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nyheder2019maj29

A warming Arctic produces weather extremes in our latitudes

Atmospheric researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have now developed a climate model that can accurately depict the frequently observed winding course of the jet stream, a major air current over the Northern Hemisphere.

20h

Krig i kommentartråden: Er elbiler grønne eller sorte?

Det vrimler med påstande om elbiler på sociale medier. Vi har faktatjekket de mest udbredte.

5h

Alternativet: »Antividenskab i regeringskontorerne truer den frie forskning«

Et opråb fra Alternativets kandidat vakte opmærksomhed ved Ingeniørens valgdebat om forskningspolitik. »Drop dystopierne,« lød det fra forskningsministeren.

13h

NHS commissioners are ignoring guidelines by rationing cataract surgery

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England are ignoring clinical guidelines by rationing access to cataract surgery, The BMJ has found.

9min

New evidence links ultra-processed foods with a range of health risks

Two large European studies published by The BMJ today find positive associations between consumption of highly processed ('ultra-processed') foods and risk of cardiovascular disease and death.

9min

Two studies sound warnings over ultra-processed food

Commercial cakes and sugary drinks boost heart disease risk by up to 62%, European researchers find. Natalie Parletta reports.

20min

Study could lead to 'cognitive therapy in your pocket'

People living with anxiety, depression, and other mental health conditions may soon be able to use a smartphone app to deliver on-demand cognitive bias modification for interpretation (CBM-I), a way to change mental habits without visiting a therapist.

23min

Author Correction: Exquisitely-preserved, high-definition skin traces in diminutive theropod tracks from the Cretaceous of Korea

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43832-0 Author Correction: Exquisitely-preserved, high-definition skin traces in diminutive theropod tracks from the Cretaceous of Korea

39min

Protected bike lanes make the roads safer—even if you're in a car

Health Cyclist-friendly streets have fewer injuries and deaths overall. Even though cycling is dangerous for cyclists, cities that have a larger proportion of cyclists tend to have safer roads overall—for pedestrians and drivers, too…

39min

Author Correction: Design of amidobenzimidazole STING receptor agonists with systemic activity

Nature, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1265-5 Author Correction: Design of amidobenzimidazole STING receptor agonists with systemic activity

40min

Three Science Contests to Enter Before Summer

Are you looking for ways to challenge yourself or stay involved in neuroscience research? If so, the Society for Neuroscience and the International Neuroethics Society are hosting a number of opportunities to share your work, network with experts, and even win cash prizes. The various deadlines are closing in, so don’t wait! Check out the following contests and presentations and learn how to ente

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Climate Change May Have Caused Mass Puffin Die-Off

A colony of tufted puffins. (Credit: tryton2011/shutterstock) From beached whales to strange seal die-offs, mass marine life mortality events are getting more common. And thanks to changing temperatures, mass seabird deaths are on the rise as well. A study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS One catalogs a four-month period starting in October 2016 where researchers and volunteers collected de

58min

New York state winters could pose solar farm 'ramping' snag for power grid

With low energy demand around midday in the winter, combined with solar-electricity production, New York's power system could face volatile swings of 'ramping' — which is how power system operators describe quick increases or decreases in demand.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Area Man Wants to Be Excluded From This Narrative

What We’re Following Today It’s Wednesday, May 29. ‣ Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that if a Supreme Court seat opens up in 2020, he would hold a vote to confirm President Donald Trump’s nominee, a reversal from 2016, when he blocked former President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court nominee because it was an election year. Here’s what else we’re watching: It’s Mueller Time: In his first

1h

Healthy, stress-busting fat found hidden in dirt

Thirty years after scientists coined the term 'hygiene hypothesis' to suggest that increased exposure to microorganisms could benefit health, researchers have identified an anti-inflammatory fat in a soil-dwelling bacterium that may be responsible.

1h

Climate undermined by lobbying

For all the evidence that the benefits of reducing greenhouse gases outweigh the costs of regulation, disturbingly few domestic climate change policies have been enacted around the world so far.

1h

Roomba's new flagship robot is an expensive way to clean your home's corners

Technology It only costs $1,300. With well-established tech products, adding a new sensor can allow for iterative improvements and new features.

1h

Cycling lanes reduce fatalities for all road users, study shows

The most comprehensive study of bicycle and road safety to date finds that building safe facilities for cyclists is one of the biggest factors in road safety for everyone. Bicycling infrastructure — specifically, separated and protected bike lanes — leads to fewer fatalities and better road-safety outcomes for all road users.

1h

Viral study suggests an approach that may decrease kidney damage in transplant patients

Sunnie Thompson's study of BK polyomavirus replication may lead to less failure of kidneys following organ transplant. The virus is silently harbored in most humans; when transplant recipients receive drugs to suppress their immune system to prevent graft rejection, the virus can reactivate and damage the kidney. Thompson's research points to a new way to reduce BK polyomavirus levels in transplan

1h

Endovascular aneurysm procedure as effective as open surgery, study finds

A minimally invasive procedure to repair abdominal aneurysms thought to be less effective than traditional open surgery has been shown to perform as well as the open repair and be as long-lasting.

1h

Study reports ibrutinib and venetoclax combo effective as front-line therapy for select chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

Ibrutinib and venetoclax, two FDA-approved drugs for treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), have been shown to be effective when given together for high-risk and older patients with the disease, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

1h

Sensor-packed glove learns signatures of the human grasp

Wearing a sensor-packed glove while handling a variety of objects, researchers have compiled a massive dataset that enables an AI system to recognize objects through touch alone. The information could be leveraged to help robots identify and manipulate objects, and may aid in prosthetics design.

1h

Nazi Code-Making Enigma Machine Is Up for Auction

A rare Enigma machine — a German gadget that encoded secret messages during World War II — is up for auction.

1h

Google won't allow marijuana delivery apps in the Play Store

Google updated its Play Store policy today to prohibit apps that early directly sell or help facilitate the sale of marijuana, even in states where the drug is legal. Apps that offer …

1h

A wave of graduate programs drop the GRE application requirement

Amid concerns about diversity and the test’s predictive value, an increasing number of science Ph.D. programs are joining the "GRExit" movement, according to our investigation

1h

Structural sexism: FSU researcher offers new perspective on gender and health inequality

In a new study published in the American Sociological Review, FSU Assistant Professor Patricia Homan developed a new structural sexism approach to the study of gender inequality and health. Her approach goes beyond sexist mistreatment by individuals to examine how the degree of systematic gender inequality in power and resources — i.e. structural sexism — in a society can impact people's health.

1h

Study could lead to 'cognitive therapy in your pocket'

People living with anxiety, depression, and other mental health conditions may soon be able to use a smartphone app to deliver on-demand cognitive bias modification for interpretation (CBM-I), a way to change mental habits without visiting a therapist.

1h

This Volkswagen Prototype Has a Holographic Interface

LCD Soundsystem In what the German automaker is calling a “ world premiere ,” Volkswagen’s futuristic Golf GTI Aurora concept has a high-end sound system in its trunk that can be operated with a hologram. You can leave your 3D glasses and augmented reality gloves at home: the hologram floats freely in the air and can be operated without any external aids. Though to be fair, VW is being very vague

1h

Some songbird nests are especially vulnerable to magpie predation

A new study has revealed a range of factors that cause a variation in predation by magpies on farmland songbirds.

1h

New path to capturing and upgrading carbon dioxide

Engineering researchers have developed a new electrochemical path to transform carbon dioxide into valuable products such as jet fuel or plastics. The technology could significantly improve the economics of capturing and recycling carbon directly from the air.

1h

Sensor-packed glove learns signatures of the human grasp

Wearing a sensor-packed glove while handling a variety of objects, researchers have compiled a massive dataset that enables an AI system to recognize objects through touch alone. The information could be leveraged to help robots identify and manipulate objects, and may aid in prosthetics design.

1h

Learn Microsoft Excel from a to z with 45 hours of certification training

You can get the bundle now for just $49. You can get this bundle now for just $49 and learn Microsoft Excel from a to z with 45 hours of certification training.

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Confirmed: Earth Is Crushing the Ocean into Salty Diamonds

A new study finds fresh proof that diamonds are crushed and melted bits of ancient seabed that you can wear on your finger.

2h

Outsmarting deep fakes: AI-driven imaging system protects authenticity

To thwart sophisticated deep fake methods of altering photos and video, researchers have devised a technique to authenticate images throughout the entire pipeline, from acquisition to delivery, using artificial intelligence.

2h

Texas A&M researcher makes breakthrough discovery in stretchable electronics materials

With a wide range of healthcare, energy and military applications, stretchable electronics are revered for their ability to be compressed, twisted and conformed to uneven surfaces without losing functionality.

2h

Model identifies high-risk areas for lumpy skin disease in cattle

Researchers have combined two separate computer models to identify areas at highest risk for outbreaks of lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) in cattle.

2h

Could Squeezing Your Arms and Legs Help Prevent Strokes?

A simple squeeze to your arms and legs might benefit your brain.

2h

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Is Dying

Changing Face One of the solar system’s most iconic landmarks is about to vanish. Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, a gigantic storm more than twice the size of the Earth, has persisted for centuries. But now scientists predict it could disappear forever in as little as 20 years. Clearing Up New images of Jupiter seem to show the Great Red Spot breaking apart, according to Space.com . Blade-shaped arms a

2h

Beyond 1 and 0: Engineers boost potential for creating successor to shrinking transistors

A materials scientist from the University of Texas at Dallas has offered a solution to the fast-approaching physical minimum for transistor size: a multi-value logic transistor based on zinc oxide, capable of two stable intermediate states between 0 and 1.

2h

Immune system discovery inspires a new barometer for inflammatory diseases

A unique discovery about the nature of neutrophils — the most numerous white blood cells in the body — may lead to new models for diagnosing and tracking inflammatory diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis.

2h

Could repeated squeezes to the arms, legs protect the brain?

What if wearing a blood pressure cuff could help prevent stroke? In a new study, people who restricted their blood flow by wearing inflated blood pressure cuffs on an arm and leg showed signs of more controlled blood flow to their brain, a process that could be protective if blood flow is more severely restricted in the event of a stroke, according at a study published in the May 29, 2019, online

2h

Early onset colorectal cancer rising fastest in the west

Early-onset colorectal cancer — cancer occurring before age 50 — is rising most rapidly in Western states, where healthy behaviors are prominent, according to a new study.

2h

High-fat diets can cause depression, study finds

A new study explores the relationship between obesity, fat intake, and depression. The results showed that obesity induced by a high-fat diet, caused depression in mice, but that this was related to changes in the hypothalamus and not the extra weight. The study could pave the way for new depression treatments, which could help the nearly 50 percent of patients who don't respond well to current a

2h

How to Silence a White House

They had hours of advance notice, but White House aides still seemed stunned by the televised spectacle that was about to unfold. After keeping a disciplined silence for more than two years, Special Counsel Robert Mueller was about to speak about an investigation that posed a mortal threat to Donald Trump’s presidency. What would he say? No one inside the building seemed to know exactly, though t

2h

Impeachment Is the Song of the Summer

After a televised press conference in which Special Counsel Robert Mueller simply reminded viewers what was contained in his 448-page report, a growing number of 2020 Democratic presidential candidates are calling for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump. On Wednesday morning, with the weary look of a professor at the end of a particularly trying school year, the special counsel

2h

Schools have more unvaccinated kids than they realize

Health Thousands of kindergarteners aren’t vaccinated, but also don’t have exemptions. Lots of unvaccinated kids don't have exemptions from the government.

2h

100 år sedan relativitetsteorin bevisades

För 100 år sedan kunde Albert Einsteins relativitetsteori bevisas genom en solförmörkelse. På frågan om vad han gjort om det misslyckades svarade den tvärsäkra vetenskapsmannen: – Då har Gud gjort ett misstag. Teorin stämmer.

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ET Deals: $1,349 Dell XPS 15 and $529 Lenovo Flex 14 2-in-1 with Ryzen 3500U

Light and compact, these notebooks instead are excellent solutions for people that want a fast system that is easy to take with you to work and school. Also today are great deals on Samsung's Galaxy S10 and Amazon's Fire TV. The post ET Deals: $1,349 Dell XPS 15 and $529 Lenovo Flex 14 2-in-1 with Ryzen 3500U appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

Without a champion, Europa lander falls to NASA’s back burner

Review also notes workforce and rocket problems for Clipper orbiter

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Missouri may lose its last abortion clinic this week. That's dark news for us all | Jill Filipovic

Anti-abortion activists know that you don’t need to outlaw abortion outright if you can make getting a safe, legal one nearly impossible By the end of the week, women in Missouri may live in a state without a single abortion clinic. While restrictive laws in states like Alabama have made headlines, Missouri shows the other side of the anti-abortion strategy: steadily shave away at abortion rights

2h

The unexpected brightness of new satellites could ruin the night sky

The number of visible, man-made objects may more than triple

2h

A new vision for genomics in animal agriculture

A new blueprint to guide the next decade of animal genomics research outlines research priorities that will help livestock producers meet the protein needs of a growing global population. The blueprint calls for increased emphasis on how genomics interact with production methods and environmental factors to make livestock production a predictive science.

2h

New regulator of immune responses discovered

Scientists have identified a new internal regulator which helps control the body's response to fight infection. The discovery could be a target for new drugs to tackle autoimmune diseases.

2h

Key link discovered between tissue cell type and different forms of arthritis

Different types of fibroblasts — the most common cells of connective tissue in animals — are organized in different layers in the joint and are responsible for two very different forms of arthritis: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, new research shows.

2h

New blood test uses DNA 'packaging' patterns to detect multiple cancer types

Researchers have developed a simple new blood test that can detect the presence of seven different types of cancer by spotting unique patterns in the fragmentation of DNA shed from cancer cells and circulating in the bloodstream.

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Unveiling how the genome has condensed itself inside the virus

Scientists have deciphered how a virus genome is condensed inside the capsid of a virus.

2h

New study evaluates transcatheter dialysis conduit procedures over 15 years

A new research study by Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute found that utilization of invasive procedures on hemodialysis conduits — artificially constructed shuts used by many individuals who require dialysis — increased markedly from 2001 through 2015 for nephrologists and declined for radiologists. The study is published online in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (JVI

2h

Illinois researchers add 'time-travel' feature to drives to fight ransomware attacks

One of the latest cyber threats involves hackers encrypting user files and then charging "ransom" to get them back. In the paper, 'Project Almanac: A Time-Traveling Solid State Drive,' CSL students Chance Coats and Xiaohao Wang and Assistant Professor Jian Huang look at how they can use the commodity storage devices already in a computer, to save the files without having to pay the ransom.

2h

A rose inspires smart way to collect and purify water

A new device for collecting and purifying water was inspired by a rose and, while more engineered than enchanted, is a dramatic improvement on current methods. Each flower-like structure costs less than 2 cents and can produce more than half a gallon of water per hour per square meter.

3h

Biohackers Are Attempting to Make Their Own Insulin

Cost of Living Type 1 diabetes means that your body doesn’t produce insulin, a hormone needed to transform sugar into energy. That means you have to inject insulin or risk devastating health complications. Unfortunately, the skyrocketing cost of insulin in the U.S. has made affording it difficult, if not impossible, for many. That situation has led to the creation of the Open Insulin Project , a

3h

5 ways you can personally fight the climate crisis

As we watch the youth take to the streets over climate change, and read daily news reports on sea-level rise, glacier melt rates and the alarming amount of carbon in the atmosphere, many are left with a desire to act. Yet, the gravity of the climate crisis can seem overwhelming – especially for those who do not work in the environmental arena. Without a clear roadmap of simple steps to take, iner

3h

Why we might want to rethink who we put on money

American money is famous for only featuring statesmen who we sometimes refer to it as "Dead Presidents." Other countries aren't so limited in their selection of people to display on their currency. The recent discussion around putting Harriet Tubman on the twenty dollar bill raises questions about who gets on money and why. None Last week, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin announced that plans to

3h

A rose inspires smart way to collect and purify water

A new device for collecting and purifying water was inspired by a rose and, while more engineered than enchanted, is a dramatic improvement on current methods. Each flower-like structure costs less than 2 cents and can produce more than half a gallon of water per hour per square meter.

3h

Birds perceive 'warm' colors differently from 'cool' ones

Birds may not have a word for maroon. Or burnt sienna. But show a zebra finch a sunset-colored object, and she'll quickly decide whether it looks more 'red' or 'orange.' A new study shows that birds mentally sort the range of hues on the blue-green side of the spectrum into two categories too, but the line between them is fuzzier, perhaps because 'either/or' thinking is less useful in this part of

3h

Patterns of chronic lymphocytic leukemia growth identified

In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the rate of disease growth is apt to follow one of three trajectories: relentlessly upward, steadily level, or something in between, scientists report in a new study.

3h

Sound barrier to chase seals, prevent shark attacks debated

A plan to develop an acoustic system to chase away seals in order to prevent shark attacks is the latest front in the debate about how Cape Cod should respond in the wake of last year's shark attacks.

3h

China Says New Tech Can Detect Stealth Jets Including F-22, F-35

Peekaboo Chinese scientists claim to have developed a new radar system capable of spotting and targeting stealth aircraft, potentially spelling doom for the U.S. Air Force’s F-22 and F-35 fighter jets . Stealth planes are designed to pass undetected through conventional radar systems. But radar with longer wavelengths can still spot them, according to National Interest — and China claims to have

3h

A Journalist Was Killed in an EU Country. Why Has No One Been Caught?

PARIS—In October 2017, the Maltese journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia, known for her scoops that alleged corruption at the highest levels of the government and beyond, was killed by a car bomb. Her assassination remains unsolved. A report released this week by the Council of Europe, the Continent’s watchdog for human rights and the rule of law, goes a long way toward explaining why that might be.

3h

Sound barrier to chase seals, prevent shark attacks debated

A plan to develop an acoustic system to chase away seals in order to prevent shark attacks is the latest front in the debate about how Cape Cod should respond in the wake of last year's shark attacks.

3h

Birds perceive 'warm' colors differently from 'cool' ones

Birds may not have a word for maroon. Or burnt sienna. But show a zebra finch a sunset-colored object, and she'll quickly decide whether it looks more like "red" or "orange."

3h

Thinning forests, prescribed fire before drought reduced tree loss

Thinning forests and conducting prescribed burns may help preserve trees in future droughts and bark beetle epidemics expected under climate change, suggests a new study.

3h

Scientists find telling early moment that indicates a coming megaquake

Scientists combing through databases of earthquakes since the early 1990s have discovered a possible defining moment 10-15 seconds into an event that could signal a magnitude 7 or larger megaquake.

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LED device could increase memory retention among astronauts

Hanli Liu, a professor of bioengineering at The University of Texas at Arlington, is working to improve memory and cognitive function in astronauts during space missions by directing light onto their brains.

3h

Birds perceive 'warm' colors differently from 'cool' ones

Birds may not have a word for maroon. Or burnt sienna. But show a zebra finch a sunset-colored object, and she'll quickly decide whether it looks more like "red" or "orange."

3h

More than victims: Migration images provide a chance to tell a greater story

One of the most devastating images from 2015 shows a 3-year-old boy, Alan Kurdi, facedown and unmoving on a beach in Turkey. Alan had drowned during an attempt to escape Syria, and the image sparked outrage and concern worldwide over the refugee crisis in Europe. It also highlighted the power a single image can have.

3h

Thinning forests, prescribed fire before drought reduced tree loss

Thinning forests and conducting prescribed burns may help preserve trees in future droughts and bark beetle epidemics expected under climate change, suggests a study from the University of California, Davis.

3h

Study identifies chemical blends as possible alternative refrigerants

More than a dozen chemical blends could serve as alternative refrigerants that won't heat the atmosphere as much as today's refrigerants do, or catch fire, according to a new computational study by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

3h

Researchers tease out genetic differences between cannabis strains

Research from Washington State University could provide government regulators with powerful new tools for addressing a bevy of commercial claims and other concerns as non-medical marijuana, hemp and CBD products become more commonplace. The new analysis of the genetic and chemical characteristics of cannabis is believed to be the first thorough examination of its kind.

3h

The 'projects' are nice now finds study on HUD Rental Assistance Demonstration Program

A study led by Columbia Mailman School examined the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) program to understand residents' experiences and their perspective on the program. The study published in Housing Policy Debates is among the first to examine the impact of RAD which aims to improve and preserve affordable housing by converting traditiona

3h

Researchers tease out genetic differences between cannabis strains

Research from Washington State University could provide government regulators with powerful new tools for addressing a bevy of commercial claims and other concerns as non-medical marijuana, hemp and CBD products become more commonplace. The new analysis of the genetic and chemical characteristics of cannabis is believed to be the first thorough examination of its kind.

3h

Using nature to adapt to climate change

As the effects of a changing climate are felt with growing intensity, researchers, policymakers, and stakeholders are turning their attention to adaptive strategies that can help build resilience. Of particular import will be adaptions aimed at improving the resilience of cities, many of which lie in the coastal areas that face the greatest peril.

3h

Yogeshwer Shukla’s toxic career of Ayurvedic infusions

Professor Shukla is a bigwig in Indian toxicology because he uses fresh fruit, tea and curry spices to cure cancer. For maximum effect, his lab resorts to fabricating data in Photoshop.

3h

F ossil captures hundreds of ancient fish swimming as one

Nature, Published online: 28 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01682-w Stone slab hints that fish schools today follow the same rules as groups dating back 50 million years.

3h

Robert Mueller Speaks, Amazon’s New Echo Show, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

3h

737 MAX jet grounded for at least 10-12 more weeks: IATA

The global aviation association IATA expects Boeing's troubled 737 MAX 8 plane to remain grounded for at least 10 to 12 more weeks, director general Alexandre de Juniac said Wednesday.

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Using nature to adapt to climate change

As the effects of a changing climate are felt with growing intensity, researchers, policymakers, and stakeholders are turning their attention to adaptive strategies that can help build resilience. Of particular import will be adaptions aimed at improving the resilience of cities, many of which lie in the coastal areas that face the greatest peril.

3h

Some songbird nests are especially vulnerable to magpie predation

A new study has revealed a range of factors that cause a variation in predation by magpies on farmland songbirds.

3h

Quantum information gets a boost from thin-film breakthrough

Efforts to create reliable light-based quantum computing, quantum key distribution for cybersecurity, and other technologies got a boost from a new study demonstrating an innovative method for creating thin films to control the emission of single photons.

3h

Tornado Damage: 13 Days of Devastation in Photos

Every day for nearly two weeks now, severe weather systems have spawned multiple tornadoes across America’s Midwest and Northeast—an average of 27.5 tornadoes a day , according to NBC News. From Oklahoma to New Jersey, storms have been bringing destructive winds and rainfall to small towns, farms, and suburbs, causing at least seven deaths and leaving behind ruined buildings, power outages, and t

3h

Some songbird nests are especially vulnerable to magpie predation

A new study has revealed a range of factors that cause a variation in predation by magpies on farmland songbirds.

3h

Sketchy Clinics Are Trying to Hire Doctor Who Gene-Edited Babies

Designer Babies The news that Chinese scientist He Jiankui had created the world’s first genetically modified babies was met with near-universal condemnation from the scientific community. But according to one of He’s colleagues, fertility clinics around the world have been far more receptive to the tech — with many even asking He if he’d be willing to teach them how to use CRISPR to create gray-

3h

Rude Uber riders could be booted from the app

Uber riders prone to rude behavior such as leaving trash or urging drivers to speed may be booted from the app under a policy change that took effect here Wednesday.

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A new vision for genomics in animal agriculture

Iowa State University animal scientists helped to form a blueprint to guide the next decade of animal genomics research. The recently released document outlines research priorities that will help livestock producers meet the protein needs of a growing global population. The blueprint calls for increased emphasis on how genomics interact with production methods and environmental factors to make liv

3h

A rose inspires smart way to collect and purify water

A new device for collecting and purifying water, developed at The University of Texas at Austin, was inspired by a rose and, while more engineered than enchanted, is a dramatic improvement on current methods. Each flower-like structure costs less than 2 cents and can produce more than half a gallon of water per hour per square meter.

3h

There Are Two Types of Airport People

It’s not hard to spot people about to miss a flight. They’re weaving between on-time travelers at a speed somewhere between a power walk and a sprint, or they’re elbow-dancing their way to the front of the TSA line to plead their case for immediate screening. They look panicked, maybe red-faced. Their suitcase’s wheels probably won’t cooperate for portions of their journey, sending it flailing be

4h

Lessons from Pohang: Solving geothermal energy's earthquake problem

A geothermal energy project triggered a damaging earthquake in 2017 in South Korea. A new analysis suggests flaws in some of the most common ways of trying to minimize the risk of such quakes when harnessing Earth's heat for energy.

4h

Ancient Rocky Structure Found Beneath Antarctica. And It's Messing with the Ice.

The potential for the Ross ice shelf in Antarctica to collapse is determined by a newly discovered rock boundary running right down the middle of the ice.

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U.S. think tank shuts down prominent center that challenged climate science

Cato Institute severs ties with the oft-quoted Pat Michaels

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Pluto is coloured red by ammonia spewing from underneath its surface

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has found signatures of ammonia on Pluto, which probably spurted from under the surface in fountains relatively recently

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Hundreds of puffins are starving to death because of climate change

Hundreds of dead seabirds have washed up on an Alaskan island – all apparently starved to death because the warming waters they forage from contain less food

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The 'projects' are nice now finds study on HUD Rental Assistance Demonstration Program

A study examined the U.S. Department of HUD Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) program to understand residents' experiences and their perspective on the program. The study is among the first to examine the impact of RAD which aims to improve and preserve affordable housing by converting traditional public housing to rental assistance. The results indicate notable, and mostly positive, results a

4h

Thinning forests, prescribed fire before drought reduced tree loss

Thinning forests and conducting prescribed burns may help preserve trees in future droughts and bark beetle epidemics expected under climate change, suggests a study from the University of California, Davis.

4h

Birds perceive 'warm' colors differently from 'cool' ones

Birds may not have a word for maroon. Or burnt sienna. But show a zebra finch a sunset-colored object, and she'll quickly decide whether it looks more "red" or "orange." A new study shows that birds mentally sort the range of hues on the blue-green side of the spectrum into two categories too, but the line between them is fuzzier, perhaps because "either/or" thinking is less useful in this part of

4h

Revolt on the horizon? How young people really feel about digital technology

As digital technologies facilitate the growth of both new and incumbent organisations, we have started to see the darker sides of the digital economy unravel. In recent years, many unethical business practices have been exposed, including the capture and use of consumers' data, anticompetitive activities and covert social experiments . But what do young people who grew up with the internet think

4h

The increase in Everest deaths may have nothing to do with crowds or waiting

Health More people are climbing the mythical peak than ever before. So far, 11 people have died climbing Mount Everest in Nepal in the 2019 hiking season, amidst overcrowding. But what exactly about this three-ring circus in the clouds…

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Robert Mueller Wishes You’d Read His Report

Special Counsel Robert Mueller wishes that you’d read his report. He’s not angry; he’s just disappointed. When the Department of Justice announced Mueller’s press conference Wednesday morning, the media exploded in a frenzy of wild speculation. What new evidence might he reveal? Would he endorse impeachment? Would he complain about the administration’s response to his report? No, he would not. No

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The Messy Politics of Spike Lee's She's Gotta Have It

By the end of She’s Gotta Have It ’s first season , back in 2017, the show’s effervescent protagonist chose to abandon the three men she’d been dating. Nola Darling, the fictional Brooklyn-based artist who animated Spike Lee’s 1986 film of the same name, had found a new love worth pursuing: the principle of honesty. “That’s why I painted The Three-Headed Monster ,” she said in one of her many fou

4h

Mueller's Bottom Line: Indicting Trump Wasn't Even an Option

Robert Mueller outlined the conclusions of the Russia investigation and made clear, in his own obtuse way, that the next steps belong to Congress.

4h

Mysterious Martian formation traced to volcanic explosion

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01660-2 A massive eruption early in Mars’s history created a rocky outcrop that will greet NASA lander in 2021.

4h

A School of Fish, Captured in a Fossil

A slab of rock and the methods used to study it could offer clues to when a behavior common in fishes first evolved.

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Secure metropolitan quantum networks move a step closer

Successful new field tests of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) system over commercial fiber networks could pave the way to its use in metropolitan areas. That is the key achievement from a team of scientists, which demonstrates CV-QKD transmission over commercial deployed fiber link with a distance of 50 kilometers.

4h

Intelligent algorithms for genome research

In order to find out which genes are responsible for diseases such as cancer or diabetes, scientists nowadays frequently resort to using machine-learning models.

4h

Sugar taxes and labelling are effective

Taxes on sugary products and labels on the front of packages can help reduce sugar consumption, according to a new study. The study, which included more than 3,500 people aged 13 and over on their purchasing behavior last spring, also found that taxes could have the greatest impact if 100 per cent fruit juice was included in reduction efforts.

4h

Colombia could lose 60% of land suitable for irrigated rice due to climate change

Without significant global reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, Colombia will have 60% less land suitable for rice production by the 2050s. Due primarily to increased temperatures and decreased rainfall — as opposed to sea-level rise, which is the driver of projected change to rice production in some Asian countries — the research shows suitable conditions will need to be found at higher elev

4h

Genetic analysis of cannabis is here

Research from Washington State University could provide government regulators with powerful new tools for addressing a bevy of commercial claims and other concerns as non-medical marijuana, hemp and CBD products become more commonplace. The new analysis of the genetic and chemical characteristics of cannabis is believed to be the first thorough examination of its kind.

4h

Tempted to cheat on a written exam? Artificial intelligence is 90% certain to nab you

Combining big data with artificial intelligence has allowed University of Copenhagen researchers to determine whether you wrote your assignment or whether a ghostwriter penned it for you — with nearly 90% accuracy.

4h

WVU biostatistician studies link between microbiome and preterm birth

Pregnant African American women are more likely than white women to give birth prematurely, but they're underrepresented in studies of preterm birth rates. Snehalata Huzurbazar, a biostatistics professor in the West Virginia University School of Public Health, is working to change that.

4h

Study finds link between ambient ozone exposure and progression of carotid wall thickness

Study of nearly 7,000 adults aged 45 to 84 from six US regions is first epidemiological study to provide evidence that ozone may advance subclinical arterial disease, providing insight into the relationship between ozone exposure and cardiovascular disease risk.

4h

NIST study identifies chemical blends as possible alternative refrigerants

More than a dozen chemical blends could serve as alternative refrigerants that won't heat the atmosphere as much as today's refrigerants do, or catch fire, according to a new computational study by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

4h

Earth recycles ocean floor into diamonds

Most diamonds are made of cooked seabed. The diamond on your finger is most likely made of recycled seabed cooked deep in the Earth. Traces of salt trapped in many diamonds show the stones are formed from ancient seabeds that became buried deep beneath the Earth's crust, according to new research led by Macquarie University geoscientists in Sydney, Australia.

4h

Surprisingly, inbred isle royale wolves dwindle because of fewer harmful genes

The tiny, isolated gray wolf population on Isle Royale has withered to near-extinction, but not because each animal carries a large number of harmful genes, according to a new genetic analysis. Instead, each one has been more likely to inherit the same harmful recessive alleles from both parents. This pattern enables expression of related genes as physical deformities,

4h

Scientists find telling early moment that indicates a coming megaquake

Scientists combing through databases of earthquakes since the early 1990s have discovered a possible defining moment 10-15 seconds into an event that could signal a magnitude 7 or larger megaquake.

4h

Renegade fat cells induce bone-damaging lesions in multiple myeloma

A study of samples from patients with multiple myeloma (MM) has demonstrated how 'reprogrammed' fat cells contribute to long-lasting bone damage, even after the cancer has gone into remission.

4h

Breastfeeding moms' milk can transfer lifelong protection against infection to their babies

Research in mice has found that the transfer of immunity from mum to baby can be long-term, beyond the period of breastfeeding. They also found that this protection was driven by the transfer of immune cells and was completely independent of antibodies.

4h

Early statin treatment may help children with Fragile X

Children with an inherited form of intellectual disability and autism could be helped by a medicine commonly used to lower cholesterol, if used early in life, research from the University of Edinburgh suggests. The drug — called lovastatin — corrected learning and memory problems in rats with a form of Fragile X Syndrome, tests revealed.

4h

Towards a safer treatment for leukemia

An international team of researchers at VIB-KU Leuven, Belgium, the UK Dementia Institute and the Children's Cancer Institute, Australia, have found a safer treatment for a specific type of leukemia. By refining a therapeutic avenue that was previously abandoned because of its severe side effects, they came up with a targeted approach that was both effective and safe in mice and in human cancer ce

4h

Among older women, 10,000 steps per day not needed for lower mortality

A new study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital found that older women, taking as few as 4,400 steps per day was significantly associated with lower risk of death compared to taking 2,700 steps per day. Risk of death continued to decrease with more steps taken but leveled off at around 7,500 steps per day — less than the 10,000 steps default goal in many wearables.

4h

Genomics of Isle Royale wolves reveal impacts of inbreeding

A new paper explores the genetic signatures of a pair of wolves isolated on Isle Royale, a remote national park in Lake Superior. The pair are father-daughter and share the same mother. Such close inbreeding leads to genetic anomalies, which likely are the main driver behind the wolf population crash over the past decade. Less extreme genetics help guide conservation decisions the world over.

4h

Snowflakes inform scientists how tooth enamel is formed

Physicists and mathematicians use the classical Stefan problem to explain the principles of crystal formation, such as snowflakes . Researchers in the University of Helsinki and Aalto University have now adapted the same principles to explain how tooth enamel gets distributed over the crown during growth.

4h

Humans used northern migration routes to reach eastern Asia

Northern and Central Asia have been neglected in studies of early human migration, with deserts and mountains being considered uncompromising barriers. However, a new study by an international team argues that humans may have moved through these extreme settings in the past under wetter conditions. By analyzing past climate, northern Asia emerges as a potential route of human dispersal, as well as

4h

Declining fertility rates may explain Neanderthal extinction, suggests new model

A new hypothesis for Neanderthal extinction supported by population modelling is put forward in a new study by Anna Degioanni from Aix Marseille Université, France and colleagues, published May 29, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

4h

Homo sapiens may have had several routes of dispersal across Asia in the Late Pleistocene

Homo sapiens may have had a variety of routes to choose from while dispersing across Asia during the Late Pleistocene Epoch, according to a study released May 29, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Feng Li of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology in Beijing and colleagues.

4h

Mass die-off of puffins recorded in the Bering Sea

A mass die-off of seabirds in the Bering Sea may be partially attributable to climate change, according to a new study publishing May 29 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Timothy Jones of the citizen science program COASST at University of Washington, Lauren Divine from the Aleut Community of St. Paul Island Ecosystem Conservation Office, and colleagues. The birds appeared to have died from t

4h

Amazon's $90 Echo Show 5 has a sliding camera cover as part of Alexa's privacy makeover

Gadgets No one is sure whether or not smart screens should have cameras. Amazon's new Echo has a sliding cover for its camera.

4h

Nanoscale bioabsorbable wound dressing

Scientists are harnessing the combined power of organic nanomaterials-based chemistry and a natural product found in crustacean exoskeletons to help bring emergency medicine one step closer to a viable solution for mitigating blood loss, from the hospital to the battlefield.

4h

New study asks: Should we replace mental health meds with exercise?

Researchers at the University of Vermont believe exercise should be prescribed to patients with mental health issues before psychiatric drugs. In a study of roughly a hundred volunteers, 95 percent of patients reported feeling better, while 63 percent reported feeling happy or very happy. The researchers suggest that mental health facilities should be built with gyms moving forward. None Exercise

4h

Fertility Clinics Sought Advice from Scientist Who CRISPRed Babies

Emails reveal that a facility in Dubai and others have asked geneticist He Jiankui for help in gene-editing embryos.

4h

18 Small New Worlds Found In Old Planet-Hunting Data

Hundreds of previously overlooked Earth-sized planets may await discovery in archives from NASA’s Kepler mission — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Genomic signatures of extensive inbreeding in Isle Royale wolves, a population on the threshold of extinction

The observation that small isolated populations often suffer reduced fitness from inbreeding depression has guided conservation theory and practice for decades. However, investigating the genome-wide dynamics associated with inbreeding depression in natural populations is only now feasible with relatively inexpensive sequencing technology and annotated reference genomes. To characterize the genom

4h

Melting of sediments in the deep mantle produces saline fluid inclusions in diamonds

Diamonds growing in the Earth’s mantle often trap inclusions of fluids that are highly saline in composition. These fluids are thought to emerge from deep in subduction zones and may also be involved in the generation of some of the kimberlite magmas. However, the source of these fluids and the mechanism of their transport into the mantle lithosphere are unresolved. Here, we present experimental

4h

Worldwide phylogeography and history of wheat genetic diversity

Since its domestication in the Fertile Crescent ~8000 to 10,000 years ago, wheat has undergone a complex history of spread, adaptation, and selection. To get better insights into the wheat phylogeography and genetic diversity, we describe allele distribution through time using a set of 4506 landraces and cultivars originating from 105 different countries genotyped with a high-density single-nucle

4h

Characterizing large earthquakes before rupture is complete

Whether earthquakes of different sizes are distinguishable early in their rupture process is a subject of debate. Studies have shown that the frequency content of radiated seismic energy in the first seconds of earthquakes scales with magnitude, implying determinism. Other studies have shown that recordings of ground displacement from small to moderate-sized earthquakes are indistinguishable, imp

4h

Pre-conception maternal helminth infection transfers via nursing long-lasting cellular immunity against helminths to offspring

Maternal immune transfer is the most significant source of protection from early-life infection, but whether maternal transfer of immunity by nursing permanently alters offspring immunity is poorly understood. Here, we identify maternal immune imprinting of offspring nursed by mothers who had a pre-conception helminth infection. Nursing of pups by helminth-exposed mothers transferred protective c

4h

Corticosteroid signaling at the brain-immune interface impedes coping with severe psychological stress

The immune system supports brain plasticity and homeostasis, yet it is prone to changes following psychological stress. Thus, it remains unclear whether and how stress-induced immune alterations contribute to the development of mental pathologies. Here, we show that following severe stress in mice, leukocyte trafficking through the choroid plexus (CP), a compartment that mediates physiological im

4h

MAGE cancer-testis antigens protect the mammalian germline under environmental stress

Ensuring robust gamete production even in the face of environmental stress is of utmost importance for species survival, especially in mammals that have low reproductive rates. Here, we describe a family of genes called melanoma antigens (MAGEs) that evolved in eutherian mammals and are normally restricted to expression in the testis ( http://MAGE.stjude.org ) but are often aberrantly activated i

4h

Detection of ammonia on Plutos surface in a region of geologically recent tectonism

We report the detection of ammonia (NH 3 ) on Pluto’s surface in spectral images obtained with the New Horizons spacecraft that show absorption bands at 1.65 and 2.2 μm. The ammonia signature is spatially coincident with a region of past extensional tectonic activity (Virgil Fossae) where the presence of H 2 O ice is prominent. Ammonia in liquid water profoundly depresses the freezing point of th

4h

Defining early SIV replication and dissemination dynamics following vaginal transmission

Understanding HIV transmission is critical to guide the development of prophylactic interventions to prevent infection. We used a nonhuman primate (NHP) model with a synthetic swarm of sequence-tagged variants of SIVmac239 ("SIVmac239X") and scheduled necropsy during primary infection (days 3 to 14 after challenge) to study viral dynamics and host responses to the establishment and dissemination

4h

Control of antiviral innate immune response by protein geranylgeranylation

The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) orchestrates host antiviral innate immune response to RNA virus infection. However, how MAVS signaling is controlled to eradicate virus while preventing self-destructive inflammation remains obscure. Here, we show that protein geranylgeranylation, a posttranslational lipid modification of proteins, limits MAVS-mediated immune signaling by targe

4h

Early divergence of mutational processes in human fetal tissues

A developing human fetus needs to balance rapid cellular expansion with maintaining genomic stability. Here, we accurately quantified and characterized somatic mutation accumulation in fetal tissues by analyzing individual stem cells from human fetal liver and intestine. Fetal mutation rates were about fivefold higher than in tissue-matched adult stem cells. The mutational landscape of fetal inte

4h

Temporal scaling of aging as an adaptive strategy of Escherichia coli

Natural selection is thought to shape the evolution of aging patterns, although how life-history trajectories orchestrate the inherently stochastic processes associated with aging is unclear. Tracking clonal growth-arrested Escherichia coli cohorts in an homogeneous environment at single-cell resolution, we demonstrate that the Gompertz law of exponential mortality characterizes bacterial lifespa

4h

Oxygen tension-mediated erythrocyte membrane interactions regulate cerebral capillary hyperemia

The tight coupling between cerebral blood flow and neural activity is a key feature of normal brain function and forms the basis of functional hyperemia. The mechanisms coupling neural activity to vascular responses, however, remain elusive despite decades of research. Recent studies have shown that cerebral functional hyperemia begins in capillaries, and red blood cells (RBCs) act as autonomous

4h

Quantum information gets a boost from thin-film breakthrough

Efforts to create reliable light-based quantum computing, quantum key distribution for cybersecurity, and other technologies got a boost from a new study demonstrating an innovative method for creating thin films to control the emission of single photons.

4h

Manuka honey to kill drug-resistant bacteria found in cystic fibrosis infections

Manuka honey could provide the key to a breakthrough treatment for cystic fibrosis patients following preliminary work.

4h

Using nature to adapt to climate change

Climate change poses major threats to people around the world. One important method for adapting to these changes may lie in the deployment of nature-based solutions in urban areas.

4h

Nanoscale bioabsorbable wound dressing

Scientists are harnessing the combined power of organic nanomaterials-based chemistry and a natural product found in crustacean exoskeletons to help bring emergency medicine one step closer to a viable solution for mitigating blood loss, from the hospital to the battlefield.

4h

Environmental justice issues

New research examined the impact that bottom-up, community-level initiatives have in addressing environmental justice issues. They found that the best way to address a community's environmental injustices is to meet them where they are, integrating into the community and building trust over a long-term partnership.

4h

Researchers standardize test for predicting transplant rejection

Researchers have developed a standardized method of measuring the immune response in islet transplant recipients, helping predict patient outcomes.

4h

Why Hundreds of Puffins Washed Up Dead on an Alaskan Beach

Lauren Divine first heard that the birds were dying on October 13, 2016, when one of her colleagues stumbled across the corpse of a tufted puffin while walking along a beach on Alaska’s St. Paul Island. The next day: another carcass. Soon, several of the island’s 450 residents started calling in with details of more stranded puffins. Some were already dead. Others were well on their way—emaciated

4h

4h

Uber’s quiet ride option is a warning: We are falling victims to convenience | Penelope Blackmore

You can outsource pretty much every aspect of irritation in your life. But you can’t outsource loneliness Uber has launched a quiet ride service in the US, which means that passengers can request that a driver refrain from talking to them during their trip. The quiet ride feature is available in Uber’s premium Black service. If you’re reading this thinking, “Great, now rich people have even less

4h

Science on the Hill: How to Make Recycling Profitable

We need to invest in companies with approaches that are scalable and replicable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Experimental drug completely effective against Nipah virus infection in monkeys

The experimental antiviral drug remdesivir completely protected four African green monkeys from a lethal dose of Nipah virus, according to a new study in Science Translational Medicine from National Institutes of Health scientists and colleagues.

4h

Polysubstance use, social factors associated with opioid overdose deaths

A new study led by Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction shows that opioid-related overdose deaths involving another substance is now the norm, not the exception, in Massachusetts. The researchers analyzed opioid overdose death data from the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, which showed that 82% of those deaths involved an opioid and another substance, including stimulants

4h

More than victims: Migration images provide a chance to tell a greater story

Keith Greenwood, an associate professor in the Missouri School of Journalism, has found that a majority of photos depicting the 2015 Syrian refugee crisis portrayed the refugees as victims.

4h

Potential novel biomarker for alcohol dependence

Specific molecules (small noncoding microRNAs or miRNAs) found in saliva may be able to predict alcohol dependence as biomarkers. This is the first study to examine changes in the miRNA expression in the saliva of people with alcohol dependence. Currently, no genetic markers exist to test for this condition.

4h

NIH-funded study links microbiome composition to African American preterm birth risk

A research project funded by the National Institutes of Health has identified differences in the vaginal bacteria that may raise the risk of preterm birth among pregnant African-American women. The findings could be a first step toward the development of a screen for the early identification of preterm birth risk in this population. The study was conducted by Jennifer Fettweis, Ph.D., of Virginia

4h

A Signal in Giant Earthquakes That Could Save Lives

The full power of the biggest temblors could be determined in as little as 10 to 15 seconds after they begin, a new study finds, and long before it ends.

4h

Humans used northern migration routes to reach eastern Asia

Northern and Central Asia have been neglected in studies of early human migration, with deserts and mountains being considered uncompromising barriers. However, a new study by an international team argues that humans may have moved through these extreme settings in the past under wetter conditions. We must now reconsider where we look for the earliest traces of our species in northern Asia, as wel

4h

Snowflakes inform scientists how tooth enamel is formed

Physicists and mathematicians use the classical Stefan problem to explain the principles of crystal formation, such as those that create snowflakes . Researchers in the University of Helsinki and Aalto University have now adapted the same principles to explain how tooth enamel gets distributed over the crown during growth. The newly published work provides a theoretical basis for the developmental

4h

Scientists find telling early moment that indicates a coming megaquake

Scientists combing through databases of earthquakes since the early 1990s have discovered a possible defining moment 10-15 seconds into an event that could signal a magnitude 7 or larger megaquake.

4h

Genomics of Isle Royale wolves reveal impacts of inbreeding

A new paper explores the genetic signatures of a pair of wolves isolated on Isle Royale, a remote national park in Lake Superior. The pair are father-daughter and share the same mother. Such close inbreeding leads to genetic anomalies, which likely are the main driver behind the wolf population crash over the past decade.

4h

Earth recycles ocean floor into diamonds

The diamond on your finger is most likely made of recycled seabed cooked deep in the Earth.

4h

Icy volcanoes on Pluto may have spewed organic-rich water

Planetary scientists found ammonia-rich ice near cracks on Pluto, suggesting the dwarf planet had recent icy volcanoes.

4h

Breaking: robot makes breakfast

Researchers have programmed a robot to crack an egg. It’s more important than it sounds. Mark Bruer reports.

4h

The mathematical link between snowflakes and teeth

Modelling shows that the formula describing crystal growth can also predict enamel distribution. Andrew Masterson reports.

4h

Snowflakes inform scientists how tooth enamel is formed

Physicists and mathematicians use the classical Stefan problem to explain the principles of crystal formation, such as those that create snowflakes . Researchers in the University of Helsinki and Aalto University have now adapted the same principles to explain how tooth enamel gets distributed over the crown during growth. The newly published work provides a theoretical basis for the developmental

4h

Genomics of Isle Royale wolves reveal impacts of inbreeding

A new paper explores the genetic signatures of a pair of wolves isolated on Isle Royale, a remote national park in Lake Superior. The pair are father-daughter and share the same mother. Such close inbreeding leads to genetic anomalies, which likely are the main driver behind the wolf population crash over the past decade.

4h

Mass die-off of puffins recorded in the Bering Sea

A mass die-off of seabirds in the Bering Sea may be partially attributable to climate change, according to a new study publishing May 29 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Timothy Jones of the citizen science program COASST at University of Washington, Lauren Divine from the Aleut Community of St Paul Island Ecosystem Conservation Office, and colleagues. The birds appeared to have died from th

4h

Three Studies Track People's Microbiomes Through Health and Disease

The second phase of the Human Microbiome Project reports on microbial composition in prediabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and pregnancy.

4h

Eastern European universities score highly in university gender ranking

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01642-4 The annual Leiden Ranking of institutes’ scientific performance includes a measure of gender balance for first time.

4h

Science on the Hill: How to Make Recycling Profitable

We need to invest in companies with approaches that are scalable and replicable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Declining fertility rates may explain Neanderthal extinction, suggests new model

A new hypothesis for Neanderthal extinction supported by population modelling is put forward in a new study by Anna Degioanni from Aix Marseille Université, France and colleagues, published May 29, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

4h

Mass die-off of puffins recorded in the Bering Sea

A mass die-off of seabirds in the Bering Sea may be partially attributable to climate change, according to a new study publishing May 29 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Timothy Jones of the citizen science program COASST at University of Washington, Lauren Divine from the Aleut Community of St Paul Island Ecosystem Conservation Office, and colleagues. The birds appeared to have died from th

4h

Cognitive behavior therapy shown to improve multiple menopause symptoms

Although hormone therapy (HT) is the most commonly recommended treatment for menopause symptoms, research is ongoing for alternatives, especially nonpharmacologic options. Cognitive behavior therapy has previously been proposed as a low-risk treatment for hot flashes, but a new study suggests it may also effectively manage other menopause symptoms.

4h

Kratom's reputed pain-relief benefits could come from one of its metabolites

Kratom is a Southeast Asian tree with a long history of use in traditional medicine. In the region, the plant's leaves are widely consumed for pain relief, treatment of opioid addiction and other uses. Though its efficacy and safety are unproven, kratom use has spread to the US and Europe. Now, researchers report that a metabolite of a kratom alkaloid could be responsible for the treatment's thera

4h

Artificial intelligence boosts proteome research

Using artificial intelligence, researchers have succeeded in making the mass analysis of proteins from any organism significantly faster than before and almost error-free. This new approach is set to provoke a considerable change in the field of proteomics, as it can be applied in both basic and clinical research.

4h

Sensor-laden glove helps robotic hands 'feel' objects

(HealthDay)—Holding an egg is a lot different from holding an apple or a tomato, and humans are naturally able to adjust their grip to avoid crushing or dropping each object.

5h

A bendable mirror is a step toward finding life outside our solar system

A CubeSat launching to space this year will provide a test run for future telescopes.

5h

Beat your competition by analyzing performance data

In this lesson, two-time NBA champion Shane Battier explores how advanced basketball analytics contributed to his personal game plan on the court. Data allows for a greater competitive advantage, says Battier. When every point comes at a premium, it's vital to understand on a deeper level the intricacies and nuances of the game. As Battier explains, most actions in basketball indeed can be quanti

5h

How you can help end the email epidemic

We all have a love-hate relationship with email, which allows us to communicate easily while inundating us with conversation. How can we tackle these problems and free up valuable time in our work day? Dorie Clark has a few simple recommendations for putting an end to these common email epidemics.

5h

Million-person U.S. study of genes and health stumbles over including Native American groups

Tribes worry about open-ended studies of data from their members

5h

Low vitamin D in pregnancy linked to potentially harmful vaginal bacteria in black women

Race plays a role in how vitamin D affects the vaginal microbiome. In a trial of pregnant women of diverse ethnicity, black women lower in vitamin D had more bacteria linked to bacterial vaginosis and preterm delivery, while vitamin D-replete white women had more lactobacilli, which promote vaginal health. This study by Medical University of South Carolina and Virginia Commonwealth University rese

5h

Unsettling Sex Robot Looks Almost Exactly Like a Real Person

Raunchy Robot Some sex experts predict we’re headed toward a future in which “virtual” lovers replace human ones — and based on advances happening in the field of sex robots, it could eventually be hard to tell the difference. One company in particular, DS Doll Robotics, has cooked up incredibly lifelike robotic heads and busts for sex dolls, which it shows off periodically in video clips, like t

5h

Ekonomi och könsnormer avgör vem som vabbar

År 2007 sänktes marginalskatten för låg- och medelinkomsttagare i och med det första jobbskatteavdraget. Forskare har i en rapport från IFAU (Institutet för arbetsmarknads- och utbildningspolitisk utvärdering) studerat hur uttaget av vab förändrades i par där den ena föräldern fick en skattesänkning, jämfört med par som inte fick det. Enligt ekonomisk teori borde den föräldern som får sänkt skatt

5h

Extroverts enjoy four key advantages according to science; here they are

Researchers have determined that extroverts enjoy four key advantages over their more introverted peers.

5h

New light shed on the harms of air pollution

A new study based on levels before, during and after the Beijing Olympics reveals how air pollution affects the human body at the level of metabolites. Researchers found that 69 metabolites changed significantly when air pollution changed.

5h

Epigenetics of daytime sleepiness

A new, multi-ethnic study explores associations between daytime sleepiness and epigenetic modifications — measurable, chemical changes that may be influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. The team finds tantalizing clues about Excessive Daytime Sleepiness, laying a foundation for larger scale studies of diverse populations.

5h

Mueller Breaks His Silence—Without Breaking Protocol

Robert Mueller isn’t letting Congress off the hook. The special counsel on Wednesday used his first public comments in more than two years to lay out the limits of his position—both as he pursued the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump, and in his ability to decide what should happen as a result of his 448-page

5h

Are Wormholes Real?

Everyday Einstein explores the far reaches of our universe (and beyond) — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The Need for Standards in Human Microbiome Research

Download this application note to learn about where bias can be introduced during microbiome research and how to alleviate the problems that bias causes!

5h

Smart glove works out what you’re holding from its weight and shape

Teaching robots how to touch is tricky, but this new smart glove lets a neural network learn the shape and weight of an object the wearer is holding

5h

Singapore's ban on fake news sets a dangerous precedent

As tempting as it sounds, Singapore's initiative to curb online misinformation could stop public-interest journalism and stifle academic discourse, says Donna Lu

5h

Stalled jet stream has caused two weeks of tornadoes in the US

A warming Arctic has stalled the jet stream over the Pacific ocean, leading to severe weather across much of the US, including a record-breaking run of tornadoes

5h

Here's Why Astronomers Are So Worried About SpaceX's Planned 'Megaconstellation'

SpaceX put 60 bright satellites in space May 23, and astronomers are sounding the alarm about the eventual 12,000-strong Starlink constellation SpaceX plans.

5h

Paris, destroyed: A map of buildings lost to history

Following the blaze that ripped through Notre Dame, it feels like Paris had lost a major link to its past. But the cathedral is lucky to have survived this far: It was almost torched by revolutionaries in 1871. As the world's first communist revolt was crushed, other Parisian landmarks were set ablaze – many of which were lost forever. The burning of Notre Dame on April 15th felt like a singular

5h

From viruses to social bots, researchers unearth the structure of attacked networks

Researchers at USC developed a machine learning model of the invisible networks around us including, how viruses interact with proteins and genes in the body. Their work, they believe, can help across the disciplines from the design of future medicines or gene therapies against viruses and diseases like cancer or help understand how to address cyber attacks.

5h

Patterns of chronic lymphocytic leukemia growth identified

In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the rate of disease growth is apt to follow one of three trajectories: relentlessly upward, steadily level, or something in between, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the University of Washington report in a new study published in Nature.

5h

Unveiling how the genome has condensed itself inside the virus

Scientists at the University of Helsinki working in collaboration with the University of Oxford have deciphered for the first time how a virus genome is condensed inside the capsid of a virus.

5h

New findings from Human Microbiome Project reveal how microbiome is disrupted during IBD

A new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard is the first to have observed the complex set of chemical and molecular events that disrupt the microbiome and trigger immune responses during flare-ups of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.

5h

Asia's glaciers provide buffer against drought

A new study to assess the contribution that Asia's high mountain glaciers make to relieving water stress in the region is published this week (May 29, 2019) in the journal Nature. The study has important economic and social implications for a region that is vulnerable to drought. Climate change is causing most of the region's glaciers to shrink.

5h

New blood test uses DNA 'packaging' patterns to detect multiple cancer types

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a simple new blood test that can detect the presence of seven different types of cancer by spotting unique patterns in the fragmentation of DNA shed from cancer cells and circulating in the bloodstream.

5h

Key link discovered between tissue cell type and different forms of arthritis

Research shows, for the first time, that different types of fibroblasts — the most common cells of connective tissue in animals — are organized in different layers in the joint and are responsible for two very different forms of arthritis; osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

5h

Fuels out of thin air: New path to capturing and upgrading CO2

Engineering researchers at the University of Toronto have developed a new electrochemical path to transform CO2 into valuable products such as jet fuel or plastics. The technology could significantly improve the economics of capturing and recycling carbon directly from the air.

5h

New regulator of immune responses discovered

Scientists have identified a new internal regulator which helps control the body's response to fight infection.The discovery could be a target for new drugs to tackle autoimmune diseases, such as lupus and scleroderma, where healthy tissues are attacked by the body's own immune system.

5h

Sensor-packed glove learns signatures of the human grasp

Wearing a sensor-packed glove while handling a variety of objects, MIT researchers have compiled a massive dataset that enables an AI system to recognize objects through touch alone. The information could be leveraged to help robots identify and manipulate objects, and may aid in prosthetics design.

5h

Scientists offer designer 'big atoms' on demand

Physicists report that they can build and control particles that behave like tiny atoms with a precision never seen before.

5h

How to quell a cytokine storm: New ways to dampen an overactive immune system

BRCA DNA-repair proteins interact with a molecular complex that is also responsible for regulating the immune system. When certain players in this pathway go awry, autoimmune disorders arise. An international team has deciphered the structure of the complex and have found new molecular targets for fighting autoimmunity.

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300lb 4 legged robot tows 7000lb plane

submitted by /u/LikeOk [link] [comments]

5h

2019 has been a big year for meat alternatives. I’m Kelsey Piper, a staff writer at Vox’s Future Perfect, where I cover the growing meatless meat industry. AMA.

Hi, reddit! I'm Kelsey Piper , a reporter for Vox's Future Perfect section , where I write about global problems and new solutions that are emerging to address them. One topic I've reported on, and watched grow from a weird niche into a big mainstream story, is meat alternatives . Companies like Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat are making plant-based burgers, beef and sausages that taste like the

5h

Why Women Are Called 'Influencers' and Men 'Creators'

It's rooted in how social media celebrities see themselves. Also, sexism.

5h

Amazon adds Alexa delete commands

The retail giant updates its voice-activated speaker, giving users the ability to delete recordings with a spoken request.

5h

Research reveals the link between primate knuckles and hand use

Researchers have found differences between the knuckle joints of primates that will enable a better understanding of ancient human hand use.

5h

Seeing disfigured faces prompts negative brain and behavior responses

A new study finds that people have implicit negative biases against people with disfigured faces, without knowingly harboring such biases.

5h

Guiding plants towards obtaining iron

A team relates the presence of beneficial organisms in plant roots to their response to iron deficiency.

5h

Compostable food containers could release PFAS into environment

Compostable food containers seem like a great idea: They degrade into nutrient-rich organic matter, reducing waste and the need for chemical fertilizers. But much of this packaging relies on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to repel water and oil. Now, researchers have shown that PFAS can leach from the containers into compost. However, the potential health effects of applying this mater

5h

The US Military Is Officially Rolling out Its HELIOS Laser Weapon

Upgrades Ready The U.S. Navy just announced which ship will be first to be outfitted with HELIOS, a powerful anti-missile laser weapon . In 2021, the USS Preble, a destroyer operating out of the Pearl Harbor naval base, will be equipped with the HELIOS, according to The Honolulu Star-Advertiser — and the weapon will become the Navy’s go-to system for disabling any inbound cruise missiles launched

5h

VR vs. AR vs. MR: What Is Each One Good for?

Having a hard time getting a handle on all the action around VR, AR, and MR. We explain each of them, and compare their strengths and weaknesses. The post VR vs. AR vs. MR: What Is Each One Good for? appeared first on ExtremeTech .

5h

Looks Matters, but so Does Smarts

A lesson from parakeet romance on how to get a date — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Two types of fibroblast drive arthritis

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01594-9 Fibroblast cells promote the development of rheumatoid arthritis. The finding that two distinct fibroblast populations affect different aspects of the disease in mice has implications for efforts to develop clinical treatments.

5h

Distinct fibroblast subsets drive inflammation and damage in arthritis

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1263-7 Distinct subsets of fibroblasts, which differ in their expression of thymus cell antigen 1 (THY1), are responsible for inflammation and tissue damage in mouse models of arthritis.

5h

DNA damage detection in nucleosomes involves DNA register shifting

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1259-3 Cryo-electron microscopy structures reveal that the DNA-repair factor UV-DDB exposes inaccessible nucleosome lesions for binding by inducing a translational shift in the nucleosome position.

5h

Immunization expands B cells specific to HIV-1 V3 glycan in mice and macaques

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1250-z The immunogen RC1 facilitates recognition of the V3-glycan patch on the envelope of HIV-1 and elicits specific serological responses in mice and macaques, making it a possible priming immunogen for sequential vaccination strategies in humans.

5h

Observation of thermal Hawking radiation and its temperature in an analogue black hole

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1241-0 The spectrum of Hawking radiation is measured in an analogue black hole composed of rubidium atoms, confirming Hawking’s prediction that Hawking radiation is thermal with a temperature given by the surface gravity.

5h

Quantum simulation of black-hole radiation

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01592-x It is extremely difficult to observe the radiation that is thought to be emitted by black holes. The properties of this radiation have now been analysed using an analogue black hole comprising a system of ultracold atoms.

5h

Elastic colloidal monopoles and reconfigurable self-assembly in liquid crystals

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1247-7 Unstructured light controls the elastic monopole moments of nematic liquid-crystal colloidal particles and switches them to quadrupoles, with like-charged monopoles attracting and oppositely charged ones repelling, enabling reconfigurable dynamic self-assembly.

5h

Learning the signatures of the human grasp using a scalable tactile glove

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1234-z Tactile patterns obtained from a scalable sensor-embedded glove and deep convolutional neural networks help to explain how the human hand can identify and grasp individual objects and estimate their weights.

5h

Specialized coding of sensory, motor and cognitive variables in VTA dopamine neurons

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1261-9 Two-photon calcium imaging of a large population of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area of mice performing a virtual-reality navigation task reveals the organization principles of the dopamine system.

5h

Metabolic control of BRISC–SHMT2 assembly regulates immune signalling

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1232-1 Cryo-electron microscopy and mutation experiments demonstrate that the inactive SHMT2 dimer—and not the pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-bound tetramer—binds to BRISC, which reveals a mechanism for the regulation of deubiquitylases and inflammatory signalling.

5h

Priorities for the next 10 years of human microbiome research

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01654-0 The dream of microbiome-based medicine requires a fresh approach — an ecological and evolutionary understanding of host-microbe interactions — argues Lita Proctor.

5h

The Integrative Human Microbiome Project

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1238-8 Over ten years, the Human Microbiome Project has provided resources for studying the microbiome and its relationship to disease; this Perspective summarizes the key achievements and findings of the project and its relationship to the broader field.

5h

Cas13-induced cellular dormancy prevents the rise of CRISPR-resistant bacteriophage

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1257-5 The RNA-cleaving Cas13 degrades both host and bacteriophage transcripts, thereby rendering infected cells dormant and broadly resistant to phage-mediated lysis.

5h

Bacterial dormancy curbs phage epidemics

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01595-8 One type of CRISPR–Cas bacterial-defence system destroys phage and bacterial RNA, which leads to bacterial dormancy. Dormancy is found to limit viral spread, and also protects against unrelated viruses and viral mutants.

5h

Long-term ex vivo haematopoietic-stem-cell expansion allows nonconditioned transplantation

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1244-x An albumin-free culture system for the long-term ex vivo expansion of mouse haematopoietic stem cells produces 236- to 899-fold expansion, and generates cultures that robustly engraft in recipient mice without toxic pre-conditioning.

5h

Bridging the gap between artificial vision and touch

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01593-w Object manipulation using an innovative glove allows large databases of detailed pressure maps to be obtained. Such data could lead to advances in robotic sensing and in our understanding of the role of touch in manipulation.

5h

Multiple liquid crystalline geometries of highly compacted nucleic acid in a dsRNA virus

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1229-9 The cryo-electron microscopy structure of the bacteriophage ɸ6 dsRNA genome shows that the genome is packaged in a spooled manner that is more similar to dsDNA viruses than to other dsRNA viruses.

5h

Cryo-EM structures of herpes simplex virus type 1 portal vertex and packaged genome

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1248-6 Cryo-electron microscopy structures of the herpesvirus capsid including the viral genome reveal ordered DNA structures and structural features of the capsid that suggest possible mechanisms for viral genome encapsidation.

5h

Asia’s shrinking glaciers protect large populations from drought stress

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1240-1 Glaciers in the high mountains of Asia provide a uniquely drought-resilient source of water, supplying summer meltwater sufficient for the basic needs of around 200 million people.

5h

Look beyond the ‘retraction’ label

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01676-8 Retracting a manuscript can be an opportunity to revisit the topic afresh.

5h

Tracking humans and microbes

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01591-y The Human Microbiome Project put the health-associated microbes found in humans on centre stage. The project’s second phase shows how microbial disturbance in disease is linked to host processes.

5h

Growth dynamics in naturally progressing chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1252-x Analysis of growth dynamics in a dataset from 107 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) reveals both exponential and logistic patterns of growth, which are associated with differences in genetic attributes and clinical outcomes.

5h

Genome-wide cell-free DNA fragmentation in patients with cancer

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1272-6 Analyses of fragmentation patterns of cell-free DNA in the blood of patients with cancer and healthy individuals using a machine learning algorithm provide a proof-of principle approach for the early detection and screening of human cancer.

5h

After the Integrative Human Microbiome Project, what’s next for the microbiome community?

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01674-w The latest phase of this ambitious undertaking has provided important insights into inflammatory bowel disease, the onset of type 2 diabetes and preterm birth. But fully integrated multidisciplinary collaborations are now needed to convert knowledge of the microbiome into clinical applications.

5h

Multi-omics of the gut microbial ecosystem in inflammatory bowel diseases

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1237-9 The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Multi’omics Database includes longitudinal data encompassing a multitude of analyses of stool, blood and biopsies of more than 100 individuals, and provides a comprehensive description of host and microbial activities in inflammatory bowel diseases.

5h

Longitudinal multi-omics of host–microbe dynamics in prediabetes

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1236-x Deep profiling of transcriptomes, metabolomes, cytokines, and proteomes, alongside changes in the microbiome, in samples from individuals with and without prediabetes reveal insights into inter-individual variability and associations between changes in the microbiome and other factors.

5h

Himalayan glacier melting threatens water security for millions of people

Asia’s glaciers are melting faster than they are accumulating new stores of snow and ice.

5h

A single layer spin-orbit torque nano-oscillator

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10120-4 Spin torque nano-oscillatiors promise novel microwave applications but the functioning relies on the spin current from additional ferromagnetic or metal layers. The authors here achieved in a single ferromagnetic layer sandwiched by nonmagnetic insulators the spin wave auto-oscillations due to a localized edge mo

5h

Selective light absorber-assisted single nickel atom catalysts for ambient sunlight-driven CO2 methanation

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10304-y While light-driven CO2 methanation provides a renewable means to upgrade waste emissions, the sunlight is insufficient to drive high temperature CO2 methanation. Here, authors prepare single-atom Ni on Y2O3 with a selective light absorber for ambient-sunlight-driven photothermal CO2 methanation.

5h

Structure and immunogenicity of a stabilized HIV-1 envelope trimer based on a group-M consensus sequence

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10262-5 Stabilized, native-like trimers of the HIV envelope protein, such as SOSIP trimers, are potential antigens for an HIV vaccine. Here, the authors generate a SOSIP trimer based on the consensus sequence of group M isolates, determine its structure and exposure of common epitopes, and show immunogenicity in rabbits

5h

Atypical function of a centrosomal module in WNT signalling drives contextual cancer cell motility

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10241-w Centrosomes function in cell migration by organizing microtubules. Here, Luo et al. surprisingly show that centrosome proteins also control migration after recruitment by Wnt-PCP proteins to the cell cortex, leading to actin remodelling and protrusive activity relevant to aggressive cancer motility.

5h

Publisher Correction: Chromatin dysregulation and DNA methylation at transcription start sites associated with transcriptional repression in cancers

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10557-7 Publisher Correction: Chromatin dysregulation and DNA methylation at transcription start sites associated with transcriptional repression in cancers

5h

The UbiX flavin prenyltransferase reaction mechanism resembles class I terpene cyclase chemistry

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10220-1 The UbiD-UbiX decarboxylase system is required for the biosynthesis of quinone cofactors. Here, the authors combine structural and biochemical analyses to elucidate the UbiX reaction mechanism, showing that it resembles the mode of action of class I terpene cyclases.

5h

Reducing MSH4 copy number prevents meiotic crossovers between non-homologous chromosomes in Brassica napus

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10010-9 Non-homologous crossovers impair correct chromosome segregation in allopolyploids. Here the authors show that most non-homologous crossovers in Brassica napus arise from MSH4-dependent recombination and provide evidence that post-polyploidization reduction of MSH4 duplicate stabilizes meiosis.

5h

Ep400 deficiency in Schwann cells causes persistent expression of early developmental regulators and peripheral neuropathy

Nature Communications, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10287-w The Ep400 chromatin remodeler determines genomic distribution of variant histones. In the current study, the authors show that loss of Ep400 in Schwann cells leads to aberrant expression of developmental regulators, and a peripheral neuropathy phenotype.

5h

Intelligent algorithms for genome research

Although the importance of machine learning methods in genome research has grown steadily in recent years, researchers have often had to resort to using obsolete software. Scientists in clinical research often did not have access to the most recent models. This will change with the new free open access repository: Kipoi enables an easy exchange of machine learning models in the field of genome res

5h

Scientists offer designer 'big atoms' on demand

In the not-so-distant future, researchers may be able to build atoms to your specifications with the click of a button. It's still the stuff of science fiction, but a team at the University of Colorado Boulder reports that it is getting closer when it comes to controlling and assembling particles called "big atoms."

5h

Fuels out of thin air: New path to capturing and upgrading CO2

A research team from U of T Engineering has developed a new electrochemical path to transform CO2 into valuable products such as jet fuel or plastics. The technology could significantly improve the economics of capturing and recycling carbon directly from the air.

5h

Unveiling how the genome has condensed itself inside the virus

Scientists at the University of Helsinki working in collaboration with the University of Oxford have deciphered for the first time how a virus genome is condensed inside the capsid of a virus.

5h

Asia's glaciers provide buffer against drought

A new study to assess the contribution that Asia's high mountain glaciers make to relieving water stress in the region is published this week (29 May 2019) in the journal Nature. The study has important economic and social implications for a region that is vulnerable to drought. Climate change is causing most of the region's glaciers to shrink.

5h

2 Russians venture into open space from Space Station

Two Russian crewmembers on the International Space Station have begun a spacewalk to conduct scientific research and help maintain the orbiting outpost.

5h

“This is a case of good science:” Nature republishes retracted glacier paper

Nature has republished a paper on glacier melt that was retracted more than a year ago after the author became aware that he had made an error that underestimated such melt. The paper, originally titled “Asia’s glaciers are a regionally important buffer against drought,” was subjected to an expression of concern in 2017 after two … Continue reading “This is a case of good science:” Nature republis

5h

Intelligent algorithms for genome research

Although the importance of machine learning methods in genome research has grown steadily in recent years, researchers have often had to resort to using obsolete software. Scientists in clinical research often did not have access to the most recent models. This will change with the new free open access repository: Kipoi enables an easy exchange of machine learning models in the field of genome res

5h

Unveiling how the genome has condensed itself inside the virus

Scientists at the University of Helsinki working in collaboration with the University of Oxford have deciphered for the first time how a virus genome is condensed inside the capsid of a virus.

5h

Hands that see, eyes that feel? Brain study reveals the mathematics of identifying objects

Researchers demonstrate that our brain need only perform a few lightning-fast statistical calculations to detect key properties of unknown objects.

5h

Secure metropolitan quantum networks move a step closer

Successful new field tests of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) system over commercial fiber networks could pave the way to its use in metropolitan areas.

5h

When drug treatment for social anxiety is insufficient

A study group clarified that cognitive therapy maintained its effects more than a year after the end of therapy for patients with a social anxiety disorder even for those who did not respond to antidepressant drugs.

5h

Self-healing DNA nanostructures

DNA assembled into nanostructures such as tubes and origami-inspired shapes could someday find applications ranging from DNA computers to nanomedicine. However, these intriguing structures don't persist long in biological environments because of enzymes called nucleases that degrade DNA. Now, researchers have designed DNA nanostructures that can heal themselves in serum.

5h

Targeting inflammation to better understand dangerous blood clots

Forty percent of people who develop venous thromboembolism don't know what caused it. New preclinical research further explores inflammation's role in inciting the clots.

5h

Chloropicrin application increases production and profit potential for potato growers

Chloropicrin was first used on potato in 1940 as a wireworm suppressant and then in 1965 as a verticillium suppressant. Farmers stopped using it on potato for many years, but over the last decade, it has seen a resurgence in popularity — and for good reason.

5h

Quantum information gets a boost from thin-film breakthrough

Efforts to create reliable light-based quantum computing, quantum key distribution for cybersecurity, and other technologies got a boost from a new study demonstrating an innovative method for creating thin films to control the emission of single photons.

5h

Some songbird nests are especially vulnerable to magpie predation

A new study has revealed a range of factors that cause a variation in predation by magpies on farmland songbirds.

5h

Schools that are socially connected have similar educational outcomes

Ivan Smirnov, a researcher from the Higher School of Economics, analysed the data of 36,951 students from 590 schools of Saint Petersburg and found that there is a strong correlation between the educational outcomes of a school and its digital neighbors. Students are more likely to be connected if the educational outcomes of their schools are similar. The results were published in PLOS ONE.

5h

Using nature to adapt to climate change

Climate change poses major threats to people around the world. One important method for adapting to these changes may lie in the deployment of nature-based solutions in urban areas.

5h

Intelligent algorithms for genome research

In order to find out which genes are responsible for diseases such as cancer or diabetes, scientists nowadays frequently resort to using machine-learning models. In order to give clinical researchers access to the latest algorithms, Professor Julien Gagneur from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has set up a new repository called 'Kipoi' in collaboration with scientists from other universit

5h

Colombia could lose 60% of land suitable for irrigated rice due to climate change

Without significant global reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, Colombia will have 60% less land suitable for rice production by the 2050s. Due primarily to increased temperatures and decreased rainfall — as opposed to sea-level rise, which is the driver of projected change to rice production in some Asian countries — the research shows suitable conditions will need to be found at higher elev

5h

Outsmarting deep fakes: AI-driven imaging system protects authenticity

To thwart sophisticated deep fake methods of altering photos and video, researchers at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering devised a technique to authenticate images throughout the entire pipeline, from acquisition to delivery, using artificial intelligence (AI). In tests, a prototype pipeline increased the ability to detect manipulation from approximately 45% to over 90% without sacrificing imag

5h

In a first, scientists took the temperature of a sonic black hole

A lab-made black hole that traps sound, not light, emits radiation at a certain temperature, as Stephen Hawking first predicted.

5h

Looks Matters, but so Does Smarts

A lesson from parakeet romance on how to get a date — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

You Can Now Tell Alexa to Delete Everything You Said Today

Always Listening It’s no secret that Amazon’s Alexa voice assistant records everything said to it, and the company hasn’t made it easy to delete those recordings — you either have to erase each utterance individually or visit Amazon’s website to delete the whole trove of recordings at once. But as of Wednesday , a new feature on all Alexa-enabled devices lets you delete a day’s worth of commands

5h

Archaeological evidence that a late 14th-century tsunami devastated the coast of northern Sumatra and redirected history [Environmental Sciences]

Archaeological evidence shows that a predecessor of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami devastated nine distinct communities along a 40-km section of the northern coast of Sumatra in about 1394 CE. Our evidence is the spatial and temporal distribution of tens of thousands of medieval ceramic sherds and over 5,000 carved…

6h

BCL6 modulates tissue neutrophil survival and exacerbates pulmonary inflammation following influenza virus infection [Immunology and Inflammation]

Neutrophils are vital for antimicrobial defense; however, their role during viral infection is less clear. Furthermore, the molecular regulation of neutrophil fate and function at the viral infected sites is largely elusive. Here we report that BCL6 deficiency in myeloid cells exhibited drastically enhanced host resistance to severe influenza A…

6h

Conformational plasticity of the intracellular cavity of GPCR-G-protein complexes leads to G-protein promiscuity and selectivity [Medical Sciences]

While the dynamics of the intracellular surface in agonist-stimulated GPCRs is well studied, the impact of GPCR dynamics on G-protein selectivity remains unclear. Here, we combine molecular dynamics simulations with live-cell FRET and secondary messenger measurements, for 21 GPCR−G-protein combinations, to advance a dynamic model of the GPCR−G-protein interface. Our…

6h

Individual differences in visual salience vary along semantic dimensions [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

What determines where we look? Theories of attentional guidance hold that image features and task demands govern fixation behavior, while differences between observers are interpreted as a “noise-ceiling” that strictly limits predictability of fixations. However, recent twin studies suggest a genetic basis of gaze-trace similarity for a given stimulus. This…

6h

Fate plasticity and reprogramming in genetically distinct populations of Danio leucophores [Developmental Biology]

Understanding genetic and cellular bases of adult form remains a fundamental goal at the intersection of developmental and evolutionary biology. The skin pigment cells of vertebrates, derived from embryonic neural crest, are a useful system for elucidating mechanisms of fate specification, pattern formation, and how particular phenotypes impact organismal behavior…

6h

Analysis of phototoxin taste closely correlates nucleophilicity to type 1 phototoxicity [Neuroscience]

Pigments often inflict tissue-damaging and proaging toxicity on light illumination by generating free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the molecular mechanism by which organisms sense phototoxic pigments is unknown. Here, we discover that Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1-A isoform [TRPA1(A)], previously shown to serve as a receptor for…

6h

Gain-of-function mutations in a member of the Src family kinases cause autoinflammatory bone disease in mice and humans [Genetics]

Autoinflammatory syndromes are characterized by dysregulation of the innate immune response with subsequent episodes of acute spontaneous inflammation. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory bone disorder that presents with bone pain and localized swelling. Ali18 mice, isolated from a mutagenesis screen, exhibit a spontaneous inflammatory paw phenotype that…

6h

Adverse organogenesis and predisposed long-term metabolic syndrome from prenatal exposure to fine particulate matter [Agricultural Sciences]

Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) during pregnancy is associated with high risks of birth defects/fatality and adverse long-term postnatal health. However, limited mechanistic data are available to assess the detailed impacts of prenatal PM exposure. Here we evaluate fine PM exposure during pregnancy on prenatal/postnatal organogenesis in offspring and…

6h

Historical and genomic data reveal the influencing factors on global transmission velocity of plague during the Third Pandemic [Environmental Sciences]

Quantitative knowledge about which natural and anthropogenic factors influence the global spread of plague remains sparse. We estimated the worldwide spreading velocity of plague during the Third Pandemic, using more than 200 years of extensive human plague case records and genomic data, and analyzed the association of spatiotemporal environmental factors…

6h

Gene-edited stem cells enable CD33-directed immune therapy for myeloid malignancies [Medical Sciences]

Antigen-directed immunotherapies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), such as chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR-Ts) or antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), are associated with severe toxicities due to the lack of unique targetable antigens that can distinguish leukemic cells from normal myeloid cells or myeloid progenitors. Here, we present an approach to…

6h

Decadal trends in the ocean carbon sink [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Measurements show large decadal variability in the rate of CO2 accumulation in the atmosphere that is not driven by CO2 emissions. The decade of the 1990s experienced enhanced carbon accumulation in the atmosphere relative to emissions, while in the 2000s, the atmospheric growth rate slowed, even though emissions grew rapidly….

6h

Photocontrollable mononegaviruses [Microbiology]

Mononegaviruses are promising tools as oncolytic vectors and transgene delivery vectors for gene therapy and regenerative medicine. By using the Magnet proteins, which reversibly heterodimerize upon blue light illumination, photocontrollable mononegaviruses (measles and rabies viruses) were generated. The Magnet proteins were inserted into the flexible domain of viral polymerase, and…

6h

Human NK cell receptor KIR2DS4 detects a conserved bacterial epitope presented by HLA-C [Immunology and Inflammation]

Natural killer (NK) cells have an important role in immune defense against viruses and cancer. Activation of human NK cell cytotoxicity toward infected or tumor cells is regulated by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) that bind to human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I). Combinations of KIR with HLA-I are genetically…

6h

The long noncoding RNA Morrbid regulates CD8 T cells in response to viral infection [Immunology and Inflammation]

The transcriptional programs that regulate CD8 T-cell differentiation and function in the context of viral infections or tumor immune surveillance have been extensively studied; yet how long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and the loci that transcribe them contribute to the regulation of CD8 T cells during viral infections remains largely unexplored….

6h

Correction for Colon-Gonzalez at al., Limiting global-mean temperature increase to 1.5-2 {degrees}C could reduce the incidence and spatial spread of dengue fever in Latin America [Corrections]

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Correction for “Limiting global-mean temperature increase to 1.5–2 °C could reduce the incidence and spatial spread of dengue fever in Latin America,” by Felipe J. Colón-González, Ian Harris, Timothy J. Osborn, Christine Steiner São Bernardo, Carlos A. Peres, Paul R. Hunter, and Iain R. Lake, which…

6h

Motor primitives are determined in early development and are then robustly conserved into adulthood [Neuroscience]

Motor patterns in legged vertebrates show modularity in both young and adult animals, comprising motor synergies or primitives. Are such spinal modules observed in young mammals conserved into adulthood or altered? Conceivably, early circuit modules alter radically through experience and descending pathways’ activity. We analyze lumbar motor patterns of intact…

6h

PSD-95 binding dynamically regulates NLGN1 trafficking and function [Neuroscience]

PSD-95 is a scaffolding protein that regulates the synaptic localization of many receptors, channels, and signaling proteins. The NLGN gene family encodes single-pass transmembrane postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that are important for synapse assembly and function. At excitatory synapses, NLGN1 mediates transsynaptic binding with neurexin, a presynaptic cell adhesion molecule,…

6h

Correction for Kroger et al., Acquisition of a hybrid E/M state is essential for tumorigenicity of basal breast cancer cells [Corrections]

CELL BIOLOGY Correction for “Acquisition of a hybrid E/M state is essential for tumorigenicity of basal breast cancer cells,” by Cornelia Kröger, Alexander Afeyan, Jasmin Mraz, Elinor Ng Eaton, Ferenc Reinhardt, Yevgenia L. Khodor, Prathapan Thiru, Brian Bierie, Xin Ye, Christopher B. Burge, and Robert A. Weinberg, which was first…

6h

Mechanisms by which sialylated milk oligosaccharides impact bone biology in a gnotobiotic mouse model of infant undernutrition [Medical Sciences]

Undernutrition in children is a pressing global health problem, manifested in part by impaired linear growth (stunting). Current nutritional interventions have been largely ineffective in overcoming stunting, emphasizing the need to obtain better understanding of its underlying causes. Treating Bangladeshi children with severe acute malnutrition with therapeutic foods reduced plasma…

6h

Mechanistic evidence for tracking the seasonality of photosynthesis with solar-induced fluorescence [Environmental Sciences]

Northern hemisphere evergreen forests assimilate a significant fraction of global atmospheric CO2 but monitoring large-scale changes in gross primary production (GPP) in these systems is challenging. Recent advances in remote sensing allow the detection of solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) emission from vegetation, which has been empirically linked to GPP at…

6h

High sensitivity and interindividual variability in the response of the human circadian system to evening light [Neuroscience]

Before the invention of electric lighting, humans were primarily exposed to intense (>300 lux) or dim (<30 lux) environmental light—stimuli at extreme ends of the circadian system’s dose–response curve to light. Today, humans spend hours per day exposed to intermediate light intensities (30–300 lux), particularly in the evening. Interindividual differences…

6h

The emergence of the formal category “symmetry” in a new sign language [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Logical properties such as negation, implication, and symmetry, despite the fact that they are foundational and threaded through the vocabulary and syntax of known natural languages, pose a special problem for language learning. Their meanings are much harder to identify and isolate in the child’s everyday interaction with referents in…

6h

Historical roots of implicit bias in slavery [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Implicit racial bias remains widespread, even among individuals who explicitly reject prejudice. One reason for the persistence of implicit bias may be that it is maintained through structural and historical inequalities that change slowly. We investigated the historical persistence of implicit bias by comparing modern implicit bias with the proportion…

6h

SCFFBXO22 targets HDM2 for degradation and modulates breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis [Biochemistry]

Human homolog of mouse double minute 2 (HDM2) is an oncogene frequently overexpressed in cancers with poor prognosis, but mechanisms of controlling its abundance remain elusive. In an unbiased biochemical search, we discovered Skp1-Cullin 1-FBXO22-ROC1 (SCFFBXO22) as the most dominating HDM2 E3 ubiquitin ligase from human proteome. The results of…

6h

Correction for Beraki et al., Divergent kinase regulates membrane ultrastructure of the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole [Corrections]

MICROBIOLOGY Correction for “Divergent kinase regulates membrane ultrastructure of the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole,” by Tsebaot Beraki, Xiaoyu Hu, Malgorzata Broncel, Joanna C. Young, William J. O’Shaughnessy, Dominika Borek, Moritz Treeck, and Michael L. Reese, which was first published March 8, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1816161116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 6361–6370). The…

6h

TIMELESS mutation alters phase responsiveness and causes advanced sleep phase [Neuroscience]

Many components of the circadian molecular clock are conserved from flies to mammals; however, the role of mammalian Timeless remains ambiguous. Here, we report a mutation in the human TIMELESS (hTIM) gene that causes familial advanced sleep phase (FASP). Tim CRISPR mutant mice exhibit FASP with altered photic entrainment but…

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Profile of Mahzarin R. Banaji [Profiles]

Harvard University experimental social psychologist Mahzarin Banaji is on the frontlines of the “implicit revolution,” a paradigm shift in psychology that, since the 1980s, has been reconceiving the relationship between unconscious and conscious mental processes. Banaji and her colleague Anthony Greenwald applied the concept to social psychology via the intertwined…

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Music in premature infants enhances high-level cognitive brain networks [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Neonatal intensive care units are willing to apply environmental enrichment via music for preterm newborns. However, no evidence of an effect of music on preterm brain development has been reported to date. Using resting-state fMRI, we characterized a circuitry of interest consisting of three network modules interconnected by the salience…

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Humboldt’s Tableau Physique revisited [Ecology]

Alexander von Humboldt’s Tableau Physique (1807) has been one of the most influential diagrams in the history of environmental sciences. In particular, detailed observations of the altitudinal distribution of plant species in the equatorial Andes, depicted on a cross-section of Mt. Chimborazo, allowed Humboldt to establish the concept of vegetation…

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Evolution of global marine fishing fleets and the response of fished resources [Sustainability Science]

Previous reconstructions of marine fishing fleets have aggregated data without regard to the artisanal and industrial sectors. Engine power has often been estimated from subsets of the developed world, leading to inflated results. We disaggregated data into three sectors, artisanal (unpowered/powered) and industrial, and reconstructed the evolution of the fleet…

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Link to stress, health of whales might be in giant mouths

Whale researchers in New England believe they've found a new way to measure the amount of stress felt by whales when they experience traumas such as entanglements in fishing gear, and they say the technique could help protect the massive sea creatures from extinction.

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Study could improve fire monitoring in Brazilian savana

A study conducted by scientists from Brazil, the United States and Portugal investigated the accuracy and consistency of different satellite data collections with regard to the location and size of burned areas in the Cerrado biome, the Brazilian savanna.

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Kevin Durant’s Inessential Greatness

One afternoon last month, the Golden State Warriors’ star forward Kevin Durant spoke to reporters. The two-time defending champions had just blown a 31-point lead to the eighth-seeded Los Angeles Clippers, and the questions concerned strategy and morale. Durant touched on the team’s talent for ball movement and his belief that the difficulties were simply a hiccup. But the prime quote—and somethi

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Secure metropolitan quantum networks move a step closer

Successful new field tests of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) system over commercial fiber networks could pave the way to its use in metropolitan areas.

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Self-healing DNA nanostructures

DNA assembled into nanostructures such as tubes and origami-inspired shapes could someday find applications ranging from DNA computers to nanomedicine. However, these intriguing structures don't persist long in biological environments because of enzymes called nucleases that degrade DNA. Now, researchers have designed DNA nanostructures that can heal themselves in serum.

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Ancient DNA Yields Snapshots of Vanished Ecosystems

Somewhere in a remote cave in western Georgia, a few dozen miles east of the Black Sea shore, scientists on an archaeological dig were searching among scattered stalagmites for pieces of the past. Ancient bones were strewn about on the floor of the cave, but those held only mild interest for the team. Instead, they gathered buckets of sediment, on the hunt for ancient DNA. Ancient DNA, like that

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Link to stress, health of whales might be in giant mouths

Whale researchers in New England believe they've found a new way to measure the amount of stress felt by whales when they experience traumas such as entanglements in fishing gear, and they say the technique could help protect the massive sea creatures from extinction.

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Former Apple exec says he's 'really worried' about the firm's anti-competitive behavior

A former Apple exec said that the firm's increasing shift toward being a predominantly services-focused business raises some concerns around how it treats its competition.

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IEEE, a major science publisher, bans Huawei scientists from reviewing papers

Move prompted by U.S. trade sanctions against Chinese company

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Manuka honey to kill drug-resistant bacteria found in cystic fibrosis infections

Manuka honey could provide the key to a breakthrough treatment for cystic fibrosis patients following preliminary work by experts at Swansea University.

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ASCO 2019: Delays lead to late-stage diagosis of young people with colorectal cancer

Median 294 days passed between the first time patients noticed rectal bleeding and the time they were diagnosed. By the time of diagnosis, 37.8% of the patients were Stage IV.

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New research suggests sugar taxes and labeling are effective

Taxes on sugary products and labels on the front of packages can help reduce sugar consumption, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.The study, which included more than 3,500 people aged 13 and over on their purchasing behavior last spring, also found that taxes could have the greatest impact if 100% fruit juice was included in reduction efforts.

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Absorbable ‘bandage’ combines crab shell stuff and nanotech

A new bioabsorbable wound dressing builds on the proven blood-flow-stanching properties of chitosan. The new work harnesses the combined power of organic nanomaterials-based chemistry and chitosan, a natural product found in crustacean exoskeletons, to help bring emergency medicine one step closer to a viable solution for mitigating blood loss. Hemorrhage is a leading cause of death in traumatic

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Ava DuVernay Does True Crime Differently in When They See Us

The loss of innocence is a theme that writers can take entire novels to document . Ava DuVernay manages the same feat in fewer than eight minutes. That’s all the time it takes in When They See Us for five kids to tussle with parents over Yankees loyalty, cajole girlfriends into accompanying them to Kennedy Fried Chicken, and tell sisters about their audacious plans to make first trumpet in the sc

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What the Mueller Report Actually Said

Robert Mueller has advised Americans to go back and actually read his report if we want to understand what happened in 2016. “We chose those words carefully, and the work speaks for itself,” he said on Wednesday morning, speaking publicly for the first time since his appointment. But the words of the report are damning. “The Russian government interfered in the 2016 presidential election in sweep

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AI researchers in China want to keep the global-sharing culture alive

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01681-x Despite obstacles, such as an ongoing trade war between China and the United States, artificial-intelligence researchers are working to ensure they can collaborate internationally.

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So Tired: Doctors Can Now Diagnose You With Burnout

So Tired Big news: work-related burnout is now a medical condition recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO). In the recently-released 11th edition of the WHO’s handbook — the “ International Classification of Diseases — burnout is formally designated as “a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.” Recognition of the disord

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Astronomers Find Distant “Forbidden Planet” In “Neptunian Desert”

Rogue Planet An international team of astronomers says it’s discovered a rogue exoplanet three times the size of Earth — in an orbit that was thought to be impossible, meaning more Earth-like planets could be found hiding in nearby star systems. No exoplanets with gas atmospheres were previously thought be able to orbit this close to a star — a region known as the “Neptunian Desert” — as the gas

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'Fleet of UFOs' Followed US Aircraft, Navy Pilot Says

The mysterious objects first appeared after an aircraft radar upgrade.

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Trump Administration to Issue First Emissions Limits for Planes

Greenhouse gas contributions from air travel are expected to rapidly increase in the near future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A rose inspires smart way to collect and purify water

The rose may be one of the most iconic symbols of the fragility of love in popular culture, but now the flower could hold more than just symbolic value. A new device for collecting and purifying water, developed at The University of Texas at Austin, was inspired by a rose and, while more engineered than enchanted, is a dramatic improvement on current methods. Each flower-like structure costs less

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A Bit of Wildfire Isn't Necessarily a Bad Thing

For some species, it’s a threat, but for others, it’s essential — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brain scans reveal magic mushroom drug enhances mindfulness meditation

Both meditation and psychedelic drugs can lead to more self-awareness and serenity. Now a study has found that combining the two seems to magnify the effect

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Seeing disfigured faces prompts negative brain and behavior responses

A new study led by Penn Medicine researchers, which published today in Scientific Reports, found that people have implicit negative biases against people with disfigured faces, without knowingly harboring such biases.

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Study could improve fire monitoring in Brazilian savana

With the aim of enhancing the quality of Brazilian space research output, scientists investigated the accuracy of different satellite data collections.

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When drug treatment for social anxiety is insufficient

A Japanese study group clarified that cognitive therapy maintained its effects more than a year after the end of therapy for patients with a social anxiety disorder even for those who did not respond to antidepressant drugs.

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'Fettuccine' may be most obvious sign of life on Mars, researchers report

A rover scanning the surface of Mars for evidence of life might want to check for rocks that look like pasta, researchers report. The bacterium that controls the formation of such rocks on Earth is ancient and thrives in harsh environments that are similar to conditions on Mars, said a geology professor.

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Early humans deliberately recycled flint to create tiny, sharp tools

A new study finds that prehistoric humans 'recycled' discarded or broken flint tools 400,000 years ago to create small, sharp utensils with specific functions. The artifacts were discovered at the site of Qesem Cave, located just outside Tel Aviv.

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Coral reefs can't return from acid trip

When put to the test, corals and coralline algae are not able to acclimatize to ocean acidification.

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Death Stranding: Release date and other details of anticipated game revealed in live stream

The release date of Hideo Kojima's Death Stranding, perhaps the most anticipated game in the world, has finally been revealed.

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Extroverts enjoy four key advantages according to science; here they are

A new U of T study has for the first time outlined a few key advantages that extroverts enjoy in the workplace.

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‘I will feel actual rage.’ Unusual responses to kind touches could help explain autism traits

Touch that conveys social and emotional information may reveal how autism begins

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'Fettuccine' may be most obvious sign of life on Mars, researchers report

A rover scanning the surface of Mars for evidence of life might want to check for rocks that look like pasta, researchers report in the journal Astrobiology.

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Research reveals the link between primate knuckles and hand use

Research carried out by the University of Kent has found differences between the knuckle joints of primates that will enable a better understanding of ancient human hand use.

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Early humans deliberately recycled flint to create tiny, sharp tools

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that prehistoric humans "recycled" discarded or broken flint tools 400,000 years ago to create small, sharp utensils with specific functions. These recycled tools were then used with great precision and accuracy to perform specific tasks involved in the processing of animal products and vegetal materials.

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Kratom's reputed pain-relief benefits could come from one of its metabolites

Kratom is a Southeast Asian tree with a long history of use in traditional medicine. In the region, the plant's leaves are widely consumed for pain relief, treatment of opioid addiction and other uses. Though its efficacy and safety are unproven, kratom use has spread to the U.S. and Europe. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science that a metabolite of a kratom alkaloid could be responsible

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HGF-inhibitory macrocyclic peptide—mechanisms and potential cancer theranostics

Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) is a protein that acts as a cell growth factor. By binding to its receptor protein MET on the cell membrane, it exerts its physiological functions such as proliferation and migration of cells, as well as tissue repair and regeneration. For a cancer tissue however, since it promotes invasion and survival of cancer cells, it can play roles in cancer metastasis and acqu

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Research reveals the link between primate knuckles and hand use

Research carried out by the University of Kent has found differences between the knuckle joints of primates that will enable a better understanding of ancient human hand use.

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Secure metropolitan quantum networks move a step closer

Successful new field tests of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) system over commercial fiber networks could pave the way to its use in metropolitan areas.

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Ocean and space exploration blend at URI's Graduate School of Oceanography

Scientists with a NASA-led expedition are operating from the Inner Space Center at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography as colleagues explore the deep Pacific Ocean to prepare to search for life in deep space.

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Research reveals the link between primate knuckles and hand use

Research carried out by the University of Kent has found differences between the knuckle joints of primates that will enable a better understanding of ancient human hand use.Using samples from the Powell-Cotton Museum in Birchington-on-Sea (UK), as well as samples from Germany, Belgium and the USA, a team led by School of Anthropology and Conservation (SAC) PhD student Christopher Dunmore examined

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Secure metropolitan quantum networks move a step closer

Successful new field tests of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) system over commercial fiber networks could pave the way to its use in metropolitan areas.That is the key achievement from a joint team of Chinese scientists, published today in Quantum Science and Technology, which demonstrates CV-QKD transmission over commercial deployed fiber link with a distance of 50 kilomet

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Hands that see, eyes that feel? Brain study reveals the mathematics of identifying objects

From a child snapping Legos together to a pickpocket nabbing your wallet, our brains have a remarkable ability to spot new objects and figure out how to manipulate them. A new study suggests that the human brain requires only a tiny bit of information, as well as its previous experience, to accomplish this. These results explain the mental mathematics that enable us to easily know what a novel obj

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A Bit of Wildfire Isn't Necessarily a Bad Thing

For some species, it’s a threat, but for others, it’s essential — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Lyophilized Drug Product Development

In this webinar, learn about lyophilization, how it works, and how to develop a lyophilization process for drug products!

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The Future of Self-Driving Vehicle & Robot Delivery | Ford

submitted by /u/Professional-Dragon [link] [comments]

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Annual growth of photovoltaic capacity vs IEA predictions

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Fujitsu developing 'real quantum computer'

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Kratom's reputed pain-relief benefits could come from one of its metabolites

Kratom is a Southeast Asian tree with a long history of use in traditional medicine. In the region, the plant's leaves are widely consumed for pain relief, treatment of opioid addiction and other uses. Though its efficacy and safety are unproven, kratom use has spread to the U.S. and Europe. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science that a metabolite of a kratom alkaloid could be responsible

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New study details outcomes from long-term environmental justice partnership in East End

For the past 40 years, research has proven that people of color, low-income communities and ethnic minorities suffer the effects of environmental contamination more than other communities. The Flint, Mich., water crisis and the Dakota Pipeline protests serve as national examples of environmental injustices, but similar issues affect communities across the country.

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Farmers and food companies hit the dirt to improve soil health

Big food brands, such as Kellogg, Campbell, Mars Wrigley and General Mills, have started investing in their ingredients by helping farmers improve soil health and sustainability. Not only do these programs enable companies to reach their sustainability targets, they also help farmers cut costs, provide quality crops and improve stewardship of the land, according to an article in Chemical & Enginee

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Vaping is linked to adolescents' propensity for crime, study shows

A new study explores emerging drug use in the form of adolescent vaping and its association with delinquency among 8th and 10th grade students.

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Princeton Scientists: Mutations in “Junk” DNA Can Cause Autism

“Junk” DNA Approximately two percent of the human genome contains genes that tell our bodies how to make proteins. The rest is what’s called noncoding or “junk” DNA. But that’s something of a misnomer, because the extra DNA plays an important role: it controls where and when our genes make those proteins. Now, a Princeton University-led research team has found a way to use artificial intelligence

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Self-harm images on Instagram associated with subsequent self-harm in viewers

Research has documented the widespread availability of graphic images of self-harm, such as cuttings, on the photo-sharing platform Instagram. After a British father said his 14-year-old daughter had viewed such explicit images on Instagram prior to her suicide, the platform announced that it would no longer allow such graphic images to appear.

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Chemists develop nanoscale bioabsorbable wound dressing

Scientists at Texas A&M University are harnessing the combined power of organic nanomaterials-based chemistry and a natural product found in crustacean exoskeletons to help bring emergency medicine one step closer to a viable solution for mitigating blood loss, from the hospital to the battlefield.

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One night brand: Sexy snaps lead to clean buys

Sex sells—but not always what we think.

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Artificial intelligence boosts proteome research

Using artificial intelligence, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in making the mass analysis of proteins from any organism significantly faster than before and almost error-free. This new approach is set to spur a considerable change in the field of proteomics, as it can be applied in both basic and clinical research.

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HGF-inhibitory macrocyclic peptide—mechanisms and potential cancer theranostics

Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF) is a protein that acts as a cell growth factor. By binding to its receptor protein MET on the cell membrane, it exerts its physiological functions such as proliferation and migration of cells, as well as tissue repair and regeneration. For a cancer tissue however, since it promotes invasion and survival of cancer cells, it can play roles in cancer metastasis and acqu

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Microsoft envisions a modern Windows OS that seamlessly updates in the background

On Tuesday, Microsoft’s keynote at Computex revealed how the company is looking to adapt to new types of devices. As the industry continues to innovate with variants on the traditional PC and …

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Read Mueller’s First Public Comments on the Russia Investigation

On Wednesday morning, Special Counsel Robert Mueller made his first public comments about the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump. Mueller had stayed notably silent through the more than two years of his inquiry, never speaking on camera or publicly answering questions from reporters. “I hope and expect this to

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Artificial intelligence boosts proteome research

Using artificial intelligence, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in making the mass analysis of proteins from any organism significantly faster than before and almost error-free. This new approach is set to spur a considerable change in the field of proteomics, as it can be applied in both basic and clinical research.

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Ocean and space exploration blend at URI's Graduate School of Oceanography

Scientists with a NASA-led expedition are operating from the Inner Space Center at the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography as colleagues explore the deep Pacific Ocean to prepare to search for life in deep space.

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Let's clear the air

New research from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation, in partnership with the Kingsley Association and funded by the Heinz Endowments examined the impact that bottom-up, community-level initiatives have in addressing environmental justice issues. They found that the best way to address a community's environmental injustices is to

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Daily briefing: Japanese ocean-drilling ship gets deeper than ever before

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01706-5 But fails in its quest to reach the earthquake-generating zone. Plus: rethinking the impact factor and considering whether ‘data for good’ is really that good.

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NASA Just Got $125 Million to Develop Nuclear Rockets

Nuclear Launch For the first time since the 1970s, NASA is developing nuclear propulsion systems for its spacecraft. NASA didn’t request any money for a nuclear propulsion program, but it will get $125 million for the research as part of the space agency’s $22.3 billion budget that Congress approved last week, Space.com reports . If the program succeeds, nuclear propulsion could significantly cut

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The Moon That Got Away

This might offend some astronomers, but exoplanets are kind of old news. Over the course of two decades, telescope observations have pinpointed thousands of planets orbiting other stars across the cosmos. Some of these planets are as giant as Jupiter and smoldering hot. Others are more massive than Earth and covered in ice. A few reside in their solar system’s habitable zone, the not-too-hot, not

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Clarence Thomas Knows Nothing of My Work

In Tuesday’s ruling on Indiana’s abortion law, Justice Clarence Thomas took the national debate over the right to choose to a dark new place: eugenics. His 20-page concurring opinion included an extensive discussion of the eugenics movement of the early 20th century. Thomas argued that as the justices consider abortion going forward, they should pay more attention to its potential to become a “to

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Could some chimps' crustacean crave yield clues about human evolution?

Researchers report on chimpanzees in Guinea fishing and consuming freshwater crabs, something previously undiscovered. The article describes how this is a potential clue in explaining how our primarily fruit-eating ancestors began eating aquatic life, and supplementing their diet with nutrients critical for brain development.

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Energy drinks may increase risk of heart function abnormalities and blood pressure changes

Three to four hours after drinking 32 ounces of energy drinks, the heart's electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a placebo drink. Two different commercially available energy drinks produced the same results, suggesting that energy drinks as a class should be consumed with caution.

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New Nintendo Game Lets You Catch Pokémon by Sleeping

Gotta Catch All ‘Em Z’s In 2016, you couldn’t visit your local park or even cemetery without running across a group of Pokémon Go zombies slouched over their smartphones, trying to catch obscure virtual monsters. And now, the Pokémon Company is officially bringing the experience to your sleeping hours as well. Yes, the Nintendo-owned Japanese company announced “Pokémon Sleep” today . Details are

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Rude Uber riders could be booted from the app

Uber riders prone to rude behavior such as leaving trash or urging drivers to speed may be booted from the app under a policy change that took effect here Wednesday.

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Bose introduces new flagship noise-cancelling headphones

Bose's active noise cancellation tech has gone from strength to strength over the past few years, most recently culminating in its wire free and wildly popular Quiet Comfort 35s. The …

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Humans fueled last summer's deadly heat

Nexus Media News Why summer 2018 saw wildfires, power outages, and buckling roads and railways. Last summer, heat waves across the Northern Hemisphere sparked wildfires, desiccated crops, and left hundreds dead. Scientists say humans are to blame.

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'Fettuccine' may be most obvious sign of life on Mars, researchers report

A rover scanning the surface of Mars for evidence of life might want to check for rocks that look like pasta, researchers report in the journal Astrobiology. The bacterium that controls the formation of such rocks on Earth is ancient and thrives in harsh environments that are similar to conditions on Mars, said University of Illinois geology professor Bruce Fouke, who led the new, NASA-funded stud

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Russian scientists investigate new materials for Li-ion batteries of miniature sensors

Researchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) are developing new materials for solid-state thin-film Li-ion batteries for micro and nanodevices. The project is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (RScF). Part of the results obtained at the first stage of the project was published in the journal Coatings, MDPI.

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Early humans deliberately recycled flint to create tiny, sharp tools

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that prehistoric humans 'recycled' discarded or broken flint tools 400,000 years ago to create small, sharp utensils with specific functions. The artifacts were discovered at the site of Qesem Cave, located just outside Tel Aviv.

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Texas A&M chemists develop nanoscale bioabsorbable wound dressing

Scientists at Texas A&M University are harnessing the combined power of organic nanomaterials-based chemistry and a natural product found in crustacean exoskeletons to help bring emergency medicine one step closer to a viable solution for mitigating blood loss, from the hospital to the battlefield.

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New substance can form in the OA process of crystal growth, new study reveals

Chinese scientists from the Institute of Solid State Physics (ISSP) under the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science of the Chinese Academy of Scienceshave revealed that a new substance can form during the oriented attachment (OA) process of crystal growth, which may shed new light on the microscopic mechanism of crystal growth.

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Study examines youth suicides after '13 Reasons Why'

The popular Netflix series '13 Reasons Why' was controversial for its portrayal of the suicide of a 17-year-old girl. This study, called a time series analysis, used suicide data before and after the show's release in 2017 to estimate suicides among different age groups (10 to 19, 20 to 29, and 30 or older for females and males in the US) and to identify changes in the specific methods of suicide

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Does Thirst Start in the Mouth or the Gut?

A new study in mice reveals why consuming a beverage is usually pleasurable but is not always enough to quench thirst — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Climate driving new right whale movement

New research connects recent changes in the movement of North Atlantic right whales to decreased food availability and rising temperatures in Gulf of Maine's deep waters. Right whales have been showing up in unexpected places in recent years, putting the endangered species at increased risk. The study provides insights to this key issue complicating conservation efforts.

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Klimalov, havvind og jordreform: Socialdemokratiet lægger et-årsplan for klimaet

Socialdemokratiet lover at igangsætte en lang række klima-projekter i den nye regerings første leveår, hvis partiet overtager nøglerne til Statsministeriet den 5. juni.

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Roman amphitheaters act like seismic invisibility cloaks

The discovery may explain how these buildings have survived for so long in earthquake zones.

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Extroverts enjoy four key advantages according to science; here they are

Researchers have determined that extroverts enjoy four key advantages over their more introverted peers.

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Farmers and food companies hit the dirt to improve soil health

Big food brands, such as Kellogg, Campbell, Mars Wrigley and General Mills, have started investing in their ingredients by helping farmers improve soil health and sustainability. Not only do these programs enable companies to reach their sustainability targets, they also help farmers cut costs, provide quality crops and improve stewardship of the land, according to an article in Chemical & Enginee

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Study helps develop new treatment option for multi-drug resistant infections

A new study, published in 'Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy' conducted by a University of Liverpool led research consortium, has helped develop a new treatment option for some multi-drug resistant (MDR) infections.

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Kratom's reputed pain-relief benefits could come from one of its metabolites

Kratom is a Southeast Asian tree with a long history of use in traditional medicine. In the region, the plant's leaves are widely consumed for pain relief, treatment of opioid addiction and other uses. Though its efficacy and safety are unproven, kratom use has spread to the US and Europe. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science that a metabolite of a kratom alkaloid could be responsible fo

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Chimpanzees catch and eat crabs

Chimpanzees have a mainly vegetarian diet, but do occasionally eat meat. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown for the first time that chimpanzees also eat crabs. In the rainforest of Guinea, the researchers observed how chimpanzees regularly fish for crabs.

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Cognitive behavior therapy shown to improve multiple menopause symptoms

Although hormone therapy (HT) is the most commonly recommended treatment for menopause symptoms, research is ongoing for alternatives, especially nonpharmacologic options. Cognitive behavior therapy has previously been proposed as a low-risk treatment for hot flashes, but a new study suggests it may also effectively manage other menopause symptoms. Results are published online today in Menopause,

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Genomics institute to close world-leading animal facility

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01685-7 Sanger’s decision prompts questions among some scientists, who fear the UK centre could fall behind.

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Does Thirst Start in the Mouth or the Gut?

A new study in mice reveals why consuming a beverage is usually pleasurable but is not always enough to quench thirst — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New substance can form in the oriented attachment process of crystal growth, study reveals

Chinese scientists have revealed that a new substance can form during the oriented attachment (OA) process of crystal growth, which may shed new light on the microscopic mechanism of crystal growth.

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Atomic engineering with electric irradiation

Atomic engineering can selectively induce specific dynamics on single atoms followed by combined steps to form large-scale assemblies thereafter. In a new study now published in Science Advances, Cong Su and an international, interdisciplinary team of scientists in the departments of Materials Science, Electronics, Physics, Nanoscience and Optoelectronic technology; first surveyed the single-step

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Does Thirst Start in the Mouth or the Gut?

A new study in mice reveals why consuming a beverage is usually pleasurable but is not always enough to quench thirst — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Watch Robert Mueller’s Statement on the Russia Investigation

Special counsel Robert Mueller is making his first public remarks since the release of his report in April.

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How to deconstruct racism, one headline at a time | Baratunde Thurston

Baratunde Thurston explores the phenomenon of white Americans calling the police on black Americans who have committed the crimes of … eating, walking or generally "living while black." In this profound, thought-provoking and often hilarious talk, he reveals the power of language to change stories of trauma into stories of healing — while challenging us all to level up.

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Striped maple trees can swap sexes

Striped maple trees can change sex from year to year, research finds. A tree may be male one year and female the next, and while male trees grow more, female trees are more likely to die. More than 90 percent of flowering plant species combine both sexes in one plant. In the less than 10 percent of species where female and male flowers exist on separate plants, they typically remain female or mal

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How Two Paralyzed Patients Walked Again Without Surgery

Just a decade ago, the Walk Again Project was a blue sky, Hail Mary moonshot at total neural rehab for those paralyzed. The project, a collaboration among fearless neuroengineers, has the lofty goal of giving patients with spinal cord injuries their dignity, autonomy, and lives back in full. Perhaps a testament to the team’s successes—beyond wildest imagination—is just how mundane brain-machine i

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When the U.S. Constitution Is the Source Material for Your One-Woman Play

Heidi Schreck’s What the Constitution Means to Me is, on paper, quite a sloppy Broadway show. It begins with Schreck recounting her adolescent experiences competing in the American Legion’s Oratorical Contest , where high-school students give speeches on the U.S. Constitution (the prize money helped pay for her college education). As she reenacts her younger self’s presentation, Schreck steps out

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A research study analyzes employment hiring practices in Europe

It is calculated that in Europe at present, 19 million people are children of immigrants, 6 million of whom have parents who were born outside the EU. In Spain, nearly 1 in 4 young people under the age of 18 have foreign-born parents. Many of these "new Europeans" are now joining the labor force. One of the questions that the researchers posed is if they are doing so in the same conditions of equa

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NASA’s New Goal: A “Robust Economy” of Orbital Space Habitats

Robust Low-Earth Orbit Economy NASA asked 12 spaceflight companies, including Blue Origin and Boeing, to study the future of commercial spaceflight in space — a bid to build a “robust low-Earth orbit economy” without relying on government-funding. The companies assessed what habitable platforms in space could look like, and found that in-space research laboratories, manufacturing, entertainment,

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Flipboard Database Leaked Usernames And Passwords

It’s not uncommon for online services to get infiltrated which results in the username and passwords of countless users being compromised. That is precisely what has happened with Flipboard. …

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Analyzing a protein from the cerebrospinal fluid will help diagnose patients with prion diseases

Recently, a study published in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry demonstrates that very high levels of neurogranin in the cerebrospinal fluid can be detected in human patients that suffer from prion diseases.

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Antibiotic alternative scores well in second round of swine trials

Travelling can be stressful experience—whether it be to a vacation spot or business destination. The stress of travel also extends to piglets, such as when they're weaned from their mothers and transported to nursery barns.

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Greater transparency needed over lobbyist influence on UK renewable energy schemes

Greater transparency is needed to understand the influence of lobbyists when delivering crucial renewable energy schemes in the UK, new research has claimed.

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Clean air taxis cut pollution in New York City, study finds

New York City Clean Air Taxi rules are successful in cutting emissions and reducing air pollution, according to a new study by researchers at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Drexel University. Between 2009 and 2015, the legislation more than doubled the fuel efficiency of the fleet of 13,500 yellow taxis, leading to estimated declines in air pollution emissions. The fin

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Fra gylle til gas: Nyt biogas-anlæg i Esbjerg kan være verdens største

Et nyt, enormt anlæg øger den danske biogas-produktion med op mod syv procent. Anlægget er muligvis verdens største, men det går direktøren ikke op i.

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Antibiotic alternative scores well in second round of swine trials

Travelling can be stressful experience—whether it be to a vacation spot or business destination. The stress of travel also extends to piglets, such as when they're weaned from their mothers and transported to nursery barns.

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The New CRISPR Tool That Could ‘Delete’ Disease From Our DNA

submitted by /u/CodePerfect [link] [comments]

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Hungary to Build $1 Billion Green-Powered Town From Scratch

submitted by /u/ValuableJackfruit [link] [comments]

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Justin Amash and the Moral Minority

On Tuesday, Representative Justin Amash faced his constituents for the first time since becoming the only congressional Republican to urge Donald Trump’s impeachment. For two hours, he stood at the front of a high-school auditorium in Grand Rapids, Michigan, taking comments and questions from a divided crowd. A majority of those present joined a standing ovation after one constituent declared, “I

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'Loser effect' evolves separate from fighting ability in animals

The 'loser effect' — which causes animals to shy away from violence after losing a fight — evolves independently of any change in fighting ability, new research suggests.

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NASA is running a competition to figure out how to settle the galaxy

You have 80 million years, a fleet of starships, and a galaxy to colonise: Go! That’s the problem astrophysicists face in a NASA challenge to settle the stars

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Should you give your data to a period tracker or smart breast pump?

Health tech firms believe that women are a lucrative and untapped market, but are these products worth the privacy costs?

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The Trump Administration Has Attacked Science 100 Times…and Counting

That’s more than any administration since the Union of Concerned Scientists started tracking — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Team guides plants towards obtaining iron

A team at the University of Cordoba has examined the link between the presence of beneficial organisms in plant roots to their response to iron deficiency.

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The grammar of cell development branching time

One of the greatest achievements of science in recent years is the technology for obtaining information about thousands of individual cells extracted from an organism. This technology includes the so-called 'omics' for individual cells (genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics), which give us the data about the genomes of thousands of single cells, the state and activity of various genes

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More safe havens for native plants and animals needed in New South Wales' west

Location matters for species struggling to survive under a changing climate. A new study led by Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, has found we need to provide more safe havens for wildlife and plant species to survive under climate change in New South Wales' west.

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HGF-inhibitory macrocyclic peptide — mechanisms and potential cancer theranostics

Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is involved in cancer progression through MET receptor signaling. Here, HiP-8, a 12 amino-acid macrocyclic peptide, was identified to selectively recognize active HGF. Biochemical analysis and high-speed AFM demonstrated HiP-8 restricted dynamic domains of HGF, resulting in allosteric inhibition. Positron emission tomography using radiotracer HiP-8 enabled noninvasiv

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Greater transparency needed over lobbyist influence on UK renewable energy schemes

Greater transparency is needed to understand the influence of lobbyists when delivering crucial renewable energy schemes in the UK, new research has claimed.

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Researchers standardise test for predicting transplant rejection

Researchers from The Westmead Institute for Medical Research have developed a standardised method of measuring the immune response in islet transplant recipients, helping predict patient outcomes.

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Coral reefs can't return from acid trip

When put to the test, corals and coralline algae are not able to acclimatise to ocean acidification.

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Cycling lanes, not cyclists, reduce fatalities for all road users

The most comprehensive study of bicycle and road safety to date finds that building safe facilities for cyclists is one of the biggest factors in road safety for everyone. Bicycling infrastructure — specifically, separated and protected bike lanes — leads to fewer fatalities and better road-safety outcomes for all road users. New study published in Journal of Transport & Health.

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Flow water research and education more towards developing world: UN University

Post-secondary education and research aimed at tackling the global water crisis is concentrated in wealthy countries rather than the poorer, developing places where it is most needed, the United Nations University says.Two new papers from the UNU's Canadian-based Institute for Water, Environment and Health call for reducing this 'alarming' imbalance between resources and need, which impedes the se

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Clean air taxis cut pollution in New York City: Study

New York City Clean Air Taxi rules are successful in cutting emissions and reducing air pollution, according to a new study by researchers at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Drexel University. Between 2009 and 2015, the legislation more than doubled the fuel efficiency of the fleet of 13,500 yellow taxis, leading to estimated declines in air pollution emissions. The fin

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Team guides plants towards obtaining iron

A team at the University of Cordoba has examined the link between the presence of beneficial organisms in plant roots to their response to iron deficiency.

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Stigende interesse for lægemiddelallergi

EAACI har oprettet både en interessegruppe og to taskforcer. Men arrangementer om lægemiddelallergi har fortsat en beskeden plads i EAACI-programmet.

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Tid til opdatering af guidelines om fødevareallergi

Professor Susanne Halken selvskreven til arbejdet i kraft af hendes centrale placering som deltager i de arbejdsgrupper, der har udformet EAACIs guidelines for allergen immunterapi og for fødevareallergi.

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Dansk EAACI-veteran i ny rolle

Professor Lars K. Poulsen kan efter mange års arbejde for EAACI nu giver stafetten videre – og give sig selv mulighed for at lytte og lære.

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ORCA har skruet ned for bidrag til EAACI

Eliteforskningscentret ORCA på Odense Universitetshospital bidrager til årets EAACI især med allerede færdiggjorte projekter.

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EAACI jagter målrettet behandling

De tusinder af proteiner, som er allergener, er i sidste ende afgørende at udvikle præcisionsmedicin og personificeret behandling.

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Professor: EAACI bringer mig på forkant

For Jeanne Duus Johansen er årets EAACI-kongres det forum, hvor hun forventer at blive opdateret på den internationale udvikling på på allergiområdet.

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Striped maple trees often change sexes, with females more likely to die

Although pollen has covered cars for weeks and allergy sufferers have been sneezing, we think of sex as being the realm of animals. But plant sex can be quite interesting, especially in species …

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In Yemen Conflict, Some See A New Age Of Drone Warfare

Iran has been developing drones for both itself and its proxies. In recent months those drones have been used for targeted assassinations, military strikes and to sow chaos in the region. (Image credit: Iranian Army via AP)

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A student's disability status depends on where they go to school

A new study suggests that the likelihood of a child being classified with an educational disability depends on the characteristics of their school and how distinctive they are from their peers.

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Long-term health effects of armed conflict could last years after bombs stop falling

Living in a warzone is linked with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke among civilians, even years after the conflict ends, a study has found.

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Natural Product Artifacts

Like many organic chemists, I find natural products very interesting, since their structures are often things that I would never imagine making (and in some cases have trouble imagining how to make at all!) But there’s a feature of the literature in that area that not everyone appreciates: the fact that a reasonable number of structures are, in fact, artifacts. That’s reviewed in this article . T

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Watch: Chimpanzees fish for tiny crabs to eat

Chimpanzees, beyond their mainly vegetarian diet and the occasional meat, also eat crabs, according to new research. In the rainforest of Guinea, the researchers observed for the first time how chimpanzees regularly fish for crabs. “Our study is the first evidence showing that non-human apes regularly catch and eat aquatic fauna,” says Kathelijne Koops, researcher in the anthropology department a

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Spring into Action on National Senior Health & Fitness Day!

If you were looking for a reason to start your day with pep in your step, look no further because today is the 26th annual Senior Health & Fitness Day! Join more than 120,000 older adults at over 1,200 participating locations embracing the benefits of physical activity and celebrating Older Americans Month . Photo: Shutterstock The benefits of exercise are many-fold: it can boost mood and reduce

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The Secret to Soap Bubbles' Iridescent Rainbows

The interaction of light reflecting off the front and back of a soap bubble gives it its colorful appearance. A similar effect explains color-shifting cars.

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Taking aim, preparing for landing

Orbiting craft keeps a weather eye on next Mars mission landing spot.

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Health worker shortage pushes India towards crisis

New data reveals the country has well below the recommended level of professionals, prompting concerns. Biplab Das reports.

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Stars expelled two-by-two

Chandra data reveals binary stars blasted from galaxies after supernovae. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Compostable food packaging may contaminate compost

US research flags presence of potentially hazardous substances leaching from takeaway containers. Andrew Masterson reports.

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The Trump Administration Has Attacked Science 100 Times…and Counting

That’s more than any administration since the Union of Concerned Scientists started tracking — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Striped maple trees often change sexes, with females more likely to die

Although pollen has covered cars for weeks and allergy sufferers have been sneezing, we think of sex as being the realm of animals. But plant sex can be quite interesting, especially in species that can have male or female flowers. Researchers have now found that striped maple trees can change sex from year to year.

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Recovery twice as hard for survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

The cardiorespiratory fitness of survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is 22% worse than that general Canadian population,and genetics might play a role, an UdeM researcher finds.

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Artificial intelligence boosts proteome research

Using artificial intelligence, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have succeeded in making the mass analysis of proteins from any organism significantly faster than before and almost error-free. This new approach is set to provoke a considerable change in the field of proteomics, as it can be applied in both basic and clinical research.

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Lifting the lid on bladder cancer support

Bladder cancer is a painful and sometimes life-threatening condition that patients can find difficult to talk about, with many becoming homebound as they cope with debilitating side effects such as incontinence. As with prostate and other male cancers, the majority of support and care is taken by the wife, spouse or an immediate family member. The responsibility and burden of the couple's combined

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More isn't better when it comes to evaluating chest pain

New and more effective tests are needed to help predict heart attacks and other major cardiac events in patients with chest pain, the second most common reason for emergency department visits in the US.

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Childhood trauma boosts risk of later tooth loss

Trauma early in life causes greater risk for tooth loss later on, according to new research. Haena Lee, a postdoctoral researcher at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, assessed the impact of adverse childhood events on oral health—specifically, total tooth loss—later in life. These events included childhood trauma, abuse, and, to a lesser extent, smoking. “The signif

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Famous unsolved math problem sees new progress

A new paper suggests that one of the many proposed solutions to the most famous open problem in mathematics—the Riemann Hypothesis—is unexpectedly practical. “In a surprisingly short proof, we’ve shown that an old, abandoned approach to the Riemann Hypothesis should not have been forgotten,” says Ken Ono, a number theorist at Emory University and coauthor of the paper in PNAS . A commentary on th

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Powerful Tornadoes Rip Through Midwest, the Plains, Leaving Trail of Destruction

A destructive tornado moved through the outskirts of Kansas City on Tuesday, injuring at least a dozen people and killing one.

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Why does my iPhone screen crack so easily and what should I do now?

From his perch at Jet City Device Repair in Chicago, store manager Neal Dexter wants you to know something about broken phones: It's not you.

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2-timers glukoseværdi er en stærk markør for hjertekarsygdomme

Prædiabetikere, der har normaliseret deres 2-timers glukoseværdi, har halveret risikoen for at udvikle hjertekarsygdomme, viser nyt studie. Forsker bag studiet kalder det bemærkelsesværdigt, mens overlæge tvivler på dets betydning.

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Healthy fat hidden in dirt may fend off anxiety disorders

Thirty years after scientists first suggested that increased exposure to microorganisms could benefit health, CU Boulder researchers have identified an anti-inflammatory fat in a soil-dwelling bacterium that may be partly responsible. Someday, they hope to use it to develop an immunization against stress-related disorders.

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Researchers explore the epigenetics of daytime sleepiness

A new, multi-ethnic study led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital explores associations between daytime sleepiness and epigenetic modifications — measurable, chemical changes that may be influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. The team finds tantalizing clues about Excessive Daytime Sleepiness, laying a foundation for larger scale studies of diverse populations.

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One night brand: Sexy snaps lead to clean buys

New research by Monash University in Australia shows that highly sexualised imagery in advertising causes some consumers to feel 'physically dirty' and motivates them to buy products such as toothpaste, soap and face wash.

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Review: Acer's portable projector brings a big picture in a tiny footprint

I don't play with projectors very much, so it's a real treat when I get one to review.

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The Science Behind an Anaconda’s “Virgin Birth”

My Anaconda Scientists at the New England Aquarium confirmed last week that one of their anacondas named Anna gave birth via parthenogenesis. That is to say it had a sort of “virgin birth,” in which it produced offspring without ever having mated. It’s the second case of successful anaconda parthenogenesis, according to the The Washington Post, a genetic quirk where an egg cell clones itself, rep

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Educational success among children of similar cognitive ability depends on their background

Britain's got talent—but we're still wasting it. That's the main finding of a new report by researchers from Oxford University published today.

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On-demand, photonic entanglement synthesizer

Quantum information protocols are based on a variety of entanglement modes such as Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR), Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) and other cluster states. For on-demand preparation, these states can be realized with squeezed light sources in optics, but such experiments lack versatility as they require a variety of optical circuits to individually realize diverse states of entan

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Toxic runoff from Tijuana River invades Imperial Beach

The southern shoreline of Imperial Beach has been closed since November due to water pollution spilling over the border from Mexico—including about 110 million gallons of toxic stormwater runoff in the last two months.

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Københavns Universitet åbner nyt forskningscenter, der skal forudsige hvornår klimaet løber løbsk

I dag kan vores klimamodeller ikke forudsige pludselige og voldsomme ændringer i klimaet –…

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11 gross animals you can eat in a survival situation

DIY These meats might not be appetizing, but they sure beat the heck out of starving. Just thinking about biting into a crispy cricket activates my gag reflex. But all that can change when you find yourself starving in a survival situation. No matter if…

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New compounds could be used to treat autoimmune disorders

In autoimmune disorders, the body's defense system erroneously attacks normal cells, leading to serious health problems. Researchers have developed new molecules that potentially could be used to treat many of these conditions.

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All ears: Genetic bases of mammalian inner ear evolution

Mammals have also a remarkable capacity in their sense of hearing, from the high-frequency echolocation calls of bats to low frequency whale songs. Assuming that these adaptations have a root genetic cause, a team of scientists has identified two new genes involved in hearing.

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Why parents should teach their kids to give

Teaching children how to appropriately give money away can help them develop valuable financial skills such as budgeting, and it may also contribute to their well-being later in life, according to a new study.

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Does being seen really make cyclists safer on the road?

Researchers have determined motorists tended to give cyclists wearing high-visibility vests more room on the road, compared to cyclists without high-visibility clothing. The vests, with arrows directing traffic away from pedestrians and cyclists, have shown to reduce the number of traffic accidents involving these groups.

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Light at night is harmful for amphibians, new research shows

Light at night might be convenient for humans, but it's having a detrimental effect on amphibian populations, according to new research.

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How interval training affects 'belly fat' in obese 70-year-olds

Researchers have designed a study to learn more about the effects of a 10-week, easy-to-perform, personalized, progressive vigorous-intensity interval training among 70-year-olds with 'belly fat.'

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Does your health in middle age predict how healthy you'll be later in life?

In a new study, researchers identified factors associated with brain health in middle age in order to identify ways to preserve brain function when people are older.

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High sugar levels during pregnancy could lead to childhood obesity

The children of women who have high glucose blood levels during pregnancy, even if their mothers are not diagnosed with gestational diabetes, are at an increased risk of developing obesity in childhood, according to a new study.

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Laurie Abraham and Thomas Gebremedhin Join The Atlantic as Senior Editors

May 29, 2019 (Washington, D.C.)— The Atlantic today announced two new senior editors joining the staff of the print magazine: Laurie Abraham and Thomas Gebremedhin. Abraham, currently executive features editor at New York magazine, and Gebremedhin, who joins The Atlantic from WSJ Magazine , where he was culture editor, will both expand the range of stories and subjects covered across the magazine

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Study: People who use food banks live in substandard and unaffordable homes

Once relatively unheard of in the UK, the number of food banks has grown dramatically in recent years. The Trussell Trust, which runs the country's largest network of food banks, saw the number of food parcels it distributed increase from 61,500 in 2010-11 to 1.33m by 2017-18—a 21-fold increase.

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The University of Cordoba guides plants towards obtaining iron

A team at the University of Cordoba relates the presence of beneficial organisms in plant roots to their response to iron deficiency.

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Study sheds new light on the harms of air pollution

A new University at Buffalo study based on levels before, during and after the Beijing Olympics reveals how air pollution affects the human body at the level of metabolites. Researchers found that 69 metabolites changed significantly when air pollution changed.

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Researchers identify new roles for common oncogene MYC

Cancer researchers have discovered surprising new functions for a protein called MYC, a powerful oncogene that is estimated to drive the development of almost half a million new cancer cases in the US every year. The study, which will be published May 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that MYC affects the efficiency and quality of protein production in lymphoma cells, fueling their

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Self-harm images on Instagram associated with subsequent self-harm in viewers

Instagram and self-harm: An analysis of a two-wave survey of 729 young adults in the U.S. finds that those who reported seeing self-harm images on Instagram were much more likely than those who didn't to report their own self-harm at a second interview. Exposure to self-harm images also predicted higher levels of suicidal ideation and risk for suicide at the second interview.

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Better social skills in pigs found to result in reduced length of rank fights

A small team of researchers from Scotland's Rural College, the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna and Queens University in the U.K., has found that better social skills in pigs lead to shorter rank fights. They have published a paper in Royal Society Open Science describing experiments they conducted with domesticated pigs and what they found.

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Apple's iPhone sales slump while China's Huawei gains

Apple's biggest cash cow, the iPhone, continued to suffer weaker sales around the world in first quarter of the year as Chinese tech giant Huawei flexed its muscles and claimed more market share from Apple and its longtime rival, Samsung.

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Experts develop nanolasers on silicon

Researchers at Cardiff University have shown tiny light-emitting nanolasers less than a tenth of the size of the width of a human hair can be integrated into silicon chip design.

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Better social skills in pigs found to result in reduced length of rank fights

A small team of researchers from Scotland's Rural College, the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna and Queens University in the U.K., has found that better social skills in pigs lead to shorter rank fights. They have published a paper in Royal Society Open Science describing experiments they conducted with domesticated pigs and what they found.

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Voksne diabetikere kan nu få udleveret flash glukosemålere

Nye retningslinjer anbefaler, at voksne med dårligt reguleret type 1-diabetes skal tilbydes en flash glukosemåler. Kun et skridt i den rigtige retning og stadig udtryk for forskelsbehandling, lyder kritikken. Der ikke evidens nok, siger Danske Regioner.

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To læger frikendt for uagtsomt manddrab

To læger er ved Retten i Lyngby blevet frikendt for uagtsomt manddrab, efter at en kvinde døde 1. januar 2016 få timer efter sit andet opkald til 1813. Begge læger skal dog betale 5000 kr. i bøde for at have overtrådt autorisationsloven.

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Mirza udvalgt til at præsentere banebrydende forskning om ovariecancer

Overlæge på Rigshospitalet Mansoor Raza Mirza er udvalgt som ‘Best of ASCO’. Han glæder sig til at præsentere sit studie på kongressen, der ellers ikke byder på de største nyheder inden for gynækologisk kræft.

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Ladekarl: ASCO giver mig et fagligt boost

Professor Morten Ladekarl fra Aalborg Universitetshospital bruger ASCO til at blive opdateret på kommende behandlingsmetoder. Personlig medicin vil især fylde i hans program i år.

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ASCO giver læge ekstra blod på tanden til forskning

Netværket er vigtigt for læge Caroline Brenner Thomsen, når hun er på ASCO. Derudover bruger hun kongressen til at fremme lysten til at fortsætte med at forske ved siden at uddannelsen til speciallæge.

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ASCO-debutant: »Det er jo kæmpestort, hvad jeg kan forstå«

Læge Edina Dizdarevic skal på ASCO for første gang, og hun skal præsentere en poster om rectumcancer. Hun håber på at få et fagligt indspark og finde nye samarbejdspartnere.

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Afdelingslæge: ASCO gør mig skarpere

Trine Heide Øllegaard nyder, at hun på ASCO har tid til de faglige diskussioner med kollegerne om nye data, og hvordan det kan forbedre det daglige arbejde.

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Kroman: Der er mødepligt på ASCO

ASCO har det med at oversælge sin forskning, men der er mødepligt for cheflæge Niels Kroman fra Kræftens Bekæmpelse – i Chicago bliver han opdateret på de store kræftområder.

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Johansen: Der er en helt særlig stemning

For første gang i 10 år, skal professor Christoffer Johansen til ASCO, hvor han forventer at hente inspiration til kommende studier. Læs også hans daglige blog i Dagens Medicin.

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A leap into the continuum

Computing the dynamics of many interacting quantum particles accurately is a daunting task. There is however a promising calculation method for such systems: tensor networks, which are being researched in the theory division at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics. The initial focus of tensor network was on quantum particles restricted to a lattice, just as they occur in crystals for example

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A wind tunnel designed to simulate the dusty surface of Mars

Part of Aarhus University's Mars Simulation Laboratory in Denmark, this wind tunnel has been specially designed to simulate the dusty surface of planet Mars.

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Record-breaking chaotic data transmission

Engineers in China have used a chaos-based system to pipe data securely through a fibre-optic at a rate of 1.25. gigabits per second across a distance of 143 kilometres.

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Photometric observations detect 28 new variable stars in NGC 4147

Using the Devasthal optical telescope in India, astronomers have conducted photometric observations of the globular cluster NGC 4147. The observational campaign yielded the discovery of 28 new variable stars in this cluster. The findings are detailed in a paper published May 20 on the arXiv pre-print server.

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Is China's social credit system coming to Australia?

Privacy was not a hot topic in the recent Australian election, but it should have been. This is because the City of Darwin is adapting elements of the Chinese social credit system for use in Australia. The Chinese system's monitoring of citizens' behaviour has been widely condemned as "Orwellian", with frequent comparisons to the dystopian near-future sci-fi of Black Mirror. But for Australians it

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New organic flow battery brings decomposing molecules back to life

After years of working on an organic aqueous flow battery, researchers found that their ground-breaking, organic anthraquinone molecules were decomposing over time, reducing the long-term usefulness of the battery. Now, the researchers have not only learned how the molecules are decomposing but also how to reverse it. The team's rejuvenation method cuts the capacity fade rate of the battery a fact

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Societal values and perceptions shape energy production and use as much as new technology

Societal values and perceptions have shaped the energy landscape as much as the technologies that drive its production and consumption, a new article suggests.

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Children from disadvantaged backgrounds do less vigorous physical activity

Children from disadvantaged backgrounds and certain ethnic minority backgrounds in the United Kingdom have lower levels of vigorous physical activity, according to researchers.

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New tool for understanding cells in health and disease

A new analysis platform called CellBench is helping to interpret large biological datasets from single-cell studies. Accurately interpreting these complex datasets is crucial for understanding the role cells play in health and disease. The ability to identify and define each cell and its activity will ultimately help in the development of new therapies.

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Iconic Australian working dog may not be part dingo after all

Researchers have found no genetic evidence that the iconic Australian kelpie shares canine ancestry with a dingo, despite Australian bush myth.

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Thirty years after anorexia onset, fewer ill than healthy

A study that started in 1985 in Gothenburg, Sweden, followed some 50 people who had become anorexic in their teens. It shows that 30 years later, the majority were healthy but some had persistent eating disorders.

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Are Elon Musk and SpaceX about to ruin our view of the night sky?

Already, the first 60 of SpaceX's planned 12,000 internet-delivery satellites have appeared as a decidedly unnatural string of lights in the night sky. Scientists worry the company's plan to ring Earth with orbiting "Starlink" devices will wreck our view of the cosmos.

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Freak mud flows threaten our water supplies, and climate change is raising the risk

Slurries of mud increasingly threaten the water we drink. This rush of sediment, known as "debris flow," is a type of erosion where mud and boulders in steep catchments suddenly tumble down the stream channel, often traveling at speeds of several meters per second.

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Metro til Vestegnen bliver ikke sat i gang de næste tolv år

Mens borgmestrene i Rødovre og Hvidovre håber, at København vil bygge metro ud på Vestegnen, ser det ikke ud til, at pengene kan findes nogle steder foreløbigt.

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The biotechnologists making their mark on the international stage

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01693-7 Nature meets five scientists working in non-Western nations.

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Fraud probe targets top Porsche bosses: report

Three top executives at Volkswagen subsidiary Porsche including chief Oliver Blume are under investigation over alleged excessive payments to a former works council leader, according to a Wednesday media report.

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Why a deadly shadow hangs over Everest summit

As the return of cloud and frozen hurricane-force winds seal off Mount Everest for another year, questions are being asked about how to police the world's highest peak after the deadliest climbing season in years.

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Why do top executives leave companies? It's personal, study finds

In a new study, researchers at the University of Missouri have called attention to the importance of several types of disruptive events that contribute to top executives leaving companies.

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Why Godzilla is the perfect monster for our age of environmental destruction

The monsters that stalk us in popular culture embody fears about our contemporary human condition. As a new Godzilla film opens in cinemas this week, we might gain insight into what currently haunts us most.

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To save the African elephant, focus must turn to poverty and corruption

African elephants are threatened with extinction. With numbers shrinking by a third in just seven years, there are now fewer than 350,000 left in the wild. And their dwindling numbers are not just the concern of nature documentaries—they play vital roles in helping plant life prosper, digging water holes and improving foraging conditions for other animals.

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To save the African elephant, focus must turn to poverty and corruption

African elephants are threatened with extinction. With numbers shrinking by a third in just seven years, there are now fewer than 350,000 left in the wild. And their dwindling numbers are not just the concern of nature documentaries—they play vital roles in helping plant life prosper, digging water holes and improving foraging conditions for other animals.

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Family to be deported from Australia because son has cystic fibrosis

An Irish family settled in Australia are calling for community support after their bid to stay in the country was denied due to the cost of their son’s genetic disease

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What do the European Parliament results mean for climate change?

Green parties have made gains in the European Parliament and may become coalition partners. But newly-elected populists are likely to fight climate action

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The Wagon Wheel Effect Shows the Limits of the Human Brain

This famous optical illusion, ubiquitous in car commercials and movies, helps neuroscientists study how the mind perceives the world.

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Amazon Echo Show 5 and Alexa Privacy Hub: Price, Details, Release Date

The $90 smart device launches alongside a new set of tools for managing—and deleting—all the data Alexa collects.

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Distant Neutron Stars Could Reveal the Quirks of Quarks

Physicists are studying gravitational waves from neutron stars for clues about quarks, "quark matter," and their role in the universe's evolution.

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Red Sea may be cooling rather than warming, study finds

A recent study by Earth Scientists and Oceanographers at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) has revealed that surface temperatures in the Red Sea might be cooling, rather than rising.

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Will we ever agree to just one set of rules on the ethical development of artificial intelligence?

Australia is among 42 countries that last week signed up to a new set of policy guidelines for the development of artificial intelligence (AI) systems.

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The Controversial Kid ASMR Community

It started in preschool for Gracie. She and her classmates were coloring with markers. The crinkling of the paper and the squeak of the markers made Gracie so tired that she put her head on the table and fell asleep. It kept happening, that tingly, drowsy feeling, when she heard tapping sounds or whispering. In 2011, when Gracie was 7, she learned that the feeling had a name: ASMR, which stands f

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Chemists build a better cancer-killing drill

An international team of scientists is getting closer to perfecting molecule-sized motors that drill through the surface of cancer cells, killing them in an instant.

10h

Evidence found of fish swimming in unison 50 million years ago

A team of researchers from Arizona State University working with a group from the Oishi Fossils Gallery of Mizuta Memorial Museum in Japan has found evidence of fish swimming in unison approximately …

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RIP F-35 and F-22: China Claims It Has Radar That Can Detect Stealth Aircraft

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Eye on A.I.— Why Standards Are Critical to Improving Artificial Intelligence

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Google’s AI can create videos from start and end frames alone

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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California pilot project could put Universal Basic Income on 2020 map

submitted by /u/mynameis_neo [link] [comments]

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UAE Introduces AI Speaking News Anchor

submitted by /u/hahaweeb [link] [comments]

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Should you give your data to a period tracker or smart breast bump?

Health tech firms believe that women are a lucrative and untapped market, but are these products worth the privacy costs?

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Menneskekæde om AUH var en »stor succes«

Næsten dobbelt så mange som håbet mødte op til protesten mod besparelserne på Aarhus Universitetshospital. En tre kilometer lang menneskekæde skulle sende et signal til politikerne, siger initiativtager.

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Japan law loosens rules for self-driving cars

Stuck in traffic on a Japanese highway? If you're in a self-driving car you might be able to kick back with a sandwich and check your phone under new legislation in the country.

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Compostable food containers could release PFAS into environment

Compostable food containers seem like a great idea: They degrade into nutrient-rich organic matter, reducing waste and the need for chemical fertilizers. But much of this packaging relies on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to repel water and oil. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have shown that PFAS can leach from the containers into compost.

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Evidence found of fish swimming in unison 50 million years ago

A team of researchers from Arizona State University working with a group from the Oishi Fossils Gallery of Mizuta Memorial Museum in Japan has found evidence of fish swimming in unison approximately 50 million years ago. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of a slab of stone containing an entire school of fossilized fish and w

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Electric-field-controlled superconductor-ferromagnetic insulator transition

High-temperature (Tc) superconductivity typically develops from antiferromagnetic insulators, and superconductivity and ferromagnetism are always mutually exclusive. Recently, Xianhui Chen's group at the University of Science and Technology of China observed an electric-field controlled reversible transition from superconductor to ferromagnetic insulator in (Li,Fe)OHFeSe thin flake. This work offe

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Uncovering the evolution of monsoon and arid regions in Asia, Africa and Australia

Monsoon and arid climates are two climate types commonly seen in mid- and low-latitudes of the Earth. These climate types have sculpted the corresponding landforms, ecosystems and the living environments of human society. The present-day most well-known monsoon and arid regions are found in Africa, Asia and Australia. When did they originate? How have they evolved over time? What were the factors

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Rare crops crucial to protect Europe's food supply, boost health

Rye bread or porridge oats may not be everyone's first choice of breakfast, but scientists say Europeans need to broaden their taste in cereals both to boost their own health and to protect the future of Europe's farming.

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Evidence found of fish swimming in unison 50 million years ago

A team of researchers from Arizona State University working with a group from the Oishi Fossils Gallery of Mizuta Memorial Museum in Japan has found evidence of fish swimming in unison approximately 50 million years ago. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of a slab of stone containing an entire school of fossilized fish and w

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Rare crops crucial to protect Europe's food supply, boost health

Rye bread or porridge oats may not be everyone's first choice of breakfast, but scientists say Europeans need to broaden their taste in cereals both to boost their own health and to protect the future of Europe's farming.

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Researchers discover how a nanocatalyst works at the atomic level

Researchers of the Nanoscience Center (NSC) at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, and Xiamen University, China, have discovered how copper particles at the nanometer scale operate in modifying a carbon-oxygen bond when ketone molecules turn into alcohol molecules. Modification of the carbon-oxygen and carbon-carbon bonds found in organic molecules is an important intermediate stage in catalytic

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Microaerobic Fe(II) oxidation could drive microbial carbon assimilation in paddy soil

The carbon assimilation process driven by soil microorganisms is important to maintain the production and ecological function of paddy fields. A recent publication from Prof. Fangbai LI's group has found that Fe(II) oxidation under microaerobic conditions could drive microbial carbon assimilation in paddy soil, and identified the potential microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). These fi

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3-D printed artificial corneas similar to human ones

When a person has a severely damaged cornea, a corneal transplant is required. However, there are 2,000 patients waiting for the cornea donation in the country as of 2018, and they wait for six or more years on average for the donation. For this reason, many scientists are attempting to develop an artificial cornea. The existing artificial cornea uses recombinant collagen or is made of chemical su

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Super-fast broadband may have negative side effects for companies

The latest expansion of optic fiber broadband creates conditions for parallel expansion of mobile broadband. A study argues that the negative effect is mainly due to mobile broadband. The argument is supported by the fact that the effect does not exist in the countryside, where mobile broadband has poor coverage..

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Microaerobic Fe(II) oxidation could drive microbial carbon assimilation in paddy soil

The carbon assimilation process driven by soil microorganisms is important to maintain the production and ecological function of paddy fields. A recent publication from Prof. Fangbai LI's group has found that Fe(II) oxidation under microaerobic conditions could drive microbial carbon assimilation in paddy soil, and identified the potential microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB). These fi

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Self-healing DNA nanostructures

DNA assembled into nanostructures such as tubes and origami-inspired shapes could someday find applications ranging from DNA computers to nanomedicine. However, these intriguing structures don't persist long in biological environments because of enzymes called nucleases that degrade DNA. Now, researchers have designed DNA nanostructures that can heal themselves in serum. They report their results

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Compostable food containers could release PFAS into environment

Compostable food containers seem like a great idea: They degrade into nutrient-rich organic matter, reducing waste and the need for chemical fertilizers. But much of this packaging relies on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) to repel water and oil. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have shown that PFAS can leach from the containers into compost.

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Epigenetic study provides new approaches to combination therapies for aggressive cancers

A recent study reveals how the interaction of the epigenetic protein BRD4 with the metabolic enzyme MTHFD1 controls gene expression and cell proliferation. The results of the study have now been published in the renowned journal Nature Genetics. They suggest novel approaches for the development of combination therapies for aggressive cancers.

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Could some chimpanzees' crustacean crave yield clues about human evolution?

Why do we fish? At some point eons ago, our primarily fruit-eating ancestors put their hands in the water to catch and eat aquatic life, inadvertently supplementing their diet with nutrients …

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Fieldwork Robotics completes initial field trials of raspberry harvesting robot system

University of Plymouth spinout company Fieldwork Robotics has completed initial field trials of its robot raspberry harvesting system.

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There's a climate crisis – but Trump's cabinet continues to backtrack on science | Kate Aronoff

Conservative donors and fossil fuel companies have the most to lose from large-scale decarbonization – and they know it In an effort to suppress federal climate research, the Trump administration will direct state agencies to no longer consider worst-case scenarios of global warming. Climate modelers working for federal agencies will only be permitted to forecast to 2040, decades before the as-mu

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Sådan gik dialogmødet på AUH

Spørgsmålene var som forventeligt kritiske ved gårsdagens dialogmøde mellem ledelsen og de ansatte på Aarhus Universitetshospital, siger hospitalsdirektør.

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Diabetesforsker ny mand i spidsen for Diabetesforeningen

Professor og tidligere praktiserende læge Torsten Lauritzen afløser Truels Schultz som formand for Diabetesforeningen. Det står klart efter et tæt kampvalg på weekendens repræsentantskabsmøde.

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Anthropocene vote, pollution cover-up and quark pioneer dies

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01677-7 The week in science: 24–30 May 2019.

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In the spaces of strangers

Nature, Published online: 29 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01578-9 Identity crisis.

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Bill Nye talks killer clowns, mermaids, pigeon poo, and deadly bicycles

Science Welcome to The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week. This week, our hit podcast welcomes a very weird and special guest: Bill Nye the Science Guy.

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Time to Move Beyond the Impact Factor

The impact factor has become the one metric for journal quality. It's time to rethink this system.

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Self-healing DNA nanostructures

DNA assembled into nanostructures such as tubes and origami-inspired shapes could someday find applications ranging from DNA computers to nanomedicine. However, these intriguing structures don't persist long in biological environments because of enzymes called nucleases that degrade DNA. Now, researchers have designed DNA nanostructures that can heal themselves in serum. They report their results

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Image of the Day: Fossilized Motion

A fossil of a school of fish from the Eocene appears to represent coordinated collective movement.

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Overblik: Lægerne stemmer rødt og vægter prioritering højest

Dagens Medicin har spurgt lægerne, hvilke emner de vægter højest, og hvem de stemmer på. »Prioritering er rigtig vigtigt,« siger Andreas Rudkjøbing.

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Fra klinikchefen til silikonekongen: 16 kendte læger fortæller, hvem de stemmer på

Dagens Medicin har spurgt Else Smith, Andreas Rudkjøbing og et stort dusin andre prominente medicinere, hvor de har tænkt sig at sætte krydset 5. juni.

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Logitech's new stylus is built for VR

Architects, product designers and concept artists just got a ground-breaking new tool in their creative arsenals: Logitech's VR Ink Pilot Edition, the world's first VR stylus …

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Pokémon wants to 'turn sleeping into entertainment' with new app

Pokémon thinks we gotta catch 'em all — even in our sleep.

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More knowledge changes opinions on G.M. food

People’s attitudes about genetically modified food would change if the public understood the underlying science better, according to new research. Jonathon McPhetres, a PhD in psychology from the University of Rochester, admits he’s “personally amazed” what we can do with genes, specifically genetically modified food—such as saving papayas from extinction. “We can makes crops better, more resilie

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Dieselgate: Hver fjerde bilejer gider ikke opdatere for at mindske diesel-os

Over ti millioner forurenende dieselbiler kan mindske deres udledninger kun ved hjælp med software, men det går ikke så hurtigt som håbet – ihvertfald ikke når det er frivilligt.

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More safe havens for native plants and animals needed in NSW's west

Location matters for species struggling to survive under a changing climate.

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More safe havens for native plants and animals needed in NSW's west

Location matters for species struggling to survive under a changing climate.

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Hate Groups Love Ancient Greece and Rome. Scholars Are Pushing Back.

Scholars are signaling the alarm about the love that right-wing hate groups have for the classics. Two key websites have become the main portals for digital public scholarship on the embrace of the Greco-Roman world by white supremacists, misogynists, anti-Semites, ethnonationalists, and xenophobes.

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Every bat travels differently

The females of some bat species migrate hundreds of kilometers after hibernation to give birth to their offspring in insect-rich regions. Unlike birds, it is largely unknown how bats keep their energy consumption low during flight. Dina Dechmann and colleagues from the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior in Konstanz equipped female common noctule bats with air pressure sensors and tracked thei

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