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nyheder2019maj25

Greta Thunberg modtaget som en stjerne i Danmark: 'Vi skal opføre os, som om vores liv er på spil'

Tusindvis af danskere deltog i dag i en landsdækkende klimamarch, hvor den svenske klimaktivist var hovedtaler.

5h

High-intensity exercise may restore heart function in people with type 2 diabetes

Researchers have discovered that high-intensity exercise can reduce or reverse the loss in heart function caused by type 2 diabetes.

7h

Scientists uncover exotic matter in the sun's atmosphere

Scientists from Ireland and France today announced a major new finding about how matter behaves in the extreme conditions of the Sun's atmosphere.

9h

Flystriber kan opvarme planeten langt mere end flyenes CO2-udledning

Jetmotorernes forbrænding skaber skyer og flystriber, der kan risikere at øge den globale opvarmning fra fly mere end deres CO2, hvis flytrafikken fortsat vokser.

19h

885 Million First American Financial Records Exposed Online

Real estate giant First American left Social Security numbers, tax documents, and more publicly available.

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Uber's first employee Ryan Graves steps down from board of directors – CNET

Just two weeks after the ride-hailing company went public, it's board is getting a shakeup.

5min

New Origami-inspired Design Turns Pushing Into Pulling

The series of paper cells developed by researchers at the University of Washington uses origami folds to absorb the force of impacts. (Credit: Kiyomi Taguchi/University of Washington) Whether applied to auto collisions or rocket landings, absorbing energy from impacts is a valuable trait, and industries have been working on various solutions for years. For spacecraft, landing safely has entailed e

10min

What's up with all this wild, weird weather — and is it linked to climate change?

Violent thunderstorms boiled up across Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri on May 22, 2019, as seen in this animation of infrared images acquired by the GOES-16 weather satellite. Tornadoes, including one that ravaged parts of Jefferson City, MO, are indicated by blue-colored T's. (Note: The animation may take awhile to load. It's worth the wait! Source: CIMSS Satellite Blog) It certainly has been a wil

15min

Yes, you can get throat gonorrhea

Health If you think chlamydia and gonorrhea are just for genitals, they've got you right where they want you. If you think chlamydia and gonorrhea are just for genitals, they've got you right where they want you.

35min

Table scraps can be used to reduce reliance on fossil fuels

New technology engineers natural fermentation to produce a biodegradable chemical that can be refined as a source of energy.

38min

Simple test can tell if you're stressed out

Researchers have developed a new test that can easily and simply measure common stress hormones using sweat, blood, urine or saliva. Eventually, they hope to turn their ideas into a simple device that patients can use at home to monitor their health.

1h

Climate change affects the genetic diversity of a species

What effects does climate change have on the genetic diversity of living organisms? In a new study, researchers studied the genome of the alpine marmot. Results were unexpected: the species was found to be the least genetically diverse of any wild mammal studied to date. The alpine marmot has lost its genetic diversity during ice-age related climate events and been unable to recover its diversity

1h

The surprising popularity of workplace choirs

Workplace choirs are becoming increasingly popular in the U.K. and USA, particularly in companies such as Boeing, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google. Proponents tout choirs as a way to avoid employee burnout, and the research seems to suggest they're right. Singing in choirs comes with a slew of psychosocial benefits that can make the workday a little more bearable. None In some workplaces, you might

1h

Simple test can tell if you're stressed out

Researchers have developed a new test that can easily and simply measure common stress hormones using sweat, blood, urine or saliva. Eventually, they hope to turn their ideas into a simple device that patients can use at home to monitor their health.

1h

Trump’s feud with Huawei and China could lead to the balkanization of tech

Trade barriers and immigration controls might lead different countries to adopt incompatible products, impeding global innovation.

1h

Security blog reports that First American left hundreds of millions of records exposed

A leading mortgage settlement and title insurance company, First American Financial Corporation, left hundreds of millions of customer records accessible on the web, including personal information …

1h

Google’s ‘Translatotron’ translates your speech while retaining the sound of your voice

Current translators break down the translation process into three steps, based on converting the speech to text. The new system uses machine learning to bypass the text representation steps, converting spectrograms of speech from one language into another language. Although it's in early stages, the system can reproduce some aspects of the original speaker's voice and tone. None Google's Translat

1h

Last week in tech: Facebook’s upcoming cryptocurrency, a new MacBook Pro keyboard, and the cutest game console ever

Technology Catch up on the week's biggest tech news. Finally a fixed MacBook Pro keyboard.

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The threat of quantum computing on blockchain & cryptocurrencies

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B.C. fuel-cell drone business gaining altitude

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1h

NASA's Mars 2020 mission drops in on Death Valley

On a test flight in Death Valley, California, an Airbus helicopter carried an engineering model of the Lander Vision System (LVS) that will help guide NASA's next Mars mission to a safe touchdown on the Red Planet. During the flight – one in a series—the helicopter (which is not part of the mission and was used just for testing) and its two-person crew flew a pre-planned sequence of maneuvers whil

1h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Doublespeak

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, May 24. ‣ The Republican Chip Roy delayed an already delayed $19.1 billion disaster-aid measure—which was about to pass with unanimous consent— by objecting on the House floor. Here’s what else we’re watching: Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. (James Lawler Duggan / Reuters) Caught in the Middle (East): Trump, a p

1h

World celebrates centenary of confirmation of relativity

Celebrations are underway across the globe to commemorate 100 years since a UK-led expedition confirmed Einstein's general theory of relativity. The theory fundamentally changed our understanding of physics and astronomy, and underpins critical modern technologies such as the satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS). A series of public events in the UK and around the world will mark this se

1h

How diversity creates necessary safe spaces for innovation

Conformity is not conducive to good problem solving, says economist and author Tim Harford. The opposite of conformity? Diversity. The kind of discussions that diversity facilitates actually improve the ability of groups to arrive at effective solutions.

1h

Murray Gell-Mann gave structure to the subatomic world

Best known for his quarks, the preeminent theoretical physicist was also a complexity pioneer

1h

Comet inspires chemistry for making breathable oxygen on Mars

Science fiction stories are chock full of terraforming schemes and oxygen generators for a very good reason—we humans need molecular oxygen (O2) to breathe, and space is essentially devoid of it. Even on other planets with thick atmospheres, O2 is hard to come by.

1h

Rare iron oxide could be combined with 2-D materials for electronic, spintronic devices

Rice University researchers have simplified the synthesis of a unique, nearly two-dimensional form of iron oxide with strong magnetic properties that is easy to stack atop other 2-D materials.

1h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Samsung’s Innovation Dilemma

David Eun, president of Samsung’s innovation arm NEXT, says younger consumers are shifting towards experiences, not things. What does that mean for a company that makes devices?

1h

Emory Researchers Removed After Failing to Disclose Chinese Funding

This marks the second known instance in which an institution has acted on NIH's concern about foreign influence over US-based researchers.

1h

How to prevent mosquitofish from spreading in water ecosystems

Preventing the introduction of the mosquitofish and removing its population are the most effective actions to control the dispersal of this exotic fish in ponds and lakes, according to a new study.

1h

Army Corps approves $778M plan to block Asian carp advance

The head of the Army Corps of Engineers has sent Congress a $778 million plan to fortify an Illinois waterway with noisemakers, electric cables and other devices in the hope that they will prevent Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes, where the aggressive invaders could leave other fish with too little to eat.

1h

Army Corps approves $778M plan to block Asian carp advance

The head of the Army Corps of Engineers has sent Congress a $778 million plan to fortify an Illinois waterway with noisemakers, electric cables and other devices in the hope that they will prevent Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes, where the aggressive invaders could leave other fish with too little to eat.

1h

Prime yourself for creativity: Don't wait for inspiration, embrace being stuck

Alan Lightman, physicist and author of Einstein's Dreams, examined 30 great scientific discoveries of the 20th century. Here he explores the habits of mind that push innovators toward creative breakthroughs. His advice for reaching creative heights? Embrace stuck-ness and don't rely on inspiration.

1h

Ex-Facebook exec recommends Zuckerberg step down as CEO

Facebook's former security chief is disagreeing with calls to break up the social network.

1h

Volcano on Indonesia's Bali erupts, flights canceled

Bali's airport has canceled flights following an eruption of the Mount Agung volcano that spread ash over the south of the Indonesian island.

1h

Adding a carbon atom transforms 2-D semiconducting material

A technique that introduces carbon-hydrogen molecules into a single atomic layer of the semiconducting material tungsten disulfide dramatically changes the electronic properties of the material, according to Penn State researchers at Penn State who say they can create new types of components for energy-efficient photoelectric devices and electronic circuits with this material.

1h

If you could learn every disease your child could possibly develop in life, would you?

Adding genomic sequencing results to traditional newborn screening means a baby could potentially test positive for numerous conditions that might not develop within their lifetime. A new study proposed a method for how to responsibly determine which types of conditions to include in testing and potentially return to parents.

2h

Better together: human and robot co-workers

More and more processes are being automated. Self-driving delivery vehicles are finding their way into many areas. However, an interdisciplinary research team has observed that cooperation between humans and machines can work much better than just human or just robot teams alone.

2h

uTalk helps you master the wide world of languages on any device

Get lifetime learning now for $15. Get lifetime learning now for $15 with uTalk. The app helps you master the wide world of languages on any device.

2h

Apple's MacBook Pro Keyboard Fix Comes Down to Tiny Tweaks

There are at least two material differences in the 2019 MacBook Pro keyboard, intended to fix its sticky keys.

2h

Finding the cause of capacity loss in a metal-oxide battery material

Scientists studying a lithium-ion battery with an iron-oxide electrode as it charged and discharged over 100 cycles found that the loss is due to a buildup of lithium oxide and decomposition of the medium through which lithium ions flow.

2h

How corn's ancient ancestor rejects crossbreeding

New research elucidates the mechanism that keeps maize distinct from its ancient ancestor grass, teosinte.

2h

Cancer cells are quick-change artists adapting to their environment

New research shows that cancer cells of glioblastomas — conspicuously aggressive solid brain tumors — manifest developmental plasticity and their phenotypic characteristics are less constrained than believed.

2h

Do you hear what I hear?

A new study found that infants at high risk for autism were less attuned to differences in speech patterns than low-risk infants. The findings suggest that interventions to improve language skills should begin during infancy for those at high risk for autism.

2h

Does Your Life Have Purpose? The Answer Could Affect How Long You Live.

Having a strong purpose in life may have not only mental benefits, but also physical ones.

2h

Older People Are Contributing to Climate Change, and Suffering From It

Growing numbers of seniors are using more energy. They also are most likely to suffer in extreme weather, which has become more common as the planet warms.

2h

At $2.1 Million, New Gene Therapy Is The Most Expensive Drug Ever

The Food and Drug Administration approved a new gene therapy for a rare but devastating genetic disorder. The drugmaker says the cost is worth it because it's a one-time treatment that saves lives. (Image credit: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

2h

This Fungus Mines For Gold, Then Wears It

Silence is golden. In Australia, so is the fungus.

3h

Netflix's Anything-Goes Philosophy Gets to Parody Rap with Lonely Island's 'Unauthorized Bash Brothers Experience'

A surprise "visual poem" from Lonely Island embraces late-’80s sports and rap nostalgia—and tightens Netflix's grip on comedy gambles.

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Origami-inspired materials could soften the blow for reusable spacecraft

Researchers have developed a novel solution to help reduce impact forces — for potential applications in spacecraft, cars and beyond.

3h

Every Xbox One title will be playable on Project xCloud

A major selling point for Xbox One is its broad backward compatibility with an array of Xbox and Xbox One games, giving it an enormous library of more than 3,500 titles. When Project …

3h

Inside Tesla’s Truck Technology

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A ball of space mud just pelted Earth—and scientists couldn't be happier

Space We haven’t seen a rock like this in 50 years. In late April, the residents of Aguas Zarcas in Costa Rica saw a giant fireball light up the sky as it hurtled towards the ground and broke up into hundreds of pieces in…

3h

Anonymous Group of 3D-Printed Gun Makers Is Spreading Online

One of Many A global network of gun enthusiasts is using the internet to anonymously share the files needed to 3D-print firearms — and there’s seemingly nothing anyone can do to stop them, according to a newly published Wired story that includes an interview with one of the network’s members. “If they [the government] were to come after me, they’d first have to find my identity,” a person going b

3h

New approaches to study the genetics of autism spectrum disorder may lead to new therapies

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is highly variable disorder, both in its presentation and in its genetics — hundreds of risk genes have been identified. One key to understanding and ultimately treating ASD is to identify common molecular mechanisms underlying this genetically heterogeneous disorder. Four Canadian researchers presented the results of unique approaches to understand ASD at the 14th

3h

A Curious Sequence of Prime Numbers

Euclid’s proof of the infinitude of primes opens the door to some interesting questions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

'Neural Lander' uses AI to land drones smoothly

Control engineers and AI experts team up to make drones that fly more smoothly close to the ground.

3h

Photos of the Week: Swan Song, Eiffel Climb, Porcelain Starlings

Tornadoes in Missouri, paratroopers in France, a handwriting competition in China, abortion-rights protests in New York City, the Great Wall Marathon in China, whitewater sports in England, a newborn walrus in Germany, red-carpet arrivals at the Cannes Film Festival, flooding in Oklahoma, and much more

3h

The Family Weekly: Weekend Weddings Are Cliché. Do It on Tuesday Instead.

(Stockbyte / Getty) This Week in Family One in five couples will say goodbye to the cookie-cutter weekend wedding—with all its elaborate bells and whistles—and opt for a weeknight ceremony instead. One major reason for this shift might be cost, since many venues and vendors offer lower prices for a Tuesday wedding than for one on a Saturday. But the trend also reflects the fact that more couples

3h

Murray Gell-Mann, Who Peered at Particles and Saw the Universe, Dies at 89

A Nobel winner, he found hidden patterns in the subatomic matter that forms the universe, evoking James Joyce in calling one kind of particle “quarks.”

3h

Comparative transcriptomics of 3 high-altitude passerine birds and their low-altitude relatives [Evolution]

High-altitude environments present strong stresses for living organisms, which have driven striking phenotypic and genetic adaptations. While previous studies have revealed multiple genetic adaptations in high-altitude species, how evolutionary history (i.e., phylogenetic background) contributes to similarity in genetic adaptations to high-altitude environments is largely unknown, in particular in

3h

Predicting disease-causing variant combinations [Genetics]

Notwithstanding important advances in the context of single-variant pathogenicity identification, novel breakthroughs in discerning the origins of many rare diseases require methods able to identify more complex genetic models. We present here the Variant Combinations Pathogenicity Predictor (VarCoPP), a machine-learning approach that identifies pathogenic variant combinations in gene pairs (calle

3h

MZB1 promotes the secretion of J-chain-containing dimeric IgA and is critical for the suppression of gut inflammation [Immunology and Inflammation]

IgA is the most abundantly produced antibody in the body and plays a crucial role in gut homeostasis and mucosal immunity. IgA forms a dimer that covalently associates with the joining (J) chain, which is essential for IgA transport into the mucosa. Here, we demonstrate that the marginal zone B…

3h

Multifunctional graphene supports for electron cryomicroscopy [Biochemistry]

With recent technological advances, the atomic resolution structure of any purified biomolecular complex can, in principle, be determined by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM). In practice, the primary barrier to structure determination is the preparation of a frozen specimen suitable for high-resolution imaging. To address this, we present a multifunctional specimen…

3h

Replisome activity slowdown after exposure to ultraviolet light in Escherichia coli [Biochemistry]

The replisome is a multiprotein machine that is responsible for replicating DNA. During active DNA synthesis, the replisome tightly associates with DNA. In contrast, after DNA damage, the replisome may disassemble, exposing DNA to breaks and threatening cell survival. Using live cell imaging, we studied the effect of UV light…

3h

SR9009 has REV-ERB-independent effects on cell proliferation and metabolism [Pharmacology]

The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and -β link circadian rhythms and metabolism. Like other nuclear receptors, REV-ERB activity can be regulated by ligands, including naturally occurring heme. A putative ligand, SR9009, has been reported to elicit a range of beneficial effects in healthy as well as diseased animal models and cell…

3h

Genomic divergence and adaptive convergence in Drosophila simulans from Evolution Canyon, Israel [Evolution]

Biodiversity refugia formed by unique features of the Mediterranean arid landscape, such as the dramatic ecological contrast of “Evolution Canyon,” provide a natural laboratory in which local adaptations to divergent microclimate conditions can be investigated. Significant insights have been provided by studies of Drosophila melanogaster diversifying along the thermal gradient…

3h

Histone deacetylase 4 promotes type I interferon signaling, restricts DNA viruses, and is degraded via vaccinia virus protein C6 [Microbiology]

Interferons (IFNs) represent an important host defense against viruses. Type I IFNs induce JAK-STAT signaling and expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), which mediate antiviral activity. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) perform multiple functions in regulating gene expression and some class I HDACs and the class IV HDAC, HDAC11, influence type I IFN…

3h

Direct high-resolution mapping of electrocatalytic activity of semi-two-dimensional catalysts with single-edge sensitivity [Chemistry]

The catalytic activity of low-dimensional electrocatalysts is highly dependent on their local atomic structures, particularly those less-coordinated sites found at edges and corners; therefore, a direct probe of the electrocatalytic current at specified local sites with true nanoscopic resolution has become critically important. Despite the growing availability of operando imaging…

3h

Using attribution to decode binding mechanism in neural network models for chemistry [Chemistry]

Deep neural networks have achieved state-of-the-art accuracy at classifying molecules with respect to whether they bind to specific protein targets. A key breakthrough would occur if these models could reveal the fragment pharmacophores that are causally involved in binding. Extracting chemical details of binding from the networks could enable scientific…

3h

Biological composition and microbial dynamics of sinking particulate organic matter at abyssal depths in the oligotrophic open ocean [Ecology]

Sinking particles are a critical conduit for the export of organic material from surface waters to the deep ocean. Despite their importance in oceanic carbon cycling and export, little is known about the biotic composition, origins, and variability of sinking particles reaching abyssal depths. Here, we analyzed particle-associated nucleic acids…

3h

Adjustment in tumbling rates improves bacterial chemotaxis on obstacle-laden terrains [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The mechanisms of bacterial chemotaxis have been extensively studied for several decades, but how the physical environment influences the collective migration of bacterial cells remains less understood. Previous models of bacterial chemotaxis have suggested that the movement of migrating bacteria across obstacle-laden terrains may be slower compared with terrains without…

3h

The role of the genome in experience-dependent plasticity: Extending the analogy of the genomic action potential [Perspectives]

Our past experiences shape our current and future behavior. These experiences must leave some enduring imprint on our brains, altering neural circuits that mediate behavior and contributing to our individual differences. As a framework for understanding how experiences might produce lasting changes in neural circuits, Clayton [D. F. Clayton, Neurobiol….

3h

Mosaic origin of the eukaryotic kinetochore [Cell Biology]

The emergence of eukaryotes from ancient prokaryotic lineages embodied a remarkable increase in cellular complexity. While prokaryotes operate simple systems to connect DNA to the segregation machinery during cell division, eukaryotes use a highly complex protein assembly known as the kinetochore. Although conceptually similar, prokaryotic segregation systems and the eukaryotic…

3h

This Robot Scans Preschoolers’ Faces Daily for Signs of Sickness

Dr. Robot Every morning, children at more than 2,000 preschools in China start their days by facing off with a robot named Walklake. The bot looks for signs of illness and alerts a teacher or school nurse if it notices that a child might be under the weather, according to a recent New Scientist story . It’s then up to the human to decide whether or not to send the student home for the day — and e

3h

New Research: The Oceans Are Slowly Leaking Into the Earth

Drain Plug The Earth’s oceans are gradually leaking into the interior of the planet. That’s according to new research by Norwegian scientists, who told New Scientist that the Earth’s water is slowly draining into the planet’s crust — though nowhere near fast enough to cancel out the sea level rises we’re currently experiencing because of climate change. Rapid Subduction The new research, publishe

3h

Origami-inspired materials could soften the blow for reusable spacecraft

Researchers have developed a novel solution to help reduce impact forces — for potential applications in spacecraft, cars and beyond.

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Adding a carbon atom transforms 2D semiconducting material

A technique that introduces carbon-hydrogen molecules into a single atomic layer of the semiconducting material tungsten disulfide dramatically changes the electronic properties of the material, according to researchers who say they can create new types of components for energy-efficient photoelectric devices and electronic circuits with this material.

4h

Climate Change Is Bringing Epic Flooding to the Midwest

We often focus on coastal cities when we talk about rising waters, but massive rainfall in the middle of the US has put millions at risk, harming the nation’s ability to produce food.

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The FDA knows expiration dates are confusing, so they’re changing them

Health Who among us really knows what “best if sold by” means? You can get extraordinarily sick eating expired food, but more often than not we’re just throwing away perfectly good chow.

4h

The Next Space Race: Bezos vs. Musk

submitted by /u/Java_writing_Java [link] [comments]

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House spending panel drops U.S. ban on gene-edited babies

Change would allow FDA to consider controversial treatments

4h

'Neural Lander' uses AI to land drones smoothly

Control engineers and AI experts team up to make drones that fly more smoothly close to the ground.

4h

Adding a carbon atom transforms 2D semiconducting material

A technique that introduces carbon-hydrogen molecules into a single atomic layer of the semiconducting material tungsten disulfide dramatically changes the electronic properties of the material, according to Penn State researchers at Penn State who say they can create new types of components for energy-efficient photoelectric devices and electronic circuits with this material.

4h

Origami-inspired materials could soften the blow for reusable spacecraft

University of Washington researchers have developed a novel solution to help reduce impact forces — for potential applications in spacecraft, cars and beyond.

4h

Uncovering Connections across Citizen Science Projects: A Social Network Analysis

Sara Futch, a graduate student at North Carolina State University, won Best Overall Poster at the Citizen Science Association Conference 2019 for her poster, “Uncovering Connections across Citizen Science Projects: A Social Network Analysis.” Conference attendees selected Sara’s poster via in-person votes during the poster session. Sara Futch's poster Here’s more from Sara about her research: “My

4h

Reading Mars' Deep Climate History in the Layers of its Ice Cap

Radar reveals that Mars is hiding past ice caps under the ones visible today. (Credit: SA/DLR/FU Berlin; NASA MGS MOLA Science Team) Bands of ice and sand at Mars' north pole reveal an ancient climate that swung between warm and cold. Mars, now dry and dusty, still holds water ice at its poles, and evidence strongly suggests it was once a planet where water flowed freely across the surface. The Ma

4h

How Game of Thrones Lost Its Way as a Political Drama

When Game of Thrones ended its eight-year run on Sunday, the series finale, titled “The Iron Throne,” received a largely negative critical response . Many writers pointed out that the show’s last season had given up on the careful character-building of Thrones ’ early days—a problem that, in truth, had started a few years back. The result was a seemingly rushed conclusion where multiple character

4h

Studying the Sun’s Atmosphere Could Make Fusion Power a Reality

Solar Plasma Scientists from Dublin, Ireland and Paris, France just reported some amazing observations from a massive ultraviolet radio telescope in central France: they managed to image radio pulses and watch plasmas become unstable in the Sun’s atmosphere. Plasma is extremely difficult to study and observe. But by studying the plasma in the Sun’s atmosphere — its gases exist primarily in plasma

4h

Fungus Found in Australian Soil Can Oxidize Gold

The chemical process may make the metal more soluble and move it closer to the Earth's surface.

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Quick liquid packaging: Encasing water silhouettes by three-dimensional polymer membranes

One of the most important substances on Earth is water. It is an essential medium for living microorganisms and for many technological and industrial processes. Confining water in an enclosed compartment without manipulating it or by using rigid containers can be very attractive, even more if the container is biocompatible and biodegradable. Here, we propose a water-based bottom-up approach for f

4h

Atomic-scale structural identification and evolution of Co-W-C ternary SWCNT catalytic nanoparticles: High-resolution STEM imaging on SiO2

Recently, W-based catalysts have provided a promising route to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with specific chirality, but the mechanism of the growth selectivity is vaguely understood. We propose a strategy to identify the atomic structure as well as the structure evolution of the Co-W-C ternary SWCNT catalyst. The key is to use a thin SiO 2 film as the catalyst support and o

4h

Experimental investigation of performance differences between coherent Ising machines and a quantum annealer

Physical annealing systems provide heuristic approaches to solving combinatorial optimization problems. Here, we benchmark two types of annealing machines—a quantum annealer built by D-Wave Systems and measurement-feedback coherent Ising machines (CIMs) based on optical parametric oscillators—on two problem classes, the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) model and MAX-CUT. The D-Wave quantum annealer o

4h

Origami-based impact mitigation via rarefaction solitary wave creation

The principles underlying the art of origami paper folding can be applied to design sophisticated metamaterials with unique mechanical properties. By exploiting the flat crease patterns that determine the dynamic folding and unfolding motion of origami, we are able to design an origami-based metamaterial that can form rarefaction solitary waves. Our analytical, numerical, and experimental results

4h

A high-spin ground-state donor-acceptor conjugated polymer

Interest in high-spin organic materials is driven by opportunities to enable far-reaching fundamental science and develop technologies that integrate light element spin, magnetic, and quantum functionalities. Although extensively studied, the intrinsic instability of these materials complicates synthesis and precludes an understanding of how fundamental properties associated with the nature of th

4h

Carbon doping of WS2 monolayers: Bandgap reduction and p-type doping transport

Chemical doping constitutes an effective route to alter the electronic, chemical, and optical properties of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDs). We used a plasma-assisted method to introduce carbon-hydrogen (CH) units into WS 2 monolayers. We found CH-groups to be the most stable dopant to introduce carbon into WS 2 , which led to a reduction of the optical bandgap from 1.9

4h

A mid-infrared biaxial hyperbolic van der Waals crystal

Hyperbolic media have attracted much attention in the photonics community due to their ability to confine light to arbitrarily small volumes and their potential applications to super-resolution technologies. The two-dimensional counterparts of these media can be achieved with hyperbolic metasurfaces that support in-plane hyperbolic guided modes upon nanopatterning, which, however, poses notable f

4h

Visualization of ultrafast melting initiated from radiation-driven defects in solids

Materials exposed to extreme radiation environments such as fusion reactors or deep spaces accumulate substantial defect populations that alter their properties and subsequently the melting behavior. The quantitative characterization requires visualization with femtosecond temporal resolution on the atomic-scale length through measurements of the pair correlation function. Here, we demonstrate ex

4h

Highly selective electrochemical hydrogenation of alkynes: Rapid construction of mechanochromic materials

Electrochemical hydrogenation has emerged as an environmentally benign and operationally simple alternative to traditional catalytic reduction of organic compounds. Here, we have disclosed for the first time the electrochemical hydrogenation of alkynes to a library of synthetically important Z-alkenes under mild conditions with great selectivity and efficiency. The deuterium and control experimen

4h

Specific ion effects directed noble metal aerogels: Versatile manipulation for electrocatalysis and beyond

Noble metal foams (NMFs) are a new class of functional materials featuring properties of both noble metals and monolithic porous materials, providing impressive prospects in diverse fields. Among reported synthetic methods, the sol-gel approach manifests overwhelming advantages for versatile synthesis of nanostructured NMFs (i.e., noble metal aerogels) under mild conditions. However, limited gela

4h

Ultraselective glassy polymer membranes with unprecedented performance for energy-efficient sour gas separation

Membrane-based separation of combined acid gases carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide from natural gas streams has attracted increasing academic and commercial interest. These feeds are referred to as "sour," and herein, we report an ultra H 2 S-selective and exceptionally permeable glassy amidoxime-functionalized polymer of intrinsic microporosity for membrane-based separation. A ternary feed mix

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This mechanism could be why fermented foods benefit immune health

Scientists find a cell receptor that evolved only in humans and great apes allows a bacterial byproduct of fermented foods to activate immune cells.

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Pee Values: Tapping into large databases to answer an awkward situation in veterinary medicine

A handy research tool has just helped answer some long standing questions about the spaying of female dogs and urinary incontinence.

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Soil communities threatened by destruction, instability of Amazon forests

A meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies of soil biodiversity in Amazonian forests found that the abundance, biomass, richness and diversity of soil fauna and microbes were reduced following deforestation.

4h

Technology better than tape measure for identifying lymphedema risk

New research finds that a special scan measuring lymphatic fluid volume is significantly better than a tape measure at predicting which women undergoing treatment for breast cancer are at risk of developing a common complication resulting from damaged lymph nodes.

4h

Meteor magnets in outer space: Finding elusive giant planets

A team has discovered two Jupiter-sized planets about 150 light years away from Earth that could reveal whether life is likely on the smaller planets in other planetary systems.

4h

AI and high-performance computing extend evolution to superconductors

Researchers used the power of artificial intelligence and high-performance supercomputers to introduce and assess the impact of different configurations of defects on the performance of a superconductor.

4h

More than a protein factory: A role for ribosomes in regulating human gene expression

Researchers have discovered a new function of ribosomes in human cells that may show the protein-making particle's role in destroying healthy mRNAs, the messages that decode DNA into protein.

4h

Mortality risks among pro athletes

A first-of-its-kind comparison between elite pro athletes suggests higher overall mortality among NFL players compared with MLB players. NFL players also appear to have higher risk of dying from cardiovascular and neurodegenerative causes compared with MLB peers. The differences warrant further study of sport-specific mechanisms of disease development. Clinicians treating current and former NFL pl

4h

Drug-resistant infections: If you can't beat 'em, starve 'em, scientists find

To treat Candida albicans, a common yeast that can cause illness in those with weakened immune systems, researchers limited the fungus' access to iron, an element crucial to the organism's survival.

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Gut is organized by function, and opportunities for better drug design

New findings provide insights about how the intestine maximizes nutrient uptake, while at the same time protecting the body from potentially dangerous microbes.

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Terminated Emory researcher disputes university’s allegations about China ties

Geneticist says school gave no chance to reply to “unverified accusations”

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Origami-inspired materials could soften the blow for reusable spacecraft

Space vehicles like SpaceX's Falcon 9 are designed to be reusable. But this means that, like Olympic gymnasts hoping for a gold medal, they have to stick their landings.

4h

Why would you want a $10k camera with 100 megapixels anyway?

Technology Fujifilm's new GFX 100 is a $10,000 camera with lots of pixels. Here's what they're made to do. The $10,000 Fujifilm GFX 100 is a comparative steal.

4h

Trump Wants to Leave the Middle East. He’s Not Getting His Wish.

Updated at 3:00 p.m. ET on May 24, 2019. President Donald Trump is learning, like two presidents before him, that wanting to get out of the Middle East isn’t enough to make it happen. On Friday the Pentagon announced that it would send 1,500 troops to the region in what officials described as a “force protection” measure because of what they’ve called increased Iranian threats, including to Ameri

4h

Why Silicon Valley Loved Uber More Than Everyone Else

Uber is now a massive, publicly traded company. Anyone can buy Uber shares at a valuation of about $70 billion. This isn’t bad for a company losing billions of dollars a year, but it’s a fraction of the $120-billion valuation the IPO’s bankers initially floated . It’s roughly what private investors valued it at three years ago, when the company made $7.43 billion less revenue. That is to say, the

4h

This New Treatment Could Save the Lives of Babies. But It Costs $2.1 Million.

The price set by the Swiss drugmaker Novartis may be the world’s highest for a single treatment — prompting renewed debate about how society will pay for gene-therapy breakthroughs.

4h

A Common Atrial Fibrillation Procedure Is Aided by Damaging Neurons

Patients in a study of catheter ablation who showed signs of more injury to nerve cells and glia in the heart had fewer symptoms after the treatment.

5h

Dead roots double shoreline loss in Gulf

A new study finds that the loss of marsh-edge salt grasses and mangroves due to disturbances such as heavy oiling from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill doubles the rate of shoreline erosion in hard-hit marshes.

5h

Underground Transportation: Boring Company tunnel

submitted by /u/RumbleTiltFin [link] [comments]

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SpaceX has launched the first 60 satellites of its space internet system

submitted by /u/The_Necromancer10 [link] [comments]

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San Francisco bans city use of facial recognition technology tools

Concerned that some new surveillance technologies may be too intrusive, San Francisco became the first U.S. city to ban the use of facial recognition tools by its police and other municipal departments. FuturistSpeaker.com http://www.impactlab.net/2019/05/23/san-francisco-bans-city-use-of-facial-recognition-technology-tools/ #facialrecognition #ai #keynotespeaker #futuretrends submitted by /u/dr2

5h

I made a vending machine to sell likes and followers.

Hi futurology community, I just finished a new art project. It's named "Quick Fix" and it's a vending machine selling fake likes and followers.I added some pictures of the outside but also from the inside. Inside you can find a Raspberry Pi B+, power supply's, Arduino (only to work with the coin acceptors), LCD's (I2C connected). Also I made a video to explain the project easy: https://www.youtub

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Shy fish no bigger than a pinkie provide much of the food in coral reefs

More than half of the fish flesh that predators in coral reefs eat comes from tiny, hard-to-spot species.

5h

Burger King’s Dystopian Student-Debt Sweepstakes

Every so often a tweet breaks out of its social medium, and finds its way to Instagram and Facebook. On Wednesday, the tweet spreading across the internet came from Burger King. got student loans? what's ur $cashtag? — Burger King (@BurgerKing) May 22, 2019 Either Burger King was saying that it was going to send money to student borrowers using Cash App, a mobile payment service (a $cashtag is it

5h

Why Trump Is Rolling Back LGBTQ Health-Care Protections

Updated on May 24, 2019 at 4:58 p.m. EST On Friday, Donald Trump’s administration started rolling back two controversial legal provisions related to the Affordable Care Act: protections against discrimination based on gender identity, and based on the termination of a pregnancy. Advocates for LGBTQ and women’s health care see this proposed reversal as a pointed attack on transgender people and pa

5h

Private Companies Are Building an Exoskeleton Around Earth

In 1957, a beach-ball-shaped satellite hurtled into the sky and pierced the invisible line between Earth and space. As it rounded the planet, Sputnik drew an unseen line of its own, splitting history into distinct parts—before humankind became a spacefaring species, and after. “Listen now for the sound that will forevermore separate the old from the new,” one NBC broadcaster said in awe, and insi

5h

'Reluctant Psychonaut' Michael Pollan Embraces 'New Science' Of Psychedelics

Author Michael Pollan experimented with mushrooms, LSD and other psychedelics while researching his latest book, How to Change Your Mind. Originally broadcast May 15, 2018.

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Paper stickers to monitor pathogens are more effective than swabs

Using paper stickers to collect pathogens on surfaces where antisepsis is required, such as in food processing plants, is easier, and less expensive than swabbing, yet similarly sensitive. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

5h

The British Empire's Homophobia Lives On in Former Colonies

NAIROBI—When the Nigerian writer Unoma Azuah was growing up in the Asaba Niger Delta, she once asked her grandmother about a teenage boy in her village with an effeminate aura whom others would tease, calling him a girl. Her grandmother replied that she didn’t understand why people bullied him. “In her time, there were men who dressed as women, and they were seen as spiritual people, with a speci

5h

A Single Scandal Sums Up All of Trump’s Failures

Many of the tales of controversy to emerge from the Trump administration have been abstract, or complicated, or murky. Whenever anyone warns about destruction of “ norms ,” the conversation quickly becomes speculative—the harms are theoretical, vague, and in the future. This makes new Washington Post reporting about President Donald Trump’s border wall especially valuable. The Post writes about h

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Fake Facebook accounts: the never-ending battle against bots

The staggering figure of more than three billion fake accounts blocked by Facebook over a six-month period highlights the challenges faced by social networks in curbing automated accounts, or bots, and other nefarious efforts to manipulate the platforms.

5h

Sea dragons captivate visitors at California aquarium

At first glance, it looks like a branch of kelp, but then an eye moves among its leafy appendages, and ridges of tiny, translucent fins start to flutter, sending the creature gliding through the water like something from a fairy tale.

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Paper stickers to monitor pathogens are more effective than swabs

Using paper stickers to collect pathogens on surfaces where antisepsis is required, such as in food processing plants, is easier, and less expensive than swabbing, yet similarly sensitive. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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NASA Just Hired the First Contractor to Build Lunar Space Station

Sign Here NASA just picked its first construction partner for the lunar Gateway . On Thursday, the agency announced it had awarded a contract worth a maximum of $375 million to Maxar Technologies . The Colorado-based spacetech company will now have the responsibility of developing and demonstrating power, propulsion, and communications capabilities for the Moon-orbiting space station — an integra

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Sea dragons captivate visitors at California aquarium

At first glance, it looks like a branch of kelp, but then an eye moves among its leafy appendages, and ridges of tiny, translucent fins start to flutter, sending the creature gliding through the water like something from a fairy tale.

5h

Paper stickers to monitor pathogens are more effective than swabs

Using paper stickers to collect pathogens on surfaces where antisepsis is required, such as in food processing plants, is easier, and less expensive than swabbing, yet similarly sensitive. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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Facebook acknowledges Pelosi video is faked but declines to delete it

Despite determinations that a Nancy Pelosi video circulating widely on social media is a fake, Facebook has determined not to remove it, saying its policies don't require that postings be true.

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Engineers create a simple test that can measure stress hormones in sweat, blood, urine or saliva

Stress is often called "the silent killer" because of its stealthy and mysterious effects on everything from heart disease to mental health.

5h

Dead roots, not just waves, account for marsh losses in gulf

A new Duke University-led study finds that the death of marsh plants due to disturbances like the heavy oiling from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill can double the rate of shoreline erosion in hard-hit marshes.

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Soil communities threatened by destruction, instability of Amazon forests

The clearing and subsequent instability of Amazonian forests are among the greatest threats to tropical biodiversity conservation today.

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Dead roots, not just waves, account for marsh losses in gulf

A new Duke University-led study finds that the death of marsh plants due to disturbances like the heavy oiling from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill can double the rate of shoreline erosion in hard-hit marshes.

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The right way to spend $1bn on healthcare

Invested well, even a small amount could galvanise drug development

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Race Replay: Daddy Dave vs. Ryan for the #2 Spot | Street Outlaws

#3 Ryan calls out Daddy Dave's #2 spot on The List. Don't miss new episodes of Street Outlaws at Mondays 9p! Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery ht

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Soil communities threatened by destruction, instability of Amazon forests

A meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies of soil biodiversity in Amazonian forests found that the abundance, biomass, richness and diversity of soil fauna and microbes were reduced following deforestation.

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Dead roots double shoreline loss in gulf

A new Duke University-led study finds that the loss of marsh-edge salt grasses and mangroves due to disturbances such as heavy oiling from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill doubles the rate of shoreline erosion in hard-hit marshes.

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For Nancy Pelosi, This Is All Just Déjà Vu

Nancy Pelosi has seen this all before. When President Donald Trump on Thursday night tweeted a doctored video with the heading “PELOSI STAMMERS THROUGH NEWS CONFERENCE,” a predictable chorus of outrage quickly followed. Here was the president of the United States crossing yet another line of civil discourse, distributing a deceptively edited clip of a political adversary aimed at sowing doubts ab

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Finding the cause of capacity loss in a metal-oxide battery material

Because of their high energy-storage density, materials such as metal oxides, sulfides, and fluorides are promising electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles and other technologies. However, their capacity fades very rapidly. Now, scientists studying an electrode made of an inexpensive and nontoxic iron-oxide material called magnetite have proposed a scenario—described in

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Tapping the power of AI and high-performance computing to extend evolution to superconductors

Owners of thoroughbred stallions carefully breed prizewinning horses over generations to eke out fractions of a second in million-dollar races. Materials scientists have taken a page from that playbook, turning to the power of evolution and artificial selection to develop superconductors that can transmit electric current as efficiently as possible.

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Scientists want to help restore Notre Dame, hoping to make new discoveries in the process

The disaster may give scientists unexpected access to medieval materials

6h

Tesla's bad news accelerates as Wall Street loses faith

Late last year, Tesla Inc. was fully charged and cruising down the highway on Autopilot.

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CEOs get $800,000 pay raise, leaving workers further behind

Did you get a 7% raise last year? Congratulations, yours was in line with what CEOs at the biggest companies got. But for chief executives, that 7% was roughly $800,000.

6h

Measles: Symptoms, Treatment and Vaccination

Measles is making a comeback. Here's what you should know about one of the most contagious infectious diseases in the world.

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Researchers propose new federal rule of evidence for more accurate verdicts in court

While many juries use commonsense when determining an innocent or guilty verdict, research has shown that commonsense can be misleading and inaccurate. In a new study, researchers propose a new federal rule of evidence that ensures a jury is educated on theories of false memory in order to produce more just verdicts — a rule that would especially be of aid in testimonies from children.

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'Neural Lander' uses AI to land drones smoothly

Control engineers and AI experts team up to make drones that fly more smoothly close to the ground.

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SpaceX Successfully Launches Starlink Satellites

After a few false starts, SpaceX has successfully launched its first full batch of Starlink internet satellites. A Falcon 9 rocket carrying the satellites lifted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station overnight, and it deployed the satellite a short time later. The post SpaceX Successfully Launches Starlink Satellites appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Elon Musk Ridicules Jeff Bezos’ Plan For Space Colonies

Space Feud Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has become increasingly vocal about the idea that humans will eventually live in “giant space colonies” — an idea that’s been widely mocked by critics who’ve pointed out that humans are doing a pretty bad job taking care of their first space habitat, the Earth. Now, another outsize personality in the space research scene is roasting Bezos: SpaceX CEO Elon Musk

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Drug-resistant infections: If you can't beat 'em, starve 'em, scientists find

To treat Candida albicans, a common yeast that can cause illness in those with weakened immune systems, University at Buffalo researchers limited the fungus' access to iron, an element crucial to the organism's survival.

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Facebook is apparently planning to launch its digital currency in early 2020

We are getting a clearer picture of what the social network is working on behind the scenes: Globalcoin

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Sonic The Hedgehog movie director announces three-month delay to make Sonic look 'just right'

Fans of Sega's long-running Sonic The Hedgehog franchise have been concerned that its upcoming film adaptation would miss the mark ever since we got a brief glimpse of the blue hedgehog's new …

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Fleabag Has a Poignant Insight About Sisterhood

This article contains mild spoilers throughout Season 2 of Fleabag . Fleabag doesn’t follow her older sister’s lead. The titular protagonist of Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s ecstatic Amazon Prime series has mostly tripped her way into a chaotic, circuitous life path. The resolutely uptight Claire (played by Sian Clifford), by contrast, has forged a meticulous plan. The two sisters are almost uncannily d

6h

See China’s Newly Unveiled Maglev Train

Fast Track A new high-speed transportation system is taking shape in China. On Thursday, state-owned China Railway Rolling Stock Corporation (CRRC) unveiled a prototype for a new high-speed magnetic-levitation — better known as “maglev” — train that could dramatically cut travel times in the nation. “The prototype has already achieved static levitation and is in ideal condition,” CRCC Qingdao’s d

6h

The Universe as Cosmic Dashboard

Relational quantum mechanics suggests physics might be a science of perceptions, not observer-independent reality — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mathematicians report possible progress on proving the Riemann hypothesis

A new study advances one strategy in the quest to solve the notoriously difficult problem, which is still stumping researchers after 160 years.

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Study analyzes mortality risks among pro athletes

A first-of-its-kind comparison between elite pro athletes suggests higher overall mortality among NFL players compared with MLB players. NFL players also appear to have higher risk of dying from cardiovascular and neurodegenerative causes compared with MLB peers.The differences warrant further study of sport-specific mechanisms of disease development. Clinicians treating current and former NFL pla

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AI and high-performance computing extend evolution to superconductors

In a new study from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory, researchers used the power of artificial intelligence and high-performance supercomputers to introduce and assess the impact of different configurations of defects on the performance of a superconductor.

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Technology better than tape measure for identifying lymphedema risk

New research by School of Nursing professor Sheila Ridner finds that a special scan measuring lymphatic fluid volume is significantly better than a tape measure at predicting which women undergoing treatment for breast cancer are at risk of developing a common complication resulting from damaged lymph nodes.

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Mobile phone app designed to boost physical activity in women shows promise in trial

Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of Health, the study is one of the first to examine how an app-based program can help increase and maintain objectively measured daily physical activity. It was published online on May 24 in JAMA Network Open, a peer-reviewed online-only journal.

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Daily briefing: Video films four trillion frames per second

Nature, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01687-5 Say cheese (really fast), disputes at the world’s largest laser lab and the trouble with amber.

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The ‘Enemy of the People’ Is the Real Target of the Assange Prosecution

It was treason. The conservative commentator Ann Coulter said The New York Times’ reporters had done something that “could have gotten them executed.” Bill Kristol, now known as a prominent anti-Trump Republican, said the Justice Department “had an obligation to consider prosecution.” The radio host Rush Limbaugh declared , “I think 80 percent of their subscribers have to be jihadists. If you loo

6h

The Universe as Cosmic Dashboard

Relational quantum mechanics suggests physics might be a science of perceptions, not observer-independent reality — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Meteor magnets in outer space—study finds elusive giant planets

Astronomers believe planets like Jupiter shield us from space objects that would otherwise slam into Earth. Now they're closer to learning whether giant planets act as guardians of solar systems elsewhere in the galaxy.

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Driving upside down might be easier than it seems

The idea of driving on an inverted track has attracted lots of analysis, but a previously overlooked approach could let an upside-down driver keep going safely and indefinitely.

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Could Dead Aliens Help Save Humanity?

It might take a dramatic extinction example to put us on the right path.

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Oldest Fungus Fossils May Rewrite Our View of How Life Made the Leap to Land

The find pushes the oldest direct evidence for fossils of fungus back more than 500 million years.

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Highly flexible high-energy textile lithium battery to cope with surging demand for wearable electronics

Researchers have developed a highly flexible, high-energy textile lithium battery that offers more stable, durable and safe energy supply for wearable electronics with a myriad of applications, such as in healthcare monitoring, intelligent textiles, smartphones, global positioning system (GPS) tracking and Internet of Things (IoT).

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New algorithm uses disease history to predict intensive care patients' chances of survival

Researchers have used data on more than 230,000 intensive care patients to develop a new algorithm. Among other things, it uses disease history from the past 23 years to predict patients' chances of survival in intensive care units.

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Mathematically designed graphene has improved electrocatalytic activity

An international research group has improved graphene's ability to catalyze the 'hydrogen evolution reaction,' which releases hydrogen as a result of passing an electronic current through water. They designed a mathematically predicted graphene electrocatalyst, and confirmed its performance using high resolution electrochemical microscopy and computational modelling.

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Stark social inequalities in children's body mass index (BMI)

Researchers have found that socioeconomic inequalities in children's body mass index (BMI) emerge during the preschool years and widen across childhood and into early adolescence. By analyzing data on height and weight (BMI) they found that lower maternal education was associated with faster gains in child body weight but lower height growth leading to a higher risk of overweight and obesity.

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ALS research reveals new treatment approach

New research on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (AML) has revealed that a protein called membralin plays a key role in the disease process. The study suggests that membralin-boosting gene therapy is a potential therapeutic direction to treat this often deadly disease.

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How corn's ancient ancestor swipes left on crossbreeding

Determining how one species becomes distinct from another has been a subject of fascination dating back to Charles Darwin. New research led by Carnegie's Matthew Evans and published in Nature Communications elucidates the mechanism that keeps maize distinct from its ancient ancestor grass, teosinte.

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More than a protein factory: A role for ribosomes in regulating human gene expression

Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have discovered a new function of ribosomes in human cells that may show the protein-making particle's role in destroying healthy mRNAs, the messages that decode DNA into protein.

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Unique Iron Age shield gives insight into prehistoric technology

A unique bark shield, thought to have been constructed with wooden laths during the Iron Age, has provided new insight into the construction and design of prehistoric weaponry.

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How corn's ancient ancestor swipes left on crossbreeding

Determining how one species becomes distinct from another has been a subject of fascination dating back to Charles Darwin. New research led by Carnegie's Matthew Evans and published in Nature Communications elucidates the mechanism that keeps maize distinct from its ancient ancestor grass, teosinte.

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More than a protein factory: A role for ribosomes in regulating human gene expression

Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have discovered a new function of ribosomes in human cells that may show the protein-making particle's role in destroying healthy mRNAs, the messages that decode DNA into protein.

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Scientists Claim to Have Discovered Entirely New Form of Computing

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Energy-free superfast computing invented by scientists using light pulses

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Stronger than aluminum, a heavily altered wood cools passively

submitted by /u/PHealthy [link] [comments]

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Powerful new AI framework turbocharges automated learning process

AI researchers have developed a new framework for deep neural networks that allows AI systems to better learn new tasks while “forgetting” less of what it has learned regarding previous tasks. FuturistSpeaker.com http://www.impactlab.net/2019/05/23/powerful-new-ai-framework-turbocharges-automated-learning-process/ #ai #neuralnetworks #keynotespeaker #futuretrends submitted by /u/dr2tom [link] [co

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How to Prepare for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Hubble spies curious galaxy moving a little closer

This Hubble image stars Messier 90, a beautiful spiral galaxy located roughly 60 million light-years from the Milky Way in the constellation of Virgo (the Virgin). The galaxy is part of the Virgo Cluster, a gathering of galaxies that is over 1,200 strong.

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New study reveals gut is organized by function, and opportunities for better drug design

New findings provide insights about how the intestine maximizes nutrient uptake, while at the same time protecting the body from potentially dangerous microbes.

7h

More than a protein factory

Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have discovered a new function of ribosomes in human cells that may show the protein-making particle's role in destroying healthy mRNAs, the messages that decode DNA into protein.

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Meteor magnets in outer space

A UC Riverside-led team has discovered two Jupiter-sized planets about 150 light years away from Earth that could reveal whether life is likely on the smaller planets in other solar systems.

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Researchers discover how three-dimensional organization of the genome regulates cell differentiation

A new study from the University of Minnesota Medical School clarifies how the three-dimensional organization of the genome is regulated at the onset of skeletal muscle formation.

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Cancer cells are quick-change artists adapting to their environment

Until now, researchers have assumed that the growth of solid tumors originates from cancer stem cells characterized by specific surface markers, which develop in a fixed, hierarchical order. In a joint interdisciplinary project led by the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH), researchers now show that cancer cells of glioblastomas — conspicuously aggressive solid brain tumors — manifest developm

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Gene therapy towards a clinical trial for gamma-sarcoglycanopathy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

Isabelle Richard's team, a CNRS researcher in an Inserm unit at Genethon, the AFM-Telethon laboratory, has demonstrated the efficacy of gene therapy and determined the effective dose for treating a rare muscle disease, gamma-sarcoglycanopathy, in mouse models of the disease. Based on these encouraging results, published in Molecular Therapy: Methods and Clinical Development, the researchers are pr

7h

Do you hear what I hear?

A new study by Columbia University researchers found that infants at high risk for autism were less attuned to differences in speech patterns than low-risk infants. The findings suggest that interventions to improve language skills should begin during infancy for those at high risk for autism.

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Simple test can tell if you're stressed out

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have developed a new test that can easily and simply measure common stress hormones using sweat, blood, urine or saliva. Eventually, they hope to turn their ideas into a simple device that patients can use at home to monitor their health.

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If you could learn every disease your child could possibly develop in life, would you?

Adding genomic sequencing results to traditional newborn screening means a baby could potentially test positive for numerous conditions that might not develop within their lifetime. A UNC School of Medicine study proposed a method for how to responsibly determine which types of conditions to include in testing and potentially return to parents.

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Better together: human and robot co-workers

More and more processes are being automated and digitised. Self-driving delivery vehicles, such as forklifts, are finding their way into many areas — and companies are reporting potential time and cost savings. However, an interdisciplinary research team from the universities of Göttingen, Duisburg-Essen and Trier has observed that cooperation between humans and machines can work much better than

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How corn's ancient ancestor swipes left on crossbreeding

Determining how one species becomes distinct from another has been a subject of fascination dating back to Charles Darwin. New research led by Carnegie's Matthew Evans and published in Nature Communications elucidates the mechanism that keeps maize distinct from its ancient ancestor grass, teosinte.

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These Monthly Arduino Project Kits Are an Awesome Way to Learn Coding and Electronics

If you’ve recently found yourself spending too much time looking at memes on your phone, or you’ve noticed you are becoming unnervingly familiar with Netflix’s back catalogue of obscure conspiracy theory documentaries, it might be time to find a new hobby. Preferably one that’s not going to rot your brain. And if you happen to have an interest in science and technology, you probably won’t find a

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Alger udløser massedød blandt norske laks

11.600 ton opdrætslaks er døde som følge af algeopblomstring i de nordnorske fjorde. Forsuring af havene kan gøre alger giftigere i fremtiden, siger forsker.

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Shedding light on the burden of dengue in Bangladesh

Dengue, also known as dengue fever, is a viral disease transmitted to humans by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. The incidence of dengue is currently increasing dramatically, and it is now one of the diseases said to be re-emerging. Researchers have conducted a study to determine the burden of dengue in Bangladesh and identify key risk factors for infection.

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Scientists discover signalling circuit boards inside body's cells

Cells in the body are wired like computer chips to direct signals that instruct how they function, research suggests. Unlike a fixed circuit board, however, cells can rapidly rewire their communication networks to change their behavior. The discovery of this cell-wide web turns our understanding of how instructions spread around a cell on its head.

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Short-term use of opioids increases subjective pleasure: Risk of addiction

As indicated by a recently published study, short-term opioid use shifts a range of emotional responses to the positive direction. This may be one of the reasons behind the onset of opioid use disorder.

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Exotic matter uncovered in the sun's atmosphere

Scientists have announced a major new finding about how matter behaves in the extreme conditions of the sun's atmosphere. Their work has shed new light on the exotic but poorly understood 'fourth state of matter,' known as plasma, which could hold the key to developing safe, clean and efficient nuclear energy generators on Earth.

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When macrophages are deprived of oxygen

Infected tissue has a low concentration of oxygen. The body's standard immune mechanisms, which rely on oxygen, can then only function to a limited extent. How does the immune system nevertheless manage to control bacteria under such conditions? Researchers have discovered that fewer metabolites are produced in the citric acid cycle under hypoxic conditions, leading to a reduced rate of reproducti

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Here’s How NASA Prepares Its Spacecraft for Mars

Mars 2020 The unmanned spacecraft that NASA wants to send to Mars in the year 2020 — if things go according to plan — just underwent a series of extreme tests to prepare it for the extreme journey. “First we blast it with sound to make sure nothing vibrates loose,” said David Gruel, launch operations manager at JPL, in a press release . “Then, after a thorough examination, we ‘put it in space’ by

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It’s a Lefty! Welcome to the World’s First Crispr Snail Baby

Most snails are righties. Now scientists have found genes that make some of them born with shells coiling the other way.

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Elevate Your Leadership and Grow Your Business at Your Clouds Can 2019

Elevate your leadership potential with Futurism + IBM at this unique, one-day-only traveling experience in New York City. Your Clouds Can 2019 is an immersive journey behind closed doors at some of NYC’s most innovative companies working with data-driven cloud technologies. This is not your typical conference. Your Clouds Can 2019 will deliver the tools and frameworks that drives impact for leade

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NASA’s Moon Mission Leader Just Quit After Only Six Weeks

Restructuring A NASA executive who was appointed just six weeks ago to lead the strategy for future missions to the Moon has resigned, The Hill reports . Mark Sirangelo was hired in April as special assistant to NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. It’s a sudden departure that looks especially odd considering the White House’s focus on getting Americans back to the Moon — but Congress’s refusal to

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Former football pros die at a faster rate than baseball veterans—and the reasons are surprising

Study is the first to compare elite athletes who played in the same era

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New AI can create fake videos of people from a single picture

Samsung researchers improve AI modeling to quickly create realistic (but fake) videos. The model uses "single-shot learning" to create videos from a single picture. The application of the tech could be in telepresence, video conferencing and gaming. None An AI can now take a single picture of a person's face and animate it convincingly. This can lead to animating paintings and photos but also add

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CNIO participates in a study identifying a novel oncogene for most common types of blood cancer

The study shows that tumour suppressor hnRNP K can lead to cancer. Overexpression of the gene may lead to B-cell lymphoma, the most common type of blood cancer. Lymphoma patients might benefit from more personalised treatments.

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Finding the cause of capacity loss in a metal-oxide battery material

The formation and thickening of internal and surface barriers during battery charge and discharge cycles limits electrochemical reactions in a lithium-ion battery with an iron oxide electrode.

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How to prevent mosquitofish from spreading in water ecosystems

Preventing the introduction of the mosquitofish and removing its population are the most effective actions to control the dispersal of this exotic fish in ponds and lakes, according to a study published in the journal Science of the Total Environment.

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New neurons form in the brain into tenth decade of life, even in people with Alzheimer's

Researchers examining post-mortem brain tissue from people ages 79 to 99 found that new neurons continue to form well into old age. The study provides evidence that this occurs even in people with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, although neurogenesis is significantly reduced in these people compared to older adults with normal cognitive functioning.

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Infection biology: Signs of selection in the stomach

Helicobacter pylori, a globally distributed gastric bacterium, is genetically highly adaptable. Microbiologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now characterized its population structure in individual patients, demonstrating an important role of antibiotics for its within-patient evolution.

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US dentists out-prescribe UK dentists when it comes to opioids

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that dentists practicing in the US write 37 times more opioid prescriptions than dentists practicing in England. And, the type of opioids they prescribe has a higher potential for abuse.

7h

Hospitals fall short in teaching fall prevention to departing patients

Falls are a leading cause of hospitalizations and emergency room visits among older adults, but until now, little was known about the relationship between falls and hospital readmissions.

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Blood pressure and glucose control may prevent common arrhythmia

Blood-pressure and glucose control may be effective in preventing heart block, a common form of arrhythmia, and the subsequent need for a pacemaker, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

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Archaeologists Discover the First Ever Iron-Age Shield Made of Bark in England

This 2,300-year-old shield was painted in a red checkerboard pattern.

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SpaceX Launched 60 Internet-Beaming Satellites Into Orbit

Last night's successful launch was the first big step in SpaceX's plan to provide global internet coverage from space

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Watch a Tesla in an Underground Tunnel Race One on the Street

A Tale of Two Teslas On Friday, the Boring Company tweeted a video of two Tesla Model 3s racing — and though they had the same destination, they took two very different routes. While one of the cars used surface streets, the other opted for the Boring Company’s underground test tunnel. Taking the low road allowed it to absolutely destroy the time of its opponent, making the trek in just 1 minute

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How single neurons and brain networks support spatial navigation

Research groups worldwide have studied the neuronal basis of spatial navigation, and the activity of both individual nerve cells and large cell assemblies in the brain appear to play a crucial role in the process. However, the relationship between the behaviour of individual cells and the behaviour of large cell networks has for the most part remained unexplored. Various theories on this topic wer

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Aluminum is the new steel: NUST MISIS scientists made it stronger than ever before

Aluminum is one of the most promising materials for aeronautics and automobile industry. Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' found a simple and efficient way of strengthening aluminum-based composite materials. Doping aluminum melt with nickel and lanthanum, scientists managed to create a material combining benefits of both composite materials and standard all

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"Tug-of-War" between Air Pollution and CO2 Masks Warming's Impacts

Rising pollution in Asia is contributing to weaker monsoons, the opposite of what is expected with climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Books Briefing: Sympathy for the Devil

Almost every story has good guys and bad guys, heroes and villains, winners and losers. Convention goes that readers are supposed to root for the former, but let’s face it: The “good guys” aren’t always the most interesting. Take J. K. Rowling’s Voldemort, for instance. Harry Potter might be the Boy Who Lived, but how did a young man named Tom Riddle come to despise half-bloods, split his soul se

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Midwest Tornadoes: Why It’s So Hard to Predict Where a Twister Will Strike

A series of tornadoes has brought devastation to the Midwest. Ideally, we could forecast such twisters, but the phenomenon is confounding.

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Latest Arena for China’s Growing Global Ambitions: The Arctic

In a warming Arctic, China is drilling for gas, testing new shipping lanes and partnering with the region's military powerhouse, Russia.

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What prosecutors and incarcerated people can learn from each other | Jarrell Daniels

A few weeks before his release from prison, Jarrell Daniels took a class where incarcerated men learned alongside prosecutors. By simply sitting together and talking, they uncovered surprising truths about the criminal justice system and ideas for how real change happens. Now a scholar and activist, Daniels reflects on how collaborative education could transform the justice system and unlock solut

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Odds of success

The more a student engages with various activities on campus, the higher their odds of success post-graduation. According to a study by researchers from the Higher School of Economics, not only academic but also research and social engagement, such as participation in student organisations and events, can be linked to the development of critical thinking skills which are essential for general well

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Hubble spies curious galaxy moving a little closer

This Hubble image stars Messier 90, a beautiful spiral galaxy located roughly 60 million light-years from the Milky Way in the constellation of Virgo (the Virgin). The galaxy is part of the Virgo Cluster, a gathering of galaxies that is over 1,200 strong. Messier 90 is remarkable; it is one of the few galaxies seen to be traveling toward the Milky Way, not away from it.

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Shedding light on the burden of dengue in Bangladesh

Dengue, also known as dengue fever, is a viral disease transmitted to humans by mosquitoes of the genus Aedes. The incidence of dengue is currently increasing dramatically, and it is now one of the diseases said to be re-emerging. Researchers at the Institut Pasteur have conducted a study to determine the burden of dengue in Bangladesh and identify key risk factors for infection.

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Molecular ‘cage’ can trap salt to clean drinking water

A powerful new molecule that extracts salt from liquid has the potential to help increase the amount of drinkable water on Earth, report researchers. As reported in Science , researchers designed the molecule to capture chloride, which forms when the element chlorine pairs with another element to gain an electron. The most familiar chloride salt is sodium chloride, or common table salt. Other chl

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Sea Levels Could Rise More Than 6 Feet by Century’s End, Experts Warn

According to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica might be melting faster than once predicted, and, if emissions proceed unchecked, sea levels could plausibly rise two meters by 2100. This could displace 187 million people.

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Temperature alters developing nervous system in frogs, study shows

A new study that compared the effects of cold and warm temperatures on the development of frog eggs into larvae found that environmental temperature significantly changes how the nervous system develops.

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Scientists create new standard genome for heavily studied worm

A new study finds that the genome for a widely researched worm, on which countless studies are based, was flawed. Now, a fresh genome sequence will set the record straight and improve the accuracy of future research.

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Tilsyns-direktør afviser at stå i vejen for at oplade en million elbiler

Elselskabernes brancheforening kræver nye politiske rammer for at sikre udbygning af distributionsnettene til elbiler, men politikerne har allerede fastsat betingelserne. Det påpeger direktøren for det tilsyn, som sikrer forbrugerne mod for høje monopol-regninger.

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Google Duplex AI Still Needs a Lot of Help From Humans

We met Google Duplex at the I/O conference in 2018 when Google showed off a suspiciously realistic AI that could call and make appointments for you. The service has now rolled out to users of Google Assistant in most US states, but you may not be getting the full AI experience. The post Google Duplex AI Still Needs a Lot of Help From Humans appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Can we turn down the emotion on traumatic memories?

New research shows just how pliable memory is if you know which regions of the hippocampus to stimulate. The discovery could someday lead to personalized treatment for people haunted by particularly troubling memories. What if scientists could manipulate your brain so that a traumatic memory lost its emotional power over your psyche? Senior author Steve Ramirez, an assistant professor of psycholo

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Book Review: How Quantum Mechanics Puts the ‘Real’ in Reality

In “Einstein’s Unfinished Revolution,” Lee Smolin highlights the shortcomings of quantum mechanics and its insistence on a universe ruled by probability and the act of observation. Instead, he gamely argues for a "realist" interpretation of the theory that can better explain the world as it really is.

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Are Nutritional Supplements a Waste of Money?

The FDA is stepping up its oversight of the $50 billion nutritional supplement industry — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mathematically designed graphene has improved electrocatalytic activity

An international research group has improved graphene's ability to catalyze the 'hydrogen evolution reaction,' which releases hydrogen as a result of passing an electronic current through water. They designed a mathematically predicted graphene electrocatalyst, and confirmed its performance using high resolution electrochemical microscopy and computational modelling. The findings were published in

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New algorithm uses disease history to predict intensive care patients' chances of survival

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Rigshospitalet have used data on more than 230,000 intensive care patients to develop a new algorithm. Among other things, it uses disease history from the past 23 years to predict patients' chances of survival in intensive care units.

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PolyU develops highly flexible high-energy textile lithium battery to cope with surging demand for wearable electronics

Researchers at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) have developed a highly flexible, high-energy textile lithium battery that offers more stable, durable and safe energy supply for wearable electronics with a myriad of applications, such as in healthcare monitoring, intelligent textiles, smartphones, global positioning system (GPS) tracking and Internet of Things (IoT).

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Short-term use of opioids increases subjective pleasure

As indicated by a recently published study, short-term opioid use shifts a range of emotional responses to the positive direction. This may be one of the reasons behind the onset of opioid use disorder.

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To save biodiversity and feed the future, first cure 'plant blindness'

From the urban jungle — even the leafier parts of suburbia — we often have a tough time naming the last plant we saw. Even if we just ate part of it. This is a symptom of 'plant blindness,' a term coined two decades ago by researchers who showed that people are perilously disconnected from the plant kingdom. This has progressed to the point where we hardly recognize the plants that feed us every

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Reversal of transmission and reflection based on acoustic metagratings with integer parity design

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10377-9 Phase gradient metagratings suffer from limits on conversion efficiency. Here, the authors show a refractive-type metagrating which can enable anomalous reflection and refraction with almost unity efficiency over a wide incident range and uncover how integer parity plays a role in higher order diffraction.

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Poly(bis-arylimidazoliums) possessing high hydroxide ion exchange capacity and high alkaline stability

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10292-z The hydroxide anion exchange polymers are key materials of solid polymer electrolyte devices that operate under alkaline conditions. Here the authors show the rational design of such polymers that exhibit high ion exchange capacity and exceptional stability under highly caustic conditions.

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Dynamics-dependent density distribution in active suspensions

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10283-0 It has been predicted theoretically that the density of self-propelled particles whose speed is spatially dependent should be inversely proportional to the local speed. Here the authors present a systematic check of this prediction in a system of light-activated E. coli.

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qDSB-Seq is a general method for genome-wide quantification of DNA double-strand breaks using sequencing

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10332-8 Measuring relative frequencies of DNA double-strand breaks between loci does not provide the full physiological relevance of those breaks. Here Rowicka and colleagues present qDSB-Seq method which uses spike-in double-strand breaks induced by a restriction enzyme to accurately quantify DNA damage.

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Collective cell migration and metastases induced by an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in Drosophila intestinal tumors

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10269-y Modelling and visualizing tumor metastasis in Drosophila has been a challenge. Here, the authors show that constitutive expression of Sna in primary adult Drosophila intestinal tumors drives EMT and dissemination of tumor cells, induces collective cell migration and formation of polyclonal metastases.

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The stability of multitrophic communities under habitat loss

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10370-2 Habitat loss could affect ecological communities in variable ways depending on its structure. Here, the authors show that contiguous rather than random loss is more damaging to the stability of multitrophic communities, regardless of the fraction of mutualistic interactions within the community.

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Schistosoma mansoni treatment reduces HIV entry into cervical CD4+ T cells and induces IFN-I pathways

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09900-9 Schistosoma mansoniinfection has been linked with an increased risk of HIV acquisition in women. Here, the authors show that standard S. mansoniinfection treatment causes a reduction of HIV entry into cervical and blood CD4+ T cells, which is sustained for up to two months and is associated with de-repression of

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Absorbable hemostatic hydrogels comprising composites of sacrificial templates and honeycomb-like nanofibrous mats of chitosan

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10290-1 Sacrificial templates are used for a range of different applications. Here, the authors synthesise a hyperbranched cyclodextrin polyester template with large void spaces, which is degraded in physiological conditions, and use it to create high surface area chitosan scaffolds for haemostatic applications.

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SpaceX Just Unleashed 60 Starlink Satellites Into Orbit

Starlink Express SpaceX just successfully let loose 60 of its tiny Starlink satellites, intended to bring internet broadband connectivity to people across the globe. While it’s a good start, the Elon Musk-led space company still has its work cut out to truly bring internet to all. “In a year and a half, maybe two years, if things go well, SpaceX will probably have more satellites in orbit than al

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In-car technology: are we being sold a false sense of security?

The retired football star David Beckham recently received a six-month driving ban after being photographed using his hand-held phone while driving. Unfortunately, Beckham is not alone in apparently thinking that time spent driving can also be usefully spent doing something else.

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The Justin Amash Test

The next time a Republican politician claims to put principle before partisanship, ask what he or she did when Representative Justin Amash came under attack. The Michigan Republican, elected in 2010 at the height of the Tea Party wave, has always presented himself as a libertarian-leaning adherent of limited government. And he has always voted exactly as his supporters would expect, as reflected

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The Boring Intimacy of the All-Day Group Chat

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week, she talks with three friends who instant-message one another on Gchat all day, every day. They’ve been friends since high school, but even though they’ve lost touch with other people from that time, they’ve on

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Professor's debut book tracks down China's 'missing girls'

When University of Kansas professor John James Kennedy began working in rural China, he would get introduced to villagers with multiple children—despite the country's strict one-child policy.

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Nature inspires a novel new form of computing, using light

Researchers have developed a simple and highly novel form of computing by shining patterned bands of light and shadow through different facets of a polymer cube and reading the combined results that emerge.

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Nature inspires a novel new form of computing, using light

Researchers have developed a simple and highly novel form of computing by shining patterned bands of light and shadow through different facets of a polymer cube and reading the combined results that emerge.

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Mites and ticks are close relatives, new research shows

Scientists have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks.

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Researchers use 3-D printing to push knowledge of microbial communities

As enthusiasm grows for 3-D printing, hailed by hobbyists and high-tech industry as a new frontier in the creation of custom products, researchers at Montana State University are using the technology for another purpose: studying bacteria.

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Researchers use 3-D printing to push knowledge of microbial communities

As enthusiasm grows for 3-D printing, hailed by hobbyists and high-tech industry as a new frontier in the creation of custom products, researchers at Montana State University are using the technology for another purpose: studying bacteria.

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WIRED's 14 Must-Read Books of Summer

It's time to charge up the Kindle.

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The Tricky Physics of How the Avengers Manage to Fly

To understand how Star-Lord flies, you have to consider both the forces acting on him (hello, jet boots) and the torque.

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Earth's methane emissions are rising and we don't know why

Researchers warn that if the methane levels keep increasing at current rates, it will be very difficult to limit global warming to 2°C

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Permafrost melt is transforming the Arctic landscape

Rapid changes in terrain are taking place in Canada’s high Arctic polar deserts due to increases in summer air temperatures. A new study presents close to 30 years of aerial surveys and extensive ground mapping of the Eureka Sound Lowlands area of Ellesmere and Axel Heiberg Islands located at approximately 80 °N. The research focuses on a particular landform (known as a retrogressive thaw slump)

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Leonardo da Vinci had ADHD, neuroscientist claims

Tentative diagnosis advanced to explain the painter’s legendary inattention. Nick Carne reports.

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Spike in ozone-destroying emissions traced to China

Research indicates new facilities are running, in breach of conventions and defying Chinese authorities. Olivia Henry reports.

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Dating with the parents: bonobo mothers help sons get it on

For humanity’s closest relatives, sex is rarely private and often a family affair. Ben Garrod from the UK’s University of East Anglia reports.

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Inside the mind of a robot, or a fungus, or a mutant

A new book explores links between states of mind and science fiction. Andrew Masterson reports.

8h

The Next Space Race: Bezos vs. Musk

We are witnessing the next great space race. But this time, it’s not the US vs. USSR. This race is between Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos . The aerospace industry has always been driven by competition. In 1927, Charles Lindberg competed against eight other teams to achieve the first non-stop transatlantic flight to win the $25,000 Orteig Prize. In the 1960s, it was America versus the Soviet Union that

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PSA, a prostate cancer marker, activates vascular and lymphangiogenic growth factors

A new study indicates that PSA, a prostate cancer marker, is one of the catalysts that activate vascular endothelial and lymphangiogenic growth factors which contribute to the spread of cancer.

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Discovery of hippocampal mossy cell involvement to maximize antidepressant effects

Professor Yong-Seok Oh's team at the DGIST Department of Brain-Cognitive Science clarified the expression of antidepressant efficacy by modulating hippocampal mossy cells. Expects to provide a basis to understand the mechanism of existing anti-depressants and contribute greatly to the development of next generation depression treatment.

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Water stays in the pipes longer in shrinking cities – a challenge for public health

The geographic locations where Americans live are shifting in ways that can negatively affect the quality of their drinking water.

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Child migrants around the world are being denied their human rights

At 3 a.m., we were forced to leave the bus station. We were caught by the police. They asked if we had passports. We said no, we are from Afghanistan, please help us—the police drove away.

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Mathematically designed graphene has improved electrocatalytic activity

An international research group has improved graphene's ability to catalyse the hydrogen evolution reaction, which releases hydrogen as a result of passing an electronic current through water. They designed a mathematically-predicted graphene electrocatalyst, and confirmed its performance using high resolution electrochemical microscopy and computational modelling. The findings were published in t

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Earth's Oldest Meteorite Collection Just Found in the Driest Place on the Planet

Researchers scouring the desert for space rocks found the oldest collection of meteorites on Earth.

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ALS research reveals new treatment approach

New research on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (AML) has revealed that a protein called membralin plays a key role in the disease process. The study, published in Journal of Clinical Investigation, suggests that membralin-boosting gene therapy is a potential therapeutic direction to treat this often deadly disease.

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Video: 100 years of gravity

One hundred years ago this month, observations performed during a total solar eclipse proved for the first time the gravitational bending of light predicted by Albert Einstein's new theory of gravity, general relativity. In this video, Günther Hasinger, ESA Director of Science, reflects on this historic measurement that inaugurated a century of exciting experiments, investigating gravity on Earth

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Study investigates how spin-orbit interaction protects Majorana nanowires

Researchers at Delft University of Technology have recently carried out a study investigating spin-orbit interaction in Majorana nanowires. Their study, published in Physical Review Letters, is the first to clearly show the mechanism that enables the creation of the elusive Majorana particle, which could become the building block of a more stable type of quantum computer.

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A step toward fully electric ferries

Hybrid and electric vessels are under the spotlight lately, thanks to intensified efforts to limit greenhouse gas emissions from global shipping, a significant source of CO2 and other pollutants. There are already several offerings of such green ships in Europe, and a Danish operator is ready to pave the way for the widespread use of fully electric powered vessels in the ferry sector.

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Getting started with Arduino

DIY You just need to take the first step. Once you know how to use Arduino boards, you can make custom shortcut keys for your computer, change your thermostat, or even control a walking robot. But to do that,…

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Building a better salt trap: Scientists synthesize a molecular 'cage' to trap chloride

Researchers have synthesized a powerful new molecule to trap chloride salts. The technology has the potential to reduce its seepage into freshwater systems, which is a threat to drinkable water around the globe.

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Mouse Models for Disease Research

Genetically modified/knockout/transgenic mice have revolutionized the biological sciences, helping to uncover countless mechanisms of physiological and pathological function, as well as being instrumental for testing potential intervention possibilities. Understanding how mouse models work goes a long way in helping each scientist find a model that can help them answer their own research questions

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New study recommends legal recommendations for dealing with false memories in court

Although kids are known for their active imaginations, research shows that children are actually less likely than adults to create false memories. In a new study, the authors reinforce this research in order to detail new policy recommendations.

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Climate change is destroying a barrier that protects the U.S. East Coast from hurricanes

A new study suggests that climate change could soon eliminate an atmospheric barrier that protects much of the U.S. East Coast from powerful hurricanes.

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Novo Nordisk skal genopfinde sig selv

PLUS. For 19. gang topper Novo Nordisk ­Ingeniørens imageundersøgelse. Ingeniørerne belønner blandt andet virksomhedens miljøprofil, der nu står foran næste store skridt. Frem mod 2030 vil koncernen fjerne sin miljøpåvirkning fra drift og transport og træde ind i den cirkulære tidsalder.

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Danske ingeniører kårer igen Novo Nordisk som den mest attraktive arbejdsplads

Novo Nordisk vandt for 19. år i træk prisen som den mest attraktive arbejdsplads blandt de erhvervsaktive ingeniører. Blandt de ingeniørstuderende snuppede DTU prisen.

9h

Now Julian Assange Is a Martyr

Julian Assange, the Australian national who founded WikiLeaks, was indicted Thursday for soliciting classified information from an American whistle-blower in 2010 and publishing sensitive military files as well as State Department cables. Unlike his source, then–Army Private Chelsea Manning, who pledged to protect state secrets to get a security clearance, Assange had no obligation to the U.S. go

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Algorithm lets robots make faster sense of our chaotic world

Researchers have developed an algorithm that lets machines perceive their environments orders of magnitude faster than previous similar approaches. The new work takes a step toward home-helper robots that can quickly navigate unpredictable and disordered spaces. “Robot perception is one of the biggest bottlenecks in providing capable assistive robots that can be deployed into people’s homes,” say

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This 1950s Heart-Lung Machine Revolutionized Cardiac Surgery

Open-heart procedures evolved rapidly once Mayo Clinic surgeon John Kirklin made his improvements to an earlier invention

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Forensic examiners are in danger of missing evidence in low-light environments, according to new research

Forensic examiners are in danger of missing evidence in low-light environments if their vision has not fully adapted to the dark, a new study has found.

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People assume they're immune to social network dynamics, but other people aren't

A number of prominent figures have called for some sort of regulation of Facebook—including one of the company's co-founders and a venture capitalist who was one of Facebook's early backers.

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Trinity researchers find stark social inequalities in children's body mass index (BMI)

Researchers at Trinity College have found that socioeconomic inequalities in children's body mass index (BMI) emerge during the preschool years and widen across childhood and into early adolescence. By analyzing data on height and weight (BMI) they found that lower maternal education was associated with faster gains in child body weight but lower height growth leading to a higher risk of overweigh

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Scientists uncover exotic matter in the sun's atmosphere

Scientists today announced a major new finding about how matter behaves in the extreme conditions of the sun's atmosphere. Their work has shed new light on the exotic but poorly understood 'fourth state of matter,' known as plasma, which could hold the key to developing safe, clean and efficient nuclear energy generators on Earth.

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New study recommends legal recommendations for dealing with false memories in court

Although kids are known for their active imaginations, research shows that children are actually less likely than adults to create false memories. In a new study, the authors reinforce this research in order to detail new policy recommendations.

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High-intensity exercise may restore heart function in people with type 2 diabetes

University of Otago researchers have discovered that high-intensity exercise can reduce or reverse the loss in heart function caused by type 2 diabetes.

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A collaboration between art and science explores the turbulent physics of eddies

Many of us as kids have played Poohsticks—throwing a twig into flowing water from a bridge or riverbank and watching it race downstream, but then losing the competition because your stick gets caught in the endless spin of an eddy on the edge of a creek.

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In how many years, do you think machines, robots, and technology will have taken over our planet

Last month, a team of scientists led by Edward Chang from the University of California in San Francisco, found a way to decode specific signals in the brain that convert our thoughts into words. ​ By understanding these signals, they’re making tentative steps towards merging our minds with machines. Just like with anything else, change is exciting, especially technological advances transforming t

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Uber’s Drivers and Riders Are Locked in a Pine-Scented Battle

When Kirsten Schultz slid into a Lyft and noticed several air fresheners shoved around the vehicle, she was nervous that it might become a problem. Schultz, a sex educator from Madison, Wisconsin, has asthma and is sensitive to smells. She’d hailed the ride to travel just a few miles from a conference at Stanford University back to her hotel, but it was not long before the overpowering smell of t

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Why Good Girls Is Such a Rewarding Show

When Christina Hendricks first read the script for Good Girls , she was certain the gutsy story—about three Detroit moms who turn to crime to make ends meet—would get neutered by NBC. A broadcast network, the actor explained at a panel, meant constraints, constraints that could dull daring programming. “My big fear was that it was on network television,” she said. “I was terrified that they were

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Scientists spy on superbugs to see how they outsmart our antibiotics

Scientists have discovered yet another way that single-celled organisms have outsmarted us.

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Sundhedsminister vil diskutere spareplan på AUH

Ellen Trane Nørby vil have Aarhus Universitetshospitals økonomi med på økonomiforhandlingerne efter valget. Vi kan ikke lade dårlig håndtering af økonomi gå ud over medarbejdere og patienter, siger hun.

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Savings on Master & Dynamic headphones, refurbished MacBook Pros, and other great deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Gene target could lead to treatment for Down syndrome

Targeting a key gene before birth could someday help lead to a treatment for Down syndrome by reversing abnormal embryonic brain development and improving cognitive function after birth, according to a new study. Using stem cells that can turn into other cells in the brain, researchers developed two experimental models—a living 3D “organoid” model of the brain and a mouse brain model with implant

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Mathematics of scale: Big, small and everything in between

Breathe. As your lungs expand, air fills 500 million tiny alveoli, each a fraction of a millimeter across. As you exhale, these millions of tiny breaths merge effortlessly through larger and larger airways into one ultimate breath.

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Automatic insect identification for better grasp on biodiversity

One hundred camera traps, developed specifically for the automatic counting and recognition of insects, will be placed throughout the Netherlands this summer. This is a first, as this system has never before been used. Counting insects is very important and the system, announced last year, is popular. The builders have already received more requests than they can honor this year. The official laun

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What caused the fireballs that lit up the sky over Australia?

Over the past few days a pair of spectacular fireballs have graced Australia's skies.

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Automatic insect identification for better grasp on biodiversity

One hundred camera traps, developed specifically for the automatic counting and recognition of insects, will be placed throughout the Netherlands this summer. This is a first, as this system has never before been used. Counting insects is very important and the system, announced last year, is popular. The builders have already received more requests than they can honor this year. The official laun

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Lake Tahoe's clarity improved dramatically over past year

The famed cobalt blue waters of Lake Tahoe became more clear last year, gaining 10 feet in visibility from the year before, according to a new study released Thursday by scientists at the University of California, Davis.

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Cognitive behavioral therapy for kids with long-term conditions

The mental health of children and young people with some long term physical conditions could benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), according to a recent study. The systematic review used robust methods to bring together and make sense of the best science in this area.

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Quantum computing boost from vapor stabilizing technique

A technique to stabilize alkali metal vapor density using gold nanoparticles, so electrons can be accessed for applications including quantum computing, atom cooling and precision measurements, has now been patented.

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Crabs' camouflage tricks revealed

Crabs from a single species rely on different camouflage techniques depending on what habitat they live in, new research shows.

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Scientists (dis)solve a century-long mystery to treat asthma and airway inflammation

Research groups have solved a century-long puzzle about the presence of protein crystals in asthma. Normally, proteins do not crystallize in the body, but there are some instances where this process does occur.

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Building a better salt trap: Scientists synthesize a molecular 'cage' to trap chloride

Researchers have synthesized a powerful new molecule to trap chloride salts. The technology has the potential to reduce its seepage into freshwater systems, which is a threat to drinkable water around the globe.

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Signs of selection in the stomach

Helicobacter pylori, a globally distributed gastric bacterium, is genetically highly adaptable. Microbiologists at LMU have now characterized its population structure in individual patients, demonstrating an important role of antibiotics for its within-patient evolution.

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Signs of selection in the stomach

Helicobacter pylori, a globally distributed gastric bacterium, is genetically highly adaptable. Microbiologists at LMU have now characterized its population structure in individual patients, demonstrating an important role of antibiotics for its within-patient evolution.

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Scientists investigate global spread of stinging jellyfish

"Get it off of me! Get it off of me!" shrieked Mary Carman, a marine ecologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) as she flailed knee deep in the bath-like water of Farm Pond on Martha's Vineyard. She was observing tunicates (also known as sea squirts) in the quiet coastal pond, garbed in a full wetsuit and snorkeling gear as she hovered through the shallow grassy water. She was well c

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The Playdate Is a Boutique Gaming Handheld With a Crank

No, the crank doesn't power it. Yeah, we're a little disappointed, too.

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How to Solve a Rubik's Cube in 5 Seconds—or Less

The world record for unscrambling a Rubik's cube keeps dropping, as fleet-fingered speedcubers hone their pattern recognition and "lookahead" skills.

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Scientists investigate global spread of stinging jellyfish

"Get it off of me! Get it off of me!" shrieked Mary Carman, a marine ecologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) as she flailed knee deep in the bath-like water of Farm Pond on Martha's Vineyard. She was observing tunicates (also known as sea squirts) in the quiet coastal pond, garbed in a full wetsuit and snorkeling gear as she hovered through the shallow grassy water. She was well c

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As the dust of the election settles, Australia's wildlife still needs a pathway for recovery

The environment was a key concern in the recent federal election. It was also a polarising one, with concerns raised about regional industries and livelihoods. But jobs and environment need not be locked in battle: there are pathways that secure a better future for both our environment and future generations.

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New catalogue of 12,000 X-ray spectral lines

X-ray sources in the sky radiate "bar codes" revealing their properties. These bar codes consist of narrow peaks and troughs within the source's spectrum. The RGS instrument on the satellite XMM-Newton was built to find these bars—or spectral lines. Astronomer Junjie Mao and his colleagues at SRON and ESA have now created a catalogue filled with 12,000 X-ray lines, which astronomers can use to con

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Sending surplus food to charity is not the way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions

With the recent news that Canada is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) is calling for urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

10h

A 'crisper' method for gene editing in fungi

CRISPR/Cas9 is now a household name associated with genetic engineering studies. Through cutting-edge research described in their paper published in Scientific Reports, a team of researchers from Tokyo University of Science, Meiji University, and Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, led by Dr. Takayuki Arazoe and Prof Shigeru Kuwata, has recently established a series of novel strategies

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Hot spots in rivers that nurture salmon 'flicker on and off' in Bristol Bay region

Chemical signatures imprinted on tiny stones that form inside the ears of fish show that two of Alaska's most productive salmon populations, and the fisheries they support, depend on the entire watershed.

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Bacteria in fermented food signal the human immune system, explaining health benefits

Researchers have discovered that humans and great apes possess a receptor on their cells that detects metabolites from bacteria commonly found in fermented foods and triggers movement of immune cells.

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A 'crisper' method for gene editing in fungi

CRISPR/Cas9 is now a household name associated with genetic engineering studies. Through cutting-edge research described in their paper published in Scientific Reports, a team of researchers from Tokyo University of Science, Meiji University, and Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, led by Dr. Takayuki Arazoe and Prof Shigeru Kuwata, has recently established a series of novel strategies

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Wood consumption in energy generation continues to increase

In 2018, the consumption of wood fuels reached yet another record as a result of the increased use of black liquor produced by the forest industries. Heating and power plants consumed the same amount of solid wood fuels as in the previous year. In addition, the small-scale combustion of wood remained unchanged.

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Novel research accounts for future impacts of greenhouse gas emissions

Sustainability researchers and scientists conduct Life Cycle Assessments to understand the environmental impact of new products, initiating an opportunity to evaluate and reduce greenhouse gas emissions outputs. Until now, those assessments largely focused on today's greenhouse gas impacts. Now, mechanical engineering Ph.D. candidate Evan Sproul, former student Jay Barlow, and Associate Professor

10h

Video: Se F-35 buldre over landet for første gang

Et norsk F-35 fløj onsdag over Jylland for at give forsvaret mulighed for at måle støjen fra Danmarks kommende kampfly.

10h

A Total Solar Eclipse 100 Years Ago Proved Einstein’s General Relativity

Two teams of astronomers voyaged to Africa and Brazil to observe the most famous eclipse in science

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NASA Orders First Segment of Lunar Station for 2024 Artemis Moon Mission

NASA has awarded the first contract for the future orbiting lunar gateway we're building around the Moon. The post NASA Orders First Segment of Lunar Station for 2024 Artemis Moon Mission appeared first on ExtremeTech .

10h

Evidence found of continuous phase transition when rats move from sleep to awake

A team of researchers with affiliations to institutions in Brazil, Portugal and Spain has found evidence of a continuous phase transition occurring in the brains of rats when they move from sleep to wakefulness. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their study of sleeping rats and what they found.

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Scientists caught chimps smashing tortoises like walnuts for future snacking

Animals It's not cute, but it does tell us a lot about primate cognition. These chimpanzees regularly catch, kill, and consume tortoises that have been grabbed from the forest floor. But the way they do it is shocking.

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Get Ready For A ‘Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic’ Movie

When Disney and Lucasfilm say that the upcoming Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker is the end of the saga, they really just mean that Episode IX is the end of the Skywalker Saga. […] The …

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Measles vaccination: 'All for one and one for all'

A commentary by researchers addresses the specter of clinical, ethical, public health and legal concerns that have been raised because of the recent measles outbreaks in New York. So far, the outbreaks seem to have emanated from ultra-Orthodox Jewish residents whose affected children were never vaccinated. Their commentary is motivated in part by the availability of important and relevant data fro

10h

There Is Too Much Stuff

In theory, Amazon is a site meant to serve the needs of humans. The mega-retailer’s boundless inventory gives people easy access to household supplies and other everyday products that are rarely fun to shop for. Most people probably aren’t eager to buy clothes hangers, for instance. They just want to have hangers when they need them. But when you type hangers into Amazon’s search box, the mega-re

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Generation Z Gets Its Coming-of-Age Classic

There’s a whiff of topicality to the premise of Booksmart , given the mounting scandals around elite-college admissions of late. Olivia Wilde’s new comedy follows the high-school pals Amy (played by Kaitlyn Dever) and Molly (Beanie Feldstein), who’ve stayed out of trouble for their entire academic career so that they could get into the best colleges. But when graduation week rolls around, Amy and

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Intel’s Silicon Photonics Work Could Supercharge AI Neural Networks

Intel has published new work on optical neural networks, showing they can be designed with fault-tolerance in mind, with latency and power efficiency theoretically far higher than silicon designs. The post Intel’s Silicon Photonics Work Could Supercharge AI Neural Networks appeared first on ExtremeTech .

10h

Stort gennembrud: Forskere skaber organisme, der er anderledes end alt andet liv

Organismen er skabt med kunstigt DNA, og den lever i bedste velgående.

10h

Ny forskning: Mindre luftforurening giver mindre astma

Der er dog stadig tvivl om graden af korrelation, siger dansk forsker i folkesundhed.

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The ongoing Huawei saga, explained in brief

Here’s a rundown of all the major news in the past week

10h

Send us your questions for climate activist Greta Thunberg

Got a question for the Swedish 16-year-old who started a youth climate revolution? Here’s your chance to ask her… On 20 August 2018, Greta Thunberg , then aged 15, did not attend her first day back at school after the summer holidays. Instead, she made a sign that read “School strike for climate change” and stood in front of the Swedish parliament in Stockholm, demanding the government reduce c

10h

Grilling Over Charcoal Is Objectively, Scientifically Better Than Grilling Over Gas

Cooking on a gas grill is more convenient than cooking with charcoal. It’s also a lot less special.

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Grilling Over Gas Is Objectively, Scientifically Better Than Grilling Over Charcoal

A gas grill rules. But the real debate should be whether charcoal is necessary at all…

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The oceans are very slowly draining into the rock below Earth's crust

Ever since the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea, sea water has been flowing deep into the planet, causing sea levels to fall over millions of years

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How rapamycin’s anti-aging effects work

New research digs into exactly how the anti-aging effects of the drug rapamycin work, which potentially expands uses for the drug. In 1972, Easter Island, called Rapa Nui, famous for its moai statues, offered a new wonder: the discovery of rapamycin. Over the past three decades, rapamycin, which was isolated from soil bacteria, has been applied as an immuno-suppressor in a multitude of ways, incl

10h

Image of the Day: Training Day

A video captures T cells learning to recognize cells from the body that shouldn't be attacked.

10h

Theresa May’s Final Humiliation

British Prime Minister Theresa May announced Friday that she “will shortly leave the job that has been the honor of my life to hold.” The long-anticipated address, outside Downing Street, confirms that May will step down as the leader of the Conservative Party on June 7. She will remain prime minister until the party chooses a new leader, a process that will take approximately six weeks. In many

10h

To Calm Nervous Families, Pakistan Changes Polio Vaccination Tactics

Paralysis cases spiked after a vaccination drive was derailed by false rumors that dozens of children had collapsed and died.

10h

Organic matter from space preserved in 3.3-billion-year-old rocks

Carbon-based chemicals carried to Earth by a meteorite 3.3 billion years ago have been found encased in rock, and may have been crucial to the origin of life

11h

Using Bacteria to Store Energy

Energy storage is now a critical technology for the future of our energy infrastructure. We want to move to renewable forms of energy, but many of them are intermittent sources, and so energy storage will be necessary. At low penetration, up to about 30%, we can essentially use the grid as if it were a battery – putting unused energy into the grid when producing excess, and then taking from the g

11h

Voldemort har infiltreret vores sygehusvæsen

I fremtiden kommer vi til at mangle diagnosekoden ‘Præmatur død på grund af manglende behandling’.

11h

Facebook is apparently planning to launch its digital currency in early 2020

We are getting a clearer picture of what the social network is working on behind the scenes: Globalcoin

11h

Vietnam seizes 5 tonnes of pangolin scales from Nigeria

Vietnam police have seized more than five tonnes of pangolin scales stashed in a cashew shipment from Nigeria, the government said Friday.

11h

Facebook plans cryptocurrency launch next year: BBC

Facebook has been in contact with US and British financial regulators with a view to launching its own cryptocurrency next year, the BBC reported on Friday.

11h

A 'silver bullet' for the chemical conversion of carbon dioxide

Fossil fuels are the lifeblood of modern societies, but their increased use releases carbon dioxide, a climate-warming greenhouse gas, faster than plants can recycle it via photosynthesis.

11h

Lithium doesn't crack under pressure, it transforms

Using cutting-edge theoretical calculations performed at NERSC, researchers at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have predicted fascinating new properties of lithium—a light alkali metal that has intrigued scientists for two decades with its remarkable diversity of physical states at high pressures.

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A novel synchrotron technique for studying diffusion in solids

Understanding and controlling how the diffusion process works at the atomic scale is an important question in the synthesis of materials. For nanoparticles, the stability, size, structure, composition, and atomic ordering are all dependent on position inside the particle, and diffusion both affects all of these properties and is affected by them. A more thorough understanding of the mechanisms and

11h

Vietnam seizes 5 tonnes of pangolin scales from Nigeria

Vietnam police have seized more than five tonnes of pangolin scales stashed in a cashew shipment from Nigeria, the government said Friday.

11h

Så gör akademiker motstånd i det tysta

Hur reagerar akademiker på universitets och högskolors alltmer näringslivsinspirerade styrning? Vilka strategier använder de för att anpassa sig – eller göra motstånd? I en ny avhandling i arbetsvetenskap från Handelshögskolan vid Karlstads universitet, beskriver Jo Ese, Høgskolen i Østfold, konflikten som uppstår mellan akademikers värderingar och ”management”. Akademisk frihet och universiteten

11h

Scientists discover ancient seawater preserved from the last Ice Age

Twenty thousand years ago, in the thick of an Ice Age, Earth looked very different. Because water was locked up in glaciers hundreds of feet thick, which stretched down over Chicago and New York City, the ocean was smaller—shorelines extended hundreds of miles farther out, and the remaining water was saltier and colder.

11h

Demographer addresses federal report on U.S. birthrate

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's annual report on the U.S. birthrate delivered some sobering news when it was released on May 15.

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Mars 2020 spacecraft subjected to brutal tests as it prepares for launch

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U.S. and China Go Their Own Ways With AI

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MIT’s AI makes autonomous cars drive more like humans

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SpaceX puts up 60 internet satellites

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Wouldn't workers democracy be a better alternative to UBI?

Much of the rhetoric around universal basic income involves a defense of UBI on the grounds that it is the only solution available to automation driven unemployment. But it seems that honest people are saying this because they are not aware of other more bottom up options. Industrial Democracy is a practical ideal which involves the creation and promotion of companies where workers and other stak

11h

Why Sydney residents use 30% more water per day than Melburnians

This week Melbourne's water storage dropped below 50 percent, a sign of the prolonged and deepening drought gripping eastern Australia. Sydney is only marginally better off, at 53.8 percent of full storage.

11h

Dolphin study reveals the genes essential for species' survival

UNSW scientists have added to the growing body of research into genetic markers that are important for animal conservation.

11h

Dolphin study reveals the genes essential for species' survival

UNSW scientists have added to the growing body of research into genetic markers that are important for animal conservation.

11h

How a See-Through Fish Is Helping Answer Big Questions about Biology

The skin of the zebra fish, transparent for the first few days of the organism’s life, is helping scientists address deafness, the Zika virus, and much more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

We Can't Solve Climate Change without Nuclear Power

Renewable energy, carbon-capture technologies, efficiency measures, reforestation and other steps are important—but they won’t get us there — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Solving geothermal energy's earthquake problem

On a November afternoon in 2017, a magnitude 5.5 earthquake shook Pohang, South Korea, injuring dozens and forcing more than 1,700 of the city's residents into emergency housing. Research now shows that development of a geothermal energy project shoulders the blame.

11h

Fodspor i sneen: Sådan afslører forskere tyvens køn, vægt og gangart

PLUS. Fod- og sålaftryk er noget, politiet på daglig basis undersøger for at finde forbrydere. Fremtiden for området ligger inden for 3D-scannere, vurderer politiet, mens indiske forskere går skridtet videre og prøver at give signalement ud fra fodsporet.

11h

Being bilingual is great. But it may not boost some brain functions

A large study of U.S. bilingual children didn’t turn up obvious benefits in abilities to ignore distractions or switch quickly between tasks.

11h

The Lancet journals: Papers at European Stroke Organisation Conference (ESOC) 2019

The following papers will be presented at the ESOC conference in Milan and published simultaneously in either The Lancet or The Lancet Neurology journals. All papers are under embargo until the stated time. Contact details for corresponding authors are provided in the Articles and linked Comments. Funding information is listed on the first page of each Article.

11h

What an Extinct Bird Re-Evolving Says About “Species” – Facts So Romantic

How could the same species evolve more than once? Photograph by Janos Rautonen / Flickr You may have heard the news of what sounds like a resurrection story on the small island of Aldabra, off the coast of Madagascar. Around 136,000 years ago, the island was submerged in water and a layer of limestone captured the rails—a species of flightless bird—living there. The birds (and all other land spec

11h

Airbnb and New York City Reach a Truce on Home-Sharing Data

Airbnb agreed to turn over information on 17,000 residences, so city officials can look for signs of illegal short-term rentals.

11h

Hiking or Camping? Take the Bus to the Trail This Summer

Transit agencies and nonprofits are teaming up to expand access to parks and recreation areas.

11h

Netflix's 'Rim of the World' Shows Where Sci-Fi Is Headed

One good thing about the streaming wars? The return of '80s-style adventure flicks.

11h

How the EU’s Far Right Will Boost Google, Facebook, and Amazon

Trump’s former campaign guru said he would unite Europe’s nationalists and show them how to fight Big Tech. Instead, they’ve dismissed Bannon, embraced Big Tech—and are poised to expand their ranks in Parliament.

11h

We Can't Solve Climate Change without Nuclear Power

Renewable energy, carbon-capture technologies, efficiency measures, reforestation and other steps are important—but they won’t get us there — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Havsplanering avgörande för Östersjöns överlevnad

Liksom städer behöver världshaven planeras för att överleva i framtiden, menar Ralph Tafon, doktorand i miljövetenskap med avhandlingen The Dark Side of Marine Spatial Planning, på svenska ”havsplaneringens mörka sidor”. – Utan havsplanering blir det kaos, alla skulle göra som de själva vill och haven är redan tillräckligt utsatta som det är. Östersjön ligger illa till. Studien lyfter framför all

11h

'Sabotaged' tanker in Gulf of Oman leaked oil

A satellite spotted an oil slick trailing from a tanker mysteriously attacked off the UAE on 12 May.

12h

The extraordinary powers of bacteria visualized in real time

The global spread of antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and a priority for international microbiology research. In a paper to be published in the journal Science, a team led by Christian Lesterlin, Inserm researcher at CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 filmed the process of antibiotic resistance acquisition in real time, discovering an unexpected key player in its maintenance

12h

Chemical juggling with three particles

Chemists from the University of Bonn and their U.S. colleagues at Columbia University in New York have discovered a novel mechanism in catalysis that allows the cheap, environmentally friendly synthesis of certain alcohols. The reaction follows a previously unknown pattern in which hydrogen is split into three components in a time-coordinated manner. More than five years passed between the idea an

12h

One year on, EU's GDPR sets global standard for data protection

The EU's strict data laws have set the global benchmark for protecting personal information online since coming into force a year ago, but some worry that many users have barely noticed the change.

12h

New Law Would Help Bees–but Could Leave Other Pollinators out in the Cold

Proposed legislation focuses mostly on threats to honeybees and their wild cousins — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

The extraordinary powers of bacteria visualized in real time

The global spread of antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and a priority for international microbiology research. In a paper to be published in the journal Science, a team led by Christian Lesterlin, Inserm researcher at CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 filmed the process of antibiotic resistance acquisition in real time, discovering an unexpected key player in its maintenance

12h

Rights and obligations under EU's data protection rules

The EU's stringent data protection rules have bolstered the rights of European citizens and imposed new responsibilities on companies since coming into force a year ago.

12h

Progress in hunt for unknown compounds in drinking water

An unknown number of byproducts are formed in the drinking water treatment process, and scientists don't know what many of them are. However, using advanced technology, researchers at Linköping University have been able to detect new compounds, and report that every water treatment plant has a unique combination.

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SpaceX Launches 60 Starlink Satellites on Thrice-Flown Rocket, Sticks Landing

Thousands more will follow, if all goes according to plan.

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New Law Would Help Bees–but Could Leave Other Pollinators out in the Cold

Proposed legislation focuses mostly on threats to honeybees and their wild cousins — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hør podcast: Virker flyafgifter? Forskere tegner det danske klima år 2050

Hvordan vil klimaet i Danmark se ud i 2050? Det har Ingeniøren fået en række forskere til at skitsere. Flytrafikken er en af klimasynderne, og nu viser det sig, at flystriberne på himlen er lige så skadelige for klimaet som flyenes CO2-udledning.

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Samsung vil producere tre-nanometer-chips om to år

Med en ny transistor-arkitektur vil Samsung hæve ydeevnen med 35 pct. på 45 pct. mindre plads.

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Scientists pursue universal snakebite cure using HIV antibody techniques

British specialist among those aiming to develop ‘next generation’ treatment that could help millions of victims each year Scientists in five countries, including the UK, hope to find a universal cure for snakebite using the same technology that discovered HIV antibodies. A new consortium of venom specialists in India, Kenya, Nigeria, Britain and the US will locate and develop antibodies to treat

12h

Taiwan considers double-blind peer review for grants

Nature, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01651-3 If the system is adopted, reviewers and applicants will be anonymous, in an attempt to make selection fairer.

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Everest: Three more die amid overcrowding near summit

Seven have died climbing the world's highest peak in a week – more than for the whole of last year.

12h

Woman's Facial Injection for 'Liquid Nose Job' Left Her with Rare Eye Problem

An injection of facial filler into her nose led to a rare eye complication.

12h

Chernobyl vs. Fukushima: Which Nuclear Meltdown Was the Bigger Disaster?

Nuclear meltdowns at power plants in Chernobyl and Fukushima were the most devastating in recent history.

12h

How Hinduism Became a Political Weapon in India

VARANASI, India—The seven pandits draped in cloth of gold are clearly competing against the five in saffron. In front of thousands of assembled pilgrims, each bevy of priests furiously recites Sanskrit chants, deftly swinging pyramids of flaming oil lamps, banging on bells and blowing on conch shells, wafting thick clouds of incense over the moonlit waters of the limpid, unlistening Ganges. The c

12h

The China Problem Isn’t Going Away

America’s relationship with China has taken a turn toward the confrontational. Tariffs are rising, rhetoric is heating up, and both sides are digging in. For all the efforts at a resolution, this current phase will likely be remembered as merely the opening skirmish in a long-term competition. The China contest now represents a key organizing principle of American foreign policy. Even a successfu

12h

War-Crime Pardons Dishonor Fallen Heroes

President Donald Trump is reportedly planning to mark Memorial Day by pardoning several American military members accused or convicted of war crimes. If he does so, it would undermine our military-justice system, weaken good order and discipline in the ranks, erode trust with our allies and partners, and sanction the worst inclinations of our adversaries. During my three decades in the Marine Cor

12h

The City That’s Giving People Money

Is Maggie Denang deserving of your money? How about Tomas Vargas Jr.? Denang and Vargas are residents of Stockton, a high-poverty city on the outskirts of the Bay Area’s technology-and-wealth boom. They are also participants in a much publicized, pathbreaking project, the Stockton Economic Empowerment Demonstration, in which 130 people are receiving $500 a month for 18 months, to use however they

12h

Forensics Friday: Just how many bands are duplicated in this image?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the third in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our … Continue reading Foren

12h

School strike for climate: Protests staged around the world

From Australia to Europe, school children are skipping classes to call for action on climate change.

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Server fyldt med KMD-software – herunder til valgoptælling – stod pivåben

KMD havde åbnet op for fri adgang til en såkaldt deployment-server fyldt med software inden for alt fra valg-systemer til dagpleje-administration.

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Robo-pups, printed ears and bias – a tour of AI

Nature, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01671-z A bold, multifaceted exhibition on artificial intelligence wows Elizabeth Gibney.

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Neuroprosthetics and deep brain stimulation: Two big neuroscience breakthroughs

Neuroscience and engineering are uniting in mind-blowing ways that will drastically improve the quality of life for people with conditions like epilepsy, paralysis or schizophrenia. Researchers have developed a brain-computer interface the size of a baby aspirin that can restore mobility to people with paralysis or amputated limbs. It rewires neural messages from the brain's motor cortex to a rob

12h

The Future of Amusement Parks? VR Bumper Car

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5G Networks could throw weather forecasting into chaos

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Realistic Neural Talking Head Models

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I Was Wrong About Infrastructure Week

As I write this, my heart crumbles—much like our nation’s infrastructure. It wasn’t supposed to be this way. Hadn’t I just written that, when it came to the ongoing joke that is Infrastructure Week, the tide was turning? Hadn’t I argued that, for the first time in his presidency, Donald Trump looked serious about working with Congress to revamp America’s highways and bridges and tunnels? Indeed,

13h

Klima, transport og miljø: EP-valget er teknologiens valg

Nok er Europaparlamentets magt fokuseret på visse områder – men netop derfor er det valget på søndag, den teknologisk interesserede skal interessere sig for – mere end folketingsvalget.

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Nature inspires a novel new form of computing, using light

McMaster researchers have developed a simple and highly novel form of computing by shining patterned bands of light and shadow through different facets of a polymer cube and reading the combined results that emerge.

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Scientists discover signalling circuit boards inside body's cells

Cells in the body are wired like computer chips to direct signals that instruct how they function, research from the University of Edinburgh suggests. Unlike a fixed circuit board, however, cells can rapidly rewire their communication networks to change their behavior. The discovery of this cell-wide web turns our understanding of how instructions spread around a cell on its head.

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New research shows that mites and ticks are close relatives

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum in London have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks.

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Quantum computing boost from vapor stabilizing technique

A technique to stabilize alkali metal vapor density using gold nanoparticles, so electrons can be accessed for applications including quantum computing, atom cooling and precision measurements, has been patented by scientists at the University of Bath.

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Crabs' camouflage tricks revealed

Crabs from a single species rely on different camouflage techniques depending on what habitat they live in, new research shows.

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Tom Steyer on Impeachment: ‘We Have Won the Argument. Period.’

The billionaire Tom Steyer spent years as a hedge-fund investor, but for the past decade, he’s devoted his life to activism—first focused on the environment, and since 2017, as the leading promoter of impeaching President Donald Trump. Need to Impeach, the San Francisco–based group he founded, is now the largest organization in politics outside of the Republican and Democratic Parties , with a li

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Background matching and disruptive coloration as habitat-specific strategies for camouflage

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44349-2 Background matching and disruptive coloration as habitat-specific strategies for camouflage

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Possible Male Infanticide in Wild Orangutans and a Re-evaluation of Infanticide Risk

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42856-w Possible Male Infanticide in Wild Orangutans and a Re-evaluation of Infanticide Risk

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Effect of elastic grading on fretting wear

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44269-1 Effect of elastic grading on fretting wear

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Enhanced auditory disembedding in an interleaved melody recognition test is associated with absolute pitch ability

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44297-x Enhanced auditory disembedding in an interleaved melody recognition test is associated with absolute pitch ability

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A core genome approach that enables prospective and dynamic monitoring of infectious outbreaks

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44189-0 A core genome approach that enables prospective and dynamic monitoring of infectious outbreaks

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Rapamycin modulates tissue aging and lifespan independently of the gut microbiota in Drosophila

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44106-5 Rapamycin modulates tissue aging and lifespan independently of the gut microbiota in Drosophila

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Identifying the origin of nitrous oxide dissolved in deep ocean by concentration and isotopocule analyses

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44224-0 Identifying the origin of nitrous oxide dissolved in deep ocean by concentration and isotopocule analyses

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Past and Future Hurricane Intensity Change along the U.S. East Coast

Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44252-w Past and Future Hurricane Intensity Change along the U.S. East Coast

13h

To Calm Nervous Families, Pakistan Changes Polio Vaccination Tactics

Paralysis cases spiked after a vaccination drive was derailed by false rumors that dozens of children had collapsed and died.

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We’re stepping up – join us for a day to halt this climate crisis | Naomi Klein, Bill McKibben and others

We’re calling for a global strike on 20 September. Disrupting our normal lives is the only way to secure our future On 20 September, at the request of the young people who have been staging school strikes around the world, we’re walking out of our workplaces and homes to spend the day demanding action on the climate crisis, the greatest existential threat that all of us face. It’s a one-day climat

13h

Scientists discover signalling circuit boards inside body's cells

Cells in the body are wired like computer chips to direct signals that instruct how they function, research suggests.

13h

New research shows that mites and ticks are close relatives

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum in London have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks.

13h

Researchers perform simple calculations by shining light patterns through a translucent cube

McMaster researchers have developed a simple and highly novel form of computing by shining patterned bands of light and shadow through different facets of a polymer cube and reading the combined results that emerge.

13h

Quantum computing boost from vapour stabilising technique

A technique to stabilise alkali metal vapour density using gold nanoparticles, so electrons can be accessed for applications including quantum computing, atom cooling and precision measurements, has been patented by scientists at the University of Bath.

13h

Crabs' camouflage tricks revealed

Crabs from a single species rely on different camouflage techniques depending on what habitat they live in, new research shows.

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Vilken art dominerar jordens liv?

Det är förstås en fråga om definitioner och hur man räknar. Människan ligger ganska bra till. Jag har bara hittat uppgifter för att räkna på “vuxna” (människor som är minst 15 år gamla). År 2005 fanns det 4630 miljoner av oss, med en genomsnittsvikt av 62 kg. Det är tillsammans 287 miljoner ton. Av detta beror 15 miljoner ton på övervikt, motsvarande 242 miljoner “vuxna” människor av genomsnittsvi

13h

Scientists discover signalling circuit boards inside body's cells

Cells in the body are wired like computer chips to direct signals that instruct how they function, research suggests.

13h

New research shows that mites and ticks are close relatives

Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Natural History Museum in London have reconstructed the evolutionary history of the chelicerates, the mega-diverse group of 110,000 arthropods that includes spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks.

13h

Crabs' camouflage tricks revealed

Crabs from a single species rely on different camouflage techniques depending on what habitat they live in, new research shows.

13h

Region Sjælland finder uventede besparelser på dyr sygemedicin

En gennemgang af økonomien i Region Sjælland efter årets første måneder viser, at udgifterne til særlig dyr sygehusmedicin ligger langt under budgettet. Det betyder flere penge på sygehusbudgetterne i regionen, forklarer vicedirektør.

14h

In mice: Are animal studies relevant to human health?

Scientists often use animal models such as mice and rats in biomedical research. But what can these studies tell us about human health?

14h

Brintproduktion udleder enorme mængder CO2: Nu er DTU og Haldor Topsøe klar med en grønnere teknik

Med en ny teknik kan hydrogen produceres i små elektrisk opvarmede reaktorer og med markant mindre CO2-udledninger end ved konventionel produktion.

14h

Cooling wood: Engineers create strong, sustainable solution for passive cooling

What if the wood your house was made of could save your electricity bill? In the race to save energy, using a passive cooling method that requires no electricity and is built right into your house could save even chilly areas of the US some cash. Now, researchers at the University of Maryland and the University of Colorado have harnessed nature's nanotechnology to help solve the problem of finding

14h

Brist på reglering kring säkerheten hos mensskydd

Försäljningen av sanitetsprodukter, inklusive bindor, tamponger och på senare år, menskoppar, är en miljardindustri. Ändå är det en marknad med mycket svaga standardiseringar, det vill säga att det i hög grad saknas internationella riktlinjer samt testmetoder för vilka kemikalier produkterna får innehålla. Istället finns det till viss del nationella regler, eller interna föreskrifter hos företage

14h

CBT could benefit mental health of children with long-term conditions

The mental health of children and young people with some long term physical conditions could benefit from cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), according to a recent study from the University of Exeter Medical School. The systematic review used robust methods to bring together and make sense of the best science in this area.

14h

Author Correction: miR-34a blocks osteoporosis and bone metastasis by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis and Tgif2

Nature, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1266-4 Author Correction: miR-34a blocks osteoporosis and bone metastasis by inhibiting osteoclastogenesis and Tgif2

14h

Author Correction: A CRISPR/Cas system mediates bacterial innate immune evasion and virulence

Nature, Published online: 24 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1253-9 Author Correction: A CRISPR/Cas system mediates bacterial innate immune evasion and virulence

14h

How cheap can we store energy?

I'm curious if anyone has any guesses to the prices of the cheapest energy storage? I'd be curious to know big form factor and small factor solutions out there. Please include numbers in your post. submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

14h

14h

Fem skarpe til Flemming Møller Mortensen

Sundhedsvæsenet har det godt, men der skal sættes flere penge af til flere hænder og forebyggelse, mener Flemming Møller Mortensen (S).

14h

Familielægen er en bevaringsværdig konstruktion

Fra mit mangeårige arbejde på den anden side – på hospitalet – ved jeg, hvor vigtigt et arbejde de praktiserende læger udfører for den enkelte patient, men også for hele det samlede sundhedsvæsen.

14h

Fem skarpe til Ellen Trane Nørby

Sundhedsvæsenets tilstand er langt over middel, til gengæld er der nogle faresignaler omkring travlhed og overbelastning, vurderer sundhedsministeren.

14h

174 danske forskere opfordrer til civil ulydighed for klimaet

Forskere skriver i et åbent brev, at de ser det som deres pligt at opfordre til et "ikke-voldeligt oprør".

14h

Nya strategier mot cancer

Vad sker i kroppen när cancer uppstår? Hur arbetar forskarna för att vässa diagnosmetoder och terapier? Vilka utmaningar möter den som återvänder från Cancerlandet? Det – och mycket mer -får du svar på i detta nummer av Vetenskap & hälsa. Välkommen till en hel tidning om cancerforskning.

15h

Ny algoritme bruger sygdomshistorie til at forudsige overlevelseschancer for intensivpatienter

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet og Rigshospitalet har brugt data fra mere end 230.000 intensivpatienter…

15h

15h

Individanpassad vård – på riktigt

Cancervården har över lag kommit långt när det gäller att välja medicinsk behandlingstyp utifrån patientens – och tumörens – olika egenskaper, som till exempel genprofil. Nu menar forskaren och sjuksköterskan Marlene Malmström att det är dags att på allvar ta individtänket till omvårdnaden.

15h

”Det går att dö på ett bra sätt”

Av alla som dör i Sverige dör de flesta, ungefär 80 procent, den långsamma döden. Endast 20 procent dör snabbt, i olyckor, hjärtstopp eller liknande. I takt med att befolkningen blir äldre kommer behovet av palliativ vård öka men kvaliteten i vården som erbjuds varierar. Därför är det viktigt att fler inom vården får grundläggande utbildning i palliativ vård och vård i livets slutskede.

15h

Öka familjens delaktighet i vården

Vuxensjukvården är inriktad på att vårda patienten vid sjukdom. Det blir då ofta upp till den sjuke att löpande informera sin familj om sjukdom och behandling.

15h

Hur är det att återvända från Cancerlandet?

Hur påverkas den som får en cancerdiagnos och vilket stöd kan behövas från sjukvården? ST-läkaren och doktoranden Åsa Mohlin letar ledtrådar i böcker skrivna av patienter med cancer.

15h

Tar fingeravtryck på sarkomtumörer

Fredrik Mertens har forskat på sarkom i nästan 30 år och har tappat räkningen på de olika genetiska tumörtyper av sarkom som han hittills har upptäckt i labbet. Förra året tilldelades han Cancerfondens utmärkelse "Årets cancerforskare” för sin banbrytande forskning inom mjukdelssarkom.

15h

Så utnyttjar cancercellerna sina grannar

Runt 90 procent av alla dödsfall relaterade till cancer, beror på att tumörer har spridit sig till andra organ. Kristian Pietras och Chris Madsens forskning handlar om att förstå hur tumörcellerna kommunicerar med kroppens olika vävnader och lurar intilliggande bindvävs- celler för att kunna sprida sig.

15h

Patientregistren – forskarnas guldgruva

Hela 84 000 patientfall ingår i registret för ändtarms- och tjocktarmscancer. Det ger stora möjligheter för forskning som kan förbättra behandlingen.

15h

Barncancer: sjukdom som lämnar spår

Allt fler barn som drabbas av cancer överlever sin cancersjukdom. Men två tredjedelar av dem riskerar att få komplikationer senare i livet, på grund av sjukdomen eller behandlingen de genomgått. På Skånes universitetssjukhus och Lunds universitet bedrivs olika forskningsprojekt för att förbättra livet för dessa canceröverlevare.

15h

Kan ett plåster upptäcka cancer?

Hudcancer är en av de vanligaste cancerformerna i Sverige och malignt melanom är den cancersjukdom som ökar mest. Genom att utveckla ett plåster vill forskare vid Malmö universitet möjliggöra ett kostnadseffektivt och lindrigt diagnosverktyg.

15h

Slump och tur ledde blickarna till oväntat protein

Kan ett broskprotein utvecklas till en biomarkör som skiljer mellan aggressiv och mindre aggressiv cancer, och kanske till och med bidra till att behandla tumörerna? Det hoppas Anna Blom, professor i proteinkemi vid Lunds universitet.

15h

Kan socker avslöja tumörer?

Vanligt socker, samma som vi använder när vi bakar, kan komma att bli framtidens kontrastmedel för att diagnostisera hjärntumörer, prostatacancer och annan cancer vid undersökning med magnetkamera. Sockret kan också injiceras för att potentiellt utvärdera effekten av en behandling mot cancer.

15h

Sätter cancerns viktigaste proteiner på kartan

Du har säkert hört talas om kartläggningen av det mänskliga genomet, alltså människans alla gener. På liknande vis har forskare tagit fram en proteinatlas, Human Protein Atlas. En del i projektet har varit att kartlägga cancerrelaterade proteiner och hur dessa påverkar prognosen.

15h

Lär dig känna igen varningsflaggor för cancer

Ju tidigare en cancer upptäcks, desto bättre är prognosen och chansen att bli botad. Lär dig alarmsymtomen för cancer.

15h

Övervikt, bröstcancer – och nya strategier

Att övervikt kan leda till hjärt-kärlsjukdomar är känt, men studier visar att detta även kan spela en roll vid bröstcancer. Här berättar Signe Borgquist om sin forskning om detta och om förhoppningen att ett kolesterolsänkande läkemedel ska kunna användas som tilläggsbehandling för att förebygga återfall i bröstcancer i framtiden.

15h

Tar hjälp av virtual reality

Med hjälp av de svarta VR-glasögonen öppnar sig ett helt universum av olika sfärer, där varje sfär representerar en blodcell. Genom handkontrollen väljer forskaren ut skilda grenar av blodcellernas utvecklingsträd, för att se vilka gener som är aktiva när vissa celltyper bildas.

15h

Plastantikroppar som hittar cancerceller

Forskare vid Malmö universitet utvecklar målstyrda nanopartiklar i plast som är riktade mot strukturer specifika vid cancer som vanliga antikroppar har svårt att känna igen. Tidig diagnostik är tillämpningen som ligger närmast till hands men forskarna hoppas att nanopartiklarna så småningom ska kunna användas även för riktade behandlingar.

15h

Do Snails Fart? A Behavioural Ecologist Answers This Burning Question

Curious kids want to know, and now so do we.

15h

Tradition meets tech as Kenya's herders adapt to climate change

For generations, Kaltuma Hassan's clan would study the sky over Kenya's arid north for any sign of rain—some wind here, a wisp of cloud there—to guide their parched livestock to water.

15h

Drones flown straight at aircraft to test collision avoidance tech

A start-up has tested its collision avoidance system by flying drones straight at planes and helicopters over 7000 times — so far there haven't been any crashes

15h

Lungelæger til ny regering: Fordobling af tobakspriser og mere ensartethed

En fordobling af tobakspriserne og en langt større ensartethed i tilbuddene til KOL-patienter og rygestop-interesserede borgere. Det er ønskelisten fra Ole Hilberg, formand for Dansk Lungemedicinsk Selskab til en kommende regering.

15h

Sinking feeling: Philippine cities facing 'slow-motion disaster'

When Mary Ann San Jose moved to Sitio Pariahan more than two decades ago, she could walk to the local chapel. Today, reaching it requires a swim.

15h

4 Women With Lives Scarred by Genital Cutting: Could a Surgeon Heal Them?

Over 200 million women and girls alive today have been circumcised. Four of them shared with The Times their pain, emotional trauma and sexual struggles — and their journey to feel whole.

15h

15h

Sleepless in Berlin: Nightingales flock to scruffy city parks

Sarah Darwin, the great-great granddaughter of British biologist Charles Darwin, was sleepless in Berlin when, to her "enormous surprise", she heard a nightingale warbling merrily outside her window.

15h

Regulators fail to set date for 737 MAX return to service

Civil aviation regulators from around the world failed to make a determination Thursday on when Boeing's popular 737 MAX aircraft can return to the skies after being grounded following two deadly crashes.

15h

Sleepless in Berlin: Nightingales flock to scruffy city parks

Sarah Darwin, the great-great granddaughter of British biologist Charles Darwin, was sleepless in Berlin when, to her "enormous surprise", she heard a nightingale warbling merrily outside her window.

15h

Main EU parties adopt climate change as rallying cry

In a shift since the last European Parliament elections, mainstream parties have adopted climate change as a rallying cry—spurred in part by a wave of student strikes.

15h

Lift off for SpaceX rocket carrying 60 satellites

A Falcon-9 rocket launches from Florida, packed with 60 satellites capable of giving users on the ground high-speed connections to the internet.

16h

Snart i hamn efter 20-årig resa

Cancer i bukspottkörteln, pankreascancer, ger diffusa svårtolkade symtom vilket för med sig att den oftast upptäcks för sent, när den redan hunnit sprida sig. Dödligheten är hög men tidig upptäckt skulle kunna ändra på det. Snart kan ett diagnostiskt test, som upptäcker pankreascancer tidigt, vara tillgängligt.

16h

3D-mammografi – hur ska den användas?

Röntgenläkaren Sophia Zackrisson och hennes forskargrupp fick under 2018 stort genomslag för resultat de presenterade om screening med 3D-mammografi , så kallad brösttomosyntes. Vad har hänt sedan dess?

16h

Evolutionär drivkraft bakom cancerns ständiga utveckling

För att cancer ska kunna uppstå, krävs att cellen som ska bli en cancercell genomgår ett antal mutationer som inte repareras av kroppens ”genetiska kontrollanter”. Då övergår cellen från att vara en del i laget till att börja bete sig som en encellig organism som förökar sig på omgivningens bekostnad. Men varför fortsätter cellerna i en tumör att mutera, så att den till slut består av en mängd gen

16h

Så gör cancern för att bli framgångsrik

De flesta cancerformer svarar bra på den första cellgiftsbehandlingen och för en del patienter räcker det så – patienten blir botad. Men om cancern kommer tillbaka brukar behandlingen fungera sämre eller inte alls. David Gisselsson Nord vill ta reda på varför.

16h

Immunterapi – så funkar det

Tanken med immunterapi är att stärka immunförsvaret så att det kan oskadliggöra cancercellerna på ett effektivt sätt. Forskargrupper över hela världen jobbar med olika spår inom immunterapi. Här nämns några av de viktigaste.

16h

Att hjälpa immunförsvaret på traven

Immunterapi belönades med 2018 års Nobelpris i fysiologi eller medicin. Men mycket återstår att lära innan immunterapi kan bli förstahandsvalet vid cancerbehandling. Karin Leanderssons forskargrupp kartlägger vad som händer när cancern kidnappar immunförsvaret och får det att hjälpa cancern istället för att bekämpa den.

16h

Kan strålning stärka immunterapi?

Mycket har hänt inom cancervården sedan cancerläkaren Ana Carneiro började arbeta som läkare i början av 2000- talet, både vad gäller behandling och diagnostik.

16h

Vad händer i kroppen vid cancer?

Cancer är ett samlingsnamn för cirka 200 olika tumörsjukdomar som i sin tur kan delas in i mängder av undergrupper. Gemensamt är att någonstans i kroppen har celler börjat växa och bete sig avvikande. De slutar göra det de ska och samverkar inte längre med omgivningen. Istället för att ge plats åt nya friska celler växer de okontrollerat.

16h

”Jag lever tack vare forskningen”

Michael Anderberg var 36 år när han fick reda på att han bara hade några veckor kvar att leva. Den aggressiva cancern hade återvänt och nu fanns det inget mer att göra. Det här är berättelsen om en tvåbarnspappa som drabbas mitt i livet, en ihärdig läkare – och forskningen som ändrade allt.

16h

Slå in kilar i det okända

Vi berörs alla av cancer, antingen som drabbade eller som närstående. Varje år insjuknar ungefär 60 000 personer i cancer i Sverige och uppskattningsvis var tredje nu levande person kommer att få ett cancerbesked under sin livstid.

16h

Colombian breeds rare frogs to undermine animal traffickers

In a small farmhouse surrounded by cloud forest, Iván Lozano inspects dozens of glass containers that hold some of the world's most coveted frogs.

16h

SpaceX launches first 60 satellites of its internet network

SpaceX has launched a rocket carrying the first 60 satellites of its "Starlink" constellation, which is intended to provide internet from space in an array that could one day contain over 12,000 orbiting transponders.

16h

Virtual reality helps police learn to interact with autistic

Police officers are now using virtual reality to learn the best ways to interact with people who suffer from autism and de-escalate situations that could quickly turn awry.

16h

3 dead, state capital battered as storms rake Missouri

An outbreak of nasty storms spawned tornadoes that razed homes, flattened trees and tossed cars across a dealership lot, injuring about two dozen people in Missouri's capital city and killing at least three others elsewhere in the state.

16h

Clotilda: Last US slave ship discovered among gators, snakes

The old wooden ship hull didn't look like much when researchers first saw it: just broken, waterlogged boards and a few pieces of rusted metal, all stuck in the muddy bottom of a bug-infested Alabama bayou where an alligator and poisonous water moccasins swam nearby.

16h

Colombian breeds rare frogs to undermine animal traffickers

In a small farmhouse surrounded by cloud forest, Iván Lozano inspects dozens of glass containers that hold some of the world's most coveted frogs.

16h

Older male crickets attract more females—but have less sex

Older male crickets are better at getting females to live with them—but they mate less than younger rivals once they find a partner.

16h

Coming to your household soon: 3-D food printers, nano foods and bug burgers

David Julian McClements, Distinguished Professor of Food Science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and among the world's most highly cited researchers, has written a new book that explores the brave new world of science and food.

16h

Older male crickets attract more females—but have less sex

Older male crickets are better at getting females to live with them—but they mate less than younger rivals once they find a partner.

16h

Initially threatened by change, people adapt to societal diversity over time

President Donald Trump recently introduced immigration reforms that would prioritize education and employment qualifications over family connections in selecting immigrants and nominated immigration hard-liner Kris Kobach as "immigration czar." The moves, like many by Trump, speak to those who feel threatened by what they perceive as a changing America.

16h

Energy storage in the Midwest and beyond: A timely analysis

As the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) released an update to last year's order on energy storage, MRS Energy & Sustainability today publishes a timely collection of papers that unpack the issue of energy storage in the Midwest and beyond.

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Media watchdog has beef with ABC over Catalyst program

Authority finds science show breached impartiality standards in its portrayal of the beef industry as harmful to the environment The media watchdog has found the ABC science program Catalyst breached editorial standards for impartiality in its presentation of the beef industry as harmful to the environment. Meat & Livestock Australia complained to the ABC last year that the program was unfair to

16h

Sperm counts are on the decline – could plastics be to blame?

A recent study that tested both men and dogs added to concerns that chemicals in the environment are damaging the quality and quantity of sperm • Help us reach our $150,000 goal to fund this series. Make a contribution Surprising new research into dog sperm has reproductive biologists concerned about the fate of their own species. In a March study , scientists at Nottingham University found that

16h

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17h

Fungi that draws gold from its surroundings discovered in Western Australia

Interaction that could signal new gold deposits ‘had to be seen to be believed’, CSIRO researcher says Fungi that draws gold from its surroundings has been discovered in Western Australia, stunning scientists who say it could signal new deposits. Found near Boddington, south of Perth, the strain of the fusarium oxysporum fungus attaches gold to its strands by dissolving and precipitating particle

17h

Region H: Brug af oxycodon er forholdsvis udbredt

Præparatet oxycodon, der kædes sammen med opioid-epidemien i USA, er »forholdsvis udbredt« på hovedstadens hospitaler og i praksissektoren. Det fremgår af et politikersvar fra Region H, hvoraf det også fremgår, at overlæge ønsker større tilbageholdenhed.

17h

Jagten på moderne lokaler

Lægemanglen er de senere år kommet til hovedstaden og sivet ind over grænsen til Frederiksberg. Det skal et nyt lægehus i det gamle Frederiksberg Hospital være med til at lave om på. Og for praktiserende læger er projektet en særlig mulighed for at bytte gammeldags lokaler ud med nye og opnå et større fagligt fællesskab.

17h

En dag i ølægens liv

To håndfulde patienter, administrative opgaver og et enkelt sygebesøg. Få et indblik i en tilfældig arbejdsdag i maj for Hans-Henrik Kaae, Sejerøs praktiserende læge.

17h

»Læger bliver tit fremhævet som vigtigst i sundhedsvæsenet. Det er en fejl.«

Politikerne skal investere mere i forebyggelse, og så skal der gøres op med konservatismen i sundhedsvæsenet. Det mener Socialdemokratiets sundhedsordfører Flemming Møller Mortensen, der har inviteret Dagens Medicin til Aalborg for at vise, hvilket sundhedsvæsen han vil have.

17h

Get a life with Gary Stacey

Gary Stacey is soybean researcher at University of Missouri and ASPB member. Whatever problems you might have with his science, the university already attested him a "clean bill of health". Get a life.

17h

These Scientists Think Leonardo Da Vinci May Have Had ADHD

Welcome to the tricky world of retrodiagnoses.

17h

17h

Cross Section: Hiranya Peiris – Science Weekly podcast

What happened before the Big Bang? This is one of the hardest questions scientists are trying to answer, but Prof Hiranya Peiris is not daunted by the challenge. Hannah Devlin invited Peiris on the podcast to discuss the origins of our universe Continue reading…

17h

Cross Section: Hiranya Peiris – Science Weekly podcast

What happened before the Big Bang? This is one of the hardest questions scientists are trying to answer, but Prof Hiranya Peiris is not daunted by the challenge. Hannah Devlin invited Peiris on the podcast to discuss the origins of our universe. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

17h

Ketchup, toastbrød og pizza: Færdigmad får dig til at spise 500 kalorier ekstra om dagen

Vi har tendens til at overspise, hvis maden er industrielt forarbejdet.

18h

Science Snapshots — May 2019

Researchers at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry have predicted fascinating new properties of lithium; a powerful combination of experiment and theory has revealed atomic-level details about how silver helps transform carbon dioxide gas into a reusable form; new study reports the first comprehensive, highly coordinated effort to examine the global diversity and biogeography of activated sludge micr

18h

When macrophages are deprived of oxygen

Infected tissue has a low concentration of oxygen. The body's standard immune mechanisms, which rely on oxygen, can then only function to a limited extent. How does the immune system nevertheless manage to control bacteria under such conditions? Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg and University Hospital Regensburg discovered that fewer metabolites are produced in the

18h

SpaceX launches 60 internet satellites into orbit

Starlink mission aims to create high-speed internet connectivity service

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18h

»Du skal nok være lidt speciel for at være ølæge«

320 patienter, fyraften kl. 13 og færre storbydiagnoser. Det lyder som en praktiserende læges drøm, men for Hans-Henrik Kaae er det hverdag i lægeklinikken på Sejerø ud for Sjællands vestkyst.

18h

»Søren gav min datter en chance, før jeg selv gjorde«

For 16 år siden mødte de hinanden for første gang, da han som læge var med til fødslen af hendes tvillinger i en højdramatisk fødsel. Nu krydser deres veje igen, når Søren Brostrøm bliver chef for Camilla Rathcke.

18h

Jeg er advokat for ­hjertepatienterne – uden persons anseelse

KRONIK. En patientforening kan godt komme i klemme mellem patienters oplevelser og den klassiske lægefaglige verdens anskuelse og opførsel. Og nok er jeg advokat for hjertepatienterne, men jeg er ikke enøjet.

18h

Med Ellen Trane til lægen: Hvis ikke almen praksis ­fungerer, fungerer vores sundhedsvæsen ikke

Dagens Medicin har været med Ellen Trane Nørby (V) til læge i hjembyen Sønderborg. »H.P. er mit sundhedsvæsen,« siger sundhedsministeren om praktiserende læge Hans Peter Henriksen.

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What's the most likely cause of the extinction of humans?

Create a text-cloud out of the Hollywood blockbusters 2018. Extinction is one of the favorites of Hollywood producers. submitted by /u/Michael_Renz [link] [comments]

18h

Would it be possible use genetic engineering and bioprinting and create a womb, ovaries, eggs, placenta, and vagina from a man’s stem cells?

Will be possible in the future to create female only organs using a man`s stem cells? submitted by /u/SabrineCrystal [link] [comments]

18h

Konsekvenser af Huawei-forbud for europæisk 5G, chip- og netværks-leverandører og smartphones

Den amerikanske beslutning om at forbyde Huawei-teknologi kan få vidtrækkende betydning for en række europæiske selskaber og teknologi-områder.

19h

Trump’s Cover-Up Accelerates

President Donald Trump can only escalate. He cannot help it. On Thursday night, he spread from his own presidential account a video of the speaker of the House, edited to splice together moments when she stumbled over her words, in an apparent effort to deceive people into thinking her drunk or ill. In 2016, Trump’s Russian supporters performed this service for him with faked videos of Hillary Cl

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20h

SpaceX puts up 60 internet satellites

The California firm launches the first spacecraft in its multi-billion-dollar broadband project.

20h

Geometry of an electron determined for the first time

Physicists are able to show for the first time how a single electron looks in an artificial atom. A newly developed method enables them to show the probability of an electron being present in a space. This allows improved control of electron spins, which could serve as the smallest information unit in a future quantum computer.

20h

The man who made Einstein world-famous

UK astronomer Arthur Eddington proved the German-born physicist's theory of relativity in May 1919.

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The extraordinary powers of bacteria visualized in real time

The global spread of antibiotic resistance is a major public health issue and a priority for international microbiology research. In a new paper, researchers report on filming the process of antibiotic resistance acquisition in real time, discovering a key but unexpected player in its maintenance and spread within bacterial populations.

20h

Has the "Sea Serpent" Seismic Mystery Been Solved?

A team of geologists believe they’ve discovered the origin of the sea serpent seismic signal heard around the world last November. The answer could involve future volcanic tsunamis — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

Gas vs. electric? Fuel choice affects efforts to achieve low-energy and low-impact homes

If you want to make your home as energy-efficient and green as possible, should you use gas or electric for your heating and cooling needs?

21h

How to avoid living in ‘City.inc’

submitted by /u/cardboardzach [link] [comments]

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China’s alarming AI surveillance of Muslims should wake us up

submitted by /u/extra_good [link] [comments]

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Initially threatened by change, people adapt to societal diversity over time

With time, people can adapt to societal diversity and actually benefit from it, according to a new study. Those in power especially set the tone for integrating people into a new society.

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Icy Room Temperatures May Chill Productivity

A new study suggests women's performance on math and verbal tasks increases as room temperature rises, up to about the mid 70s F. Christopher Intagliata reports.

21h

Virtual reality can spot navigation problems in early Alzheimer's disease

Virtual reality (VR) can identify early Alzheimer's disease more accurately than 'gold standard' cognitive tests currently in use, new research suggests.

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Did Leonardo da Vinci have ADHD?

Leonardo da Vinci produced some of the world's most iconic art, but historical accounts show that he struggled to complete his works. New research now suggests the best explanation for Leonardo's inability to finish projects is that the great artist may have had attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

21h

Game theory highlights power of local reporting in vaccine decisions

Computational modeling of social networks suggests that vaccination programs are more successful in containing disease when individuals have access to local information about disease prevalence.

21h

The effect of sleep quality on peptic-ulcer relapse in older adults

Poor sleep quality and peptic ulcer disease (PUD, a condition when sores known as ulcers develop on the lining of your stomach or in the first part of your small intestine) are both major public health problems that affect the physical and psychological wellbeing of older adults.

21h

GRACE data contributes to understanding of climate change

The team that led a twin satellite system launched in 2002 to take detailed measurements of the Earth, called the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), reports on the contributions that their nearly two decades of data have made to our understanding of global climate patterns.

21h

Presence of oral bacteria in cerebral emboli of stroke patients

Researchers have shown for the first time that the cerebral emboli of stroke patients contain DNA from oral pathogens.

21h

Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Benefit remains unclear

Meaningful studies are lacking for certain patient groups. Disease-specific registries could help close the data gap.

21h

Climate change: Answers to your most asked questions

You sent us thousands of questions about climate change. Here are some answers to the most common.

22h

Voyager science boss wins major award

Edward Stone has helmed the epic NASA mission for almost half a century.

22h

Spanish flu may have lingered two years before 1918 outbreak and vaccine could have treated it

The most severe pandemic in recent history, killing some 50 million people worldwide, the Spanish influenza, may have emerged up to two years earlier than previously believed. And, according to a new and influential study, its early manifestation was ignored at the time as a 'minor infection.'

22h

A step closer to identifying cause of a blinding disease

A recent study offers an important step in unlocking the mystery of LHON's cause. The researchers had previously showed that the cells that connect the eye to the brain were sensitive to a certain free radical, known as 'superoxide,' and hypothesized that the presence of too much superoxide was likely the cause of LHON.

22h

Experimental fertility preservation provides hope for young men

Testicular tissue samples obtained from 189 males who were facing procedures that could imperil fertility were cryopreserved at one university, proving the feasibility of centralized processing and freezing of testicular tissue obtained from academic medical centers scattered around the world.

22h

Marching for climate change may sway people's beliefs and actions

Americans have a long tradition of taking to the streets to protest or to advocate for things they believe in. New research suggests that when it comes to climate change, these marches may indeed have a positive effect on the public.

22h

Evolution and diversity of Leptospira bacteria

Leptospirosis is an emerging zoonotic disease that affects more than one million people around the world each year. Researchers have now sequenced the genomes of Leptospira collected from environments around the globe and revealed 30 new species and new patterns of species diversity.

22h

Obsessive-compulsive disorder research needs more focus on patients, new study asserts

In a review of recent literature on obsessive-compulsive disorder, a researcher/practitioner writes that cognitive science is becoming further and further removed from the people those studies are supposed to help: OCD patients and the therapists who treat them.

22h

Gas vs. electric? Fuel choice affects efforts to achieve low-energy and low-impact homes

If you want to make your home as energy-efficient and green as possible, should you use gas or electric for your heating and cooling needs?

22h

Icy Room Temperatures May Chill Productivity

A new study suggests women's performance on math and verbal tasks increases as room temperature rises, up to about the mid 70s F. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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