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nyheder2019maj30

Transgenic fungus rapidly killed malaria mosquitoes in West African study

According to the World Health Organization, malaria affects hundreds of millions of people around the world, killing more than 400,000 annually. Decades of insecticide use has failed to control mosquitoes that carry the malaria parasite and has led to insecticide-resistance among many mosquito strains. In response, scientists began genetically modifying mosquitoes and other organisms that can help

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IEA: Atomkraft er en nødvendig del af den grønne omstilling

I sin første rapport om atomkraft i 20 år appellerer Det Internationale Energiagentur til, at udfasningen af atomkraft bremses af hensyn til CO2-udslippet. Der skal bygges nye værker, og de gamle skal levetidsforlænges.

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Spacewatch: Nasa awards first contract for lunar space station

Maxar wins $375m deal to build the Lunar Gateway’s power and propulsion element Nasa has contracted Maxar Technologies to develop the first element of its Lunar Gateway space station, an essential part of its plan to return astronauts to the moon by 2024. Astronauts arriving from Earth in the Orion crew capsule will dock at the gateway, which will be in orbit around the moon, before transferring

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Fighting the Gender Stereotypes That Warp Biomedical Research

Female animals were once deemed too hormonal and messy for science. Some scientists warn it’s not enough to just use more female lab rats.

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Undercover as a ‘Madwoman,’ She Reinvented Journalism

“In my time, women usually had their life stories written for them. But I didn’t like the story I was given, so I wrote a new one.” That’s Nellie Bly, the nom de plume of Elizabeth Cochrane. The story she wrote—in a newspaper in 1887, and, figuratively, of her life—would change the course of journalism in America. A new short film from Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting brings Bly

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To curb infection, bacteria direct their defenses against themselves

To fight off invading viruses, bacteria have evolved a slew of creative defense tactics. New research shows that in some cases, microbes go to great lengths to keep an infection from spreading, even destroying bits of their own genetic material.

28min

Gut bacteria's connections to human health, disease

Researchers have made an important advance in understanding the roles that gut bacteria play in human health.

28min

Experiments and calculations allow examination of boron's complicated dance

In a study that combines groundbreaking experimental work and theoretical calculations, researchers have determined the nuclear geometry of two isotopes of boron. The result could help open a path to precise calculations of the structure of other nuclei that scientists could experimentally validate.

28min

Potential therapeutic target for sepsis

Scientists have identified a potential new therapeutic target for sepsis.

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Transgenic fungus rapidly killed malaria mosquitoes in West African study

Researchers describe the first trial outside the laboratory of a transgenic approach to combating malaria. The study shows that a naturally occurring fungus engineered to deliver a toxin to mosquitoes safely reduced mosquito populations by more than 99% in a screen-enclosed, simulated village setting in Burkina Faso, West Africa.

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Five-year outcomes for face transplant recipients

Scientists present the longer-term outcomes for six face transplant recipients who had been followed for up to 5 years after surgery, representing the largest cohort of patients in the US.

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Being teased about weight linked to more weight gain among children

Youth who said they were teased or ridiculed about their weight increased their body mass by 33 percent more each year, compared to a similar group who had not been teased, according to researchers. The findings appear to contradict the belief that such teasing might motivate youth to change their behavior and attempt to lose weight.

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Climate Change Is Thawing out the Corpses on Mt. Everest

Hello Again As the world continues to heat up due to humanity-induced climate change , so too is the peak of Mount Everest. The Nepalese government reports that glaciers throughout the Himalayas are melting away, and on Everest that means the snow and ice that covered the bodies of dead hikers is vanishing. Climbers and guides are seeing more and more human remains: bones, limbs, and preserved bo

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The story we tell about millennials — and who we leave out | Reniqua Allen

Millennials are now the largest, most diverse adult population in the US — but far too often, they're reduced to the worn-out stereotype of lazy, entitled avocado toast lovers, says author Reniqua Allen. In this revealing talk, she shares often overlooked stories of millennials of color, offering a broader, more nuanced view of the generation. "Millennials are not a monolith," she says.

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A combination of agrochemicals shortens the life of bees, study shows

A nonlethal dose of insecticide clothianidin can reduce honeybees' life span by half; once combined with the fungicide pyraclostrobin, it alters the behavior of worker bees to the point of endangering the whole colony.

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To curb infection, bacteria direct their defenses against themselves

To fight off invading viruses, bacteria have evolved a slew of creative defense tactics. New research shows that in some cases, microbes go to great lengths to keep an infection from spreading, even destroying bits of their own genetic material.

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Laser technique could unlock use of tough material for next-generation electronics

Researchers used a laser technique to permanently stress graphene into a structure that allows the flow of electric current, which is necessary for the material to be useful for next-generation electronics.

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Cancer-fighting combination targets glioblastoma

An international team of researchers combined a calorie-restricted diet high in fat and low in carbohydrates with a tumor-inhibiting antibiotic and found the combination destroys cancer stem cells and mesenchymal cells, the two major cells found in glioblastoma, a fast-moving brain cancer that resists traditional treatment protocols.

43min

New framework helps gauge impact of mosquito control programs

Effective methods of controlling mosquito populations are needed to help lower the worldwide burden of mosquito-borne diseases including Zika, chikungunya, and dengue. Now, researchers have described a new statistical framework that can be used to assess mosquito control programs over broad time and space scales.

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Pain free, thanks to evolution

African mole-rats are insensitive to many different kinds of pain. This characteristic has even allowed mole-rats to populate new habitats, researchers report. Thanks to a genetic change, the highveld mole-rat is able to live alongside venomous ants with painful stings that other mole-rats avoid.

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Combination of three gene mutations results in deadly human heart disease

Scientists believe that more common forms of disease may be the result of a combination of more subtle genetic mutations that act together. Now researchers have used technological advances to prove that three subtle genetic variants inherited within a family worked together to cause heart disease in multiple siblings at a very young age.

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Ancient DNA tells the story of the first herders and farmers in east Africa

A collaborative study led by archaeologists, geneticists and museum curators is providing answers to previously unsolved questions about life in sub-Saharan Africa thousands of years ago.

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A bizarre new theory connects supernovae explosions with humans' ability to walk upright

Space We're going to need some more evidence. Things from space can have quite the impact on the lifeforms trying to chill here on Earth. The most obvious example of this is the meteor impact that casually wiped out…

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NASA Commercial Crew Manager Calls SpaceX Explosion a “Gift”

Crew Dragon Explosion On April 20, reports emerged that SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft had exploded during an engine test. It took nearly two weeks for SpaceX to admit the capsule was destroyed — but Kathy Lueders, manager of the commercial crew program at NASA, sees the accident as a blessing in disguise. In fact, she said during a committee meeting earlier this week, she sees the incident as a

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50-Million-Year-Old Fossil Shows School of Baby Fish in Their Final Moments

Baby fish swam in schools 50 million years ago, according to this remarkable fossil held in a Japanese museum.

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Stem Cells Delivered to the Nose Restore Mice's Ability to Smell

The introduced cells engrafted in the nose, became olfactory sensory neurons, and sent axons to the animals' brains.

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Physicists 'teleport' logic operation between separated ions

Physicists have teleported a computer circuit instruction known as a quantum logic operation between two separated ions (electrically charged atoms), showcasing how quantum computer programs could carry out tasks in future large-scale quantum networks.

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Facebook shareholders say Mark Zuckerberg holds too much power – CNET

Proposals to rein in Zuckerberg's control over the company didn't pass on Thursday.

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International team identifies potential therapeutic target for sepsis

An international collaboration led by scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center has identified a potential new therapeutic target for sepsis.

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Experiments and calculations allow examination of boron's complicated dance

In a study that combines groundbreaking experimental work and theoretical calculations, researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with scientists in Germany and Poland, have determined the nuclear geometry of two isotopes of boron. The result could help open a path to precise calculations of the structure of other nuclei that scientists could

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ASCO 2019: 40-50 percent response rate for brigatinib after other next-gen ALK inhibitors

University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at ASCO 2019 shows that brigatinib remains effective even after treatment with another next-generation ALK inhibitor

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Nreal Light Consumer Edition AR glasses Arriving Later This Year for $499

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Alex Trebek's Promising Cancer Update: What Is 'Near Remission'?

Alex Trebek says his tumors have shrunk 50% since he started chemotherapy, but that's no guarantee that the pancreatic cancer will go into full remission.

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DeepMind's AI gamer is a better teammate than human players

DeepMind’s new gaming AI has learned to play Quake III Arena cooperatively with teammates, and performs better than human players

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Research deepens understanding of gut bacteria's connections to human health, disease

Researchers have made an important advance in understanding the roles that gut bacteria play in human health.

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Laser technique could unlock use of tough material for next-generation electronics

Researchers used a laser technique to permanently stress graphene into a structure that allows the flow of electric current, which is necessary for the material to be useful for next-generation electronics.

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Ferrari’s Most Powerful Production Car Ever Is a Plug-in Hybrid

Plugged In Ferrari’s newly unveiled SF90 Stradale can go from zero to 100 kilometers per hour (62 miles per hour) in 2.5 seconds. It has a top speed of 339 kph (211 mph), and 986 horsepower makes it the most powerful production car the company has ever released. It’s also the company’s first plug-in hybrid — another encouraging sign that luxury carmakers are starting to embrace electric vehicles.

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Scientists design organic cathode for high performance batteries

Researchers have designed a new, organic cathode material for lithium batteries. With sulfur at its core, the material is more energy-dense, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly than traditional cathode materials in lithium batteries.

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Laser technique could unlock use of tough material for next-generation electronics

In 2004, researchers discovered a super thin material that is at least a 100 times stronger than steel and the best known conductor of heat and electricity.

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Another Pair of Eyes Does See Different Things

Another Pair of Eyes Does See Different Things New study shows that we direct our gazes differently even when we are staring at the same images. Eye-movement.gif Image credits: Taken from " The American encyclopedia and dictionary of ophthalmology ," published in 1913. Animated by Yuen Yiu. Human Thursday, May 30, 2019 – 14:30 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — If a picture is worth

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Over half a million corals destroyed by port of Miami dredging, study finds

A team of researchers including scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, published new findings that reveal significant damage to Miami's coral reefs from the 16-month dredging operation at the Port of Miami that began in 2013. The study found that sediment buried between half to 90 percent of nearby reefs, resulting in widespread coral death.

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Scientists identify a novel strategy to fight viral infections and cancer in animal model

A potential therapeutic strategy to treat viral infection and boost immunity against cancer is reported in the May 30 online issue of the journal Cell.

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5 reasons ‘green growth’ won’t save the planet

Green growth has emerged as the dominant narrative for tackling contemporary environmental problems. Its supporters, including the likes of the UN, OECD, national governments, businesses and even NGOs , say that sustainability can be achieved through efficiency, technology and market-led environmental action. Green growth suggests we really can have our cake and eat it – both growing the economy

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Africa’s first herders spread pastoralism by mating with foragers

DNA unveils long-ago hookups between early pastoralists and native hunter-gatherers in Africa.

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Scientists identify a novel strategy to fight viral infections and cancer in animal model

A potential therapeutic strategy to treat viral infection and boost immunity against cancer is reported in the May 30 online issue of the journal Cell.

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If China Really Wants to Retaliate, It Will Target Apple

As the trade war heats up, Apple is an enticing target for Chinese reprisals. It derives a nearly 20% of its revenue from the country, and its supply chain is based there.

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Cancer-fighting combination targets glioblastoma

An international team of researchers combined a calorie-restricted diet high in fat and low in carbohydrates with a tumor-inhibiting antibiotic and found the combination destroys cancer stem cells and mesenchymal cells, the two major cells found in glioblastoma, a fast-moving brain cancer that resists traditional treatment protocols.

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Renault and Fiat Chrysler stuck over merger terms: report

Talks between Fiat Chrysler and Renault have hit a roadblock over the financial terms of the proposed merger between the Italian-US and French carmakers, the French business daily Les Echos reported online Thursday, citing sources close to Fiat Chrysler.

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Bacteria's protein quality control agent offers insight into origins of life

The discoveries not only offer new directions for fighting the virulence of some of humanity's most dangerous pathogens, they have implications for our understanding of how life itself evolved.

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Scientists design organic cathode for high performance batteries

Researchers have designed a new, organic cathode material for lithium batteries. With sulfur at its core, the material is more energy-dense, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly than traditional cathode materials in lithium batteries.

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Cannabis use among older adults rising rapidly

Cannabis use among older adults is growing faster than any other age group but many report barriers to getting medical marijuana, a lack of communication with their doctors and a lingering stigma attached to the drug, according to researchers.

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Early humans used northern migration routes to reach eastern Asia

Northern and Central Asia have been neglected in studies of early human migration, with deserts and mountains being considered uncompromising barriers. However, a new study argues that humans may have moved through these extreme settings in the past under wetter conditions. By analyzing past climate, northern Asia emerges as a potential route of human dispersal, as well as a zone of potential inte

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How to convince catalytic converters to ignore the chills

Nature, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01697-3 Precise arrangement of molecules helps to create a catalyst that works well even at low temperatures.

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Eco-friendly packaging could be poisoning our compost

Environment After a study uncovered PFAS in compost, regulators in Washington moved to ban this class of synthetic compounds. Per-and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, are everywhere. PFAS are useful, but the major problem with many of them is that they never fully breakdown in the…

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MD Anderson clears researcher flagged by NIH for not disclosing foreign ties

No punishment for last of five scientists identified by funding agency

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How a quantum computer could break 2048-bit RSA encryption in 8 hours

A new study shows that quantum technology will catch up with today’s encryption standards much sooner than expected. That should worry anybody who needs to store data securely for 25 years or so.

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Record-Breaking Heat in Alaska Wreaks Havoc on Communities and Ecosystems

Abnormally high temperatures have led to unsafe travel conditions, uncertain ecological futures and even multiple deaths

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Striking satellite imagery reveals multiple wildfires blazing across northern Alberta

A satellite view of the Chuckegg Creek wildfire near High Level, Alberta in Canada on May 26, 2019. With unusual heat refusing to loosen its grip on Western Canada, ten out-of-control wildfires are now burning in northern Alberta. Thanks to the hot, dry weather and rising winds, officials in Alberta were concerned on Tuesday (May 29) that the Chuckegg Creek fire near High Level, Alberta could lead

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This Futuristic Non-Lethal Weapon Will Electrocute Your Enemies

No Safety The citizens and police of South Africa have a new option for personal protection : A Turkish company called Albayraklar Group just launched a new handgun-shaped taser called the Wattozz. CEO Sertan Ayçiçek told Hürriyet Daily News that the Wattozz could prevent unnecessary injuries at the hands of police officers, as the weapon is capable of administering non-lethal electric shocks fro

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Google Is Finally Making Chrome Extensions More Secure

Third-party developers don't always build extensions with security best practices in mind. Now Google is taking steps to better protect user data.

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‘Captivating’ – BFI shares first footage of a solar eclipse from 1900

Magician John Nevil Maskelyne captured the moon passing in front of the sun while in the US The first moving picture of a solar eclipse, captured by a British magician-turned-film-maker more than a century ago, has been rediscovered in the archive of the Royal Astronomical Society. The shaky footage, recorded by John Nevil Maskelyne using a specially-adapted camera, shows the moon passing in fron

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A type of African mole rat is immune to the pain caused by wasabi

A species of mole rat doesn't feel pain in response to a compound that gives wasabi its pungent taste, and could hint at new ways to relieve pain in people

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DeepMind's AI gamer is a better teammate than human players

DeepMind’s new gaming AI has learned to play Quake III Arena cooperatively with teammates, and performs better than human players

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Human contact plays big role in spread of some hospital infections, but not others

An observational study conducted in a French hospital showed that human contact was responsible for 90 percent of the spread of one species of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to new patients, but less than 60 percent of the spread of a different species. Audrey Duval of the Versailles Saint Quentin University and Institut Pasteur in Paris, France, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Comput

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Freshwater find: Genetic advantage allows some marine fish to colonize freshwater habitats

Fishes are present in not only marine but also freshwater environments. However, only few fish lineages could colonize freshwater habitats. What enable some lineages to colonize freshwater? Dr. Asano Ishikawa and Dr. Jun Kitano at the National Institute of Genetics, Japan, collaborated with international researchers to answer this question. They found that Fatty acid desaturase 2 (Fads2) is a key

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Transgenic fungus rapidly killed malaria mosquitoes in West African study

In a research paper published in the May 31, 2019, issue of the journal Science, a team of scientists from the University of Maryland and Burkina Faso described the first trial outside the laboratory of a transgenic approach to combating malaria. The study showed that a naturally occurring fungus engineered to deliver a toxin to mosquitoes safely reduced mosquito populations by more than 99% in a

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Ancient DNA illuminates first herders and farmers in east Africa

Genome-wide analyses of 41 ancient sub-Saharan Africans answer questions left murky by archaeological records about the origins of the people who introduced food production — first herding and then farming — into East Africa over the past 5,000 years.

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More democracy — A second chance for climate politics

Hope was high when the Paris Climate Agreement was adopted 2015. Countries pledged to keep global warming below two degrees Celsius. Five years later it is sobering: global emissions of carbon dioxide and other climate-relevant gases continue to rise. In Science, Mark Lawrence and Stefan Schäfer of the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) argue that the centralized approach to addr

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Ancient DNA tells the story of the first herders and farmers in east Africa

A collaborative study led by archaeologists, geneticists and museum curators is providing answers to previously unsolved questions about life in sub-Saharan Africa thousands of years ago.

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Are hormones a 'female problem' for animal research?

Women, but not men, are often still described as 'hormonal' or 'emotional,' an outdated stereotype that poses a critical problem for public health, writes Rebecca Shansky in this Perspective.

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DeepMind's new gamer AI goes 'for the win' in multiplayer first-person video games

DeepMind researchers have taught artificially intelligent gamers to play a popular 3D multiplayer first-person video game with human-like skills — a previously insurmountable task.

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Multi-step spread of first herders into sub-Saharan Africa

An analysis of 41 ancient African genomes led by Mary Prendergast and David Reich suggests that the spread of herding and farming into eastern Africa affected human populations in phases, involving multiple movements of — and gene flow among — ancestrally distinct groups.

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How protected areas are losing ground in the United States and Amazonia

Once champions of global conservation, the United States and Brazil are now leading a troubling global trend of large-scale rollbacks in environmental policy, putting hundreds of protected areas at risk, a new study suggests.

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Combination of three gene mutations results in deadly human heart disease

The Human Genome project allowed scientists to identify some rare cases of disease caused by severe mutations of a single gene, but scientists believe that more common forms of disease may be the result of a combination of more subtle genetic mutations that act together. Yet experimental proof for this concept of human disease has remained elusive — until now.

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CNIO researchers discover a new way to protect against high-dose radiation damage

Intensive radiotherapy can be toxic in 60% of patients with tumors located in the gastrointestinal cavity. Increases in URI levels protect mice against high-dose ionizing radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome and enhance mouse intestinal regeneration and survival in 100% of the cases.This finding could be useful to mitigate side effects of other sources of intensive radiation, such as nuclea

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Pain free, thanks to evolution

African mole-rats are insensitive to many different kinds of pain. As an international research team led by the MDC's Gary Lewin reports in Science, this characteristic has even allowed mole-rats to populate new habitats. Thanks to a genetic change, the highveld mole-rat is able to live alongside venomous ants with painful stings that other mole-rats avoid.

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NIST physicists 'teleport' logic operation between separated ions

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have teleported a computer circuit instruction known as a quantum logic operation between two separated ions (electrically charged atoms), showcasing how quantum computer programs could carry out tasks in future large-scale quantum networks.

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Understanding why virus can't replicate in human cells could improve vaccines

The identification of a gene that helps to restrict the host range of the modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) could lead to the development of new and improved vaccines against diverse infectious agents, according to a study published May 30, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Bernard Moss of the National Institutes of Health, and colleagues.

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How the immune system keeps the Epstein-Barr virus in check

A protein called PD-1, which is found on immune cells called CD8+ T cells, plays a key role in controlling infection with the Epstein-Barr virus, according to a study published May 30 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Christian Münz of the University of Zurich, and colleagues. The results from this study indicate that monitoring PD-1 signaling during future vaccination and immunotherapy

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New framework helps gauge impact of mosquito control programs

Effective methods of controlling mosquito populations are needed to help lower the worldwide burden of mosquito-borne diseases including Zika, chikungunya, and dengue. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have described a new statistical framework that can be used to assess mosquito control programs over broad time and space scales.

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Wild boars, hunting dogs and hunters carry tick-borne bacteria

Rickettsia bacteria cause a number of human and animal infections, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have for the first time surveyed the prevalence of Rickettsia antibodies and Rickettsia-carrying ticks in wild boars, hunting dogs and hunters in Brazil.

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The FASEB Journal: Alternative molecular mechanisms observed in cancer cells

Current anti-cancer drugs can be quite effective but too often, tumors are not fought off completely and end up returning. A recent study published in The FASEB Journal provides the first evidence that some cancer cells evade therapy by switching over to alternative molecular mechanisms that are not affected by existing anti-cancer treatments.

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Teaching kids about money? Don’t forget giving

One of the most valuable lessons parents can teach their children about money might be how to give it away. A new study explores how financial-giving habits extend through generations, and how early life lessons in giving may contribute to personal and financial well-being later on. Existing research has established that children learn more about finances from their parents than any other source.

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AI slår mennesket af pinden som bedste holdspiller i computerspil

PLUS. Kunstig intelligens og reinforcement learning når nye højder inden for 3D multiplayer-computerspil.

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Give Up on Work-Life Balance

Brigid Schulte has baked Valentine’s Day cupcakes until 2 a.m. and written articles until 4 a.m. In 2014, when she wrote Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time , a book about the hunt for work-life balance, Schulte was a reporter for The Washington Post and a mother of two young children. Her unforgiving schedule had no free time and left her constantly torn between her family

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Why Dodo Bones Are Extra Scarce

Last week, at Christie’s auction house in London, an anonymous buyer paid almost $625,000 for the skeleton of a dodo bird. More precisely, the buyer purchased a set of fossilized bones belonging to at least two different birds, dug up and assembled into a skeleton by collectors. The last such assemblage sold in 2016 for about $430,000. Before that, no dodo skeleton of any kind had been offered fo

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'Ecstasy' shows promise for post-traumatic stress treatment

An international study has shown that MDMA, also known as ecstasy, may be a valuable tool for treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study demonstrated substantial improvements in individuals who had not responded to prior treatments. This is also, he adds, the most comprehensive evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD.

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Concussions in elite soccer not assessed according to expert recommendations

An average of at least one potential concussive event occurred per game during the 2016 UEFA European Championship and nearly three quarters of the head collision incidents did not result in a medical assessment by sideline health-care personnel.

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DNA tests for patients move closer with genome analysis advance

Diseases caused by genetic changes could be detected more readily thanks to an advance in DNA analysis software.

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International travelers experience the harmful effects of air pollution

Even a short stay for travelers in cities with high levels of air pollution leads to breathing problems that can take at least a week from which to recover, a new study shows.

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Scientists discover 'switch' that helps breast cancer spread around the body

Researchers have unveiled clues into how breast cancer cells spread around the body.

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New imaging tool for diagnosing heart disease

Scientists have shown that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be used to measure how the heart uses oxygen for both healthy patients and those with heart disease.

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Concussion symptoms reversed by magnetic therapy

Concussion symptoms — such as loss of balance and ability to walk straight — can be reversed by a new type of magnetic stimulation.

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Combing through someone's phone could lead to end of relationship — or not

For some people, the thought of their partner, friend or colleague snooping through their phone, reading their texts and emails, is an automatic deal breaker. However, some relationships can survive the snooping, a new study examining the motivations behind phone snooping has found.

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Scientists Genetically Modify Fungus To Kill Mosquitoes That Spread Malaria

The modified fungus produces spider toxin that rapidly kills mosquitoes, raising hopes for a new weapon to fight a disease that sickens millions. But not everyone is convinced. (Image credit: Courtesy of Brian Lovett)

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Synthetic CBD may be a safe treatment for seizures

A nonintoxicating, synthetic CBD that is not easy to convert to THC and comprises inexpensive, noncannabis ingredients treated seizures safely in rats.

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The Crucial Role of Brain Simulation in Future Neuroscience

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Scientists tackle a burning question: When will our quiet sun turn violent?

Researchers study 11-year solar cycle to predict timing of peak magnetic outbursts

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Artificial intelligence learns teamwork in a deadly game of capture the flag

Bots’ new strategies for beating Quake could one day help smart machines work with humans

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Fungus with a venom gene could be new mosquito killer

Transgenic approach shows promise in field test but is likely to face regulatory and political hurdles

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Study raises questions about roots of lactose tolerance in Africa

Ancient DNA reveals both parallels and contrasts between ancient African and European herders

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Insular cortex processes aversive somatosensory information and is crucial for threat learning

Learning about threats is essential for survival. During threat learning, an innocuous sensory percept such as a tone acquires an emotional meaning when paired with an aversive stimulus such as a mild footshock. The amygdala is critical for threat memory formation, but little is known about upstream brain areas that process aversive somatosensory information. Using optogenetic techniques in mice,

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Artificial teamwork

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Well prepared

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Turbulent activity

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Rapid molecular evolution of pain insensitivity in multiple African rodents

Noxious substances, called algogens, cause pain and are used as defensive weapons by plants and stinging insects. We identified four previously unknown instances of algogen-insensitivity by screening eight African rodent species related to the naked mole-rat with the painful substances capsaicin, acid (hydrogen chloride, pH 3.5), and allyl isothiocyanate (AITC). Using RNA sequencing, we traced th

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Human-level performance in 3D multiplayer games with population-based reinforcement learning

Reinforcement learning (RL) has shown great success in increasingly complex single-agent environments and two-player turn-based games. However, the real world contains multiple agents, each learning and acting independently to cooperate and compete with other agents. We used a tournament-style evaluation to demonstrate that an agent can achieve human-level performance in a three-dimensional multi

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Oligogenic inheritance of a human heart disease involving a genetic modifier

Complex genetic mechanisms are thought to underlie many human diseases, yet experimental proof of this model has been elusive. Here, we show that a human cardiac anomaly can be caused by a combination of rare, inherited heterozygous mutations. Whole-exome sequencing of a nuclear family revealed that three offspring with childhood-onset cardiomyopathy had inherited three missense single-nucleotide

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Imaging the electronic Wigner crystal in one dimension

The quantum crystal of electrons, predicted more than 80 years ago by Eugene Wigner, remains one of the most elusive states of matter. In this study, we observed the one-dimensional Wigner crystal directly by imaging its charge density in real space. To image, with minimal invasiveness, the many-body electronic density of a carbon nanotube, we used another nanotube as a scanning-charge perturbati

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Quantum gate teleportation between separated qubits in a trapped-ion processor

Large-scale quantum computers will require quantum gate operations between widely separated qubits. A method for implementing such operations, known as quantum gate teleportation (QGT), requires only local operations, classical communication, and shared entanglement. We demonstrate QGT in a scalable architecture by deterministically teleporting a controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate between two qubits in s

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Observation of parity-time symmetry breaking in a single-spin system

Steering the evolution of single spin systems is crucial for quantum computing and quantum sensing. The dynamics of quantum systems has been theoretically investigated with parity-time–symmetric Hamiltonians exhibiting exotic properties. Although parity-time symmetry has been explored in classical systems, its observation in a single quantum system remains elusive. We developed a method to dilate

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The uncertain future of protected lands and waters

Protected areas are intended to safeguard biodiversity in perpetuity, yet evidence suggests that widespread legal changes undermine protected area durability and efficacy. We documented these legal changes—protected area downgrading, downsizing, and degazettement (PADDD) events—in the United States and Amazonian countries and compiled available data globally. Governments of the United States and

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A key metabolic gene for recurrent freshwater colonization and radiation in fishes

Colonization of new ecological niches has triggered large adaptive radiations. Although some lineages have made use of such opportunities, not all do so. The factors causing this variation among lineages are largely unknown. Here, we show that deficiency in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential -3 fatty acid, can constrain freshwater colonization by marine fishes. Our genomic analyses revealed

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Ultrafast optical pulse shaping using dielectric metasurfaces

Advances in ultrafast lasers, chirped pulse amplifiers, and frequency comb technology require fundamentally new pulse-modulation strategies capable of supporting unprecedentedly large bandwidth and high peak power while maintaining high spectral resolution. We demonstrate how dielectric metasurfaces can be leveraged to shape the temporal profile of a near-infrared femtosecond pulse. Finely tailor

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Transgenic Metarhizium rapidly kills mosquitoes in a malaria-endemic region of Burkina Faso

Malaria control efforts require implementation of new technologies that manage insecticide resistance. Metarhizium pingshaense provides an effective, mosquito-specific delivery system for potent insect-selective toxins. A semifield trial in a MosquitoSphere (a contained, near-natural environment) in Soumousso, a region of Burkina Faso where malaria is endemic, confirmed that the expression of an

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New Products

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Travel for two

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URI is required to maintain intestinal architecture during ionizing radiation

Ionizing radiation (IR) can cause gastrointestinal syndrome (GIS), a lethal disorder, by means of unknown mechanisms. We show that high-dose irradiation increases unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor (URI) levels in mouse intestinal crypt, but organ regeneration correlates with URI reductions. URI overexpression in intestine protects mice from radiation-induced GIS, whereas halving URI expres

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Cysteine-rich peptides promote interspecific genetic isolation in Arabidopsis

Reproductive isolation is a prerequisite for speciation. Failure of communication between female tissues of the pistil and paternal pollen tubes imposes hybridization barriers in flowering plants. Arabidopsis thaliana LURE1 (AtLURE1) peptides and their male receptor PRK6 aid attraction of the growing pollen tube to the ovule. Here, we report that the knockout of the entire AtLURE1 gene family did

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News at a glance

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AI learns multi-player video game – and smashes it

With no instructions or help, an artificial intelligence program masters a popular video game, against expectations. Drew Turney reports.

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Acid, wasabi, chillies: mole-rats couldn’t give a toss

Several species of African rodent display remarkable insensitivity to pain, hinting at hew ways to manage it in humans. Paul Biegler reports.

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Penicillin: Discovery, Benefits and Resistance

Penicillin is was once hailed as a "miracle drug." However, some bacteria have become resistant to penicillin, making those infections difficult or even impossible to treat.

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DeepMind Can Now Beat Us at Multiplayer Games, Too

Chess and Go were child’s play. Now A.I. is winning at capture the flag. Will such skills translate to the real world?

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These Mole Rats Felt No Pain, Even From Wasabi’s Burn

Discovering the rodent’s imperviousness to a stinging chemical compound may lead to advancements in pain treatment for people.

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Transgenic fungus rapidly killed malaria mosquitoes in West African study

According to the World Health Organization, malaria affects hundreds of millions of people around the world, killing more than 400,000 annually. Decades of insecticide use has failed to control mosquitoes that carry the malaria parasite and has led to insecticide-resistance among many mosquito strains. In response, scientists began genetically modifying mosquitoes and other organisms that can help

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Ancient DNA tells the story of the first herders and farmers in east Africa

A collaborative study led by archaeologists, geneticists and museum curators is providing answers to previously unsolved questions about life in sub-Saharan Africa thousands of years ago. The results were published online in the journal Science Thursday, May 30.

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Mole rats are pain-free, thanks to evolution

African mole rats are insensitive to many kinds of pain. As an international research team led by the MDC's Gary Lewin reports in Science, this characteristic has allowed mole rats to populate new habitats. Thanks to a genetic change, the highveld mole rat is able to live alongside venomous ants with painful stings that other mole rats avoid.

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Freshwater find: Genetic advantage allows some marine fish to colonize freshwater habitats

How did some marine fish manage to make their way from the salty sea to the newly available freshwater niches after the last ice age and eventually differentiate from their marine brethren?

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More democracy: A second chance for climate politics

Hope was high when the Paris Climate Agreement was adopted 2015. Under the agreement, countries pledged to keep global warming well below two degrees Celsius. Five years later, the situation is sobering: Global emissions of carbon dioxide and other climate-relevant gases continue to rise. In an article in Science, Mark Lawrence and Stefan Schäfer of the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studie

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Physicists 'teleport' logic operation between separated ions

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have teleported a computer circuit instruction known as a quantum logic operation between two separated ions (electrically charged atoms), showcasing how quantum computer programs could carry out tasks in future large-scale quantum networks.

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Artificial teamwork

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How can organizations promote and benefit from socioeconomic diversity?

A new white paper has been published by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Written by SIOP members McKenzie Preston and Sumona De Graf, this research evidence explains how individuals from lower social class backgrounds tend to engage highly in prosocial behaviors, which have shown to be related to improvements in team cooperation and performance. Socioeconomic diversity als

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Mole rats are pain-free, thanks to evolution

African mole rats are insensitive to many kinds of pain. As an international research team led by the MDC's Gary Lewin reports in Science, this characteristic has allowed mole rats to populate new habitats. Thanks to a genetic change, the highveld mole rat is able to live alongside venomous ants with painful stings that other mole rats avoid.

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Freshwater find: Genetic advantage allows some marine fish to colonize freshwater habitats

How did some marine fish manage to make their way from the salty sea to the newly available freshwater niches after the last ice age and eventually differentiate from their marine brethren?

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Circadian clock and fat metabolism linked through newly discovered mechanism

Researchers found that the enzyme Nocturnin, known for its role in fat metabolism and circadian rhythm, acts on two well-established molecules in metabolism. The discovery sheds light on how the enzyme's daily fluctuations aid in energy regulation in the body.

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Cold-parenting linked to premature aging, increased disease risk in offspring

New research suggests that unsupportive parenting styles may have several negative health implications for children, even into their adult years. The study found that the telomeres — protective caps on the ends of the strands of DNA — of subjects who considered their mothers' parenting style as 'cold' were on average 25% smaller compared to those who reported having a mother whose parenting styl

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Exposure to airborne metal pollution associated with increased risk of early mortality

A recent study uses samples of wild moss to estimate individual human exposure to atmospheric metals.

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Scientists offer designer 'big atoms' on demand

Physicists report that they can build and control particles that behave like tiny atoms with a precision never seen before.

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Physicists 'teleport' logic operation between separated ions

Experiment completes key step in quantum computing development. Nick Carne reports.

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Africa’s first herders spread pastoralism by mating with foragers

DNA unveils long-ago hookups between early pastoralists and native hunter-gatherers in Africa.

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A fungus weaponized with a spider toxin can kill malaria mosquitoes

In controlled field experiments in Burkina Faso, a genetically engineered fungus reduced numbers of insecticide-resistant mosquitoes that can carry malaria.

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Scientists offer designer 'big atoms' on demand

Physicists report that they can build and control particles that behave like tiny atoms with a precision never seen before.

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NASA scientist unexpectedly released after almost 3 years in Turkish prison

Serkan Golge, convicted on terrorism charges, still isn’t free to travel, his wife says

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Big Oil Operative Gets Busted Secretly Undermining Electric Cars

Sneaky Stuff In March, Arizona proposed a rule requiring utility companies to build public charging stations for electric cars. In response, the state’s Corporation Commission received what the Arizona Republic described as a “handful” of form letters opposing the rule. But this wasn’t the grassroots campaign from random Arizonans that it appeared to be. Each of the letters was sent by a Chevron

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Flying Car Startup Alaka'i Bets Hydrogen Outdoes Batteries

The new aviation player is showing off an electric, boxy, six-rotor air taxi powered by hydrogen fuel cells.

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Wild bees' nest made entirely out of plastic discovered in Argentina

The first report of a bee’s nest made entirely from plastic comes from Argentina. The leafcutter bees created cells out of what may be bits of old plastic bags

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Stor mängd is upptäckt på Mars: ”Otroligt spännande”

En sond från Nasa har upptäck något som forskarna tror är en stor isfyndighet under marken på Mars. Enligt Sci-News skulle fyndet räcka för att täcka hela planetens yta med 1,5 meter vatten i nedsmält form. – Vi kan studera den här isen och lära oss mer om Mars tidiga klimat och om det fanns förutsättningar för liv, säger Anna Neubeck, forskare på Uppsala Universitet.

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The king behind Machu Picchu built his legacy in stone

Science In lieu of a written language, the Inca communicated through construction. The Builders takes you behind the construction tape to reveal the individuals responsible for history’s greatest architectural works. Here is the Incan emperor…

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Belief in learning styles myth may be detrimental

Many people, including educators, believe learning styles are set at birth and predict both academic and career success even though there is no scientific evidence to support this common myth, according to new research.

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Brain activity in teens predicts future mood health

An imbalance of functioning in attention-related brain systems may help forecast the course of teen depression, according to a new study.

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Researchers study resistance to 'protect' anti-TB drug

Scientists are trying to conserve the life-saving treatment bedaquiline, by studying how the bacterium that causes TB can develop resistance to this drug.

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'Time-travel' feature added to drives to fight ransomware attacks

One of the latest cyber threats involves hackers encrypting user files and then charging 'ransom' to get them back. In a new paper, researchers examine how to use the commodity storage devices already in a computer to save the files without having to pay the ransom.

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Mass die-off of puffins recorded in the Bering Sea

A mass die-off of seabirds in the Bering Sea may be partially attributable to climate change, according to a new study.

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Earth recycles ocean floor into diamonds

Most diamonds are made of cooked seabed. The diamond on your finger is most likely made of recycled seabed cooked deep in the Earth. Traces of salt trapped in many diamonds show the stones are formed from ancient seabeds that became buried deep beneath the Earth's crust, according to new research.

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No One Wants to Talk About Mueller’s Most Definitive Conclusion

Having apparently not bothered to read Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report—after all, it was 448 pages, often in repetitive legalese—large sections of the political and journalistic establishment seemed shocked to learn yesterday that Mueller had pointedly not cleared President Donald Trump of the charge of obstruction of justice, and that he felt that only Congress (and not the Justice Depar

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The Collapsing Crime Rates of the ’90s Might Have Been Driven by Cellphones

It’s practically an American pastime to blame cellphones for all sorts of societal problems, from distracted parents to faltering democracies . But the devices might have also delivered a social silver lining: a de-escalation of the gang turf wars that tore up cities in the 1980s. The intriguing new theory suggests that the arrival of mobile phones made holding territory less important, which red

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New AI Generates Horrifyingly Plausible Fake News

Meet GROVER In an attempt to prevent artificial intelligence-generated fake news from spreading across the internet, a team of scientists built an AI algorithm that creates what might be the most believable bot-written fake news to date — based on nothing more than a lurid headline. The system, GROVER, can create fake and misleading news articles that are more believable than those written by hum

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Nuclear power is not the answer in a time of climate change

In November 2018, the Woolsey Fire scorched nearly 100,000 acres of Los Angeles and Ventura counties, destroying forests, fields and more than 1,500 structures, and forcing the evacuation of nearly 300,000 people over 14 days. It burned so viciously that it seared a scar into the land that's visible from space. Investigators determined that the Woolsey Fire began at the Santa Susana Field Laborat

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Cancer Leader LaSalle Leffall, Jr. Dies

The Howard University surgeon was the first African American president of the American Cancer Society and mentored thousands of medical students.

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Upcoming AI Traffic Systems Can Improve Pedestrian Safety Without Sacrificing Privacy

New traffic systems are employing artificial intelligence to track pedestrian behavior to create safer and more efficient walking paths. A new approach destined for Vienna takes privacy into account as well. The post Upcoming AI Traffic Systems Can Improve Pedestrian Safety Without Sacrificing Privacy appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Teens at greater risk of violence, injury during sexual assaults than previously thought

A recent study of the forensic evidence in 563 sexual assault cases in Massachusetts found 'striking similarities' in the types of injuries and violence experienced by adult and adolescent victims. The similarities suggest that teens are at greater risk of violence and injury during sexual assaults than previously thought, according to the study's authors, University of Illinois senior research sp

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Scientists identify a novel strategy to fight viral infections and cancer in animal model

A potential therapeutic strategy to treat viral infection and boost immunity against cancer is reported in the May 30, 2019 online issue of the journal Cell.

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‘Unearthly’ factors move the sand on Mars

Processes not involved in controlling sand movement on Earth play major roles on Mars, report planetary scientists. Wind has shaped the face of Mars for millennia, but its exact role in piling up sand dunes, carving out rocky escarpments, or filling impact craters has eluded scientists until now. In the most detailed analysis of how sands move around on Mars, researchers led by Matthew Chojnacki

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‘Call of Duty: Modern Warfare’ trailer reveal

Everything we know about Call of Duty: Modern Warfare.

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Depression sufferers at risk of multiple chronic diseases

Women who experience symptoms of depression are at risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, research has found.

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Stress during early pregnancy is linked to reduced reproductive function in male offspring

Men whose mothers were exposed to stressful life events while they were in the first 18 weeks of pregnancy may have reduced sperm counts when they become adults, according to a new study.

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Brain size and fertility in mammals may depend on who cares for offspring

The evolution of larger brain size in offspring is associated with the amount of paternal care in mammals, whereas higher fertility in the mothers is correlated with additional care support from individuals that are not the offspring's biological parents (alloparents), according to a new study.

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Biostatistician studies link between microbiome and preterm birth

Pregnant African American women are more likely than white women to give birth prematurely, but they're underrepresented in studies of preterm birth rates. A biostatistics is working to change that.

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Hydrogen Fuel Cell Flying Car Has a Range of 400 Miles

Skai’s the Limit Massachusetts startup Alaka’i has designed a flying car that the company touts as the “first air mobility vehicle powered by hydrogen fuel cells” in a flashy announcement video . The big promise: ten times the power of conventional lithium batteries without compromising on carbon emissions. The hydrogen fuel cells give the five-passenger Skai a maximum range of 400 miles (640 km)

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Busy tornado season catches naive Easterners off guard

A tornado that caused damage in New Jersey this week caught many people unaware or unprepared.

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First ever solar eclipse film brought back to life

The BFI and the Royal Astronomical Society have announced the rediscovery of the earliest moving picture of a total solar eclipse from 1900. The original film fragment held in The Royal Astronomical Society's archive has been painstakingly scanned and restored in 4K by conservation experts at the BFI National Archive, who have reassembled and retimed the film frame by frame. Available now to watch

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Mass Puffin Die-Off May Be Linked to Climate Change

Rising ocean temperatures and melting ice are disrupting the birds’ food sources — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Swapping water for CO2 could make fracking greener and more effective

Scientists have demonstrated that CO2 may make a better hydraulic fracturing (fracking) fluid than water. New research could help pave the way for a more eco-friendly form of fracking that would double as a mechanism for storing captured atmospheric CO2.

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Intranasal stem cell therapy restores smell in mice

A stem cell therapy delivered into the nose can restore the sense of smell in a mouse model of olfactory loss. The findings provide proof of principle for an approach that has the potential to be of broad utility for a range of clinical conditions causing loss of olfaction.

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Eating blueberries every day improves heart health

Eating a cup of blueberries a day reduces risk factors for cardiovascular disease — according to a new study. Eating 150g of blueberries daily reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease by up to 15 per cent. The research team say that blueberries and other berries should be included in dietary strategies to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease — particularly among at risk groups.

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Lights, camera, fracture

Stretchable electronics are where engineering meets Hollywood special effects.

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New roles for common oncogene MYC

Cancer researchers have discovered surprising new functions for a protein called MYC, a powerful oncogene that is estimated to drive the development of almost half a million new cancer cases in the US every year. The study shows that MYC affects the efficiency and quality of protein production in lymphoma cells, fueling their rapid growth and altering their susceptibility to immunotherapy.

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Philippines sends rotting exported waste back to Canada

Exported waste, intended for recycling, is being sent back to Canada by the Philippines.

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UCI research helps shed new light on circadian clocks

Can your liver sense when you're staring at a television screen or cellphone late at night? Apparently so, and when such activity is detected, the organ can throw your circadian rhythms out of whack, leaving you more susceptible to health problems.

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Over half a million corals destroyed by port of Miami dredging, study finds

A team of researchers including scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, published new findings that reveal significant damage to Miami's coral reefs from the 16-month dredging operation at the Port of Miami that began in 2013. The study found that sediment buried between half to 90% of nearby reefs, resulting in widespread coral death.

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ASCO: Oncologists see benefit of medical marijuana, but not comfortable prescribing

73 percent of oncology providers believe that medical marijuana provides benefits for cancer patients, but only 46 percent are comfortable recommending it.

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ASCO: Entrectinib gets edge over crizotinib against ROS1+ lung cancer

Median time to treatment discontinuation (TTD) on crizotinib was 8.8 months; TTD of patients using entrectinib was 14.6 months. Compared with patients on entrectinib, patients on crizotinib had an additional 44 percent chance that their cancer would resume its growth.

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A New Age of Conflict Between Washington and the States

A new proposal from Senator Kamala Harris requiring federal approval of state laws restricting abortion access captures how the unrelenting escalation of conflict between the parties is igniting fresh tensions between the federal government and the states. More and more, both parties are seeking to use federal authority to block state initiatives they oppose, even as they routinely mobilize their

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Gogo To Bring 5G To North American Skies By 2021

Gogo, a leading provider of in-flight internet services for aviation, has announced that it’s going to build a 5G network for the aviation sector. This new air-to-ground network will …

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U.S. Postal Service mail, packages are headed to Dallas by self-driving truck

Before letters end up in your mailbox and packages land on your doorstep, many travel hundreds or thousands of miles in the back of a truck. Now, the United States Postal Service is testing …

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The best electric gooseneck kettles

Gadgets Great for more than just coffee and tea. Outfit your kitchen with an electric kettle for precise temperature control and a quicker, safer boil. Here are my picks.

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Fishing among worst jobs for health

People working in the fishing industry have among the poorest health of all workers in England and Wales, new research suggests.

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A new mechanism for accessing damaged DNA

UV light damages the DNA of skin cells, which can lead to cancer. This process is counteracted by the DNA repair machinery. It has been unclear, however, how repair proteins work on DNA tightly packed in chromatin, where access to DNA damage is restricted by protein packaging. Using cryo electron microscopy, researchers from the Thomä group at the FMI have identified a new mechanism whereby repair

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The Tendency for Order to Emerge from Chaos Was Hidden in the Most Fundamental Equations of Fluid Mechanics

Order sometimes emerges from chaos in turbulent fluid flow. We may finally have a mathematical explanation for why.

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A 'Noah's Ark' project for corals: Scientists race to save Florida Reef from killer disease

On a sunny afternoon in Dania Beach, a dozen scientists unloaded crates full of corals from a dive boat and onto a pickup truck. They gently removed each piece from large tanks on the deck and placed them inside smaller containers, which were slowly taken onshore.

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Research proves Midwestern fish species lives beyond 100 years

Research recently completed at North Dakota State University has proven that the Bigmouth Buffalo (Ictiobus cyprinellus), a fish native to North America, lives more than eight decades longer than previously thought. The study published in Communications Biology documents several individuals more than 100 years of age, with one at 112 years, which more than quadruples all previous age estimates for

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Research proves Midwestern fish species lives beyond 100 years

Research recently completed at North Dakota State University has proven that the Bigmouth Buffalo (Ictiobus cyprinellus), a fish native to North America, lives more than eight decades longer than previously thought. The study published in Communications Biology documents several individuals more than 100 years of age, with one at 112 years, which more than quadruples all previous age estimates for

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Spaceplanes (SFIA)

submitted by /u/igmrlm [link] [comments]

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CERN’s Ambitious Plan to Build the Largest Particle Smasher Ever

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Scientists engineer unique 'glowing' protein

Biophysicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have joined forces with colleagues from France and Germany to create a new fluorescent protein. Besides glowing when irradiated with ultraviolet and blue light, it is exceedingly small and stable under high temperatures. The authors of the paper, published in the journal Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences, believe the protein

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Sorry, FCC—killing net neutrality probably didn’t expand internet access

FCC chairman Ajit Pai had claimed that rosy broadband numbers showed his deregulation approach was working.

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Pollution is a 'significant' problem at 401 national parks, report says

More than 96% of national parks assessed in a recent report are "plagued by significant air pollution problems," and some of California's most iconic parks are among the most troubled, according to one of the nation's largest nonprofit conservation associations.

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Scientists engineer unique 'glowing' protein

Biophysicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have joined forces with colleagues from France and Germany to create a new fluorescent protein. Besides glowing when irradiated with ultraviolet and blue light, it is exceedingly small and stable under high temperatures. The authors of the paper, published in the journal Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences, believe the protein

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NICER's night moves trace the X-ray sky

In this image, numerous sweeping arcs seem to congregate at various bright regions. You may wonder: What is being shown? Air traffic routes? Information moving around the global internet? Magnetic fields looping across active areas on the Sun?

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Sharks popping up all around Florida for summer beach season

There are sharks off Florida's coast. That's not news, but with Memorial Day weekend's traditional summer season kickoff, there are now thousands more people venturing to Florida's beaches, so that means more shark sightings.

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Bees have built a nest entirely out of plastic bags in the environment

The first report of a bee’s nest made entirely from plastic comes from Argentina. The leafcutter bees created cells out of what may be bits of old plastic bags

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LSU health research finds new RX target for common STD

Research led by Ashok Aiyar, PhD, Associate Professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has identified a target that may lead to the development of new treatments for the most common sexually transmitted infection in the US.

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Chicago winter without a furnace or gas bill: Passive houses make it possible and are slowly catching on

In the 1970s, long before the Prius and Green New Deal, a small group of engineers and architects at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was already going green.

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Sharks popping up all around Florida for summer beach season

There are sharks off Florida's coast. That's not news, but with Memorial Day weekend's traditional summer season kickoff, there are now thousands more people venturing to Florida's beaches, so that means more shark sightings.

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Tech giant brings software to a gun fight

Business-software giant Salesforce instituted a new policy barring its retail customers from selling semiautomatic weapons and some other firearms.

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Rethinking the Infamous Stanford Prison Experiment

Newly revealed evidence suggests that putting people into positions of absolute control over others doesn’t necessarily lead to cruelty by itself — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Beyond 1 and 0: Engineers boost potential for creating successor to shrinking transistors

Scientists offer a solution to the fast-approaching physical minimum for transistor size: a multi-value logic transistor based on zinc oxide, capable of two stable intermediate states between 0 and 1.

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Escaped 'Racoon Dogs' Harass English Village. What Are These Things?

A pair of escaped raccoon dogs are stalking the English village of Clarborough, according to the Nottinghamshire police. Here's what they really are.

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The Paradox at the Heart of Godzilla

On Sunday mornings in the 1970s, I was the first in my house to wake up. As soon as I got out of bed, I’d retrieve the thick Sunday edition of the newspaper, pull out the comics section, and then dig for the weekly TV guide. I’d flip to the listing for the following Saturday to see which monster movies would be part of that morning’s “Creature Features.” Any film would’ve thrilled me, but I was a

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The Atlantic and Anonymous Content Sign First-Look Deal

The Atlantic and Anonymous Content have signed a first-look agreement, giving Anonymous Content first option to develop and produce scripted and unscripted content from The Atlantic’s journalism, past and present. The deal encompasses projects across multiple platforms and mediums including feature films, documentaries, television shows, and podcasts. The multi-year deal is the first of its kind

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The Gandhi Dynasty Helped Found India. It Is Now in Demise.

Amid the Bharatiya Janata Party’s landslide victory in India’s parliamentary elections, one result stood out, in the town of Amethi, near the border with Nepal. There, the family that has dominated Indian politics since the country’s independence more than 70 years ago suffered a humiliating blow: Rahul Gandhi, the leader of the opposition Congress Party, lost his seat. The BJP’s overall victory

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Rethinking the Infamous Stanford Prison Experiment

Newly revealed evidence suggests that putting people into positions of absolute control over others doesn’t necessarily lead to cruelty by itself — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dealing with the Hazards from Tornadoes and Eruptions

EF3 tornado from an 2017 tornado outbreak near Washburn, Illinois. Wikimedia Commons. I live in Ohio and one thing I've had to get used to here that I didn't experience most places I have lived are tornadoes. This week, parts of western Ohio got hit by some big and destructive tornadoes and in total, at least 17 tornadoes were confirmed across the state. This is part of a larger tornado outbreak a

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Daily briefing: Being a Chinese scientist in the United States

Nature, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01722-5 “Where do our hearts and bodies belong?” Plus: lessons from the Human Microbiome Project and blood stem cells produced in vast quantities in the lab — using a surprisingly simple ingredient found in glue.

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This Luxury Apartment Comes With Two Free Tickets to Space

Free Space A real estate firm is going to great lengths to attract buyers for a $85 million penthouse in Manhattan. The 15,000-square-foot property has been on the market for six years . But so far, no one has been been willing to pay the astronomical asking price. To sweeten the pot, broker Daniel Neiditch is now offering buyers a slew of incentives, including a $1 million yacht, a mansion in th

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Scientists engineer unique 'glowing' protein

Biophysicists from MIPT and their colleagues from France and Germany have created a new fluorescent protein. Besides glowing when irradiated with ultraviolet and blue light, it is exceedingly small and stable under high temperatures. The authors believe the protein holds prospects for fluorescence microscopy. This technique is used in research on cancer, infectious diseases, and organ development,

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NICER's night moves trace the X-ray sky

This is a map of the entire sky in X-rays recorded by NASA's Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER), a payload on the International Space Station.

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Godzilla is back and he's bigger than ever: The evolutionary biology of the monster

Godzilla first made his debut in 1954. At inception, he was a 50-meter tall metaphor for indiscriminate destruction, particularly U.S. hydrogen-bomb testing in the Marshall Islands, which, in the film, destroyed Godzilla's deep-sea ecosystem. Sixty-five years and 35 films later, Godzilla is back and bigger than ever in Godzilla: King of the Monsters. At 119.8 meters tall, Godzilla battles it out f

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Telecoms giant EE launches Britain's first 5G services

British mobile phone operator EE on Thursday became the first in the country to launch a high-speed 5G service, but without smartphones from controversial Chinese technology giant Huawei.

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Exposure to airborne metal pollution associated with increased risk of mortality

Although there is ample evidence that air pollution—specifically airborne particulate matter—is associated with an increased risk of premature death, it is still not known which specific particles are responsible for this effect. The Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a research centre supported by "la Caixa," participated in a study that used wild moss samples to estimate human exp

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The most complete study of battery failure sees the light

An international team of researchers just published in Advanced Energy Materials the widest study on what happens during battery failure, focusing on the different parts of a battery at the same time. The role of the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, in France, was crucial for its success.

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Bacteria's protein quality control agent offers insight into origins of life

May 30—Our cells' process for transforming genes into useful proteins works much like an automobile factory's assembly line; there are schematics, parts, workers, motors, quality control systems and even recycling crews. If the cell's recycling process falters, abnormal protein fragments accumulate, potentially causing the cell's death. In nerve cells, the process is linked to a variety of neurode

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James Webb Space Telescope emerges successfully from final thermal vacuum test

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has successfully cleared another critical testing milestone, taking this ambitious observatory one step closer to its 2021 launch. The spacecraft has gone through its final thermal vacuum test meant to ensure that its hardware will function electronically in the vacuum of space, and withstand the extreme temperature variations it will encounter on its mission.

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Uncovering microgel mysteries

Researchers at Shinshu University successfully recorded previously unexplained behavior of hydrogel microspheres (microgels) using a newly customized tool: temperature-controlled high-speed atomic force microscopy (TC HS AFM). This machine, which is the only one in the world, was assembled by Dr. Takayuki Uchihashi of Nagoya University to investigate proteins. It was applied for the first time to

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Bacteria's protein quality control agent offers insight into origins of life

May 30—Our cells' process for transforming genes into useful proteins works much like an automobile factory's assembly line; there are schematics, parts, workers, motors, quality control systems and even recycling crews. If the cell's recycling process falters, abnormal protein fragments accumulate, potentially causing the cell's death. In nerve cells, the process is linked to a variety of neurode

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What Does All This Local Reporting Add Up To?

Yesterday, Deb Fallows and I sent an email to various loyal readers of The Atlantic . You can see what was in that message in the “Continue Reading” section of this post. In response, I got this message, from a longtime reader in Oregon: I would like to see someone “package” or “productize,” both recipes for solutions, and recipes for non-solutions, which you and Deborah Fallows uncover. I would

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Fishing among worst jobs for health

People working in the fishing industry have among the poorest health of all workers in England and Wales, new research suggests.

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The Body’s Clock Offers a Rhythmic Target to Viruses

For at least 3,000 years , humans have known that malaria runs like clockwork, with a devastating fever that peaks, fades and returns on a predictable schedule. The Greek physician Hippocrates observed that it took 24-, 48- and 72-hour forms, and that the daily variety was more deadly than the tertian (second-day) and quartan (third-day) fevers, though all could kill. Later medical authorities ha

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How the bicycle shifted labor, technology, and marriage

The bicycle has had an impact over time on travel, fashion, and even marriage, says historian David Ortiz. The earliest bicycle design, called the “ordinary,” “penny farthing,” or “hi-boy,” was very tall with a disproportionately large front wheel. The introduction of the “safety” design seen in modern bicycles made riding more accessible beginning in the 1890s. Ortiz, associate professor at the

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China Is Now Assembling Its 2020 Mars Rover

Mars Rover Chinese space scientists are currently outfitting their Mars Rover with scientific instruments in preparation for a launch next year. The “Mars 2020 mission spacecraft is undergoing integration,” Wang Chi, director of China’s National Space Science Center, told Space News . In this case, integration means attaching 13 separate scientific instruments to the Mars rover and orbiter, both

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Solar power plant in California co-located with grass fed cows for Whole Foods

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Andrew Yang Wants To Give You $1,000 A Month (HBO)

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Cannabis use among older adults rising rapidly

Cannabis use among older adults is growing faster than any other age group but many report barriers to getting medical marijuana, a lack of communication with their doctors and a lingering stigma attached to the drug, according to researchers.

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Bacteria's protein quality control agent offers insight into origins of life

The discoveries not only offer new directions for fighting the virulence of some of humanity's most dangerous pathogens, they have implications for our understanding of how life itself evolved.

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Greater emphasis is needed on joint role of condoms and vaccines to prevent HPV

Public health efforts must emphasize condom use and vaccination together to reduce human papillomavirus (HPV) cases among young sexually active gay men, according to researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health published today in the journal Vaccine. The work builds on other studies demonstrating success of these methods by modeling how many HPV cases can be prevented by inc

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Researchers restore beta-cell function by deleting old cells

Joslin researchers confirmed similarly increased proportion of aged beta-cells in islets recovered from humans with type 2 diabetes. The study also showed that beta cell function can be recovered by removing these aged populations either via genetic modification or oral medication.

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Interaction with stromal cells influences tumor growth, metastasis in pancreatic cancer

A study from researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center has demonstrated how the response to pancreatic cancer cells of normal tissue — called the stroma — within tumors can influence the ability of individual cancer cells to proliferate and metastasize

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Perceived discrimination associated with well-being in adults with poor vision

This study of nearly 7,700 men and women 50 or older in England looked at how common perceived discrimination was among those with visual impairment and how that was associated with emotional well-being. Of the individuals, 913 reported poor overall eyesight and 658 reported poor eyesight up close.

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Novel protocol significantly improves outcomes in locally advanced pancreatic cancer

A Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center clinical trial of a protocol combining intensive chemotherapy and radiation therapy with the blood pressure drug losartan has produced unprecedented results in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, allowing complete removal of the tumor in 61% of participants and significantly improving survival rates.

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Unknown mini-proteins in the heart

A team led by Professor Norbert Hübner's MDC research group has observed the human heart cells' 'protein factories' in action, examining the entire tissue for the very first time. In an article published in Cell, the group reveals their surprising discoveries and the possibilities they contain for the future treatment of heart disease.

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Wildfire smoke worse for kids' health than smoke from controlled burns, study finds

Children were exposed to higher air pollutant levels during a California wildfire than during a similar-sized controlled burn, and the difference was reflected by changes in immune markers in their blood, a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found.

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Intranasal stem cell therapy restores smell in mice

A stem cell therapy delivered into the nose can restore the sense of smell in a mouse model of olfactory loss. The findings, published May 30, 2019 in the journal Stem Cell Reports, provide proof of principle for an approach that has the potential to be of broad utility for a range of clinical conditions causing loss of olfaction.

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Gut bacteria influence autism-like behaviors in mice

Caltech researchers have discovered that gut bacteria directly contribute to autism-like behaviors in mice.

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Swapping water for CO2 could make fracking greener and more effective

Scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and China University of Petroleum (Beijing) have demonstrated that CO2 may make a better hydraulic fracturing (fracking) fluid than water. Their research, published May 30 in the journal Joule, could help pave the way for a more eco-friendly form of fracking that would double as a mechanism for storing captured atmospheric CO2.

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Scientists bioengineer human liver disease in the lab to find new treatments

Scientists successfully bioengineered human liver organoids that faithfully mimic key features of fatal liver disease in the laboratory. This allowed them to uncover underlying disease biology in the organoids and test a potential therapy that in preclinical lab tests reversed an often-fatal childhood condition called Wolman disease. In findings published online by the journal Cell Metabolism, stu

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Newly discovered immune cell linked to type 1 diabetes

In a discovery that might be likened to finding medicine's version of the Loch Ness monster, a research team from Johns Hopkins Medicine, IBM Research and four collaborating institutions is the first to document the existence of long-doubted 'X cell', a 'rogue hybrid' immune system cell that may play a key role in the development of type 1 diabetes.

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Autism symptoms replicated in mice after faecal transplants

Study aims to discover whether gut microbes play a part in development of the condition Scientists have induced the hallmarks of autism in mice by giving them faecal transplants from humans with the condition. The experiments were designed to test whether the communities of gut microbes found in people with autism have a role in their symptoms, an idea that is gaining ground among researchers. Co

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Disney May Stop Filming In Georgia Over Abortion Ban

Mouse House honcho Bob Iger says it would be "very difficult" to continue working in the state if the law goes into effect.

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Former Head of Pentagon's Secret UFO Program Has Some (Strange) Stories to Tell

The UFO-investigating initiative hid in plain sight for years.

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Europeans looked down on Neanderthals—until they realized they shared their DNA

Science Excerpt: Superior Scientists were convinced that Aboriginal Australians were further down the evolutionary ladder from other humans, perhaps closer to Neanderthals. In 2010 it turned out…

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The Hybrid System That Spots Tornadoes

It has been an exceptional week for tornadoes in the United States. In the past 13 days, more than 366 twisters have struck the central and eastern United States. They ranged from a deadly tornado in Dayton, Ohio, to a mile-wide beast that leveled houses across 30 miles of Kansas but remarkably left no fatalities. This outbreak has been abiding: While no one day has proved catastrophic, it’s odd

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Damaged sense of smell fixed in mice by squirting stem cells up nose

Stem cell therapy delivered through nasal droplets can restore a sense of smell in mice – but it will take time to develop a safe nasal spray for humans

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Could fracking with carbon dioxide instead of water be greener?

Using CO2 to fracture rocks for oil and gas is being touted as a more environmentally friendly approach to fracking, but it may not be greener overall

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Everest deaths: Four reasons why this climbing season went wrong

Overcrowding is blamed for an increase in deaths on the world's highest peak, but other factors are at play.

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Gut bacteria may contribute to autism symptoms, mouse study finds

Fecal transplants from children with autism reduce social behavior in mice

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Hungary is Building a $1 Billion Carbon-Neutral Town From Scratch

Green Town Hungary is planning to build a fully carbon-neutral town from the ground up in the northwest of the country, Bloomberg reports . German property investment company FAKT invested $1.1 billion in the 1.27 square mile horticultural and infrastructure project that could create 5,000 permanent jobs. The entire town will be powered by solar and biogas power. The idea is to provide the ground

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Towards a new era of small animal imaging research

Thanks to a collaborative effort between McGill University, Montreal Canada and the University of Antwerp, Belgium this no longer needs to be the case. A new study, published in NeuroImage by researchers from the Molecular Imaging Center Antwerp (MICA) and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute of McGill University, describes a new PET imaging platform capable of simultaneously scanning mu

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Scientists design organic cathode for high performance batteries

Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory have designed a new, organic cathode material for lithium batteries. With sulfur at its core, the material is more energy-dense, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly than traditional cathode materials in lithium batteries.

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Swapping water for CO2 could make fracking greener and more effective

Scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and China University of Petroleum (Beijing) have demonstrated that CO2 may make a better hydraulic fracturing (fracking) fluid than water. Their research, published May 30 in the journal Joule, could help pave the way for a more eco-friendly form of fracking that would double as a mechanism for storing captured atmospheric CO2.

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Human beings may owe their existence to nearby supernovas

Cosmic rays from them would have changed the world’s vegetation

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More evidence that autism is linked to gut bacteria

Understanding that link may be crucial to treatment

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Sunshine may decrease risk of inflammatory bowel disease

Children who spend half an hour a day outside in the sun reduce their risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

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Novel Type of Immune Cell Discovered in Type 1 Diabetes Patients

A rogue hybrid lymphocyte, bearing characteristics of both B and T cells, may play a role in driving autoimmunity in the disease, although the mechanism is far from clear.

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A new mechanism for accessing damaged DNA

UV light damages the DNA of skin cells, which can lead to skin cancer. But this process is counteracted by DNA repair machinery, acting as a molecular sunscreen. It has been unclear, however, how repair proteins work on DNA tightly packed in chromatin, where access to DNA damage is restricted by protein packaging. Using cryo electron microscopy, researchers from the Thomä group at the Friedrich Mi

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Church, couch, couple: Social psychological connections between people and physical space

Societies and people have reshaped the world many times over. From building cities and communities that live within them, to the smaller changes in a person's home or place of worship, people influence their space. Benjamin Meagher, a social psychologist at Hope College, argues that the space people shape, also shapes the individual, and that social psychology must take an "ecological" view of peo

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Resistance to Fusarium head blight holding in Illinois, study says

Illinois wheat growers, take heart. A new University of Illinois study shows no evidence of a highly toxic Fusarium head blight (FHB) variant, known as NA2, in the wheat-growing region of the state. The study also reinforces the effectiveness of wheat resistance to the fungal disease.

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If You’re Curious About Buying CBD Online, This Deal is Too Good to Pass Up

Millions of Americans are using cannabidiol (CBD) for a wide range of purported health and wellness benefits. But for someone interested in buying CBD for the first time, figuring out where to start can be intimidating. Fortunately, a company called Eaze Wellness is making it easier than ever to buy CBD online . Not only does Eaze Wellness offer nationwide delivery on a wide variety of trusted CB

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A new mechanism for accessing damaged DNA

UV light damages the DNA of skin cells, which can lead to skin cancer. But this process is counteracted by DNA repair machinery, acting as a molecular sunscreen. It has been unclear, however, how repair proteins work on DNA tightly packed in chromatin, where access to DNA damage is restricted by protein packaging. Using cryo electron microscopy, researchers from the Thomä group at the Friedrich Mi

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Resistance to Fusarium head blight holding in Illinois, study says

Illinois wheat growers, take heart. A new University of Illinois study shows no evidence of a highly toxic Fusarium head blight (FHB) variant, known as NA2, in the wheat-growing region of the state. The study also reinforces the effectiveness of wheat resistance to the fungal disease.

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A Scorecard for Police Departments

As the Black Lives Matter movement rose to national prominence in 2015, a small group associated with the push to end unnecessary police killings suggested 10 specific reforms that every police agency ought to adopt, hoping to inspire informed, constructive activism in communities across the country. On Wednesday, Campaign Zero launched a new initiative grounded in a similar premise—that changing

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Politics this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Business this week

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Rosalind Franklin: Mars rover control centre opens

Day-to-day operation of the Rosalind Franklin Mars rover will be run out of a facility in Turin.

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What it takes to launch a telescope | Erika Hamden

TED Fellow and astronomer Erika Hamden leads the team building FIREBall, a telescope that hangs from a giant balloon at the very edge of space and looks for clues about how stars are created. She takes us inside the roller-coaster, decade-long journey to get the telescope from an idea into orbit — and shows how failure is inevitable when you're pushing the limits of knowledge.

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Heartburn drugs linked to fatal heart and kidney disease, stomach cancer

A study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System has linked long-term use of such popular heartburn drugs — called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) — to fatal cases of cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease and upper gastrointestinal cancer. More than 15 million Americans have prescriptions for PPIs.

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Emergency room or doctor's office?

A new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier, examines the relationship between the way individuals perceive and respond to threats (threat sensitivity) and where they most frequently seek medical care. The study investigates the association between the healthcare utilization practices of African American men in a low-income urban neighborhood and their relative levels of threat sensi

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Resistance to Fusarium head blight holding in Illinois, study says

Illinois wheat growers, take heart. A new University of Illinois study shows no evidence of a highly toxic Fusarium head blight (FHB) variant, known as NA2, in the wheat-growing region of the state. The study also reinforces the effectiveness of wheat resistance to the fungal disease.

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Public health leaders call for new efforts to promote vaccination acceptance

On Thursday, an international coalition of public health leaders including CUNY SPH Dean Ayman El-Mohandes and Senior Scholar Scott Ratzan issued a statement asserting its commitment to vaccine acceptance around the world and to eliminating vaccine-preventable diseases, including childhood diseases such as measles, mumps, and rubella.

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Patient groups untested in cancer immunotherapy trials found to also benefit

Cancer patients previously excluded and underrepresented in immunotherapy clinical trials, such as African Americans and patients with HIV or viral hepatitis, actually benefit at the same rate as patients tested in the clinical trials, according to a Georgetown-led study to be presented at the 2019 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago.

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Another Ripple From the Huawei Ban: Scientific Peer Review

IEEE, an engineering organization that publishes several scientific journals, bans Huawei employees from prepublication peer reviews.

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Church, couch, couple: Social psychological connections between people and physical space

From couples to communities, the built environment shapes us as much as we shape it. A newly published literature review in Personality and Social Psychology Review describes the importance of the person-environment connection.

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Significant 'knowledge gap' exists in use of genetic testing to decide cancer treatment

A survey conducted by Georgetown investigators found a significant knowledge and practice gap among community oncologists in the understanding and usage of genetic testing in determining patients' treatment plans and potential clinical trial outcomes.

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A new mechanism for accessing damaged DNA

UV light damages the DNA of skin cells, which can lead to cancer. This process is counteracted by the DNA repair machinery. It has been unclear, however, how repair proteins work on DNA tightly packed in chromatin, where access to DNA damage is restricted by protein packaging. Using cryo electron microscopy, researchers from the Thomä group at the FMI have identified a new mechanism whereby repair

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Eating blueberries every day improves heart health

Eating a cup of blueberries a day reduces risk factors for cardiovascular disease — according to a new study. Eating 150g of blueberries daily reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease by up to 15 per cent.The research team say that blueberries and other berries should be included in dietary strategies to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease — particularly among at risk groups.

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Annual Report to the Nation: Overall cancer mortality continues to decline

For all cancer sites combined, cancer death rates continued to decline in men, women, and children in the United States from 1999 to 2016. Overall cancer incidence rates, or rates of new cancers, decreased in men from 2008 to 2015, after increasing from 1999 to 2008, and were stable in women from 1999 to 2015. In a special section of the report, researchers looked at cancer rates and trends in adu

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Global garment companies failing to deliver on living wage promises to workers, study finds

]Global garment companies are failing to meet living wage promises to workers, according to a study published by researchers at the University of Sheffield today (30 May 2019).

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Thermal analog black hole agrees with Hawking radiation theory

A team of researchers at the Israel Institute of Technology has found that a thermal analog black hole they created agrees with the Hawking radiation theory. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes building their analog black hole and using data from it to test its temperature. Silke Weinfurtner with the University of Nottingham has published a News and Views piece on t

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Rocketman Deserves to Be a Smash Hit

It’s inevitable that Rocketman will draw comparisons to Bohemian Rhapsody , last year’s smash-hit biopic in the form of a jukebox musical. Both are about hyper-popular rock acts who reigned supreme in the 1970s and ’80s; both are focused on effervescent showmen who spent many years in the closet, and both were—in a manner of speaking—directed by Dexter Fletcher. The direction of Bohemian Rhapsody

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The Crucial Role of Brain Simulation in Future Neuroscience

“Do we have a chance of ever understanding brain function without brain simulations?” So asked the Human Brain Project (HBP), the brainchild of Henry Markram , in a new paper in the prestigious journal Neuron . The key, the team argued, is to consider brain simulators in the vein of calculus for Newton’s laws—not as specific ideas of how the brain works, but rather as a programming language that

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Habitat loss doesn't just affect species, it impacts networks of ecological relationships

Habitat loss is the leading cause of biodiversity loss worldwide. Depending on their size, animals need a given amount of area to be able to find enough resources to maintain viable populations. But once the area of available habitat goes below a certain threshold, populations are no longer viable and species go locally extinct.

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Save the beetles! Cut down trees!

Successful Swedish conservation strategy seems counterintuitive.

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Pluto ammonia find suggests a possible life-friendly ocean

NASA data suggests relatively recent leakage from deep below the dwarf planet’s surface. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Diamonds are made from recycled seabed

Discolouration in industrial diamonds reveal their high-pressure origin. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Habitat loss doesn't just affect species, it impacts networks of ecological relationships

Habitat loss is the leading cause of biodiversity loss worldwide. Depending on their size, animals need a given amount of area to be able to find enough resources to maintain viable populations. But once the area of available habitat goes below a certain threshold, populations are no longer viable and species go locally extinct.

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Google Bans Weed Delivery Apps From Play Store

Buncha Narcs If you had plans to capitalize on the growing trend of marijuana legalization by starting a weed-delivery app, then the Google Play Store is not the place for you. Google just banned any apps on its platform from selling pot or even facilitating the sale of THC products, according to Android Police . The push likely stems from Google’s efforts to make its app store more child-friendl

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Scientists demonstrate plant stress memory and adaptation capabilities

Russian and Taiwanese scientists have discovered a connection between the two signalling systems that help plants survive stress situations, demonstrating that they can remember dangerous conditions that they have experienced and adapt to them. This memory mechanism will help improve agricultural plants, making them more resistant to drought, flooding high humidity and extreme temperatures. The re

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Discovery may lead to natural ent-kaurane diterpenoid for NK-based tumor immunotherapy

Research groups led by Prof. LI Yan and Prof. Puno Pematenzin from the Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that ent-kaurane diterpenoids, which show a wide range of bioactivity, especially antitumor activity, are good candidates as sensitizer agents for NK cells.

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Raw or cooked: this is how we recognise food

Do we see an apple? The occipital cortex in our brain will activate itself to recognise it. A plate of pasta? Another region will come into play, called middle temporal gyrus. According to a new study, different regions are implicated in recognition of different foods, raw in one case and processed in the other, because two components of the 'semantic memory', the one that we always use to recogni

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'Slothbot' takes a leisurely approach to environmental monitoring

For environmental monitoring, precision agriculture, infrastructure maintenance and certain security applications, slow and energy efficient can be better than fast and always needing a recharge. That's where 'SlothBot' comes in.

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Sunshine may decrease risk of inflammatory bowel disease

Children who spend half an hour a day outside in the sun reduce their risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to new research from The Australian National University (ANU).

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'Ecstasy' shows promise for post-traumatic stress treatment

An international study involving researchers from UBC Okanagan has shown that MDMA, also known as ecstasy, may be a valuable tool for treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Published recently in Psychopharmacology, the study demonstrated substantial improvements in individuals who had not responded to prior treatments, explains UBCO Associate Professor of psychology Zach Walsh. This is al

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Technology can transform global health and education, but it's no silver bullet

New report offers a blueprint for prudent investments in technology, through which governments can create effective and fair health and education services.

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Unsettling sex robot looks almost exactly like a real person

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IEA Predicts 250 Million EVs On The Road By 2030

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Nearly Half of All Retail Sales Jobs May Soon Be Replaced by Automation

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Half of transgender and non-binary people hide their identity at work in fear of discrimination

For people who identify as LGBT+, the workplace can be a difficult environment to manage. One in five lesbian, gay and bisexual employees say they have experienced verbal bullying. For those who are transgender and gender non-conforming things can be even more difficult.

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Edible insects? Lab-grown meat? The real future food is lab-grown insect meat

Livestock farming is destroying our planet. It is a major cause of land and water degradation, biodiversity loss, acid rain, coral reef degeneration, deforestation—and of course, climate change. Plant-based diets, insect farming, lab-grown meat and genetically modified animals have all been proposed as potential solutions. Which is best?

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T-Mobile and Sprint May Have to Create Fourth Competitor to Win Merger Approval

Right now, most estimates of a T-Mobile/Sprint merger getting approved say its a coin flip. That’s because while FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has given the deal his blessing, the Justice Department …

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Belief in learning styles myth may be detrimental

Many people, including educators, believe learning styles are set at birth and predict both academic and career success even though there is no scientific evidence to support this common myth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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International travelers experience the harmful effects of air pollution

Even a short stay for travelers in cities with high levels of air pollution leads to breathing problems that can take at least a week from which to recover, a new study shows.

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Recreation video shows how 'earliest Pictish fort' may have looked

A stunning video, based on research by the University of Aberdeen, has revealed what one of the earliest known Pictish forts may have looked like.

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Depression sufferers at risk of multiple chronic diseases

Women who experience symptoms of depression are at risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, research led by The University of Queensland has found.

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Stellenbosch University researchers study resistance to 'protect' anti-TB drug

Scientists from Stellenbosch University are trying to conserve the life-saving treatment bedaquiline, by studying how the bacterium that causes TB can develop resistance to this drug.

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COMMD3/8 protein complex: a potential drug target for treating inflammatory diseases

A team of researchers led by Kazuhiro Suzuki from the Immunology Frontier Research Center at Osaka University discovered the COMMD3/8 complex as a molecule involved in immune cell migration, clarifying that the complex plays a critical role in the establishment of immune responses. Their research results were published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

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Dogs help spread a dangerous tick-borne disease

New research examines risk factors for Rocky Mountain spotted fever, one of the deadliest tick-borne diseases in the Americas, in Mexicali, Mexico. In Mexicali, an uncontrolled epidemic of Rocky Mountain spotted fever has affected more than 1,000 people since 2008. Researchers examined dogs, ticks, and surveyed households in 200 neighborhoods. Half of the neighborhoods in the study had diagnosed

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7 apps that will let you hire people to do almost anything

DIY Outsource work without leaving your bed. From answering phone calls to clearing the attic, these apps can help you get assistance for all kinds of tasks.

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Four ways your name can affect your job prospects

What's in a name? A lot, according to research. Your name can have a huge influence on your prospects in life. Much of this is due to bias, stereotyping and other rules of thumb that people employ when making judgments about others.

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UK car output crashes on Brexit-induced shutdowns

British car output almost halved in April as factories imposed shutdowns in the face of Brexit uncertainty and other sector-wide headwinds, industry data showed Thursday.

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Estonians hold 'funeral march' for science over govt funding

Estonian scientists on Thursday held a funeral march for research after the tech-savvy Baltic state's government reneged on a promise to increase science funding in next year's budget.

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Waymo bringing self-driving trucks to Phoenix area freeways

Google's self-driving vehicle division says it's bringing autonomous trucks to the Phoenix area.

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Subaru Telescope captures 1800 new supernovae

Astronomers using the Subaru Telescope identified about 1800 new supernovae in the distant universe, including 58 Type Ia supernovae over 8 billion light-years away. These findings will help elucidate the expansion of the universe.

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Book aims to rethink how school-age mothers are taught, engaged with education

Any teacher can attest that reaching students is easier and their lessons more effective when they can relate to classroom subject matter. Yet for school-age mothers and other "at-risk" students, curriculum most often utilizes a deficit model, or fixing what students are deemed to be lacking. A University of Kansas professor has co-written a book that aims to rethink how school-age mothers are tau

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For the first time, scientists recreate cell division—outside a cell

Every living thing moves—prey from predators, ants to crumbs, leaves toward sunlight. But at the most fundamental level, scientists are still struggling to grasp the physics behind how our own cells build, move, transport and divide.

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Why fewer Americans are getting divorced

Fewer and fewer Americans are getting divorced, with the rates falling 18% between 2008 and 2016.

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Prescribed burning to combat wildfires has not increased in the U.S. West

Fire management agencies are not increasing the use of prescribed fire—a key tool for preventing wildfires—anywhere outside of the Southeastern United States, according to a new University of Idaho study.

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Influencing energy use behavior through training and gamification

Buildings are responsible for approximately 40 percent of energy consumption and 36 percent of CO2 emissions in the EU, according to the European Commission. It's also widely accepted that to reduce the amount of energy used, consumers have to change their behavior. But old habits die hard, especially when it comes to making sacrifices for the environment.

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Stabilizing the no-boundary proposal sheds light on the universe's quantum origins

One idea for how the universe began is that the universe may have appeared out of nothing due to some quantum effect, such as quantum tunneling. In the 1980s, Stephen Hawking and James Hartle further elaborated on this idea by suggesting that time did not exist before the beginning of the universe, leading them to conclude that the universe has no initial boundary conditions on either time or spac

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Scientists Just Took the Temperature of a Lab-Made Black Hole

Sonic Black Hole When we talk about black holes , we’re usually referring to the massive space phenomena with gravity so strong that they capture even light. However, in 2009, researchers managed to create a different kind of black hole — one that absorbs sound — in the lab. Since then, these sonic black holes have proven useful as analogs for the light-absorbing kind. And now, a team of physicis

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For the first time, scientists recreate cell division—outside a cell

Every living thing moves—prey from predators, ants to crumbs, leaves toward sunlight. But at the most fundamental level, scientists are still struggling to grasp the physics behind how our own cells build, move, transport and divide.

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Scientists design organic cathode for high performance batteries

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have designed a new, organic cathode material for lithium batteries. With sulfur at its core, the material is more energy-dense, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly than traditional cathode materials in lithium batteries. The research was published in Advanced Energy Materials on April 10, 2019.

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More than a spring-clean for LHC magnets

In April, work began on one of the major projects scheduled for the second long shutdown (LS2) of the CERN accelerators: improving the electrical insulation of over 1200 magnets in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). To complete this mammoth task, more than 150 people are hard at work in the LHC tunnel… and they will be there for over a year.

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Exposure to airborne metal pollution associated with increased risk of mortality

Study uses samples of wild moss to estimate individual human exposure to atmospheric metals.

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The most complete study of battery failure sees the light

An international team of researchers just published in Advanced Energy Materials the widest study on what happens during battery failure, focusing on the different parts of a battery at the same time. The role of the ESRF was crucial for its success.

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Providing a critical roadmap to bridge the gap between medicine and public health

Academic medical centers across the country and around the world are rapidly creating and expanding population health departments to bridge the worlds of clinical practice and public health. However, few frameworks exist to guide these efforts. Now a new case study from a pioneering leader in the field provides an important and definitive road map.

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Edible insects? Lab-grown meat? The real future food is lab-grown insect meat

Livestock farming is destroying our planet. It is a major cause of land and water degradation, biodiversity loss, acid rain, coral reef degeneration, deforestation — and of course, climate change. Plant-based diets, insect farming, lab-grown meat and genetically modified animals have all been proposed as potential solutions. Which is best? All of these combined, say researchers at Tufts Universit

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Research confirms gut-brain connection in autism

Up to 90% of people with autism suffer from gut problems, but nobody has known why. New research reveals the same gene mutations — found both in the brain and the gut — could be the cause.

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Brain activity in teens predicts future mood health

An imbalance of functioning in attention-related brain systems may help forecast the course of teen depression, according to a study published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier.

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Uncovering microgel mysteries

Researchers successfully recorded the behavior of hydrogel microspheres (microgels) using a newly customized tool: the temperature-controlled high-speed atomic force microscopy. It was applied for the first time to the study of microgels by the team at Daisuke Suzuki Laboratory of Shinshu University. The study succeeded in observing the structural differences of microgels in differing states, whic

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International travelers experience the harmful effects of air pollution

Even a short stay for travelers in cities with high levels of air pollution leads to breathing problems that can take at least a week from which to recover, a new study shows.

7h

Belief in learning styles myth may be detrimental

Many people, including educators, believe learning styles are set at birth and predict both academic and career success even though there is no scientific evidence to support this common myth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Five-year outcomes for Brigham face transplant recipients

In the New England Journal of Medicine, a Brigham team presents the longer-term outcomes for six face transplant recipients who had been followed for up to 5 years after surgery, representing the largest cohort of patients in the US.

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Climate change is causing mass 'die-offs' in seabirds such as puffins

Changes in seabird numbers are probably the best way to monitor the quality of the marine environment. And things are looking bad. In the past 50 years, the world population of marine birds has more than halved. What's worse is that few people have noticed.

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Online tools can help people in disasters, but do they represent everyone?

With natural hazard and climate-related disasters on the rise, online tools such as crowdsourced mapping and social media can help people understand and respond to a crisis. They enable people to share their location and contribute information.

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Why giant human-sized beavers died out 10,000 years ago

Giant beavers the size of black bears once roamed the lakes and wetlands of North America. Fortunately for cottage-goers, these mega-rodents died out at the end of the last ice age.

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Carelessly linking crime to being homeless adds to the harmful stigma

The news of Courtney Herron's death has shocked Melburnians. While full details are yet to emerge, both she and the man charged with murdering her have been widely reported as being homeless. It's revealing how news media use this information in framing their coverage of what happened.

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Volcanic eruption witnessed by prehistoric humans

A volcanic eruption believed to be eye-witnessed by humans in prehistoric times happened 245,000 years later than originally expected, according to new research involving Curtin University researchers.

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What nearly all languages have in common—whether you speak or sign

If you hear someone say "John and Mary kiss," you'd likely imagine a single symmetrical action. But hear them say "John and Mary kiss each other," and you may construe an entirely different picture—one in which the parties reciprocate with two separate actions, kissing the other's hand.

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Climate change is causing mass 'die-offs' in seabirds such as puffins

Changes in seabird numbers are probably the best way to monitor the quality of the marine environment. And things are looking bad. In the past 50 years, the world population of marine birds has more than halved. What's worse is that few people have noticed.

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Researchers trace the genetic history and diversity of wheat

A team of researchers from Université Clermont Auvergne and BreedWheat in France and the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium in the U.S. has conducted genomic testing of thousands of wheat types to trace the genetic history and diversity of wheat. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the history of wheat domestication and how it

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Call to consider raising minimum legal length of bluefish in New South Wales

A UNSW study has found the length that tailor (bluefish) are reaching maturity has increased by 5cm in four decades, which means some fish are currently being removed too early in their life cycle through the practice of fishing.

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A Stain on the Honor of the Navy

One prays to the “ Eternal Father, strong to save / Whose arm hath bound the restless wave ” that The Wall Street Journal has got it horribly wrong. The newspaper reports that the United States Navy, under orders from the White House and with the approval of the acting secretary of defense and the compliance of a chain of naval officers in the Seventh Fleet, did its efficient best to conceal the

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The Cyclofluidic Story

The recent post here on automation in chemistry (especially medicinal chemistry) is a good intro for this paper in ACS Med. Chem. Letters. It’s from David Parry, who led Cyclofluidic, and I’ve blogged about them a few times over the years . That was a company formed in 2008 in the UK to try to develop a “closed loop” of automated medicinal chemistry, where compounds would be synthesized, then tes

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Chemists prove the mechanism of direct amination from benzene

A team of chemists from Tomsk Polytechnic University discovered a mechanism of direct electrophilic amination and predicted the ways of its implementation. TPU scientists proved the most promising method for rapid and cost-effective production of aromatic amines. They are ones of the most sought-after organic synthesis products that are used in the manufacture of drugs, dyes, tires, and polymers.

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Natural spectral lines

Certain ranges of frequency across the electromagnetic spectrum are reserved by regulators for particular applications: TV, digital radio, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth etc. Unregulated devices are precluded from broadcasting on these spread frequencies. However, much of the bandwidth is unused across vast swathes of the planet and could be used by other devices, but for those legal constraints.

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Researchers trace the genetic history and diversity of wheat

A team of researchers from Université Clermont Auvergne and BreedWheat in France and the International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium in the U.S. has conducted genomic testing of thousands of wheat types to trace the genetic history and diversity of wheat. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the history of wheat domestication and how it

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NASA's Curiosity Mars rover finds a clay cache

NASA's Curiosity rover has confirmed that the region on Mars it's exploring, called the "clay-bearing unit," is well deserving of its name. Two samples the rover recently drilled at rock targets called "Aberlady" and "Kilmarie" have revealed the highest amounts of clay minerals ever found during the mission. Both drill targets appear in a new selfie taken by the rover on May 12, 2019, the 2,405th

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Call to consider raising minimum legal length of bluefish in New South Wales

A UNSW study has found the length that tailor (bluefish) are reaching maturity has increased by 5cm in four decades, which means some fish are currently being removed too early in their life cycle through the practice of fishing.

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Study points to non-Newtonian force affecting particles' flight

The quotation marks had the force of tradition—and the tradition of force—behind them.

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A new view of exoplanets with NASA's upcoming Webb Telescope

While we now know of thousands of exoplanets—planets around other stars—the vast majority of our knowledge is indirect. That is, scientists have not actually taken many pictures of exoplanets, and because of the limits of current technology, we can only see these worlds as points of light. However, the number of exoplanets that have been directly imaged is growing over time. When NASA's James Webb

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Forget rampant killer robots: AI’s real danger is far more insidious

AI isn’t going to crush us underfoot, but it does harbour a threat that makes Terminator look innocent: entrenching human biases and turning them against us

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We need to talk about how population growth is harming the planet

Discussions of population's impact on Earth have been off limits, but scientists and conservationists are challenging the taboo and politicians must do the same, says Graham Lawton

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Space Exploration and the Age of the Anthropocosmos

The new generation of space architects can learn from our successes and failures in protecting the internet commons and build a better paradigm for space.

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Geothermal Energy Could Save the Climate—or Trigger Lots of Quakes

Unlike wind or solar, geothermal energy is always available, rain or shine, day and night. There's just one thing: earthquakes.

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Cold-parenting linked to premature aging, increased disease risk in offspring

New research out of Loma Linda University Health suggests that unsupportive parenting styles may have several negative health implications for children, even into their adult years. The study found that the telomeres — protective caps on the ends of the strands of DNA — of subjects who considered their mothers' parenting style as 'cold' were on average 25% smaller compared to those who reported

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Godzilla is back and he's bigger than ever: The evolutionary biology of the monster

Godzilla first made his debut in 1954 as a 50-meter tall metaphor for indiscriminate destruction, particularly US hydrogen-bomb testing in the Marshall Islands, which, in the film, destroyed Godzilla's deep-sea ecosystem. Sixty-five years and 35 films later, Godzilla is back and bigger than ever in Godzilla: King of the Monsters. In fact, Godzilla has evolved 30 times faster than other organisms o

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Google Maps adds speed limit, speed camera data for more than 40 countries – Roadshow

Only a small handful of markets had access to these features before the expansion.

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Colombia could lose 60% of land suitable for irrigated rice due to climate change

Without significant global reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, Colombia will have 60 percent less land suitable for rice production by the 2050s, according to a new study by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS). Due primarily to increased temperatures and decreased rainfall—as opposed to sea-level rise, which is the driver of projected change to r

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Ammonia detected on the surface of Pluto, hints at subterranean water

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and one in France has found evidence of ammonia on the surface of Pluto. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their finding and what it might have revealed about the dwarf planet.

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CRISPR enzyme protects bacteria by turning infected cells on themselves

What doesn't kill a bacterium makes it stronger.

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Capturing real-time data as nanofibers form makes electrospinning more affordable and effective

Electrospinning, a nanofiber fabrication method, can produce nanometer- to micrometer-diameter ceramic, polymer, and metallic fibers of various compositions for a wide spectrum of applications: tissue engineering, filtration, fuel cells and lithium batteries. These materials have unique properties because of their high-aspect-ratio morphology and large surface area.

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Tempted to cheat on a written exam? Artificial intelligence is 90% certain to nab you

Combining big data with artificial intelligence has allowed University of Copenhagen researchers to determine whether you wrote your assignment or whether a ghostwriter penned it for you—with nearly 90 percent accuracy.

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Australians could have saved over $1 billon in fuel if car emissions standards were introduced 3 years ago

When it comes to road transport, Australia is at risk of becoming a climate villain as we lag behind international best practice on fuel efficiency.

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CRISPR enzyme protects bacteria by turning infected cells on themselves

What doesn't kill a bacterium makes it stronger.

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Models with cosmetic surgery don't make the cut

While cosmetic surgery is becoming increasingly common in the world of advertising, chasing beauty ideals by going under the knife does not necessarily make a model more attractive to consumers.

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The role religion plays in workplace behavior

Understanding the relationship between religion and ethical decision-making is important for organizations with diverse workforces. While there is considerable research from a Christian perspective, the same is not true for Islamic traditions, says Massey University Ph.D. graduate Rahizah Sulaiman.

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Stop blaming blue light for all your problems

Health It’s not quite the enemy. The latest trend in eyewear is actually to see less—by filtering out certain parts of the visible light spectrum, particularly blue light. Countless brands offer…

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The Role of Carbon Capture

The primary solution to avoid the worst consequences of CO2 induced climate change is to reduce the release of additional CO2 into the atmosphere. So far we have not achieved even this goal – the global release of CO2 reached a new record in 2018 at 37.1 billion tonnes. We need to reverse this trend, for CO2 emissions to actually start decreasing globally. There is debate about how quickly this h

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Why Tracking Your Symptoms Can Make You Feel Worse

Health apps can trigger the nocebo effect: Obsessively tracking how you feel, what you ate, and how you slept can end up being a drag on your health.

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DJI Osmo Action Review: A GoPro Alternative You Should Try

DJI's new action camera takes on GoPro Hero7 and succeeds, thanks to its dual screens and easy operation.

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Ferrari’s Latest Goes 211 MPH With 986 HP—and It’s a Hybrid

The SF90 Stradale is Ferrari’s most powerful production vehicle: a plug-in hybrid electric that goes 0 to 62 mph in 2.5 seconds.

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Image of the Day: Beached Birds

Biologists recover the bodies of puffins from a mass mortality event.

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Most atheists believe in the supernatural, despite trusting science

While atheists say they don't believe in a god, a survey has found that the majority hold at least one supernatural belief, such as life after death or reincarnation

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Chronic ozone exposure overlaps with injured arteries

Long-term exposure to ambient ozone appears to accelerate arterial conditions that progress into cardiovascular disease and stroke, according to a new research. It’s the first epidemiological study to provide evidence that ozone might advance subclinical arterial disease—injuries that occur to the artery walls prior to a heart attack or stroke—and provides insight into the relationship between oz

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How Successful Are the Marriages of People With Divorced Parents?

Justin Lange did not grow up with many good examples of a stable, long-lasting partnership. After his parents’ divorce, his mom remarried twice more; his dad, three more times. One lesson Lange took away from his upbringing, he told me, is that “actions speak louder than words—people were willing to [make] a lifetime commitment but not willing to back it up.” Until he joined the Navy and met the

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We Should All Use They/Them Pronouns … Eventually

A response to criticism of a recent proposal to adopt gender-neutral language universally — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Tale of Two Surveillance States

Subscribe to Crazy/Genius : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play The Chinese government is brutalizing its Muslim Uyghur population in the western province of Xinjiang, in what Omer Kanat, the director of the Uyghur Human Rights Watch, calls a “genocide without the gas chambers.” Up to 2 million Uyghurs are reportedly being held in detention centers, where they have allegedly been se

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Blood stem cells produced in vast quantities in the lab

Nature, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01690-w A glue ingredient was the secret to getting the mouse cells to multiply outside the body.

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We Should All Use They/Them Pronouns … Eventually

A response to criticism of a recent proposal to adopt gender-neutral language universally — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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30 'Homeless' Binary Stars Spotted Drifting in the Void Outside Any Known Galaxy

The universe may be full of binary stars that have been exiled from their home galaxies, thanks to one star's rowdy behavior.

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Fertility Treatment Gets Less Clinical, More ‘Grammable

Boutique egg freezing and IVF services are bringing personal coaches, relaxation retreats, and more to the modern baby-making experience.

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Cryptocurrency Firms Renew Push to Break Free From SEC Rules

Kik has started a crowdfunding campaign to support its legal battle, asserting that its kin coins are not securities.

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Podcast: Cold fusion, gender parity in universities, and studying wildfires

Nature, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01716-3 Nick Howe brings you the latest science updates.

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Zombie Diet: 10 Real-Life Examples of Humans Eating Humans

The dead don't eat the living, but sometimes the living eat their dead.

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Neanderthals May Have Been Driven to Extinction by a Tiny Drop in Fertility Rates

Just a slight dip in the fertility rates of Neanderthals could explain their extinction over the course of several thousand years.

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New Virus Infecting People in China, and Ticks May Be the Culprit

So far, the virus has only been found in northeastern China, but it could potentially have a much wider range.

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The Worth of an Angry God – Issue 72: Quandary

A god who knows everything, is everywhere, and wields impossible power, is a potent fantasy. Allegiance to it animates the lives of billions worldwide. But this “Big God,” as psychologists and anthropologists refer to it, wasn’t dreamt from scratch but pieced together, over thousands of years, paralleling humanity’s move from small- to large-scale societies. One burning question researchers want

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The Thrill of Defeat – Issue 72: Quandary

I once knew a scientist who worked in the lab all of her waking hours for weeks on end. Indeed I’ve known a few. When a big discovery appears within reach, research can become an obsession. Imagine, then, what it must feel like to lose the race to be first—to be scooped. Months or years of work can become redundant, or worthless. Of no use to anyone. While I’ve never been scooped on a big discove

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The Ancient Rites That Gave Birth to Religion – Issue 72: Quandary

The invention of religion is a big bang in human history. Gods and spirits helped explain the unexplainable, and religious belief gave meaning and purpose to people struggling to survive. But what if everything we thought we knew about religion was wrong? What if belief in the supernatural is window dressing on what really matters—elaborate rituals that foster group cohesion, creating personal bo

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Vaping the sweetener sucralose may produce toxic chemicals

Sucralose in e-liquids can break down, increasing toxic aldehydes in vapors and producing harmful organochlorines, including a potential carcinogen.

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We Should All Use They/Them Pronouns … Eventually

A response to criticism of a recent proposal to adopt gender-neutral language universally — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cancer Research Points to Key Unknowns about Popular "Antiaging" Supplements

The health promises of boosting an important metabolic molecule may be clouded by its possible role in promoting cancer-cell growth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Start-ups focus on early-stage cancer diagnosis

Companies target ‘preventive model’ with tests to detect disease before symptoms appear

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Cancer Research Points to Key Unknowns about Popular "Antiaging" Supplements

The health promises of boosting an important metabolic molecule may be clouded by its possible role in promoting cancer-cell growth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Army project develops agile scouting robots

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Secure metropolitan quantum networks move a step closer

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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The New CRISPR Tool That Could ‘Delete’ Disease From Our DNA

submitted by /u/LickLikeLucas [link] [comments]

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Apple and WhatsApp condemn GCHQ plans to eavesdrop on encrypted chats

GCHQ ‘ghost protocol’ would seriously undermine user security and trust, says letterA GCHQ proposal that would enable eavesdropping on encrypted chat services has been condemned as a “serious …

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Cancer Research Points to Key Unknowns about Popular "Antiaging" Supplements

The health promises of boosting an important metabolic molecule may be clouded by its possible role in promoting cancer-cell growth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cancer? This researcher says he can see it in your blood

Another large-scale effort is under way to develop a doctor’s-office test to find cancer in people with no symptoms.

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Algeria and Argentina declared malaria-free

Nature, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01684-8 S cientists discovered the malaria parasite in Algeria in 1880.

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Concussions in elite soccer not assessed according to expert recommendations: study

An average of at least one potential concussive event occurred per game during the 2016 UEFA European Championship and nearly three quarters of the head collision incidents did not result in a medical assessment by sideline health-care personnel, according to a review published today in the journal BMJ Open.

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The Wisest Remedy Is Not Impeachment

Former Special Counsel Robert Mueller yesterday turned up the pressure on House Democrats. Mueller emphasized and underlined that there is strong evidence that Trump obstructed justice, and that only Congress can constitutionally decide what to do about that evidence. Over to you, Nancy Pelosi. Pelosi, of course, has resisted the push for impeachment hearings. But more and more national Democrats

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Mueller Indicted the Media

On May 17, 2017, Robert Mueller was appointed special counsel to oversee the Russia investigation. On May 29, 2019—a month after the release of his report on the investigation, and almost exactly two years after he was first appointed—Mueller finally spoke. Based only on the reaction to Mueller’s appearance, you could be forgiven for assuming that he had dropped a bombshell. “Robert Mueller’s sta

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The Obstruction Mess Was Preordained

One must assume that the primary purpose of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s surprise Wednesday press conference was the clarification of what he considered to be widely held misconceptions about his report. Alas, by the time Mueller had finished speaking, Americans seemed more confused than ever. Now, as before, to ask what Mueller “really meant”—and, indeed, what he “really thinks”—is to receiv

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Modi's New Challenge Is Embracing Urbanization

When Narendra Modi led his Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) to an outright parliamentary majority in 2014—a feat no party had been able to achieve in the previous 25 years of Indian politics—the hopes and expectations for his first term were straightforward, if lofty. Modi promised to build a “new India” that would curb corruption, spur economic growth, and advance the interests of the growing “neo–m

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What to Make of the European Elections

T he sheer scale of the European elections, coupled with the huge differences among the parties that were on the ballot from Sweden to Greece, makes it possible to find evidence for just about any story about the results. Perhaps because the rise of far-right populism has, three years after the surprise victory of Brexit and the shock election of Donald Trump, come to look rather old hat, many pu

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How a ‘Communiversity’ Works

Here’s a difference between the world of national politics and that of public problem-solving at the local and regional levels. Four or five years ago, I would have had no idea of this. Now I notice it practically every day. In national politics, terms like partnership or collaboration are hard to utter with a straight face, or a non-sinking heart. At best, they can seem boring or (damning with f

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With New Trump Policy, Is the Moon for the Taking?

Fifty years after Apollo 11, the Trump administration has announced that it wants to send astronauts back to the lunar surface by 2024. But it has left the public guessing as to what it hopes to accomplish there. What little public information there is suggests that moon mining may be on the agenda.

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Critic up to 18 retractions for plagiarism

H. L. Mencken once wrote that “It is impossible to think of a man of any actual force and originality, universally recognized as having those qualities, who spent his whole life appraising and describing the work of other men.” One wonders what linguistic Hell Mencken would have divined for Robert Cardullo. Cardullo, a critic with … Continue reading Critic up to 18 retractions for plagiarism

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Prisoner’s dilemma shows exploitation is a basic property of human society

A new analysis of the famous game-theory puzzle finds that even when the players seem equal, one can learn to profit at the other’s expense—and the victim will cooperate.

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MIT Researcher Allegedly Copied Other Groups' Drug Designs

Executives at a biotech that develops new antibodies argue that Ram Sasisekharan didn't come up with the structures for at least two experimental therapies that his group has described.

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Svensk ledelsesrådgiver: »Tilfredse medarbejdere er farlige for arbejdspladsen«

Hvad nytter det, at vi fester over høj medarbejdertilfredshed, hvis de mest engagerede medarbejdere har forladt virksomheder, advarer Svante Randlert, som opfordrer til at supplere forretningsplanen med en ’people plan’, hvis de vil overleve.

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New imaging tool for diagnosing heart disease

An international team led by scientists from Lawson Health Research Institute and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center are the first to show that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be used to measure how the heart uses oxygen for both healthy patients and those with heart disease.

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Circadian clock and fat metabolism linked through newly discovered mechanism

Princeton University researchers found that the enzyme Nocturnin, known for its role in fat metabolism and circadian rhythm, acts on two well-established molecules in metabolism. The discovery sheds light on how the enzyme's daily fluctuations aid in energy regulation in the body.

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DNA tests for patients move closer with genome analysis advance

Diseases caused by genetic changes could be detected more readily thanks to an advance in DNA analysis software developed by experts at the University of Edinburgh and the European Bioinformatics Institute at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory.

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In Turkey, Keeping a Language of Whistles Alive

Before cellphones, Turkish “bird language” allowed farmers to communicate across long distances in the Pontic Mountains.

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I’m a Veteran Without PTSD. I Used to Think Something Was Wrong With Me.

I couldn’t understand why I was able to move on from my traumatic experiences until I joined a PTSD study.

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Liver MR relaxometry at 3T – segmental normal T1 and T2* values in patients without focal or diffuse liver disease and in patients with increased liver fat and elevated liver stiffness

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44377-y Liver MR relaxometry at 3T – segmental normal T 1 and T 2 * values in patients without focal or diffuse liver disease and in patients with increased liver fat and elevated liver stiffness

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Effects of açai on oxidative stress, ER stress, and inflammation-related parameters in mice with high fat diet-fed induced NAFLD

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44563-y Effects of açai on oxidative stress, ER stress, and inflammation-related parameters in mice with high fat diet-fed induced NAFLD

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Induced androgenetic development in rainbow trout and transcriptome analysis of irradiated eggs

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44568-7 Induced androgenetic development in rainbow trout and transcriptome analysis of irradiated eggs

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Changes in the distribution of hydro-climatic extremes in a non-stationary framework

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44603-7 Changes in the distribution of hydro-climatic extremes in a non-stationary framework

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The diagnostic quality of needle brain biopsy specimens obtained with different sampling methods – Experimental study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44622-4 The diagnostic quality of needle brain biopsy specimens obtained with different sampling methods – Experimental study

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CTLA-4 Protects against Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation in Mice

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44523-6 CTLA-4 Protects against Angiotensin II-Induced Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Formation in Mice

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Eosinophil extracellular trap formation is closely associated with disease severity in chronic rhinosinusitis regardless of nasal polyp status

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44627-z Eosinophil extracellular trap formation is closely associated with disease severity in chronic rhinosinusitis regardless of nasal polyp status

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Mitch McConnell’s Grand Plan Was Obvious All Along

Anyone who thought Mitch McConnell was going to give up a prized Supreme Court seat purely for the sake of appearances hasn’t been paying attention. With four words and a proud smile, the Senate majority leader this week confirmed what those who have watched him closely have long understood to be true: If a vacancy on the high court occurs in the election year of 2020, the Republican majority tha

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This new compound could fight potent 'superbugs'

The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is creating a global crisis, but a newly developed compound offers fresh hope in addressing this issue.

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Humans and volcanoes caused nearly all of global heating in past 140 years

New study confirms natural cycles play little role in global temperature trends and tackles discrepancies in previous models Emissions from fossil fuels and volcanoes can explain nearly all of the changes in Earth’s surface temperatures over the past 140 years, a new study has found. The research refutes the popular climate denial myth that recent global warming is merely a result of natural cycl

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Safe Or Scary? The Shifting Reputation Of Glyphosate, AKA Roundup

The world's most widely used weed killer was once seen as one of the safest pesticides. Now it is blamed for causing cancer. Yet the scientific evidence remains disputed. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

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Machine-learning Approach for the Development of a Novel Predictive Model for the Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Scientific Reports, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44022-8 Machine-learning Approach for the Development of a Novel Predictive Model for the Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

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Scientists discover 'switch' that helps breast cancer spread around the body

Researchers have unveiled clues into how breast cancer cells spread around the body.

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Magdalena Migocka blames students for impending retractions

Magdalena Migocka is a shooting star of plant sciences in Poland. Now she will have to retract at least two papers, for which she blames her incompetent students.

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The Race to Replace Theresa May: A Cheat Sheet

Theresa May’s decision to stand down as the leader of Britain’s Conservative Party—and, consequently, as prime minister—has sparked a leadership battle months in the making. As many as 11 Conservatives have announced their candidacy, and more can be expected to enter the race once it formally begins on June 10. Whoever succeeds May will carry the burden of steering Britain through its seemingly i

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Hungary to Build $1 Billion Green-Powered Town From Scratch

submitted by /u/bebesiege [link] [comments]

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Heavily processed food like ready meals and ice-cream linked to early death

Two major studies add to body of evidence against foods made with industrial ingredients People who eat large amounts of heavily processed foods, from breakfast cereals and ready meals to muffins and ice-cream, have a greater risk of heart attack, stroke and early death, according to two major studies. The findings, from separate teams in France and Spain, add to a growing body of evidence that f

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Infomercial in PLOS One links to website selling unproven treatments for fibromyalgia and dementia

PLOS One recently published a clinical trial that was essentially a poorly-disguised advertisement for an unproven product. I object to this use of the scientific literature to market such a device.

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Beyond 1 and 0: Engineers boost potential for creating successor to shrinking transistors

Computers and similar electronic devices have gotten faster and smaller over the decades as computer-chip makers have learned how to shrink individual transistors, the tiny electrical switches that convey digital information.

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Researchers make breakthrough discovery in stretchable electronics materials

Stretchable electronics are where engineering meets Hollywood special effects.

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Combing through someone's phone could lead to end of relationship—or not

For some people, the thought of their partner, friend or colleague snooping through their phone, reading their texts and emails, is an automatic deal breaker. However, some relationships can survive the snooping, a new study examining the motivations behind phone snooping has found.

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Model identifies high-risk areas for lumpy skin disease in cattle

Researchers have combined two separate computer models to identify areas at highest risk for outbreaks of lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) in cattle. The models could help officials determine where to send resources ahead of outbreaks and serve as a potential early warning system for cattle farmers in affected areas.

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Structural sexism: Researcher offers new perspective on gender and health inequality

A Florida State University researcher has found gender inequality in U.S. states is bad for everybody's health.

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Model identifies high-risk areas for lumpy skin disease in cattle

Researchers have combined two separate computer models to identify areas at highest risk for outbreaks of lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) in cattle. The models could help officials determine where to send resources ahead of outbreaks and serve as a potential early warning system for cattle farmers in affected areas.

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Will Apple's roots in China hold fast amid political storm?

Apple is seen as a prime target for retaliation over US moves against the Chinese tech giant Huawei, but the roots planted by the company in China should help it weather the storm, analysts say.

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Brain size and fertility in mammals may depend on who cares for offspring

The evolution of larger brain size in offspring is associated with the amount of paternal care in mammals, whereas higher fertility in the mothers is correlated with additional care support from individuals that are not the offspring's biological parents (alloparents), according to a study published in the journal Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology.

13h

Brain size and fertility in mammals may depend on who cares for offspring

The evolution of larger brain size in offspring is associated with the amount of paternal care in mammals, whereas higher fertility in the mothers is correlated with additional care support from individuals that are not the offspring's biological parents (alloparents), according to a study published in the journal Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology.

13h

Huawei a key beneficiary of China subsidies that US wants ended

A replica of the Palace of Versailles, medieval turrets, and spires rise across Huawei's new campus in southern China, a monument to the telecom giant's growing fortune—and the benefits of state aid.

14h

Boeing CEO on 737 MAX problems: 'We clearly fell short'

The head of Boeing acknowledged Wednesday that the company "clearly fell short" in dealing with the accident-ridden 737 MAX and said that it had not adequately communicated with regulators.

14h

G20 countries eye tax policy for internet giants: Nikkei

G20 countries are planning a new tax policy for digital giants like Google, based on the business a company does in a country, not where it is headquartered, the Nikkei business daily said Thursday.

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Inmarsat lays big satellite order with Airbus

The London-based satellite operator announces a major expansion of its telecommunications network.

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Crispr gene-editing will change the way Americans eat – here's what's coming

The technology will be labeled and subject to stringent health and environment review in the EU, but not in the US, where produce could be radically changed Soon, soybeans will be bred to yield oil without dangerous trans fats. Lettuce will be grown to handle warmer, drier fields. Wheat to contain less gluten. And pigs bred to resist deadly viruses. Someday, maybe even strawberry plants whose del

14h

Man Busted at Canadian Airport With Almost 5,000 Live Leeches in a Grocery Bag

Please be careful when opening the overhead compartments.

15h

Fredag åbner Danmarks første nye fjernbanestrækning i årtier – med ét tog i timen

PLUS. Den dobbeltsporede København-Ringsted-bane skulle have haft kapacitet til 12 tog i timen hver vej. Men foreløbig er der ikke udsigt til mere end fire, når der er travlest.

15h

The Anthropocene epoch: have we entered a new phase of planetary history?

Human activity has transformed the Earth – but scientists are divided about whether this is really a turning point in geological history. By Nicola Davison It was February 2000 and the Nobel laureate Paul Crutzen was sitting in a meeting room in Cuernavaca, Mexico, stewing quietly. Five years earlier, Crutzen and two colleagues had been awarded the Nobel prize in chemistry for proving that the oz

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Hver femte 0-årige kommer til kiropraktor: Men virker det?

Ja, vurderer forsker. Men videnskaben har indtil nu ikke påvist en effekt.

16h

Combing through someone's phone could lead to end of relationship — or not

For some people, the thought of their partner, friend or colleague snooping through their phone, reading their texts and emails, is an automatic deal breaker. However, some relationships can survive the snooping, a new study examining the motivations behind phone snooping has found.

16h

Concussion symptoms reversed by magnetic therapy

Concussion symptoms — such as loss of balance and ability to walk straight — can be reversed by a new type of magnetic stimulation

16h

Being teased about weight linked to more weight gain among children, NIH study suggests

Youth who said they were teased or ridiculed about their weight increased their body mass by 33 percent more each year, compared to a similar group who had not been teased, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health. The findings appear to contradict the belief that such teasing might motivate youth to change their behavior and attempt to lose weight.

16h

Alaka'i's Skai wants to be the fuel cell-powered aircraft of the people

submitted by /u/ourlifeintoronto [link] [comments]

16h

Building Africa's City in the Sea | The B1M

submitted by /u/jaxxborn [link] [comments]

16h

Superior by Angela Saini — are we all created equal?

Race science is undergoing a revival, after its horrific climax in the 20th century

16h

Minister: »Hvis regeringen falder, er det bedste, at jeg ikke skal sidde i Disruptionrådet«

Til valgmøde om digitalisering og iværksætteri blev økonomi- og indenrigsminister Simon Emil Ammitzbøll-Bille konfronteret med VLAK-regeringens kuldsejlede ambitioner på digitaliseringsområdet.

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‘Freedom Gas,’ the Next American Export

The Department of Energy announced plans to boost exports of liquefied natural gas abroad, calling the fuel “molecules of U.S. freedom.”

18h

Extreme Weather Has Made Half of America Look Like Tornado Alley

"Every day, somewhere in the United States is getting pummeled by tornadoes."

18h

19h

Why Can't We Stop Yelling at Each Other?

submitted by /u/roarden [link] [comments]

19h

Populations are not declining and food webs are not collapsing at the Luquillo Experimental Forest [Letters (Online Only)]

In PNAS, Lister and Garcia (1) report declines in abundances of understory arthropods and lizards between 1976 and 2012 and claim similar declines in populations of arthropods, frogs, and insectivorous birds based on data from the Luquillo Long-Term Ecological Research project (LUQ). Their conclusion, that increasing temperature has led to…

19h

Reply to Willig et al.: Long-term population trends in the Luquillo Rainforest [Letters (Online Only)]

Temperatures In our study (1), given Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) information, we avoid data compromised by long-term averages and adjustments using data from other stations. Since temperatures for January 1975 to April 1978 include long-term averages, our data (1) begin in 1979. From 1979 on, we use temperatures corrected by…

19h

Stabilization of reactive Co4O4 cubane oxygen-evolution catalysts within porous frameworks [Chemistry]

A major challenge to the implementation of artificial photosynthesis (AP), in which fuels are produced from abundant materials (water and carbon dioxide) in an electrochemical cell through the action of sunlight, is the discovery of active, inexpensive, safe, and stable catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Multimetallic molecular catalysts,…

19h

Direct visualization of cAMP signaling in primary cilia reveals up-regulation of ciliary GPCR activity following Hedgehog activation [Physiology]

The primary cilium permits compartmentalization of specific signaling pathways, including elements of the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway. Hh transcriptional activity is thought to be negatively regulated by constitutively high ciliary cAMP maintained by the Gα(s)-coupled GPCR, GPR161. However, cilia also sequester many other Gα(s)-coupled GPCRs with unknown potential to regulate Hh….

19h

Multiphase reactivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is driven by phase separation and diffusion limitations [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a key polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) often associated with soot particles coated by organic compounds, is a known carcinogen and mutagen. When mixed with organics, the kinetics and mechanisms of chemical transformations of BaP by ozone in indoor and outdoor environments are still not fully elucidated. Using direct…

19h

Cardiac myosin binding protein-C phosphorylation regulates the super-relaxed state of myosin [Biochemistry]

Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) accelerates cardiac contractility. However, the mechanisms by which cMyBP-C phosphorylation increases contractile kinetics have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that phosphorylation of cMyBP-C releases myosin heads from the inhibited super-relaxed state (SRX), thereby determining the fraction of…

19h

NAD+-capped RNAs are widespread in the Arabidopsis transcriptome and can probably be translated [Plant Biology]

As the most common RNA cap in eukaryotes, the 7-methylguanosine (m7G) cap impacts nearly all processes that a messenger RNA undergoes, such as splicing, polyadenylation, nuclear export, translation, and degradation. The metabolite and redox agent, nicotinamide adenine diphosphate (NAD+), can be used as an initiating nucleotide in RNA synthesis to…

19h

Human cGAS catalytic domain has an additional DNA-binding interface that enhances enzymatic activity and liquid-phase condensation [Immunology and Inflammation]

The cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS)–cGAMP–STING pathway plays a key role in innate immunity, with cGAS sensing both pathogenic and mislocalized DNA in the cytoplasm. Human cGAS (h-cGAS) constitutes an important drug target for control of antiinflammatory responses that can contribute to the onset of autoimmune diseases. Recent studies have established…

19h

Perfluorocarbon nanoparticle-mediated platelet inhibition promotes intratumoral infiltration of T cells and boosts immunotherapy [Medical Sciences]

Cancer immunotherapy can stimulate and enhance the ability of the immune system to recognize, arrest, and eliminate tumor cells. Immune checkpoint therapies (e.g., PD-1/PD-L1) have shown an unprecedented and durable clinical response rate in patients among various cancer types. However, a large fraction of patients still does not respond to…

19h

On the origin and evolution of germline chromosomes in songbirds [Commentaries]

In addition to the normal set of chromosomes, eukaryote genomes sometimes also contain chromosomes that do not follow the Mendelian law of inheritance. These chromosomes, called B chromosomes, were detected in the early 20th century (1) and are believed to consist of selfish genetic elements that have parasitized the genome…

19h

NAD tagSeq reveals that NAD+-capped RNAs are mostly produced from a large number of protein-coding genes in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

The 5′ end of a eukaryotic mRNA transcript generally has a 7-methylguanosine (m7G) cap that protects mRNA from degradation and mediates almost all other aspects of gene expression. Some RNAs in Escherichia coli, yeast, and mammals were recently found to contain an NAD+ cap. Here, we report the development of…

19h

Laser- and cryogenic probe-assisted NMR enables hypersensitive analysis of biomolecules at submicromolar concentration [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Solution-state NMR typically requires 100 μM to 1 mM samples. This limitation prevents applications to mass-limited and aggregation-prone target molecules. Photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization was adapted to data collection on low-concentration samples by radiofrequency gating, enabling rapid 1D NMR spectral acquisition on aromatic amino acids and proteins bearing aromatic…

19h

Role of thyroid dysimmunity and thyroid hormones in endometriosis [Immunology and Inflammation]

Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of ectopic endometrial cells outside the uterine cavity. Thyroid autoimmunity has been associated with endometriosis. This work investigated the potential pathophysiological link between endometriosis and thyroid disorders. Transcripts and proteins involved in thyroid metabolism are dysregulated in eutopic and ectopic endometrium of endometriotic pati

19h

Torque-dependent remodeling of the bacterial flagellar motor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Multisubunit protein complexes are ubiquitous in biology and perform a plethora of essential functions. Most of the scientific literature treats such assemblies as static: their function is assumed to be independent of their manner of assembly, and their structure is assumed to remain intact until they are degraded. Recent observations…

19h

Quantitative proteomics of MDCK cells identify unrecognized roles of clathrin adaptor AP-1 in polarized distribution of surface proteins [Cell Biology]

The current model of polarized plasma membrane protein sorting in epithelial cells has been largely generated on the basis of experiments characterizing the polarized distribution of a relatively small number of overexpressed model proteins under various experimental conditions. Thus, the possibility exists that alternative roles of various types of sorting…

19h

Variable G protein determinants of GPCR coupling selectivity [Pharmacology]

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) activate four families of heterotrimeric G proteins, and individual receptors must select a subset of G proteins to produce appropriate cellular responses. Although the precise mechanisms of coupling selectivity are uncertain, the Gα subunit C terminus is widely believed to be the primary determinant recognized by…

19h

Why haploinsufficiency persists [Genetics]

Haploinsufficiency describes the decrease in organismal fitness observed when a single copy of a gene is deleted in diploids. We investigated the origin of haploinsufficiency by creating a comprehensive dosage sensitivity data set for genes under their native promoters. We demonstrate that the expression of haploinsufficient genes is limited by…

19h

Steps on Pt stereodynamically filter sticking of O2 [Chemistry]

Low coordinated sites on catalytic surfaces often enhance reactivity, but the underlying dynamical processes are poorly understood. Using two independent approaches, we investigate the reactivity of O2 impinging onto platinum and resolve how step edges on (111) terraces enhance sticking. At low incident energy, the linear dependence on step density,…

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Brain size and fertility in mammals may depend on who cares for offspring

The evolution of larger brain size in offspring is associated with the amount of paternal care in mammals, whereas higher fertility in the mothers is correlated with additional care support from individuals that are not the offspring's biological parents (alloparents), according to a study published in the journal Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology.

20h

Bonobo Mothers Supervise Their Sons' Monkey Business

Some wild female bonobos introduce their sons to desirable females—then make sure their relations won’t be interrupted by competing males. Karen Hopkin reports.

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Tiny Robots That Carry Stem Cells Through a Mouse Developed By Korean Engineers

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

20h

High Levels of 'Bad' Cholesterol Tied to Early-Onset Alzheimer's

New research suggests that LDL cholesterol may play a role in developing early-onset Alzheimer's disease. (Credit: Atthapon Raksthaput/Shutterstock) Most of us know that high levels of “bad” cholesterol in our blood can increase our risk of developing cardiovascular problems. Now, a new study gives us another reason to keep cholesterol levels in check. High cholesterol may also play a role in the

20h

Like us, birds are particularly good at sorting warm colors

Birds mentally sort the range of hues on the blue-green side of the spectrum into two categories, but research finds the line between those hues is fuzzier for birds than the one between red and orange. It may be that “either/or” thinking is less useful in this part of the color spectrum, the researchers say. Deciding whether, say, a reddish-beaked male is good mate material, or which fruits are

20h

Bonobo Mothers Supervise Their Sons' Monkey Business

Some wild female bonobos introduce their sons to desirable females—then make sure their relations won’t be interrupted by competing males. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Could synthetic CBD treat seizures?

A synthetic, non-intoxicating analogue of cannabidiol can effectively treat seizures, according to new research with rats. The synthetic CBD alternative is easier to purify than a plant extract, eliminates the need to use agricultural land for hemp cultivation, and could avoid legal complications with cannabis-related products. “It’s a much safer drug than CBD, with no abuse potential and doesn’t

20h

Bonobo Mothers Supervise Their Sons' Monkey Business

Some wild female bonobos introduce their sons to desirable females—then make sure their relations won’t be interrupted by competing males. Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

Gadgets: After a day of grilling, have a robot take care of cleaning

I've been grilling for years, and love it. I've also been cleaning grills for years, and hate it. The past few years, I've used a power washer with good results but it's still a chore. The Grillbot has been out for a few years but I didn't know about it, so I'll assume you didn't know about the grill cleaning robot either.

21h

To thwart deep fakes, add these digital ‘watermarks’

To thwart deep fakes, researchers have developed an experimental technique to authenticate images from acquisition to delivery using artificial intelligence. Determining whether a photo or video is authentic is becoming increasingly problematic. Sophisticated techniques for altering photos and videos have become so accessible that deep fakes—manipulated photos or videos that are remarkably convin

21h

Nyt institut skal beskrive jordens og menneskets mangfoldighed

Igennem forskning i jordens og livets oprindelse, livets udbredelse og genetiske diversitet samt menneskets…

21h

Climate change link to puffin deaths

Climate change played a role in the deaths of thousands of puffins in Alaska, according to a study.

21h

An Experimental Ebola Cure May Also Protect Against Nipah Virus

African green monkeys survived infection with the Nipah virus after they received remdesivir. The virus, a pandemic threat carried by bats, has killed dozens of people in Asia.

21h

Tempted to cheat on a written exam? Artificial intelligence is 90% certain to nab you

Combining big data with artificial intelligence has allowed researchers to determine whether you wrote your assignment or whether a ghostwriter penned it for you — with nearly 90 percent accuracy.

21h

Genetic analysis of cannabis is here

Research could provide government regulators with powerful new tools for addressing a bevy of commercial claims and other concerns as non-medical marijuana, hemp and CBD products become more commonplace. The new analysis of the genetic and chemical characteristics of cannabis is believed to be the first thorough examination of its kind.

21h

From viruses to social bots, researchers unearth the structure of attacked networks

Researchers have developed a machine learning model of the invisible networks around us including, how viruses interact with proteins and genes in the body. Their work, they believe, can help across the disciplines from the design of future medicines or gene therapies against viruses and diseases like cancer or help understand how to address cyber attacks.

21h

Clean air taxis cut pollution in New York City

New York City Clean Air Taxi rules are successful in cutting emissions and reducing air pollution, according to a new study. Between 2009 and 2015, the legislation more than doubled the fuel efficiency of the fleet of 13,500 yellow taxis, leading to estimated declines in air pollution emissions.

21h

How to quell a cytokine storm: New ways to dampen an overactive immune system

BRCA DNA-repair proteins interact with a molecular complex that is also responsible for regulating the immune system. When certain players in this pathway go awry, autoimmune disorders arise. An international team has deciphered the structure of the complex and have found new molecular targets for fighting autoimmunity.

21h

Stress during early pregnancy is linked to reduced reproductive function in male offspring

Men whose mothers were exposed to stressful life events while they were in the first 18 weeks of pregnancy may have reduced sperm counts when they become adults, according to a study published in Human Reproduction, one of the world's leading reproductive medicine journals.

21h

Premature death from heart failure is on the rise

Death rates due to heart failure are now increasing, and this increase is most prominent among younger adults under 65, research finds. The increase in premature death from heart failure was highest among black men under age 65. The study is first to show that death rates due to heart failure have been increasing since 2012. The rise in deaths comes despite significant advances in medical and sur

21h

Robots are taking on more warehouse jobs

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

21h

Rise of the robots: Bank deploys ‘Pepper’ to assist customers

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

21h

Korean researchers 3D-print biocompatible human cornea

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

21h

Britain Nears 12 Days Without Coal

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

21h

Traffic sign recognition 'most influential' innovation of past decade

A research paper which revolutionised how cars read traffic signs has been recognised as the 'most influential over the decade' at a ceremony in Tokyo.

21h

Among older women, 10,000 steps per day not needed for lower mortality

A new study found that older women, taking as few as 4,400 steps per day was significantly associated with lower risk of death compared to taking 2,700 steps per day. Risk of death continued to decrease with more steps taken but leveled off at around 7,500 steps per day — less than the 10,000 steps default goal in many wearables.

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