born into and how long they remain in that situation has an impact on early childhood outcomes, including school readiness.

2h

How rural areas like Florida's Panhandle can become more hurricane-ready

When Hurricane Michael roared onto northwest Florida's Gulf Coast in October 2018, its 160 mile-per-hour winds made it the strongest storm ever to hit the region. It was only the fourth Category 5 storm on record to make landfall in the United States.

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How dogs help keep multiracial neighborhoods socially segregated

Cities in the United States are getting less segregated and, according to a recent national survey, most Americans value the country's racial diversity.

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Small-scale fisheries have unintended consequences on tropical marine ecosystems

Hundreds of millions of people in some of the world's poorest countries are supported by small scale fisheries. These are usually self-employed fishers who use relatively simple methods, primarily to feed the local community and generate income. Though the impact of one small fishery may seem negligible, collectively they catch millions of tonnes per year, from some of the most biodiverse and thre

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Researchers find oil does not damage or clog whale baleen, but plastic does

A trio of researchers with Hampden-Sydney College has found that exposure to oil does not damage or clog whale baleen. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Alexander Werth, Shemar Blakeney and Adrian Cothren describe their study of baleen exposure to several types of oils and what they found.

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Long-lived roundworms helped identify new anti-aging compounds among FDA approved drugs

Researchers from Gero, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) collaborated to derive a transcriptomic signature of aging, which they confirmed using large transcriptomic databases. They discovered that aging in nematodes is partially programmed and can be therapeutically reve

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Researchers examine the age of groundwater in Egyptian aquifers

Most of the water used by people in Egypt comes from the Nile River, which originates from precipitation over mountainous areas in the Ethiopian highlands. In areas far from the Nile River Valley, however, where water is scarce and the population is growing, groundwater is the only available freshwater resource.

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Birds outfitted with 'backpacks' to research environmental change

As a child visiting his grandmother's farm in Illinois, Alex Jahn used to gaze up into the evening sky and watch Canada geese on their long flight home for summer.

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Birds outfitted with 'backpacks' to research environmental change

As a child visiting his grandmother's farm in Illinois, Alex Jahn used to gaze up into the evening sky and watch Canada geese on their long flight home for summer.

2h

How to repair window screens

DIY Let the fresh air in but keep those rotten bugs out. Repairing a screen is one of the simpler DIY home repair projects and usually takes less than 10 minutes, even if you don’t know a spline roller from a screwdriver.

2h

How plans to live on Mars could reshape our homes on Earth

Space missions demand we make the best use of our resources—and that's something we could learn from at home.

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New research sheds light on the possibility of past life on Venus

While today Venus is a very inhospitable place with surface temperatures hot enough to melt lead, geological evidence, supported by computer model simulations, indicate it may have been much cooler billions of years ago and had an ocean, and so have been very similar to Earth.

2h

Egg-unboiling machine takes on fish oil

The technology that unboiled the egg is being used to help improve people's capacity to absorb fish oil.

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New tool could help molecular biologists understand complex processes within cells

Northwestern Engineering researchers have developed a new platform that can image single molecules in 3-D, allowing deeper probes into the inner workings of cells.

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New understanding of how cells form tunnels may help in treating wounds, tumors

A simple slice of the finger sends a complex series of interactions between types of cells into motion. Two types of cells in particular, called macrophages and fibroblasts, work together to clean up and repair the fibers destroyed by the cut.

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Rescue ants save the day for comrades entangled in spider silk

Nature, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01601-z Every life matters to one species of desert ant, despite its colonies numbering in the tens of thousands.

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CRISPR zeroes in on antibiotic-resistance genes

Nature, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01577-w Surveillance system sweeps human samples for microbial genes that pathogens rely on to dodge drug treatment.

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Norman Hansen’s Scary Injury | Deadliest Catch

On the Northwestern, Norman Hansen takes a fall that leaves him unconscious and experiencing seizures. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Deadlies

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Comcast’s New Smart Sensor Will Count How Many Times You Pee

Bathroom Monitor Telecom giant Comcast wants to know how often you pee — but it has a legitimate reason, thankfully. According to a story published by CNBC on Tuesday, Comcast is developing a device that will use ambient sensors to monitor everything from how much time a person spends in bed to, yes, the number of trips they make to the bathroom in order to monitor their health — another sign tha

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New tool could help molecular biologists understand complex processes within cells

Northwestern Engineering researchers have developed a new platform that can image single molecules in 3-D, allowing deeper probes into the inner workings of cells.

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Physicists propose a second level of quantization for quantum Shannon theory

Information theory, which was developed by Claude Shannon starting in the late 1940s, deals with questions such as how quickly information can be sent over a noisy communications channel. Both the information carriers (e.g., photons) and the channel (e.g., optical fiber cable) are assumed to be classical systems, with well-defined, perfectly distinguishable states.

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Discovery may explain mystery of long-term parasites

As hosting gigs go, it's a tough crowd.

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Mowing the astroturfers

A grassroots movement is one that emerges and evolves naturally, growing new support as it does so. "Astroturfing" is the opposite of that. It is a movement support for which is bought and paid for. It has the look of a grassroots movement, but a closer inspection reveals it to be fake. Now, writing in the International Journal of Web and Grid Services, Australian computer scientists have surveyed

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Discovery may explain mystery of long-term parasites

As hosting gigs go, it's a tough crowd.

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New ultra-fast imaging technology with high frame rate and frame number

Acquiring images of ultrafast processes is a technology vitally needed for many cutting-edge physical, chemical, and biological studies. Scientists have now successfully developed a novel compressed ultrafast photographic technique, enabling both an ultra-high frame rate and a large frame number. Having overcome the existing limitations, the new technique offers an important tool for observing com

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Forskere: Mindre luftforurening i byen giver færre børn med astma

Antallet af børn, der får astma, er faldet med 20 procent i en af USAs største byer.

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Scientists reveal details of how flu and bacteria work together to promote infection

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have evidence the influenza virus functions like Velcro to help common respiratory bacteria gain a foothold in the airways. The research appears today as an advance online publication in the journal Nature Microbiology.

2h

Cities living with a strong chance of rain

Heavy rain can overwhelm municipal infrastructure and lead to flooding that can threaten lives and property. The U.S. alone spends millions – and sometimes billions – of dollars per year on flood recovery, and more is spent around the world.

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New understanding of how cells form tunnels may help in treating wounds, tumors

A simple slice of the finger sends a complex series of interactions between types of cells into motion. Two types of cells in particular, called macrophages and fibroblasts, work together to clean up and repair the fibers destroyed by the cut.

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Data shows buckling up saves lives in auto crashes

Nearly half of the people killed in auto crashes in Alabama last year were not wearing a seat belt, according to an analysis of state crash records.

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Scientists unlock the potential of ultra-thin 2-D materials

Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) have, for the first time, demonstrated the maximum potential of ultra-thin 2-D materials to generate electricity using sunlight.

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Positive aspects of masculinity helps improve boys' attitudes toward relationship violence

A program aimed at reducing violence against women and girls by focusing on positive expressions of masculinity changed the attitudes of middle school boys who may have been prone to harassment and dating violence as they got older, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick and University of New Hampshire led study that was done in partnership with prevention practitioners in New England.

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Scientists reveal details of how flu and bacteria work together to promote infection

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have evidence the influenza virus functions like Velcro to help common respiratory bacteria gain a foothold in the airways. The research appears today as an advance online publication in the journal Nature Microbiology.

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Contact with nature during childhood could lead to better mental health in adulthood

Almost 3,600 people participated in a European study on the impact of green and blue spaces on mental health and vitality.

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Stellar waltz with dramatic ending

Astronomers have identified an unusual celestial object. It is most likely the product of the fusion of two stars that died a long time ago. After billions of years circling around each other these so-called white dwarfs merged and rose from the dead. In the near future, their lives could finally end — with a huge bang.

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Most e-cigarette users want to quit, study finds

Most people who smoke e-cigarettes want to quit and many have tried to reduce their use, according to researchers. The study is the first to examine e-cigarette users' past attempts and current intentions to quit e-cigarettes in a representative sample of adult e-cigarette users in the United States.

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Ultra-luminous X-ray pulsar NGC 300 ULX1 experienced unprecedented spin evolution, study finds

Using NASA's Swift space telescope and NICER instrument aboard the International Space Station (ISS), astronomers have investigated the properties of an ultra-luminous X-ray pulsar known as NGC 300 ULX1. Results of this study, presented in a paper published May 9 on the arXiv preprint server, indicate that this object experienced an unprecedented spin evolution as its spin period decreased signifi

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Aboriginal mothers are incarcerated at alarming rates—and their mental and physical health suffers

Aboriginal women are the fastest growing prison population in Australia. They comprise around one-third of female prisoners in New South Wales, despite making up just 3% of the population. The majority of Aboriginal women in prison (more than 80%) are mothers.

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Natural environments favor 'good' bacteria

A new study has shown that restoring environments to include a wider range of species can promote "good" bacteria over "bad"—with potential benefits for human health.

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Natural environments favor 'good' bacteria

A new study has shown that restoring environments to include a wider range of species can promote "good" bacteria over "bad"—with potential benefits for human health.

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DNA from mummy's tomb reveals ancient Egyptian origins of watermelon

Painted watermelons adorn the walls of several ancient Egyptian tombs, and now DNA analysis has revealed what their flesh would have looked and tasted like

2h

ARM reportedly tells employees to suspend all business with Huawei

UK-based chip designer ARM told its employees to stop all their dealings with Huawei, according to the BBC. It reportedly notified its personnel in a memo to suspend "all active …

2h

Steam Chat launches for iOS and Android

Gamers can look forward to a modernized Steam chat experience on their Android and iOS devices with the Steam Chat app. It follows the desktop version that was released a year ago. The mobile …

2h

Creating integrated circuits that can generate chaotic signals

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have found a simple, yet highly versatile way to generate "chaotic signals" with various features. The technique consists of interconnecting three ring oscillators, effectively making them compete against each other, while controlling their respective strengths and their linkages. The resulting device is rather small and efficient, thus suitable for eme

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Critical friendship groups aid teacher candidates' reflection, study finds

Student teaching, the time when teacher candidates are apprenticing with a mentor teacher in schools, is extremely busy. Most teacher candidates are also studying learning theory, designing lesson plans for the first time, developing strategies for classroom management and being evaluating in multiple informal and formal ways. It can be hard to find time to reflect.

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Quantum interferometry reveals the chosen pathway of coherent phonon generation

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Keio University investigated the excitation and detection of photogenerated coherent phonons in polar semiconductor GaAs through an ultrafast dual pump-probe laser for quantum interferometry.

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EU's anti-terror-koordinator ønsker bagdør til 5G-netværk

EU's koordinator for anti-terror ønsker sikkerhedshuller i 5G-netværk, så det er nemmere for efterretningstjenester at overvåge trafik på mobilnettet. Det viser et lækket notat fra EU.

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Flux Puppy: Ecological app for measuring carbon dioxide

"Today I am talking the Flux Puppy for a walk at @HarvardForest to measure stem respiration," NAU postdoctoral researcher Tim Rademacher recently tweeted. With it, a photo of a small white chamber fastened to a tree trunk (think half Dixie cup, half electrode) and hooked at the other end to a handheld tablet sporting a clear, clean graph of CO2 in parts per million. The wire between seems charged

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It’s Impossible to Take the New Aladdin Seriously

Disney’s 1992 classic Aladdin is one of the greatest cinematic arguments for the storytelling potential of animation, which is perfectly expressed through the character of Genie. As voiced by Robin Williams and rendered in two dimensions, he’s a slapstick genius who can conjure anything, appear in any shape or size, and gleefully defy the laws of physics. For years, animation was the only way suc

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Early life exposure to nicotine alters neurons, predisposes brain to addiction later

In a new mouse study, neonatal exposure to nicotine changed the biochemistry of reward circuitry in the brain. Researchers suggest the same mechanism may be at work in humans.

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River valleys helped shape current genetic landscape of Han Chinese

New research shows the importance of how the three main river valleys in China contributed to Han genetic diversity.

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Women are less likely to be resuscitated and survive a cardiac arrest than men

Women who have a cardiac arrest outside the hospital setting are less likely to receive resuscitation from bystanders and more likely to die than men, according to new research. Researchers looked at data from nearly 6,000 people who had resuscitation attempts between 2006 and 2012 and found that women were less likely to receive resuscitation attempts from bystanders and less likely to survive a

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New method could shed light on workers' historical radiation exposure

Researchers in the UK have developed a new method for evaluating plutonium workers' historical internal radiation exposure. They focused their efforts on workers employed at the start of plutonium operations at the Sellafield (formerly Windscale) nuclear reprocessing facility in the UK.

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Only half of US kids and teens have ideal cholesterol levels

Cholesterol levels in US youth have improved from 1999 to 2016, but only half of children and adolescents are in the ideal range and 25% are in the clinically high range, according to a new study.

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New lidar instruments peer skyward for clues on weather and climate

Researchers have developed a set of diode-based lidar instruments that could help fill important gaps in meteorological observations and fuel a leap in understanding, modeling and predicting weather and climate.

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First in human results show early bird device effective in early detection of internal bleeding

New study results validate the effectiveness of the Saranas Early Bird Bleed Monitoring System to sense bleeding events during endovascular related procedures by using sensors to detect relative changes in tissue bioimpedance. The study enrolled 60 patients from five sites who underwent an endovascular procedure and detected bleeding in more than half of patients.

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New ultra-fast imaging technology with high frame rate and frame number

Acquiring images of ultrafast processes is a technology vitally needed for many cutting-edge physical, chemical, and biological studies. Scientists have now successfully developed a novel compressed ultrafast photographic technique, enabling both an ultra-high frame rate and a large frame number. Having overcome the existing limitations, the new technique offers an important tool for observing com

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Flux Puppy: Ecological app for measuring carbon dioxide

"Today I am talking the Flux Puppy for a walk at @HarvardForest to measure stem respiration," NAU postdoctoral researcher Tim Rademacher recently tweeted. With it, a photo of a small white chamber fastened to a tree trunk (think half Dixie cup, half electrode) and hooked at the other end to a handheld tablet sporting a clear, clean graph of CO2 in parts per million. The wire between seems charged

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How to explore inaccessible places by swarms of sensors

Since the dawn of humankind, exploration of certain places, ranging from the depths of the oceans to the edges of the universe, has led to numerous discoveries. However, there are also several environments that need to be examined but can't be directly observed, like chemical or nuclear reactors, underground water or oil distribution pipes, space and inside of the body. The EU-funded Phoenix proje

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan forsynede man det store Notre Dame-orgel med luft?

En læser har i forbindelse med branden i Notre Dame-katedralen i Paris undret sig over, hvordan man egentlig fik luft til de mange tusinde orgelpiber for flere hundrede år siden. Det svarer et par orgeleksperter på.

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180 stillinger skal væk på Aarhus Universitetshospital

Spareplanen betyder, at 180 stillinger bliver nedlagt på Aarhus Universitetshospital. Ulykkelig situation, siger regionsformand. Svært at skære mere, siger overlæge.

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Freckled Woman with High Alcohol Tolerance Lived in Japan 3,800 Years Ago

More than two decades after researchers discovered the 3,800-year-old remains of "Jomon woman" in Hokkaido, Japan, they've finally deciphered her genetic secrets.

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We Broke the Atmosphere; Here's a Way We Can Start to Fix It

It’s counterintuitive, but let’s temporarily increase carbon dioxide emissions in order to get rid of a more potent greenhouse gas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Drone can transform into a tiny car to to slide under small gaps

A shape-shifting drone can switch between flying and driving to fit through small gaps or get past rough terrain

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We Broke the Atmosphere; Here's a Way We Can Start to Fix It

It’s counterintuitive, but let’s temporarily increase carbon dioxide emissions in order to get rid of a more potent greenhouse gas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists Might Have an Explanation for Pluto’s Subsurface Ocean

It's safe at this point to say that the former planet is a much more complex object than anyone dared expect. It has clouds, fields of nitrogen ice, and (surprisingly) a liquid water ocean. Scientists from the US and Japan think they've teased out the secrets of Pluto's hidden water reservoir. The post Scientists Might Have an Explanation for Pluto’s Subsurface Ocean appeared first on ExtremeTech

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Evidence dinosaur walked on all fours when young and switched to bipedalism as an adult

A team of researchers affiliated with institutions in Argentina and the U.K. has found evidence of a dinosaur that walked on all fours when it was young and then switched to walking on two legs as it grew to adulthood. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes their study of Mussaurus patagonicus, an early sauropod species that lived in what is now Argentina,

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Voyager spacecraft steward among winners of prestigious Hong Kong prizes

Nature, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01650-4 A biologist whose work enabled gene-editing tools and a pioneer in mysterious spin magnets also won a Shaw prize.

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Biobased nanocarriers to cure plant diseases for the first time

Plant diseases, though a normal part of nature, can have disastrous effects in agriculture. They reduce food for people and revenues in rural areas. In the worst cases they result in hunger and starvation, as many famines in history show. About 16 percent of all crops are lost to plant diseases each year across the world.

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A step closer to decarbonising long-haul road transportation

Thanks to the urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, efforts to promote the deployment of low-carbon alternative fuels (AFs) in transport have intensified in recent years. However, these technologies haven't yet become mainstream, particularly in the heavy-duty road vehicles sector that predominantly relies on diesel engines.

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The case for stabilizing forest carbon to mitigate climate change

There's no doubt that climate change is affecting ecosystems as well as the lifestyles of plants and animals around the globe. As temperatures rise, so do the complexity of the issues. Scientists, both in the United States and around the world, are actively pursuing mitigation solutions while providing governments with the understanding of natural hazards to help stem the effects of climate change

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From sharks in seagrass to manatees in mangroves, we've found large marine species in some surprising places

When we think of mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and saltmarshes, we don't immediately think of shark habitats. But the first global review of links between large marine animals (megafauna) and coastal wetlands is challenging this view—and how we might respond to the biodiversity crisis.

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From sharks in seagrass to manatees in mangroves, we've found large marine species in some surprising places

When we think of mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and saltmarshes, we don't immediately think of shark habitats. But the first global review of links between large marine animals (megafauna) and coastal wetlands is challenging this view—and how we might respond to the biodiversity crisis.

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Study results suggest cannabis originated in the Tibetan Plateau

A trio of researchers with the University of Vermont, Middlebury College and the University of Nottingham, Ningbo, China, has found evidence that suggests cannabis originated in the Tibetan Plateau. In their paper published in the journal Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, John McPartland, William Hegman and Tengwen Long describe their analysis of prior studies of the plant and how they narrowe

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Toward a New Frontier in Human Intelligence: The Person-Centered Approach

New research is shedding light on how intelligence changes and develops over time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fish fences across the tropical seas having large-scale devastating effects

Huge fish fences which are commonly used in tropical seas are causing extensive social, ecological and economic damage and are threatening marine biodiversity and human livelihoods, according to a new study.

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Concerns often not offered or accepted in close employee-manager relationships, study shows

Research has long suggested that strong relationships between managers and employees lead to positive outcomes, including employees feeling safe to speak up and take risks.

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Exposing vaccine hesitant to real-life pain of diseases makes them more pro-vaccine

New research from Brigham Young University professors finds there is a better way to help increase support for vaccinations: Expose people to the pain and suffering caused by vaccine-preventable diseases instead of trying to combat people with vaccine facts.

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Two-legged robot delivers packages to your door

In the near future, delivery truck drivers may be replaced by autonomous vehicles or drones that can take a package right to your door. Ford is looking to this future with a parcel-delivering …

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Judge rules Qualcomm violated antitrust law

Qualcomm's stock is tumbling before the opening bell after a federal judge ruled that the company unlawfully stifled cellphone chip market competition and charged excessive licensing fees.

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The extinction crisis is 'unprecedented in human history'

A recent landmark United Nations report delivered an alarming assessment of the fate of animal life and biodiversity on Earth. According to the authors—145 experts from fifty countries—up to 1 million species are threatened with extinction, many within decades. They report how natural habitats are declining in rates "unprecedented in human history," as species extinction is accelerating "with grav

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The extinction crisis is 'unprecedented in human history'

A recent landmark United Nations report delivered an alarming assessment of the fate of animal life and biodiversity on Earth. According to the authors—145 experts from fifty countries—up to 1 million species are threatened with extinction, many within decades. They report how natural habitats are declining in rates "unprecedented in human history," as species extinction is accelerating "with grav

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Creative Types Reserve a Special Corner of the Brain for Dreaming Big

Artists, novelists, actors and directors excel at tapping into “imagination” circuits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This spider’s exoskeleton looks like a helmet for a very tiny alien

Animals Megapixels: The husk was captured on a specialized macro lens. Mating can be a real battle in the animal world, but peacock spiders leave their helmets behind—literally. This arachnid exoskeleton came from an adult male Maratus …

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Cells develop a 'thicker skin' under extreme gravity

A high-gravity experiment has revealed how cells keep their shape under pressure.

3h

The 'pulse' of a volcano can be used to predict its next eruption

Predicting when a volcano will next blow is tricky business, but lessons we learned from one of Hawaii's recent eruptions may help.

3h

Project to gather detailed data on microplastics starts with Pacific Ocean expedition

Millions of tonnes of plastic waste are transported by rivers, by wind and in waste water into the sea, where the plastic remains. "To date, there are no detailed data on where plastic accumulates and how much," says UFZ environmental chemist, Dr. Annika Jahnke. Previous estimates rely on computer modelling, individual data and observations from the air. "We want to provide substantiation for thes

3h

Cells develop a 'thicker skin' under extreme gravity

A high-gravity experiment has revealed how cells keep their shape under pressure.

3h

Netflix's 'See You Yesterday' Challenges the Meaning of Time Travel

Director Stefon Bristol's Netflix feature isn't concerned with the past or the future—it's worried about the present.

3h

Læge stiller op for Riskær: Vi kan gøre tingene smartere

Frem mod valget 5. juni bringer Dagens Medicin interviews med de seks læger, der stiller op til Folketinget. Søren Søfelt er virksomhedsansvarlig overlæge for Smerteklinikkerne og stiller op for partiet Klaus Riskær Pedersen i Nordsjælland.

3h

Estrogen receptor could offer shield from obesity

An estrogen-activated protein inside cells appears to offer protection against obesity—in both men and women—according to a new study with mice. The research, reported in two separate studies, indicates that the protein reduces various metabolic diseases, including fatty liver disease. “Reducing obesity and metabolic disease risks are urgent public health priorities,” says Vicki Vieira Potter, as

3h

Image of the Day: Fish Fences

Structures built in tropical coastal waters capture fish, but harm the ecosystem and may lead to overfishing.

3h

'Metasurfaces' that manipulate light at tiny scales could find uses in consumer technology

Most of us know optical lenses as curved, transparent pieces of plastic or glass, designed to focus light for microscopes, spectacles, cameras, and more. For the most part, a lens' curved shape has not changed much since it was invented many centuries ago.

3h

DNA from 10,000 year old chewing gum reveals the secrets of Stone Age Scandinavians

Chewing gum may seem like a modern habit but that's apparently not quite the case. Scientists have recovered DNA that is nearly 10,000 years old from gum that was chewed by people in Scandinavia during the Mesolithic—or Stone Age—period.

3h

Stem Cells for Knee Arthritis

Stem cell treatments for knee arthritis are not yet ready for prime time, but that has not stopped their premature commercialization.

3h

Creative Types Reserve a Special Corner of the Brain for Dreaming Big

Artists, novelists, actors and directors excel at tapping into “imagination” circuits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

It’s all my fault, or the Beanstalk sucks

Nature, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01508-9 Scope for improvement.

3h

Creative Types Reserve a Special Corner of the Brain for Dreaming Big

Artists, novelists, actors and directors excel at tapping into “imagination” circuits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Vår uråldriga hjärna – ett lätt byte för mobilen

1. Varför skrev du boken? – En utgångspunkt var att mänskligheten under nästan hela sin tid på jorden har levt i en värld som såg helt annorlunda ut än den gör i dag, en värld utan elektricitet, bilar, datorer och mobiltelefoner. Och det har format vår hjärna.

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Lyme disease is spreading across the US but your dog can help track it

Lyme disease is spreading as the climate warms. An analysis of veterinary records suggests our dogs’ annual health checks can track infection’s across the US

4h

The truth about lie detectors: They don't work and never have

Polygraph machines remain in use despite being widely discredited, and there are much better alternatives for seeking the truth

4h

A synthetic genome could be the base for ‘designer lifeforms’

Lab-made bacteria pave the way for scientists to build life from scratch

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Tank Robots Protected Marines in ‘First-Time’ British War Simulation

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Ford’s Way to Finish Driverless Deliveries: Package-Carrying Robots

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

4h

Here's how to make opinion polls more representative and honest

In 2012, US statistician Nate Silver correctly predicted the results of all 50 states in the US presidential election with 100% accuracy.

4h

Newly discovered hybrid molecules could serve as a novel category of anti-cancer agent

Researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi's (NYUAD) chemistry program and colleagues from the University's biology program have developed and studied the biological activity of five new, metal-organic hybrid knotted molecules, termed metal-organic trefoil knots (M-TKs). These molecules can effectively deliver metals to cancer cells, demonstrating the potential to act as a new category of anti-cancer agents.

4h

Researcher connects the dots in fin-to-limb evolution

About 400 million years ago, vertebrates first began to crawl from the primordial seas onto land. Last week, thanks to a cutting-edge mathematical-analysis technique, a global research team uncovered how a crucial stage in evolution made that advance possible. Published May 8 in Science Advances, the paper deciphers crucial information about how those sea-dwelling creatures' fins became the specia

4h

Researcher connects the dots in fin-to-limb evolution

About 400 million years ago, vertebrates first began to crawl from the primordial seas onto land. Last week, thanks to a cutting-edge mathematical-analysis technique, a global research team uncovered how a crucial stage in evolution made that advance possible. Published May 8 in Science Advances, the paper deciphers crucial information about how those sea-dwelling creatures' fins became the specia

4h

A World Run with Code

Rethinking computation casts light on free will, intelligence and more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Newly discovered hybrid molecules could serve as a novel category of anti-cancer agent

Researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi's (NYUAD) chemistry program and colleagues from the University's biology program have developed and studied the biological activity of five new, metal-organic hybrid knotted molecules, termed metal-organic trefoil knots (M-TKs). These molecules can effectively deliver metals to cancer cells, demonstrating the potential to act as a new category of anti-cancer agents.

4h

Measles Had Been Eliminated. Now It’s Nearly a Daily Threat

The US declared measles eliminated in 2000, but it could lose that status in September—entering a darker era of heightened infectious disease risk.

4h

Praksislæger flokkes om Odense – men ingen vil til Vollsmose

Region Syddanmark har netop afsluttet en budrunde på 12 ydernumre blandt landets praktiserende læger. Det har blotlagt store forskelle i områdernes popularitet blandt lægerne. Overlæge kritiserer både læger og region for forløbet i Vollsmose.

4h

What Europe is getting right about research

Nature, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01561-4 The European Union’s cross-border collaborative programmes offer lessons for the rest of the world.

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The future of science in Europe

Nature, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01540-9 On the eve of the European Union’s parliamentary elections, a special issue examines the prospects for science across the region.

4h

Norway salmon farms ravaged by algae bloom: authority

Millions of farmed salmon have died in northern Norway due to an algae bloom that the authorities are struggling to bring under control, the Norwegian Fisheries Directorate has said.

4h

Newly discovered hybrid molecules could serve as a novel category of anti-cancer agent

Researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi's (NYUAD) chemistry program and colleagues from the University's biology program have developed and studied the biological activity of five new, metal-organic hybrid knotted molecules, termed metal-organic trefoil knots (M-TKs). These molecules can effectively deliver metals to cancer cells, demonstrating the potential to act as a new category of anti-cancer agents.

4h

Norway salmon farms ravaged by algae bloom: authority

Millions of farmed salmon have died in northern Norway due to an algae bloom that the authorities are struggling to bring under control, the Norwegian Fisheries Directorate has said.

4h

Some plants use hairy roots and acid to access nutrients in rock

Shrubs in mountainous areas of Brazil have specialized roots that secrete chemicals to extract phosphorus from rock.

4h

F-35 flyver for første gang over Danmark i dag

Borgerne nær Flyvestation Skrydstrup får for allerførste gang mulighed for at høre støjen fra Flyvevåbnets nye jagerfly.

4h

A World Run with Code

Rethinking computation casts light on free will, intelligence and more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Fears rise China could weaponise rare earths in US tech war

The US has hit China where it hurts by going after its telecom champion Huawei, but Beijing's control of the global supply of rare earths used in smartphones and electric cars gives it a powerful weapon in their escalating tech war.

5h

Seeking energy independence, Palestinians open solar plant

Palestinian officials say they have inaugurated their first solar panel plant as part of a plan to reduce their dependence on Israeli power sources.

5h

Beautiful Math

A new book shows off spectacular works of art inspired by mathematical principles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Endangered bird returned to S. Korean wild 40 years after extinction

An endangered bird was reintroduced to the wild by South Korean authorities Wednesday, four decades after it went extinct on the peninsula.

5h

Germany relaxes rules on wolf culls

The German government on Wednesday relaxed rules on culling wolves, as the population of the predator has grown since its return to the country two decades ago.

5h

Fake news changes shape as EU heads into elections

Fake news has evolved beyond the playbook used by Russian trolls in the U.S. election. As the European Union gears up for a crucial election, it is mostly homegrown groups rather than foreign powers that are taking to social media to push false information and extremist messages, experts say.

5h

Daimler offers wheel to new CEO amid tricky gear change

Flamboyant Daimler boss Dieter Zetsche was set bow out after 13 years on Wednesday, leaving successor Ola Kallenius to tackle problems brewing under the bonnet of the Mercedes-Benz maker.

5h

Metro til Hvidovre og Bispebjerg Hospital vil koste 30 milliarder kroner

Metroselskabet har undersøgt mulighederne for at udbygge metroen på to nye strækninger i en ny rapport. Det vil være dyrt, men mere effektivt end alternativer på samme ruter.

5h

Why Are Two Stars in Our Galaxy Suddenly Acting Very Strange?

There's a binary star system out there in the Milky Way, and it's followed a very simple pattern since the 1890s. Now, it's breaking its old habits.

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Could We Move the Entire Planet Earth to a New Orbit?

The big move could help our rocky planet escape the expanding sun and prevent a collision with Jupiter.

5h

Endangered bird returned to S. Korean wild 40 years after extinction

An endangered bird was reintroduced to the wild by South Korean authorities Wednesday, four decades after it went extinct on the peninsula.

5h

Germany relaxes rules on wolf culls

The German government on Wednesday relaxed rules on culling wolves, as the population of the predator has grown since its return to the country two decades ago.

5h

Beautiful Math

A new book shows off spectacular works of art inspired by mathematical principles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Region Midtjylland letter økonomisk pres på kriseramt hospital

Et enigt regionsråd letter sparekravet for Aarhus Universitetshospital, så hospitalet ikke skal spares 325 mio. kr., men 150 mio. kr. i 2019. Godt, men slet ikke ikke nok, siger overlæge.

5h

Regionsklinik i Lemvig har ansat fire læger

Region Midtjylland har ansat læger nok til at åbne sin nye regionsklinik i Lemvig som planlagt 1. september. Lægedækningen i Lemvig er dog fortsat under pres.

5h

'Face Mites' Live in Your Pores, Eat Your Grease and Mate on Your Face While You Sleep

Meet the ubiquitous "face mites" that live in your pores, eat your grease and have sex on your face while you sleep.

5h

Many Sunscreens Sold in US Offer Suboptimal Protection, According to New Report

About two-thirds of sunscreens available in the U.S. offer suboptimal protection or contain ingredients that may harm your health, according to a new report.

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Aspirin green light for brain bleed stroke patients, study finds

People who suffer a stroke caused by bleeding in the brain — known as brain haemorrhage — can take common medicines without raising their risk of another stroke, a major clinical trial has found. Researchers say the findings are reassuring for the thousands of people who take the medicines to reduce their risk of heart attack and another common type of stroke caused by blood clots in the brain.

5h

Chevy's new seat belt feature stops teens taking off unless they're buckled up

According to Chevrolet, teen drivers are far less likely to use a seat belt, so it has incorporated some new technology into vehicles to encourage safer habits. Called Buckle to Drive, …

5h

Comcast may be making an in-home health monitoring device – CNET

The device will reportedly use sensors to track basic health metrics.

5h

Question: For Those Who Feel Their Country is Going Backwards-

Hello all, I have been amongst your ranks for a little while now, enjoying the posts and discussions. Frequently I read fantastic revelations in all manner of fields that enrich us all and lead to a better world! However… When I compare it to my own country I feel the cold hand of anxiety and despair creeping. Why? Because I see what can and is being achieved right now , only for that to be con

5h

China’s Space Plant Could Beam to Almost Anywhere on Earth

submitted by /u/debate2 [link] [comments]

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A Priestless Church Simply Isn’t Catholic

James Carroll, the author of this month’s Atlantic ’s cover story, “ Abolish the Priesthood ,” is famous in certain Catholic circles for his bitter denunciations of the Church. To the well-documented renunciation of his own priesthood years ago, Carroll now adds the claim that, by its very nature, the Catholic priesthood is inextricably tied to clericalism (all priests being clerics, of course),

5h

There’s More to College Than Getting Into College

The crazed pursuit of college admissions helps no one thrive. And while the Varsity Blues admissions scandal shines a light on families that break the rules, it’s time to consider the unhappiness of families that play by them. While competition for seats may be inevitable, students scramble to do ever more to get into college—and give away more of their childhood to do so. This competition might

5h

Google: Adgangskoder til G suite er ved en fejl opbevaret i klartekst

Datalæk har ikke haft konsekvenser, lover Google

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Obstacles and Opportunities in Alzheimer's Disease

submitted by /u/adi_intellect [link] [comments]

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Social interaktion kan ge kreativa lärmiljöer

Kreativitet, liksom komplex problemlösning, anses vara viktiga kompetenser för hållbar utveckling och lyfts därför fram inom program för framtida utbildning, både hos Europeiska unionen och UNESCO. – Mot bakgrund av denna globala utbildningsagenda, menar jag att det är viktigt att forska om design för kreativa lärmiljöer inom samtida utbildningsvetenskap. Det finns dock inte särskilt mycket tidig

5h

The psychology of moral grandstanding

Moral grandstanding is the use of moral talk for self-promotion. Moral grandstanders have egotistical motives: they may want to signal that they have superhuman insight into a topic, paint themselves as a victim, or show that they care more than others. Moral philosophers view moral grandstanding as a net negative. They argue that it contributes to political polarization, increases levels of cyni

5h

Trane: Differentieret basishonorar er ikke ambitiøst nok

Overenskomstens parter bør bruge flere penge på at differentiere lægernes honorar. Det mener sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby, som retter en kritik af den nuværende ordning. Regionernes topforhandler er åben for forslaget, mens PLO vil gå andre veje.

5h

Washington becomes first US state to legalise human composting

Under the new law, people can choose to have their body turned into soil after their death.

5h

It-brist i Sundhedsplatformen: Personale døjer med manuel indberetning af vigtige data på tredje år

Vigtige behandlingsdata om komplikationer og overlevelsesgrad efter behandling skal indberettes til de landsdækkende såkaldte kliniske kvaltietsdatabaser. Det burde ske automatisk fra Sundhedsplatformen – men integrationen er stadig ikke lykkedes

6h

Tillidsmand fyret for at dække over kollega efter storebæltsulykke

Advokat fastholder, at tillidsmanden ikke ønskede at påvirke sagen med overstregningen.

6h

Exercise may help teens sleep longer, more efficiently

Getting more exercise than normal — or being more sedentary than usual — for one day is enough to affect sleep later that night. Researchers found that when teenagers got more physical activity than they usually did, they got to sleep earlier, slept longer and slept better that night.

6h

Civil War plant medicines blast drug-resistant bacteria in lab tests

A new study based on a mostly forgotten guide to medicinal plants, 'Resources of the Southern Fields and Forests,' focuses on three of the plants and shows they inhibit bacteria associated with wound infections.

6h

A new genetic tool to modify and understand gene function

CNIC scientists have developed a new genetic tool that significantly facilitates the study of gene function in physiological conditions and disease.

6h

Veterans with depression and/or PTSD more likely to seek cardiac rehab

Veterans with PTSD and/or depression were more likely to use cardiac rehabilitation services.A large study offers new evidence that mental health disorders may not be a barrier to cardiac rehabilitation.

6h

How European scientists will spend €100 billion

Nature, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01566-z The European Union has partially approved the shape of its next giant research-spending programme, but it faces political tensions.

6h

Europe’s controversial plans to expand defence research

Nature, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01567-y Smart drones and artificial intelligence are part of the European Union’s plans for defensive research, but many academics oppose the programme.

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Science in Europe: by the numbers

Nature, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01565-0 The region already hosts some of the world’s leading scientific countries, and some of its smaller states are quickly catching up.

6h

Nytt spår i antimateriamysteriet

En stor internationell forskargrupp har gjort en precisionsmätning på partiklar, med en ny metod som grundar sig på teoretiskt arbete av fysiker vid Uppsala universitet. Mätningen visar att metoden är fungerar för att leta efter en av de mekanismer som skulle kunna skapa obalans mellan partiklar och antipartiklar. Vanligtvis bildas och förintas materia och antimateria i lika stora mängder, men de

6h

Predicting protein-ligand interactions based on bow-pharmacological space and Bayesian additive regression trees

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43125-6 Predicting protein-ligand interactions based on bow-pharmacological space and Bayesian additive regression trees

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Improving medication adherence in adult kidney transplantation (IMAKT): A pilot randomised controlled trial

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44002-y Improving medication adherence in adult kidney transplantation (IMAKT): A pilot randomised controlled trial

6h

Differential Immune Activation in Fetal Macrophage Populations

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44181-8 Differential Immune Activation in Fetal Macrophage Populations

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Dietary tryptophan deficiency and its supplementation compromises inflammatory mechanisms and disease resistance in a teleost fish

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44205-3 Dietary tryptophan deficiency and its supplementation compromises inflammatory mechanisms and disease resistance in a teleost fish

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Bidirectional, Daily Temporal Associations between Sleep and Physical Activity in Adolescents

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44059-9 Bidirectional, Daily Temporal Associations between Sleep and Physical Activity in Adolescents

6h

AI kan løse en af robotteknologiens helt store udfordringer

Kunstig intelligens kan gøre industrirobotterne i stand til at tilpasse sig omgivelserne i stedet for omvendt. Men kunstig intelligens kommer ikke til at udkonkurrere konventionel robotprogrammering lige med det samme, mener forskere.

6h

News Brief: Impeaching Trump, Iran Threat, CRISPR Modified Viruses

House Democrats meet to decide whether to move forward with impeaching the president. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are briefed on the threat Iran poses. And, the latest on genetically modified viruses.

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Scientists Modify Viruses With CRISPR To Create New Weapon Against Superbugs

Superbugs are bacteria that can beat modern medicine's most powerful drugs. So doctors are racing to find new ways to fight back, such as developing "living antibiotics." (Image credit: Rob Stein/NPR)

6h

What Matters Most on the Road to Scientific Success?

New data suggests that scientists' career trajectories are shaped by more than their individual learning and skills. Factors such as mentorship, institutional prestige, and access to high-quality students all appear to influence one's chances of publishing in prestigious journals and winning awards.

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A simple, yet versatile, new design for chaotic oscillating circuitry inspired by prime numbers

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have found a simple, yet highly versatile, way to generate 'chaotic signals' with various features. The technique consists of interconnecting three 'ring oscillators,' effectively making them compete against each other, while controlling their respective strengths and their linkages. The resulting device is rather small and efficient, thus suitable for

7h

Sensorærme kan føre til bedre behandling af parkinsons

PLUS. Ny, dansk sensorteknologi kan hjælpe medicinalindustrien med præcise målinger af effekten af nye medikamenter.

7h

The young sun spun slowly, which could explain why we are here

The makeup of the moon shows that the young sun rotated slower than other similar stars, leaving the early solar system relatively calm so life could arise

8h

Depressionsmiddel kan lede til spontane aborter

Et nyt studie peger på, at hvis kvinder indtager benzodiazepiner for depression, søvnløshed eller angst tidligt i graviditeten, øger det risikoen for spontan abort.

8h

Algoritme skal få praksislæger til at gribe ind inden indlæggelse

Forskningsprojektet Tværspor har udviklet en algoritme, der skal hjælpe praktiserende læger og andre sundhedsprofessionelle til at forudse, hvornår en borger er høj i risiko for at blive indlagt. Det skal føre til forebyggelige indsatser, så indlæggelsen ikke sker.

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Privacy is Dead

submitted by /u/ponieslovekittens [link] [comments]

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Long-lived roundworms help identify new anti-aging compounds among the FDA approved drugs

Researchers from Gero, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) collaborated to derive a transcriptomic signature of aging, which they confirmed using large transcriptomic databases. They discovered that aging in nematodes is partially programmed and can be therapeutically reve

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US sanctions on Huawei bite, but who gets hurt?

Trump administration sanctions against Huawei have begun to bite even though their dimensions remain unclear. U.S. companies that supply the Chinese tech powerhouse with computer chips face a drop in sales, and Huawei's smartphone sales could get decimated with the anticipated loss of Google's popular software and services.

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Two Japanese carriers postpone release of Huawei phones

Two of Japan's top mobile phone carriers said Wednesday they will delay releasing new handsets made by Huawei after a US ban on American companies selling technology to the Chinese tech giant.

8h

Space travel and your joints

A novel Henry Ford Hospital study of mice aboard a Russian spaceflight may raise an intriguing question for the astronauts of tomorrow: Could traveling in space be bad for your joints?

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Computerized Model Reveals Details Of How Human Cells Divide

The nonprofit Allen Institute in Seattle has produced a visualization of human cell division that promises to be useful for professional scientists and curious amateurs alike. (Image credit: Allen Institute)

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Prison-based college presents challenges, but can succeed, study finds

Creating a prison-based program where incarcerated individuals can take college classes and then work toward a degree upon release can be successful, but many obstacles challenge the success of such efforts, according to a new study.

8h

River valleys helped shape current genetic landscape of Han Chinese

The Han Chinese are the world's largest ethnic group, making up 91.6% of modern-day China. As DNA sequencing tools and statistical analyses software have advanced, scientists have been exploring the forces that helped shape the current genetic landscape of Han Chinese.

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River valleys helped shape current genetic landscape of Han Chinese

The Han Chinese are the world's largest ethnic group, making up 91.6% of modern-day China. As DNA sequencing tools and statistical analyses software have advanced, scientists have been exploring the forces that helped shape the current genetic landscape of Han Chinese.

9h

Dreams of Comoros oil boom hang on seismic survey

For years, the Comoros islands off the east coast of Africa have dreamt of an oil or gas strike—now the first planned seismic survey could reveal if the poverty-stricken nation's hopes are about to come true.

9h

World nations failing the poorest on energy goals: study

More than 150 million people are gaining access to electricity every year, reducing the ranks of those who live without power, but this is not enough to meet global development goals, according to a report released Wednesday.

9h

Sea dragon exhibit dazzles visitors at California aquarium

At first glance, it looks like a branch of kelp, but then an eye moves among its leafy appendages, and ridges of tiny, translucent fins start to flutter, sending the creature gliding through the water like something from a fairy tale.

9h

China's big three airlines seek 737 MAX payouts from Boeing: reports

China's three biggest airlines have filed claims seeking compensation from Boeing over the grounding and delayed delivery of 737 MAX 8 aircraft following two deadly crashes, Chinese state media reported on Wednesday.

9h

Sea dragon exhibit dazzles visitors at California aquarium

At first glance, it looks like a branch of kelp, but then an eye moves among its leafy appendages, and ridges of tiny, translucent fins start to flutter, sending the creature gliding through the water like something from a fairy tale.

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Three-quarters of food bought in UK hospitals is unhealthy, audit shows

NHS staff, patients and visitors shun nutritious snacks in favour of crisps, sweets and cakes Researchers have called for radical restrictions on junk food in UK hospitals after an audit of NHS health centres found that people overwhelmingly bought unhealthy snacks and drinks on the premises. Three-quarters of the best-selling snacks in hospital cafes and canteens were rated as unhealthy, along w

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The US Is No Longer the World's Largest Smart Speaker Market

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

10h

Can automation reduce employee stress?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

10h

PODD: Kost och cancer

Charkuterier, det vill säga mat som korv, bacon eller annat processat kött har klassats som cancerframkallande. Det innebär att charkuterier hamnar i samma kategori som rökning även om risken att drabbas av cancer är mycket större på grund av rökning än av processat kött.

10h

Europe’s Far-Right Leaders Are Using Facebook to Transcend Borders

ATHENS—Late last year, a video titled “Time to Shake Up Brussels!” appeared in my Facebook News Feed. It depicted images of violence, painted refugees and Muslims as a threat to the Continent, and laid blame with a Belgian politician who has consistently been seen by both his supporters and his critics as a proponent of migration and liberalism. In some ways, the video, though objectionable, was

10h

Introducing a new citizens initiative for carbon pricing in Europe

A new European Citizens’ Initiative (ECI) called “ The fast, fair and effective solution to climate change ” was launched on May 6 . The proposal asks that the European Commission introduce a carbon-pricing policy known as Carbon Fee and Dividend at the European Union level. The European Commission registered the proposal earlier this month. Organizers behind the initiative now have one year unti

10h

Linköping whistleblower under attack from May Griffith’s lawyers

Former Linköping professor May Griffith set lawyers upon a former colleague who dared to protest about her research practices on my site. Jaywant Phopase is ordered to delete official documents I made available for download, retract his complaints to journals and pay Griffith a compensation. Or else.

10h

Far-Right Propaganda Floods Facebook Ahead of EU Elections

Fake accounts spread white-nationalist messages and amassed larger followings than actual far-right parties before being taken down, according to a new report.

10h

Plastic straws will be banned in the UK from April 2020

The billions of plastic straws consumed in the UK each year will be banned from April 2020. The move will also cover plastic drinks stirrers and cotton buds

10h

Eksperter er uenige: Virker CO2-afgifter på fly overhovedet på klimaet?

Med EU’s nuværende kvotesystem vil andre industrier kunne overtage flytrafikkens CO2-udledning. Og så er vi lige vidt med klimaeffekten.

11h

The top 25 medical lab tests around the world

A recent study can help governments understand which diagnostic laboratory tests are most important when developing universal health coverage systems.

11h

A light matter: Understanding the Raman dance of solids

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Keio University investigated the excitation and detection of photogenerated coherent phonons in polar semiconductor GaAs through an ultrafast dual pump-probe laser for quantum interferometry.

11h

Global study of urban poor links childhood adversity to adolescent violence and depression

In poor urban areas around the world, exposure to adverse events as children — including physical and emotional neglect, violence, and sexual abuse — is strongly associated with both adolescent depression and violence perpetrated by young people, with the data suggesting that boys are suffering even more than girls, according to a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health from the Johns Hopk

11h

Prison-based college presents challenges, but can succeed, study finds

Interest in prison-based education has grown in recent years as an approach to reduce recidivism and improve the future of people who are incarcerated for crimes. A study of a North Carolina program finds that creating a prison-based program where incarcerated individuals can take college classes and then work toward a degree upon release can be successful, but many obstacles challenge the success

11h

First states to expand Medicaid saw larger screening rate increases

The five states and District of Columbia that first adopted Medicaid expansion saw larger increases in cancer screening than those states that did not.

11h

Poor semen quality in Switzerland

A marked decrease in sperm count has been observed. And in Switzerland? Researchers (UNIGE) have undertaken the first nationwide assessment of the semen quality. The scientists assessed the number of spermatozoa, their motility and morphology. The results were well below the reference values issued by the WHO. The current situation is a matter of concern since the poor semen quality of Swiss men i

11h

Tryg-chef: Hvis man skulle beskytte sig teknisk fra alle cyberangreb, kunne man ikke længere arbejde

Tryg har i de sidste år haft stort fokus på medarbejderuddannelse i deres sikkerhedsstrategi. Man kan nemlig ikke rent teknisk sikre sig mod alle angreb, hvis man også skal arbejde, mener Trygs koncernsikkerhedschef

12h

Flying Cars Are Real—And They’re Not Bad for the Climate

submitted by /u/MuonsAreKillingUs [link] [comments]

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Seattle scores an A in climate change strategies, says environmental group

submitted by /u/The_Necromancer10 [link] [comments]

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Viral Video Reveals The Bizarre Way You Can Make a Soda Can Fully Transparent

A little-known industry secret, hiding inside your soft drink.

12h

Demand grows for tiny phone chargers using ‘new silicon’

China’s Anker looks to ramp up production of accessories made with gallium nitride

12h

Re-designing hydrogenases

Chemists have synthesized the first ever functional non-native metal hydrogenase.

12h

Exercise: Psych patients' new primary prescription

A new study advocates for exercise as the primary method of treatment and intervention, rather than psychotropic medications, within inpatient psychiatric facilities.

13h

Stem cell differences could explain why women are more likely to develop adrenal cancer

Scientists have discovered a potential biological reason why women are more likely to develop adrenal disorders, including cancer. According to the researchers, the answer could lie in the increased turnover of hormone-producing cells found in the adrenal glands of females.

13h

Lake sediment records reveal recent floods in NW England (UK) unprecedented

A new study of UK lake sediment records stretching back over several centuries has found that the floods that hit Northern England in 2009 and 2015 ('Storm Desmond'),were the largest in 600 years, pointing to the impact of climate changes on the frequency and magnitude of these extreme events.

13h

Re-designing hydrogenases

Chemists have synthesized the first ever functional non-native metal hydrogenase.

13h

Tropical Pacific variability key for successful climate forecasts

The warming of the Earth by the human-caused greenhouse effect is progressing. But predictions for the next decades still show relatively large uncertainties. A research team has now identified the large natural variations in the tropical Pacific region as the key reason.

13h

Children of both young and old parents share risk for certain neurodevelopment disorders

Results of a new study reports that parental age is linked to the risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in children, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD); attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); and Tourette's disorder/chronic tic disorder (TD/CT).

13h

Successful HIV effort prompts call for clinics to expand mental health services on site

Increasing access to mental health services improves HIV outcomes among vulnerable patients, a new study suggests. Based on their findings, the researchers are urging HIV clinics to expand their mental health services on site.

13h

Blood proteins help predict risk of developing heart failure

Two blood proteins help predict more accurately the risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure hospitalization.

13h

New opioid speeds up recovery without increasing pain sensitivity or risk of chronic pain

A new type of non-addictive opioid accelerates recovery time from pain compared to morphine without increasing pain sensitivity, according to a new study.

13h

Young athletes who require ACL reconstruction may benefit from additional procedure

An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, an injury of the knee, can be devastating to a young athlete. While the ACL can be reconstructed through surgery, there is a high risk of re-injury in patients under the age of 25. In the largest clinical trial of its kind, researchers have shown that performing an additional surgical procedure called lateral extra-articular tenodesis (LET) may reduce the

13h

Multiple brain regions moderate and link depressive mood and pain

New research expands and deepens the association between clinical depression and pain, identifying specific regions of the brain that drive, influence and moderate depressive mood and its relationship to perceiving physical pain.

13h

Summit charts a course to uncover the origins of genetic diseases

A team used the 200-petaflop IBM AC922 Summit system, the world's smartest and most powerful supercomputer, to develop an integrative model of the transcription preinitiation complex (PIC), a complex of proteins vital to gene expression.

13h

Ecological factors influences the distribution of lionfish on deep reefs

Diver-led visual surveys at 11 mesophotic reef sites around Bermuda found that high densities of lionfish were associated with both higher abundances of prey fish and higher prey fish biomass. However, the influence of seawater temperature was found to have the strongest effect on lionfish distribution, with higher lionfish densities recorded at sites with lower bottom temperatures. These results

13h

No yield benefit to higher plant populations

Scientists have reviewed plant population studies published in 2000 or later. They found that yield is optimized at about 15,000 plants per acre (1.1 seed per foot in 40-inch rows), and contrary to popular belief, there is no yield benefit to high populations.

13h

Statistical model could predict future disease outbreaks

Researchers have created a statistical method that may allow public health and infectious disease forecasters to better predict disease reemergence, especially for preventable childhood infections such as measles and pertussis.

13h

Distinct microbes found living next to corals

Symbiotic algae living inside corals provide those animals with their vibrant color, as well as many of the nutrients they need to survive. That algae, and other microbes within the bodies of corals, have been extensively studied — yet until now, researchers have largely ignored the microbial communities just outside of the coral colonies. A new study describes microbes that live just a few centi

13h

The cultural significance of carbon-storing peatlands to rural communities

A group of researchers have carried out the first detailed study of how rural communities interact with peatlands in the Peruvian Amazon, a landscape that is one of the world's largest stores of carbon.

13h

Better way to transport life-saving vaccines

Researchers have invented a stable, affordable way to store fragile vaccines for weeks at a time at temperatures up to 40C, opening the way for life-saving anti-viral vaccines to reach remote and impoverished regions of the world.

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Baby tiger sharks eat songbirds

Tiger sharks have a reputation for being the 'garbage cans of the sea' — they'll eat just about anything, from dolphins and sea turtles to rubber tires. And in a new study, scientists just discovered that baby tiger sharks eat birds. And not seabirds like gulls or pelicans — familiar backyard birds like sparrows, woodpeckers, and doves. In short: Baby sharks, doo doo doo doo doo doo They eat bir

14h

The effects of air pollution on human health

People with lung conditions describe the impact air pollution has on their health.

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Tesla Autopilot suggests lane change into oncoming traffic

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

15h

Andrew Yang: The U.S. government is 24 years behind on tech

submitted by /u/DragonGod2718 [link] [comments]

15h

Air pollution linked to childhood anxiety

A new study looks at the correlation between exposure to traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) and childhood anxiety, by looking at the altered neurochemistry in pre-adolescents.

15h

How usable is virtual reality?

Virtual reality is taking over ever more areas of our lives, so it is important that virtual worlds offer high usability. Until now, the only way to check was to conduct tests with volunteers — time-consuming and cost-intensive. A new technology automatically detects many problems with user-friendliness and usability in the virtual environment.

15h

Nanomaterial can protect electronics from major heat

A new nanocomposite could help flexible electronics, energy storage devices, and electric devices better hold up to heat. The nanocomposite combines one-dimensional polymer nanofibers and two-dimensional boron nitride nanosheets. The nanofibers reinforce the self-assembling material while the “white graphene” nanosheets provide a thermally conductive network that allows it to withstand the heat t

15h

Ammonium fertilized early life on Earth

New research demonstrates that ammonium was a vital source of nitrogen for early life on Earth.

15h

It's Official: Sea Level Rise Could Soon Displace Up to 187 Million People

It's going to be a refugee crisis on a whole new scale.

15h

EEG scans can detect signs of Parkinson’s disease

Researchers have zeroed in on what may be easily detectable markers of Parkinson’s disease. The evidence is in the specific angles and sharpness of electrical waves in unfiltered raw data from scalp electroencephalograms of patients receiving treatment for the degenerative disease that slowly damages the central nervous system. Medical facilities around the world use noninvasive scalp EEG, in whi

15h

New opioid has speedier pain recovery than morphine

Researchers have developed a new type of opioid that accelerates recovery time from pain compared to morphine. It also doesn’t have the side effect of increasing pain sensitivity, according to a new study with rats. Morphine and other opioid-based painkillers are very effective at treating pain initially, but studies have shown that the drugs can make patients more pain-sensitive, prolonging thei

15h

Baby Tiger Sharks Are Eating Sparrows And Woodpeckers

A tiger shark — woodpeckers beware. (Credit: Shane Gross/Shutterstock) Often called “the garbage cans of the sea,” tiger sharks are voracious eaters. The sharks will eat just about anything — fish, other sharks, seabirds, sea turtles, whale carcasses. The list goes on. That hodgepodge of prey now also includes a few creatures that don't usually even go in the ocean. Young tiger sharks also feast o

15h

Straws: UK government to bring in new controls on plastic

In a bid to limit ocean pollution, the government will introduce new controls on plastic next year.

15h

The Atlantic Daily: How the Huawei Drama Benefits American Tech

What We’re Following (Edgar Su / Reuters) A standoff with Huawei is giving American tech companies a new narrative. With lingering concerns that equipment made by the telecom giant is compromised by Chinese intelligence officials, the Trump administration had moved to place Huawei on a blacklist, which makes it difficult for American companies to do business with it. And Google added to the drama

15h

Flamingoes, elephants and sharks: How do blind adults learn about animal appearance?

They've never seen animals like hippos and sharks but adults born blind have rich insight into what they look like, a new study found.

15h

Extreme draining of reservoir aids young salmon and eliminates invasive fish

A new study finds that the low-cost, extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon aided downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon — and led to the gradual disappearance of two species of predatory invasive fish in the artificial lake.

16h

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