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nyheder2019maj28

12h

Alarmerende forskning: Plastik i havene påvirker den ilt, du indånder

Ti procent af al ilt kommer fra bakterier i havet, som bliver skadet af kemikalier fra plast.

12h

Forbrugerorganisation: Uheld vidner om alvorlige problemer med Teslas førerassistent

Førerassistentsystemet i den nye Tesla Model 3 var aktivt, da en mand blev dræbt i sin bil af et sammenstød med en sættevogn på en amerikansk motorvej.

6h

Study reveals structure of a 'master switch' controlling cell division

Unregulated cell division is a hallmark of cancer, and one of the key proteins involved in controlling cell division is called FoxM1. Abnormal activation of FoxM1 is a common feature of cancer cells and is correlated with poor prognosis, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy.

now

New snake species in Europe named after a long-forgotten Iron Age kingdom

An international team of scientists identified the snake and its range, which includes Turkey, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Georgia, Iraq, Iran, and Russia including a small region extending into the corner of Europe. Based on the genetic and morphological data, the researchers were able to say that the Blotched Rat Snake (Elaphe sauromates) is actually comprised of two different species and includes a cr

now

Stem cell identity unmasked by single cell sequencing technology

Scientists from The University of Queensland's Diamantina Institute have revealed the difference between a stem cell and other blood vessel cells using gene-sequencing technology.

now

Murray Gell-Mann, father of quarks, dies

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01689-3 US physicist was one of the chief architects of the standard model of particle physics.

now

MacKenzie Bezos pledges half her fortune to charity

MacKenzie Bezos, who finalized her divorce from Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos earlier this year, is pledging to give away half her fortune to charity.

3min

New mutations for herbicide resistance rarer than expected, study finds

After exposing more than 70 million grain amaranth seeds to a soil-based herbicide, researchers were not able to find a single herbicide-resistant mutant. Though preliminary, the findings suggest that the mutation rate in amaranth is very low, and that low-level herbicide application contributes little—if anything—to the onset of new mutations conferring resistance, researchers say.

3min

Replacing diesel with liquefied natural leads to a fuel economy of up to 60%

The substitution of diesel oil with liquefied natural gas (LNG) for cargo transportation in São Paulo would possibly lead to a significant reduction in fuel costs and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions—as well as other pollutants—in São Paulo State, Brazil. This was presented in a study by the Research Centre for Gas Innovation (RCGI) supported by the São Paulo Research Foundation—FAPESP—and Shell.

3min

The power of empathy in product development

What kind of potato chip would you create, and what would you name it, if you wanted to sell the product exclusively to pregnant women?

3min

Why Facebook is right not to take down the doctored Pelosi video

The slowed-down video made the House Speaker look drunk. But taking it down would set a precedent for censoring political satire or dissent.

4min

New mutations for herbicide resistance rarer than expected, study finds

After exposing more than 70 million grain amaranth seeds to a soil-based herbicide, researchers were not able to find a single herbicide-resistant mutant. Though preliminary, the findings suggest that the mutation rate in amaranth is very low, and that low-level herbicide application contributes little—if anything—to the onset of new mutations conferring resistance, researchers say.

6min

Astronomers: SpaceX’s New Satellites Are Ruining the Night Sky

Light Pollution Last week, SpaceX unleashed 60 tiny Starlink satellites — meant to eventually bring broadband connections to all — to orbit the Earth at just 340 miles (550 km). That’s far lower than most other satellites in orbit, which has some astronomers worried that they’ll be way brighter than expected and could end up ruining the night sky. “They’re bright, and there are going to be a lot

6min

Scientists develop surface acidity- and selectivity-tunable manganese oxide catalyst

A research group led by Prof. Xu Jie from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed a surface acidity- and selectivity-tunable manganese oxide catalyst using a surface modification technique. Their findings were published in Nature Communications.

9min

Domino effect of species extinctions also damages biodiversity

The mutual dependencies of many plant species and their pollinators mean that the negative effects of climate change are exacerbated. As UZH researchers show, the total number of species threatened with extinction is therefore considerably higher than predicted in previous models.

9min

Scientists find a way to increase the capacity of energy sources for portable electronics

Scientists from Skoltech, Moscow State University (MSU) and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have proposed a new approach to replacing carbon atoms with nitrogen atoms in the supercapacitor's crystal lattice and developed a novel capacity enhancement method based on carbon lattice modification with the aid of plasma. Their findings can help create the next generation of power sour

9min

Energy researchers break the catalytic speed limit

A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota and University of Massachusetts Amherst has discovered new technology that can speed up chemical reactions 10,000 times faster than the current reaction rate limit. These findings could increase the speed and lower the cost of thousands of chemical processes used in developing fertilizers, foods, fuels, plastics, and more.

12min

Replacing diesel with liquefied natural leads to a fuel economy of up to 60% in São Paulo

A study conducted in Brazil at the FAPESP-funded Research Centre for Gas Innovation pointed to the environmental and economic benefits of the cargo transportation industry in São Paulo State's interior adopting LNG.

12min

Domino effect of species extinctions also damages biodiversity

The mutual dependencies of many plant species and their pollinators mean that the negative effects of climate change are exacerbated. As UZH researchers show, the total number of species threatened with extinction is therefore considerably higher than predicted in previous models.

12min

Why Thousands of Aftershocks of a 1959 Earthquake Just Rumbled Through Yellowstone 60 Years Later

Recent rumblings at Yellowstone National Park are actually aftershocks of a quake that occurred 60 years ago.

24min

Deep empathy: How AI can strengthen doctor-patient connections

Today's rate of innovation and change has made it difficult for patients and physicians to effectively integrate technology into medical best practices. Experts agree that physicians need more time in their day to build bonds with patients. Dr. Eric Topol believes that artificial intelligence may help restore that time, creating what he calls "deep medicine." None Today's rate of technological ch

25min

Bizarre Theory: Supernovas Kickstarted Human Evolution

Big Bang Millions of years ago, a cascade of powerful supernovas bombarded the Earth with radiation from exploding stars — and now scientists say cosmic radiation could have given human evolution a kickstart at a pivotal moment. It’s a provocative hypothesis that would be difficult to prove conclusively. But the arguments laid out in the research, first shared online in March and published Tuesda

27min

Palm oil: Down from the conservation barricades and out of the rhetorical trenches

Oil palm is neither the devil's work, nor a godsend to humanity. Its effects on its surroundings largely depends on case-specific circumstances. Those who ask to boycott all palm oil due to its contribution to deforestation should also consider boycotting coffee, chocolate and coconut if they wish to be consistent.

33min

Fewer than 60% of young women diagnosed with STIs in emergency departments fill scripts

Fewer than 60% of young women diagnosed with sexually transmitted infections in the emergency department fill prescriptions for antimicrobial therapy to treat these conditions, according to a research letter published online May 28, 2019, by JAMA Pediatrics.

33min

New mutations for herbicide resistance rarer than expected, study finds

New evidence suggests that herbicide resistance in weeds is more likely to occur from pre-existing genetic variation than from new mutations.

33min

A warming Arctic produces weather extremes in our latitudes

Atmospheric researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have now developed a climate model that can accurately depict the frequently observed winding course of the jet stream, a major air current over the Northern Hemisphere.

33min

Scientists Use Spherical Flames on ISS to Understand Soot-Free Fires

Scientists haven't been sure why some fires produce soot and others don't. The unique nature of microgravity on the ISS allowed the crew to create spherical flames to shed light on the problem. The post Scientists Use Spherical Flames on ISS to Understand Soot-Free Fires appeared first on ExtremeTech .

39min

Does this belong here?

submitted by /u/boo_vixen04 [link] [comments]

45min

45min

The Administration says future carriers are 'going to use steam' in weird rant

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

45min

Wood Gets a Makeover to Provide Energy-Free Air Conditioning

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

45min

45min

45min

From Point A to Point B: How Do We Achieve Interstellar Flight?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

45min

'Aladdin' Made $113 Million at the Box Office This Weekend

It's the fifth-largest Memorial Day weekend opening ever.

54min

Study reveals structure of a 'master switch' controlling cell division

Unregulated cell division is a hallmark of cancer, and one of the key proteins involved in controlling cell division is called FoxM1. Abnormal activation of FoxM1 is a common feature of cancer cells and is correlated with poor prognosis, metastasis, and resistance to chemotherapy. Now researchers at UC Santa Cruz have determined the structure of this protein–a kind of 'master switch' for cell div

54min

Bariatric surgery can be safe and effective for adolescents

Pediatricians are often reluctant to recommend bariatric surgery for teen-agers, but a Rutgers-led study concludes it is a justifiable treatment for adolescents with persistent extreme obesity if they can maintain a healthy lifestyle afterward.

54min

Tibetan Monks Meet Science near the Roof of the World

Astronomical and cosmological questions get an airing in India’s Sikkim province in a program started 20 years ago by the Dalai Lama — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

55min

“Is Going Solar Near Me Worth It?” This Simple Cost Benefit Estimator Has Answers

In theory, the benefits of retrofitting your home for solar energy are obvious. It’s good for the environment, sunlight is free, and the upfront costs of going solar are lower than ever. What’s not so obvious is whether or not these theoretical benefits are actually worth it near you. After all, when asking yourself, “is going solar near me worth it,” so much depends on the architecture features

56min

Tibetan Monks Meet Science near the Roof of the World

Astronomical and cosmological questions get an airing in India’s Sikkim province in a program started 20 years ago by the Dalai Lama — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

56min

The Rural-Urban Divide Is More Complicated Than You Think

Here are a few stories I found intriguing from the past week’s newspapers, on the unfolding complexities of the much-discussed “rural-urban divide.” 1) The first is by Andrew Van Dam, in The Washington Post , on the fundamental reasons for rural decline. Here’s the way his story was presented in the print version of the Post , in the Sunday business section: Print headline in The Washington Post

1h

The Tragedy of Edmund Morris

I often think of Edmund Morris, the master biographer who died this weekend at the age of 78, as the man whom Ronald Reagan, the subject of his most famous biography, drove crazy. Reagan drove a lot of people crazy. Anyone who spent time in the faculty lounges and graduate seminars of the 1980s, as I did, can tell you all about it. You had to see it to believe it, the intensity of it, especially

1h

Domino effect of species extinctions also damages biodiversity

The mutual dependencies of many plant species and their pollinators mean that the negative effects of climate change are exacerbated. As UZH researchers show, the total number of species threatened with extinction is therefore considerably higher than predicted in previous models.

1h

New snake species in Europe named after a long-forgotten Iron Age kingdom

Based on the genetic and morphological data, researchers were able to say that the Blotched Rat Snake (Elaphe sauromates) is actually comprised of two different species and includes a cryptic species that has been named after the old kingdom of Urartu.

1h

Threatened beetles benefit from forest thinning

Wood-living beetles that use oak trees are a species-rich and threatened animal group in modern forestry and agriculture in southern Sweden. New research from the University of Gothenburg shows that management with conservation thinning can be an effective way to promote these beetles in the long term.

1h

Finding a cell's true identity

Scientists have long sorted cells into different varieties based on their appearance under a microscope or, for differences that are more visually subtle, based on the behavior of a handful of genes. But in a bid to reveal even more distinctive differences and similarities, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, the Johns Hopkins Institute for Genetic Medicine and the Johns Hopki

1h

Scientists create bioplastic for food packaging which degrades in two years

A group of scientists at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU). Lithuania have created biodegradable plastic, which decomposes in a compost bin in a couple of years. Bioplastic created at KTU is transparent and all the materials in its composition are suitable for contact with food.

1h

Finding a cell's true identity

Scientists have long sorted cells into different varieties based on their appearance under a microscope or, for differences that are more visually subtle, based on the behavior of a handful of genes. But in a bid to reveal even more distinctive differences and similarities, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, the Johns Hopkins Institute for Genetic Medicine and the Johns Hopki

1h

Expedeon AG adds CaptSure DIY ELISA to immunoassay technology product range

Addressing a billion-dollar market with innovative technologies which remove bottlenecks in research and discovery

1h

Watch Lightning Strike a Rocket as It Launches

Ride the Lightning In Russia, a little lightning isn’t enough to stop a rocket from completing its mission. On Monday, Russian space agency Roscosmos launched a Soyuz 2-1b rocket from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome, a spaceport about 800 kilometers (497 miles) north of Moscow. About 10 seconds later, a massive bolt of lightning struck the spacecraft — a remarkable sight captured on video by numerous spe

1h

Jumping drops get boost from gravity

A decade ago a new idea was brought into the general scientific community—shedding water from condensers was more efficient by using surface tension to make microscopic water droplets "jump" off the surface. The idea took the research community by storm.

1h

Inhibitory neurons have two types of impact on brain oscillations

Studying the brain involves measuring the activity of billions of individual brain cells called neurons. Consequently, many brain measurement techniques produce data that is averaged to reflect the activity of large populations of these neurons. If all of the neurons are behaving differently, this will average out. But, when the behaviour of individual neurons is synchronized, it produces clearly

1h

Efter nye radarsystemer: Amerikanske piloter ser stadig flere UFO'er

Den amerikanske flåde har udsendt ny, hemmeligstemplet guide til deres piloter om, hvordan de rapporterer uidentificerede flyvende objekter, der trænger ind i det amerikanske luftrum.

1h

Breast cancer spreads through the body in just two or three waves

The evolution of deadly tumours and their migration around the body has been charted in unprecedented detail in ten women with breast cancer for first time

1h

African elephant poaching is falling at last – but it's still too high

The number of African elephants being killed by poachers has fallen to below 15,000 per year, which is still too high for populations to have a future

1h

1h

Why sports fans find this brand violation a game winner

Researchers from University of Oregon and Zayed University (UAE) published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing, which finds that sports fans exhibit more favorable attitudes towards sponsors who adopt the team colors, such as Anheuser Busch customizing Bud Light beer cans to match each NFL team it sponsors. Fans exhibit a higher likelihood to visit, buy, and recommend the sponsor.

1h

Inhibitory neurons have two types of impact on brain oscillations

Synchronisation is important to understanding how neurons behave, which is particularly relevant with regard to brain diseases like Alzheimer's, epilepsy and Parkinson's. Now, a group of researchers from the Institute of Computational Physics and Complex Systems at Lanzhou University, China, has used a combination of two computer models to study the ways different kinds of neurons can impact synch

1h

The message that addiction is a disease makes substance users less likely to seek help

Research finds that people with substance-use problems who read a message describing addiction as a disease are less likely to report wanting to engage in effective therapies, compared to those who read a message that addiction behaviors are subject to change. The finding could inform future public and interpersonal communication efforts regarding addiction.

1h

Researchers identified novel oncogenic function for receptor linked to Alzheimer's disease

Common and rare SORLA single nucleotide polymorphisms have been associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. So far, SORLA has been mainly studied in neurons, but the new study focused on SORLA's role in cancer cells. Led by Academy Professor Johanna Ivaska, researchers from the University of Turku in Finland observed that SORLA was highly expressed in HER2 positive cancers. Removing SO

1h

The power of empathy in product development

'Subtle things, such as imagining how someone else would feel, can have a huge impact on creativity in general,' says UConn's Kelly Herd.

1h

Put more father friendly cues in OB/GYN offices, Rutgers-led study suggests

A new Rutgers-led study finds that by adding a few subtle cues to prenatal care waiting rooms, such as photos of men and babies, and pamphlets and magazines aimed toward men, OBGYNS can get fathers more involved in prenatal care and increase healthier outcomes for women and infants.

1h

Why sports fans find this brand violation a game winner

A new study finds that sports fans are more likely to buy and recommend sponsors who shed their brand colors to adopt their team's colors.

1h

Jumping drops get boost from gravity

'It turns out that surface tension and gravity work far better together than either works on its own.'

1h

3D printed artificial corneas similar to human ones

Professor Dong-Woo Cho of Mechanical Engineering, Professor Jinah Jang of Creative IT Convergence Engineering, and Ms. Hyeonji Kim at POSTECH, collaborated with Professor Hong Kyun Kim of Ophthalmology at Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, 3D printed an artificial cornea using the bioink which is made of decellularized corneal stroma and stem cells. Because this cornea is made of co

1h

Avalanche Victims: When can rewarming lead to survival?

It is difficult for doctors to accurately assess avalanche victims who arrive at hospital suffering cardiac arrest: has the patient effectively suffocated, or is there a realistic prospect of survival if the patient is properly rewarmed? The correct initial assessment is crucial: it ensures that patients with a viable chance of survival are properly rewarmed, while also preventing unnecessary medi

1h

Stiffening arteries in teenagers with persistent obesity

Children and adolescents with long-term obesity have increased arterial stiffness by their late teens, a study of more than 3,000 children followed from age 9 to 17 shows. These results, in the researchers' view, call for more initiatives to reduce teenage obesity.

1h

How stress leads to Facebook addiction

Friends on social media such as Facebook can be a great source of comfort during periods of stress. However, if they don't receive any support offline, stressed users are at risk of developing a pathological dependence on the social networking site — the so-called Facebook addiction. This is the result of a study conducted by a team of the Mental Health Research and Treatment Center at Ruhr-Unive

1h

Scientists develop surface acidity — and selectivity-tunable manganese oxide catalyst

A research group led by Prof. XU Jie from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed a surface acidity — and selectivity-tunable manganese oxide catalyst using a surface modification technique.

1h

New evidence: It's not necessary to fast before complete cholesterol test

A large study led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Imperial College provides robust evidence that nonfasting lipid levels were similar to fasting lipid levels in the same individuals, predicting cardiovascular risk just as well.

1h

Stem cell identity unmasked by single cell sequencing technology

Scientists from The University of Queensland's Diamantina Institute have revealed the difference between a stem cell and other blood vessel cells using gene-sequencing technology.

1h

Africa's elephant poaching rates in decline, but iconic animal still under threat

Elephant poaching rates in Africa have started to decline after reaching a peak in 2011, an international team of scientists have concluded.

1h

High LDL linked to early-onset Alzheimer's

Researchers with the Atlanta VA and Emory University found a link between high LDL cholesterol and early-onset Alzheimer's disease. The results could help doctors understand how the disease develops and what the possible causes are, including genetic variation.

1h

Lost in translation: The medium is the message for a healthy heartbeat

Researchers at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at Virginia Tech Carilion have revealed how a genetic message to produce healthy heart tissue is altered in the body during stress and aging to contribute to sudden cardiac death. The discovery published in Cell Reports centers on communication between heart cells and allows for the potential of developing targeted therapies to help people at

1h

Release of solar panel dataset helps cities make power grids more safe, reliable

Solar power researchers have traditionally used the power measurements from single residential solar photovoltaic systems to estimate the power generated within a city. But one installation isn't a good representation of all rooftops. Data from systems across a city is desperately needed to fully understand how this energy source can be integrated into the power grid. Engineers have provided a fre

1h

Sound waves bypass visual limitations to recognize human activity

Video cameras continue to gain widespread use, but there are privacy and environmental limitations in how well they work. Acoustical waves are an alternative medium that may bypass those limitations. Unlike electromagnetic waves, acoustical waves can be used to find objects and also identify them. As described in a new paper in Applied Physics Letters, the researchers used a 2D acoustic array and

1h

MacKenzie Bezos pledges to donate half her $37bn fortune

The ex-wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos pledges to give half of her $37bn fortune to charity.

1h

Elephant poaching falls dramatically in Africa

Slowing Chinese demand for ivory may be responsible

1h

Sound waves bypass visual limitations to recognize human activity

Video cameras continue to gain widespread use to monitor human activities for surveillance, health care, home use and more, but there are privacy and environmental limitations in how well they work. Acoustical waves, such as sounds and other forms of vibrations, are an alternative medium that may bypass those limitations.

1h

Africa's elephant poaching rates in decline, but iconic animal still under threat

Elephant poaching rates in Africa have started to decline after reaching a peak in 2011, an international team of scientists have concluded.

1h

This bacteria eats plastic | Morgan Vague

Humans produce 300 million tons of new plastic each year — yet, despite our best efforts, less than 10 percent of it ends up being recycled. Is there a better way to deal with all this waste? Microbiologist Morgan Vague studies bacteria that, through some creative adaptations, have evolved the unexpected ability to eat plastic — and could help us solve our growing pollution problem.

1h

Ny analyse: Energieffektivisering kan gøre grøn omstilling markant billigere

Rapport: Vi kan spare op til 160 milliarder med udbygning af grøn energi og energieffektivisering for at nå vores klimamål i 2050.

1h

You're having a heart attack; why not ask for help?

A perceived inability to act on symptoms could signify a life-threatening situation, according to research published today in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Most deaths from heart attack occur in the first few hours after the start of symptoms. Quick treatment is crucial to restore blood flow to blocked arteries and save lives

1h

Texture-modified foods for people with dysphagia

Eight percent of the population suffer dysphagia or difficulty in swallowing food and this could rise to 80% among the elderly or in cases of neurodegenerative diseases. The University of the Basque Country's Texture Analysis Laboratory (LaTEX) has published a paper in the Food Hydrocolloids journal pointing to the poor standardization of thickened foods.

1h

Immune discovery set to boost cancer therapies, study suggests

Cancer therapies that use immune cells to trigger the body to attack tumors could be improved by a molecule that boosts their function, research from the University of Edinburgh suggests. Studies with mice have found the improved therapies produced a powerful anti-cancer immune response, which led to tumors shrinking.

1h

Young carers' futures look bleak without flexible school support

Young Australians providing care for family members with mental illnesses, alcohol and drug addictions are struggling to keep up with their studies, according to new research.The study by Flinders University and UNSW found the problem will continue without improved flexibility in schools and personalised intervention programs.

1h

The discovery of acoustic spin

Recently, Chengzhi Shi (now at Georgia Tech), Rongkuo Zhao, Sui Yang, Yuan Wang, and Xiang Zhang from the University of California, Berkeley and Long Yang, Hong Chen, and Jie Ren from Tongji University discover and experimentally observe the existence of acoustic spin in airborne sound waves.

1h

Efficient triplet pair separation in dibenzopentalene derivatives

In intramolecular SF (iSF), the strong coupling nature and confinement of diffusional separation of 1(TT) limits the extraction and harnessing of triplet energy. A series of iSF-capable dibenzopentalene derivatives (DBPs) have been synthesized and their photoinduced dynamics are monitored. Intramolecular singlet fission occurs in DBPs with consecutive 1(TT) separation in polycrystalline film with

1h

Scientists revisit the cold case of cold fusion

Scientists from the University of British Columbia, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Maryland, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Google are conducting a multi-year investigation into cold fusion, a type of benign nuclear reaction hypothesized to occur in benchtop apparatus at room temperature.

1h

Signalling protein discovery may lead to drug-based therapies to treat hyperparathyroidism

Singapore researchers discover protein that protects parathyroid glands from excessive growth, suggesting potential drug-based strategies to treat hyperparathyroidism and other relevant tumours.

1h

Microaerobic Fe(II) oxidation could drive microbial carbon assimilation in paddy soil

Carbon assimilation process is important to maintain the production and ecological function of paddy field. The recent publication from Professor Fangbai LI's group has found that microaerobic Fe(II) oxidation could drive microbial carbon assimilation in paddy soil that was developed from iron-rich red soil, which provides an insight into the ecological function of iron cycling in the critical zon

1h

Africa's elephant poaching rates in decline, but iconic animal still under threat

Elephant poaching rates in Africa have started to decline after reaching a peak in 2011, an international team of scientists have concluded.

1h

Save the bees (and time and money) by creating a bee lawn

Flowering "bee lawns" that attract pollinators are a compromise between fastidious turf management and the more casual yard approach. They add biodiversity to the landscape and need less maintenance. That makes them cost-effective, too.

1h

What’s the Magic Behind Graphene’s ‘Magic’ Angle?

The blockbuster discovery last year of superconductivity in a material called twisted bilayer graphene caught theorists off guard. In all their published ruminations, none of them had even speculated about the phenomenon that showed up in Pablo Jarillo-Herrero ’s lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology: a sudden loss of electrical resistance when two sheets of graphene — honeycomb lattic

1h

Save the bees (and time and money) by creating a bee lawn

Flowering "bee lawns" that attract pollinators are a compromise between fastidious turf management and the more casual yard approach. They add biodiversity to the landscape and need less maintenance. That makes them cost-effective, too.

1h

Fighting academic failures

Children from undereducated, low-income families face a greater risk of poor academic performance. But schools are capable of decreasing these risks. Experts from the Higher School of Economics have studied international experience in addressing these challenges. The results have presented in Journal of Modern Foreign Psychology.

1h

CMU AI generates human faces from voices

submitted by /u/taurish [link] [comments]

1h

Comet inspires chemistry for making breathable oxygen on Mars

Researchers have demonstrated a new reaction for generating oxygen that could help humans explore the universe and perhaps even fight climate change at home.

2h

Shake Hands With Innovators, Get Answers About Cloud and Data-Driven Tech

Here at Futurism, we like to dive deep into the latest technologies. Partnering with IBM, we’re excited to invite you to this one-day-only event on June 5th: Your clouds can 2019. This isn’t an auditorium of seating with a keynote speaker on stage. Attendees will journey to four company headquarters, going behind closed doors, meeting with CEOs, discussing culture and process, data-driven solutio

2h

Will flu’s ‘hidden target’ lead to a universal vaccine?

The discovery of a “hidden target” on the surface of the hypervariable influenza A virus could lead to better ways to prevent and treat the flu, researchers say. Because influenza A viruses such as H1N1 and H3N2 mutate continuously, vaccines sometimes provide variable or incomplete protection and need annual updates. Poor matches can lead to severe flu seasons as in 2017-2018, when an estimated 8

2h

Chandra finds stellar duos banished from galaxies

Scientists have found evidence that pairs of stars have been kicked out of their host galaxies. This discovery, made using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, is one of the clearest examples of stellar pairs being expelled from their galactic base.

2h

EPFL researchers crack an enduring physics enigma

Researchers from EPFL have found the mechanism that lies behind a mysterious physics phenomenon in fluid mechanics: the fact that turbulence in fluids spontaneously self-organizes into parallel patterns of oblique turbulent bands — an example of order emerging spontaneously from chaos. In so doing, they solved a problem that had stumped generations of physicists.

2h

Pollen allergies occur more frequently in anxiety sufferers

Seasonal allergies to different types of grass or tree pollen are more common in people with anxiety disorders, while patients with depression are more likely to suffer from perennial allergies triggered by allergens such as animal hair. These are the findings of a team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM). Conversely, food and drug allergies were unaffected by these psycho

2h

Copenhagen researchers break quantum limit in precision of force and position measurements

Researchers of the Schliesser Lab at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have pushed the precision of force and position measurements into a new regime. Their experiment is the first to surpass the so-called 'Standard Quantum Limit,' or SQL, which arises in the most common (and successful) optical techniques for ultra-precise position measurements. The result and underlying experim

2h

Scientists found a way to increase the capacity of energy sources for portable electronics

Scientists from Skoltech, Moscow State University (MSU) and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have proposed a new approach to replacing carbon atoms with nitrogen atoms in the supercapacitor's crystal lattice and developed a novel capacity enhancement method based on carbon lattice modification with the aid of plasma. Their findings can help create the next generation of power sour

2h

Using the past to unravel the future for Arctic wetlands

A new study has used partially fossilised plants and single-celled organisms to investigate the effects of climate change on the Canadian High Arctic wetlands and help predict their future.

2h

Fossil zooplankton indicate that marine ecosystems have entered the Anthropocene

Climate change caused by humans impacts species diversity and ecosystems. Marine ecosystems are no exception. In order to assess exactly how climate change affects ecosystems, their current state has to be compared with the situation before human influence. Researchers from MARUM at the University of Bremen, and from the ICBM of the University of Oldenburg, have now shown that the associations of

2h

Researchers have discovered how a nanocatalyst works at the atomic level

The researchers of the Nanoscience Center (NSC) at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, and in the Xiamen University, China, have discovered how copper particles at the nanometer scale operate in modifying a carbon-oxygen bond when ketone molecules turn into alcohol molecules.

2h

'Mindreading' neurons capable of having expectations about the behavior of the others

Psychologists and philosophers had long suggested that simulation is the mechanism whereby humans understand the minds of others. However, the neural basis of this complex process had not been identified. The amygdala is involved in various functions related to social behaviour as well as in autism. However, it was not known whether the amygdala neurons contributed to advanced social knowledge, su

2h

Thai dinosaur is a cousin of T. rex

Scientists from the University of Bonn and the Sirindhorn Museum in Thailand have identified two new dinosaur species. They analyzed fossil finds that were already discovered 30 years ago in Thailand. Both species are distant relatives of T. rex, but with a somewhat more primitive structure. They were efficient predators. The results have now been published in the journal Acta Palaeontologica Polo

2h

Study highlights vulnerability of rural coast to sea-level rise

Type "sea-level rise" in an internet search engine and almost all the resulting images will show flooded cities, with ample guidance on civic options for protecting urban infrastructure, from constructing seawalls to elevating roadways.

2h

Direct methane conversion under mild conditions by thermo-, electro- or photocatalysis reviewed

Direct conversion of Earth-abundant methane into value-added chemicals under mild conditions is an attractive technology in response to the increasing industrial demand for feedstocks and the worldwide appeal of energy conservation. Exploring advanced low-temperature C-H activation catalysts and reaction systems is the key to converting methane in a direct and mild manner.

2h

Iconic Australian working dog may not be part dingo after all

Researchers at the University of Sydney have found no genetic evidence that the iconic Australian kelpie shares canine ancestry with a dingo, despite Australian bush myth.

2h

Comet inspires chemistry for making breathable oxygen on Mars

Researchers have demonstrated a new reaction for generating oxygen that could help humans explore the universe and perhaps even fight climate change at home.

2h

Being overweight as a teen may be associated with higher risk of heart muscle disease in adulthood

The risk of developing cardiomyopathy, which often leads to heart failure, increased in adult Swedish men who were even mildly overweight around age 18. The risk steadily increased as weight increased, even among those who started out at a normal weight.

2h

Plainification holds promise for improving material sustainability

Extensive alloying makes material development more dependent on scarce resources. Alloyed materials with complicated compositions are also difficult to synthesize and recycle. With increased alloying, material costs continue to spiral while property enhancements level off. For these reasons, the sustainability of materials, especially metals, has recently gained more and more attention.

2h

Centuries-old drawings lead to better understanding of fan-shaped auroras

Physics researchers and literature researchers have joined together to better understand the rare natural phenomenon of white and red auroras fanning across the night sky in Japan. Armed with drawings and descriptions dating back to the 1700s, microfilm from the 1950s, and today's spectral image data, they've confirmed the accuracy of the older depictions. They've also started to understand how th

2h

Imperfection is OK for better MOFs

Perfect crystals are not necessarily the most useful. Defects in the ordered crystalline structure of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) could tailor these versatile materials for specific applications. KAUST researchers have already developed a pioneering method to image the defects using transmission electron microscopy. They now report that creating specific defects, visualizing them, and investig

2h

Iconic Australian working dog may not be part dingo after all

Researchers at the University of Sydney have found no genetic evidence that the iconic Australian kelpie shares canine ancestry with a dingo, despite Australian bush myth.

2h

Thai dinosaur is a cousin of T. rex

Scientists from the University of Bonn and the Sirindhorn Museum in Thailand have identified two new dinosaur species. They analyzed fossil finds that were already discovered 30 years ago in …

2h

New York Times: Navy Pilots Baffled by UFO Encounters

Close Encounters In an astonishing new story by The New York Times , Navy pilots detail their encounters with UFOs — “strange objects” that have “no visible engine or infrared exhaust plumes,” but could reach “30,000 feet and hypersonic speeds.” “Wow, what is that, man?” an unnamed pilot said in a video recorded in early 2015 of what appears to be an object flying above the ocean. “Look at it fly

2h

Stenålderns jägare odlade spannmål

Spåren efter jägarnas och samlarnas odlingar är mycket få och mycket små. Men en studie gjord av forskare vid bland annat Helsingfors universitet och arkeologer i firmorna Arkeologerna och Arkeologikonsult mer än fördubblar underlaget för analyser av sådana fynd jämfört med vad som funnits tillgängligt tidigare.

2h

Electric-field-controlled superconductor-ferromagnetic insulator transition

Xianhui Chen's group at University of Science and Technology of China observed an electric-field controlled reversible transition from superconductor to ferromagnetic insulator in (Li,Fe)OHFeSe thin flake using the latest SIC-FET gating technique. This work offers a unique platform to study the relationship between superconductivity and ferromagnetism in Fe-based superconductors, and it also demon

2h

Continent drift and plateau uplift drive evolutions of Asia-Africa-Australia monsoon and arid regions

Monsoon and arid regions in the Asia-Africa-Australia realm occupy more than 60% of the total area of these continents. What are their origins, evolutions, causes and regional differences? A new study indicates that the monsoon and arid regions in Asia, Africa and Australia were formed in different geological periods of the Cenozoic, mainly controlled by continental drift and uplift of the Tibetan

2h

Newly discovered mechanism reveals how Parkinson's disease can spread between brain cells

Tiny channels between nerve cells are involved in a newly discovered mechanism of how Parkinson's disease can spread throughout the brain, according to new research from Linköping University, Sweden. The results demonstrate that harmful protein aggregates, or deposits, can bind and 'hitch a lift' with channel-forming proteins, and in this way spread to healthy cells. The study has been published i

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New cable-free brain imaging method may take social neuroscience to the next level

Osaka University researchers developed a cable-free recording method that can measure brain activity associated with social behavior in mice. The method was based on a bioluminescent indicator of membrane voltage called 'LOTUS-V', which was delivered to cells via a gene expression system; it is therefore minimally invasive. LOTUS-V enabled cable-free detection of brain activity in freely moving mi

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Finding a cell's true identity

In a bid to reveal even more distinctive differences and similarities, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, the Johns Hopkins Institute for Genetic Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Department of Neuroscience developed two new artificial intelligence methods that decipher complex gene activity controlling cell fate decisions in retina development and relate this gene activity to w

2h

Cranberries join forces with antibiotics to fight bacteria

The global spread of antibiotic resistance is undermining decades of progress in fighting bacterial infections. Due to the overuse of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture, we are on the cusp of returning to a pre-antibiotic era in which minor infections can once again become deadly. Therefore, countering the fall in antibiotic efficacy by improving the effectiveness of currently available antib

2h

GWAS identifies new risk loci for harmful alcohol use

A genome-wide association study has identified five new genetic risk loci that can pass on risk for harmful alcohol use from parents to children, and confirmed one previously identified risk locus. The findings were published in Biological Psychiatry, published by Elsevier.

2h

Researchers find 28% of 35- to 50-year-old men studied are at-risk for osteoporosis

The study analyzed the bone mineral density of 173 adults between 35 and 50 years old. Participants were scanned at the femoral hip and lumbar spine, using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, which is proven to be precise, while exposing patients to a minimal dose of radiation. Findings indicate more middle-aged adults should be scanned to understand their risk and establish a baseline for monitorin

2h

Fighting academic failures

Children from undereducated, low-income families face a greater risk of poor academic performance. But schools are capable of decreasing these risks. Experts from the Higher School of Economics have studied international experience in addressing these challenges. The results have presented in Journal of Modern Foreign Psychology.

2h

New study dismisses green growth policies as a route out of ecological emergency

The new study examines green growth policies as articulated in major reports by the World Bank, the OECD and the UN Environment Programme, and tests the theory against extant empirical evidence and models of the relationship between GDP and both material footprint and CO2 emissions.

2h

Diagnosis of coronary artery disease improved by deep learning analysis of SPECT MPI

A multicenter international study has demonstrated that diagnosis of obstructive coronary artery disease can be improved through deep learning analysis of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging. The research is featured in the May issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

2h

Study highlights vulnerability of rural coast to sea-level rise

A new paper in Nature Climate Change highlights growing recognition that existing knowledge is insufficient to best inform public and private decisions regarding the encroachment of wetlands into privately owned farm land and forests.

2h

Study: High rates of food insecurity found at Southern Appalachia Colleges

College students in Southern Appalachia are affected by food insecurity at a higher rate than the national average, which can translate into poor academic performance and unhealthy spending habits and coping mechanisms, according to a new study coauthored by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and published in Current Developments in Nutrition.

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How to teach and parent better in the age of big data

At the parent-teacher conference, I sat across the table from my first grader's teacher in a chair made for a 6-year-old. The teacher pointed to percentages scrawled in red ink. I looked and listened.

2h

Microsoft's retro-inspired Pro IntelliMouse arrives in the US

Microsoft in October 2017 released a modern iteration of one of its most iconic accessories. The Microsoft Classic IntelliMouse, inspired by the IntelliMouse Explorer 3.0, featured a familiar …

2h

New Data From the Sun May Lead to Advances in Nuclear Fusion

Scientists have made new observations of the Sun's atmosphere that reveal new information about the instability of its plasma. This information may turn out to be the key to generating power through nuclear fusion. The post New Data From the Sun May Lead to Advances in Nuclear Fusion appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

The mysterious case of the disappearing pencil cedar

Is it too early to talk about Christmas? Some might consider midway through May to be slightly premature, to put it mildly. But when it comes to saving critically endangered trees, there's no time like the present. Having said that, we first need to delve briefly into the past in order to provide some context.

2h

How small can they get? Polymers may be the key to single-molecule electronic devices

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and University of Tsukuba demonstrate that polymers could play a key role in the fabrication of single-molecule electronic devices, allowing us to push the boundaries of the nanoelectronics revolution.

2h

The mysterious case of the disappearing pencil cedar

Is it too early to talk about Christmas? Some might consider midway through May to be slightly premature, to put it mildly. But when it comes to saving critically endangered trees, there's no time like the present. Having said that, we first need to delve briefly into the past in order to provide some context.

2h

Researchers break quantum limit in the precision of force and position measurements

Researchers of the Schliesser Lab at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have pushed the precision of force and position measurements into a new regime. Their experiment is the first to surpass the so-called "Standard Quantum Limit," or SQL, which arises in the most common (and successful) optical techniques for ultra-precise position measurements. For more than 50 years, experimen

2h

Multiple births are more common but face disadvantages

Families that have multiple births can face serious disadvantages compared to singletons and their parents, report researchers. The new report identifies common challenges facing these families, including greater risk of pregnancy complications and premature birth, infant development delays and special needs, as well as financial, psychological, and social support obstacles. The researchers call

2h

Life at Huawei: Trains, European Design, and Lunch Naps

Photographer Kevin Frayer documented the company's facilities and work culture in southern China over five days in April.

2h

Another type of cell phone

Researchers uncover complex communication web in every cell.

2h

100 years ago today, the sun made Einstein a star

Observations made during a solar eclipse provided the evidence to confirm the Theory of General Relativity. Robyn Arianrhod reports.

2h

Ethiopian volcano bacteria are analogues for early Mars life, researchers say

Surprising extremophiles thrive in desperately unfriendly environment. Andrew Masterson reports.

2h

In lager, veritas: the physics of beer

Experimenting with beer in the name of science yields insights into volcanic eruptions, asteroid formation, and the perils of drinking in space. Phil Dooley reports.

2h

From the archive

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01597-6 How Nature reported Apollo 10 in 1969, and the permanent establishment of the US National Research Council in 1919.

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These scientists are setting a forest on fire — and studying it with drones

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01604-w Data from the blaze in Utah could improve models of how wildfire smoke spreads.

2h

Hacking conservation: how a tech start-up aims to save biodiversity

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01678-6 Standard efforts have failed to slow the pace of extinctions, so Conservation X Labs is trying a fresh approach.

2h

World of addiction, zen cosmology, and the impending aquacalypse: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01657-x Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

2h

Regrow forests with locals’ participation

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01664-y Regrow forests with locals’ participation

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Rethinking impact factors: better ways to judge a journal

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01643-3 We need a broader, more-transparent suite of metrics to improve science publishing, say Paul Wouters, colleagues and co-signatories.

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Use nudges to change behaviour towards conservation

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01662-0 Use nudges to change behaviour towards conservation

2h

The neurobiology of conscience

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01658-w An exploration of the science behind our morality from philosopher Patricia Churchland is illuminating and grounded, finds Nicholas A. Christakis.

2h

Design and evolution of an enzyme with a non-canonical organocatalytic mechanism

Nature, Published online: 27 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1262-8 A hydrolytic enzyme with a non-canonical organocatalytic mechanism was generated by introducing Nδ-methylhistidine through the cellular translation machinery into a designed active site, allowing optimization of enzyme performance using laboratory evolution protocols adapted to an expanded genetic code.

2h

Catalytic machinery of enzymes expanded

Nature, Published online: 27 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01596-7 Only a few types of natural amino-acid residue are used directly by enzymes to catalyse reactions. The incorporation of an unnatural residue into an enzyme shows how the catalytic repertoire of enzymes can be enlarged.

2h

Google revives controversial cold-fusion experiments

Nature, Published online: 27 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01683-9 Researchers tested mechanisms linked to nuclear fusion at room temperature — but found no evidence for the phenomenon.

2h

Revisiting the cold case of cold fusion

Nature, Published online: 27 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1256-6 Three years of investigation by a multi-disciplinary team into claims of ‘cold fusion’ found no evidence that the phenomenon exists, but identified a parameter space potentially worthy of further exploration.

2h

Wood Gets a Makeover to Provide Energy-Free Air Conditioning

Powering buildings costs America $430 billion a year and accounts for 40 percent of total energy use . Almost half of that is used for heating and cooling. Now scientists have given our oldest building material, wood, a makeover to make it eight times stronger, highly reflective, and able to radiate away building heat without using any power. Scientists have long known that when thermal radiation

2h

Ultra-cold lithium atoms shedding light on superfluid formation

A new study resolves a long-standing debate about what happens at the microscopic level when matter transitions into a superconducting or superfluid state.Correlations between pairs of atoms in an ultra-cold gas were found to grow suddenly as the system was cooled below the transition temperature.The experiments at Swinburne University of Technology used gases of lithium atoms cooled to temperatur

2h

How small can they get? Polymers may be the key to single-molecule electronic devices

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and University of Tsukuba demonstrate that polymers could play a key role in the fabrication of single-molecule electronic devices, allowing us to push the boundaries of the nanoelectronics revolution.

2h

Scientists evaluated the effects of different chemical treatments to tissue transplants

A group of scientists from Russia and Ireland found out how quality of tissue-engineered biomeshes (biological 'frame' which is used for tissue repair) is affected by various chemical fixatives (cross-linkers). Such compounds form chemical 'bridges' between biomesh polymers and change its mechanical and functional properties. It will help to select cross-linkers for treatment of certain transplant

2h

Microglia turned on

Part of the immune system in the brain is made up of so-called microglia cells. Korean and Singaporean researchers have now developed a fluorescent probe that specifically labels this type of macrophage. The cells were visualized in cell culture and in the live brains of rodents. As detailed in the journal Angewandte Chemie, a gene product expressed in microglia triggers the probe into a fluoresci

2h

Antibiotic ornament clasp

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an increasing health threat, making new antibiotics essential. German researchers have recently had a breakthrough: they discovered lugdunin in the human nose — a new kind of cyclic peptide that comes from the bacterium Staphylococcus lugdunensis and has strong antimicrobial properties against Stahphylococcus aureus, among others. The researchers have been able t

2h

The sun follows the rhythm of the planets

One of the big questions in solar physics is why the sun's activity follows a regular cycle of 11 years. Researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), an independent German research institute, now present new findings, indicating that the tidal forces of Venus, Earth and Jupiter influence the solar magnetic field, thus governing the solar cycle. The team of researchers present

2h

Altered brain activity in antisocial teenagers

Teenage girls with problematic social behavior display reduced brain activity and weaker connectivity between the brain regions implicated in emotion regulation. The findings of an international study carried out by researchers from the University of Zurich and others now offer a neurobiological explanation for the difficulties some girls have in controlling their emotions, and provide indications

2h

Plainification holds promise for improving material sustainability

Researchers from Institute of Metal Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposed to advance material properties by plainification, which means tailoring stable interfaces at different length scales instead of alloying. The newly proposed strategy intends to lower materials cost and increase their resource-independence and recyclability, therefore advancing material sustainability.

2h

Music helps to build the brains of very premature babies

In Switzerland, 1% of children are born 'very prematurely.' These children are at high risk of developing neuropsychological disorders. To help the brains of these newborns develop as well as possible despite the stressful environment of intensive care, researchers (UNIGE/HUG) propose an original solution: music written especially for them. And the first results are surprising: medical imaging rev

2h

Epigenetic study provides new approaches to combination therapies for aggressive cancers

A recent study by CeMM reveals how the interaction of the epigenetic protein BRD4 with the metabolic enzyme MTHFD1 controls gene expression and cell proliferation. The results of the study have now been published in the renowned journal Nature Genetics. They suggest novel approaches for the development of combination therapies for aggressive cancers.

2h

High sugar levels during pregnancy could lead to childhood obesity

The children of women who have high glucose blood levels during pregnancy, even if their mothers are not diagnosed with gestational diabetes, are at an increased risk of developing obesity in childhood, according to a new study published in PLOS One.

2h

How to interact between mantle and crustal components in the subduction zone?

Subduction process drives the differential evolution of the earth and realizes material cycle and energy exchange. Recent studies have shown that orogenic peridotites reveal crust-mantle interaction in subduction zone. SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences has published relevant reports.

2h

How video gamers can save the world

The United Nations has recognised gamers as a potential force for sustainability and energy efficiency. Andrew Urevig reports.

2h

When algorithms mess up, the nearest human gets the blame

A look at historical case studies shows us how we handle the liability of automated systems.

2h

More intense wildfires are here to stay, and we need to adapt, says report

Zac Robinson remembers hiking through B.C.'s Monashee Mountains last August and, on a cloudless day, staring directly into the sun.

2h

More lighting alone does not create safer cities

"I walk this route to the train station. I often get cat-called whilst walking to the train. It's also very poorly lit at night." (Female, age 27)

2h

Researchers study the warming effect of consumed ginger

Ginger is a widely used spice, particularly in the cuisine of East and South Asia. It is known to have some physiological effects and is commonly used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Writing in the International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design, Guang Zheng, Fei Hou, Jinghu Wang, and Nannan Wang of Lanzhou University, China, focus on one of the spice's most well-known proper

2h

New method to evaluate comfort of smart and functional textiles

Until now, user-friendliness has been the focus of the development of smart and functional textiles. Now it is time to address comfort when wearing these textiles—a quality factor that should be of interest to the industry.

2h

Passwords serve a personal purpose

A Victoria University of Wellington study has shown that people build their passwords from personal information for a variety of reasons including to invoke important memories or achieve future goals.

2h

High-tech fishing gear could help save critically endangered right whales

Many fish, marine mammals and seabirds that inhabit the world's oceans are critically endangered, but few are as close to the brink as the North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis). Only about 411 of these whales exist today, and at their current rate of decline, they could become extinct within our lifetimes.

2h

7 ways to find new music, shows, and movies

DIY Stick it to those fancy recommendation algorithms and do it yourself. You don't have to rely on your streaming apps to recommend new content for you—here are some worthwhile alternatives.

2h

Researchers study the warming effect of consumed ginger

Ginger is a widely used spice, particularly in the cuisine of East and South Asia. It is known to have some physiological effects and is commonly used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Writing in the International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design, Guang Zheng, Fei Hou, Jinghu Wang, and Nannan Wang of Lanzhou University, China, focus on one of the spice's most well-known proper

3h

High-tech fishing gear could help save critically endangered right whales

Many fish, marine mammals and seabirds that inhabit the world's oceans are critically endangered, but few are as close to the brink as the North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis). Only about 411 of these whales exist today, and at their current rate of decline, they could become extinct within our lifetimes.

3h

Högt förtroende för nyhetsmedier – men förtroendeklyftan ökar

– Sett över tid har partipolariseringen i medieförtroendet ökat, och det är bland högersympatisörerna som vi hittar de personer som har lägst förtroende för våra nyhetsmedier, säger medieforskaren Ulrika Andersson. De traditionella mediernas ställning i det svenska samhället har förändrats under 2000-talet. Mediemarknaden har genomgått en strukturomvandling och samtidigt blivit mer segmenterad, m

3h

3 plants from U.S. Civil War medical guide fight infection

Three plants from a guide to traditional plant remedies of the South that the Confederate Surgeon General commissioned during the height of the Civil War have antiseptic properties, according to new research. The results show that extracts from the plants—the white oak, the tulip poplar, and the devil’s walking stick—have antimicrobial activity against one or more of a trio of dangerous species o

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Google & Microsoft Banking On Africa's AI Labeling Workforce

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

3h

Rising seas threaten Australia's major airports

Most major airports in Australia are located on reclaimed swamps, sitting only a few meters above the present day sea level. And the risk of sea level rise from climate change poses a greater threat to our airports than we're prepared for.

3h

Cranberries join forces with antibiotics to fight bacteria

The global spread of antibiotic resistance is undermining decades of progress in fighting bacterial infections. Due to the overuse of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture, we are on the cusp of returning to a pre-antibiotic era in which minor infections can once again become deadly. Therefore, countering the fall in antibiotic efficacy by improving the effectiveness of currently available antib

3h

Researchers crack an enduring physics enigma

For decades, physicists, engineers and mathematicians have failed to explain a remarkable phenomenon in fluid mechanics: the natural tendency of turbulence in fluids to move from disordered chaos to perfectly parallel patterns of oblique turbulent bands. This transition from a state of chaotic turbulence to a highly structured pattern was observed by many scientists, but never understood.

3h

Thai dinosaur is a cousin of T. rex

Scientists from the University of Bonn and the Sirindhorn Museum in Thailand have identified two new dinosaur species. They analyzed fossil finds that were already discovered 30 years ago in Thailand. Both species are distant relatives of T. rex, but with a somewhat more primitive structure. They were efficient predators. The results have now been published in the journal Acta Palaeontologica Polo

3h

Cranberries join forces with antibiotics to fight bacteria

The global spread of antibiotic resistance is undermining decades of progress in fighting bacterial infections. Due to the overuse of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture, we are on the cusp of returning to a pre-antibiotic era in which minor infections can once again become deadly. Therefore, countering the fall in antibiotic efficacy by improving the effectiveness of currently available antib

3h

Brain scans clarify uncontrolled emotion in teenage girls

New findings offer a neurobiological explanation for the difficulties some teenage girls have in controlling their emotions. Teen girls with problematic social behavior display reduced brain activity and weaker connectivity between the brain regions implicated in emotion regulation, research finds. Becoming a teenager means going through a variety of physical and behavioral changes in the context

3h

Mysterious ancient burial mound used for 2,000 years

Researchers have found evidence that an unremarkable prehistoric burial mound near Bordeaux, in southwest France, was re-used by locals for around 2,000 years.

3h

Precarious employment in education impacts workers, families and students

Recent announcements in Ontario about public education have been controversial, with changes including larger classroom sizes, mandatory online courses and curriculum revisions. However, perhaps most significantly, the imposed changes will lead to the loss of teaching positions across the province.

3h

New tool for understanding cells in health and disease

A first-of-its-kind data analysis platform is enabling researchers to select the best tool for interpreting the overwhelming amounts of data generated by single-cell research.

3h

Researchers introduce novel heat transport theory in quest for efficient thermoelectrics

NCCR MARVEL researchers have developed a novel microscopic theory that is able to describe heat transport in very general ways, and applies equally well to ordered or disordered materials such as crystals or glasses and to anything in between. This is not only a significant first, it also shows, surprisingly, that heat can tunnel, quantum-mechanically, rather than diffuse away, like an atomic vibr

3h

Centuries-old drawings lead to better understanding of fan-shaped auroras

Physics researchers and literature researchers have joined together to better understand the rare natural phenomenon of white and red auroras fanning across the night sky in Japan. Armed with drawings and descriptions dating back to the 1700s, microfilm from the 1950s, and today's spectral image data, they've confirmed the accuracy of the older depictions. They've also started to understand how th

3h

Imperfection is OK for better MOFs

Imaging defects in MOF crystals, and monitoring how they develop, will allow control of defect formation to design better MOFs for many applications.

3h

Thirty years after anorexia onset, fewer ill than healthy

A study that started in 1985 followed some 50 people who had become anorexic in their teens. It shows that 30 years later, the majority were healthy but some had persistent eating disorders. The study, published in The British Journal of Psychiatry, was carried out at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

3h

Iconic Australian working dog may not be part dingo after all

Researchers at the University of Sydney have found no genetic evidence that the iconic Australian kelpie shares canine ancestry with a dingo, despite Australian bush myth.

3h

Direct methane conversion under mild conditions by thermo-, electro- or photocatalysis reviewed

A research group led by Professor DENG Dehui from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reviewed the latest progress in low-temperature methane conversion in thermocatalytic, electrocatalytic, and photocatalytic systems.

3h

New tool for understanding cells in health and disease

A new analysis platform called CellBench is helping to interpret large biological datasets from single-cell studies.Accurately interpreting these complex datasets is crucial for understanding the role cells play in health and disease. The ability to identify and define each cell and its activity will ultimately help in the development of new therapies.

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Does your health in middle age predict how healthy you'll be later in life?

Cognitive decline is the medical term for a decline in your abilities to think, remember, and make decisions. Researchers know now that cognitive decline may begin in midlife and can develop over a period of 20 years or so. In a new study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS), researchers identified factors associated with brain health in middle age in order to identi

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How interval training affects 'belly fat' in obese 70-year-olds

A team of researchers have designed a study to learn more about the effects of a 10-week, easy-to-perform, personalized, progressive vigorous-intensity interval training among 70-year-olds with 'belly fat.' Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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New tool for understanding cells in health and disease

A first-of-its-kind data analysis platform is enabling researchers to select the best tool for interpreting the overwhelming amounts of data generated by single-cell research.

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Radiation damage lowers melting point of potential fusion reactor material

Radiation damage lowers the melting point of the metal tungsten, an effect that could contribute to material failure in nuclear fusion reactors and other applications where materials are exposed to particle radiation from extremely hot fusion plasma. That's the result of a study, published today in Science Advances, that was led by researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerato

3h

Researchers wonder if ancient supernovae prompted human ancestors to walk upright

Did ancient supernovae induce proto-humans to walk on two legs, eventually resulting in homo sapiens with hands free to build cathedrals, design rockets and snap iPhone selfies?

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Researchers demonstrate constraints on symmetries from holography

A pair of researchers, one at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and another at California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and the University of Tokyo, have recently investigated a set of old conjectures about symmetries in quantum gravity. The specific conjectures of focus: (1) Quantum gravity does not allow for global symmetries; (2) For gauge symmetry, all possible charges must b

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Ultra-small microbes exhibit extreme survival skills in Ethiopia's Mars-like wonderland

The first study of ultra-small bacteria living in the extreme environment of Ethiopia's Dallol hot springs shows that life can thrive in conditions similar to those thought to have been found on the young planet Mars. An international team of researchers lead by Dr. Felipe Gómez from Astrobiology Center in Spain (CAB (CSIC-INTA)) has found a strain of the Nanohaloarchaeles Order bacteria embedded

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Immersive ethics tool helps developers avoid Internet of Things dystopia

Google's infamous "Don't be evil" motto laid out the core values of its founders in the simplest terms (whether or not you think they have stuck to their promise is another conversation). But is being tech-ethical as simple as just stating your values, or does it require further introspection throughout the process of development?

3h

The Mystery of the Disappearing Elephant-Seal Dialects

A northern elephant seal needs to remember the calls of his rivals. An encounter between two males, fighting to control female harems, can be bloody—skin marked by an opponent’s canines, chunks torn from the trunklike nose, wounds on the chest shield. Such battles are rather rare only because less violent cues are often enough to deter an adversary. Vocal displays are fundamental in these rituali

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Big Pharma emits more greenhouse gases than the automotive industry

Rarely does mention of the pharmaceutical industry conjure up images of smoke stacks, pollution and environmental damage.

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Lessons from Pohang: Solving geothermal energy's earthquake problem

A geothermal energy project triggered a damaging earthquake in 2017 in South Korea. A new analysis suggests flaws in some of the most common ways of trying to minimize the risk of such quakes when harnessing Earth's heat for energy.

3h

Stem cell study determines most harmful vape liquids

Novel approach reveals vaping's effect on endothelial cells and the most harmful flavors.

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Researchers advance search for laboratory test to predict spread of breast cancer

Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University and other institutions report that a new laboratory test that induces cancer cells to squeeze through narrow spaces has the potential to accurately predict which breast cancers and other solid tumors are likely to spread, or metastasize, to other sites. The test, they say, might also help clinicians select the best drugs to prevent cancer's spread.

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Researchers wonder if ancient supernovae prompted human ancestors to walk upright

Supernovae bombarded Earth with cosmic energy starting as many as 8 million years ago, with a peak some 2.6 million years ago, initiating an avalanche of electrons in the lower atmosphere and setting off a chain of events that feasibly ended with bipedal hominins.

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Rice U. lab grows stable, ultrathin magnets

Rice University researchers find a simple method to make unique, nearly two-dimensional iron oxides with stable magnetic properties at room temperature. The materials are promising building blocks for nanoscale electronic applications.

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Where Drugs Come From: A Comprehensive Look

This is a solid article by Jeffrey Flier (open-access in the Journal of Clinical Investigation ) on the roles of academia and industry in drug discovery. Which is a topic that refuses to go away. I am prepared to swear that before starting this blog I had no idea of how many people are convinced that the drug industry does little or no research, and that academic labs discover all the drugs. I wi

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Not dead yet: Apple unveils new and improved iPod Touch

It's been four years since Apple brought out a new iPod Touch, but it seems the iconic music player isn't quite ready for the digital graveyard yet. A new 7th-generation player has just …

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How climate change could affect some of West Africa's iconic bird species

If scientists know how particular species are responding to the realities of global climate change, they can help to recommend better conservation strategies.

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Pushing stargazing to the limits with the world's largest gamma-ray observatory

To discover the secrets of exploding stars or black holes, scientists have been focusing on the gamma rays they emit. However, gamma rays don't pass through the Earth's atmosphere, making them difficult to study. To find what high-energy process a gamma ray originates from, scientists have been observing the cascades of secondary particles produced when these rays hit the atmosphere. The cascades—

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How climate change could affect some of West Africa's iconic bird species

If scientists know how particular species are responding to the realities of global climate change, they can help to recommend better conservation strategies.

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Stolen comets and free-floating objects

Our solar system may contain alien comets that were stolen from another star flying past 4.5 billion years ago. Far away in a distant cluster of young stars, a similar close encounter might have also sent the inter-stellar visitor "Oumuamua" flying on its way toward us, and there must be many more of these free-floating objects in the galaxy. These are results of a new study by astrophysicists at

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Evidence of new magnetic transitions in late-type dwarfs from Gaia DR2

Since the second Gaia data release on the 25th April 2018, astrophysicists have had at their disposal an unprecedented wealth of information not only on distances and motions of stars in the galaxy, but also on many other stellar parameters that came along by exploiting the instrumentation aboard the satellite and the unique characteristics of the mission. Multiple observations of the same star, r

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Study corroborates the influence of planetary tidal forces on solar activity

One of the big questions in solar physics is why the sun's activity follows a regular cycle of 11 years. Researchers from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), an independent German research institute, now present new findings, indicating that the tidal forces of Venus, Earth and Jupiter influence the solar magnetic field, thus governing the solar cycle. The team of researchers present

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Giant planets and comets battling in the circumstellar disk around HD 163296

In a study appearing today in the Astrophysical Journal, an INAF-lead team of researchers explored whether the anomalous features in the dust and gas distributions of HD 163296's disk revealed by ALMA's observations could arise from the interaction of the giant planets with planetesimals, a component of the disk previously unaccounted for.

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Threatened beetles benefit from forest thinning

Wood-living beetles that use oak trees are a species-rich and threatened animal group in modern forestry and agriculture in southern Sweden. New research from the University of Gothenburg shows that management with conservation thinning can be an effective way to promote these beetles in the long term.

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We finally understand how oxygen reacts on platinum

Platinum is a widely used catalyst, but its precise mechanism largely remains a mystery to scientists. Ludo Juurlink has now demonstrated for the first time how oxygen reacts on the platinum surface. Together with Ph.D. students Kun Cao and Richard van Lent and international colleagues, he has published his findings in PNAS.

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New technique for studying rusting of steel benefits mining industry

University of Saskatchewan (USask) Ph.D. student Arthur Situm has developed a new non-invasive technique to study the rusting of steel, research that may help with the safety of potash mining and construction of buildings, roads and bridges.

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Threatened beetles benefit from forest thinning

Wood-living beetles that use oak trees are a species-rich and threatened animal group in modern forestry and agriculture in southern Sweden. New research from the University of Gothenburg shows that management with conservation thinning can be an effective way to promote these beetles in the long term.

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Se, hvad de ansatte vil spørge AUH’s ledelse om ved dagens dialogmøde

Spørgsmålene fra de ansatte stiller sig i kø, når ledelsen på Aarhus Universitetshospital i dag stiller op til dialogmøde med hospitalets stab.

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Exploding stars led to humans walking on two legs, radical study suggests

Scientists say surge of radiation led to lightning causing forest fires, making adaptation vital It was the evolutionary leap that defined the species: while other apes ambled around on all fours, the ancestors of humans rose up on two legs and, from that lofty position, went on to conquer the world. The benefits of standing tall in the African savannah are broadly nailed down, but what prompted

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Review: Ring's Stick Up Cam Battery Eliminates Wires

The latest version of Ring’s camera aims to replace your home security system—no wires or drilling necessary.

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Does being seen really make cyclists safer on the road?

Researchers from UBC Okanagan have determined motorists tended to give cyclists wearing high-visibility vests more room on the road, compared to cyclists without high-visibility clothing. The vests, with arrows directing traffic away from pedestrians and cyclists, have shown to reduce the number of traffic accidents involving these groups.

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Steroids can reduce lung cancer risk in COPD patients

For many people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD, a steroid inhaler is a daily necessity to keep their airways open and help them to breathe. Now, a new UBC analysis shows that these medicated devices may also reduce patients' risk of lung cancer by as much as 30 per cent.

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NASA-supported monitoring network assesses ozone layer threats

On the heels of the first definitive signs of the ozone layer recovery last year, an international team of scientists discovered that production and emission of a banned, potent ozone-depleting chemical is on the rise again. A new research finding, published in Nature on May 23, locates the source region for about half of those new emissions. Since 2013, they found that an increase of about 7000 t

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Deletion in mouse neutrophils offers clues to pathogenesis in multiple sclerosis

A mouse model called experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, or EAE, is used to discover disease mechanisms that may translate into treatments for patients with multiple sclerosis. Researchers now report in the journal JCI Insight how dysregulated neutrophils cause damage in a severe, mouse model form of EAE called atypical EAE, which attacks cerebellum brain tissue.

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Is Stalin Making a Comeback in Russia?

NOVOSIBIRSK, Russia—To find Joseph Stalin here in Russia’s third-largest city, drive down the main thoroughfare, Red Аvenue, past Lenin Square. At the Ob River, turn left on Bolshevik Street until you reach a two-story wooden building with traditionally carved window trimmings. There, at the Communist Party’s local headquarters on a sunny day in May, the city’s mayor unveiled the bust of the “ Ge

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Resurvey of mountains depicted in Tableau Physique reveal errors, impact of climate change

A team of researchers from Toulouse University, Pontificia Universidad and CNRS, Université de Montpellier, has conducted a resurvey of the mountains depicted in the famous "Tableau Physique," and in so doing, have found both errors in the drawings and the true impact of climate change on the region. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes t

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Algorithm predicts patient survival in intensive care

A new algorithm uses up to 23 years of individual disease history to predict patients’ chances of survival in the intensive care unit. Determining which treatment is best for each intensive care patient is a great challenge and the existing methods that doctors and nurses use could be much better. The new algorithm appears in the journal Lancet Digital Health . “We have used Danish health data in

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Rapid water quality tests better protect beachgoers

Planning a trip to the beach? Along with looking forward to some summer fun, beachgoers may be thinking about the safety of their waterfront destination. Will the water be clean enough for swimming, surfing, wading and all the other ways people enjoy the nation's shoreline?

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Less can be more: Semiconductor nanowires for flexible photovoltaics

Capturing and manipulating light at nanoscale is a key factor to build high efficiency solar cells. Researchers in the 3-D Photovoltaics group have recently presented a promising new design. Their simulations show that vertically stacked nanowires on top of ultrathin silicon films reduces the total amount of material needed by 90 percent while increasing the efficiency of the solar cell. These pro

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Rapid water quality tests better protect beachgoers

Planning a trip to the beach? Along with looking forward to some summer fun, beachgoers may be thinking about the safety of their waterfront destination. Will the water be clean enough for swimming, surfing, wading and all the other ways people enjoy the nation's shoreline?

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People born very preterm or with very low birthweight have high risk of lung disease

A global study shows people born very preterm or with very low birthweight have a high risk of lungdisease and are not reaching their full airway capacity by early adulthood.

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Comet inspires chemistry for making breathable oxygen on Mars

Caltech researchers discover a process that turns carbon dioxide into molecular oxygen.

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Global Payments buying Total System Services in $21.5B deal

Global Payments will buy Total System Services in an all-stock deal valued at $21.5 billion, the third major acquisition in the payment technology sector this year.

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Public opinion study in Europe shows drop in anti-immigration sentiment, among other changes

Contrary to appearances at times, Europeans have become more receptive to immigration in recent decades. That's one of multiple new findings from an innovative study on European public opinon co-authored by an MIT political scientist. The study aggregates public opinion polls from 27 countries over a span of 36 years, offering new insight into broad trends and changes in European politics and soc

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Power generation by source in EU countries (2000–2018)

submitted by /u/Proxmer [link] [comments]

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Bringing 3D-printing to the moon – Melting moon dust with the laser

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The Fourth Industrial Revolution is only as good as the people behind it

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Researchers find more evidence of 14th-century tsunami that wiped out Sumatran villages

A team of researchers with members from Singapore, Indonesia, Ireland and the U.K. has found more evidence of a tsunami approximately 600 years ago that destroyed communities in the same part of Sumatra as the 2004 tsunami. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of gravestones and pottery in the area and what they found.

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Climate change puts commercial viability of citrus, vineyards and olive trees at risk

Climate change threatens the medium-term commercial viability of citrus fruits, vines and olives. A study by the Ecophysiology and Biotechnology research group at the Universitat Jaume I de Castelló (UJI) – carried out in collaboration with scientists from France, Greece and the United Kingdom—warns that the effects of global warming will reduce the productivity of these three species of tradition

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Last male Sumatran rhino in Malaysia dies

The future of the critically endangered Sumatran rhino has been struck a blow, with the death of Malaysia's last male.

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The walking dead: VR og digitale lig skal genskabe drab

PLUS. Det er ikke altid, vidner husker en sag helt præcist. Stod offeret nu ovre ved vinduet, eller var det nærmere døren? Det kan 3D-virtualisering og digitale lig hjælpe med i projekt ’Walking Dead’.

4h

Using the past to unravel the future for Arctic wetlands

A new study has used partially fossilized plants and single-celled organisms to investigate the effects of climate change on the Canadian High Arctic wetlands and help predict their future.

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New study dismisses green growth policies as a route out of ecological emergency

A new study examines green growth policies as articulated in major reports by the World Bank, the OECD and the UN Environment Programme, and tests the theory against extant empirical evidence and models of the relationship between GDP and both material footprint and CO2 emissions.

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Hyperloop Hype

Here is another future technology where it is not yet clear how things will work out – the hyperloop concept. Several companies are working on developing what is called a hyperloop – a closed tube with reduced air pressure that will operate like a rail system for high-speed travel. The idea is almost a staple of science fiction, but could one day be a reality. Most of the press for hyperloop has

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Climate change puts commercial viability of citrus, vineyards and olive trees at risk

Climate change threatens the medium-term commercial viability of citrus fruits, vines and olives. A study by the Ecophysiology and Biotechnology research group at the Universitat Jaume I de Castelló (UJI) – carried out in collaboration with scientists from France, Greece and the United Kingdom—warns that the effects of global warming will reduce the productivity of these three species of tradition

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Lägre acceptans för miljöskatter i länder med dysfunktionellt styre

Offentliga tjänster som vård, utbildning och rättsväsende är ofta den mest direkta formen av kontakt som människor har med staten. Kvalitén på dessa tjänster är därför avgörande för om folk har förtroende för offentliga institutioner och för demokratin i största allmänhet. Quality of Government (QoG), eller samhällsstyrningens kvalitet, är ett mått på effektivitet, rättvisa och korruption i ett l

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New evidence supports surgery for rare type of brain lymphoma

Through a systematic review of published studies going back 50 years, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have identified a distinct subtype of primary central nervous system (PCNS) lymphoma that should be considered for surgical removal, suggesting a major shift in how this type of tumor is evaluated and managed.

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Mars Orbiter Finds Giant Cache of Ice on the Red Planet

Scientists believe this may be the remains of Mars' long-lost ice caps. The post Mars Orbiter Finds Giant Cache of Ice on the Red Planet appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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2019 Mini Countryman S E All4 Review: Bouncy, Fun-to-Drive Plug-In Hybrid

Incredible fun to drive it you don't mind stiff suspensions and 12 miles on battery power. But it's also a turbocharger-like booster for the three-cylinder engine. A full-on electric Mini arrives later this year. The post 2019 Mini Countryman S E All4 Review: Bouncy, Fun-to-Drive Plug-In Hybrid appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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New Ikea app will save you a trip to the store – CNET

Stay home and make your own Swedish meatballs.

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Dell’s New Alienware Laptops Are Slimmer And More Mature

A lot of the gaming laptops that we’re seeing in the market today can come across a bit garish, what with their sharp angular designs and glowing RGBs. However, we get it, but in case …

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Self-censorship on Campus Is Bad for Science

I have taught evolution and genetics at Williams College for about a decade. For most of that time, the only complaints I got from students were about grades. But that all changed after Donald Trump’s election as president. At that moment, political tensions were running high on our campus. And well-established scientific ideas that I’d been teaching for years suddenly met with stiff ideological

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Lægepolitiker: Jeg savner politikere, der er menneskelige

Frem mod valget 5. juni bringer Dagens Medicin interviews med de seks læger, der stiller op til Folketinget. Psykiater Peter Grydehøj stiller op for Nye Borgerlige i Vestjylland.

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Birds might follow their noses home

Animals Excerpt: Supernavigators Animal navigation has been an understudied field. Scientists are currently at an impasse as to whether birds smell their way home, or have another system underlying…

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New model predicts changes in wood

Wood is a living material that changes with varying temperatures and humidity. Sabina Huč, a former researcher at the University of Borås, has developed a model that can predict wood's behavior. It has already been used to describe what is happening to wood from the royal vessel Vasa when the climate in its museum varies.

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Signaling protein discovery may lead to drug-based therapies to treat hyperparathyroidism

Overactive parathyroid glands,which control the body's blood calcium levels, can lead to kidney stones, neuropsychiatric disorders and bone abnormalities, particularly among elderly women. Researchers led by Duke-NUS Medical School have discovered a signaling protein that appears to protect these glands from excessive activity, providing insights for drug development to treat hyperparathyroidism—a

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Study finds microdosing psychedelics can be beneficial, but not in the way that users most expect

What if you could take a psychedelic drug regularly in such tiny quantities that the immediate effects were not discernible, yet over time it led to a range of psychological benefits, especially enhanced focus and heightened creativity? That's the principle behind "microdosing" – a controversial technique that's exploded in popularity ever since the publication of a 2011 book The Psychedelic Expl

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Italy's new ruins: heritage sites being lost to neglect and looting

Overgrown and weathered, many historical monuments are disappearing as public funds for culture fail to match modern Italy’s inheritance Legend has it that the grotto hidden among the craggy cliffs on San Marco hill in Sutera in the heart of Sicily holds a treasure chest full of gold coins. In order to find it, three men must dream contemporaneously about the precise place to dig. Treasure or no

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German prosecutors raid Porsche in corruption probe

Prosecutors in Stuttgart said they raided German sports car maker and Volkswagen subsidiary Porsche on Tuesday on suspicion that an auditor was bribed to pass information to the company's tax advisor.

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'Submarines' small enough to deliver medicine inside human body

UNSW engineers have shown that micro-submarines powered by nano-motors could navigate the human body to provide targeted drug delivery to diseased organs without the need for external stimulus.

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Image of the Day: Baby Steps

Watch young birds move like rock climbers.

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The Military Is Locked in a Power Struggle With Wind Farms

A nationwide fight between wind developers and the military highlights the challenge of transitioning to a future of renewable energy.

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The Radical Plan to Change How Antibiotics Get Developed

The traditional structure of the pharma business doesn't work for antibiotics. The answer might lie in removing profit from the equation.

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A new optical atomic clock’s heart is as small as a coffee bean

Optical atomic clocks are extremely good at keeping time, and they’re on their way to becoming pocket watches.

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GE to cut over 1,000 jobs in French power operations

US industrial conglomerate General Electric said Tuesday that it would cut more than 1,000 jobs mainly at its gas turbine operations in eastern France, part of a wave of European layoffs as it tries to stem losses in its power generation business.

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Mother, daughter sue France over ill health from air pollution

A Paris court on Tuesday began hearing a case brought by a mother and daughter who, in a legal first in France, are suing the state for damages over ill health caused by air pollution.

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Lights in the sky from Elon Musk's new satellite network have stargazers worried

UFOs over Cairns. Lights over Leiden. Glints above Seattle. What's going on?

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Study finds ocean acidification threatens coral reef systems

A new study led by The University of Western Australia has found the future of the world's coral reefs is under threat from ocean acidification with many corals unable to adapt to the conditions.

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Researchers demonstrate new properties of atomically thin ferroelectrics

According to the rules of quantum mechanics, electrons behave as particles or waves. Similar to the walls of a water reservoir, "electrostatic potential walls" can be created to confine electrons to desired spatial regions, known to physicists as "quantum corrals." Confining electrons allows physicists to work with them, the experimental counterpart to "particle in a box" exercises in undergraduat

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Researcher discusses reopening the case of cold fusion

Researchers at MIT have collaborated with a team of scientists from the University of British Columbia, the University of Maryland, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Google to conduct a multiyear investigation into cold fusion, a type of benign nuclear reaction hypothesized to occur in benchtop apparatus at room temperature.

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Tonåringar med fetma har stelare blodkärl

– Tonårstiden är en viktig period för åtgärder som tacklar fetma eftersom det ger bättre hälsa på lång sikt, konstaterar Frida Dangardt, förstaförfattare bakom artikeln, docent i klinisk fysiologi vid Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, och läkare på Drottning Silvias barn- och ungdomssjukhus i Göteborg. Studien omfattar 3 423 barn vars kroppssammansättning mättes vid 9, 11, 13, 15 och 1

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Fruit bat hunting also harms humans

According to the report of the World Biodiversity Council IPBES 2019 on the global state of biodiversity, one million animal and plant species are acutely threatened with extinction. In addition, the overexploitation of the last 50 years has led to a massive decline in the performance of many ecosystems. One example of this is the ecological services of flying foxes in Africa, which are affected b

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Signaling protein discovery may lead to drug-based therapies to treat hyperparathyroidism

Overactive parathyroid glands,which control the body's blood calcium levels, can lead to kidney stones, neuropsychiatric disorders and bone abnormalities, particularly among elderly women. Researchers led by Duke-NUS Medical School have discovered a signaling protein that appears to protect these glands from excessive activity, providing insights for drug development to treat hyperparathyroidism—a

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Fruit bat hunting also harms humans

According to the report of the World Biodiversity Council IPBES 2019 on the global state of biodiversity, one million animal and plant species are acutely threatened with extinction. In addition, the overexploitation of the last 50 years has led to a massive decline in the performance of many ecosystems. One example of this is the ecological services of flying foxes in Africa, which are affected b

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Subcritical experiment captures scientific measurements to advance stockpile safety

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) successfully executed its first subcritical experiment since 2003 on Feb. 13 at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) U1a facility. The experiment—dubbed "Ediza"—took place deep below the desert floor and was the culmination of a five-year campaign aimed at capturing high-fidelity plutonium data in support of nuclear stockpile safety.

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Getting to Mars, whatever it takes

Sending manned missions to Mars is essential, according to Pierre Brisson, the president of Mars Society Switzerland, "because we can." We spoke with him about this challenge while he was at EPFL recently to give a talk.

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Researcher discusses social implications and responsibilities of computing

Since February, five working groups have been generating ideas about the form and content of the new MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing. That includes the Working Group on Social Implications and Responsibilities of Computing, co-chaired by Melissa Nobles, the Kenan Sahin Dean of the MIT School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences and a professor of political science, and Julie Sha

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The 1919 Solar Eclipse and General Relativity's First Major Triumph

Observations by Arthur Eddington vindicated the theory—even though his nation and Einstein’s had barely stopped pummeling each other in World War I — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Getting ready for Mars on the Space Station

From disrupted biological clocks to radiation and contamination hazards, Europe is running experiments on the International Space Station to take human exploration one step closer to Mars.

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ExoMars PanCam filters

This may look like a collection of colorful contact lenses, and in some respects there are some similarities: these are the filters through which the ExoMars rover—named Rosalind Franklin—will view Mars in visible and near infrared wavelengths.

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Scientists revisit the cold case of cold fusion

Scientists from the University of British Columbia (UBC), the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Maryland, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Google are conducting a multi-year investigation into cold fusion, a type of benign nuclear reaction hypothesized to occur in benchtop apparatus at room temperature.

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To Fight Deepfakes, Researchers Built a Smarter Camera

One way to tell if an image has been faked? Bake the tamper-proofing into the camera itself.

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On Pooping in the Dark—No Lights, No Phones, No Distractions

A bowel movement, above all human projects, is the body’s way of making time for the mind to roam.

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Productivity and the Joy of Doing Things the Hard Way

I like a good efficiency hack as well as anyone, but sometimes we should take the long way around.

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US Sanctions on Huawei May Fuel China's Plan for Its Own Tech

China's government has to plan to wean itself from reliance on Western technology. Blacklisting Huawei will only accentuate that impulse.

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How to Manage Your Time: A Book List

You don’t have time to read all these books on how to carve out more time, so we did it for you.

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Drugs That Boost Our Circadian Rhythms Could Save Our Lives

Almost all of the cellular functions in your body run on a 24-hour schedule. Keep that clock regular, and you could stay healthier, and maybe even live longer.

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10 Productivity Tips and Tricks From WIRED Staff

Our journalism machine works best when we hit our deadlines. Here are some of the WIRED ones' tips and tricks for optimizing their work/time ratio.

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Infertility Linked to Dangerous Heart Condition in Pregnancy

Women undergoing fertility treatments may be at increased risk of a dangerous pregnancy condition called peripartum cardiomyopathy.

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The 1919 Solar Eclipse and General Relativity's First Major Triumph

Observations by Arthur Eddington vindicated the theory—even though his nation and Einstein’s had barely stopped pummeling each other in World War I — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rengöringsrobot städar spannmålssilon

Arbetsförhållanden vid rengöring och sanering av spannmålssilon är ofta extrema och kräver att de som jobbar bär täta kläder, hjälmar, andningsskydd och öronskydd. Silon ska rengöras ofta och alltid efter att en silo är helt tömd enligt EU-regler för hygien och livsmedelskvalitet. – Det finns ett ökat samhällsbehov för att människor ska slippa utsättas för den riskabla miljön, säger Kinan Dandan,

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No, That Baby Dinosaur Didn't Crawl. But It Did Walk on 4 Legs As an Infant.

A Jurassic-age dinosaur walked on all four legs as a baby, but graduated to a two-legged stance as an adult.

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New Pacemaker Harvests Energy from the Heart

A device that converts the heart’s mechanical energy into electrical energy has been successfully tested in pigs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Facebook use eroding in US as social media under pressure

Facebook's efforts to crack down on misinformation and sensational content have reduced the time spent at the leading social network eroding, researchers said Tuesday.

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Malaysia to ship back hundreds of tonnes of plastic waste

Hundreds of tonnes of imported plastic waste will be shipped back to where it came from, Malaysia said Tuesday, insisting the country did not want to be a global dumping ground.

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Two rare white tiger cubs find new home in Nicaragua

Two white tiger cubs have been taken to their new home at the Nicaragua National Zoo, where the playful pair will join a menagerie of rare big cat species.

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Pilot strike drags SAS net loss further down

Scandinavian airline SAS announced Tuesday that its second-quarter earnings were severely impacted by a week-long pilot strike in late April, saying it would lower its forecast for the year.

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Why It's Time To Think About Self-Driving Cars In Regards To Parking

Self-driving cars may be great for those who don't want to own a car or get behind the wheel, but they promise to be a nightmare for parking enforcement.

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Two rare white tiger cubs find new home in Nicaragua

Two white tiger cubs have been taken to their new home at the Nicaragua National Zoo, where the playful pair will join a menagerie of rare big cat species.

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Nedbrydelige batterier: Skimmelsvampe erstatter lithium

PLUS. Forskere fra DTU og Aalborg universitet får 15 millioner kroner fra Novo Nordisk Fonden til udvikling af svampebatterier.

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Stress-forskernes ni anbefalinger til ledere om bedre arbejdsliv

Otte stress-forskere, har samlet ni gode råd til ledere, som gerne vil styrke produktivitet og trivsel…

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Elevers upplevelser kan utveckla undervisningen i matematik

Att lära ut matematik är en komplex och utmanande uppgift. Läraren måste hantera en mångfald av elever med olika förutsättningar i en klass. Vissa elever har särskilda utbildningsbehov, såväl sådana som får kämpa för att förstå som sådana som har lätt för matematik. – Inkludering innebär att eleven upplever sig själv som en aktiv deltagare i undervisningen. Min doktorsavhandling rör hur elever i

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The Abortion Debate Is No Longer About Policy

Abortion politics in 2019 is a morality play about what happens when one side has all the political power, yet feels culturally embattled. In this atmosphere, victories are not satisfying if they leave the other side with a foothold, a vestige of respectability. Cataclysmic discord lies ahead. Abortion politics is no longer about policy wins, but about establishing dominance. This is why Governor

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Water Safety Risks May Grow as Cities Shrink

Shrinking cities often don’t have the tax base to pay for water system maintenance and replacement needs, and some oversized systems experience less demand than they did decades ago. The longer drinking water sits in old and corroded distribution system pipes, the greater risk it poses to public health.

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Is the universe a hologram? The strange physics of black holes.

Since energy cannot be destroyed, only transformed, some argue that information — arguably a form of energy — cannot be destroyed either. So then, what happens to information when it is absorbed into a black hole? Scientists don't know for certain, but some posit that is may be possible for it to leak away from the black hole over time. Black holes may hold information in a two-dimensional manner

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How bacteria nearly killed by antibiotics can recover — and gain resistance

A pump protein can keep bacteria alive long enough for the microbes to develop antibiotic resistance.

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“Great dismay:” When a lack of originality is tough to swallow

Researchers in India have retracted their 2013 case report of a “novel” way to treat a swallowing disorder because, well, the way wasn’t novel at all. The article, “A novel approach for the treatment of dysphagia lusoria,” was published in the European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery by a group from the Sri Jayadeva Institute of … Continue reading “Great dismay:” When a lack of originality is t

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Allan Flyvbjerg nyt æresmedlem af Diabetesforeningen

Professor Allan Flyvbjerg blev lørdag 25. maj tildelt et æresmedlemskab af Diabetesforeningen.

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GDPR år 1 …

Vi skulle nå så meget, men det bliver blot en stille fejring af ´barnets´ første fødselsdag …

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Tuning the permselectivity of polymeric desalination membranes via control of polymer crystallite size

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10132-0 Increasing the selectivity of desalination membranes is of crucial importance for advancing membrane desalination technologies. Here the authors demonstrate a plasticizing-extracting process for tuning the permselectivity of polymeric membranes and achieving desired desalination performance.

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Bcl10-controlled Malt1 paracaspase activity is key for the immune suppressive function of regulatory T cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10203-2 The differentiation and function of regulatory T (Treg) cells are critically controlled by T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Here the authors show that CARD11-BCL10-MALT1 (CBM) complexes are dispensable for effector Treg conversion under inflammatory conditions but are critical for mediating Treg suppressive activ

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Synergistic and antagonistic impacts of suspended sediments and thermal stress on corals

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10288-9 Multiple aspects of anthropogenic change threaten coral reefs. Here, the authors show that bleaching associated with thermal stress was low when local dredging released moderate amounts of suspended sediments, but high sediment loads coupled with high temperatures had synergistic negative effects on coral surviva

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Endophilin-A2 dependent VEGFR2 endocytosis promotes sprouting angiogenesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10359-x VEGF-A/VEGFR2 signaling is a key driver of endothelial cell migration during sprouting angiogenesis. Here Genet et al. show that endophilin A2 regulates these processes by mediating clathrin-independent VEGFR2 internalization.

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Tuning porosity in macroscopic monolithic metal-organic frameworks for exceptional natural gas storage

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10185-1 While metal–organic frameworks exhibit record-breaking gas storage capacities, their typically powdered form hinders their industrial applicability. Here, the authors engineer UiO-66 into centimetre-sized monoliths with optimal pore-size distributions, achieving benchmark volumetric working capacities for both CH

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The FANCM-BLM-TOP3A-RMI complex suppresses alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT)

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10180-6 ALT telomeres experience DNA damage that may drive recombination-based telomere elongation. Here, the authors reveal that FANCM plays a critical role in the suppression of ALT activity through its interaction with the BTR (BLM-TOP3A-RMI) complex.

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The major secreted protein of the whipworm parasite tethers to matrix and inhibits interleukin-13 function

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09996-z In the study, the authors identify a protein excreted by the parasite Trichuris muris, p43, which can modulate IL-13 function, a key cytokine involved in host protection. These data suggest that p43 may be a novel therapeutic target for both whipworm infections and IL13 mediated pathologies.

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SORLA regulates endosomal trafficking and oncogenic fitness of HER2

Nature Communications, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10275-0 The EGF receptor HER2 is an oncogene protein thought to reside at the plasma membrane, but its endosomal trafficking is currently unclear. Here, the authors report that HER2 is endocytosed and that sortillin-related receptor 1 (SORLA) promotes endosomal HER2 recycling and HER2 oncogenic signalling.

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New study reveals an unexpected survival mechanism of a subset of cancer cells

A research group led by Claus M. Azzalin at iMM has discovered that a human enzyme named FANCM is absolutely required for the survival of ALT tumor cells. The results were now published in the open access journal Nature Communications. Future strategies targeting the activity of this molecule in ALT tumor cells can constitute the basis of a novel therapeutic protocol for the treatment of these tum

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What is known — and not known — about heart muscle diseases in children

Cardiomyopathies (heart muscle diseases) in children are the focus of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association that provides insight into the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases as well as identifying future research priorities. It is published in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation.

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Deducing Phonon Scattering from Normal Mode Excitations

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43306-3 Deducing Phonon Scattering from Normal Mode Excitations

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Improved TGIRT-seq methods for comprehensive transcriptome profiling with decreased adapter dimer formation and bias correction

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44457-z Improved TGIRT-seq methods for comprehensive transcriptome profiling with decreased adapter dimer formation and bias correction

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Alteration of erythrocyte membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids in preterm newborns with retinopathy of prematurity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44476-w Alteration of erythrocyte membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids in preterm newborns with retinopathy of prematurity

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The Most Unrealistic Proposal in the Democratic Presidential Primary

The unlikeliest 2020 promise isn’t a big-spending plan like Medicare for All, the Green New Deal, or Andrew Yang’s universal basic income—it’s an anti-corruption proposal that would apply to just 535 Americans and cost taxpayers nothing. This pipe dream is coming from the decidedly unflashy Senator Michael Bennet, a self-proclaimed pragmatist who has chided his rivals for their unrealistic vision

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Satellite time series can guide forest restoration

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01665-x Satellite time series can guide forest restoration

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Would a gene-editing ban fit human-rights law?

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01663-z Would a gene-editing ban fit human-rights law?

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What would happen to the markets once teleportation gets adopted around the world? (Housing markets, automotive markets, etc.)

I'd like to think the 3rd world countries would see a huge influx of demand for their housing due to low housing prices. You could live in Port-Au-Prince for $80/month and teleport to work in Oslo for $80/hour. And San Francisco's housing would get abandoned en masse, because everyone could just live somewhere cheap and teleport to their jobs. How would auto manufacturers deal with the onset of t

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Københavnske fjernvarmeselskaber dropper udvikling af geotermi

Private selskaber må på banen for at bringe teknologien videre, siger selskaberne. Tilbage står et slidt anlæg på Amager.

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The World Economic Forum wants to develop global rules for AI

Can the world’s great powers agree on rules of the road for artificial intelligence?

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Norges største vindmøllepark åbnet

568 trailerlæs ankom fra Vestas. Nu er 71 vindturbiner i gang hos Roan Vindpark.

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Here’s why the outcomes of this week’s European elections are good news for science

New parliament expected to continue pushing for generous funding, but wins for green and liberal groups could shift priorities

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”Alla kvinnor har rätt till bra mensskydd”

Alla kvinnor på jorden har en sak gemensamt. En gång i månaden kommer menstruationen. Men medan kvinnor i västvärlden kan köpa högabsorberande bindor och tamponger använder fattiga kvinnor allt från löv till tygtrasor. Det vill två forskare från Högskolan i Borås ändra på. Karin Högberg, universitetslektor i vårdvetenskap, och Lena Berglin, docent i textilteknologi, har tillsammans utvecklat ett n

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Typhoon-proof wind turbines to help Philippines keep lights on

submitted by /u/kumori_noasa [link] [comments]

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Dell's 2019 XPS 15, XPS 13 2-in-1 offer extreme performance and design starting at $1,000 – CNET

From OLED and HDR displays to 10th-gen Intel chips and Wi-Fi 6, Dell's newest premium laptops are loaded with the latest tech.

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Treating Mental Illness with Nutrition: The Walsh Protocol

The Walsh Institute offers the Walsh protocol for the nutritional treatment of mental illness. This "orthomolecular psychiatry" is not supported by any clinical studies.

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Frances Arnold Turns Microbes Into Living Factories

Instead of synthesizing new biochemicals from scratch, the Nobel Prize-winning chemist puts nature to the task — with astonishing results.

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In Syria's Maalula, fear for survival of language of Christ

Hunched over a thick book, George Zaarour uses a magnifying glass to decipher Aramaic script—the biblical language of Jesus that is starting to disappear from everyday use in his village.

10h

The New HP Envy Laptops Are Sporting Wood

There are scores of thin and light laptops to choose from nowadays, but few of them are truly eye-catching. HP’s newest Envy models, on the other hand, are definitely going to get some …

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Alibaba eyes $20 bn second listing in HK: report

Chinese e-commerce leader Alibaba Group is exploring a potential second listing in Hong Kong that could raise $20 billion as Beijing seeks to encourage its tech titans to list closer to home, …

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Alibaba eyes $20 bn second listing in HK: report

Chinese e-commerce leader Alibaba Group is exploring a potential second listing in Hong Kong that could raise $20 billion as Beijing seeks to encourage its tech titans to list closer to home, a report on Tuesday said.

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These Animals Are Surrounded by Water. But What Do They Drink?

Marine species have developed unusual adaptations for filtering salt from the water they require.

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Half of H.I.V. Patients Are Women. Most Research Subjects Are Men.

Trials of vaccines and treatments have not included enough female participants. Now that scientists are exploring possible cures, the need to enroll women is greater than ever.

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Sydney imposes first water restrictions in decade

Sydney on Tuesday announced its first major water restrictions in a decade, putting limits on homes and businesses amid a record-breaking drought.

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Flood buyout costs rise as storms intensify, seas surge

The residents of this small riverside town have become accustomed to watching floods swamp their streets, transform their homes into islands and ruin their floors and furniture.

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In Houston, tech and health are cures for the oil 'curse'

In the heart of Texas oil country, the city of Houston rode high on the oil boom, but then fell hard when the bottom dropped out of crude prices.

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Sandman: The Vietnamese snowboarder training on dunes

Sun-kissed and shaggy-haired, Nguyen Thai Binh swaps his flip flops for bulky boots ahead of snowboarding practice on the sand dunes of southern Vietnam—the unlikely training ground for the country's fledgling winter athletes with mountain-sized ambitions.

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Ramadan in Mideast is for fasting and Facebook, data shows

The Muslim holy month of Ramadan, with its long days of fasting and prayer meant to draw worshippers closer to God and away from worldly distractions, is being reshaped by technology.

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Russian space sector plagued by astronomical corruption

With millions of dollars missing and officials in prison or fleeing the country, Russia's space sector is at the heart of a staggering embezzlement scheme that has dampened ambitions of recovering its Soviet-era greatness.

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New compound which kills antibiotic-resistant superbugs discovered

A new compound which visualises and kills antibiotic resistant superbugs has been discovered by scientists at the University of Sheffield and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL).

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Light at night is harmful for amphibians, new research shows

Light at night might be convenient for humans, but it's having a detrimental effect on amphibian populations, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Light at night is harmful for amphibians, new research shows

Light at night might be convenient for humans, but it's having a detrimental effect on amphibian populations, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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New compound which kills antibiotic-resistant superbugs discovered

A new compound developed by University of Sheffield experts has killed antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacteria, including E. coli, during tests.

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Light at night is harmful for amphibians, new research shows

Light at night might be convenient for humans, but it's having a detrimental effect on amphibian populations, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

12h

Microbes on explanted pedicle screws: Possible cause of spinal implant failure

In this paper, the authors demonstrate a significant association between pedicle screw loosening and the presence of low-virulent pathogens on spinal implants.

12h

Pollution cover-ups exposed in Chinese provinces

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01661-1 A government investigation reveals thousands of violations — some by local o fficials who helped companies to cover up illegal waste dumping.

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WHO: Computerspilsafhængighed er en sygdom

I fremtiden bliver computerspilsafhængighed anerkendt på WHOs liste over diagnoser, men dansk forsker mener ikke, at der er videnskabeligt grundlag for ændringen.

12h

Kig i klima-krystalkuglen: Sådan ser Danmark ud i 2050

PLUS. Ingeniøren har fået hjælp hos nogle af landets førende forskere til at tegne landskabet, som det vil tage sig ud for en dansker om 30 år.

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New traffic light system automatically recognizes pedestrians' intent to cross the road

In Vienna there are some 200 push-button pedestrian lights (signalized pedestrian crossings). They allow pedestrians to cross the road safely. But only after a waiting time, which is annoying …

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World’s First Digital-Only Clothing Has Sold For $9,500

For some, fashion has remained quite an enigma where there are certain trends and designs that can be questionable. If you don’t really get fashion, then prepare to be even more confused …

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Psychedelics may be a powerful treatment for alcoholism

A survey supplied to 343 individuals showed that psychedelic drugs such as LSD or psilocybin may have serious benefits when it comes to treating alcoholism. The majority of the participants reported having severe alcoholism, but 83% of these individuals significantly reduced their drinking to more manageable levels after taking a psychedelic. This research underscores the potential that currently

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The Scary and Most Likely Scenario on what will Happen when Robots Take our Jobs that no one is Talking About

There is a lot of fear in the media about robots taking over our jobs. The scenarios are usually the same, robots are taking over and it will either be a dystopia where there is massive inequality between rich and poor, or another dystopia where robots will rebel and kill us all, or an utopia where there is zero proverty and all humans live on unimaginable level of standards of living. ​ But I th

17h

Children from disadvantaged backgrounds do less vigorous physical activity

Children from disadvantaged backgrounds and certain ethnic minority backgrounds, including from Pakistani and Bangladeshi backgrounds, have lower levels of vigorous physical activity, according to researchers at the University of Cambridge.

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Vatican hosts major atheism conference with University of Kent

The global Understanding Unbelief program to advance the scientific understanding of atheism and nonreligion will today present results from its research at the Vatican in Rome. The multidisciplinary research program led by the University of Kent maps the nature and diversity of 'unbelief' across six countries including Brazil, China, Denmark, Japan, UK and the USA.

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Zuckerberg's latest snub could land him in contempt of Canadian parliament

Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg have snubbed an official summons and risk being held in contempt of the Canadian Parliament. The pair were called to a hearing in Ottawa, due to …

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Skilled health workforce in India does not meet WHO recommended threshold

The skilled health workforce in India does not meet the minimum threshold of 22.8 skilled workers per 10,000 population recommended by the World Health Organization, shows research published today in the online journal BMJ Open.

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