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nyheder2019maj23

10h

One billion year old fungi found are Earth's oldest

Scientists have unearthed fossilised fungi dating back up to one billion years, in a discovery that could reshape our understanding of how life on land evolved, research showed Wednesday.

1d

Roadpricing er klar til brug: V, S og DF står stadig i vejen

Teknologien er klar og der er bred enighed om behovet for grøn omstilling af transportsektoren. Alligevel tøver S, V og DF fortsat med at gå forrest med roadpricing, selvom alle partiernes fortæller, at de kan se perspektiver i ideen.

19h

Vilken diagnos passar Leonardo da Vinci?

Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) är mest känd för att ha målat tavlan Mona Lisa. Men han utmärkte sig även som arkitekt, ingenjör, uppfinnare, naturforskare, matematiker, musiker och mycket annat. Den spretiga karriären skulle kunna bero på att han hade adhd, som bland annat innebär svårigheter att behålla koncentrationen på en enda sak. Det tror i alla fall psykiatriker i Storbritannien efter att ha

14min

Connecting the dots on hurricanes and mental health issues

Health More people are likely to be affected—both physically and psychologically—by severe weather events in the future. Worsening storms have destructive effects both on infrastructure and on the physical health of affected people. They also significantly increase the risk of…

20min

Author Correction: Multimodal floral cues guide mosquitoes to tansy inflorescences

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44431-9 Author Correction: Multimodal floral cues guide mosquitoes to tansy inflorescences

29min

Author Correction: Coordinated Turning Behaviour of Loitering Honeybees

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41874-y Author Correction: Coordinated Turning Behaviour of Loitering Honeybees

29min

Author Correction: The discovery of Lake Hephaestus, the youngest athalassohaline deep-sea formation on Earth

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44367-0 Author Correction: The discovery of Lake Hephaestus , the youngest athalassohaline deep-sea formation on Earth

29min

Author Correction: Differential expression of CXCR3 and CCR6 on CD4+ T-lymphocytes with distinct memory phenotypes characterizes tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44429-3 Author Correction: Differential expression of CXCR3 and CCR6 on CD4 + T-lymphocytes with distinct memory phenotypes characterizes tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome

29min

NASA Announces Contractor for First Component of Lunar Gateway

The power and propulsion system for the Lunar Gateway will be built by Maxar. Courtesy of Business Wire) In a talk at the Florida Institute of Technology on Thursday, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine announced that Maxar Technologies will build the first stage of NASA’s planned Lunar Gateway. The Gateway, part of NASA's larger Artemis program to return to the moon, is meant to be a waystation of

47min

Why Scientists Are Putting a Telescope on the Bottom of the Ocean

The telescope, once complete, will be made of hundreds of spherical detectors suspended at the bottom of the sea. (Credit: KM3NeT) Deep under the Mediterranean Sea, hundreds of watchful eyes hang suspended on cables, waiting for a rare and valuable flash. Their quarry are ghostly neutrino particles, capable of tunneling through light-years of space and a planet's worth of rock without ever coming

47min

New Assange indictment adds 17 espionage charges

Obtaining, disclosing "National Defense Information" charges could trigger 1st Amendment battle.

54min

Ethereum’s foundation is pumping $30 million into “transformative” upgrades

The long-promised overhaul that will unlock what creator Vitalik Buterin calls the “world computer” needs a cash infusion.

1h

6,000 tires, 700 horsepower, and 230 miles per hour: The Indy 500 by the numbers

Cars One of the greatest car races in the world is also a showcase for innovative engineering. The Indy 500 has some truly impressive machines piloted by remarkable humans.

1h

Using communication to combat scientific skepticism

Sponsored Post 3M brings science to life with storytelling. The 2019 State of Science Index (SOSI) from 3M reveals that a third of respondents are skeptical of science, believing that it causes as many problems as it does…

1h

Asteroid Flying by Earth Is so Big It Has Its Own Moon

Buddy System Earth will be getting not one but two visitors from space this weekend. Astronomers expect an asteroid known as 1999 KW4 to swing by the Earth at around 7:05 p.m. ET on Saturday — and when it does, it’ll bring along its very own moon. “It’s one of the closest binary flybys probably in recent history,” planetary scientist Vishnu Reddy told NBC News . “That’s what makes it a very inter

1h

Initially threatened by change, people adapt to societal diversity over time

With time, people can adapt to societal diversity and actually benefit from it, according to a study led by researchers at Princeton University and the University of Oxford. Those in power especially set the tone for integrating people into a new society.

1h

GOP, Dem Senators officially introduce loot box, “pay-to-win” legislation

Expansive prohibitions could heavily impact large swathes of the game industry.

1h

More Data on Content Moderation Won't Silence Facebook’s Critics

Facebook’s latest report lays out the sheer scale of its battle against fake accounts, spam, and other abuses.

1h

The 2019 Hurricane Season Will Be 'Near Normal.' But Normal Can Still Be Devastating

NOAA forecasts that two to four major hurricanes will form this year in the Atlantic. But even an average year can cause record-breaking damage, as storms get bigger and wetter. (Image credit: Getty Images)

1h

‘Alexa, are you reinforcing gender biases?’ U.N. says yes.

A new U.N. report claims that virtual assistants, such as Alexa and Siri, are reinforcing gender stereotypes. The report covers gender gaps in science, technology, and computer literacy. The reason why most virtual assistants are female may stem from the fact that consumers generally prefer the female voice. None From Siri to Alexa, or Cortana to Google, our virtual assistants almost always have

1h

Experimental fertility preservation provides hope for young men

Testicular tissue samples obtained from 189 males who were facing procedures that could imperil fertility were cryopreserved at one university, proving the feasibility of centralized processing and freezing of testicular tissue obtained from academic medical centers, including Children's National, scattered around the world.

1h

Energy storage in the Midwest and beyond: A timely analysis

As the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) released an update to last year's order on energy storage, MRS Energy & Sustainability today publishes a timely collection of papers that unpack the issue of energy storage in the Midwest and beyond.

1h

Researchers investigate hormonal links between diet and obesity

Scientists have found another hint that time of day may play a role in how the body burns fuel, with implications for weight gain and heart health.

1h

United Nations: Siri and Alexa Are Encouraging Misogyny

Two-Way Street We already knew humans could make biased AIs — but the United Nations says the reverse is true as well. Millions of people talk to AI voice assistants, such as Apple’s Siri and Amazon’s Alexa. When those assistants talk back, they do so in female-sounding voices, and a new UN report argues that those voices and the words they’re programmed to say amplify gender biases and encourage

1h

Why it’s hard to tell when high-class people are incompetent

The study involves four experiments that measured individuals' socioeconomic status, overconfidence and actual performance. Results consistently showed that high-class people tend to overestimate their abilities. However, this overconfidence was misinterpreted as genuine competence in one study, suggesting overestimating your abilities can have social advantages. None People who come from high so

1h

Mother bonobos, too, pressure their sons to have grandchildren

Mother bonobos have been observed to help their sons find and copulate with mates. The mothers accomplish this by leading sons to mates, interfering with other males trying to copulate with females, and helping sons rise in the social hierarchy of the group. Why do mother bonobos do this? The "grandmother hypothesis" might hold part of the answer. None Like mother, like monkey. Bonobo mothers, it

1h

Learn the art and science of UI/UX design with this in-depth training

Get eight premium courses for $29. Get eight premium courses for $29 and learn the art and science of UI/UX design with this in-depth training.

1h

Researchers create soft, flexible materials with enhanced properties

Polymer chemists and engineers have developed a new methodology that can be used to create a class of stretchable polymer composites with enhanced electrical and thermal properties. These materials are promising candidates for use in soft robotics, self-healing electronics and medical devices.

1h

How to enhance or suppress memories

New research shows memories are pliable if you know which regions of the brain's hippocampus to stimulate — a finding that could someday enable personalized treatment for people with PTSD, depression and anxiety.

1h

Fruit juice can be twice as harmful as soda

A new study finds that the risk of all-cause mortality from over-consumption of fruit juice is significant. Other sugared beverages are still bad for you, but too much fruit juice is actually worse. Fructose, real or natural, is still fructose and problematic. None While fruit juice largely retains its reputation as a healthy thing for kids to drink, it's not exactly news that it can contain just

2h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Obama Is … Biden His Time

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, May 23. ‣ The Senate reached a bipartisan deal on a $19 billion disaster-relief package, which includes $900 million in funding for Puerto Rico. President Donald Trump has reportedly signed off on the legislation, despite the fact that it contains no border-related funds. ‣ A 10-year-old died in the care of the Department of Health and Human Services last

2h

Interplay between mitochondria and nucleus may have implications for new treatment

Mitochondria, the 'batteries' that produce our energy, interact with the cell's nucleus in subtle ways previously unseen in humans, according to new research.

2h

New strategy for preventing holiday weight gain

To avoid putting on extra pounds at the holidays, researchers have found that US adults who engage in daily self-weighing can prevent holiday weight gain.

2h

Light and nanotechnology prevent bacterial infections on medical implants

A new study reports on a new technique that could prevent bacterial contamination and infection in medical implants by using light combined with gold nanoparticles.

2h

Keep your placenta healthy by exercising while pregnant

New research found a possible explanation for the benefits of maternal exercise on fetal development, in obese mothers: it's down to improved placental function, which prevents the fetus from growing too big, and also better metabolism in the mothers.

2h

Skin patch shows promise for children with milk-induced eosinophilic esophagitis

A new study finds that a skin patch may be useful in treating children with a painful, chronic condition called eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) triggered by milk. Among 20 children with EoE who wore Viaskin Milk — a skin patch measuring just over an inch long containing trace amounts of milk protein — nine saw an improvement in their symptoms and normalization of their biopsies after 11 months.

2h

Stroke deaths in England halved in the first decade of the 21st century

Deaths from stroke in England halved during the first decade of the 21st century, mainly as a result of improved survival due to better care, finds a study.

2h

Positron emission tomography reporter gene strategy for use in the central nervous system [Medical Sciences]

There is a growing need for monitoring or imaging gene therapy in the central nervous system (CNS). This can be achieved with a positron emission tomography (PET) reporter gene strategy. Here we report the development of a PET reporter gene system using the PKM2 gene with its associated radiotracer [18F]DASA-23….

2h

Implantable multireservoir device with stimulus-responsive membrane for on-demand and pulsatile delivery of growth hormone [Engineering]

Implantable devices for on-demand and pulsatile drug delivery have attracted considerable attention; however, many devices in clinical use are embedded with the electronic units and battery inside, hence making them large and heavy for implantation. Therefore, we propose an implantable device with multiple drug reservoirs capped with a stimulus-responsive membrane…

2h

Coupling of COPII vesicle trafficking to nutrient availability by the IRE1{alpha}-XBP1s axis [Cell Biology]

The cytoplasmic coat protein complex-II (COPII) is evolutionarily conserved machinery that is essential for efficient trafficking of protein and lipid cargos. How the COPII machinery is regulated to meet the metabolic demand in response to alterations of the nutritional state remains largely unexplored, however. Here, we show that dynamic changes…

2h

An activatable PET imaging radioprobe is a dynamic reporter of myeloperoxidase activity in vivo [Medical Sciences]

Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a critical proinflammatory enzyme implicated in cardiovascular, neurological, and rheumatological diseases. Emerging therapies targeting inflammation have raised interest in tracking MPO activity in patients. We describe 18F-MAPP, an activatable MPO activity radioprobe for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. The activated radioprobe binds to proteins and accumulate

2h

A scarcity mindset alters neural processing underlying consumer decision making [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Not having enough of what one needs has long been shown to have detrimental consequences for decision making. Recent work suggests that the experience of insufficient resources can create a “scarcity” mindset; increasing attention toward the scarce resource itself, but at the cost of attention for unrelated aspects. To investigate…

2h

Mechanism of CAP1-mediated apical actin polymerization in pollen tubes [Plant Biology]

Srv2p/CAP1 is an essential regulator of actin turnover, but its exact function in regulating actin polymerization, particularly the contribution of its actin nucleotide exchange activity, remains incompletely understood. We found that, although Arabidopsis CAP1 is distributed uniformly in the cytoplasm, its loss of function has differential effects on the actin…

2h

New progress on the zeta function: From old conjectures to a major breakthrough [Commentaries]

Early History The zeta function ζ(s) today is the oldest and most important tool to study the distribution of prime numbers and is the simplest example of a whole class of similar functions, equally important for understanding the deepest problems of number theory. The celebrated Riemann hypothesis is that all…

2h

Reverse engineering field-derived vertical distribution profiles to infer larval swimming behaviors [Ecology]

Biophysical models are well-used tools for predicting the dispersal of marine larvae. Larval behavior has been shown to influence dispersal, but how to incorporate behavior effectively within dispersal models remains a challenge. Mechanisms of behavior are often derived from laboratory-based studies and therefore, may not reflect behavior in situ. Here,…

2h

Quantum phase-sensitive diffraction and imaging using entangled photons [Physics]

We propose a quantum diffraction imaging technique whereby one photon of an entangled pair is diffracted off a sample and detected in coincidence with its twin. The image is obtained by scanning the photon that did not interact with matter. We show that when a dynamical quantum system interacts with…

2h

Structural determinants for peptide-bond formation by asparaginyl ligases [Biochemistry]

Asparaginyl endopeptidases (AEPs) are cysteine proteases which break Asx (Asn/Asp)–Xaa bonds in acidic conditions. Despite sharing a conserved overall structure with AEPs, certain plant enzymes such as butelase 1 act as a peptide asparaginyl ligase (PAL) and catalyze Asx–Xaa bond formation in near-neutral conditions. PALs also serve as macrocyclases in…

2h

Genetic and molecular analysis of trichome development in Arabis alpina [Plant Biology]

The genetic and molecular analysis of trichome development in Arabidopsis thaliana has generated a detailed knowledge about the underlying regulatory genes and networks. However, how rapidly these mechanisms diverge during evolution is unknown. To address this problem, we used an unbiased forward genetic approach to identify most genes involved in…

2h

To Fight Deadly Candida Auris, New York State Proposes New Tactics

The state health department calls on hospitals to do more to fight Candida auris, a mystery germ spreading the globe.

2h

Melting small glaciers could add 10 inches to sea levels

A new review of glacier research data paints a picture of a future planet with a lot less ice and a lot more water.

2h

Thoughts on body image in pregnancy important indicator of emotional wellbeing

Researchers have shown that a new way of assessing women's relationship with their bodies during pregnancy could help predict how well the mother might bond with her unborn baby and her longer-term emotional wellbeing.

2h

New Law Could End Robocalling Once and For All

Robocall Bill In response to the almost 50 billion robocalls that were made last year in the U.S., the Senate just voted in favor of a bipartisan bill that could put an end to unsolicited marketing calls once and for all. The Telephone Robocall Abuse Criminal Enforcement and Deterrence (TRACED) Act overwhelmingly passed with just one vote against and 97 in favor — clearly an issue that both sides

2h

2h

A step closer to identifying cause of a blinding disease

A recent study, led by researchers at McGill University and published in the journal Scientific Reports, offers an important step in unlocking the mystery of LHON's cause. The researchers had previously showed that the cells that connect the eye to the brain were sensitive to a certain free radical, known as 'superoxide,' and hypothesized that the presence of too much superoxide was likely the cau

2h

Botswana Just Lifted Its Ban on Elephant Hunting. Conservationists Are Appalled.

The country has long been a safe haven for the animals, but it's unclear what will happen now.

2h

Of strawberry jelly and earthquakes: Space station investigation studies colloids

If you think your strawberry jelly is unrelated to earthquakes, think again.

2h

Aftershocks of 1959 earthquake rocked Yellowstone in 2017-18

On Aug. 17, 1959, back when Dwight D. Eisenhower was president, the U.S. had yet to send a human to space and the nation's flag sported 49 stars, Yellowstone National Park shook violently for about 30 seconds. The shock was strong enough to drop the ground a full 20 feet in some places. It toppled the dining room fireplace in the Old Faithful Inn. Groundwater swelled up and down in wells as far aw

2h

The politics of ugly buildings

In 1984, when the British government was planning to build a flashy modernist addition to the National Gallery in London, Prince Charles offered a dissenting view. The proposed extension, he said, resembled "a monstrous carbuncle on the face of a much-loved and elegant friend." A public controversy ensued, and eventually a more subtle addition was built.

2h

Marching for climate change may sway people's beliefs and actions

Americans have a long tradition of taking to the streets to protest or to advocate for things they believe in. New research suggests that when it comes to climate change, these marches may indeed have a positive effect on the public.

2h

Researchers create soft, flexible materials with enhanced properties

A team of polymer chemists and engineers from Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new methodology that can be used to create a class of stretchable polymer composites with enhanced electrical and thermal properties. These materials are promising candidates for use in soft robotics, self-healing electronics and medical devices. The results are published in the May 20 issue of Nature Nanotec

2h

Breakup isn't the answer, Facebook's Zuckerberg says

Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday rejected the idea of breaking up the social media giant as off-target, saying it could hamper the fight against deceit and harmful online content.

2h

Engineered bacteria could be missing link in energy storage

One of the big issues with sustainable energy systems is how to store electricity that's generated from wind, solar and waves. At present, no existing technology provides large-scale storage and energy retrieval for sustainable energy at a low financial and environmental cost. Engineered electroactive microbes could be part of the solution.

2h

Scientists Set New Temperature Record for Superconductivity

Hot Damn An international team of scientists has built a superconductor that functions at 250 Kelvin, or -23 degrees Celsius — or just-9 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s a few degrees colder than the chilliest winter day in Florida history, but it’s nearly 50 Celsius degrees (84.6 Fahrenheit degrees) hotter than the previous record high for superconductivity — and it puts the “ holy grail ” of energy t

2h

NASA unveils schedule for 'Artemis' 2024 Moon mission

NASA on Thursday unveiled the calendar for the "Artemis" program that will return astronauts to the Moon for the first time in half a century, including eight scheduled launches and a mini-station in lunar orbit by 2024.

2h

Apple to host WWDC developers event with first peek at new iOS on June 3

Fans of the iPhone and other Apple products can mark their calendars for details on the tech giant's next iOS update.

2h

The hidden fish keeping coral reefs alive

Nexus Media News See the unsung heroes of the sea. These tiny fish are the unsung heroes of the sea, playing a vital role in maintaining coral reef ecosystems. Now, they're threatened by climate change.

2h

The Atlantic May See Up to 4 Major Hurricanes This Season, New Forecast Says

Here's what to expect for the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season and how to get prepared.

2h

First Trailer Arrives for Upcoming Star Trek: Picard on CBS

CBS has released the first trailer for the upcoming Star Trek: Picard , and our first look at Jean-Luc in over a decade. The post First Trailer Arrives for Upcoming Star Trek: Picard on CBS appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

DOJ: SpaceX Rockets Endangered By Forged Inspection Reports

According to the Department of Justice, an employee of PMI Industries allegedly forged signatures on at least 38 inspection documents. The post DOJ: SpaceX Rockets Endangered By Forged Inspection Reports appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

Engineered bacteria could be missing link in energy storage

One of the big issues with sustainable energy systems is how to store electricity that's generated from wind, solar and waves. At present, no existing technology provides large-scale storage and energy retrieval for sustainable energy at a low financial and environmental cost. Engineered electroactive microbes could be part of the solution.

2h

How plant cells neutralize the potential for self-harm

Photosynthesis makes our atmosphere oxygen-rich and forms the bedrock of our food supply. But under changing or stressful environmental conditions, the photosynthetic process can become unbalanced, resulting in an excess of highly reactive oxygen molecules that could cause cellular damage if they aren't neutralized. New work explores how the photosynthetic algae Chlamydomonas shields itself from t

2h

New understanding of how cells form tunnels may help in treating wounds, tumors

A simple slice of the finger sends a complex series of interactions between types of cells into motion. Two types of cells in particular, called macrophages and fibroblasts, work together to clean up and repair the fibers destroyed by the cut.

2h

First comprehensive network of wild crop species will help breeders tackle food insecurity

The first comprehensive network of sites where crop wild relatives are found has been developed.

2h

On Mars, sands shift to a different drum

In the most detailed analysis of how sands move around on Mars, a team of planetary scientists led by the UA found that processes not involved in controlling sand movement on Earth play major roles on Mars.

2h

Marching for climate change may sway people's beliefs and actions

Americans have a long tradition of taking to the streets to protest or to advocate for things they believe in. New research suggests that when it comes to climate change, these marches may indeed have a positive effect on the public.

2h

Gene therapy may have its first blockbuster

Novartis awaits approval to sell Zolgensma to treat spinal muscular atrophy.

3h

Function of liver cancer genes in mini-organs

Researchers have developed a human model in which they use organoids, or mini organs, to study the function of specific genes that are mutated in liver cancer. Using this method, they have found that mutations in BAP1, a gene commonly mutated in liver cancer, changes the behavior of the cells, which may make them more likely to be invasive.

3h

Chemical juggling with three particles

Chemists have discovered a novel mechanism in catalysis. It allows the synthesis of certain alcohols more cheaply and environmentally friendly than before. The reaction follows a previously unknown pattern in which hydrogen is split into three components in a time-coordinated manner.

3h

Chemical juggling with three particles

Chemists have discovered a novel mechanism in catalysis. It allows the synthesis of certain alcohols more cheaply and environmentally friendly than before. The reaction follows a previously unknown pattern in which hydrogen is split into three components in a time-coordinated manner.

3h

Trace metal exposure among pregnant women living near fracking wells in Canada

Researchers find higher concentrations of trace metals such as barium in the hair and urine of 29 pregnant women living near fracking wells in British Columbia, Canada.

3h

Ecologists find bush dog, native of South America, in remote central Costa Rica

Wildlife ecologists who are studying different conservation practices in the forests of Costa Rica recently made a startling discovery on a wildlife camera trap — wild bush dogs documented farther north than ever before and at the highest elevation.

3h

NASA picks Maxar to build the first piece of its lunar space station

NASA chose Maxar Technologies to build the power and propulsion element of the Gateway lunar space station, which will be an outpost for going to the moon and Mars

3h

Aftershocks of 1959 earthquake rocked Yellowstone in 2017-18

A swarm of more than 3,000 small earthquakes in the Maple Creek area (in Yellowstone National Park but outside of the Yellowstone volcano caldera) between June 2017 and March 2018 are, at least in part, aftershocks of the 1959 quake.

3h

What we think we know — but might not — pushes us to learn more

Our doubts about what we think we know pique our curiosity and motivate us to learn more, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley.

3h

Piedmont Atlanta first in Georgia to offer new minimally invasive treatment for emphysema

Piedmont Atlanta Hospital is the first in the state of Georgia to offer a new minimally invasive treatment for emphysema, a severe form of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

3h

T-Mobile says it will match the special discounts making you reluctant to leave its rivals

T-Mobile is about to offer a fresh sweetener for prospective customers reluctant to leave AT&T, Verizon or Sprint because they are grandfathered into a corporate, affiliate, senior, military …

3h

Trump’s Impeachment Finger Trap

Do you remember the little woven finger traps you sometimes got as a kid, as a party favor or a reward at a fair? You could comfortably stick your fingers in, but if you tried to pull them out, the weave would tighten and you’d be stuck. Only by maneuvering gently, and not pulling too hard, could you extract yourself. President Donald Trump finds himself in a sort of impeachment finger trap right

3h

The Future Called: We’re Disgusting And Barbaric

submitted by /u/threequartersavvy [link] [comments]

3h

How Morocco is already living in the future

submitted by /u/tattooedpill [link] [comments]

3h

Seawater could bring breakthrough for hydrogen cars

submitted by /u/The_Necromancer10 [link] [comments]

3h

Only electric 2-wheelers to be sold in India after 2025

submitted by /u/TransPlanetInjection [link] [comments]

3h

India is investing more money in solar power than coal for first time

submitted by /u/TransPlanetInjection [link] [comments]

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Dissolving protein traffic jam at the entrance of mitochondria

Researchers have discovered a novel mechanism that ensures obstacle-free protein traffic into the powerhouse of the cell.

3h

The healing power of fish skin for a dog named Stella

Veterinarians used a creative approach to treat the burns of Stella, a 1-year-old Rottweiler puppy, who escaped a house fire. Smoke inhalation prohibited Stella from being sedated for skin grafts, so the team used cod fish skins to help heal Stella's burns. This successful treatment could help other animals.

3h

Climate change may make the Arctic tundra a drier landscape

With climate change, the Arctic tundra is likely to become drier. Lakes may shrink in size and smaller lakes may even disappear according to a new study. In western Greenland, Kangerlussuaq experienced a 28% decrease in the number of smaller lakes (those less than 10,000 square meters) and a 20% decrease in total area from 1969 to 2017. Many of the lakes that had disappeared in 1969 have since bec

3h

Function of liver cancer genes in mini-organs

Researchers have developed a human model in which they use organoids, or mini organs, to study the function of specific genes that are mutated in liver cancer. Using this method, they have found that mutations in BAP1, a gene commonly mutated in liver cancer, changes the behavior of the cells, which may make them more likely to be invasive.

3h

Conservation goals compete at the expense of biodiversity

With an ever-growing list of threats facing biodiversity on multiple scales, conservationists struggle to determine which to address. A common reaction is to prioritize their efforts on threats to individual species or management areas, but researchers say this narrow-minded approach is detrimental to the overall goal of saving species and ecosystems worldwide. Instead, they say large-scale, long-

3h

Targeting key gene could help lead to Down syndrome treatment

Targeting a key gene before birth could someday help lead to a treatment for Down syndrome by reversing abnormal embryonic brain development and improving cognitive function after birth, according to a new study.

3h

Variation of FTO gene linked to weight gain and obesity in children

Researchers have discovered that children who do not have obesity, but who are at risk for the chronic disease due to a common genetic variant eat more, according to a new study.

3h

Home-schoolers see no added health risks over time

Years of home-schooling don't appear to influence the general health of children, according to a new study.

3h

Self-Driving Startup Aurora Buys Speed-Sensing Lidar Company

Aurora is buying Blackmore, whose “Doppler lidar” system can determine how far away an object it, and its speed.

3h

Carnegie Mellon researchers create soft, flexible materials with enhanced properties

A team of polymer chemists and engineers from Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new methodology that can be used to create a class of stretchable polymer composites with enhanced electrical and thermal properties. These materials are promising candidates for use in soft robotics, self-healing electronics and medical devices. The results are published in the May 20, 2019 issue of Nature N

3h

Daily self-weighing can prevent holiday weight gain

Researchers at the University of Georgia have shown that a simple intervention — daily self-weighing — can help people avoid holiday weight gain.

3h

Two White Dwarf Stars Collided and Came Back from the Dead. Soon, They’ll Go Supernova.

These two dead stars united and came back to life. And soon, they’ll go supernova.

3h

When Libraries Are ‘Second Responders’

Everyone knows about first responders. I’ve come to think of libraries as playing a crucial role as “second responders.” In Ferguson, Missouri, the public library stayed open when the schools were closed after the riots, to offer the kids a safe place and even classes taught by volunteers. After the hurricanes in Houston, some library websites were immediately up and running, announcing that they

3h

Seeing Red in the Fossil Record

A discovery in a fossilized mouse could help scientists work out the true colors of dinosaurs and other creatures from prehistory.

3h

Senate passes bill meant to combat robocalls

The U.S. Senate has passed a bill that aims to combat the illegal robocalls torturing Americans .

3h

T-Mobile says it will match the special discounts making you reluctant to leave its rivals

T-Mobile is about to offer a fresh sweetener for prospective customers reluctant to leave AT&T, Verizon or Sprint because they are grandfathered into a corporate, affiliate, senior, military or other special discount they don't want to lose.

3h

New York subway riders will be able to tap and pay the fare starting May 31

New Yorkers routinely grumble about overcrowded subways and having to wait on long lines to purchase or refill their Metro Cards.

3h

Climate change may make the Arctic tundra a drier landscape

With climate change, the Arctic tundra is likely to become drier. Lakes may shrink in size and smaller lakes may even disappear according to a new Dartmouth study. In western Greenland, Kangerlussuaq experienced a 28 percent decrease in the number of smaller lakes (those less than 10,000 square meters) and a 20 percent decrease in total area from 1969 to 2017. Many of the lakes that had disappeare

3h

Game theory highlights power of local reporting in vaccine decisions

Computational modeling of social networks suggests that vaccination programs are more successful in containing disease when individuals have access to local information about disease prevalence. Anupama Sharma of The Institute of Mathematical Sciences in Chennai, India, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

3h

Women are less likely than men to be diagnosed with minor stroke

A new study find women experiencing a minor stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are less likely to be diagnosed with a stroke compared to men — even though they describe similar symptoms in emergency departments.

3h

World’s largest laser lab rocked by slew of disputes

Nature, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01607-7 Delays and disagreements plague final stages of a world-leading, €850-million facility being built across Eastern Europe.

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Violent birth could explain galaxy’s shortage of dark matter

Nature, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01626-4 Ghostly galaxy could be result of enormous collision.

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Game theory highlights power of local reporting in vaccine decisions

Computational modeling of social networks suggests that vaccination programs are more successful in containing disease when individuals have access to local information about disease prevalence. Anupama Sharma of The Institute of Mathematical Sciences in Chennai, India, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Report finds California above national average for sexual harassment rates

A new study shows California sexual harassment rates above national average.

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Climate change may make the arctic tundra a drier landscape

With climate change, the Arctic tundra is likely to become drier. Lakes may shrink in size and smaller lakes may even disappear according to a new Dartmouth study. In western Greenland, Kangerlussuaq experienced a 28% decrease in the number of smaller lakes (those less than 10,000 square meters) and a 20% decrease in total area from 1969 to 2017. Many of the lakes that had disappeared in 1969 have

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Should a fetus be a citizen? Why many pro-lifers say no.

Abortion rights in the United States might be in for a bit of a reduction. Many of the debates around abortion center around what rights, if any, a fetus should have. If a fetus is a person, the question of if it would be a citizen seems quickly comes to mind. With the recent spike in laws limiting abortion access in the United States recently, the debate over the future of abortion has been reki

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The secret to saving salmon is lodged in their ears

Environment Salmon of the Nushagak River shift their habitat year-to-year—and that has important implications for how we protect these fish. The sockeye and Chinook salmon that hatch, grow, and return to spawn on southwest Alaska’s Nushagak River are part of the world’s largest salmon fishery, Bristol Bay.

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Measuring methane from coal and gas in Pennsylvania informative

While methane pollution caused by natural gas production in Pennsylvania is underestimated by the US Environmental Protection Agency, natural gas still has half the carbon footprint of underground coal mining, according to an international team of researchers.

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Making Wood the ‘Cool’ New Building Material

Making Wood the ‘Cool’ New Building Material Researchers have modified wood not only to make it stronger but to make it capable of cool itselfing, which may lead to energy savings. WhiteWood.jpg This bright white building material rejects heat. Image credits: University of Maryland Technology Thursday, May 23, 2019 – 14:00 Bailey Bedford, Contributor (Inside Science) — Futuristic, energy-efficie

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Did Scientists Just Break the Record for Highest-Temperature Superconductor? Maybe.

A superconductor lets electricity flow through it perfectly, without losing any of it.

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High-tech wood could keep homes cool by reflecting the sun’s rays

A new type of wood material that reflects sunlight could keep homes cool and cut energy used for air conditioning

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The tiniest fish are the most important for healthy coral reefs

It turns out that tiny fish are crucial to supporting larger animals on and around a healthy coral reef

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Tiny, Snackable Fish Are Linchpins of Coral Reef Ecosystems

Fish that are so small and shy that they escape attention may be the foundation of reefs’ outsize productivity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Barcelona taxi drivers to lodge legal case against Uber

A Barcelona-based association of taxi drivers on Thursday announced it would lodge a legal complaint against ride-hailing services Uber and Cabify for fraud and other offences.

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Game theory highlights power of local reporting in vaccine decisions

Computational modeling of social networks suggests that vaccination programs are more successful in containing disease when individuals have access to local information about disease prevalence. Anupama Sharma of The Institute of Mathematical Sciences in Chennai, India, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Tiny fish live fast, die young

Fish on coral reefs manage to thrive in isolated areas where there are very low levels of nutrients for them to use. How? The answer may lie in the tiny fish that live in the gaps in the coral structure.

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The extraordinary powers of bacteria visualized in real time

The global spread of antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and a priority for international microbiology research. In his paper to be published in the journal Science, Christian Lesterlin, Inserm researcher at Lyon's 'Molecular Microbiology and Structural Biochemistry' laboratory (CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1), and his team were able to film the process of antibiotic resist

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Chemical juggling with three particles

Chemists from the University of Bonn and their US colleagues at Columbia University in New York have discovered a novel mechanism in catalysis. It allows the synthesis of certain alcohols more cheaply and environmentally friendly than before. The reaction follows a previously unknown pattern in which hydrogen is split into three components in a time-coordinated manner. The results are published in

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Scientists (dis)solve a century-long mystery to treat asthma and airway inflammation

Belgian research groups from the VIB, Ghent University, Ghent University Hospital, and the biotech company argenx have solved a century-long puzzle about the presence of protein crystals in asthma. Normally, proteins do not crystallize in the body, but there are some instances where this process does occur. The study is published in the leading journal Science.

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Interplay between mitochondria and nucleus may have implications for new treatment

Mitochondria, the 'batteries' that produce our energy, interact with the cell's nucleus in subtle ways previously unseen in humans, according to research published today in the journal Science.

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Live fast, die young: Study shows tiny fishes fuel coral reefs

Scientists have long sought to understand how coral reefs support such an abundance of fish life despite their location in nutrient-poor waters. According to a new study published May 23, 2019 in the journal Science, an unlikely group fuels these communities: tiny, mostly bottom-dwelling creatures called 'cryptobenthic' reef fishes.

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Building a better salt trap: Scientists synthesize a molecular 'cage' to trap chloride

Indiana University researchers have synthesized a powerful new molecule to trap chloride salts. The technology has the potential to reduce its seepage into freshwater systems, which is a threat to drinkable water across the globe.

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Passive radiative cooling in delignified wood material

A newly engineered, wood-based material successfully reflects heat, or infrared radiation, and could cut the energy costs associated with cooling buildings by up to 50%, according to a modeling analysis of its application in 16 US cities.

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How bacteria acquire antibiotic resistance in the presence of antibiotics

A new study's disconcerting findings reveal how antibiotic resistance is able to spread between bacteria cells despite the presence of antibiotics that should prevent them from growing.

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Hot new approach to 'green' hydrogen production is 'next logical step'

Electrifying the conventional fossil-fueled approaches to steam-methane reforming (SMR) enables a 'greener' approach to industrial hydrogen production, one that maximizes methane conversion while limiting the formation of unwanted carbon byproducts, researchers report.

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Surprise: The survival of coral reefs hinges on the hidden lives of the sea's tiniest fishes

The survival of coral reef ecosystems and their menagerie of rainbowed residents relies on seldom seen, historically overlooked cryptobenthic reef fishes — the smallest of marine vertebrates.

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Tiny fish a big lure for life on coral reefs

Researchers from Simon Fraser University have discovered how coral reefs support such an abundance and diversity of life. Banting Postdoctoral Fellow Simon Brandl and a team of international researchers revealed that tiny fish species around the world fuel life on coral reefs. The research, published in Science, examines how commonly overlooked 'cryptobenthic' fishes — tiny, bottom-dwelling creat

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Hot spots in rivers that nurture salmon 'flicker on and off' in Bristol Bay region

Chemical signatures imprinted on tiny stones that form inside the ears of fish show that two of Alaska's most productive salmon populations, and the fisheries they support, depend on the entire watershed.

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Study reveals the evolution and diversity of Leptospira bacteria

Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic disease that affects more than one million people around the world each year. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now sequenced the genomes of Leptospira collected from environments around the globe and revealed 30 new species and new patterns of species diversity.

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Bacteria in fermented food signal the human immune system, explaining health benefits

Researchers have discovered that humans and great apes possess a receptor on their cells that detects metabolites from bacteria commonly found in fermented foods and triggers movement of immune cells. Claudia Stäubert of the University of Leipzig and colleagues report these findings in a new study published May 23 in PLOS Genetics.

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How Bacteria Become Drug-Resistant While Exposed to Antibiotics

A membrane pump found in most bacteria helps E. coli acquire drug resistance from neighboring cells even while they're exposed to antibiotics, a new study shows.

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Senate passes bill meant to combat robocalls

The U.S. Senate has passed a bill that aims to combat the illegal robocalls torturing Americans .

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Illegal killings, political opposition hobble wolf recovery

Illegal killings and longstanding political resistance have undercut the return of two species of endangered wolves to the wild, frustrating government efforts that already cost more than $80 million but have failed to meet recovery targets.

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Amazon is reportedly working on an Alexa-powered wearable that reads human emotions

Amazon is reportedly developing a voice-activated wearable device that can recognize human emotions.

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Regulators ponder: When can Boeing's 737 MAX fly again?

Two months after Boeing's popular 737 MAX aircraft was grounded worldwide following two deadly crashes, civil aviation authorities gathered Thursday in Texas to consider a burning question: When will the top-selling jet fly again?

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Tiny, Snackable Fish Are Linchpins of Coral Reef Ecosystems

Fish that are so small and shy that they escape attention may be the foundation of reefs’ outsize productivity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Can You Tell Which of These Models Is CGI?

Imma Real Spoiler: it’s only the one in the middle. The model in question is Instagram influencer Imma , who has racked up over 50,000 followers. Imma may be rendered entirely by a computer, but that hasn’t stopped her from picking up her first gig: modeling Japanese makeup brand Kate Cosmetics for the Vice owned site i-D . In the photos, she’s posing alongside real human models, adding to the ef

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Illegal killings, political opposition hobble wolf recovery

Illegal killings and longstanding political resistance have undercut the return of two species of endangered wolves to the wild, frustrating government efforts that already cost more than $80 million but have failed to meet recovery targets.

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Seeing inside superfog

High humidity and plant moisture combine with cold air and smoke from burning vegetation to form particularly dense fog, but researchers can't predict when.

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Wild chimpanzees eat tortoises after cracking them open against tree trunks

Researchers have observed wild chimpanzees in the Loango National Park, Gabon, eating tortoises. They describe the first observations of this potentially cultural behavior where chimpanzees hit tortoises against tree trunks until the tortoises' shells break open and then feed on the meat.

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Photos: Deadly Post-election Riots in Indonesia

Yesterday in Jakarta, after it was announced that incumbent President Joko Widodo had been reelected as president of Indonesia, beating former General Prabowo Subianto by 11 percentage points, Subianto’s supporters took to the streets. Protesters made claims of widespread cheating, and clashed with riot police in several locations in Jakarta, setting fire to vehicles and buildings. Police reporte

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The Tiny Fish That Break a Fundamental Rule of Vertebrate Life

Although coral reefs are home to bustling communities of gaudy marine life, half the fishes that live there are hardly ever seen. Aptly known as cryptobenthics—literally “hidden bottom-dwellers”—these species are mostly shorter than two inches and usually hidden in crevices. If you snorkel past, they’ll scurry away. But Simon Brandl of Simon Fraser University has made a career of studying them. A

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Landlocked Mongolia might hold clues to underwater volcanoes

Nature, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01624-6 Chemistry of Central Asian minerals resembles that of deeply buried rocks that supply seafloor volcanic chains.

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Tiny, Snackable Fish Are Linchpins of Coral Reef Ecosystems

Fish that are so small and shy that they escape attention may be the foundation of reefs’ outsize productivity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We Asked an AI to Finish Real Elon Musk Tweets

ElonBot We’ve written previously about Talk to Transformer , a site by OpenAI that uses a sophisticated artificial intelligence to complete passages of text with surprisingly deft context. Close news watchers will recall that Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, co-founded OpenAI, but decided to part ways with the company earlier this year, pointing to disagreements with its direction — which is w

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How lack of sleep harms circulation

New research pinpoints a possible mechanism underlying the relationship between lack of sleep and a heightened risk of diverse cardiovascular problems.

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Measuring methane from coal and gas in Pennsylvania informative

While methane pollution caused by natural gas production in Pennsylvania is underestimated by the US Environmental Protection Agency, natural gas still has half the carbon footprint of underground coal mining, according to an international team of researchers.

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Watch a Super-Strong Robot Dog Pull a Three-Ton Airplane

Go Fetch Man’s best friend may be great at pulling a sled, but a manmade best friend can pull an entire airplane. A little over a month has passed since we witnessed a pack of Boston Dynamics robot dogs pulling a truck . Now, researchers at Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT) have announced a new version of their hydraulic, quadrupedal robot, HyQReal — and what better way to show off the bot’s

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Fossils in Burmese amber offer an exquisite view of dinosaur times—and an ethical minefield

Before scientists can study it, Burmese amber is mined in a conflict zone, smuggled into China, and sold to the highest bidder

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These tiny, mysterious fish may be key to solving coral reef ‘paradox’

Cryptobenthic fish may be feeding entire reef communities

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Home-schoolers see no added health risks over time

Years of home-schooling don't appear to influence the general health of children, according to a Rice University study.

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Hot spots in rivers that nurture salmon 'flicker on and off' in Bristol Bay region

Chemical signatures imprinted on tiny stones that form inside the ears of fish show that two of Alaska's most productive salmon populations, and the fisheries they support, depend on the entire watershed.

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Live fast, die young: Study shows tiny fishes fuel coral reefs

Scientists have long sought to understand how coral reefs support such an abundance of fish life despite their location in nutrient-poor waters. According to a new study published May 23 in the journal Science, an unlikely group fuels these communities: tiny, mostly bottom-dwelling creatures called "cryptobenthic" reef fishes.

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Building a better salt trap: Scientists synthesize a molecular 'cage' to trap chloride

Indiana University researchers have created a powerful new molecule for the extraction of salt from liquid. The work has potential to help increase the amount of drinkable water on Earth.

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Interplay between mitochondria and nucleus may have implications for new treatment

Mitochondria, the 'batteries' that produce our energy, interact with the cell's nucleus in subtle ways previously unseen in humans, according to research published today in the journal Science.

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Study reveals the evolution and diversity of Leptospira bacteria

Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic disease that affects more than one million people around the world each year. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now sequenced the genomes of Leptospira collected from environments around the globe and revealed 30 new species and new patterns of species diversity.

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Hot spots in rivers that nurture salmon 'flicker on and off' in Bristol Bay region

Chemical signatures imprinted on tiny stones that form inside the ears of fish show that two of Alaska's most productive salmon populations, and the fisheries they support, depend on the entire watershed.

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Live fast, die young: Study shows tiny fishes fuel coral reefs

Scientists have long sought to understand how coral reefs support such an abundance of fish life despite their location in nutrient-poor waters. According to a new study published May 23 in the journal Science, an unlikely group fuels these communities: tiny, mostly bottom-dwelling creatures called "cryptobenthic" reef fishes.

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Interplay between mitochondria and nucleus may have implications for new treatment

Mitochondria, the 'batteries' that produce our energy, interact with the cell's nucleus in subtle ways previously unseen in humans, according to research published today in the journal Science.

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Study reveals the evolution and diversity of Leptospira bacteria

Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic disease that affects more than one million people around the world each year. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now sequenced the genomes of Leptospira collected from environments around the globe and revealed 30 new species and new patterns of species diversity.

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A race against time

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New Research Warns of ‘Normal Accident’ From AI in Modern Warfare

Artificial intelligence continues to provide vital solutions to some very complex problems in this early stage but remains a looming threat as we consider its applications on the battlefield. New research details the impending risks and pins the fate of humanity on complex choices we will face in the near future. The post New Research Warns of ‘Normal Accident’ From AI in Modern Warfare appeared

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Brainstem nucleus incertus controls contextual memory formation

Hippocampal pyramidal cells encode memory engrams, which guide adaptive behavior. Selection of engram-forming cells is regulated by somatostatin-positive dendrite-targeting interneurons, which inhibit pyramidal cells that are not required for memory formation. Here, we found that -aminobutyric acid (GABA)–releasing neurons of the mouse nucleus incertus (NI) selectively inhibit somatostatin-positi

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News at a glance

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Troubled treasure

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Finding our way

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Artificial memories

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Strongly correlated quantum walks with a 12-qubit superconducting processor

Quantum walks are the quantum analogs of classical random walks, which allow for the simulation of large-scale quantum many-body systems and the realization of universal quantum computation without time-dependent control. We experimentally demonstrate quantum walks of one and two strongly correlated microwave photons in a one-dimensional array of 12 superconducting qubits with short-range interac

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Electrified methane reforming: A compact approach to greener industrial hydrogen production

Electrification of conventionally fired chemical reactors has the potential to reduce CO 2 emissions and provide flexible and compact heat generation. Here, we describe a disruptive approach to a fundamental process by integrating an electrically heated catalytic structure directly into a steam-methane–reforming (SMR) reactor for hydrogen production. Intimate contact between the electric heat sou

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A radiative cooling structural material

Reducing human reliance on energy-inefficient cooling methods such as air conditioning would have a large impact on the global energy landscape. By a process of complete delignification and densification of wood, we developed a structural material with a mechanical strength of 404.3 megapascals, more than eight times that of natural wood. The cellulose nanofibers in our engineered material backsc

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Anti-Markovnikov alcohols via epoxide hydrogenation through cooperative catalysis

The opening of epoxides typically requires electrophilic activation, and subsequent nucleophilic (S N 2) attack on the less substituted carbon leads to alcohols with Markovnikov regioselectivity. We describe a cooperative catalysis approach to anti-Markovnikov alcohols by combining titanocene-catalyzed epoxide opening with chromium-catalyzed hydrogen activation and radical reduction. The titanoce

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Searching for hidden earthquakes in Southern California

Earthquakes follow a well-known power-law size relation, with smaller events occurring much more often than larger events. Earthquake catalogs are thus dominated by small earthquakes yet are still missing a much larger number of even smaller events because of signal fidelity issues. To overcome these limitations, we applied a template-matching detection technique to the entire waveform archive of

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Detecting nanometric displacements with optical ruler metrology

We introduce the optical ruler, an electromagnetic analog of a physical ruler, for nanoscale displacement metrology. The optical ruler is a complex electromagnetic field in which singularities serve as the marks on the scale. It is created by the diffraction of light on a metasurface, with singularity marks then revealed by high-magnification interferometric observation. Using a Pancharatnam-Berr

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Molecular basis for high-affinity agonist binding in GPCRs

G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the G protein–coupled active state have higher affinity for agonists as compared with when they are in the inactive state, but the molecular basis for this is unclear. We have determined four active-state structures of the β 1 -adrenoceptor (β 1 AR) bound to conformation-specific nanobodies in the presence of agonists of varying efficacy. Comparison with ina

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Role of AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump in drug-resistance acquisition by plasmid transfer

Drug-resistance dissemination by horizontal gene transfer remains poorly understood at the cellular scale. Using live-cell microscopy, we reveal the dynamics of resistance acquisition by transfer of the Escherichia coli fertility factor–conjugation plasmid encoding the tetracycline-efflux pump TetA. The entry of the single-stranded DNA plasmid into the recipient cell is rapidly followed by comple

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Shifting habitat mosaics and fish production across river basins

Watersheds are complex mosaics of habitats whose conditions vary across space and time as landscape features filter overriding climate forcing, yet the extent to which the reliability of ecosystem services depends on these dynamics remains unknown. We quantified how shifting habitat mosaics are expressed across a range of spatial scales within a large, free-flowing river, and how they stabilize t

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Bacterial pseudokinase catalyzes protein polyglutamylation to inhibit the SidE-family ubiquitin ligases

Enzymes with a protein kinase fold transfer phosphate from adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) to substrates in a process known as phosphorylation. Here, we show that the Legionella meta-effector SidJ adopts a protein kinase fold, yet unexpectedly catalyzes protein polyglutamylation. SidJ is activated by host-cell calmodulin to polyglutamylate the SidE family of ubiquitin (Ub) ligases. Crystal struct

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New Products

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Protein crystallization promotes type 2 immunity and is reversible by antibody treatment

Although spontaneous protein crystallization is a rare event in vivo, Charcot-Leyden crystals (CLCs) consisting of galectin-10 (Gal10) protein are frequently observed in eosinophilic diseases, such as asthma. We found that CLCs derived from patients showed crystal packing and Gal10 structure identical to those of Gal10 crystals grown in vitro. When administered to the airways, crystalline Gal10 s

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Germline selection shapes human mitochondrial DNA diversity

Approximately 2.4% of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome exhibits common homoplasmic genetic variation. We analyzed 12,975 whole-genome sequences to show that 45.1% of individuals from 1526 mother–offspring pairs harbor a mixed population of mtDNA (heteroplasmy), but the propensity for maternal transmission differs across the mitochondrial genome. Over one generation, we observed selectio

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Topological control of cytokine receptor signaling induces differential effects in hematopoiesis

Although tunable signaling by G protein–coupled receptors can be exploited through medicinal chemistry, a comparable pharmacological approach has been lacking for the modulation of signaling through dimeric receptors, such as those for cytokines. We present a strategy to modulate cytokine receptor signaling output by use of a series of designed C2-symmetric cytokine mimetics, based on the designe

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Dolby wants you to experience music in a new way

Dolby, the company most of us know for bringing premium sound to movie theaters and high-end home audio, wants you to listen to music in a different way.

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Chinese Rocket Fails Spectacularly, Raining Debris Back to Earth

Failure to Launch China’s attempt to launch a satellite into orbit ended in a trail of smoke and falling debris Thursday morning. At just before 7am local time, an uncrewed Long March 4C rocket lifted off from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center. Minutes later, onlookers saw the craft’s smoke trails begin to twist across the sky — and what appeared to be bits of the Chinese rocket began to fall t

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US forecasters: Expect near normal Atlantic hurricane season

The Atlantic hurricane season is off to yet another early start, but U.S. weather officials say it should be a near normal year.

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The effect of sleep quality on peptic-ulcer relapse in older adults

Poor sleep quality and peptic ulcer disease (PUD, a condition when sores known as ulcers develop on the lining of your stomach or in the first part of your small intestine) are both major public health problems that affect the physical and psychological wellbeing of older adults.

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First Author Should Be Responsible for Paper Accuracy: Study

An analysis of misconduct investigations finds first authors are more likely to commit transgressions, suggesting they should be held accountable for the integrity of the work.

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Forecasts Call for a Normal Hurricane Season, but ‘It Only Takes One’

Government forecasters predict as many as fifteen named storms, and as many as four major hurricanes, during the season which begins June 1 and stretches to Nov. 30

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Where Did the Right Whales Go?

New evidence suggests that the endangered population lost much of a critical food source, but may be stabilizing slightly as it shifts territory to feed elsewhere.

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New 3D-printed technology lowers cost of common medical test

A desire for a simpler, cheaper way to do common laboratory tests for medical diagnoses and to avoid 'washing the dishes' led researchers to develop a new technology that reduces cost and time. The 3D-printed pipette-tip test developed by the researchers leverages what 'has long been the gold standard for measuring proteins, pathogens, antibodies and other biomolecules in complex matrices,' they s

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New 3D-printed technology lowers cost of common medical test

A desire for a simpler, cheaper way to do common laboratory tests for medical diagnoses and to avoid 'washing the dishes' led researchers to develop a new technology that reduces cost and time. The 3D-printed pipette-tip test developed by the researchers leverages what 'has long been the gold standard for measuring proteins, pathogens, antibodies and other biomolecules in complex matrices,' they s

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Unique Iron Age shield gives insight into prehistoric technology

A unique bark shield, thought to have been constructed with wooden laths during the Iron Age, has provided new insight into the construction and design of prehistoric weaponry.

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Vegas tourism board backs $49M Elon Musk transit system

A company backed by tech billionaire Elon Musk has been awarded a nearly $49 million contract to build a transit system using self-driving vehicles underneath the Las Vegas Convention Center.

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Scientists create new standard genome for heavily studied worm

A new Cornell University-led study finds that the genome for a widely researched worm, on which countless studies are based, was flawed. Now, a fresh genome sequence will set the record straight and improve the accuracy of future research.

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What Is Potential Energy?

Potential energy is a core concept of any physics-based discussion, and one of the most influential variables in the formulas that describe our known universe.

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Scientists teach old worms new tricks

Model organisms such as yeast, fruit flies, and worms have advanced the study of genomics, eukaryotic biology, and evolution. An important resource for any model organism is a near-complete reference genome from which a multitude of scientific questions can be answered. Caenorhabditis elegans have been widely studied due to their short generation time and transparent anatomy and were one of the fi

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Mapping global phytoplankton yields a surprise

Researchers have charted the distribution of phytoplankton in the world’s oceans for the first time and investigated the environmental factors that explain it. They conclude that plankton diversity is only partially congruent with previous theories of biodiversity for the seas between the equator and the poles. With some 10,000 to 20,000 different species in the world’s oceans, the diversity of p

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Scientists create new standard genome for heavily studied worm

A new Cornell University-led study finds that the genome for a widely researched worm, on which countless studies are based, was flawed. Now, a fresh genome sequence will set the record straight and improve the accuracy of future research.

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Scientists teach old worms new tricks

Model organisms such as yeast, fruit flies, and worms have advanced the study of genomics, eukaryotic biology, and evolution. An important resource for any model organism is a near-complete reference genome from which a multitude of scientific questions can be answered. Caenorhabditis elegans have been widely studied due to their short generation time and transparent anatomy and were one of the fi

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Scientists recommend measures to contain rapid woody weed spread in Baringo County, Kenya

A team of international scientists, including CABI's Dr. Urs Schaffner, have recommended ways to manage the devastating spread of the woody weed Prosopis juliflora, where in Baringo County, Kenya, its coverage rapidly increased by 2,031 percent in just 28 years.

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Unique Iron Age shield gives insight into prehistoric technology

A unique bark shield, thought to have been constructed with wooden laths during the Iron Age, has provided new insight into the construction and design of prehistoric weaponry.

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Scientists create new standard genome for heavily studied worm

A new Cornell University-led study finds that the genome for a widely researched worm, on which countless studies are based, was flawed. Now, a fresh genome sequence will set the record straight and improve the accuracy of future research.

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Scientists teach old worms new tricks

Model organisms have advanced the study of genomics, eukaryotic biology, and evolution. An important resource for any model organism is a near-complete reference genome. Caenorhabditis elegans have been widely studied due to their short generation time and transparent anatomy and were one of the first multicellular organisms sequenced, yet gaps in their reference genome remain. Three studies, publ

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Google boosts Assistant, Search and Maps to help with ordering food – CNET

Google wants to help you find, and order, your next meal.

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Breakup isn't the answer, Facebook's Zuckerberg says

Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg on Thursday rejected the idea of breaking up the social media giant as off-target, saying it could hamper the fight against deceit and harmful online content.

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Scientists recommend measures to contain rapid woody weed spread in Baringo County, Kenya

A team of international scientists, including CABI's Dr. Urs Schaffner, have recommended ways to manage the devastating spread of the woody weed Prosopis juliflora, where in Baringo County, Kenya, its coverage rapidly increased by 2,031 percent in just 28 years.

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The Education Scandal That's Bigger Than Varsity Blues

It’s hard to snatch attention from the jaws of intrigue, and Varsity Blues had it all. There were fake SAT scores, a shady deal maker, and wealthy parents eager to lay waste to anything standing in front of their children on the road to a selective college—the vaunted status symbols that they are. This exposes the gritty underbelly of the race to get into America’s colleges, a common refrain went

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Fossil Discovery Pushes Back the Origin of Fungi by Half a Billion Years

Ancient fungus helps rewrite what we know about evolution and the tree of life

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European pilots 'deeply disturbed' by possible 737 MAX return

European pilots said Thursday they found it "deeply disturbing" that the Boeing 737 MAX was already being considered for a return to service after being grounded worldwide following two deadly crashes.

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White sands of Oahu's Kailua beach are named best in the US

In Kailua, the sand is soft and white, the water is clear and calm, and the view is exactly what you would expect from a beach in the Hawaiian Islands.

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Facebook: Fake account removal doubles in 6 months to 3B

Facebook removed more than 3 billion fake accounts from October to March, twice as many as the previous six months, the company said Thursday.

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Video: Could there be life without carbon?

One element is the backbone of all forms of life we've ever discovered on Earth: carbon.

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Ecologists find bush dog, native of South America, in remote central Costa Rica

Wildlife ecologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who are studying different conservation practices in the forests of Costa Rica recently made a startling discovery on a wildlife camera trap—wild bush dogs documented farther north than ever before and at the highest elevation.

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GRACE data contributes to understanding of climate change

The University of Texas at Austin team that led a twin satellite system launched in 2002 to take detailed measurements of the Earth, called the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), reports in the most recent issue of the journal Nature Climate Change on the contributions that their nearly two decades of data have made to our understanding of global climate patterns.

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Hal Laning: The Man You Didn’t Know Saved Apollo 11

In the final minutes of Apollo 11’s descent to the lunar surface, five 1201 and 1202 alarms blared in the lunar module. The computer was overloaded with data, and for a brief moment it looked like Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin wouldn’t land on the Moon. As we know, they did; Apollo 11 got a GO to land in spite of the alarms. What we don’t know is the man whose work allowed the crew reboot the com

5h

Ecologists find bush dog, native of South America, in remote central Costa Rica

Wildlife ecologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who are studying different conservation practices in the forests of Costa Rica recently made a startling discovery on a wildlife camera trap—wild bush dogs documented farther north than ever before and at the highest elevation.

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Oldest meteorite collection on Earth found in one of the driest places

Earth is bombarded every year by rocky debris, but the rate of incoming meteorites can change over time. Finding enough meteorites scattered on the planet's surface can be challenging, especially if you are interested in reconstructing how frequently they land. Now, researchers have uncovered a wealth of well-preserved meteorites that allowed them to reconstruct the rate of falling meteorites over

5h

Producing electricity at estuaries using light and osmosis

Researchers are working on a technology to exploit osmotic energy — a source of power that's naturally available at estuaries, where fresh water comes into contact with seawater. In a laboratory experiment, the team reproduced the real-world conditions that occur where rivers meet the sea (pH and salt concentration) and showed that, by shining light on a system comprising salt, water and a membra

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Discovery of hexagonal ternary phase Ti2InB2 and its evolution to layered boride TiB

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10297-8 Two-dimensional materials are promising for electrochemical storage and conversion, but are somewhat limited in composition. Here the authors use a computational strategy to predict the existence of a layered boride material, which they synthesize and demonstrate prospective for use as an anode material.

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Observation of emergent momentum–time skyrmions in parity–time-symmetric non-unitary quench dynamics

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10252-7 Dynamic topological phenomena remain challenging to be probed experimentally. Here, Wang et al. theoretically characterize and experimentally detect dynamical skyrmions in parity‐time‐symmetric non‐unitary quench dynamics in single‐photon discrete‐time quantum walks.

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The brain represents people as the mental states they habitually experience

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10309-7 Social life requires us to store information about each person’s unique disposition. Here, the authors show that the brain represents people as the sums of the mental states that those people are believed to experience.

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Emergence of active nematics in chaining bacterial biofilms

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10311-z Active nematics consist of elongated self-driven units and can emerge in bacterial systems. Here the authors investigate such emergence in a growing bacterial biofilm and demonstrate that localized stress and mechanical instabilities drive the formation of large-scale order.

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A neural circuit model of decision uncertainty and change-of-mind

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10316-8 We make decisions with varying degrees of confidence and, if our confidence in a decision falls, we may change our mind. Here, the authors present a neuronal circuit model to account for how change of mind occurs under particular low-confidence conditions.

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Exact invariant solution reveals the origin of self-organized oblique turbulent-laminar stripes

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10208-x It is known from experiments and simulations that stripes of alternating laminar and turbulent regions can form in plane Couette flow. Here the authors find an exact invariant solution which captures the detail of the spatial structures of these patterns and identifies their origin.

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The AvrPm3-Pm3 effector-NLR interactions control both race-specific resistance and host-specificity of cereal mildews on wheat

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10274-1 The wheat Pm3 immune receptors confer resistance against powdery mildew by recognizing isolate-specific avirulence (AVR) effectors of the pathogen. Here, the authors identify and characterize two new AVR genes and demonstrate that Pm3 receptors are determinants of host-specificity for grass mildews.

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Li@C60 as a multi-state molecular switch

Nature Communications, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10300-2 Molecular switches that can access more than just a few states are difficult to realize. Here, the authors use scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy to show that a surface-bound Li@C60 endofullerene can be switched between 14 molecular states—distinguished by the location of the Li atom inside the fulle

5h

Nu går kampen om Antropocæn for alvor i gang – det kan blive hårdt

PLUS. Et stort flertal i en arbejdsgruppe anbefaler, at man vedtager, at en ny geologisk epoke begyndte i 1945. Om forslaget kan gå hele vejen, er dog noget usikkert.

5h

Gas vs. electric? Fuel choice affects efforts to achieve low-energy and low-impact homes

If you want to make your home as energy-efficient and green as possible, should you use gas or electric for your heating and cooling needs? Gas is the more eco-friendly option—for now—for an energy-efficient home in Maryland. That's the conclusion of a new economic study by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), which evaluated the power usage and environmental impact of gas ve

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Plumbene, graphene's latest cousin, realized on the 'nano water cube'

Two-dimensional materials made of Group 14 elements, graphene's cousins, have attracted enormous interest in recent years because of their unique potential as useful topological insulators.

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Scientists develop new technology for extracting non-ferrous and noble metals

Scientists at Russia's Ural Federal University (UrFU) are working on solving the problem of extracting non-ferrous and noble metals which are found in hard-to-process ores. Currently, there are many deposits where it is technically difficult to extract valuable components. This may be due to the presence of nanoscale gold and platinum group metals, their dissemination into the minerals' sulfide ma

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Artificial atomic scale materials: Discovering how electrons fatten

A single and isolated electron has a clear electrical charge, magnetic moment and mass, and its free movement can be precisely predicted. Spanish scientists fabricated a nanoscale artificial material manipulating atoms one after the other and discovered that electrons can become heavier. Heavy electrons are promising particles which endow new functionalities to novel materials. This study is the r

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Plant stem cells require low oxygen levels

Plants function as the green lungs of our planet, and rightfully so, as the capacity of a large, single tree releases more than 120 kg of oxygen into the Earth's atmosphere every year through a series of sunlight-fuelled reactions in photosynthesis. However during flood events, plant tissues may experience severe oxygen shortage, a stressful situation that every year leads to substantial loss in y

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Moving towards open science needs extensive collaboration and data sharing in Japan

A whitepaper "Challenges and Opportunities for Data Sharing in Japan" published by Springer Nature reports a survey of researchers in Japan about data sharing and management. The report includes a summary of discussions by key opinion leaders from the Japanese research community, and expresses a commitment to open science and the desire for data sharing best practice to be researcher-led and disci

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Opinion: AI superceding humans as the most advanced being will be the best thing to ever happen to the human race

I know the popular viewpoint is a doomsday scenario but listening to history one realizes that people are prone to horrific atrocities and that is an ingrained part of our humanity. An AI given the objective of protecting all human life primarily and all animal life secondarily could help eradicate murder, poverty, and malicious human behavior entirely. Sure, it could easily wipe us out but do we

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Ford's delivery robot walks like a human

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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A robot dog just pulled a 3-ton plane and we're not scared at all

submitted by /u/toyota_tacoma_black [link] [comments]

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New Progress in Stem-Cell-Free Regenerative Medicine

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

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Colonizing Black Holes

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Plant stem cells require low oxygen levels

Plants function as the green lungs of our planet, and rightfully so, as the capacity of a large, single tree releases more than 120 kg of oxygen into the Earth's atmosphere every year through a series of sunlight-fuelled reactions in photosynthesis. However during flood events, plant tissues may experience severe oxygen shortage, a stressful situation that every year leads to substantial loss in y

5h

Las Vegas Approves $48.6 Million Boring Company Tunnel

What Happens Underground… On Wednesday, the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority (LVCVA) approved a $48.6 million Boring Company contract to build the LVCC Loop , an underground tunnel system that will connect the Las Vegas Convention Center’s (LVCC) New Exhibit Hall with the existing campus. The project is expected to be finished by January 2021 — a deadline that will likely make Las Vega

5h

The healing power of fish skin for a dog named Stella

When Stella first entered the emergency department at the Michigan State University Veterinary Medical Center on a Wednesday night, Feb. 13, 2019, she had second- and third-degree burns across 10% of her body.

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A family of comets reopens the debate about the origin of Earth's water

Where did the Earth's water come from? Although comets, with their icy nuclei, seem like ideal candidates, analyses have so far shown that their water differs from that in our oceans. Now, however, an international team, bringing together CNRS researchers at the Laboratory for Studies of Radiation and Matter in Astrophysics and Atmospheres (Paris Observatory – PSL/CNRS/ Sorbonne University/Univers

5h

Scientists discover one of the mechanisms of water formation on the moon

The results of a recent study conducted by the NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, the agency's automatic interplanetary station, show the existence of 'permafrost' near the poles of the moon with a relatively high content of water ice (up to 5% by weight). It is believed that water ice could supply a life support system for the future Russian Lunar Station, and that it could also produce hydrogen-

5h

Sandia launches a bus into space

Sandia National Laboratories recently launched a bus into space. Not the kind with wheels that go round and round, but the kind of device that links electronic devices (a USB cable, short for "universal serial bus," is one common example).

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New studies increase confidence in NASA's measure of Earth's temperature

A new assessment of NASA's record of global temperatures revealed that the agency's estimate of Earth's long-term temperature rise in recent decades is accurate to within less than a tenth of a degree Fahrenheit, providing confidence that past and future research is correctly capturing rising surface temperatures.

5h

Information and language in news impact prejudice against minorities

Sylvie Graf and Sabine Sczesny from the Institute of Psychology at the University of Bern are investigating how positivity or negativity of news about immigrants and language that describes immigrants in mass media shape prejudice against them. Their project, "Immigrants in the Media," is funded by the European Commission. The psychologists recently published the results of three experimental stud

5h

The healing power of fish skin for a dog named Stella

When Stella first entered the emergency department at the Michigan State University Veterinary Medical Center on a Wednesday night, Feb. 13, 2019, she had second- and third-degree burns across 10% of her body.

5h

'Phenomenal' 2,300-year-old bark shield found in Leicestershire

Archaeologists hail iron age object a ‘marvellous, internationally important find’ An “astonishing and unparalleled” 2,300-year-old shield made of tree bark has been discovered in Leicestershire, the only example of its kind ever found in Europe. Archaeologists say the discovery of the shield, made between 395 and 250BC, has completely overturned assumptions about the weapons used in the iron age

5h

Why you should care about better fiber optics

Fibre optic research can give us better medical equipment, improved environmental monitoring, more media channels—and maybe better solar panels.

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Huawei fight is a threat to rural internet

In swaths of rural America, along roads where there are just a few farms or homes within a mile-long stretch, customers are so few that the likes of AT&T and T-Mobile don't bother to build cell towers for coverage.

5h

GRACE data contributes to understanding of climate change

The University of Texas at Austin team that led a twin satellite system launched in 2002 to take detailed measurements of the Earth, called the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), reports in the journal Nature Climate Change on the contributions that their nearly two decades of data have made to our understanding of global climate patterns.

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Embedded psychiatrist in pediatric clinic improves evaluation access, short-term treatment

A novel method of embedding child psychiatric care in an urban pediatrics clinic was found to be feasible and a promising way to increase access to and engagement in psychiatric care among a primarily Latino population, according to new study from Boston Medical Center researchers.

5h

Oldest meteorite collection on Earth found in one of the driest places

Earth is bombarded every year by rocky debris, but the rate of incoming meteorites can change over time. Finding enough meteorites scattered on the planet's surface can be challenging, especially if you are interested in reconstructing how frequently they land. Now, researchers have uncovered a wealth of well-preserved meteorites that allowed them to reconstruct the rate of falling meteorites over

5h

Engineered bacteria could be missing link in energy storage

One of the big issues with sustainable energy systems is how to store electricity that's generated from wind, solar and waves. At present, no existing technology provides large-scale storage and energy retrieval for sustainable energy at a low financial and environmental cost. Engineered electroactive microbes could be part of the solution.

5h

Bringing human-like reasoning to driverless car navigation

With aims of bringing more human-like reasoning to autonomous vehicles, MIT researchers have created a system that uses only simple maps and visual data to enable driverless cars to navigate routes in new, complex environments.

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'Unique' Iron Age shield discovered in Leicestershire

The British Museum, which will store the shield, described it as a "absolutely phenomenal object".

6h

Measuring methane from coal and gas in Pennsylvania informative

While methane pollution caused by natural gas production in Pennsylvania is underestimated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, natural gas still has half the carbon footprint of underground coal mining, according to an international team of researchers.

6h

How plant cells neutralize the potential for self-harm

Photosynthesis makes our atmosphere oxygen-rich and forms the bedrock of our food supply. But under changing or stressful environmental conditions, the photosynthetic process can become unbalanced, resulting in an excess of highly reactive oxygen molecules that could cause cellular damage if they aren't neutralized.

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How plant cells neutralize the potential for self-harm

Photosynthesis makes our atmosphere oxygen-rich and forms the bedrock of our food supply. But under changing or stressful environmental conditions, the photosynthetic process can become unbalanced, resulting in an excess of highly reactive oxygen molecules that could cause cellular damage if they aren't neutralized.

6h

How Trump Broke the Freedom Caucus

Back in February 2018, I sat down with two leaders of the House Freedom Caucus to discuss, among other things, whether fiscal conservatism had gone extinct. A few days earlier, with encouragement from his budget director, Mick Mulvaney, President Donald Trump had signed a budget deal boosting federal spending by nearly $300 billion. I told the leaders, Mark Meadows and Jim Jordan, that it seemed

6h

White Women Are Helping States Pass Abortion Restrictions

It’s common for critics of the new wave of state laws severely limiting access to abortion to say the measures are part of a Republican “war on women.” But strong support from most white women, especially those who identify as evangelical Christians, has helped Republicans dominate local government in the states passing the most restrictive measures, from Alabama and Georgia to Kentucky and Misso

6h

Producing electricity at estuaries using light and osmosis

Researchers are working on a technology to exploit osmotic energy — a source of power that's naturally available at estuaries, where fresh water comes into contact with seawater. In a laboratory experiment, the team reproduced the real-world conditions that occur where rivers meet the sea (pH and salt concentration) and showed that, by shining light on a system comprising salt, water and a membra

6h

Chemistry of stars sheds new light on the Gaia Sausage

Chemical traces in the atmospheres of stars are being used to uncover new information about a galaxy, known as the Gaia Sausage, which was involved in a major collision with the Milky Way billions of years ago.

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Plant stem cells require low oxygen levels

New research reveals that low oxygen is required for proper development of plants.

6h

Ecologists find bush dog, native of South America, in remote central Costa Rica

Wildlife ecologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst who are studying different conservation practices in the forests of Costa Rica recently made a startling discovery on a wildlife camera trap — wild bush dogs documented farther north than ever before and at the highest elevation.

6h

Trace metal exposure among pregnant women living near fracking wells in Canada

Researchers find higher concentrations of trace metals such as barium in the hair and urine of 29 pregnant women living near fracking wells in British Columbia, Canada.

6h

Nerve stimulation could provide new treatment option for most common type of stroke

Research led by a UCLA scientist found that a new nerve stimulation therapy to increase blood flow could help patients with the most common type of stroke up to 24 hours after onset.

6h

New studies increase confidence in NASA's measure of Earth's temperature

A new assessment of NASA's record of global temperatures revealed that the agency's estimate of Earth's long-term temperature rise in recent decades is accurate to within less than a tenth of a degree Fahrenheit, providing confidence that past and future research is correctly capturing rising surface temperatures.

6h

The healing power of fish skin for a dog named Stella

Michigan State University veterinarians used a creative approach to treat the burns of Stella, a 1-year-old Rottweiler puppy, who escaped a house fire. Smoke inhalation prohibited Stella from being sedated for skin grafts, so the team from the MSU Veterinary Medical Center used cod fish skins to help heal Stella's burns. This successful treatment could help other animals.

6h

Better gene knockout in aneuploid cell lines

CRISPR/Cas9 technology enables convenient and effective genome editing in diploid cell lines based on the isolation and expansion of edited single-cell clones. However, this approach is ineffective for aneuploid cell lines, and a group has now reported an improved method for genome editing based on multiple rounds of modification.

6h

Do physicians properly advise women with dense breasts on cancer risk?

A new study has shown that more than half of physicians — primary care doctors and specialists — may be unaware that dense breasts are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, and nearly half reported not being aware of laws requiring physicians to inform women about mammography-related breast density risks and supplemental screening options.

6h

Humans held responsible for twists and turns of climate change since 1900

Studies show haze and greenhouse gases, not natural cycles, controlled the start-and-stop course of recent climate change

6h

The Couples Who Get Married on a Weekday

Enter the phrase weekday wedding into a Google search, and the always revealing “People also ask” feature will serve up an especially telling pair of questions. A hefty portion of people who Google for more information on getting married during the workweek seem to be wondering two things: Do people have weekday weddings? And is it okay to have one? Apparently, more American couples than ever hav

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A 'crisper' method for gene editing in fungi

A team of researchers has recently established a series of novel strategies to increase the efficiency of targeted gene disruption and new gene 'introduction' using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in the rice blast fungus Pyricularia (Magnaporthe) oryzae.

6h

Glassy beads on Hiroshima beaches came from nuclear blast

Minuscule glassy beads formed from debris of the atomic bomb blast that devastated Hiroshima nearly 75 years ago litter nearby beaches, according to a new study. The beads, which no one seems to have noticed until now, apparently formed in the atomic cloud from melted or vaporized concrete, marble, stainless steel, and rubber, among other materials of daily life in Hiroshima. The researchers esti

6h

Egyptian fruit bats trade food for sex

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that female Egyptian fruit bats form bonds with particular male bats to exchange mating for nourishment.

6h

How a zebrafish could help solve the mysteries of genetic brain disease

A close look at the rapidly developing zebrafish embryo is helping neuroscientists better understand the potential underpinnings of brain disorders, including autism and schizophrenia. The new study, published online this month in the journal eNeuro, points to a 'clustering' of cellular interactions in the brain that may disrupt normal development and brain health.

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Obsessive-compulsive disorder research needs more focus on patients, new study asserts

In a review of recent literature on obsessive-compulsive disorder, researcher/practitioner Professor Adam Radomsky writes that cognitive science is becoming further and further removed from the people those studies are supposed to help: OCD patients and the therapists who treat them.

6h

'Terminator: Dark Fate' Trailer: Linda Hamilton Has a Big Gun

Also, Arnold Schwarzenegger is, uh, back.

6h

Indigenous Peoples Have a Critical Role in Conserving Nature

Traditional stewardship rights have shielded many of the ecosystems that are still standing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Indigenous Peoples Have a Critical Role in Conserving Nature

Traditional stewardship rights have shielded many of the ecosystems that are still standing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ford Shows Off Package Delivery Robot That Docks Inside Self-Driving Car

Companies like Amazon and Google are working on rolling and flying drones to make deliveries, but Ford is investigating the drone delivery game, too. Its vision for the future of "last mile" delivery is a walking robot called Digit that folds up inside a self-driving car. The post Ford Shows Off Package Delivery Robot That Docks Inside Self-Driving Car appeared first on ExtremeTech .

6h

Harvard Prof: Finding Dead Alien Civilizations Could Save Humans

Dead Aliens Harvard professor Avi Loeb thinks humans should be on the hunt for signs of alien life and alien death. During a recent presentation at the The Humans to Mars Summit, Loeb argued that the discovery of a dead alien civilization could serve as a sort of cautionary tale for humanity, letting us know what not to do if we want to survive. “The idea is we may learn something in the process,

6h

SpaceX Component Engineer Charged With Faking Inspection Reports

Forged Signatures An investigation by NASA’s inspector general, the FBI, and the Air Force revealed that James Smalley, a quality assurance engineer at a New York state-based aerospace parts company that makes parts for SpaceX’s rockets, forged signatures for some 38 inspection reports. According to officials, the forgeries could’ve easily ended up disaster, putting lives at risk. Smalley’s emplo

6h

This Dude Is Selling a Virus-Infested Laptop For $1.2 Million

Chaotic Energy For a $1.2 million dollar bid, you could own a 2008 Samsung laptop containing six of the most infamous computer viruses in history. The infectious computer is an art project titled “The Persistence of Chaos,” created in collaboration between Chinese internet artist Guo O Dong — known for previous projects like HiPSTER ON A LEASH — and cybersecurity company Deep Instinct , which pro

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Progress in hunt for unknown compounds in drinking water

When we drink a glass of water, we ingest an unknown amount of by-products that are formed in the treatment process. And we don't know what many of them are. However using advanced technology, researchers have been able to detect new compounds — where every water treatment plant has a unique combination.

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A 'crisper' method for gene editing in fungi

A team of researchers has recently established a series of novel strategies to increase the efficiency of targeted gene disruption and new gene 'introduction' using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in the rice blast fungus Pyricularia (Magnaporthe) oryzae.

6h

Key insight into solar material's soaring efficiency

Researchers have reported a key breakthrough in how the performance of cadmium telluride thin-film solar cells is improved even further by the addition of another material, selenium.

6h

Creativity: A question of impulsiveness

How can employees' working time be organized so as to enable them to perform in the best possible way when completing both creative and routine tasks? Economists investigated this question and made a surprising discovery. Which working model works best depends on employees' impulsiveness.

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Slavers Burned the Last US Slave Ship to Hide Their Crimes. Now It's Been Found.

After nearly 150 years, the last known ship used to bring kidnapped people to the United States to sell into slavery seems to have turned up off the coast of Mobile, Alabama.

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Daily briefing: Are carbon offsets failing us?

Nature, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01668-8 A guilt-free pass for polluters is not enough, billion-year-old fossil rewrites history of fungi and ozone-destroying emissions traced to China.

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Gas vs. electric? Fuel choice affects efforts to achieve low-energy and low-impact homes

If you want to make your home as energy-efficient and green as possible, should you use gas or electric for your heating and cooling needs?

7h

Climate change affects the genetic diversity of a species

What effects does climate change have on the genetic diversity of living organisms? In a study led by Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, an international team of researchers studied the genome of the alpine marmot. Results were unexpected: the species was found to be the least genetically diverse of any wild mammal studied to date. The alpine marmot has lost its genetic diversity during ice-age

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New in Ethics & Human Research, May-June 2019

Parent experiences when approached for research in a pediatric intensive care unit, the role of inclusion benefits in ethics committee assessment of research, and more in the current issue.

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Measuring methane from coal and gas in Pennsylvania informative

While methane pollution caused by natural gas production in Pennsylvania is underestimated by the US Environmental Protection Agency, natural gas still has half the carbon footprint of underground coal mining, according to an international team of researchers.

7h

New stimulant formulations emerging to better treat ADHD

A comprehensive new review of the expanding scope of stimulants available to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) serves as a valuable guide to clinicians as they choose from among the many new drug formulations and technologies available to treat this complex disorder. The wide-ranging review is published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, a peer-reviewed

7h

Heart failure, stroke greater among occupants in motor vehicle accidents

New research has shown that in older adults (65 and older), being an occupant in an automobile during a motor vehicle accident may lead to heart failure or stroke, as compared to pedestrians who are involved in motor vehicle accidents.

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For kun tre milliarder kr. kan det danske elnet blive klar til en million elbiler

En ny analyse fra elselskabernes brancheforening viser, at merprisen for at udbygge elnettet til elbiler er lille – hvis det vel at mærke bliver gjort intelligent.

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Reading with toddlers linked to reduced harsh parenting, enhanced child behavior

People who regularly read with their toddlers are less likely to engage in harsh parenting and the children are less likely to be hyperactive or disruptive, a new study finds.

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Young athletes may need one-year break after knee surgery

After surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament, young athletes are now recommended to undergo at least a year's rehab and thorough testing before resuming knee-strenuous sport. Research shows that those who return to sport relatively soon after surgery incur a highly elevated risk of a second ACL injury.

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Mystery Solved: Warming Superpollutant Tracked to China

Chinese firms violated international law by using a banned, potent greenhouse gas in insulation manufacturing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We need a greener way to die

Environment Most of us will keep polluting post-mortem. We take a lot with us into the ground, but don't give any of the good stuff back.

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First comprehensive network of wild crop species will help breeders tackle food insecurity

The first comprehensive network of sites where crop wild relatives are found has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham.

7h

Interactive quantum chemistry in virtual reality

Scientists from the University of Bristol's Intangible Realities Laboratory (IRL) and ETH Zurich have used virtual reality and artificial intelligence algorithms to learn the details of chemical change.

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Interactive quantum chemistry in virtual reality

Scientists have used virtual reality and artificial intelligence algorithms to learn the details of chemical change.

7h

Menopausal changes to female heart happen earlier than thought

A new University of Guelph study is the first to reveal hidden changes that are happening to the female heart during perimenopause — the stage before menopause sets in.

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Group practice of Transcendental Meditation dramatically reduced violence in Cambodia, new study shows

According to a new peer-reviewed study published in Studies in Asian Social Science, group practice of the Transcendental Meditation® and TM-Sidhi® programs in Cambodia between 1993 and 2008 was associated with a 96.2% decline in sociopolitical violence in that war-torn country compared to violence in the preceding three years. The authors conclude the likelihood this reversal in the rising 1990-1

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How plant cells neutralize the potential for self-harm

Photosynthesis makes our atmosphere oxygen-rich and forms the bedrock of our food supply. But under changing or stressful environmental conditions, the photosynthetic process can become unbalanced, resulting in an excess of highly reactive oxygen molecules that could cause cellular damage if they aren't neutralized. New work explores how the photosynthetic algae Chlamydomonas shields itself from t

7h

New understanding of how cells form tunnels may help in treating wounds, tumors

'A major aspect of our research is that it just really illustrates how complex all these different components are going on inside a person's body,' said Andrew Ford.

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A 'crisper' method for gene editing in fungi

A team of researchers from Tokyo University of Science, Meiji University, and Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, led by Professor Takayuki Arazoe, has recently established a series of novel strategies to increase the efficiency of targeted gene disruption and new gene 'introduction' using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in the rice blast fungus Pyricularia (Magnaporthe) oryzae.

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Russian scientists discover one of the mechanisms of water formation on the moon

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences have discovered one of the mechanisms for how water forms on the moon. The results have been published in Cosmic Research.

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Research reveals how personality affects susceptibility to persuasion

Researchers at Edge Hill University in England have helped identify personality traits which make people more (or less) susceptible to persuasion than others.

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Reading with toddlers reduces harsh parenting, enhances child behavior

People who regularly read with their toddlers are less likely to engage in harsh parenting and the children are less likely to be hyperactive or disruptive, a Rutgers-led study finds.

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Proof it's possible to enhance or suppress memories

Boston University neuroscientist Steve Ramirez and collaborators have published a new paper showing memories are pliable if you know which regions of the brain's hippocampus to stimulate, which could someday enable personalized treatment for people with PTSD, depression and anxiety.

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New leaf shapes for thale cress

Max Planck researchers equip the plant with pinnate leaves.

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How does the nervous system create behavior? Muscle activity map in Hydra gives insight

Accomplishing perhaps a world first, researchers at Columbia University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have mapped the full-body muscular activity of an animal while it was moving and behaving. Their study adds to mounting evidence that the coordinated activity of many cells working together — in this case, across an entire organism — generates new functional and behavioral propertie

7h

Producing electricity at estuaries using light and osmosis

Researchers at EPFL are working on a technology to exploit osmotic energy — a source of power that's naturally available at estuaries, where fresh water comes into contact with seawater. In a laboratory experiment, the team reproduced the real-world conditions that occur where rivers meet the sea (pH and salt concentration) and showed that, by shining light on a system comprising salt, water and

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Efficient, stable thermoelectric module based on high-performance liquid-like materials

Based on high-performance liquid-like materials, scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics and Northwestern University innovatively fabricated a Cu2Se/Yb0.3Co4Sb12 thermoelectric module with eight n-type Ni/Ti/Yb0.3Co4Sb12 legs and eight p-type Ni/Mo/Cu2Se legs.

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UC Davis study shows temperature alters developing nervous system in frogs

A UC Davis study that compared the effects of cold and warm temperatures on the development of frog eggs into larvae found that environmental temperature significantly changes how the nervous system develops.

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100% renewables doesn't equal zero-carbon energy, and the difference is growing

While 160 companies around the world have committed to use '100% renewable energy,' that does not mean '100% carbon-free energy.' The difference will grow as power grids become less reliant on fossil power, according to a new Stanford study. Entities committed to fighting climate change can and should measure the environmental benefits of their renewable strategies accurately, the authors write.

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Targeting key gene could help lead to Down syndrome treatment

Targeting a key gene before birth could someday help lead to a treatment for Down syndrome by reversing abnormal embryonic brain development and improving cognitive function after birth, according to a Rutgers-led study.

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Conservation goals compete at the expense of biodiversity

With an ever-growing list of threats facing biodiversity on multiple scales, conservationists struggle to determine which to address. A common reaction is to prioritize their efforts on threats to individual species or management areas, but researchers say this narrow-minded approach is detrimental to the overall goal of saving species and ecosystems worldwide. Instead, in an article published May

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These fruit bats trade food for sex

Egyptian fruit bat females living in captivity will consistently take food right from the mouths of their male peers. Now, the team that made that discovery is back with new evidence to explain why the males don't mind. As reported in the journal Current Biology on May 23, those males are often repaid with sex — and offspring.

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Studying the function of liver cancer genes in mini-organs

Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute developed a human model in which they use organoids, or mini organs, to study the function of specific genes that are mutated in liver cancer. Using this method, they have found that mutations in BAP1, a gene commonly mutated in liver cancer, changes the behavior of the cells, which may make them more likely to be invasive. Their results were published in Ce

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New York subway riders will be able to tap and pay the fare starting May 31

New Yorkers routinely grumble about overcrowded subways and having to wait on long lines to purchase or refill their Metro Cards.

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First comprehensive network of wild crop species will help breeders tackle food insecurity

The first comprehensive network of sites where crop wild relatives are found has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham.

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Travel

I’m traveling for the next couple of days, so regular blog posting will resume on Monday. See everyone then!

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These medicinal plants put brakes on cancer growth

The leaves of a variety of medicinal plants can stop the growth of breast, cervical, colon, leukemia, liver, ovarian, and uterine cancer, a new study shows. Researchers found the effects in leaves of the bandicoot berry ( Leea indica ), South African leaf ( Vernonia amygdalina ), and simpleleaf chastetree ( Vitex trifolia ). Three other medicinal plants also demonstrated anti-cancer properties. “

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Hashtag SciComm: How Social Media Platforms Are Shaping the Future of Science

By Efraín E. Rivera-Serrano 0000-0003-1823-8642 Early in school, we are introduced to the scientific method as a stepwise process of experimentation used to answer questions that have not been previously answered. Beyond the self-evident goal

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Brazilian scientists strive to turn politicians into allies

Nature, Published online: 23 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01648-y As President Jair Bolsonaro slashes support for science and education, academics open up a route to offer scientific advice to policymakers.

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New Total Residual Oxidant Analyzer Designed for Low ppb Chlorine Concentration Measurements in Wastewater

The Thermo Scientific Orion 7070iX TRO Analyzer achieves reliable, real-time, low-level measurements and operates maintenance-free

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First comprehensive network of wild crop species will help breeders tackle food insecurity

The first comprehensive network of sites where crop wild relatives are found has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham.

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The age of water

Groundwater in Egypt's aquifers may be as much as 200,000 years old and that's important to know as officials in that country seek to increasing the use of groundwater, especially in the Eastern Desert, to mitigate growing water stress and allow for agricultural projects.

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Could there be life without carbon? (video)

One element is the backbone of all forms of life we've ever discovered on Earth: carbon. Number six on the periodic table is, to the best of our knowledge, impossible to live without. In this episode of Reactions, discover what makes carbon so exceptional, its nearly infinite capabilities and intergalactic implications: https://youtu.be/VUiDwrM2YPI.

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A family of comets reopens the debate about the origin of Earth's water

Where did the Earth's water come from? Although comets, with their icy nuclei, seem like ideal candidates, analyses have so far shown that their water differs from that in our oceans. Now, however, an international team, including CNRS researchers, has found that one family of comets, the hyperactive comets, contains water similar to terrestrial water. The study relies in particular on measurement

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Plumbene, graphene's latest cousin, realized on the 'nano water cube'

Nagoya University-led researchers have created 'plumbene,' a 2D-honeycomb sheet of lead atoms. Plumbene has the largest spin-orbit interaction of any Group 14 elemental 2D material, potentially making it a robust 2D topological insulator in which the Quantum Spin Hall Effect might occur even above room temperature. As a surprising by-product, the research group also observed a nanoscale palladium-

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A Finnish study proves the presence of oral bacteria in cerebral emboli

Researchers at Tampere University have shown for the first time that the cerebral emboli of stroke patients contain DNA from oral pathogens. The research article has been published in the Journal of American Heart Association.

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New flatland material: Physicists obtain quasi-2D gold

Researchers from the MIPT Center for Photonics and 2D Materials have synthesized a quasi-2D gold film, showing how materials not usually classified as two-dimensional can form atomically thin layers. The study shows that by using monolayer molybdenum disulfide as an adhesion layer, quasi-2D gold can be deposited on an arbitrary surface.

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Progress in hunt for unknown compounds in drinking water

When we drink a glass of water, we ingest an unknown amount of by-products that are formed in the treatment process. And we don't know what many of them are. However using advanced technology, researchers at Linköping University have been able to detect new compounds — where every water treatment plant has a unique combination.

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Scientists recommend measures to contain rapid woody weed spread in Baringo County, Kenya

A team of international scientists, including CABI's Dr Urs Schaffner, have recommended ways to manage the devastating spread of the woody weed Prosopis juliflora, where in Baringo County, Kenya, its coverage rapidly increased by 2,031% in just 28 years.The study calls for the 'urgent implementation of coordinated and sustainable Prosopis management in Baringo County and other invaded areas in Eas

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How does the nervous system create behavior? Muscle activity map in Hydra gives insight

Accomplishing perhaps a world first, researchers at Columbia University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have mapped the full-body muscular activity of an animal while it was moving and behaving.

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Study shows temperature alters developing nervous system in frogs

Can the environment affect how the spinal cord develops specialized circuitry, or is that process hardwired, following prescribed genetic instructions turned on early in the embryo?

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Producing electricity at estuaries using light and osmosis

Most renewable power technologies are weather dependent. Wind farms can only operate when there's a breeze, and solar power plants rely on sunlight. Researchers at EPFL are working on a method to capture an energy source that's constantly available at river estuaries: osmotic power, also known as blue energy.

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Efficient, stable thermoelectric module based on high-performance liquid-like materials

Based on high-performance liquid-like materials, scientists from the Shanghai Institute of Ceramics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Northwestern University in the U.S. fabricated a Cu2Se/Yb0.3Co4Sb12 thermoelectric module with eight n-type Ni/Ti/Yb0.3Co4Sb12 legs and eight p-type Ni/Mo/Cu2Se legs.

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New leaf shapes for thale cress

Anyone who looks at their bowl of salad or at their garden can see how different the shapes of leaves can be. Spinach leaves, for example, have smooth edges and are comparatively simple in form, while parsley leaves are deeply notched and complex, apparently composed of many individual subunits. In a new study published in Cell, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research

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These fruit bats trade food for sex

Egyptian fruit bat females living in captivity will consistently take food right from the mouths of their male peers. Now, the team that made that discovery is back with new evidence to explain why the males don't mind. As reported in the journal Current Biology on May 23, those males are often repaid with sex—and offspring.

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Conservation goals compete at the expense of biodiversity

With an ever-growing list of threats facing biodiversity on multiple scales, conservationists struggle to determine which to address. A common reaction is to prioritize their efforts on threats to individual species or management areas, but researchers say this narrow-minded approach is detrimental to the overall goal of saving species and ecosystems worldwide. Instead, in an article published May

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Computer Scientists Expand the Frontier of Verifiable Knowledge

Imagine someone came along and told you that they had an oracle, and that this oracle could reveal the deep secrets of the universe. While you might be intrigued, you’d have a hard time trusting it. You’d want some way to verify that what the oracle told you was true. This is the crux of one of the central problems in computer science. Some problems are too hard to solve in any reasonable amount

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How does the nervous system create behavior? Muscle activity map in Hydra gives insight

Accomplishing perhaps a world first, researchers at Columbia University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have mapped the full-body muscular activity of an animal while it was moving and behaving.

7h

Study shows temperature alters developing nervous system in frogs

Can the environment affect how the spinal cord develops specialized circuitry, or is that process hardwired, following prescribed genetic instructions turned on early in the embryo?

7h

New leaf shapes for thale cress

Anyone who looks at their bowl of salad or at their garden can see how different the shapes of leaves can be. Spinach leaves, for example, have smooth edges and are comparatively simple in form, while parsley leaves are deeply notched and complex, apparently composed of many individual subunits. In a new study published in Cell, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research

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These fruit bats trade food for sex

Egyptian fruit bat females living in captivity will consistently take food right from the mouths of their male peers. Now, the team that made that discovery is back with new evidence to explain why the males don't mind. As reported in the journal Current Biology on May 23, those males are often repaid with sex—and offspring.

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PLOS Journals Now OPEN for Published Peer Review

Starting today, ALL PLOS journals will offer authors the option to publish their peer review history alongside their accepted manuscript! We’ve been excited to make this announcement, and make major strides towards a more

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Scientists Find a Volume Knob for Emotional Memories

Using mice whose neurons had been engineered to respond to light, researchers can dial up or down the emotional intensity of a memory.

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Many of Google Duplex’s “AI” Phone Calls Are Made By Humans

AI Cosplay The New York Times found that some 25 percent of Google’s controversial AI-powered Duplex robo-callers actually turn out to be humans in call centers. Google has come a long way in making their automated calling feature sound exactly like a real person, but the report shows that it still heavily relies on humans to perfect the system. Mr. Robot Google’s Duplex feature, announced last y

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My identity is a superpower — not an obstacle | America Ferrera

Hollywood needs to stop resisting what the world actually looks like, says actor, director and activist America Ferrera. Tracing the contours of her career, she calls for more authentic representation of different cultures in media — and a shift in how we tell our stories. "Presence creates possibility," she says. "Who we see thriving in the world teaches us how to see ourselves, how to think abo

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Big black holes can settle in the outskirts of small galaxies

Astronomers have found dozens of surprisingly massive black holes far from the centers of their host dwarf galaxies.

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Business this week

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Politics this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Measles is often spread by adults

Vaccinating children only is no longer enough

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Did cooking in hot springs make humans brainy?

Geothermal springs could help explain how early humans evolved such big brains

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If you’re looking for gold, look in trees

Prospecting for gold by looking for it in leaves has finally proved itself commercially in Australia

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Depth of Field: 'Game of Thrones' Was Always Doomed to Disappoint

Not every fan finds the answers they seek. The truth is all there in this one image.

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Artificial atomic scale materials: Discovering how electrons fatten!

A single and isolated electron has a clear electrical charge, magnetic moment and mass, and its free movement can be precisely predicted. Spanish scientists fabricated a nanoscale artificial material manipulating atoms one after the other and discovered that electrons around are very heavier. Heavy electrons are promising particles which endow of new functionalities to novel materials.

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Chemistry of stars sheds new light on the Gaia Sausage

Chemical traces in the atmospheres of stars are being used to uncover new information about a galaxy, known as the Gaia Sausage, which was involved in a major collision with the Milky Way billions of years ago.

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Interactive quantum chemistry in virtual reality

Scientists from the University of Bristol's Intangible Realities Laboratory (IRL) and ETH Zurich have used virtual reality and artificial intelligence algorithms to learn the details of chemical change.

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Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in non-Hodgkin lymphoma: benefit remains unclear

Meaningful studies are lacking for certain patient groups. Disease-specific registries could help close the data gap.

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Tesla shares recover after analyst's prediction of trouble

Shares of Tesla opened lower Thursday, but recovered into positive territory a day after an influential analyst questioned whether the company will become a restructuring story.

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Social media data reveal benefits or threats to biodiversity by visitors to nature locations

Understanding how people use and experience important places for living nature is essential for effectively managing and monitoring human activities and conserving biodiversity.

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Social media data reveal benefits or threats to biodiversity by visitors to nature locations

Understanding how people use and experience important places for living nature is essential for effectively managing and monitoring human activities and conserving biodiversity.

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»Dieselgate-efterspil var pinligt, men vi gjorde det sværere at snyde«

Christel Schaldemose sad med ved bordet, da EU-parlamentarikerne hudflettede industri, medlemslande og kommission om fusk med diesel-udstødning. Hun har krummet tæer undervejs, men insisterer på, at parlamentet i den slags sager spiller en vigtig rolle.

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Three ways to spot dodgy nutrition advice

Misguided nutrition advice can be more than ineffective: It can be dangerous. Over 20,000 people end up in the emergency room because of supplements each year , and a quarter of those cases are due to weight-loss related supplements. So how can you steer clear of bad or unhelpful information? Michelle Cardel, who has a doctorate in nutrition science, shares three signs that a fit-fluencer’s advic

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Rare volcanic rocks lift lid on dangers of little-studied eruptions

Unusual rocks discovered on a remote mountainside have alerted scientists to the dangers posed by a little-studied type of volcano.

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What Are the Biological Consequences of Homelessness?

Understanding why living on the street seems to cause rapid aging could help homeless people—and governments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Jeff Bezos' space colony plans are straight out of 1970s science fiction

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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This NASA Experiment Shows Promise for Farm-Fresh Foods in Space

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Here's where you can flirt with a sexting AI called Slutbot

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Dinner on the half-shell: chimpanzees eat tortoises

Adults smash open the reptiles, then share the spoils. Nick Carne reports.

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Why you should care about better fiber optics

With a new method, the gallium antimonide is initially distributed throughout the silicon. This is a simpler and cheaper method than others to grow crystals, and the technology offers many possible applications.

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Family crucial to orca survival

Orcas live in stable, structured social groups. And their survival directly depends on it. Scientists were able to show that surviving orcas from a decimated family adopted 'erratic' social behavior, moving from group to group. The weaker these social ties, the greater the animals' likelihood of dying. As these orcas are probably not completely accepted by the new groups they join, they are likely

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Information and language in news impact prejudice against minorities

Researchers at the Institute of Psychology show how news about immigrants and language describing immigrants shape prejudice against immigrants and other social minorities, as part of the project 'Immigrants in the Media.' For instance, nouns used for describing the ethnicity of immigrants enhance prejudice against immigrants more than adjectives.

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Plant stem cells require low oxygen levels

Joint Danish, Italian and German efforts reveal that low oxygen is required for proper development of plants. Their discovery is now published in the international scientific journal Nature.

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Rare volcanic rocks lift lid on dangers of little-studied eruptions

Unusual rocks discovered on a remote mountainside have alerted scientists to the dangers posed by a little-studied type of volcano.

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Thoughts on body image in pregnancy important indicator of emotional wellbeing

Researchers have shown that a new way of assessing women's relationship with their bodies during pregnancy could help predict how well the mother might bond with her unborn baby and her longer-term emotional wellbeing.

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Wolf-dog 'swarms' threaten Europe's wolves

'Swarms' of wolf-dog crossbreeds could drive Europe's wolves out of existence, according to the lead author of new research.

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New approach captures detailed mid-infrared images for medical diagnostics

Researchers have developed a unique high-resolution imaging method that can capture mid-infrared spectral images of fast events or dynamic processes that take place on the order of milliseconds. This spectral range is used for many applications because it can reveal the detailed chemical composition of a sample.

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Lunar gold rush is about to start—and we could exhaust the solar system in less than 500 years

The US president, Donald Trump, has stuck to his plan to send humans back to the moon in the next five years, recently giving the project a US$1.6 billion shot in the arm. Whether he succeeds or not, the first successful landing on the lunar far side by China, the European Space Agency's recent "lunar village" concept and a myriad of private companies all gearing up for commercial human spacefligh

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The backlash against face recognition has begun – but who will win?

Face recognition technology is being rolled out across the world, but activists and politicians are starting to push back on creeping surveillance

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A solution to psychology’s reproducibility problem just failed its first test

Psychologists were supposed to improve their studies by sharing detailed plans ahead of time. But many haven’t followed them

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Melting small glaciers could add 10 inches to sea levels

A new review of glacier research data paints a picture of a future planet with a lot less ice and a lot more water. Glaciers worldwide are projected to lose anywhere from 18% to 36% of their mass by 2100, resulting in almost 10 inches of sea level rise.

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Chemistry of stars sheds new light on the Gaia Sausage

Chemical traces in the atmospheres of stars are being used to uncover new information about a galaxy, known as the Gaia Sausage, which was involved in a major collision with the Milky Way billions of years ago.

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New searches for supersymmetry presented by ATLAS experiment

The Standard Model is a remarkably successful but incomplete theory. Supersymmetry (SUSY) offers an elegant solution to the Standard Model's limitations, extending it to give each particle a heavy "superpartner" with different spin properties (an important quantum number distinguishing matter particles from force particles and the Higgs boson). For example, sleptons are the spin 0 superpartners of

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Family crucial to orca survival

Orcas live in stable, structured social groups. And their survival directly depends on it, as a CNRS and University of La Rochelle research team has just demonstrated. Between 1996 and 2002, half of the Crozet Islands orca population was killed off by an illegal fishing operation targeting Patagonian toothfish, with the orcas removing the fish from the line during hauling.

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A unique experiment to explore black holes

What happens when two supermassive black holes collide? Combining the observing power of two future ESA missions, Athena and LISA, would allow us to study these cosmic clashes and their mysterious aftermath for the first time.

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Research explores how the management of feral cats can protect native species

New Massey research hopes to improve the management of feral cats for the protection of native species.

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Clocks, gravity, and the limits of relativity

The International Space Station will host the most precise clocks ever to leave Earth. Accurate to a second in 300 million years the clocks will push the measurement of time to test the limits of the theory of relativity and our understanding of gravity.

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Family crucial to orca survival

Orcas live in stable, structured social groups. And their survival directly depends on it, as a CNRS and University of La Rochelle research team has just demonstrated. Between 1996 and 2002, half of the Crozet Islands orca population was killed off by an illegal fishing operation targeting Patagonian toothfish, with the orcas removing the fish from the line during hauling.

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Research explores how the management of feral cats can protect native species

New Massey research hopes to improve the management of feral cats for the protection of native species.

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Ice, ice, maybe: water physics thrown into doubt

An attempt to produce a disordered form of ice is a surprise failure, raising awkward questions. Phil Dooley reports.

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Dinner on the half-shell: chimpanzees eat tortoises

Adults smash open the reptiles, then share the spoils. Nick Carne reports.

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NASA calls citizen scientists to help with asteroid landing

Mission controllers hope many eyes will make OSIRIS-Rex touchdown safer. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Xenon gas dramatically improves head injury recovery in mice

Extraordinary results raise hope for better brain injury treatment in humans. Paul Biegler reports.

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Mystery of Libyan desert glass solved at last

Famous since the time of King Tut the origin of the scattered glass fragments has long puzzled researchers. Aaron Cavosie from Australia’s Curtin University explains.

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First fungus pushed back half a billion years

New find in the Arctic updates fossil record significantly. Nick Carne reports.

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Central Asia's Wild Soviet Architecture

Photographers Roberto Conte and Stefano Perego traveled to four former republics for their latest book.

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4 gadgets that wake you up better than your phone

DIY Wake up! Without your phone—we'll help you do that break up. You don't have to rely on your smartphone as an alarm clock—these alternative, inexpensive gadgets will do an even better job.

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Seeing inside superfog

While prescribed fires are common tools in wildland management, a combination of smoke and fog, known as superfog, has in some cases crossed over major roadways, leading to multicar pileups and fatalities in visibility of less than 3 meters.

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New approach captures detailed mid-infrared images for medical diagnostics

Researchers have developed a unique high-resolution imaging method that can capture mid-infrared spectral images of fast events or dynamic processes that take place on the order of milliseconds. This spectral range is used for many applications because it can reveal the detailed chemical composition of a sample.

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TESS finds comets around ‘celebrity’ star

NASA planet-spotting mission detects its first smaller bodies. Andrew Masterson reports.

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New Progress in Stem-Cell-Free Regenerative Medicine

Regenerative medicine and stem cells are often uttered within the same breath, for good reason. In animal models, stem cells have reliably reversed brain damage from Parkinson’s disease, repaired severed spinal cords, or restored damaged tissue from diabetes , stroke , blood cancers , heart disease , or aging-related tissue damage . With the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), in

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Dissolving protein traffic jam at the entrance of mitochondria

Researchers from Freiburg discovered a novel mechanism that ensures obstacle-free protein traffic into the powerhouse of the cell.

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Exposure to air pollution before and after birth may affect fundamental cognitive abilities

A study finds that exposure to fine particulate matter in the first years of life is associated with poorer performance in working memory and executive attention.

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The geometry of an electron determined for the first time

Physicists at the University of Basel are able to show for the first time how a single electron looks in an artificial atom. A newly developed method enables them to show the probability of an electron being present in a space. This allows improved control of electron spins, which could serve as the smallest information unit in a future quantum computer. The experiments were published in Physical

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Social media data reveal benefits or threats to biodiversity by visitors to nature locations

Social media data reveal global patterns of visitation rates, attractiveness and pressure to more than 12,000 Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas (IBAs).

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Holidays disrupt drug routines of children with diabetes

Children with type 1 diabetes find it difficult to adhere to their drug routines during school holidays and weekends. Holiday distractions cause a 20% reduction in adherence to taking medications that assist managing their condition and other associated conditions, which may have serious consequences for their health.

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Women are less likely than men to be diagnosed with minor stroke

New study by University of Toronto and University of Calgary researchers find women experiencing a minor stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) are less likely to be diagnosed with a stroke compared to men — even though they describe similar symptoms in emergency departments.

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Translational research led by Singapore scientists uncovers new treatment for fatty liver disease

A new treatment approach that involves blocking a protein has, for the first time, shown promising results in the treatment of fatty liver disease, in a landmark translational research collaboration between Duke-NUS Medical School, National Heart Centre Singapore and biotech company Enleofen Bio.

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New exercise guidelines for people with cancer

A decade-old treatment recommendation for people with cancer to take a 'slowly slowly' approach to exercise has been replaced with new guidelines recommending a personalized exercise program including high-intensity workouts to achieve the best treatment outcome.

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What Are the Biological Consequences of Homelessness?

Understanding why living on the street seems to cause rapid aging could help homeless people—and governments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists proposed a novel configuration of nanoscopes

Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University together with colleagues proposed using special diffraction gratings with gold plates instead of microlenses used in the classic configuration to obtain images in nanoscopes. Microlenses transmit images by small pieces (pixels), whereas diffraction gratings allow you to see the whole object. Such innovation can help to accelerate the generation of image

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Chimpanzees spotted cracking open tortoises for meat

Scientists have observed wild chimpanzees tucking into an unusual snack: tortoises, whose hard shells they crack against tree trunks before scooping out the meat.

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Ohållbart fiske i tropikerna

En del av de satellitbilder som finns i Google Maps har så pass hög upplösning att man kan se kustnära, fast monterade fisknät. Om man exempelvis zoomar in de grunda vattnen runt Sri Lanka avtecknar sig näten som raka streck med en cirkel eller ett tvärstreck i ena ändan (se bild eller prova själv!). Strecken (näten) är i det här fallet 100–150 meter långa.

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Chimpanzees spotted cracking open tortoises for meat

Scientists have observed wild chimpanzees tucking into an unusual snack: tortoises, whose hard shells they crack against tree trunks before scooping out the meat.

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Tolkning av nya idéer avgörande vid omorganisation

Jakten på det bästa sättet att leda, styra och organisera offentliga verksamheter pågår ständigt, och olika idéer är populärare än andra under vissa tider. Men att vissa av dem blir framgångsrika och andra inte beror till stor del på hur de tolkas på den plats där de introduceras. Det visar en ny avhandling från Förvaltningshögskolan vid Göteborgs universitet. Idéer om ledning, styrning och organ

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Help NASA asteroid mission choose sample site using PSI's CosmoQuest

The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft has been at Bennu since Dec. 3, 2018, mapping the asteroid in detail, while the mission team searches for a sample collection site that is safe, conducive to sample collection, and worthy of closer study. One of the biggest challenges of this effort is that Bennu has an extremely rocky surface and each boulder presents a danger to the spacecraft's safety as it touches dow

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Phase transitions: The math behind the music

Next time you listen to a favorite tune or wonder at the beauty of a natural sound, you might also end up pondering the math behind the music.

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Using your smartphone at the supermarket can add 41% to your shopping bill

Are you constantly checking your phone when you're out and about? Do you have trouble resisting the lure of ever more screen time? If so, be careful when you go grocery shopping—as your phone may be costing you more than you think.

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Newly Found Exoplanet “Could Offer Conditions Friendly to Life”

Exo-lent Discovery To date, scientists have discovered about 4,000 exoplanets, the term used for planets that reside outside Earth’s solar system. About 96 percent of those exoplanets are far larger than Earth, but thanks to a new search algorithm, a team of German astronomers has discover 18 new Earth-sized exoplanets — including one they say in a press release “could offer conditions friendly t

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SpaceX is launching 60 satellites to start its global internet scheme

On Thursday, SpaceX will launch 60 spacecraft on a single rocket to start a planned fleet of 12,000 broadband internet satellites

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Aaaaaargh! The true nature of screaming has finally been revealed

Can you tell the difference between a scream and a whistle? Most people consider rough, high-pitched noises a scream – and 70 per cent were tricked by a whistle

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Defects in heart valve cilia during fetal development cause mitral valve prolapse

Genetic mutations in heart valve cells of the developing fetus lead to mitral valve prolapse, report a global collaborative of researchers. These mutations or genetic variations cause defects in antenna-like cellular structures called primary cilia. This finding of a developmental cause for the disease highlights the importance of early intervention and may lead to the rethinking of treatment guid

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Amazon is reportedly working on an Alexa-powered wearable that reads human emotions

Amazon is reportedly developing a voice-activated wearable device that can recognize human emotions.

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The Gendered History of Human Computers

It's ironic that women today must fight for equality in Silicon Valley. After all, their math skills helped launch the digital age

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The 'Nation's T. Rex' Prepares to Make Its Smithsonian Debut

In a new exhibit about "deep time" at the National Museum of Natural History, T. Rex is still the king

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Reimagining the Megalodon, the World's Most Terrifying Sea Creature

The ancient beast of the oceans comes to life in a new display at the National Museum of Natural History

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Using computer simulations to discover where Neanderthals lived

Archaeologist Fulco Sherjon has used computer simulations to identify where and how Neanderthals lived in West Europe. What stood out was that they probably had lots of children and lived in smaller groups than was previously thought. Ph.D. defense on 28 May.

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New Flatland material: Physicists obtain quasi-2D gold

Researchers from the MIPT Center for Photonics and 2-D Materials have synthesized a quasi-2-D gold film, revealing how materials not usually classified as two-dimensional can form atomically thin layers. Published in Advanced Materials Interfaces, the study shows that by using monolayer molybdenum disulfide as an adhesion layer, quasi-2-D gold can be deposited on an arbitrary surface. The team say

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Medieval home of Lords of the Isles virtually reconstructed

The lost medieval home of the Lords of the Isles has been reconstructed virtually by experts at the University of St Andrews.

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Study investigates potential risk of Taurid meteor swarm

A new study from Western University posits proof to the possibility that an oncoming swarm of meteors—likened to the Loch Ness Monster and Bigfoot by some extraterrestrial experts—may indeed pose an existential risk for Earth and its inhabitants. (That's us.)

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Vascularized kidney tissue engineered by WFIRM scientists

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) researchers have shown the feasibility of bioengineering vascularized functional renal tissues for kidney regeneration, developing a partial augmentation strategy that may be a more feasible and practical approach than creating whole organs.

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Melting small glaciers could add 10 inches to sea levels

A new review of glacier research data paints a picture of a future planet with a lot less ice and a lot more water. Glaciers worldwide are projected to lose anywhere from 18% to 36% of their mass by 2100, resulting in almost 10 inches of sea level rise. The review is the most comprehensive global comparison of glacier simulations ever compiled.

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SWOG spotlights high-impact research at ASCO

At ASCO 2019, SWOG investigators will report on 16 group-led trials, one jointly-led study, and another 12 involving partners. Presentation topics illustrate SWOG's wide-ranging portfolio, with talks and posters on treatment or prevention of bladder, breast, colorectal, lung, pancreatic, prostate, and rare cancers, as well as melanoma and multiple myeloma. SWOG investigators will make a particular

8h

Seeing inside superfog

Research led by the University of California, Riverside has for the first time produced superfog, a dense combination of smoke and fog, in a laboratory. The team identified the smoke particle size distribution and concentration, ambient liquid water content, ambient temperature, ambient relative humidity, fuel moisture content and wind speed that lead to superfog formation. They caution, however,

8h

Packs of wolf-dog hybrids threaten europe's wolves

"Swarms" of wolf-dog crossbreeds could drive Europe's wolves out of existence, according to the lead author of new research. Such hybridisation—driven by human activities that destroy habitats and mean wolves encounter more and more free-roaming dogs—threatens the "genetic identity" of wolves.

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Spareplan vil skubbe læger væk fra Aarhus Universitetshospital

De fleste afdelinger på Aarhus Universitetshospital bliver ramt af spareplan, der skrotter 180 stillinger, heraf 14 lægestillinger. Den største bekymring er, at utilfredse og pressede læger vil søge væk, siger Overlægerådsformand.

9h

Programming the forces of evolution

The genius of evolution is rarely seen in action, so the invisible hand guiding the direction of biological systems is often taken for granted. However, by applying the principles of natural selection to research questions and designing robots to carry out these tasks, scientists are creating the world's first evolutionary machines.

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Packs of wolf-dog hybrids threaten europe's wolves

"Swarms" of wolf-dog crossbreeds could drive Europe's wolves out of existence, according to the lead author of new research. Such hybridisation—driven by human activities that destroy habitats and mean wolves encounter more and more free-roaming dogs—threatens the "genetic identity" of wolves.

9h

STAR detector has a new inner core

For scientists tracking the transformation of protons and neutrons—the components of atomic nuclei that make up everything we see in the universe today—into a soup of fundamental building blocks known quark-gluon plasma, more is better. More particle tracks, that is. Thanks to a newly installed upgrade of the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), nuclear physicists now have

9h

Someone Tried to Return an Amazon Package Directly to Jeff Bezos

Dropoff During a question and answer session at Wednesday’s annual shareholder meeting, a disgruntled Amazon customer and investor made an unusual request of CEO Jeff Bezos. The company shareholder approached the stage and tried to return an Amazon package directly to Bezos, Business Insider reports , while complaining about four failed attempts to return the package via the standard methods. Pre

9h

Socialdemokratiet vil give 1,5 milliard til virksomheder i forskningsfradrag

Skal virksomhederne fylde mere i forskningen fremover? Det mener socialdemokratiet, som vil bruge 1,5 milliarder kroner på at hæve forskningsfradraget til virksomheder til 130 procent. Til Ingeniørens valgmøde om forskningens fremtid i Danmark talte både Konservative og Venstre kraftigt imod denn…

9h

The first observation of the nuclear Barnett effect

The electronic Barnett effect, first observed by Samuel Barnett in 1915, is the magnetization of an uncharged body as it is spun on its long axis. This is caused by a coupling between the angular momentum of the electronic spins and the rotation of the rod.

9h

Reductions in PM over decade has improved health; ozone pollution remains little changed

Fewer deaths and serious illnesses have occurred in the US over the past decade as a result of cleaner air, according to a new report focusing on the two most potent air pollutants: fine particle (PM2.5) and ground-level ozone (O3). However, these improvements are almost entirely due to reductions in PM2.5 pollution.

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Early antiretroviral treatment may preserve key immune responses to HIV

Investigators have found that instituting combination antiretroviral treatment at the earliest stages of HIV infection may allow the generation of functional CD8 'killer' T cells and preservation of the CD4 helper T cells that are the virus's primary target.

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Phase transitions: The math behind the music

Physics Professor Jesse Berezovsky contends that until now, much of the thinking about math and music has been a top-down approach, applying mathematical ideas to existing musical compositions as a way of understanding already existing music. He contends he's uncovering the 'emergent structures of musical harmony' inherent in the art, just as order comes from disorder in the physical world. He bel

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Tortoises on the menu

An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the University of Osnabrück, Germany, have observed wild chimpanzees in the Loango National Park, Gabon, eating tortoises. They describe the first observations of this potentially cultural behavior where chimpanzees hit tortoises against tree trunks until the tortoises' shells break open

9h

Nej, rika betalade inte mer skatt på 70-talet

Gunnar Lantz, forskare vid Umeå universitet, har undersökt inkomster och skatter under efterkrigstiden för att syna bilden av ett skattesystem som har sagts kraftigt missgynna höginkomsttagare. – Det är en stor missuppfattning att det svenska välfärdsbygget skulle ha bekostats av så kallade rikemansskatter, säger Gunnar Lantz. Det bekostades av skatter på låg- och medelinkomsttagare i högre grad.

9h

This robot helps you lift objects—by looking at your biceps

We humans are very good at collaboration. For instance, when two people work together to carry a heavy object like a table or a sofa, they tend to instinctively coordinate their motions, constantly …

9h

2040: Hope and action in the climate crisis

It was framed as "the climate election," but last week Australia returned a government with climate policies that make the task of building a zero-emissions, safe climate Australia even harder.

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Ultra-small microorganisms contribute to global carbon cycles

Scientists report that ultra-small microorganisms make greater contributions to global carbon cycles than previously realized and are crucial to the health of the oceans.

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Impeachment Is a Refusal to Accept the Unacceptable

In 1838, Abraham Lincoln gave a speech on “the perpetuation of our political institutions“—better known today as the Lyceum Address. Dwelling on the threats facing the American political structure, he argued that the United States was protected from foreign invasion. “At what point, then,” Lincoln asked, “is the approach of danger to be expected?” “I answer: If it ever reach us, it must spring up

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Chimpanzees eat tortoises after smashing them open on tree trunks

A group of chimpanzees in Gabon has figured out how to eat tortoises by cracking open their shells against tree trunks — further evidence of the apes’ ingenuity

9h

Ultra-small microorganisms contribute to global carbon cycles

Scientists report that ultra-small microorganisms make greater contributions to global carbon cycles than previously realized and are crucial to the health of the oceans.

9h

What the Heck Are These Fossils?

Are they the first animal embryos? 20 years post-discovery, these and other fossils from the 600 million-year-old Doushantuo Formation remain frustratingly enigmatic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Hopsy Sub Home Tap Review: A Crafty Way to Enjoy Draft Beer at Home

A craft beer subscription service ensures this mini keg fridge is always kickin'.

9h

Eastern China pinpointed as source of rogue ozone-depleting emissions

A mysterious rebound in the emissions of ozone-depleting chemicals—despite a global ban stretching back almost a decade—has been traced to eastern China.

9h

New ultra diffuse galaxy found in the NGC 5846 group

Astronomers have detected a new ultra diffuse galaxy (UDG) located most likely in the NGC 5846 galaxy group. The discovery is part of the ongoing VEGAS survey aimed at investigating early-type galaxies in a range of environments. Details of the finding were presented in a paper published May 15 on arXiv.org.

9h

ARM amputation: Huawei's big chip problem

ARM technology is used in more than 130 billion chips worldwide and is ubiquitous in mobile devices, so losing access to the British company would be like losing a limb for China's embattled Huawei.

9h

The Government Is Serious About Creating Mind-Controlled Weapons

DARPA hopes to invent ways to instantly read soldiers' minds using tools like genetic engineering of the human brain, nanotechnology and infrared beams.

9h

Spherical flames in space could solve the mystery of soot-free fires

In microgravity, flames are sphere-shaped. Tests of fire on the International Space Station are helping show how gases flow within flames.

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Why Anti-vax Doctors Are Ordering 23andMe Tests

David Reif , now a biologist at NC State, realized his old paper had taken on a dangerous second life when he saw it cited—not in the scientific literature, but in a court case. The paper was titled “ Genetic Basis for Adverse Events after Smallpox Vaccination ,” and it came up in 2016 when a vaccine-skeptical doctor tried to argue that it explained her patient’s development delays. The court was

9h

I'm an evolutionary biologist—here's why this ancient fungal fossil discovery is so revealing

Biologists don't call them "the hidden kingdom" for nothing. With an estimated 5 million species, only a mere 100,000 fungi are known to scientists. This kingdom, which includes molds, yeasts, rusts and mushrooms, receives far less attention than plants or animals. This is particularly true for fossils of fungi, most of which are discovered while hunting for more charismatic, at least to the eyes

9h

The geometry of an electron determined for the first time

Physicists at the University of Basel have shown for the first time how a single electron looks in an artificial atom. A newly developed method enables them to show the probability of an electron being present in a space. This allows improved control of electron spins, which could serve as the smallest information unit in a future quantum computer. The experiments were published in Physical Review

9h

Clean water eliminated effects of discharged drugs in fish

The development of new drugs is a good thing for both humans and animals. But unfortunately, the medications we take can have untoward consequences.

9h

CRISPR/Cas9 improves with better gene knockout method in aneuploid cell lines

CRISPR/Cas9 technology enables convenient and effective genome editing in diploid cell lines based on the isolation and expansion of edited single-cell clones. However, this approach is ineffective for aneuploid cell lines, and a group has now reported an improved method for genome editing based on multiple rounds of modification. The article is published in Tissue Engineering.

9h

Bending the norm on nanowires

New methods of arranging silver nanowires make them more durable, shows a study by KAUST. These nanowires form flexible, transparent conductive layers that can be used for improved solar cells, strain sensors and next-generation mobile phones.

9h

Complex life may only exist because of millions of years of groundwork by ancient fungi

Because of their delicate organic and decomposing nature, fossilized fungi are extremely rare. So rare, in fact, that a new discovery has just pushed back the earliest evidence of fungi by at least 500m years—doubling their age.

9h

Dissolving a protein traffic jam at the entrance of mitochondria

Researchers from Freiburg discovered a novel mechanism that ensures obstacle-free protein traffic into the powerhouse of the cell

9h

I'm an evolutionary biologist—here's why this ancient fungal fossil discovery is so revealing

Biologists don't call them "the hidden kingdom" for nothing. With an estimated 5 million species, only a mere 100,000 fungi are known to scientists. This kingdom, which includes molds, yeasts, rusts and mushrooms, receives far less attention than plants or animals. This is particularly true for fossils of fungi, most of which are discovered while hunting for more charismatic, at least to the eyes

9h

Clean water eliminated effects of discharged drugs in fish

The development of new drugs is a good thing for both humans and animals. But unfortunately, the medications we take can have untoward consequences.

9h

CRISPR/Cas9 improves with better gene knockout method in aneuploid cell lines

CRISPR/Cas9 technology enables convenient and effective genome editing in diploid cell lines based on the isolation and expansion of edited single-cell clones. However, this approach is ineffective for aneuploid cell lines, and a group has now reported an improved method for genome editing based on multiple rounds of modification. The article is published in Tissue Engineering.

9h

Complex life may only exist because of millions of years of groundwork by ancient fungi

Because of their delicate organic and decomposing nature, fossilized fungi are extremely rare. So rare, in fact, that a new discovery has just pushed back the earliest evidence of fungi by at least 500m years—doubling their age.

9h

Dissolving a protein traffic jam at the entrance of mitochondria

Researchers from Freiburg discovered a novel mechanism that ensures obstacle-free protein traffic into the powerhouse of the cell

9h

Ancient ash is likely behind odd mineral deposit on Mars

Ashfall from ancient volcanic explosions is the likely source of a strange mineral deposit near the landing site for NASA’s next Mars rover, a new study finds. The research could help scientists assemble a timeline of volcanic activity and environmental conditions on early Mars. “This is one of the most tangible pieces of evidence yet for the idea that explosive volcanism was more common on early

9h

Living smarter: The interconnected home

Smart homes have long been touted as the future of building. But now even existing homes can be turned smart—and it's easier than ever.

9h

Google Duplex AI Reservation Service Still Relies Heavily On Human Handlers

Google has been making greats strides to bring its Duplex reservation service to more states. For those not in the know, Google Duplexuses advanced artificial intelligence (AI) to automatically …

9h

Researcher documents dramatic loss of native plants on MDI

Areas across the Northeast have lost an average of one-fourth of their local plant biodiversity in the last 50 to 150 years.

9h

Room Temperatures Set for Men's Comfort May Disadvantage Women, Study Finds

Researchers say women are worse at math and word-based tasks at cooler room temperatures. (Credit: ESB Professional/Shutterstock) “The women’s winter is here. The freeze is upon us,” warns a Game of Thrones parody about men and women's office temperature preferences. If you have a Y chromosome, you probably haven’t experienced “women’s winter.” As the video explains, women’s winter is “when spring

9h

Staten kompenserer ikke regionerne nok for dyr medicin

Ny VIVE-rapport bestilt af Lægeforeningen viser, at regionernes udgifter til dyr sygehusmedicin slet ikke dækkes ind af de ekstra midler, staten har givet dem. Det er årsagen til regionernes mange sparerunder.

10h

Scientists proposed a novel configuration of nanoscopes

TPU scientists proposed using special diffraction gratings with gold plates instead of microlenses to accelerate the generation of images from nanoscopes without losing any magnification power. The advanced nanoscopes are promising for biological research to study living viruses and the insides of cells.

10h

Researchers from IKBFU study properties of amorphous microwires

Glass coated amorphous microwires are the newest perspective magnetic composite alloys that can be used for the creation of modern high-speed mass storage devices with high recording density and logic elements.

10h

B.C. needs a dedicated species at risk law—one that focuses on recovery

British Columbia is home to the most biodiversity of any Canadian province or territory, with a vast array of species from the coast to the Rockies.

10h

Economists conduct research into how to best allocate time between creative and routine tasks

How can employees' working time be organized to enable them to perform in the best possible way when completing both creative and routine tasks? Two economists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) investigated this question and made a surprising discovery: The working model that works best depends on employees' impulsiveness.

10h

Gene discovery could boost corn’s nutrition

A new discovery could improve the nutritional value and crop yields of corn, report researchers. The research could benefit millions of people who rely on corn for nutrition in South America, Africa, and elsewhere. The world’s corn supply depends on improving its yield and quality, which relies on the accumulation of starch and proteins in the grain’s endosperm, the study says. Endosperm, an impo

10h

Researcher documents dramatic loss of native plants on MDI

Areas across the Northeast have lost an average of one-fourth of their local plant biodiversity in the last 50 to 150 years.

10h

Processes not observed on Earth play major roles in the movement of sand on Mars

Wind has shaped the face of Mars for millennia, but its exact role in piling up sand dunes, carving out rocky escarpments or filling impact craters has eluded scientists until now.

10h

New collider concept would take quantum theories to an extreme

A new idea for smashing beams of elementary particles into one another could reveal how light and matter interact under extreme conditions that may exist on the surfaces of exotic astrophysical objects, in powerful cosmic light bursts and star explosions, in next-generation particle colliders and in hot, dense fusion plasma.

10h

Study provides new insight into origin of Canadian Rockies

The Canadian Rocky Mountains were formed when the North American continent was dragged westward during the closure of an ocean basin off the west coast and collided with a microcontinent more than 100 million years ago, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists.

10h

Study identifies lherzolite as a source rock for diamond deposits

A startling discovery has the potential to change diamond exploration in Canada and around the world.

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Scientists break record for highest-temperature superconductor

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How the malaria vaccine could change world health

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Geologists Discover Largest Underwater Volcano, Explain Weird Hum Heard Around the World

A strange seismic event off the coast of Africa has led scientists to a mighty finding: the discovery of the largest underwater volcanic eruption ever recorded.

10h

Hurricane season is early—again

Environment Nature doesn’t wait for June 1. 2019’s hurricane season got off to an early start—just like in 2018. And 2017. And 2016. And 2015. That means a record five years in a row have seen a named storm form…

10h

Quality preschool benefits multiple generations

Early childhood education programs can benefit life outcomes in ways that span generations, new research shows. As reported in a pair of companion papers, the children of children who participated in a landmark 1960s study saw improvements in education, health, and employment—without participating in the same preschool program themselves. “For the first time, we have experimental evidence about h

10h

How Do We Know?

A Reddit thread in the Skeptic subreddit is framed as criticism toward skeptical philosophy. The questions it raises are all important, and honestly the poster should have just framed his points as questions rather than criticisms, because they reflect not problems with skeptical philosophy but their poor understanding of it. So the first lesson here is – humility. Don’t assume that an entire fie

10h

Mangelfulde brystundersøgelser breder sig til tre af landets fem regioner

Det er ikke kun Ringsted Sygehus, der har udført mangelfulde brystkræftundersøgelser. Både Aarhus og Odense Universitetshospital har heller ikke fulgt retningslinjerne, viser nye afsløringer.

10h

Læger og andre ansatte laver menneskekæde om presset hospital i Aarhus

En kæde af ansatte rundt om hele Aarhus Universitetshospital skal vise frustration og protest over besparelserne.

10h

Image of the Day: Belly Flop

Watch a Munk's devil ray breach.

10h

Enormous Python Swallows, Vomits Up Even Bigger Python

An Australian python vomited up a larger Australian python that it had eaten earlier.

10h

Rare Dodo Skeleton May Fetch Over $700K at Auction

The bones of this extinct, flightless bird were assembled early in the 19th century.

11h

Zombie Science: Could We Ever Resurrect the Dead?

Zombies aren't real. Death is permanent. Some scientists seem to have ignored those facts.

11h

Robots conduct daily health inspections of schoolchildren in China

Thousands of preschools in China are using robots to give students heath checks. Each morning they examine pupils looking for signs of contagious diseases

11h

Vegas tourism board backs $49M Elon Musk transit system

A company backed by tech billionaire Elon Musk has been awarded a nearly $49 million contract to build a transit system using self-driving vehicles underneath the Las Vegas Convention Center.

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Why the Internet Is So Polarized, Extreme, and Screamy

Subscribe to Crazy/Genius : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play In the early 1970s, the psychologist David G. Myers conducted a famous experiment on the power of groups. He divided several hundred undergraduates into two camps based on their attitudes toward feminism, creating a conservative cluster and a liberal one. Then he left them all alone to talk. When the groups disbanded, t

11h

America’s Alliance System Will Face One of Its Biggest Tests Yet

SEOUL, South Korea—“If the United States believes that it doesn’t need an alliance with the Republic of Korea, I would say it’s okay. If the United States doesn’t want the alliance, we don’t have to beg for it.” It was a stunning statement to hear in Seoul from one of South Korea’s highest-ranking officials, considering it was in regard to a nearly 70-year partnership forged by American and Korea

11h

Polarisation on social media could be reduced with a few simple tweaks

Once again elections are being battered and political views polarized by far-right propaganda flooding social media – could a simple tweak to online connections help win the information wars?

11h

Where (Some of) Earth's Gold Came From

Of all of that precious metal ever refined, 600 tons were created in a collision between two neutron stars, 1,000 light-years away and 4.6 billion years ago — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Sweaty, vinegary and sweet odors mingle to make dark chocolate’s smell

Scientists have worked out the chemistry of dark chocolate’s smell and reconstructed the aroma.

11h

Can We Revive Empathy in Our Selfish World? – Issue 72: Quandary

You wake up on a bus, surrounded by all your remaining possessions. A few fellow passengers slump on pale blue seats around you, their heads resting against the windows. You turn and see a father holding his son. Almost everyone is asleep. But one man, with a salt-and-pepper beard and khaki vest, stands near the back of the bus, staring at you. You feel uneasy and glance at the driver, wondering

11h

Dude, Where’s My Frontal Cortex? – Issue 72: Quandary

In the foothills of the Sierra Mountains, a few hours east of San Francisco, are the Moaning Caverns, a cave system that begins, after a narrow, twisting descent of 30-some feet, with an abrupt 180-foot drop. The Park Service has found ancient human skeletons at the bottom of the drop. Native Americans living there at the time didn’t make human sacrifices. Instead, these explorers took one step t

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He Gave Away $30 Million Because It Felt Good – Issue 72: Quandary

James Doty is not a subject under study at the altruism research center that he founded at Stanford in 2008, but he could be. In 2000, after building a fortune as a neurosurgeon and biotech entrepreneur in Silicon Valley, he lost it all in the dotcom crash: $75 million gone in six weeks. Goodbye villa in Tuscany, private island in New Zealand, penthouse in San Francisco. His final asset was stock

11h

Big Tech: Breaking Us Up Will Only Help China

Amid escalating tension with China, executives at Google and Facebook argue that tough regulations against tech will hurt US competitiveness.

11h

VW’s ‘Dieselgate’ Settlement Isn’t Buying Many Electric Vehicles

States were given almost $3 billion from Volkswagen’s diesel scandal settlement to buy cleaner vehicles. But many are buying more diesels, a report shows.

11h

The Pentagon Launched Another Space Agency. Do We Need It?

By going big on small satellites, the new Space Development Agency plans to defend the country against all manner of orbital attacks.

11h

Din mobiltelefon hjælper DMI med at forudsige vejret

PLUS. 60 millioner trykmålinger fra danske smartphones er det seneste år blevet anvendt til at forbedre vejrmodellerne hos DMI. På sigt kan crowdsourcet sensordata fra biler, smartphones og mobilmaster forbedre fremtidens vejrmodeller

11h

Where (Some of) Earth's Gold Came From

Of all of that precious metal ever refined, 600 tons were created in a collision between two neutron stars, 1,000 light-years away and 4.6 billion years ago — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Swedish researchers encourage less flying, with new tool to highlight climate impact

As the climate issue heats up, consumers are becoming more conscious of their impact on the environment. "Flygskam," or "flight shame" is a word that has received extensive media coverage recently, reflecting the increasing awareness of flying's environmental consequences. Now, researchers from Sweden's Chalmers University of Technology present a tool that allows consumers to evaluate the outcome

11h

Light and nanotechnology prevent bacterial infections on medical implants

Invented approximately 50 years ago, surgical medical meshes have become key elements in the recovery procedures of damaged-tissue surgeries, the most common being hernia repair. When implanted within the tissue of the patient, the flexible and conformable design of these meshes hold muscles securely and allows quicker recovery than conventional surgical procedures of sewing and stitching.

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Galaxies as 'cosmic cauldrons'

Star formation within interstellar clouds of gas and dust, so-called molecular clouds, proceeds very rapidly yet highly inefficiently. Most of the gas is dispersed by stellar radiation, revealing galaxies to be highly dynamic systems, like "cosmic cauldrons," consisting of components that constantly change their appearance. Based on new observations of the NGC 300 spiral galaxy, a team of scientis

11h

Germany fines Bosch over 'dieselgate' role

German prosecutors said Thursday they had fined car parts supplier Bosch 90 million euros ($100 million) over its role supplying components in the "dieselgate" emissions cheating scandal.

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New report lays groundwork for improving social and behavioral science impact metrics

While measurement of science impact has traditionally been synonymous with citation counts in academic journals, such counts fail to capture the influence that research can have on policy, practice, and the public. While the social and behavioral sciences (SBS) are uniquely positioned to make this impact and thus benefit society, their tru