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nyheder2019maj27

Trump Administration Hardens Its Attack on Climate Science

In a significant escalation, policymakers are seeking to undermine or discard research showing the most dire risks of inaction on climate change.

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Liselott Blixt overvejer farvel til sundhedspolitik

Denne valgperiode kan blive Liselott Blixts sidste som sundhedsordfører for Dansk Folkeparti, siger hun til Dagens Medicin.

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Colliding lasers double the energy of proton beams

Researchers from Sweden's Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg present a new method which can double the energy of a proton beam produced by laser-based particle accelerators. The breakthrough could lead to more compact, cheaper equipment that could be useful for many applications, including proton therapy.

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Author Correction: Enhanced skyrmion stability due to exchange frustration

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44360-7 Author Correction: Enhanced skyrmion stability due to exchange frustration

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Publisher Correction: Toxoplasma Modulates Signature Pathways of Human Epilepsy, Neurodegeneration & Cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44545-0 Publisher Correction: Toxoplasma Modulates Signature Pathways of Human Epilepsy, Neurodegeneration & Cancer

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Author Correction: A new approach based on targeted pooled DNA sequencing identifies novel mutations in patients with Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44425-7 Author Correction: A new approach based on targeted pooled DNA sequencing identifies novel mutations in patients with Inherited Retinal Dystrophies

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Author Correction: Changes in separate renal function in patients who underwent minimally invasive renal stone surgery according to the preoperative functional deterioration

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44432-8 Author Correction: Changes in separate renal function in patients who underwent minimally invasive renal stone surgery according to the preoperative functional deterioration

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Author Correction: Transcriptomics analysis of host liver and meta-transcriptome analysis of rumen epimural microbial community in young calves treated with artificial dosing of rumen content from adult donor cow

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44428-4 Author Correction: Transcriptomics analysis of host liver and meta-transcriptome analysis of rumen epimural microbial community in young calves treated with artificial dosing of rumen content from adult donor cow

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Author Correction: Macro-scale ore-controlling faults revealed by micro-geochemical anomalies

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44433-7 Author Correction: Macro-scale ore-controlling faults revealed by micro-geochemical anomalies

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Group A strep genome research expedites vaccine development efforts

The global search for a group A streptococcal (Strep A) vaccine has narrowed after researchers identified a common gene signature in almost all global Strep A strains by sequencing thousands of genomes in a project spanning 10 years and more than 20 countries.

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Research team throws new light on photosynthetic supercomplex structure

A team of scientists has taken a significant step closer to unlocking the secrets of photosynthesis, by determining the structure of a very large photosynthetic supercomplex.

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Why Atlanta is building the nation's largest 'food forest'

Atlanta recently passed a measure that will convert an undeveloped plot of land into a food forest that will include food-producing trees, shrubs, and vines. For years, thousands of Atlanta residents have lived in areas that don't provide easy access to fresh food — places called "food deserts." The Urban Food Forest seeks to bring fresh produce back into local neighborhoods, hopefully serving as

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Physician burnout costs the US health care system approximately $4.6 billion a year

Physician burnout is a substantial economic burden, costing the US health care system approximately $4.6 billion a year. Investing in strategies to reduce burnout may have economic benefits. Findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Research team throws new light on photosynthetic supercomplex structure

A team of scientists has taken a significant step closer to unlocking the secrets of photosynthesis, by determining the structure of a very large photosynthetic supercomplex.

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Save hundreds on e-learning courses this Memorial Day at the PopSci Shop

Learn about big data, computer science, design, and more. Learn about big data, computer science, design, and more and save hundreds on e-learning courses this Memorial Day at the PopSci Shop.

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Robots find a new job: Skyscraper window washers

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How language developed: Comprehension learning precedes vocal production

Researchers recently investigated how the closely related West African green monkeys react to unknown sounds.

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Ny master i neurorehabilitering skal styrke praktikerne

Københavns Universitet udvider med en ny master i neurorehabilitering. Den er målrettet fysioterapeuter,…

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Study uncovers surprising melting patterns beneath Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf

Scientists have discovered an ancient geologic structure that restricts where ocean water flows, and reveals that local ocean currents may play a critical role in the ice shelf's future retreat.

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Major step forward in the production of 'green' hydrogen

The first thermodynamically reversible chemical reactor capable of producing hydrogen as a pure product stream represents a 'transformational' step forward in the chemical industry.

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Four bodies and ten tonnes of rubbish collected from Everest

Four bodies have been retrieved from Everest and some ten tonnes of garbage plucked from the mountain at the end of this year's climbing season, Nepal authorities said Monday.

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Brazil braces for another tailings dam collapse

Thousands of Brazilians braced Monday for the possible collapse of another tailings dam owned by mining giant Vale that threatens to spew millions of tons of toxic sludge over towns, rivers and forest.

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Antibiotics found in some of the world's rivers exceed 'safe' levels, global study finds

Concentrations of antibiotics found in some of the world's rivers exceed 'safe' levels by up to 300 times, the first ever global study has discovered.

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Exploring the origins of the apple

Apples originally evolved in the wild to entice ancient megafauna to disperse their seeds. More recently, humans began spreading the trees along the Silk Road with other familiar crops. Dispersing the apple trees led to their domestication.

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Colliding lasers double the energy of proton beams

Researchers have developed a new method which can double the energy of a proton beam produced by laser-based particle accelerators. The breakthrough could lead to more compact, cheaper equipment that could be useful for many applications, including proton therapy.

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Coat of proteins makes viruses more infectious and links them to Alzheimer's disease

New research shows that viruses interact with proteins in the biological fluids of their host which results in a layer of proteins on the viral surface. This coat of proteins makes the virus more infectious and facilitates the formation of plaques characteristic of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

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MIT speech2face – constructing an image of a face from voice audio data

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Semi Finalists Selected for Mars Colony Prize Competition

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AI in Five, Fifty and Five Hundred Years

submitted by /u/prdmagnet [link] [comments]

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A forest 'glow' reveals awakening from hibernation

Gross Primary Production (GPP) in forests tells scientists how much CO2 these vast and remote systems are breathing in. For decades, scientists have used satellites to monitor the changes in greenness of deciduous forests to track GPP. Evergreen trees, however, retain their green needles year round, preventing scientists from detecting photosynthesis cycles on large scales. A new study is the firs

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More fishing vessels chasing fewer fish, new study finds

A new analysis of global fishing data has found the world's fishing fleet doubled in size over the 65-years to 2015 but for the amount of effort expended the catch fell more than 80 per cent.Published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study by researchers from the University of Tasmania and CSIRO found the global fishing fleet grew from 1.7 million vessels in 1950

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De-TOXing exhausted T cells may bolster CAR T immunotherapy against solid tumors

A decade ago researchers announced development of a cancer immunotherapy called CAR (for chimeric antigen receptor)-T, in which a patient is re-infused with their own genetically modified T cells equipped to mount a potent anti-tumor attack. Since then CAR T approaches (one of several strategies collectively known as 'adoptive T cell transfer') have made headlines as a novel cellular immunotherapy

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Even dim candlelight before bed is bright enough to disrupt sleep

Our body clocks vary markedly in their response to light before bedtime, with some likely to have their slumber disturbed even by very dim illumination

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Fishing fleets have doubled since 1950—but they're having a harder time catching fish

Global analysis finds more marine vessels and bigger motors increasing pressure on fish stocks

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This iconic Humboldt map may need crucial updates

A seminal, 212-year-old diagram of Andean plants by German explorer Alexander von Humboldt is still groundbreaking — but outdated, researchers say.

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More fishing vessels chasing fewer fish, new study finds

A new analysis of global fishing data has found the world's fishing fleet doubled in size over the 65-years to 2015 but for the amount of effort expended the catch fell more than 80 per cent.

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A forest 'glow' reveals awakening from hibernation

Winters in the northern hemisphere are brutal. The harsh conditions drive some species to hibernate; bears reduce their metabolic state to conserve energy until spring. Forests also endure winter by conserving energy; they shut down photosynthesis, the process by which a green pigment called chlorophyll captures sunlight and carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce the chemical energy that fuels the plants

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Scientists want to use bacteria to revolutionize energy storage

Scientists from Cornell University suggest using biology to transform sustainable energy storage. The researchers propose combining biological and non-biological electrochemical engineering to improve on photosynthesis. Using electroactive microbes can produce biofuels. None For renewable energy to become more widespread, fresh technology that can facilitate storing it on a large scale needs to b

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Scientists want to use bacteria to revolutionize energy storage

Scientists from Cornell University suggest using biology to transform sustainable energy storage. The researchers propose combining biological and non-biological electrochemical engineering to improve on photosynthesis. Using electroactive microbes can produce biofuels. None For renewable energy to become more widespread, fresh technology that can facilitate storing it on a large scale needs to b

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First-of-its-kind study in endothelial stem cells finds exposure to flavored e-cigarette liquids, e-cigarette use exacerbates cell dysfunction

There has been a rapid rise in e-cigarette use, but its health effects have not been well-studied and their effect on vascular health remains unknown. A first of its kind study in endothelial stem cells, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, found acute exposure to flavored e-liquids or e-cigarette use exacerbates endothelial cell dysfunction, which often precedes heart d

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E-cigarette use, flavorings may increase heart disease risk, Stanford-led study finds

The flavoring liquid for electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease when inhaled, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Scientists uncover exotic matter in the sun's atmosphere

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What Losing 1 Million Species Means for the Planet—and Humanity

A new UN report finds that at least 1 million species are at risk of extinction. Will this finally be enough to motivate worldwide action? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to find native plants for your garden

DIY Back-alley deals not necessary. Invasive species can overwhelm native plants and destroy the ecosystems that rely on them, but native plants have adapted to the area, so you won’t have to spend as much…

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FDA Approves Gene Therapy for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

At $2 million for a single dose, Novartis’s Zolgensma is the most expensive medicine to date, but still less expensive over a lifetime than another approved drug for the rare genetic disease.

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Robert Smith’s Real Gift to Morehouse

In 1969, Denver began busing a small contingent of black children across town to a better-resourced white elementary school. “Every morning, we were loaded up on Bus No. 13,” Robert F. Smith told Morehouse College graduates the other weekend, before announcing that he’d pay off all their student loans. Black parents had been complaining for years about Denver’s black schools having the oldest boo

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Marriage and children don’t always make women happy. Who knew? | Suzanne Moore

Should Prof Paul Dolan’s pronouncements change the way we think about life? Er … Some of my best friends are in a subgroup: “unmarried and childless women”. Its members, according to a professor of behavioural science at the London School of Economics, are the “happiest subgroup in the population”. Paul Dolan, in a talk at the Hay festiv al , told the audience that the latest evidence, including

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The Death of Astronomy?

Probably not, but forthcoming commercial satellite constellations herald a new era for our night skies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brain stimulation enhances visual learning speed and efficiency

Brain stimulation, when coupled with visual training therapy, has dramatic effects on increasing learning speed and retention in both healthy adults and patients who have experienced vision loss due to stroke or other brain injury.

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Broken brain cells repaired in dementia mouse model

Dysfunctional neurons in the hippocampus of adult female mice modeling dementia can be repaired and reconnected to distant parts of the brain, reports a new study published in JNeurosci. The similarity between the mouse model and the human condition underscores the therapeutic potential of targeting these cells in dementia patients.

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Brain stimulation speeds up visual learning and recovery

A combination of visual training and a recently developed brain stimulation technique boosts learning in healthy adults and cortically blind patients, according to research published in JNeurosci.

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Could gold be the key to making gene therapy for HIV, blood disorders more accessible?

Scientists took a step toward making gene therapy more practical by simplifying the way gene-editing instructions are delivered to cells. Using a gold nanoparticle instead of an inactivated virus, they safely delivered gene-editing tools in lab models of HIV and inherited blood disorders.

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Study: Millions lack access to green spaces

Millions of people in Great Britain live more than a 10-minute walk away from their nearest park or green space, a study calculates.

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White Panda Is Spotted in China for the First Time

Albinism, a rare genetically inherited condition, caused the animal’s unusual appearance.

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Could gold be the key to making gene therapy for HIV, blood disorders more accessible?

Scientists took a step toward making gene therapy more practical by simplifying the way gene-editing instructions are delivered to cells. Using a gold nanoparticle instead of an inactivated virus, they safely delivered gene-editing tools in lab models of HIV and inherited blood disorders.

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The OPKIX One lets you take videos without having to stare at your phone

Gadgets Be more present without sacrificing your content. With the OPKIX One, you can take videos without having to stare at your phone allowing you to be more present without sacrificing your content.

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Scientists uncover a trove of genes that could hold key to how humans evolved

New computational analysis finds that more than two dozen human zinc finger transcription factors, previously thought to control activity of similar genes across species have in fact human-specific roles and could help explain how our species came to be.

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Swiss postal service uses drones to move lab samples between hospitals

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U.S. Banks Are Terrified of Chinese Payment Apps | Bloomberg

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Exploring the history of the apple from its wild origins

Recent archaeological finds of ancient preserved apple seeds across Europe and West Asia combined with historical, paleontological, and recently published genetic data are presenting a fascinating …

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Photographer 'overwhelmed' by response to bald eagle picture

Steve Biro snapped the picture of 'Bruce' the bald eagle at a raptor conservation centre in Canada.

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Have We Found a Diet That Truly Works?

The so-called “satiating diet” seems to help people manage weight and good health without going to extremes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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It's Time to Be Honest about Seafood

If we want to eat sustainably, aquaculture has to be part of the conversation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Have We Found a Diet That Truly Works?

The so-called “satiating diet” seems to help people manage weight and good health without going to extremes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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It's Time to Be Honest about Seafood

If we want to eat sustainably, aquaculture has to be part of the conversation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Quake II is getting an RTX makeover, will be free to download on June 6

As part of their Computex 2019 announcements, Nvidia and Bethesda have unveiled the development of Quake II RTX. The free download will include the first three single-player levels of the PC …

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New causes of autism found in 'junk' DNA

Leveraging artificial intelligence techniques, researchers have demonstrated that mutations in so-called 'junk' DNA can cause autism. The study is the first to functionally link such mutations to the neurodevelopmental condition and the first clear demonstration of non-inherited, noncoding mutations causing any complex human disease or disorder.

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Monkeys use their 'eagle' call to warn each other about drones

Monkeys in Senegal have learned to adapt to drones flying over their habitat. They use a similar call to when they spot an eagle to alert others

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Atomic Veterans Were Silenced for 50 Years. Now, They’re Talking.

Nearly everyone who’s seen it and lived to tell the tale describes it the same way: a horrifying, otherworldly thing of ghastly beauty that has haunted their life ever since. “The colors were beautiful,” remembers a man in Morgan Knibbe’s short documentary The Atomic Soldiers . “I hate to say that.” “It was completely daylight at midnight—brighter than the brightest day you ever saw,” says anothe

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Scientists throw new light on photosynthetic supercomplex structure

A team of scientists from Arizona State University has taken a significant step closer to unlocking the secrets of photosynthesis, by determining the structure of a very large photosynthetic …

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Google sponsorerer forskning i kold fusion: »Interessant, men uden evidens«

Et toårigt forskningsprojekt med deltagelse af førende universiteter i USA og Canada har ikke fundet evidens for kold fusion, men forskning inden for dette område kan alligevel være interessant i mange sammenhænge, mener forskerne.

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Study uncovers surprising melting patterns beneath Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf

In a study published today in Nature Geoscience, scientists detail how they discovered an ancient geologic structure that restricts where ocean water flows, and reveals that local ocean currents may play a critical role in the ice shelf's future retreat.

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Major step forward in the production of 'green' hydrogen

The first thermodynamically reversible chemical reactor capable of producing hydrogen as a pure product stream represents a 'transformational' step forward in the chemical industry.

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New causes of autism found in 'junk' DNA

Leveraging artificial intelligence techniques, researchers have demonstrated that mutations in so-called 'junk' DNA can cause autism. The study is the first to functionally link such mutations to the neurodevelopmental condition and the first clear demonstration of non-inherited, noncoding mutations causing any complex human disease or disorder.

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Artificial intelligence detects a new class of mutations behind autism

Using artificial intelligence, a Princeton University-led team has decoded the functional impact of regulatory DNA mutations in people with autism. The researchers believe this powerful method is generally applicable to discovering such genetic contributions to any disease.

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Could gold be the key to making gene therapy for HIV, blood disorders more accessible?

Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center took a step toward making gene therapy more practical by simplifying the way gene-editing instructions are delivered to cells. Using a gold nanoparticle instead of an inactivated virus, they safely delivered gene-editing tools in lab models of HIV and inherited blood disorders, as reported May 27, 2019 in Nature Materials.

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How language developed: Comprehension learning precedes vocal production

Green monkeys' alarm calls allow conclusions about the evolution of language.

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Scientists uncover a trove of genes that could hold key to how humans evolved

New computational analysis finds that more than two dozen human zinc finger transcription factors, previously thought to control activity of similar genes across species have in fact human-specific roles and could help explain how our species came to be.

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ASU team throws new light on photosynthetic supercomplex structure

A team of scientists from Arizona State University has taken a significant step closer to unlocking the secrets of photosynthesis, by determining the structure of a very large photosynthetic supercomplex.This important discovery is laid out in their paper published today in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology. The paper is titled 'The structure of the stress induced photosystem I — IsiA antenna

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Global Strep A vaccine one step closer

The search for a global Strep A vaccine has narrowed after researchers sequenced the DNA of more than 2,000 Group A Streptococcus samples from around the world. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and collaborators revealed the differences between strains from more than 20 countries, and identified potential vaccine targets present in strains from all countries sampled. The study in Nat

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Group A strep genome research expedites vaccine development efforts

The global search for a group A streptococcal (Strep A) vaccine has narrowed after researchers identified a common gene signature in almost all global Strep A strains by sequencing thousands of genomes in a project spanning 10 years and more than 20 countries.

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When green monkeys spy a drone, they use their cousins' cry for 'eagle'

Similarity suggests that such calls are evolutionarily ‘hard-wired’

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Rebuilding forests is a cost-effective way to cut carbon

Modelling finds reforestation in tropical zones is cheaper than carbon capture and storage. Nick Carne reports.

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Scientists throw new light on photosynthetic supercomplex structure

A team of scientists from Arizona State University has taken a significant step closer to unlocking the secrets of photosynthesis, by determining the structure of a very large photosynthetic supercomplex.

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Could gold be the key to making gene therapy for HIV, blood disorders more accessible?

Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center took a step toward making gene therapy more practical by simplifying the way gene-editing instructions are delivered to cells. Using a gold nanoparticle instead of an inactivated virus, they safely delivered gene-editing tools in lab models of HIV and inherited blood disorders, as reported May 27 in Nature Materials.

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Study uncovers surprising melting patterns beneath Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf

The ROSETTA-Ice project, a three-year, multi-institutional data collection survey of Antarctic ice, has assembled an unprecedented view of the Ross Ice Shelf, its structure and how it has been changing over time. In a study published today in Nature Geoscience, the ROSETTA-Ice team members detail how they discovered an ancient geologic structure that restricts where ocean water flows. The discover

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Major step forward in the production of 'green' hydrogen

The first thermodynamically-reversible chemical reactor capable of producing hydrogen as a pure product stream represents a "transformational" step forward in the chemical industry, the authors of a new study claim.

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Scientists uncover a trove of genes that could hold key to how humans evolved

Researchers at the Donnelly Centre in Toronto have found that dozens of genes, previously thought to have similar roles across different organisms, are in fact unique to humans and could help explain how our species came to exist.

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Monkey experiments offer clues on origin of language

Green and vervet monkeys live on either side of Africa and their evolutionary paths diverged 3.5 million years ago, and yet the two species share a hard-wired vocabulary when faced with danger, clever experiments have shown.

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A Google programme failed to detect cold fusion — but is still a success

Nature, Published online: 27 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01675-9 Major project to reproduce controversial claims of bench-top nuclear fusion kindles debate about when high-risk research is worthwhile.

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Lessons from cold fusion, 30 years on

Nature, Published online: 27 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01673-x Why revisit long-discredited claims for a source of abundant energy, asks Philip Ball? Because we are still learning how to treat pathological science.

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Autism linked to ‘junk’ DNA mutations

For the first time, research links non-coding DNA to disorder development. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Scientists throw new light on photosynthetic supercomplex structure

A team of scientists from Arizona State University has taken a significant step closer to unlocking the secrets of photosynthesis, by determining the structure of a very large photosynthetic supercomplex.

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Scientists uncover a trove of genes that could hold key to how humans evolved

Researchers at the Donnelly Centre in Toronto have found that dozens of genes, previously thought to have similar roles across different organisms, are in fact unique to humans and could help explain how our species came to exist.

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How language developed: Comprehension learning precedes vocal production

Human language and communication skills are unique in the animal kingdom. How they developed in the course of evolution is being researched, among other things, using the alarm call system of vervet monkeys. East African vervet monkeys warn their conspecifics against predators with special alarm calls that mean "leopard", "eagle" or "snake". In a recently published study, scientists from the Germa

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NMR structure of a key anticoagulant protein may help prevent thrombosis

A group of researchers from Brazil and the United States describes for the first time the structure of Ixolaris, an important anticoagulant protein found in tick saliva, and its interaction with Factor Xa, a key enzyme in the process of blood clotting. The results may benefit cancer patients, of whom approximately 20% will develop thrombosis during the disease progression.

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Hård landing overbelastede vinger og brændstofrør i Aeroflot-havari

Superjet-flyets piloter landede trods fem varsler om wind shear, og ramte banen så hårdt, at efterfølgende hop gav belastning på over fem G, afslører en foreløbig havarirapport.

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Techathlon podcast: Hot dogs, tech trivia, and our greatest hits so far

Technology Catch up on all the latest tech news in the most enjoyable way possible. How much do you know about tech? Come find out.

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Is it a bird? A plane? No, it’s your retail delivery

NASA builds drone-management software as numbers grow.

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A Harrowing Journey Up the World's Fifth Highest Mountain

Since the first attempt to ascend the Himalayan mountain Makalu in 1955, climbers have tried less than 300 times. No wonder—it's two and half months of hell.

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Mathematics of scale: big, small and everything in between

Fractals are critical tool for measuring and understanding how from little things big things grow. Physicist Mitchell Newberry from the University of Michigan in the US explains.

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Whales: gigantism and cancer suppression evolved concurrently

Humpback genome adds to growing understanding of ‘Peto’s Paradox’. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Ticks and mites closer relatives than thought

Genomic analysis finds two groups of parasites share a single lineage. Andrew Masterson reports.

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How High Can Heavy D Jump? | Diesel Brothers: Monster Jump LIVE

Heavy D tests how high he can jump with the BroDozer. This Memorial Day, the Diesel Brothers will host a night of record-breaking stunts, giveaways and entertainment with Diesel Brothers: Monster Jump LIVE. Held at the historic decommissioned WWII military base, Wendover Airfield, the special two-hour season finale premieres Memorial Day – Monday, May 27 at 8pm ET/5pm PT on Discovery Channel. Str

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How Big Companies Can Simultaneously Run and Reinvent Their Businesses

We live in the age of entrepreneurs. New startups seem to appear out of nowhere and challenge not only established companies, but entire industries. Where startup unicorns were once mythical creatures, they now seem abundant, not only increasing in numbers but also in the speed with which they can gain the minimum one-billion-dollar valuations to achieve this status. But no matter how well things

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Ultra-cold lithium atoms shed light on pair formation in superfluids, helping identify best theories

A FLEET/Swinburne study released this week resolves a long-standing debate about what happens at the microscopic level when matter transitions into a superconducting or superfluid state.

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Direct measurement of the cosmic-ray proton spectrum with the CALET on the ISS

Recent advances in the observation of high-energy radiations, including X-rays and gamma-rays, have unveiled many high-energy aspects of the universe. To achieve a complete understanding of these radiations, however, researchers need to find out more about the high-energy particles (i.e. cosmic rays) that produce them. In fact, non-thermal radiations characterized by the power-law spectrum are all

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Chemical synthesis demonstrates that antibiotic from the human nose works by proton translocation

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasing health threat, making new antibiotics essential. German researchers have recently had a breakthrough: they discovered lugdunin in the human nose—a new kind of cyclic peptide that comes from the bacterium Staphylococcus lugdunensis and has strong antimicrobial properties against Stahphylococcus aureus, among others. The researchers have been able to c

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Computational method increases design efficiency of protein-based drugs

Researchers from the Institute of Biotechnology and Biomedicine (IBB), in collaboration with scientists from the University of Warsaw recently presented an important update to their AGGRESCAN 3-D computational method, focused on facilitating and reducing the cost of developing new generation protein-based drugs, diminishing their propensity to form aggregates and keeping them stable and active for

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You could be unknowingly loading malicious content from 'trusted' sites

New research from CSIRO's Data61, the data and digital specialist arm of Australia's national science agency, questions the "trustability" of websites and in a world first quantifies the extent to which the trust model of today's World Wide Web is fundamentally broken.

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New traffic light system automatically recognizes pedestrians' intent to cross the road

In Vienna there are some 200 push-button pedestrian lights (signalized pedestrian crossings). They allow pedestrians to cross the road safely. But only after a waiting time, which is annoying for many people. This often results in pedestrians not waiting for the green phase, but instead walking in a different direction or crossing the street when the lights are red. For some people, push-button li

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Chemical synthesis demonstrates that antibiotic from the human nose works by proton translocation

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasing health threat, making new antibiotics essential. German researchers have recently had a breakthrough: they discovered lugdunin in the human nose—a new kind of cyclic peptide that comes from the bacterium Staphylococcus lugdunensis and has strong antimicrobial properties against Stahphylococcus aureus, among others. The researchers have been able to c

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Renault-Fiat merger a tempting match as challenges mount: experts

The prospect of a merger between French carmaker Renault and Italian-US auto giant Fiat Chrysler received a warm welcome on Monday, with analysts hailing the idea as an ideal fit for two companies who must keep up in the highly competitive industry.

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Vestegnskommuner drømmer om Metro til Rødovre: Håber på hjælp fra staten

Det er en dyr drøm at føre den københavnske metro helt til Rødovre Centrum, og der er endnu ikke lavet andet end estimater på prisen.

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Old partner Nissan left sidelined by Renault-Fiat merger

Nissan, a long-time Renault partner, has been left sidelined by a potential tie-up between the French firm and Fiat-Chrysler, just as the beleaguered Japanese firm battles to recover from the arrest of former boss Carlos Ghosn.

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Nasdaq withdraws offer to acquire Oslo stock exchange

US stock market operator Nasdaq said Monday it was withdrawing its offer of nearly 700 million euros ($784 million) to acquire the Oslo Stock Exchange, clearing the way for its European competitor Euronext.

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Speed bumps on German road to lower emissions

Germany has in recent years polished its "green" image abroad, but the country was only recently forced to admit it will miss a self-imposed 2020 climate target.

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Doctors are prescribing the great outdoors, but that's not great for everyone

Environment Spending time outside is a cheap way to improve your health—if you're rich. The benefits of being outside are obvious to anyone who’s tried it. But access remains unequal.

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Computational method increases design efficiency of protein-based drugs

Researchers from the Institute of Biotechnology and Biomedicine (IBB), in collaboration with scientists from the University of Warsaw recently presented an important update to their AGGRESCAN 3-D computational method, focused on facilitating and reducing the cost of developing new generation protein-based drugs, diminishing their propensity to form aggregates and keeping them stable and active for

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Exploring the history of the apple from its wild origins

Recent archaeological finds of ancient preserved apple seeds across Europe and West Asia combined with historical, paleontological, and recently published genetic data are presenting a fascinating new narrative for one of our most familiar fruits. In this study, Robert Spengler of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History traces the history of the apple from its wild origins, notin

9h

Astronomers investigate pulsar wind nebula DA 495

Astronomers have carried out a multiwavelength investigation of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN), designated DA 495, to unveil its mysterious physical nature. Results of the study, based on observations using HAWC and VERITAS ground-based observatories as well as NASA's NuSTAR spacecraft, are presented in a paper published May 17 on arXiv.org.

9h

New discovery about terahertz radiation benefits biomedicine

Scientists from ITMO University for the first time in the world managed to directly measure the nonlinear refractive index of matter in the terahertz range. The results of the experiments were compared with previous theoretical predictions to confirm the presence of nonlinear effects. The obtained data can be used to control light, as well as in fundamental and biomedical research. The results are

9h

Exploring the history of the apple from its wild origins

Recent archaeological finds of ancient preserved apple seeds across Europe and West Asia combined with historical, paleontological, and recently published genetic data are presenting a fascinating new narrative for one of our most familiar fruits. In this study, Robert Spengler of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History traces the history of the apple from its wild origins, notin

9h

Team develops highly flexible high-energy textile lithium battery for wearable electronics

PolyU's novel lightweight Textile Lithium Battery demonstrates high energy density of more than 450 Wh/L, and excellent flexibility—with a bending radius of less than 1mm, and foldability of over 1,000 cycles with marginal capacity degradation. In comparison, the existing bendable lithium battery can only reach a bending radius of about 25 mm, and with much lower performance of less than 200 Wh/L.

9h

Synthetic molecules deliver drugs directly to neuroblastoma cells

Researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid are involved in the development of specific molecular scaffolds which are able to deliver drugs and diagnostic agents to the cells of a neuroblastoma, an aggressive tumor in children.

9h

Better together: Human and robot co-workers more efficient, less accident-prone

More and more processes are being automated and digitized. Self-driving delivery vehicles, such as forklifts, are finding their way into many areas—and companies are reporting potential time and cost savings. However, an interdisciplinary research team from the universities of Göttingen, Duisburg-Essen and Trier has observed that cooperation between humans and machines can work much better than ju

9h

Synthetic molecules deliver drugs directly to neuroblastoma cells

Researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid are involved in the development of specific molecular scaffolds which are able to deliver drugs and diagnostic agents to the cells of a neuroblastoma, an aggressive tumor in children.

9h

Professor: Vi nægter at gå på kompromis med kvaliteten af brystundersøgelser

I Region Hovedstaden vil ledelsen hellere lade patienterne vente end gå på kompromis med kvaliteten, når kvinder skal undersøges for brystkræft.

9h

Sugar molecule contributes to reconstruction of prehistoric fire

Little is currently known about how early humans first used fire. That will now change thanks to a new proxy, a measurable substance that can be used to demonstrate forest fires in a distant past. The proxy is the organic substance levoglucosan, a sugar molecule produced during the combustion of vegetation and present in ocean and lake sediments. Ph.D. student Laura Schreuder carried out her resea

9h

This Crafty Robot Can Write in Languages It’s Never Seen Before

After training to hand-write Japanese characters, the robot could then copy words in Hindi, Greek, and English just by looking at examples.

9h

EU-projekt skal afhjælpe bidød: Bybier skal bo i 3D-printede kuber

PLUS. På Respond Festival stiller Asya Ilgün op med sin 3D-printer og ideer til, hvordan vi integrerer de vigtige bier i bymiljøerne.

9h

Researchers break record for atoms positioned individually in a trap to create defect-free arrays

A team of researchers at Technische Universität Darmstadt has broken the record for the number of atoms positioned individually in a trap to create a defect-free array. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group explains how they built their trap and their plans for making even larger ones.

9h

Mange er uden arbejde fem år efter hjernerystelsen

En tilsyneladende banal hjernerystelse kan få langvarige konsekvenser – især for den…

9h

This Animated Mona Lisa Was Created by AI, and It Is Terrifying

A neural network helped Mona Lisa get in touch with her feelings.

9h

New plan would fight invasive Asian carp with air bubbles, electric shocks, noise

The head of the Army Corps of Engineers has signed off on a $778 million plan to stop the spread of Asian carp toward the Great Lakes with air bubbles, electric shocks and noise, sending it to Congress for approval.

10h

New plan would fight invasive Asian carp with air bubbles, electric shocks, noise

The head of the Army Corps of Engineers has signed off on a $778 million plan to stop the spread of Asian carp toward the Great Lakes with air bubbles, electric shocks and noise, sending it to Congress for approval.

10h

Steno Diabetes-forsker modtager 1,3 millioner til forskning i fedtlever

Overlæge og klinisk professor Søren Nielsen fra Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus har modtaget millionbevilling til at forske leversygdommen ikke-alkoholisk fedtlever, som hænger sammen med type 2-diabetes.

10h

Man Ends Up in the ER After 'Overdosing' on Licorice Tea

A man in Canada "overdosed" on licorice by drinking too much licorice tea.

10h

Could drones be the solution to traffic gridlock?

Could passenger-carrying drones someday be the answer to traffic delays?

10h

What expert research says about Machine Learning

Machine learning is a field of study which creates an ability in the computers to learn without being precisely programmed. It is a branch of artificial intelligence which enables the computer’s capability to learn without being detailed programmed and enables them to perform the task intelligently. A complex data process is carried out machine learning by learning from data, instead of following

10h

What America will look like in 2040: Older, less white, less religious

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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10h

How Did Radiation Affect the 'Liquidators' of the Chernobyl Nuclear Meltdown?

What happens to the human body when exposed to such high levels of radiation?

10h

The Slow Death of Europe’s Traditional Center

BRUSSELS —Two visions for the future of Europe went head to head in the European Union’s parliamentary elections. By the time the results were announced Sunday night, it was clear neither had won outright. This is not how many expected these European elections to go. The prediction was for far-right-nationalist parties to display their newfound political influence. After all, since the last Europ

10h

Four years after California's largest dam removal project, how are the fish doing?

Four years ago, construction crews with huge jackhammers tore apart a 10-story concrete dam in the wooded canyons of the Carmel River, between the Big Sur hills and the beach front town of Carmel.

10h

Google updates Maps, Search and Assistant so you can order food without app

Google just made ordering pizza, pad thai and fried chicken from your favorite restaurants even easier.

10h

Asus Made a Portable 270Hz Monitor for Gamers On the Go

It’s never been easier to do a bit of gaming when you’re on the move. There are loads of different ways to play — Nintendo Switch, smartphone, laptop — but you’re mostly stuck …

10h

Four years after California's largest dam removal project, how are the fish doing?

Four years ago, construction crews with huge jackhammers tore apart a 10-story concrete dam in the wooded canyons of the Carmel River, between the Big Sur hills and the beach front town of Carmel.

10h

Nya stjärnor på väg kring Hästhuvudnebulosan

Hästhuvudnebulosan i stjärnbilden Orion är en av himlens mest kända former, och syntes bakom Australiens spektakulära nummer i Eurovision Song Contest 2019. Hästhuvudet ligger i utkanten av Orion B, ett av två stora nätverk av kosmiska moln som syns på himlen nära stjärnbilden Orions bälte. Astronomer tror att många nya stjärnor skulle kunna födas i Orion B – men tvärtom är födelsetalet ovanligt

10h

Scientists create new aluminum alloy with flexibility, strength, lightness

Aluminum is one of the most promising materials for aeronautics and automobile industry. Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology (MISIS) found a simple and efficient way of strengthening aluminum-based composite materials. Doping aluminum melt with nickel and lanthanum, scientists managed to create a material combining benefits of both composite materials and standard all

10h

Dyson Patent Applications Offer Hints at Its Electric Car

Appliance maker Dyson has offered few details of its promised electric car. Newly public filings reveal some of the company's thinking.

10h

Transhumanism Is Tempting—Until You Remember Inspector Gadget

Tech gurus are obsessed with treating bodies like machines—something a 30-year-old cartoon about a tricked-out detective suggests won’t work.

10h

How to prevent mosquitofish from spreading in water ecosystems

Preventing the introduction of the mosquitofish and removing its population are the most effective actions to control the dispersal of this exotic fish in ponds and lakes, according to a study published in the journal Science of the Total Environment. Neither the presence of predators nor the degradation of the quality of water and natural habitat are a threat to this invasive species -from the At

10h

To save biodiversity and feed the future, first cure 'plant blindness'

From our perches in the urban jungle—or even in the leafier parts of suburbia—we often have a tough time naming the last plant we saw. Even if we just ate part of it. This is a symptom of "plant blindness," a term coined two decades ago by researchers who showed that modern civilization is perilously disconnected from the plant kingdom. Our blindness has progressed even further since then, to the

10h

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