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nyheder2019maj31

8h

København sætter foden ned: Maks. 200 løbehjul i indre by

Der er lagt op til kraftige begrænsninger i et forslag til nye retningslinjer for udlejningscykler og løbehjul, som kommunens teknik- og miljøudvalg skal tage stilling til på mandag.

10h

825.000 danskere lider af kroniske smerter: Nu bliver det anerkendt som en sygdom

WHO's anerkendelse af kroniske smerter vil føre til bedre behandling, siger professorer.

16h

Why Gulping Down a Cold Drink Feels So Rewarding

In a study of mice, researchers found no links between the neural systems related to reward and monitoring water intake.

5min

AIDS & HIV: Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention

While AIDS remains incurable, patients are living much longer — even decades after infection — because of the development of medications to suppress the virus.

5min

Last week in tech: New Bose headphones, more 5G internet, and Uber's new rating policy

Technology Catch up on the week's biggest tech news. Everything you missed in the world of tech.

12min

Floods and Trump’s Trade War Create an Uncertain Year for Farmers

Prices are rising and planting is far behind schedule as farmers face a complex new calculus about what to plant—or whether to plant at all.

17min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Weekend With Bernie

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, May 31. ‣ President Donald Trump unexpectedly announced plans to impose 5 percent tariffs on imports from Mexico, claiming they will increase until Mexico addresses the flow of asylum seekers at the U.S. southern border. Meanwhile, the trade war with China rages on. As of mid-May, the United States has imposed 25 percent tariffs on $250 billion worth of Chi

23min

From the Gut to the Womb — How the Microbiome Shapes Our Health

(Credit: lanatoma/Shutterstock) The microbes that live in and on our bodies are fundamentally involved in our well-being. How they affect our health, though, is largely unknown due to the number of different bacteria that call us home and the complexity of our interactions with them. A project from the National Institutes of Health, the Integrated Human Microbiome Project (iHMP) is attempting to d

32min

Study in Mice Says Gut Microbes Might be Directly Linked to Autism

(Credit: PhotoUG/Shutterstock) Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects at least 1.7 percent of 8-year-olds in the U.S., and it can make social communication like talking and interactions with others difficult. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a hard time at school and often engage in repetitive behaviors. Now, researchers show the collection of bacteria and other microorganisms in

32min

30 dead deer found at Utah landfill starved, died of disease

Utah officials have determined that more than 30 deer found near a landfill in northeastern Utah died from starvation, diseases and other causes.

41min

Physicists create stable, strongly magnetized plasma jet in laboratory

When you peer into the night sky, much of what you see is plasma, a soupy amalgam of ultra-hot atomic particles. Studying plasma in the stars and various forms in outer space requires a telescope, but scientists can recreate it in the laboratory to examine it more closely.

41min

Climate change is already affecting global food production—unequally

The world's top 10 crops— barley, cassava, maize, oil palm, rapeseed, rice, sorghum, soybean, sugarcane and wheat—supply a combined 83 percent of all calories produced on cropland. Yields have long been projected to decrease in future climate conditions. Now, new research shows climate change has already affected production of these key energy sources—and some regions and countries are faring far

41min

30 dead deer found at Utah landfill starved, died of disease

Utah officials have determined that more than 30 deer found near a landfill in northeastern Utah died from starvation, diseases and other causes.

47min

Monitor air quality wherever you go with AtmoTube Plus

This wearable device is now 19 percent off MSRP. The wearable AtmoTube Plus device is now 19 percent off MSRP and lets you monitor air quality wherever you go.

47min

Atlantic hurricane season begins after three years of big storms

The 2019 Atlantic hurricane season begins Saturday, and authorities are warning coastal residents to stock up on supplies and remain vigilant after a spate of intense storms in recent years.

47min

Mark Zuckerberg's security chief faces racism complaint

The head of personal security for Mark Zuckerberg was on leave Friday pending a probe into complaints of sexual harassment and racism, some of it involving the Facebook chief's wife.

47min

NASA plans to send equipment to Moon from 2020

For the first time since the 1970s, the United States is planning to send equipment to the surface of the Moon in 2020 and 2021, in anticipation of a crewed lunar mission in 2024, NASA said Friday.

47min

Feds to investigate spike in gray whale deaths on West Coast

U.S. scientists will investigate why an unusual number of gray whales are washing up dead on West Coast beaches.

47min

SpaceX says 60 Starlink satellites will grow harder to see

SpaceX said Friday that the first 60 satellites in its "Starlink" constellation, which is intended to provide internet from space, will be less and less visible from Earth as they reach their final orbit.

47min

Why does Beijing suddenly care about AI ethics?

New guidelines on freedom and privacy protection signal that the Chinese state is open to dialogue about how it uses technology.

53min

Feds to investigate spike in gray whale deaths on West Coast

U.S. scientists will investigate why an unusual number of gray whales are washing up dead on West Coast beaches.

53min

Physicists create stable, strongly magnetized plasma jet in laboratory

A team of scientists has for the first time created a particular form of coherent and magnetized plasma jet that could deepen the understanding of the workings of much larger jets that stream from newborn stars and possibly black holes.

1h

Flexible generators turn movement into energy

Researchers have produced triboelectric nanogenerators with laser-induced graphene. The flexible devices turn movement into electrical energy and could enable wearable, self-powered sensors and devices.

1h

New records show spread of parasitic deer flies across the United States

With flattened bodies, grabbing forelegs and deciduous wings, deer keds do not look like your typical fly. These parasites of deer — which occasionally bite humans — are more widely distributed across the US than previously thought, according to entomologists, who caution that deer keds may transmit disease-causing bacteria.

1h

Native plant species may be at greater risk from climate change than non-natives

Warming temperatures affect native and non-native flowering plants differently, which could change the look of local landscapes over time, according to new research.

1h

British Columbia bans sale of gas powered vehicles by 2040

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Can a blockchain be used for voting? A new perspective.

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1h

Major River Flooding, Outbreaks Of Tornadoes: Is This What Climate Change Looks Like?

This week the central U.S. has flooded and experienced deadly and damaging tornadoes. When it comes to what Americans could see more of due to climate change — the links are present, but complicated.

1h

Men who choose active surveillance for early prostate cancer often don't follow monitoring rules

Preliminary results from a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center study suggest that not enough patients who choose active surveillance instead of treatment for early-stage prostate cancer may be following recommended monitoring guidelines.

1h

GEBCO-NF Alumni robots win ocean-mapping XPRIZE

Have we found some of the technologies that can finally help us survey Earth's unknown depths?

1h

Foursquare Is Adding Even More Data About Where You Are

Foursquare said it had acquired Placed, which tracks location through apps that offer rewards, from the owner of Snapchat.

1h

Can cannabinoids help treat obsessive-compulsive disorder?

The body's endocannabinoid system, due to the critical role it plays in regulating neurotransmitter signaling, is an enticing target for drug development against disorders associated with anxiety, stress, and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A comprehensive new review article that provides an overview of this complex system, endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids,

1h

A small electrical zap to the brain could help you retrieve a forgotten memory

A study by UCLA psychologists provides strong evidence that a certain region of the brain plays a critical role in memory recall. The research, published in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, also shows for the first time that using an electrical current to stimulate that region, the left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex, improves people's ability to retrieve memories.

1h

At First-Ever Public Hearing on CBD, FDA and Advocates Try to Blaze Trail to Regulatory Compromise

Agency officials press sometimes confused stakeholders for more data. Is it possible to define a “more effective CBD cosmetic?” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

NASA selects three companies to lead its robotic return to moon

Small commercial landings could occur as soon as next year

1h

The guy who made a tool to track women in porn videos is sorry

The programmer supposedly used face recognition to match social-media photos with images from porn sites. Collecting that data would have been illegal in some countries but not others.

1h

Spotify Is Reportedly Cooking Up A Social Listening Feature For Users

Spotify is a big name in the streaming audio market and hit 100 million paid subscribers in April. Spotify is also the reason that the EU is set to launch a probe against Apple. Spotify is …

1h

Health experts wary of EPA rush to revise carcinogen testing

Agency seeking to quickly revise rules for key risk studies

1h

May's Stellar Space Pictures

May's Stellar Space Pictures Peer into the past and predict the future with the stars this month. 4_crop__TNG50_protocluster_z2_dm_gasvel_1900px.jpg A computer simulation of a protocluster of galaxies, predicting what future telescopes might detect. Image credits: TNG Collaboration Space Friday, May 31, 2019 – 15:45 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — Humanity's fascination with

1h

Deep learning monitors human activity based on sound alone

Nature, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01704-7 R eflected sound waves can distinguish a sitting person from a walking person.

2h

Run Like a Dinosaur

Birds are living dinosaurs, but can they help us understand how their extinct relatives moved? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Here's What the Universe Looks Like in X-Rays

In NASA's new treasure map of the universe, X-ray marks the spot.

2h

Prescription drug costs steadily soar, yet price transparency is lacking

After reviewing tens of millions of insurance claims for the country's 49 most popular brand-name prescription drugs, a team found that net prices rose by a median of 76 percent from January 2012 through December 2017 — with most products going up once or twice per year.

2h

EPA Cancels Registrations for 12 Neonicotinoid Pesticides

The companies that market the products, Syngenta, Valent, and Bayer, are allowed to sell existing stock of the chemicals until 2020.

2h

Uncrewed deep-sea robots will help map the world’s oceans

The Ocean Discovery XPrize has been awarded to an uncrewed vehicle capable of mapping 250 square kilometres of the sea floor within 24 hours

2h

Microsoft Again Warns Users To Patch BlueKeep Wormable Windows Bug

Earlier this month, we brought you news of an incredibly nasty remote code execution vulnerability affecting Windows systems; specifically, Windows 7, Windows Server, Windows Server 2008 R2, …

2h

Open-Access Program Plan S Relaxes Rules

In response to concerns from the research and publishing communities, the European group pushes back the deadline for its full and immediate open-access mandate to 2021.

2h

'Call of Duty' Is Here, Apple Updates Are Coming, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

2h

Fracking With CO2 Instead of Water Is Greener, Say Researchers

Lesser Evil Fracking is a process used to remove gas and oil from shale rock. It involves pumping a highly pressurized liquid, typically water mixed with sand and chemicals, into the rock formation to open up cracks through which the gas or oil can then be extracted. The controversial practice is considered one of the most damaging forms of energy production. But now, Chinese researchers say they

2h

Astrocytes protect neurons from toxic buildup

Neurons off-load toxic by-products to astrocytes, which process and recycle them.

2h

NASA has selected three lunar landers to bring science to the moon

Three companies – Orbit Beyond, Astrobotic and Intuitive Machines – have been awarded contracts by NASA to send landers to the moon’s surface in 2020 and 2021

2h

Colloidal gel properties under the microscope

Researchers have devised a method for following the gelation of colloidal gels. Their confocal microscopy technique has allowed the different stages of the process to be analyzed, leading to insights into their mechanical stability. It is hoped that the understanding gained using this technique will contribute to the development of colloidal gels in the many fields in which they impact everyday li

2h

Prescription drug costs steadily soar, yet price transparency is lacking

After reviewing tens of millions of insurance claims for the country's 49 most popular brand-name prescription drugs, a team found that net prices rose by a median of 76 percent from January 2012 through December 2017 — with most products going up once or twice per year.

2h

Do video games with shooting affect kids' behavior with real guns?

A randomized clinical trial in a university laboratory examined the effects of video games with weapons on children's behavior when they found a real gun.

2h

Seven key health measures help predict future risk of heart disease

Seven key measures of heart health may help predict future risk of cardiovascular disease, according to researchers. They added that improving these measures may also help decrease the risk of CVD in the future.

2h

Antibiotics that dentists prescribe are unnecessary 81% of the time

Antibiotics prescribed by dentists as a preemptive strike against infection are unnecessary 81% of the time.

2h

Occupational hazards account for more than one in ten people with range of lung diseases

More than 1 in 10 people with a range of non-cancerous lung diseases may be sick as a result of inhaling vapors, gas, dust or fumes at work, according to a new statement.

2h

Certain antidepressants could provide treatment for multiple infectious diseases

Some antidepressants could potentially be used to treat a wide range of diseases caused by bacteria living within cells, according to researchers.

2h

School children who nap are happier, excel academically, and have fewer behavioral problems

Children who nap 30 to 60 minutes midday at least three times a week are happier, have more self-control and grit, and showcase fewer behavioral problems, according to new research. These children also have higher IQs and excel academically.

2h

Photos of the Week: Cheese Rolling, Spelling Champs, Atlantic Puffin

Sunrise surfing in Australia, an eruption in Indonesia, whaling in the Faroe Islands, sky diving in New York, flooding along the Mississippi River, a horse rescue in tornado-hit Kansas, protests in Kashmir, an appearance by Special Counsel Robert Mueller in Washington, corgi racing in California, high diving in China, and much more

2h

At the French Open, Serena Williams Is a Study in Motion

The tennis champion's return to the clay proves that she will not settle.

2h

Research brief: Climate change is already affecting global food production — unequally

UMN researchers found that climate change is affecting different areas of global food production differently.

3h

Physicists create stable, strongly magnetized plasma jet in laboratory

A team of scientists has for the first time created a particular form of coherent and magnetized plasma jet that could deepen the understanding of the workings of much larger jets that stream from newborn stars and possibly black holes.

3h

This distant Neptune-like planet really shouldn't exist

Space A 'Forbidden planet' defies odds and thrives under inhospitable conditions. The Forbidden Planet—formally known as NGTS-4b—is the first-ever detection of a Neptunian exoplanet defying the odds and residing amongst its host star.

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The Family Weekly: How the Spelling Bee Ended in an Eight-Way Tie

(Joshua Roberts / Reuters) This Week in Family This year, the Scripps National Spelling Bee ran out of words to stump its final contestants. After 20 rounds, the judges declared an unprecedented eight-way tie. (Previously, the spelling bee had seen only the occasional two-way tie.) How did these teens outsmart the spelling bee? They intensively trained for this moment by using sophisticated softw

3h

Don't Panic About Rare Earth Elements

The materials used in iPhones and Tesla cars need not become a long-term casualty of a U.S.-China trade war — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Congress: NASA Is Hideously Over Budget, Plagued by Delays

Flight Delays NASA has been struggling to work within its means. The U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), a watchdog agency operating within Congress, announced on Thursday that NASA missions are drastically over their budgets and delayed way beyond their deadlines, according to The Associated Press . The budget disparities and launch delays are more drastic than any point in the ten year

3h

Don't Panic About Rare Earth Elements

The materials used in iPhones and Tesla cars need not become a long-term casualty of a U.S.-China trade war — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Ancient People Watched a Volcano Erupt. This May Be Their Illustration of It.

After a treacherous volcanic eruption during the Bronze Age, curious humans and their canine companions hiked closer to the volcano, where they left footprints in the fine-grained volcanic ash.

3h

ASCO: Finally, a tool to predict response to chemotherapy before bladder cancer surgery

'The idea is that for any individual tumor, its gene expression could tell us whether the cancer will respond to a certain kind of chemotherapy,' says Thomas Flaig, MD.

3h

Prescription drug costs steadily soar, yet price transparency is lacking

After reviewing tens of millions of insurance claims for the country's 49 most popular brand-name prescription drugs, a team from Scripps Research Translational Institute found that net prices rose by a median of 76 percent from January 2012 through December 2017–with most products going up once or twice per year.

3h

Colloidal gel properties under the microscope

Researchers at The University of Tokyo have devised a method for following the gelation of colloidal gels. Their confocal microscopy technique has allowed the different stages of the process to be analyzed, leading to insights into their mechanical stability. It is hoped that the understanding gained using this technique will contribute to the development of colloidal gels in the many fields in wh

3h

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These Kinetic Pants From Ministry of Supply Use Body Heat to Stay Smooth and Wrinkle Free

Did you know what you wear doesn’t just affect what people think of you, but also how you perform? According to research published in Nautilus , what you wear directly influences not only how you think but how well you execute tasks at hand. This is because there’s a correlation between how you look and feel, and how well you can focus. With the Ministry of Supply Kinetic Collection , you’ll fina

3h

Photos: Rock Art May Depict One of First Volcanic Eruptions That Humans Ever Drew

After leaving their footprints in volcanic ash, did Bronze Age humans paint this picture of an erupting volcano?

3h

Wave number-spiral acoustic tweezers for dynamic and reconfigurable manipulation of particles and cells

Acoustic tweezers have recently raised great interest across many fields including biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine, as they can perform contactless, label-free, biocompatible, and precise manipulation of particles and cells. Here, we present wave number–spiral acoustic tweezers, which are capable of dynamically reshaping surface acoustic wave (SAW) wavefields to various pressure dis

3h

Ultra-compact broadband polarization diversity orbital angular momentum generator with 3.6 x 3.6 {mu}m2 footprint

Orbital angular momentum (OAM), one fundamental property of light, has been of great interest over the past decades. An ideal OAM generator, fully compatible with existing physical dimensions (wavelength and polarization) of light, would offer the distinct features of broadband, polarization diversity, and ultra-compact footprint. Here, we propose, design, fabricate, and demonstrate an ultra-comp

3h

Strain tolerance of two-dimensional crystal growth on curved surfaces

Two-dimensional (2D) crystal growth over substrate features is fundamentally guided by the Gauss-Bonnet theorem, which mandates that rigid, planar crystals cannot conform to surfaces with nonzero Gaussian curvature. Here, we reveal how topographic curvature of lithographically designed substrate features govern the strain and growth dynamics of triangular WS 2 monolayer single crystals. Single cr

3h

Bioinspired, graphene-enabled Ni composites with high strength and toughness

Nature’s wisdom resides in achieving a joint enhancement of strength and toughness by constructing intelligent, hierarchical architectures from extremely limited resources. A representative example is nacre, in which a brick-and-mortar structure enables a confluence of toughening mechanisms on multiple length scales. The result is an outstanding combination of strength and toughness which is hard

3h

Direct link between mechanical stability in gels and percolation of isostatic particles

Colloidal gels have unique mechanical and transport properties that stem from their bicontinuous nature, in which a colloidal network is intertwined with a viscous solvent, and have found numerous applications in foods, cosmetics, and construction materials and for medical applications, such as cartilage replacements. So far, our understanding of the process of colloidal gelation is limited to lo

3h

Perovskite nanowire-block copolymer composites with digitally programmable polarization anisotropy

One-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials with highly anisotropic optoelectronic properties are key components in energy harvesting, flexible electronics, and biomedical imaging devices. 3D patterning methods that precisely assemble nanowires with locally controlled composition and orientation would enable new optoelectronic device designs. As an exemplar, we have created and 3D-printed nanocomposite in

3h

Two-dimensional hybrid perovskites sustaining strong polariton interactions at room temperature

Polaritonic devices exploit the coherent coupling between excitonic and photonic degrees of freedom to perform highly nonlinear operations with low input powers. Most of the current results exploit excitons in epitaxially grown quantum wells and require low-temperature operation, while viable alternatives have yet to be found at room temperature. We show that large single-crystal flakes of two-di

3h

Magnetizing topological surface states of Bi2Se3 with a CrI3 monolayer

To magnetize surfaces of topological insulators without damaging their topological feature is a crucial step for the realization of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) and remains as a challenging task. Through density functional calculations, we found that adsorption of a semiconducting two-dimensional van der Waals (2D-vdW) ferromagnetic CrI 3 monolayer can create a sizable spin splitting

3h

A unified picture of the covalent bond within quantum-accurate force fields: From organic molecules to metallic complexes reactivity

Computational studies of chemical processes taking place over extended size and time scales are inaccessible by electronic structure theories and can be tackled only by atomistic models such as force fields. These have evolved over the years to describe the most diverse systems. However, as we improve the performance of a force field for a particular physical/chemical situation, we are also movin

3h

Ultrafast correlated charge and lattice motion in a hybrid metal halide perovskite

Hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskites have shown remarkable optoelectronic properties, exhibiting an impressive tolerance to defects believed to originate from correlated motion of charge carriers and the polar lattice forming large polarons. Few experimental techniques are capable of directly probing these correlations, requiring simultaneous sub–millielectron volt energy and femtosecond t

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Mole-Rat Pain Resistance Could Point the Way to New Analgesics

A novel mechanism has been discovered in the bucktoothed rodents’ ability to withstand hurt — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mole-Rat Pain Resistance Could Point the Way to New Analgesics

A novel mechanism has been discovered in the bucktoothed rodents’ ability to withstand hurt — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Mole-Rat Pain Resistance Could Point the Way to New Analgesics

A novel mechanism has been discovered in the bucktoothed rodents’ ability to withstand hurt — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

See Pics of Martian Clouds Snapped From the Planet’s Surface

Looking Up Curiosity is one busy rover. Since touching down on Mars in 2012, it’s helped astronomers locate the planet’s missing methane , delivered new evidence that Mars was once wet , and even provided clues of extraterrestrial life , But all work and no play makes Curiosity a dull bot, so it recently kicked back to do some cloud-watching — filming the stunning scene for our viewing pleasure (

3h

Colloidal gel properties under the microscope

Researchers at the University of Tokyo have devised a method for following the gelation of colloidal gels. Their confocal microscopy technique has allowed the different stages of the process to be analyzed, leading to insights into their mechanical stability. It is hoped that the understanding gained using this technique will contribute to the development of colloidal gels in the many fields in wh

3h

Can a blockchain be used for voting? A new perspective.

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3h

The AI gig economy is coming for you

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Can you recognise yourself from your data? – BBC Click

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Kiss Your Car Goodbye

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A new optical atomic clock’s heart is as small as a coffee bean

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What to expect from Apple’s WWDC 2019 keynote

Technology iOS 13, macOS 10.15, and more coming next week from Apple Here's what we're expecting at next week's conference.

3h

Are feminine hygiene products really necessary?

Are intimate hygiene products, such as 'feminine' washes and douches, safe to use? Why or why not? In this Spotlight feature, we investigate.

3h

Godzilla: the perfect monster for the age of climate change

Cinematic creatures symbolise human anxieties, and the great Japanese lizard is suddenly very modern all over again. Julian CH Lee from Australia's RMIT University explains.

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Scientists Splice Spider Gene Into Fungus to Kill Mosquitoes

Spider Gains If we want to stop malaria from killing more than 400,000 people every year, we’ll need to stop mosquitoes — the irksome insects are the primary transmitter of the deadly disease. To that end, researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) genetically modified a fungus to produce a spider toxin that quickly kills mosquitoes. And in an out-of-lab trial, the fungus reduced a mosquit

4h

Group devoted to combating sexual harassment in science is in turmoil as leaders exit

Buzzfeed article reveals resignations, disaffection with founder BethAnn McLaughlin

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Little Green Men? Nope, Extraterrestrial Life May Look More Like Pasta.

Noodle-looking rocks could be humanity's first hint that life once existed on far-flung planets.

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Thousands of birds perished in the Bering Sea. Arctic warming may be to blame

A mass die-off of puffins and other seabirds in the Bering Sea is probably linked to climate change, scientists say.

4h

A new way to predict complications after larynx cancer surgery

A technique that illuminates blood flow during surgery predicted which head and neck cancer patients were likely to have issues with wound healing. It could enable surgeons to make adjustments during surgery or recovery to improve outcomes.

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These Trump Socks Went Viral—Then Came the Counterfeiters

Gumball Poodle’s founder took all the right steps to protect her brand from counterfeits on Amazon, but it still wasn’t enough when her socks became internet famous.

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Community impacts from extreme weather shape climate beliefs

Recent studies have suggested that people who experience the impacts of hurricanes, catastrophic flooding or other severe weather events are more likely to believe in, and be concerned about, climate change in the wake of the disaster.

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Fat in soil bacteria may protect against stress

The discovery of an anti-inflammatory, stress-protective fatty acid in a soil bacterium sheds light on why contact with dirt can be good for our health.

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Trump Can’t Figure Out How to Keep His Biggest Promise

One common knock on President Donald Trump is that he is chronically dishonest. Another is that he is a fickle leader who cannot or will not focus on any particular topic for any extended period of time. Both are true. But when it comes to border security, neither of these critiques really applies. Trump’s announcement of escalating tariffs on all goods from Mexico until illegal immigration stops

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Report: Huawei cuts meetings with US, sends US workers home

The Financial Times reported Friday that tech giant Huawei has ordered its employees to cancel technical meetings with American contacts and has sent home numerous U.S. employees working at its Chinese headquarters.

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As CBD Oils Become More Popular, The FDA Considers Whether To Set New Rules

The marijuana and hemp extract has been touted as a way to ease anxiety and inflammation, despite limited science. Now, the FDA is holding its first public hearing on cannabidiol. (Image credit: Getty Images)

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The benefits of bringing positive emotions to your work through play

Jane McGonigal, a researcher and video game designer, argues that games are a windo into more effective work. "What are these types of skills [that games teach] and how can they help us enhance our performance? According to McGonigal, they include resilience, perseverance, grit, determination, epic ambition, and collaboration. In this lesson, she teaches you how to bring the power of play to your

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Number of Measles Cases in the US Higher Than It's Been in 27 Years

The last time measles cases soared to this level was in 1992.

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Facebook Knows When Someone Posts Your Nudes — but Won’t Tell You

404 If someone tries to upload revenge porn — naked pictures of a former partner shared online to “punish” or harass them — or any other nudes of someone else to Facebook, the site claims that its automated system will be able to detect and prevent it. But the would-be victims of that revenge porn would never know it happened, reports The Daily Dot , as Facebook will not send out any notification

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Target recalls store-branded Lightning cables due to fire and shock hazards

Target is recalling approximately 90,000 of its Heyday-branded Lightning cables due to possible fire hazard. The third-party cords are used to charge various Apple products including iPhones, …

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Daily briefing: Plan S will be delayed by a year

Nature, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01743-0 Researchers and publishers will get more time to adapt to Plan S, a cutting-edge tailored treatment for ALS and the science of uncertainty.

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How Many Chemical Elements Can You Name? 1 in 5 Americans Can't Name One.

One in 5 Americans can't name a single element on the Periodic Table.

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DNA origami to scale-up molecular motors

Researchers have successfully used DNA origami to make smooth-muscle-like contractions in large networks of molecular motor systems, a discovery which could be applied in molecular robotics.

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Fire in the Brenna A's Engine Room | Deadliest Catch

A smoking bilge pump on the Brenna A almost derails Sean's trip before it begins. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitte

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Hard food, strong jaw: Jawbone structure responds to forceful chewing

Chewing, or mastication, is thought to impact jawbone structure as bone is continually reconstructed along with alterations in mechanical load. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In a new study, mice fed a hard diet exhibited greater masticatory force, which enhanced growth factors in the osteocytes in the jawbone and enhanced bone formation. This change was predicted by computer simu

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Organic laser diodes move from dream to reality

Researchers from Japan have demonstrated that a long-elusive kind of laser diode based on organic semiconductors is indeed possible, paving the way for the further expansion of lasers in applications such as biosensing, displays, healthcare, and optical communications.

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Classification system based on co-occurring conditions may provide insight into autism

Creating a classification system for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) based on co-occurring conditions could provide useful insights into the underlying mechanics of ASD and these conditions.

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Subaru Telescope captures 1800 exploding stars

The Subaru Telescope has captured images of more than 1800 exploding stars in the Universe, some located 8 billion light years from Earth.

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Occupational hazards account for more than one in ten people with range of lung diseases

More than 1 in 10 people with a range of non-cancerous lung diseases may be sick as a result of inhaling vapors, gas, dust or fumes at work, according to a joint American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society statement published in the ATS's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Community impacts from extreme weather shape climate beliefs

Recent studies suggest that people who experience severe weather are more likely to believe in and be concerned about climate change. But a new study from Duke University and the University of Colorado Denver shows not all storm impacts have equal effect. Broad-scale damage — how your neighborhood or community fared — may have a stronger impact on our beliefs and perception of future risks than

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Better conservation through satellites

The use of satellite telemetry in conservation is entering a 'golden age,' and is now being used to track the movements of individual animals at unprecedented scales.

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Space has potential – we need to look up | Letters

Terraforming holds the key to colonising Mars, writes Jan Miller. And we already have a sizeable nuclear fusion reactor, writes David E Hanke I don’t agree with Philip Ball’s thesis ( Life on Mars? Sorry, Brian Cox, that’s still a fantasy , 27 May) – ever since I studied planetary geology in the 1970s I have been excited by the idea of terraforming – if you read Kim Stanley Robinson’s trilogy you

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Dark Energy Could Be Hiding In The “Cosmic Void” Between Galaxies

Void Gazing Scientists believe the universe is expanding, pushed apart by a mysterious force called dark energy that makes up over two-thirds of the cosmos. Now, if scientists want to find it, they may have to look into the all-but-empty voids in the universe, Ohio State University astrophysicist Paul Sutter writes in Space.com . Sutter argues that the cosmic web — that’s the gigantic, clustered

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Researchers strapped video cameras on 16 cats and let them do their thing. Here’s what they found

Science chats with the researcher behind a new attempt to record cats when they’re on their own

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NASA Hires 3 Companies for Moon Science Deliveries

The landers would be the first American spacecraft to touch down on the moon since the astronauts of Apollo 17 left in 1972.

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Chasing species' 'intactness'

In an effort to better protect the world's last ecologically intact ecosystems, researchers developed a new metric called 'The Last of the Wild in Each Ecoregion' (LWE), which aimed to quantify the most intact parts of each ecoregion.

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Research reveals role of fat storage cells in anti-obesity intervention

New research from a team at the Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine establishes a role of adipocyte Na/K-ATPase signaling in worsening obesity and its companion diseases, including neurodegeneration and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), that was enhanced by specific targeting of NaKtide, an antagonist of Na/K-ATPase signaling, to the adipocyte.

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New records show spread of parasitic deer flies across the US

With flattened bodies, grabbing forelegs and deciduous wings, deer keds do not look like your typical fly. These parasites of deer — which occasionally bite humans — are more widely distributed across the US than previously thought, according to Penn State entomologists, who caution that deer keds may transmit disease-causing bacteria.

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Searching for the origins of the depressive symptoms in Huntington's disease

An altered function of Cdk5 kinase — an essential enzyme in several cell signalling pathways — could explain the physiopathology of the depressive-like behavior in Huntington's disease.

5h

In hot pursuit of dinosaurs: Tracking extinct species on ancient Earth via biogeography

Identifying the movements of extinct species from millions of years ago can provide insights into ancient migration routes, interaction between species, and the movement of continents.

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DNA origami to scale-up molecular motors

Researchers have successfully used DNA origami to make smooth-muscle-like contractions in large networks of molecular motor systems, a discovery which could be applied in molecular robotics.

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Hyphens in paper titles harm citation counts and journal impact factors

According to the latest research results, the presence of simple hyphens in the titles of academic papers adversely affects the citation statistics, regardless of the quality of the articles. The phenomenon applies to all major subject areas. Thus, citation counts and journal impact factors, commonly used for professorial evaluations in universities worldwide, are unreliable.

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What 10,000 Steps Will Really Get You

In America, the conventional wisdom of how to live healthily is full of axioms that long ago shed their origins. Drink eight glasses of water a day. Get eight hours of sleep. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Two thousand calories a day is normal. Even people who don’t regularly see a doctor are likely to have encountered this information, which forms the basis of a cultural shorth

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The Books Briefing: Prison Sentences

The case of the so-called Central Park Five—a group of Harlem teenagers who were arrested for the rape and attempted murder of a white woman in 1989, and then exonerated years later—is an infamous example of how racism and paranoia can distort the workings of justice. The director Ava DuVernay’s new Netflix series about the saga, however, focuses less on the circumstances of the case than on how

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The Youths Have Outsmarted the Scripps National Spelling Bee

Last night, at the end of the final round of the annual Scripps National Spelling Bee, a record eight students were still standing, having calmly rattled off the correct spellings of words like psammosere , choumoellier , and Logudorese . The eight—Rishik Gandhasri, Erin Howard, Saketh Sundar, Shruthika Padhy, Sohum Sukhatankar, Abhijay Kodali, Christopher Serrao, and Rohan Raja—now share the tit

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Children who nap are happier, excel academically, and have fewer behavioral problems

Children who nap 30 to 60 minutes midday at least three times a week are happier, have more self-control and grit, and showcase fewer behavioral problems, according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of California, Irvine. These children also have higher IQs and excel academically.

6h

Breaking the symmetry in the quantum realm

For the first time, researchers have observed a break in a single quantum system. The observation–and how they made the observation–has potential implications for physics beyond the standard understanding of how quantum particles interact to produce matter and allow the world to function as we know it.

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Certain antidepressants could provide treatment for multiple infectious diseases

Some antidepressants could potentially be used to treat a wide range of diseases caused by bacteria living within cells, according to work by researchers in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine and collaborators at other institutions.

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Finding a needle in a haystack: Discovery of Ti 2 InB 2 for synthesizing layered TiB

Scientists at Tokyo Tech managed to use boron as the X element in a family of materials called MAX phases, for which only carbon and nitrogen could previously be used. A clever search strategy allowed them to avoid resorting to trial and error to design this novel material, from which layered TiB can be obtained for applications in Li- or Na-ion batteries.

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Racism has a toxic effect

Researchers have long known that racism is linked to health problems, but now results from a small study using RNA tests show that racism appears to increase chronic inflammation among African Americans.

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An Incredible Fossil Contains a Whole School of 259 Fish

In 2016, Nobuaki Mizumoto was visiting the dinosaur museum in his hometown of Katsuyama, Japan, when he came across an unexpected display—not of a dinosaur, but of a school of fish. It was embedded in limestone shale and exhibited in a corner with no particular fanfare. Yet the 50-million-year-old fossil was clearly extraordinary: 259 tiny fish bodies with eyes and spines and even fins. All but a

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Deadwood: The Movie Is David Milch’s Finest Work

When Deadwood abruptly ended its television run in 2006 after three seasons, well short of what its creator, David Milch, had initially planned, the reasons for its untimely demise were never fully explained. Why did a network renowned for its critically acclaimed output pull the plug on a show that some argue is the greatest in the medium’s history ? Over the years, that mystery has become part

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Game of Thrones and the Evolutionary Significance of Storytelling – Facts So Romantic

What is it about storytelling that gets people so riled up when they feel it goes wrong? Perhaps the fury stems from the evolutionary burden stories, and storytellers, have had to carry. Photograph by HBO / BagoGames / Flickr I told myself it was absurd to be discontented with the way Game of Thrones ended. Why should I feel anything for the fate of a fictional world? Even so, I watched with inte

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Native plant species may be at greater risk from climate change than non-natives

As spring advances across the Midwest, a new study looking at blooming flowers suggests that non-native plants might outlast native plants in the region due to climate change.

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Researchers Use Supersonic Fluid to Test Hawking’s Black Hole Theories

Using quantum superfluid, the researchers may have found evidence that so-called "Hawking radiation" is a real phenomenon of black holes. The post Researchers Use Supersonic Fluid to Test Hawking’s Black Hole Theories appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Scammed: US Military Spent $20M on Fake Gear Made in China

Gov’t Scammed It seems even the U.S. military can be fooled by Chinese knockoffs . The U.S. military is required by law to purchase certain goods only from manufacturers in the U.S. or other approved nations. That list of nations does not include China, but it’s now come to light that a Brooklyn clothing and goods wholesaler had been sending samples of military gear to a Chinese manufacturer to c

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This Tank-Like Machine Gun Robot Is Straight out Of “Terminator”

KillBot A new robotic tank called THeMIS could bring the remote-control capabilities of aerial drone warfare down to ground combat. The robot, which C4ISRNET reports was equipped with a 12.7mm machine gun and a 40mm automatic grenade launcher during a demo in Estonia last month, is reminiscent of those T-1 robotic tanks from “Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines” — a deadly inflection point in auto

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Image: Hubble sees a galaxy bucking the trend

This luminous orb is the galaxy NGC 4621, better known as Messier 59. As this latter moniker indicates, the galaxy is listed in the famous catalog of deep-sky objects compiled by French comet-hunter Charles Messier in the 18th century. However, German astronomer Johann Gottfried Koehler is credited with discovering the galaxy just days before Messier added it to his collection in 1779.

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Native plant species may be at greater risk from climate change than non-natives

As spring advances across the Midwest, a new study looking at blooming flowers suggests that non-native plants might outlast native plants in the region due to climate change.

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Flexible generators turn movement into energy

Wearable devices that harvest energy from movement are not a new idea, but a material created at Rice University may make them more practical.

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Lab-grown diamonds: Technology is disrupting the diamond business

Forget what you know about cubic zirconia, crystals and any simulated diamonds. This isn't about that.

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Google's rebellious employees take aim at contractor firms

Google workers on Thursday expanded their rebellion against company practices, sending letters to three firms they say provide contract workers to Google, asking them to end mandatory arbitration for those workers.

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New mail and messaging tools expected for iPhones, WWDC

New iPhones won't be out until the fall. But Monday, we'll get a sneak peek at what new features Apple has planned for us, not just for the next models but recent iPhones and iPads as well.

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The AI gig economy is coming for you

The artificial-intelligence industry runs on the invisible labor of humans working in isolated and often terrible conditions—and the model is spreading to more and more businesses.

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‘Screen Time’ Is Over

The phrase can’t remotely capture our ever-shifting digital experience, social scientists say. Say hello to the “screenome.”

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Trump Administration Lifts Ethanol-Fuel Ban That Was Meant to Cut Smog

The change, sought by corn-belt farmers hurt by the China trade war, drew criticism from environmentalists as well as energy companies.

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Facebook loses bid to block landmark ECJ data security hearing

Ireland's supreme court on Friday dismissed a bid by Facebook to block a landmark data security case from progressing to the European Court of Justice.

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Smoke from Canadian wildfires drifts into 5 US states

Smoke from large wildfires in Canada's Alberta province has drifted into five U.S. states and is causing haze and air quality issues.

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Native plant species may be at greater risk from climate change than non-natives

A study led by researchers at Indiana University's Environmental Resilience Institute has revealed that warming temperatures affect native and non-native flowering plants differently, which could change the look of local landscapes over time.

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Flexible generators turn movement into energy

Rice University researchers produce triboelectric nanogenerators with laser-induced graphene. The flexible devices turn movement into electrical energy and could enable wearable, self-powered sensors and devices.

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Hubble sees a galaxy bucking the trend

This luminous orb is the galaxy NGC 4621, better known as Messier 59.

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Radio-wave therapy proves effective against liver cancer cells

A new targeted therapy using non-thermal radio waves has been shown to block the growth of liver cancer cells anywhere in the body without damaging healthy cells, according to a study conducted by scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health.

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Antibiotics that dentists prescribe are unnecessary 81% of the time, research shows

Antibiotics prescribed by dentists as a preemptive strike against infection are unnecessary 81% of the time, according to a study published today in JAMA Network Open.

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More than half of patients in pain management study took no opioids after operations

Patients undergoing six operations said postoperative pain was manageable, according to Journal of the American College of Surgeons study findings.

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Seven key health measures help predict future risk of heart disease

Seven key measures of heart health may help predict future risk of cardiovascular disease, according to researchers. They added that improving these measures may also help decrease the risk of CVD in the future.

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Most preventive antibiotics prescribed by dentists are unnecessary

A new study has found that 81% of antibiotics prescribed by dentists – who are among the top prescribers in the US, accounting for about 10% of all antibiotic prescriptions – to prevent infections prior to dental visits are unnecessary.

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Do violent video games affect kids' behavior with real guns?

This randomized clinical trial in a university laboratory examined the effects of video games with weapons on children's behavior when they found a real gun.

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Tornado outbreaks reminder to make smartphones disaster-ready

Tornadoes have torn their way across the country as the natural disaster season starts, leaving hundreds displaced from their homes and lives in disarray.

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Sprint launches mobile 5G network in Atlanta, Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston and Kansas City

Sprint is still sweating out regulatory approval for its would-be merger with T-Mobile.

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The North Face Vandalized Wikipedia, Then Apologized After Outcry

Public Apology Outdoor clothing brand The North Face has officially apologized for uploading images of remote locations — complete with models wearing its swag — to Wikipedia in an effort to score cheap publicity points. What brought the “hack” to light was a boastful video from Ad Age bragging that the images were boosted to the top of Google Images by Google’s search engine algorithms. “We hack

6h

How Eight Middle Schoolers Toppled the Scripps Spelling Bee

The sight of eight co-champions hoisting the ceramic trophy at the Scripps National Spelling Bee last night was a remarkable ending to a competition that the ESPN announcers kept referring to as “historic” and “unprecedented.” This year’s Bee was certainly one for the history books: There had never been more than two spellers sharing the top honor before this. Those elite eight—quickly dubbed the

6h

How Trump Undermined Theresa May

President Donald Trump’s barbs at Germany and the European Union get the headlines, but no ally has been more tormented by him than the United Kingdom, to which he will make a state visit next week. Over the past two and a half years, the president has interfered in the U.K.’s domestic politics. He has repeatedly undermined its national security with his comments and actions after terrorist attac

6h

Quick liquid packaging: Encasing water silhouettes in 3-D polymer membranes for lab-in-a-drop experiments

The ability to confine water in an enclosed compartment without directly manipulating it or using rigid containers is an attractive possibility. In a recent study, Sara Coppola and an interdisciplinary research team in the departments of Biomaterials, Intelligent systems, Industrial Production Engineering and Advanced Biomaterials for Healthcare in Italy, proposed a water-based, bottom-up approach

6h

An astronaut's guide to accomplishing your mission

In any mission, whether to collect soil samples from Mars or to network effectively at a conference, there are "mission critical" actions and systems, and more peripheral ones. To achieve "mission success", it's a good idea to make contingency plans in case any of these critical pieces fails. On a NASA mission, this might mean building as many as three backup systems for the crew's oxygen supply.

6h

Immune cells sometimes end up comforting tumors

How fast a tumor grows doesn’t solely depend on how quickly the cancer cells can divide, a new study finds. By examining brain tumors in mice, researchers discovered that immune cells that should be defending the body against disease sometimes end up providing aid and comfort to tumor cells instead. The more immune cells a tumor can recruit to its side, the faster the tumor grows, the researchers

6h

The naked mole rat's furry cousin also feels no pain

Animals Immunity to discomfort seems to run in the family. The naked mole rat gets so much press, you’d think it was the only mole rat in town. Sure those hairless weirdos can survive at oxygen levels below that of Mount…

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Sepsis survivors at increased risk of death after critical illness – study

Being older, male and having multiple health problems found to heighten risk factors Sepsis survivors are at a heightened risk of death in the years after their illness if it has been critical, research has shown. Of those discharged from hospital in England after a critical care admission, 15% died within 12 months, according to a study published in the journal Jama Network Open. Continue readin

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What are the northern lights? (video)

Every winter, thousands of tourists head north hoping to catch a glimpse of the luminous auroras dancing in the sky. In this episode of Reactions, we're sharing tips on how to increase your chances of seeing one and breaking down the chemistry behind the colors of this awe-inspiring wonder.

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Politicians walk the walk, when it comes to financial investments

For the most part, politicians do put their money where their mouths are. A recent study of U.S senators and representatives finds that the more liberal a politician's voting record is, the more likely the politician is to invest in socially responsible stocks.

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The amazing brains and morphing skin of octopuses and other cephalopods | Roger Hanlon

Octopus, squid and cuttlefish — collectively known as cephalopods — have strange, massive, distributed brains. What do they do with all that neural power? Dive into the ocean with marine biologist Roger Hanlon, who shares astonishing footage of the camouflaging abilities of cephalopods, which can change their skin color and texture in a flash. Learn how their smart skin, and their ability to dep

6h

How the enzyme lipoxygenase drives heart failure after heart attacks

Heart failure after a heart attack is a global epidemic leading to heart failure pathology. Medical researchers are seeking ways to delay or reverse this heart failure, which comes from non-resolved chronic inflammation.

6h

Hyphens in paper titles harm citation counts and journal impact factors

According to the latest research results, the presence of simple hyphens in the titles of academic papers adversely affects the citation statistics, regardless of the quality of the articles. The phenomenon applies to all major subject areas. Thus, citation counts and journal impact factors, commonly used for professorial evaluations in universities worldwide, are unreliable.

6h

G20 digital tax takes step closer

Global efforts to impose a unified tax policy on Google, Facebook and other internet giants have cleared a major hurdle ahead of a G20 summit in Japan, officials said Friday.

6h

Video: What are the northern lights?

Every winter, thousands of tourists head north hoping to catch a glimpse of the luminous auroras dancing in the sky.

6h

Socialdemokrater vil kræve bæredygtigt flybrændstof – men dén løsning bliver dyr

Socialdemokratiet kræver i partiets nye klimaudspil, at alle fly, der letter fra danske lufthavne, flyver på mindst 15 pct. bæredygtigt brændstof i 2030. Det er realistisk, men bliver dyrt, siger en Niras-chef. Pluk de lavthængende frugter først, siger en KU-professor.

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How the enzyme lipoxygenase drives heart failure after heart attacks

Heart failure after a heart attack is a global epidemic leading to heart failure pathology. Ganesh Halade, Ph.D., is seeking ways to delay or reverse this heart failure, which comes from non-resolved chronic inflammation. In a study in Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, Halade and colleagues detail the profound lipidomic and metabolic signatures and the modified leukocyte profiling that delay

7h

How habitat loss can destabilize ecosystems

An international study has revealed new evidence to help understand the consequences of habitat loss on natural communities.

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A common skin bacterium put children with severe eczema at higher risk of food allergy

Scientists from King's College London have found that young children with severe eczema infected with Staphylococcus aureus (SA) bacterium, are at a higher risk of developing a food allergy.

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Godzilla: King of the Monsters Is an Utterly Disastrous Sequel

When I was, give or take, 10 years old, back in the late 1970s, I would watch Japanese monster movies every Sunday. One channel (of about four or five that were locally available in that televisual Dark Age) specialized in the genre. For this particular weekly segment, it relied mostly on Toho Studios creatures—Rodan, Mothra, and above all, Godzilla—although it occasionally dabbled in Gamera, a g

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A PTSDodgy Genetic Test

A dubious paper just published in Molecular Neurobiology makes the suggestion that all military recruits should be offered genetic testing to assess their risk of PTSD. According to the authors, Kenneth Blum et al., We hypothesize that, even before combat, soldiers with a childhood background of violence (or with a familial susceptibility risk) would benefit from being genotyped for high-risk alle

7h

Weird Flashes Keep Appearing on the Moon and Scientists Don’t Know Why

Strange Flashes Several times a week, short bursts of light appear on the surface of the Moon — and so far, scientists have only been able to guess as to why. But a team of German astronomers have a new theory, and it could provide crucial information for humans who want to settle the Moon. “Seismic activities were also observed on the moon,” said Hakan Kayal, professor of space technology at Jul

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Planned Changes to EPA Pollution Analyses Align with Industry Requests

New rules would reduce the tallied benefits of regulations compared to costs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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An Army Veteran Comes to Terms With Not Having PTSD

A reminder that popular tropes and easy assumptions about how trauma affects people often do not fit, and we all still have much to learn.

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Saybie vejede 245 gram ved fødslen: Verdens mindste fødte overlever

Selvom hun nu er fem måneder gammel, kan hun stadig få store problemer med helbredet, siger dansk overlæge.

7h

Politicians walk the walk, when it comes to financial investments

For the most part, politicians do put their money where their mouths are. A recent study of US senators and representatives finds that the more liberal a politician's voting record is, the more likely the politician is to invest in socially responsible stocks.

7h

Vulnerability of cloud service hardware uncovered

Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are, so to say, a computer manufacturer's 'Lego bricks': electronic components that can be employed in a very flexible way. Large data centers that are dedicated to cloud services, often resort to FPGAs. To date, the use of such services has been considered as relatively secure. Recently, however, scientists at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology uncovered pote

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Stand up to cancer-funded research to be presented at ASCO May 31-June 4 in Chicago

SU2C supported researchers will present work on pediatric brain tumors, cfDNA for early cancer detection, dual blockade of CTLA-4 and PD-1 in mCRC, cancer interception of pancreatic and lung cancers, machine learning RECIST in RWE study of lung cancer, and molecular markers of response to neoadjuvant nivolumab in resectable NSCLC.

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‘Thousands of excess deaths’ from popular heartburn drugs

A new study links long-term use of proton pump inhibitors to fatal cases of cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, and upper gastrointestinal cancer. Past research has linked extended use of these drugs, which treat heartburn, ulcers, and acid reflux, with an increased risk of premature death. However, little has been known about the specific causes of death attributed to the drugs. More

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The Friends Whose Kids All Have the Same Rare Disease

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week, she talks with a group of parents whose children all suffer from the same rare disease— Wegener’s granulomatosis (also known as granulomatosis with polyangiitis), a chronic illness that causes inflammation of

7h

Want to know the meaning of life? It starts with health.

In a study of nearly 7,000 individuals, those without a sense of purpose were more likely to die sooner. Interestingly, those without meaning were more likely to die of cardiovascular disease. Simply put, purpose produces better health. None What is the meaning of life? This question has caused thinkers to wax poetic for eons. Viktor Frankl believed that suffering provided meaning; Joseph Campbel

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Suicide increase linked to 13 Reasons Why

In line with critics’ warning, youth suicides increased during broadcast season of the Netflix show. Nick Carne reports.

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Godzilla: the perfect monster for the age of climate change

Cinematic creatures symbolise human anxieties, and the great Japanese lizard is suddenly very modern all over again. Julian CH Lee from Australia's RMIT University explains.

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Warning sounded on herbal tea

Canadian case highlights potential dangers of traditional beverages. Andrew Masterson reports.

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'It's Never Done This': Arkansas River Keeps Flooding, Testing Levees And Patience

The Arkansas River is rising well above its previous record, and it's forecast to stay that way for days. That's putting pressure on old levees and making it hard for some residents to evacuate. (Image credit: Nathan Rott/NPR)

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The Futuristic Tech Disrupting Real Estate and Construction

In the wake of the housing market collapse of 2008, one entrepreneur decided to dive right into the failing real estate industry. But this time, he didn’t buy any real estate to begin with. Instead, Glenn Sanford decided to launch the first-ever cloud-based real estate brokerage, eXp Realty . Contracting virtual platform VirBELA to build out the company’s mega-campus in VR, eXp Realty demonstrate

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'Good Omens' Is a Damned Heavenly Show, Adaptation or Not

Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett's beloved novel leaps to the small screen with celestially gratifying results.

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The Mighty Milky Way

Our galaxy is far bigger, brighter and more massive than most others — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ancient faeces reveals early settler parasite infection

Whipworm eggs found in 8000-year-old human coprolites. Andrew Masterson reports.

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New research shows how habitat loss can destabilise ecosystems

Habitat loss is the leading cause of biodiversity loss worldwide. Now an international study has revealed new evidence to help understand the consequences of habitat loss on natural communities.The research, co-authored by Swansea University's Dr Miguel Lurgi, shows the specific ways in which human activities destroy habitat is a key factor to understanding the effects of such destruction on the s

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Hard food, strong jaw: Jawbone structure responds to forceful chewing

Chewing, or mastication, is thought to impact jawbone structure as bone is continually reconstructed along with alterations in mechanical load. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Here, mice fed a hard diet exhibited greater masticatory force, which enhanced growth factors in the osteocytes in the jawbone and enhanced bone formation. This change was predicted by computer simulation, an

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The body responds to variations in light between the day and night independently of the brain

In mice whose body clock — an internal mechanism located in the brain — does not work properly, each tissue still knows what time it is and has the capacity to respond to changes in light intensity.The study, published in the journal Cell, is a collaboration between IRB Barcelona and the University of California, Irvine (US).

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Hyphens in paper titles harm citation counts and journal impact factors

According to the latest research results, the presence of simple hyphens in the titles of academic papers adversely affects the citation statistics, regardless of the quality of the articles. The phenomenon applies to all major subject areas. Thus, citation counts and journal impact factors, commonly used for professorial evaluations in universities worldwide, are unreliable.

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Searching for the origins of the depressive symptoms in Huntington's disease

About 40% of the affected patients with Huntington's disease — a neurodegenerative pathology — show depression symptoms, even in early stages before the apparition of the typical motor symptoms of the disease. An altered function of Cdk5 kinase — an essential enzyme in several cell signalling pathways — could explain the physiopathology of the depressive-like behaviour in Huntington's disease.

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In hot pursuit of dinosaurs: Tracking extinct species on ancient Earth via biogeography

One researcher at UTokyo is in hot pursuit of dinosaurs, tracking extinct species around ancient Earth. Identifying the movements of extinct species from millions of years ago can provide insights into ancient migration routes, interaction between species, and the movement of continents. 'If we find fossils on different continents from closely related species, then we can guess that at some point

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Using geography to explore land policy and management

One of the challenges for researchers is collaborating and communicating with communities to solve social and environmental problems. However, that challenge is what inspires and motivates scientists to keep investigating important questions.

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Gene Sequencing Could Ensure You Get the Kind of Weed You Pay For

Kind (of) Bud Cannabis acceptance is growing in the U.S. , meaning it’s getting easier for users to get their hands on marijuana. But it’s not getting any easier to keep their dealers honest about the specific strain of weed they’re buying — most people still just have to trust that their plug knows what they’re selling. But now, a team of researchers has conducted what it’s heralding as the firs

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Why Your Metro Commute Is So Insanely Windy

The intense and mysterious winds of the Washington, D.C., metro system seem to come out of nowhere. They’re not particularly bad when standing on the train platform, as one might expect; in fact, it’s the level between the train platform and the street where the infuriatingly powerful gusts are the strongest. Every now and then, my fellow commuters and I will be caught holding down our clothes an

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Understanding identity in online worlds

For Rosa Mikeal Martey, professor in Journalism and Media Communication, the relationship between identity in the offline world and identity construction in a virtual world has always been of research interest. For her dissertation, Martey studied gender identity and perception in online job applications. Her current research involves understanding how social norms develop in digital spaces. "I'm

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Three ways to travel at (nearly) the speed of light

One hundred years ago today, on May 29, 1919, measurements of a solar eclipse offered verification for Einstein's theory of general relativity. Even before that, Einstein had developed the theory of special relativity, which revolutionized the way we understand light. To this day, it provides guidance on understanding how particles move through space—a key area of research to keep spacecraft and a

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Is traffic-related air pollution killing us?

It's summer getaway season. According to AAA, two-thirds of American families are taking a summer vacation this year, and more than half of us are planning a road trip.

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Desalinating water in a greener and more economical way

We know that excessive consumption, industrial activity and growth in the global population are some of the factors threatening access to drinking water for an increasing proportion of people around the world. According to UNESCO figures from 2012, almost 700 million people suffer from limited access to water—and that number could rise to 1.8 billion by 2025. Desalination and the treatment of indu

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Plastic poisons ocean bacteria propping up the marine food chain

We've all seen the impact of our plastic addiction. It's hard to miss the devastating images of whales and sea birds that have died with their stomachs full of solidified fossil fuels. The recent discovery of a plastic bag in the Mariana Trench, at over 10,000 metres below sea level, reminds us of the depth of our problem. Now, the breadth is increasing too. New research suggests that chemicals le

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Vulnerability of cloud service hardware uncovered

Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are kind of like a computer manufacturer's Lego bricks: electronic components that can be employed in a more flexible way than other computer chips. Even large data centers that are dedicated to cloud services, such as those provided by some big technology companies, often resort to FPGAs. To date, the use of such services has been considered as relatively se

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BlackBerry Messenger dies today, but it’ll never truly be gone

My favorite phone of all time is the BlackBerry Bold 9000. Unlike the iPhone 3G, which touted a revolutionary design when it was announced just a month later in 2008, the BlackBerry …

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Most biomedical research is done on male animals—that's a public health problem

According to 60 years of scientific research, when rats are scared, they freeze. Or at least, the male rats do.

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Australia: Chinese Lasers Forced Military Pilots to Land

Blinding Light Australian navy pilots claim that they were forced to land their helicopters after Chinese militia boats aimed lasers at them during a routine exercise over the South China Sea. The laser-induced, precautionary grounding is just the latest of many similar accounts by pilots from the U.S. and elsewhere, according to The Guardian — but now the Chinese government is denying that the i

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Djurförsök med enbart hanar kan ge kvinnor sämre medicin

Experiment med råttor och möss görs oftast på hanar. Honornas hormoner anses leda till opålitliga resultat. Men det är en fördom som hotar folkhälsan, enligt en debattartikel i en av världens tyngsta vetenskapliga tidskrifter.

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New tool reveals how the different shapes of organisms grow

A new tool has been created to explain how tissue growth leads to the range of plant and animal forms we see around us.

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Conservationists find protected areas worldwide are shrinking

A large international team of researchers reports that the amount of land designated as protected around the globe is shrinking. In their paper published in the journal Science, the researchers describe their study of protected lands over the past 200 years, and what they found. Lisa Naughton-Treves and Margaret Buck Holland with the University of Wisconsin and the University of Maryland, respecti

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The magic behind the medals

The most successful winter Olympian ever opened nearly two decades of training logs to researchers to shed light on how she achieved her goals. Now researchers have looked at two methods she used for her high-intensity training sessions to see how they compare.

8h

DNA origami to scale-up molecular motors

Researchers have successfully used DNA origami to make smooth-muscle-like contractions in large networks of molecular motor systems, a discovery which could be applied in molecular robotics.

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These are the best messaging apps for your phone

DIY Don't worry about a communication breakdown. The best messaging apps bring with them video calls, location sharing, disappearing chat conversations, and much more.

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New tool reveals how the different shapes of organisms grow

A new tool has been created to explain how tissue growth leads to the range of plant and animal forms we see around us.

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DNA from 41 skeletons hints at first herders in Africa

New research clarifies food production in sub-Saharan Africa some 5,000 years ago, as well as how herding and farming spread through the continent in ancient times. “The origins of food producers in East Africa have remained elusive because of gaps in the archaeological record,” explains Mary Prendergast, a co-first author and professor of anthropology at Saint Louis University in Madrid, Spain “

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Making structural changes to antibody has potential for reducing cancer tumours

Guided by "blueprints" produced at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan, a group of scientists from academia and industry made structural changes to an antibody that is now showing a lot of potential for reducing cancer tumours.

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Making structural changes to antibody has potential for reducing cancer tumours

Guided by "blueprints" produced at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan, a group of scientists from academia and industry made structural changes to an antibody that is now showing a lot of potential for reducing cancer tumours.

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DNA origami to scale-up molecular motors

Researchers have successfully used DNA origami to make smooth-muscle-like contractions in large networks of molecular motor systems, a discovery which could be applied in molecular robotics.

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Nature's first aid kit: A fungus growing on the sides of birch trees

If you've ever stopped to admire a birch tree, you may unknowingly have something in common with a 5,300-year-old mummy called Ötzi. In 1991, hikers found Ötzi in an alpine glacier on the Austrian-Italian border, and perfectly preserved with him were pieces of fungus attached to leather cords, safely stowed in his bag. That fungus is the same one you can see growing on birch trees today: the birch

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The defect-free assembly of 2-D clusters with over 100 single-atom quantum systems

Researchers at Technische Universität Darmstadt have recently demonstrated the defect-free assembly of versatile target patterns of up to 111 single-atom quantum systems. Their findings, outlined in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, could drive assembled-atom architectures beyond the threshold of quantum advantage, paving the way for new breakthroughs in quantum science and technology.

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Water governance: Flexibility, uncertainty and participation

Whenever I start a presentation about water governance, I ask the audience if they know what the price of a litre of tap water is. Usually the room goes quiet, shoulders shrug and only a few make a guess, usually an overestimation. My next question is about the price of a litre of petrol. Within a split second, I get the right answer from the audience.

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Birds prefer to live in luxury than in poor areas, study finds

A unique study of birdlife in South African cities has found that birds prefer wealthy areas to poorer ones but will move out if things get too cramped. The study was conducted by a team of scientists from the University of Turin, Italy and the Universities of Cape Town (UCT) and the Witwatersrand, South Africa. Their findings were published this week in the international journal of Global Change

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Flashes on the moon

It happens several times a week. Sometimes it is only short flashes of light that appear on the surface of the moon. Other light phenomena on the Earth's satellite can last longer. And sometimes there are also places that darken temporarily.

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Nature's first aid kit: A fungus growing on the sides of birch trees

If you've ever stopped to admire a birch tree, you may unknowingly have something in common with a 5,300-year-old mummy called Ötzi. In 1991, hikers found Ötzi in an alpine glacier on the Austrian-Italian border, and perfectly preserved with him were pieces of fungus attached to leather cords, safely stowed in his bag. That fungus is the same one you can see growing on birch trees today: the birch

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Birds prefer to live in luxury than in poor areas, study finds

A unique study of birdlife in South African cities has found that birds prefer wealthy areas to poorer ones but will move out if things get too cramped. The study was conducted by a team of scientists from the University of Turin, Italy and the Universities of Cape Town (UCT) and the Witwatersrand, South Africa. Their findings were published this week in the international journal of Global Change

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Pre-surgical immunotherapy shows promise in trial for patients with early stage lung cancer

Pre-surgical immunotherapy shows promise in trial for patients with early stage lung cancer according to interim results of a large, multicenter trial.

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New research paves the way for safer leukemia treatments

Researchers have discovered a new, safer way to treat a type of childhood leukaemia: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Published in Science Translational Medicine, this joint research by Children's Cancer Institute (Australia), VIB-KU Leuven and UK Dementia Research Institute, is an important breakthrough in the treatment of T-ALL. This involves drugs which inhibit the enzyme 'gamma-sec

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Stanford engineers develop a more stable, efficient prosthetic foot

Hiking trails and other rough terrain are especially difficult for people with prosthetic legs. Now, Stanford engineers have come up with more stable prostheses — and a better way to design them.

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Report: Huawei cuts meetings with US, sends US workers home

The Financial Times reported Friday that tech giant Huawei has ordered its employees to cancel technical meetings with American contacts and has sent home numerous U.S. employees working at …

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Scientists develop gel-based delivery system for stem cell-derived factors

In ongoing research to find a treatment for acute kidney injury, scientists have further advanced a promising approach using therapeutic factors produced by stem cells by creating a more efficient delivery method that would improve tissue regeneration.

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Childhood adversity linked to early puberty, premature brain development and mental illness

Growing up in poverty and experiencing traumatic events like a bad accident or sexual assault were linked to accelerated puberty and brain maturation, abnormal brain development, and greater mental health disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and psychosis, according to a new study.

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Nyt måleudstyr for følsomt: Fem af seks diagnoser forkerte

Flere regioner opgiver nye hurtige metoder til at udpege patienter med forkammerflimren i hjertet. Det nye medicinske udstyr er nemlig for følsomt og risikerer at diagnosticere patienter med hjerteproblemer, selvom de slet intet fejler.

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Undersøgelse: Fire partier har elendig cybersikkerhed

Det står sløjt til med cybersikkerheden hos fire partier, viser analyse af hjemmesider.

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The Case Against Grit

Updated at 12:40 p.m. on May 31, 2019. David Epstein’s new book, Range , isn’t about parenting per se, but Epstein thought a lot about parenting while he was writing it. And not just because his first child was born a few months before its publication. Range , a book about the value of being a generalist rather than a lifelong or career-long specialist, argues that many of the most effective peop

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Study provides new insights into stellar population and gas outflow in the central region of NGC 1068

A new study conducted by French astronomers has delivered new insights about central stellar population and gas outflow in the spiral galaxy NGC 1068. Results of the research, presented in a paper published May 22 on arXiv.org, could be essential in improving our knowledge about physical processes taking place in the inner region of this galaxy.

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You can’t teach schoolkids ‘resilience’ when they’re micromanaged every day | Richard Godwin

The education secretary wants to ‘toughen up’ pupils, but that means less structure, not more Don’t tell the Conservative leadership candidates, but the education secretary, Damian Hinds, is holding a brainstorming session. He wants ideas on how we can toughen up British schoolchildren . Clearly he knows something we don’t about the future. “To truly prepare for adult life we need to make sure our

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Use of male mice skews drug research against women, study finds

Male animal bias is unjustified and can lead to drugs that work less well for women The male mind is rational and orderly while the female one is complicated and hormonal. It is a stereotype that has skewed decades of neuroscience research towards using almost exclusively male mice and other laboratory animals, according to a new study. Scientists have typically justified excluding female animals

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SLAC fires up electron gun for LCLS-II X-ray laser upgrade

Crews at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have powered up a new electron gun, a key component of the lab's upgrade of its Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser, and last night it fired its first electrons.

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Artificial intelligence, the future of work, and inequality

One of the most spectacular facts of the last two centuries of economic history is the exponential growth in GDP per capita in most of the world. Figure 1 shows the rise (and the difference) in living standards for five countries since 1000 AD.

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Bird personalities influenced by age and experience, study shows

Differences in the personalities of birds are related to both age and experience, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.

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Rock-solid archives record variations in the Earth's orbit

The shape of Earth's orbit around the sun and the orientation of its axis undergo regular variations over periods of thousands to millions of years. These variations—known as Milankovitch cycles after the Serbian geophysicist Milutin Milankovitch—affect the amount of sunlight reaching the planet's surface.

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Trees, the ancient Macedonians, and the world's first environmental disaster

It's a simple enough equation: good soil is the key to good food. And good soil starts with trees.

8h

Autism Mouse Models for the Microbiome?

Many readers will have seen the paper that just came out on a possible mouse-model demonstration of a connection between autism and the gut microbiome. It’s certainly generated a lot of headlines, and its very title guaranteed that it would: “ Human Gut Microbiota from Autism Spectrum Disorder Promote Behavioral Symptoms in Mice “. I found that a pretty startling claim, but I’m well aware that GI

8h

Racism has a toxic effect

Researchers have long known that racism is linked to health problems, but now results from a small study using RNA tests show that racism appears to increase chronic inflammation among African Americans.

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Guidelines for managing anaphylaxis in children need an update

Treatment guidelines for managing anaphylaxis in children should be reassessed, according to a new Canadian study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.

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Early genome catastrophes can cause non-smoking lung cancer

Catastrophic rearrangements in the genome occurring as early as childhood and adolescence can lead to the development of lung cancer in later years in non-smokers. This finding, published in Cell, helps explain how some non-smoking-related lung cancers develop.

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Childhood adversity linked to early puberty, premature brain development, & mental illness

Growing up in poverty and experiencing traumatic events like a bad accident or sexual assault were linked to accelerated puberty and brain maturation, abnormal brain development, and greater mental health disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and psychosis, according to a new Penn Medicine study published this week in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Scientists develop gel-based delivery system for stem cell-derived factors

In ongoing research to find a treatment for acute kidney injury, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists have further advanced a promising approach using therapeutic factors produced by stem cells by creating a more efficient delivery method that would improve tissue regeneration.

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Cave debris may be the oldest known example of people eating starch

Charred material found in South Africa puts energy-rich roots and tubers on Stone Age menus, long before farming began.

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5 Mistakes MacKenzie Bezos and Other Mega-Donors Should Avoid

The philanthropic road is littered with the carcasses of those who thought that “disrupting” poverty would be as simple as disrupting the taxi industry.

8h

'Call of Duty' Is Back—and It's Grim as Heck

Know what else is back? The single-player campaign. 'Modern Warfare' is set to be released in October.

8h

Everyone Needs a Good Pillow—Even Astronauts Bound for Mars

Sure, long-haul space travel demands a solid vehicle and ample food. But to stay sane during those lonely days, you might just want a good ol' pillow.

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Cheap Phones, Folding Bikes, and Everything Else We Loved This Month

Plus: Boosted's new e-scooter, the Beats Powerbeats Pro, and New Balance's redesigned sneakers.

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Bird personalities influenced by age and experience, study shows

Differences in the personalities of birds are related to both age and experience, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists.

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Clarksville to power all city operations with solar energy

submitted by /u/nztdealer [link] [comments]

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14 visions of the future: Life on Mars and a rural skyscraper

submitted by /u/philipjupiter [link] [comments]

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Ancient faeces reveals early settler parasite infection

Whipworm eggs found in 8000-year-old human coprolites. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Researchers use magnetically actuated microrobots to deliver stem cells to tissue targets

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in South Korea and one in Switzerland has demonstrated that it is possible to use magnetically actuated microrobots to deliver stem cells to targeted tissue. In their paper published in the journal Science Robotics, the group describes creating the tiny bots and how well they worked when tested.

8h

What does the public think about corporate responsibility?

What is the public's opinion when it comes to the responsibility of Swiss companies abroad? ETH researchers have investigated this question and are able to show that there is a great deal of support for the so-called Responsible Business Initiative.

8h

Fighting malaria with fungi: Biologists engineer a fungus to be deadlier to mosquitoes

Bed nets. Insecticides. Sterile and genetically modified insects. Now scientists are adding a genetically engineered toxic fungus to the arsenal of weapons to wipe out mosquitoes that carry the malaria parasite.

9h

Ancient DNA is revealing the origins of livestock herding in Africa

Visitors to East Africa are often amazed by massive herds of cattle with a gorgeous array of horn, hump and coat patterns. Pastoralism—a way of life centered around herding—is a central part of many Africans' identity. It's also a key economic strategy that is now threatened by climate change, rising demands for meat, urban sprawl and land conflicts.

9h

In hot pursuit of dinosaurs: Tracking extinct species on ancient Earth via biogeography

One researcher at the University of Tokyo is in hot pursuit of dinosaurs, tracking extinct species around ancient Earth. Identifying the movements of extinct species from millions of years ago can provide insights into ancient migration routes, interaction between species, and the movement of continents.

9h

Uber posts $1 bn loss in Q1 on growing revenue

Ride share giant Uber on Thursday reported a $1 billion loss in the first quarter of this year despite rising revenue and monthly users.

9h

No paper, no PhD? India rethinks graduate student policy

Nature, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01692-8 A committee has recommended scrapping a rule that requires PhD students to publish articles.

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Fighting malaria with fungi: Biologists engineer a fungus to be deadlier to mosquitoes

Bed nets. Insecticides. Sterile and genetically modified insects. Now scientists are adding a genetically engineered toxic fungus to the arsenal of weapons to wipe out mosquitoes that carry the malaria parasite.

9h

In hot pursuit of dinosaurs: Tracking extinct species on ancient Earth via biogeography

One researcher at the University of Tokyo is in hot pursuit of dinosaurs, tracking extinct species around ancient Earth. Identifying the movements of extinct species from millions of years ago can provide insights into ancient migration routes, interaction between species, and the movement of continents.

9h

Subaru Telescope captures 1800 exploding stars

The Subaru Telescope has captured images of more than 1800 exploding stars in the Universe, some located 8 billion light years from Earth.

9h

Tree of life brought to scale by Yale scientists

Examples of biological scaling are everywhere. The paw of a mouse is smaller than the human hand. Our own organs and limbs typically scale with our body size as we develop and grow.

9h

ARCHANGEL: Securing UK national archives with AI and blockchain

The University of Surrey is using its state-of-the-art blockchain and artificial intelligence technologies to secure the digital government records of national archives across the globe—including the UK, Australia and the United States of America.

9h

Study details regulation of a multi-drug transporter

Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered how a protein pump distinguishes between chemicals that it will expel from a cell and inhibitors that block its action.

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New textile dyeing method drastically reduces water needed and toxic dye discharge

Anuradhi Liyanapathiranage is passionate about sustainability and protecting the environment through science. A University of Georgia doctoral student in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences' department of textiles, merchandising and interiors, the Sri Lanka native is researching and helping develop an environmentally friendly textile dyeing method.

9h

New records show spread of parasitic deer flies across the U.S.

With flattened bodies, grabbing forelegs and deciduous wings, deer keds do not look like your typical fly. These parasites of deer—which occasionally bite humans—are more widely distributed across the U.S. than previously thought, according to Penn State entomologists, who caution that deer keds may transmit disease-causing bacteria.

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Spitzer captures stellar family portrait

In this large celestial mosaic taken by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, there's a lot to see, including multiple clusters of stars born from the same dense clumps of gas and dust. Some of these clusters are older than others and more evolved, making this a generational stellar portrait.

9h

Navigating the new landscape of LGBTQ divorce

The right to marry means same-sex couples have gained access to thousands of state and federal benefits like social security benefits and inheritance rights. But it also means the right to divorce. In their new book, LGBTQ Divorce and Relationship Dissolution: Psychological and Legal Perspectives and Implications for Practice (Oxford University Press), co-editors Adam Romero, Arnold D. Kassoy Scho

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Billions of fungi belong to just a few types (and some are carnivorous)

Pick up a handful of soil and you'll be holding a vast, rich community of microbes numbering in their billions. Scientists have recently begun to analyze the microbial "fingerprint" of these organisms to determine which types and how many of each are present.

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Study details regulation of a multi-drug transporter

Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered how a protein pump distinguishes between chemicals that it will expel from a cell and inhibitors that block its action.

9h

Tree of life brought to scale by Yale scientists

Examples of biological scaling are everywhere. The paw of a mouse is smaller than the human hand. Our own organs and limbs typically scale with our body size as we develop and grow.

9h

New records show spread of parasitic deer flies across the U.S.

With flattened bodies, grabbing forelegs and deciduous wings, deer keds do not look like your typical fly. These parasites of deer—which occasionally bite humans—are more widely distributed across the U.S. than previously thought, according to Penn State entomologists, who caution that deer keds may transmit disease-causing bacteria.

9h

Mosquito-killing spider juice offers malaria hope

Scientists have genetically modified a fungus to make it produce the same lethal toxin as is found in the funnel web spider A genetically modified fungus that kills malaria-carrying mosquitoes could provide a breakthrough in the fight against the disease, according to researchers. Trials in Burkina Faso found that a fungus, modified so that it produces spider toxin, quickly killed large numbers o

9h

Empowering African farmers with data

With a couple billion more people estimated to join the global population in the next few decades, world food production could use an upgrade. Africa has a key role to play: Agriculture is Africa's biggest industry, but much of Africa's agricultural land is currently underutilized. Crop yields could be increased with more efficient farming techniques and new equipment—but that would require invest

9h

German government expands electric car incentive program

The German government is extending a system of incentives to buy electric cars by 18 months until the end of 2020.

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'A long ride': 50 years ago, a dress rehearsal for the Moon landing

As Earth grew ever smaller below his spacecraft, Apollo 10 commander Tom Stafford made an unusual request to mission control.

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Philippines ships dumped trash back to Canada

Tonnes of garbage sent to the Philippines years ago was shipped back to Canada on Friday after a festering diplomatic row, as Asian nations increasingly reject serving as dumping grounds for international trash.

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Billions of fungi belong to just a few types (and some are carnivorous)

Pick up a handful of soil and you'll be holding a vast, rich community of microbes numbering in their billions. Scientists have recently begun to analyze the microbial "fingerprint" of these organisms to determine which types and how many of each are present.

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Bali volcano spews ash in new eruption

A volcano on the Indonesian island of Bali erupted Friday, spewing a plume of ash and smoke more than 2,000 metres (6,500 feet) into the sky.

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Deliveroo on trial in Madrid over workers' status

Online food delivery group Deliveroo went on trial in Madrid on Friday, accused of wrongly hiring more than 500 of its riders as self-employed contractors instead of regular workers, which costs less for the firm.

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Oregon votes to ban restaurants from offering plastic straws

Oregon will ban restaurants from automatically offering single-use plastic straws under a measure passed by lawmakers, making it the second state to enact restrictions on plastic straws.

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Renault says board will meet Tuesday to respond to Fiat Chrysler bid

Renault's board of directors will meet Tuesday to formulate its response to a merger proposal by Fiat Chrysler, which is likely to lead to talks aimed at creating the world's third-largest automaker, the company said.

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Seoul: North Korea confirms African swine fever outbreak

South Korea said Friday that it is scrambling to prevent the spread of the highly contagious African swine fever on its pig industry after North Korea confirmed an outbreak at a farm near its border with China.

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Tanzania latest African nation to ban plastic bags

A plastic bag ban comes into force in Tanzania on Saturday, as Africa leads efforts to stem the tide of plastic blighting the farthest reaches of the globe, and depths of the ocean.

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Alabama heralds 'last slave ship' discovery; ponders future

Dives into murky water, painstaking examinations of relics and technical data and rigorous peer review led historians and archaeologists to confirm last week that wreckage found in the Mobile River in 2018 was indeed the Clotilda, the last known ship to bring enslaved Africans to the United States.

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Seoul: North Korea confirms African swine fever outbreak

South Korea said Friday that it is scrambling to prevent the spread of the highly contagious African swine fever on its pig industry after North Korea confirmed an outbreak at a farm near its border with China.

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Ancient feces reveal parasites in 8,000-year-old village of Çatalhöyük

New research published today in the journal Antiquity reveals that ancient faeces from the prehistoric village of Çatalhöyük have provided the earliest archaeological evidence for intestinal parasite infection in the mainland Near East.

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The Psychology Podcast Recap (May 2019): Gifted Education, Hope, Male Incompetence and Contextual Evolution

The Psychology Podcast Recap for May 2019 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nordmænd tester batteridrevet hurtigbåd i lille skala

PLUS. I 2022 skal en batteridrevet katamaran flyve på vinger gennem vandet ved 35 knob. Nu skal en skalamodel bevise, at teknologien fungerer.

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Cadillac revamps its sportiest lineup, adds new CT4-V and CT5-V sedans

The new V-Series cars will be more accessible, but don't expect massive horsepower.

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New York City Schools May Introduce Facial Recognition

Smile, you’re on facial-and-object-recognition camera! Eight schools in western New York are slated to be the nation’s first to pilot facial recognition on students and faculty. …

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The Heaven and Hell of Good Omens

The new Amazon/BBC miniseries Good Omens is essentially six hours of the same joke, and that joke is the universe itself. Or—more precisely—the chronic absurdity of heaven, hell, and everything that falls in between. Adapted by Neil Gaiman from the book he co-wrote more than 30 years ago with the late fantasy novelist Terry Pratchett, Good Omens is an ongoing battle not between good and evil but

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Snow might be the next clean energy source

Nexus Media News Two scientists have developed a device that captures the electrical charge from falling snow. Two UCLA scientists have developed a technology to extract the electrical charge from snow and convert it into power.

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Teaching Media Literacy

Like many activist skeptics I have spoken to, on several occasions I have been summoned to jury duty, which was a short-lived experience. On voir dire I was asked what I do and the fact that I host a skeptical podcast came up. This lead to my almost instantaneous dismissal. Lawyers, apparently, don’t want a skeptical jury. They want jurors they can manipulate. Likewise, politicians often apprecia

9h

Generative Music Apps: Endel, Mubert, Hear

Who needs Spotify playlists? These apps create truly endless tunes to match whatever mood you desire.

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Trump’s Latest Attack on Federal Climate Science May Backfire

The Trump administration's bid to weaken federal climate science comes at a time when voters increasingly agree that a climate crisis is imminent.

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Image of the Day: Neon Tissue

See a mouse organoid imaged using two-photon microscopy.

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Ancient poos show intestinal benefits of life in a crowded town

Nature, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01672-y R esidents of a sprawling prehistoric settlement suffered from whipworm but escaped other common parasites.

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Use peer-to-peer research collaboration in graduate school

Nature, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01737-y Develop research collaborations early, and often with your fellow PhD students, say Jessica Eise, Meghana Rawat and Eric C. Wiemer.

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ExoMars orbiter prepares for Rosalind Franklin

On 15 June, the ESA-Roscosmos ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) will follow a different path. An "Inclination Change Maneuver' will put the spacecraft in an altered orbit, enabling it to pick up crucial status signals from the ExoMars rover, Rosalind Franklin, due to land on the Red Planet in 2021.

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A European mission control for the Mars rover

The ExoMars rover has a brand new control center in one of Europe's largest Mars yards. The Rover Operations Control Centre (ROCC) was inaugurated today in Turin, Italy, ahead of the rover's exploration adventure on the Red Planet in 2021.

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To get a high-renewable electric grid, build more solar and wind than needed

The famous inventor Edwin Land said, "It's not that we need new ideas, but we need to stop having old ideas." He seemed to be telling us that solutions lie just beyond our old habits of thinking.

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Ancient Roman air pollution caused climate change in Europe

The Roman Empire produced so much air pollution from fires in homes and on farms that it had a detectable cooling effect on the regional climate

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The Real Difference Between Creators and Influencers

It was 2011, and YouTube had a problem. The company, which was then a hub for low-quality cat videos and user-generated content, wanted to attract more premium advertisers and raise the quality of its programming. To that end, executives had been paying special attention to a growing class of users who were attracting large audiences of tens and sometimes hundreds of thousands of subscribers. The

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Solar energy expert shares blueprint for a carbon-free future in PV-tech power

Last year, California set the nation's most ambitious energy goal—deriving 100 percent of its electrical power from renewable sources by 2045. Many other states have since joined with similar goals, including New York, with Gov. Cuomo's "Green New Deal" calling for 100 percent carbon-free electricity by 2040.

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This 'Doomsday Plane' Can Survive a Nuclear Attack

A reporter recently got a tour of the secretive military plane. Here's what she found.

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A common skin bacterium put children with severe eczema at higher risk of food allergy

In a new study published today in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, scientists from King's College London have found that young children with severe eczema infected with Staphylococcus aureus (SA) bacterium, are at a higher risk of developing a food allergy.

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Ancient feces reveal parasites in 8,000-year-old village of Çatalhöyük

Earliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms in the ancient inhabitants of Turkey shows whipworm infected this population of prehistoric farmers.

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As Alaska Warms, Wildfires Pose a Growing Threat

But improvements in climate models can lead to better fire forecasts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Israel’s Unprecedented Political Crisis

JERUSALEM—Israel’s politics are wild and chaotic. Its electoral system is remarkably reliable. In the past seven decades, 20 parliamentary elections yielded relatively well-functioning governments. The 21st was a different story. Benjamin Netanyahu’s failure this week to form a coalition, followed by his unprecedented move to dissolve the Knesset and go for an early election , just seven weeks af

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Trump’s National-Security Report Card

D-Day is coming, and Donald Trump is headed to Europe. The 75th anniversary of the Allied landing on Normandy, which marked the “ beginning of the end ” for the Nazis in Europe, could be a celebration of the transatlantic alliance that ended World War II and then rebuilt the Western world. And yet, Trump has mounted one challenge after another to the very idea of alliances, to say nothing of the

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A combination of agrochemicals shortens the life of bees, study shows

A new study by Brazilian biologists suggests that the effect of pesticides on bees could be worse than previously thought. Even when used at a level considered nonlethal, an insecticide curtailed the lives of bees by up to 50 percent. The researchers also found that a fungicide deemed safe for bees altered the behavior of workers and made them lethargic, potentially jeopardizing the survival of th

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UK satellite 'sets sail' for return to Earth

The TechDemoSat spacecraft deploys a large membrane to pull itself out of the sky.

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A combination of agrochemicals shortens the life of bees, study shows

A new study by Brazilian biologists suggests that the effect of pesticides on bees could be worse than previously thought. Even when used at a level considered nonlethal, an insecticide curtailed the lives of bees by up to 50 percent. The researchers also found that a fungicide deemed safe for bees altered the behavior of workers and made them lethargic, potentially jeopardizing the survival of th

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Organic laser diodes move from dream to reality

Researchers from Japan have demonstrated that a long-elusive kind of laser diode based on organic semiconductors is indeed possible, paving the way for the further expansion of lasers in applications such as biosensing, displays, healthcare and optical communications.

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Scientists demonstrate plant stress memory and adaptation capabilities

Russian and Taiwanese scientists have discovered a connection between the two signaling systems that help plants survive stress situations, demonstrating that they can remember dangerous conditions that they have experienced and adapt to them. This memory mechanism will help improve agricultural plants, making them more resistant to drought, flooding, high humidity and extreme temperatures.

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U.S. Measles Elimination Status in Jeopardy as the Number of Cases Reach 25 Year High

Thanks in large part to anti-vaccine propaganda and decreasing vaccination rates, 2019 is shaping up to be a bad year when it comes to measles outbreaks, the worst in over 2 decades to be exact. And we are now at risk of losing our hard-fought elimination status.

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Snapshot: ‘Comet’

A new book of photographs taken from the Rosetta space probe tells a story of exploration some 50 years in the making

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Scientists demonstrate plant stress memory and adaptation capabilities

Russian and Taiwanese scientists have discovered a connection between the two signaling systems that help plants survive stress situations, demonstrating that they can remember dangerous conditions that they have experienced and adapt to them. This memory mechanism will help improve agricultural plants, making them more resistant to drought, flooding, high humidity and extreme temperatures.

10h

New Zealand wants to make people happy, not rich – will it work?

Prime minister Jacinda Ardern has unveiled what is being called the world's first budget to prioritise wellbeing over economic activity

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Sea creature uses stem cells to regrow entire body from a tiny piece

Sea squirts use stem cells to regenerate their bodies from nothing but fragments of blood vessel, a finding that could help uncover the evolution of regeneration

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Fossils reveal saber-toothed cats may have pierced rivals’ skulls

Two Smilodon fossils skulls from Argentina have puncture holes likely left by the teeth of rival cats.

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Is Your Wobbly, Illegible Touchscreen Signature Still You?

Touchscreen computers and Square machines have turned signatures into a thing you must jab and press into existence—and it never looks quite right.

10h

Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge and the Art of Worldbuilding

The new Disney Parks attraction is the ideal marriage of Lucasfilm's cinematic universe and Imagineering.

10h

New York Transit Edges Into a Future Without MetroCards

Beginning Friday, you can get into select subway stations by waving your phone. By 2023, MetroCards will go the way of the token.

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Apple WWDC 2019: What to Expect From the Big Developer Show

Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference kicks off Monday, June 3. Here's what we're expecting the company to show off.

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Microsoft's BlueKeep Bug Isn't Getting Patched Fast Enough

At this rate, it will take years to fix a critical vulnerability that remains in over 900,000 Windows machines. A worm will arrive much sooner.

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As Alaska Warms, Wildfires Pose a Growing Threat

But improvements in climate models can lead to better fire forecasts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Cannabis Companies Push F.D.A. to Ease Rules on CBD Products

The F.D.A. has been wary of cannabis-derived products. But it is now under pressure to help them get to market legally.

10h

Britain in two-week coal-free record

The country has not used coal to generate electricity since 17 May, the longest period since the 1880s,

10h

Google unveils new privacy rules for Chrome extensions and Drive

Google announced new rules that will restrict access to user data for third-party add-ons in Chrome and Drive. From now on, Chrome extension developers must request the least amount …

10h

Data science-chef hos Lockheed Martin: »Jeg er blevet god til at gøre folk sure«

Predictive maintenance sparer mandetimer og nedetid for Lockheed Martins kunder, men det er ikke sket uden kampe, fortæller data science-chef.

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The Universe's First Stars Exploded in Strange Ways

A new study finds observational evidence that one of the first stars exploded in an asymmetrical blast that spread heavy elements into the cosmos — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

The Universe's First Stars Exploded in Strange Ways

A new study finds observational evidence that one of the first stars exploded in an asymmetrical blast that spread heavy elements into the cosmos — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Publisher Correction: Transcriptomic alterations during ageing reflect the shift from cancer to degenerative diseases in the elderly

Nature Communications, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10559-5 Publisher Correction: Transcriptomic alterations during ageing reflect the shift from cancer to degenerative diseases in the elderly

11h

Intelligente ladestandere skal skåne det danske elnet

Intelligente ladestande til elbiler skal kunne kommunikere med hinanden og tage højde for elbilernes forbrugsvaner og behov for at undgå at overbelaste det danske elnet. Syddansk Universitet har udviklet en af slagsen.

11h

Amazon cell service? Company reportedly interested in buying Boost Mobile

The Sprint/T-Mobile merger means Boost Mobile is for sale, and Amazon is kicking the tires.

11h

Saudi Arabia First

As President Donald Trump’s critics focus anew on whether he obstructed justice to thwart Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, a more flagrant abuse of presidential power is unfolding in plain sight. For weeks, Trump has continued America’s involvement in the war in Yemen, siding with Saudi Arabia against Congress, the body that the Constitution vests with the power to declare war. The

11h

Forensics Friday: What mistake(s) did the author make in this figure?

Ever wanted to hone your skills as a scientific sleuth? Now’s your chance. Thanks to the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB), which is committed to educating authors on best practices in publishing, figure preparation, and reproducibility, we’re presenting the fourth in a series, Forensics Friday. Take a look at the image below, and then take our … Continue reading Fore

11h

The key to ending online hate? Treat it like a virus.

If online hate is a contagion, as suggested by neuroscientist Joel Finkelstein, then perhaps the most effective course of action will come from treating it as a virus: Gather an interdisciplinary team of minds to study the mechanics of the virus and treat it. The internet is as big a disruption to society as the printing press was. Sarah Ruger sees the road toward social peace as one where neuros

11h

New TSA Policy Allows Travel with Some Cannabis-Derived Products

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) on Sunday updated its policy to allow passengers to fly with some forms of CBD, or cannabidiol — the non-psychoactive component of cannabis. The agency stated the change was prompted by the FDA's approval of Epidiolex, a CBD-containing drug for epilepsy.

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Still no coal! Britain edges towards coal-free fortnight

submitted by /u/TL127R [link] [comments]

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Proton Beam Therapy; the next level of cancer therapy is looking insane

submitted by /u/CottonSlayerDIY [link] [comments]

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Cannabis Companies Push F.D.A. to Ease Rules on CBD Products

The F.D.A. has been wary of cannabis-derived products. But it is now under pressure to help them get to market legally.

11h

Google fastholder begrænsninger på blokering af reklamer i Chrome

Massiv kritik regnede ned over Google, da de i januar annoncerede en plan om at lukke for det API, som mange udvidelser bruger til at blokere reklamer. Men søgekæmpen holder fast.

11h

Classification system based on co-occurring conditions may provide insight into autism

According to research to be published May 31, 2019 in Autism Research, creating a classification system for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) based on co-occurring conditions could provide useful insights into the underlying mechanics of ASD and these conditions.

12h

Mindre virksomheder vil også bidrage til at nå FN’s verdensmål

PLUS. Der er potentiale i at få flere små og mellemstore virksomheder til at arbejde med verdensmålene. Brunata går efter mål nummer syv.

12h

The ability of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to bite through a permethrin-treated net and the consequences for their fitness

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44679-1 The ability of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to bite through a permethrin-treated net and the consequences for their fitness

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Gray Matter Alterations in Early and Late Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Evaluated with Synthetic Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44615-3 Gray Matter Alterations in Early and Late Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Evaluated with Synthetic Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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Elemental and Mineralogical Composition of the Western Andean Snow (18°S–41°S)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44516-5 Elemental and Mineralogical Composition of the Western Andean Snow (18°S–41°S)

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New type of doping effect via metallization of surface reduction in SnO2

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44634-0 New type of doping effect via metallization of surface reduction in SnO 2

12h

Graphene Oxide increases mammalian spermatozoa fertilizing ability by extracting cholesterol from their membranes and promoting capacitation

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44702-5 Graphene Oxide increases mammalian spermatozoa fertilizing ability by extracting cholesterol from their membranes and promoting capacitation

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Silicic acid limitation drives bloom termination and potential carbon sequestration in an Arctic bloom

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44587-4 Silicic acid limitation drives bloom termination and potential carbon sequestration in an Arctic bloom

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Plasmodium pseudo-Tyrosine Kinase-like binds PP1 and SERA5 and is exported to host erythrocytes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44542-3 Plasmodium pseudo-Tyrosine Kinase-like binds PP1 and SERA5 and is exported to host erythrocytes

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Extraction of gray-scale intensity distributions from micro computed tomography imaging for femoral cortical bone differentiation between low-magnesium and normal diets in a laboratory mouse model

Scientific Reports, Published online: 31 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-44610-8 Extraction of gray-scale intensity distributions from micro computed tomography imaging for femoral cortical bone differentiation between low-magnesium and normal diets in a laboratory mouse model

12h

Bernie Sanders Goes Small

MANCHESTER, N.H.—Bernie Sanders picked a small room for a weeknight rally and didn’t come close to filling it. This was, his campaign says, all part of the plan. The new plan. The plan they always figured they’d have to rely on, because that’s just how it goes in a long race for the nomination. The plan, at least, that feels much more like the old days. It’s good to be the king, but for Sanders,

12h

Running in Circles: Why Our GPS Devices Can Betray Us

People seem to have an astonishing ability to believe their GPS is always right, even when such belief defies logic and leads them astray. The reasons are partly evolutionary, and partly cultural, dating back to the cartographic revolution around 1600 in Europe, according to an Australian scholar.

13h

Radikale og socialdemokrater vil ændre landbrugspakken

Mens Socialdemokratiet fortsat er tilbageholdende med konkrete krav til landmændene, vil Radikale Venstre stoppe landbruget på op til en tredjedel af det intensivt dyrkede areal for at genoprette vandmiljøet.

13h

Philippines sends tonnes of rubbish back to Canada

The Philippines says the rubbish was falsely labelled as plastic recycling when it was sent in 2014.

14h

GM fungus rapidly kills 99% of malaria mosquitoes, study suggests

A fungus has been genetically modified with spider venom to kill the mosquitoes that spread malaria.

14h

Child deaths in Brazil fall following comprehensive smoking ban

Child deaths have fallen in Brazil following complete smoking bans in public places, according to a new study.

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Koala conservation goes high-tech with virtual reality and drones

An Australian project has demonstrated airborne thermal cameras and virtual reality could much more accurately pinpoint where koalas live, and improve conservation efforts

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Experiments and calculations allow examination of boron's complicated dance

Work opens a path to precise calculations of the structure of other nuclei.

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Organic laser diodes move from dream to reality

Researchers from Japan have demonstrated that a long-elusive kind of laser diode based on organic semiconductors is indeed possible, paving the way for the further expansion of lasers in applications such as biosensing, displays, healthcare, and optical communications.

16h

Tomorrow's weather forecast: fair with a good chance of improvement – Science Weekly podcast

Science Weekly joins forces with our sister technology podcast, Chips with Everything , to look at the future of weather forecasting. Graihagh Jackson finds out how accurate predictions currently are, while Jordan Erica Webber discusses how street cameras and connected cars could improve the forecast further Continue reading…

16h

The Migrant Workers Behind China’s Economic Miracle Are Miserable

When Liu Yanchang quit his factory job in Hebei province and took the four-hour bus ride to Beijing to become a courier, it was the farthest the 18-year-old had ever been from home. The new job, part of the booming e-commerce industry, offered him more money than he had ever made before, and he hoped to learn English and one day travel overseas. All in all, he was happy. Just a few months on, tho

16h

Physical origin of giant excitonic and magneto-optical responses in two-dimensional ferromagnetic insulators

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10325-7 The magneto-optical (MO) effects probe the electronic and magnetic properties of a material, particularly useful for 2D magnets. Here, the authors show that the large optical and MO responses in ferromagnetic monolayer CrI3 arise from strongly bound excitons, extending over several atoms.

16h

The metabolites NADP+ and NADPH are the targets of the circadian protein Nocturnin (Curled)

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10125-z Nocturnin is a rhythmically expressed protein that regulates metabolism under the control of circadian clock proposed to function through the deadenylation of metabolic enzyme mRNAs. Here the authors show that Nocturnin and its fly homolog Curled catalyze the removal of 2′-phosphate from NADP+ and NADPH, providin

16h

Strategic-tuning of radiative excitons for efficient and stable fluorescent white organic light-emitting diodes

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10104-4 Demonstrating white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters with high performance and operational stability remains a challenge. Here, the authors show efficient and stable white OLEDs based on a double-dopant TADF system.

16h

Publisher Correction: High mitogenic stimulation arrests angiogenesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10474-9 Publisher Correction: High mitogenic stimulation arrests angiogenesis

16h

A bioactive mammalian disaccharide associated with autoimmunity activates STING-TBK1-dependent immune response

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10319-5 Mammalian glycans have a role in host immunity but little is known about how they activate the host response in the context of autoimmune diseases. Here, the authors identify Manβ1-4GlcNAc as a novel innate immune modulator associated with chronic autoimmune diseases.

16h

Curvature induction and membrane remodeling by FAM134B reticulon homology domain assist selective ER-phagy

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10345-3 FAM134B/RETREG1 is a selective ER-phagy receptor that regulates the size and shape of the endoplasmic reticulum. Here authors use molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations to assemble a structural model for the reticulon-homology domain of FAM134B.

16h

A few Ascomycota taxa dominate soil fungal communities worldwide

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10373-z Soil fungi play essential roles in ecosystems worldwide. Here, the authors sequence and analyze 235 soil samples collected from across the globe, and identify dominant fungal taxa and their associated environmental attributes.

16h

Measurements of the size and correlations between ions using an electrolytic point contact

Nature Communications, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10265-2 The size of an ion affects everything from the structure of water to life itself. Here, a sub-nanometer diameter pore sputtered through a thin silicon nitride membrane is used to systematically test ion permeability by measuring the electrolytic current and current noise and show that the ions move with a grossly

16h

Tomorrow's weather forecast: fair with a good chance of improvement – Science Weekly podcast

Science Weekly joins forces with our sister technology podcast, Chips with Everything, to look at the future of weather forecasting. Graihagh Jackson finds out how accurate predictions currently are, while Jordan Erica Webber discusses how street cameras and connected cars could improve the forecast further. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

16h

Samsung's Galaxy Note 10 Flagship Might Abandon Headphone Jack With Major Redesign

When been hearing plenty of rumors about Samsung's upcoming Galaxy Note 10, and one of the most frequent ones has been that the device will forgo traditional buttons. A new report is now adding …

16h

Tre ud af fire ingeniører anvender open source

En undersøgelse fra IDA IT viser, at størstedelen af ingeniører arbejder med open source og er glade for det. Krav om offentlig open source strategi.

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More natural gas isn’t a “middle ground” — it’s a climate disaster

submitted by /u/The_Necromancer10 [link] [comments]

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FAMU laboratory the first in U.S. to print human cornea

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Changes to immune genes link paternal smoking with childhood asthma

New research shows that children exposed to paternal tobacco smoking before birth are more likely to develop asthma – and that associated changes to immune genes predict the level of risk.Published in Frontiers in Genetics to coincide with the WHO's World No Tobacco Day, the study reinforces the risks of either parent smoking — and according to the authors, could provide DNA targets for the early

17h

Dansk ekspert: »Doven GMO-modstand forhindrer grøn omstilling«

PLUS. Danmark går glip af store muligheder for indtjening og bæredygtighed, når politikerne per refleks takker nej til GMO-afgrøder, siger Søren Mark Jensen, tidligere ansat i Miljøstyrelsen.

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'You stole my cheese!': the seven best Post-it note wars

From workplace food fights to disputes with the neighbours, the humble yellow sticky note comes into its own In Sydney and London, two communities are at war. Both alike in dignity – one, an office of journalists, the other a residential Brixton street – and bound together by the humble Post-it note. In Sydney, the offices of SBS (Special Broadcasting Service) have been torn apart by one person’s

18h

Mark Zuckerberg's security chief faces racism complaint

The head of personal security for Mark Zuckerberg was on leave Friday pending a probe into complaints of sexual harassment and racism, some of it involving the Facebook chief's wife.

19h

Physicists proposal sheds light on the Universe's quantum origins

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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JAK/STAT inhibition in macrophages promotes therapeutic resistance by inducing expression of protumorigenic factors [Medical Sciences]

Tumor-associated macrophages contribute to tumor progression and therapeutic resistance in breast cancer. Within the tumor microenvironment, tumor-derived factors activate pathways that modulate macrophage function. Using in vitro and in vivo models, we find that tumor-derived factors induce activation of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)…

20h

The base pair-scale diffusion of nucleosomes modulates binding of transcription factors [Biochemistry]

The structure of promoter chromatin determines the ability of transcription factors (TFs) to bind to DNA and therefore has a profound effect on the expression levels of genes. However, the role of spontaneous nucleosome movements in this process is not fully understood. Here, we developed a single-molecule optical tweezers assay…

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Hypoxia induces the dormant state in oocytes through expression of Foxo3 [Developmental Biology]

In mammals, most immature oocytes remain dormant in the primordial follicles to ensure the longevity of female reproductive life. A precise understanding of mechanisms underlying the dormancy is important for reproductive biology and medicine. In this study, by comparing mouse oogenesis in vivo and in vitro, the latter of which…

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A global model of island species-area relationships [Ecology]

The increase in species richness with island area (ISAR) is a well-established global pattern, commonly described by the power model, the parameters of which are hypothesized to vary with system isolation and to be indicative of ecological process regimes. We tested a structural equation model of ISAR parameter variation as…

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ANO1/TMEM16A regulates process maturation in radial glial cells in the developing brain [Neuroscience]

Neural stem cells (NSCs) are primary progenitor cells in the early developmental stage in the brain that initiate a diverse lineage of differentiated neurons and glia. Radial glial cells (RGCs), a type of neural stem cell in the ventricular zone, are essential for nurturing and delivering new immature neurons to…

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A neural network protocol for electronic excitations of N-methylacetamide [Chemistry]

UV absorption is widely used for characterizing proteins structures. The mapping of UV spectra to atomic structure of proteins relies on expensive theoretical simulations, circumventing the heavy computational cost which involves repeated quantum-mechanical simulations of excited-state properties of many fluctuating protein geometries, which has been a long-time challenge. Here we…

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Routing information flow by separate neural synchrony frequencies allows for “functionally labeled lines” in higher primate cortex [Neuroscience]

Efficient transfer of sensory information to higher (motor or associative) areas in primate visual cortical areas is crucial for transforming sensory input into behavioral actions. Dynamically increasing the level of coordination between single neurons has been suggested as an important contributor to this efficiency. We propose that differences between the…

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Building bridges to move recombination complexes [Genetics]

A central feature of meiosis is pairing of homologous chromosomes, which occurs in two stages: coalignment of axes followed by installation of the synaptonemal complex (SC). Concomitantly, recombination complexes reposition from on-axis association to the SC central region. We show here that, in the fungus Sordaria macrospora, this critical transition…

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Primary structural differences at residue 226 of deer and elk PrP dictate selection of distinct CWD prion strains in gene-targeted mice [Microbiology]

Although the unifying hallmark of prion diseases is CNS neurodegeneration caused by conformational corruption of host prion protein (PrP) to its infective counterpart, contagious transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) results from shedding of prions produced at high titers in the periphery of diseased cervids. While deer and elk PrP…

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Insights into IgM-mediated complement activation based on in situ structures of IgM-C1-C4b [Immunology and Inflammation]

Antigen binding by serum Ig-M (IgM) protects against microbial infections and helps to prevent autoimmunity, but causes life-threatening diseases when mistargeted. How antigen-bound IgM activates complement-immune responses remains unclear. We present cryoelectron tomography structures of IgM, C1, and C4b complexes formed on antigen-bearing lipid membranes by normal human serum at…

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Segregation through the multiscalar lens [Social Sciences]

We introduce a mathematical framework that allows one to carry out multiscalar and multigroup spatial exploratory analysis across urban regions. By producing coefficients that integrate information across all scales and that are normalized with respect to theoretical maximally segregated configurations, this framework provides a practical and powerful tool for the…

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Preformed chromatin topology assists transcriptional robustness of Shh during limb development [Genetics]

Long-range gene regulation involves physical proximity between enhancers and promoters to generate precise patterns of gene expression in space and time. However, in some cases, proximity coincides with gene activation, whereas, in others, preformed topologies already exist before activation. In this study, we investigate the preformed configuration underlying the regulation…

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Adaptation to diversity: Individual and societal processes [Commentaries]

With the historic rise in global migration in recent decades and the dispersion of diverse groups into new communities worldwide, greater levels of contact are occurring between social groups than ever before. It is in this context that Ramos et al. (1) rightfully note the potential for humans to adapt…

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Caspase-8 promotes c-Rel-dependent inflammatory cytokine expression and resistance against Toxoplasma gondii [Immunology and Inflammation]

Caspase-8 is a key integrator of cell survival and cell death decisions during infection and inflammation. Following engagement of tumor necrosis factor superfamily receptors or certain Toll-like receptors (TLRs), caspase-8 initiates cell-extrinsic apoptosis while inhibiting RIPK3-dependent programmed necrosis. In addition, caspase-8 has an important, albeit less well understood, role in…

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Dating app users may be more likely to control their weight in unhealthy ways

Use of dating apps may be associated with an increased risk of unhealthy weight control behaviors, including vomiting, laxative use, or diet pill use, a study in the open-access Journal of Eating Disorders suggests.

21h

Radio Atlantic: The Abortion Debate’s New Urgency

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Recent weeks have seen strict anti-abortion bills pass in states across the country. In Alabama, abortion is now banned under state law, without any exceptions for rape or incest. Georgia, Ohio, and Kentucky have all passed so-called heartbeat bills , making abortion illegal after six to eight weeks into a pregnancy.

21h

Moral Dilemma: To share or not to share

Moral Dilemma: If you could build an electric power unit that used no fuel or oil and was small enough to power cars, trucks, houses, apartment complexes, excreta, but would devastate the fossil fuel industries putting millions out of work and likely cause the middle east to explode with violence and possibly lead to global war. What would you do? Build it and share with the world. Build it and k

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2024 is Mr. Orwell’s 1984

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Renewable energy is growing faster currently than nuclear ever has.

submitted by /u/Wile__E___Coyote [link] [comments]

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Ferrari’s 986-HP Hybrid, Disney’s Message to Georgia, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Clinical calculator could spare breast cancer patients five years of unnecessary hormone therapy

New research confirms that an algorithm, called CTS5, can accurately identify patients who are at a significantly low risk of their breast cancer returning at a later stage. In doing so it means some patients may need to take hormone therapy for five years, rather than 10, something that researchers say could have a huge impact both psychologically and physically.

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Alternative molecular mechanisms observed in cancer cells

New evidence shows that some cancer cells evade therapy by switching over to alternative molecular mechanisms that are not affected by existing anti-cancer treatments.

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Research confirms gut-brain connection in autism

Up to 90 percent of people with autism suffer from gut problems, but nobody has known why. New research reveals the same gene mutations — found both in the brain and the gut — could be the cause.

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Climate change: Zero emissions law should be PM's legacy, scientists say

Climate scientists ask Theresa May to make her "legacy" a target to cut greenhouse gases to zero.

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Radical open-access plan delayed a year as revised effort seeks more support

In response to criticisms, Plan S lifts cap on article fees

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Ambitious open-access Plan S delayed to let research community adapt

Nature, Published online: 30 May 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01717-2 Funders behind the policy tweak rules after major consultation.

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Over half a million corals destroyed by port of Miami dredging, study finds

New findings reveal significant damage to Miami's coral reefs from the 16-month dredging operation at the Port of Miami that began in 2013. The study found that sediment buried between half to 90 percent of nearby reefs, resulting in widespread coral death.

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Circadian clocks: Body parts respond to day and night independently from brain, studies show

Researchers have suspected that the body's various circadian clocks can operate independently from the central clock in the hypothalamus of the brain. Now, they have found a way to test that theory.

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Scientists identify a novel strategy to fight viral infections and cancer in animal model

Researchers report on a potential therapeutic strategy to treat viral infection and boost immunity against cancer.

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'Slothbot' takes a leisurely approach to environmental monitoring

For environmental monitoring, precision agriculture, infrastructure maintenance and certain security applications, slow and energy efficient can be better than fast and always needing a recharge. That's where 'SlothBot' comes in.

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Ammonia on Pluto’s Surface Points to Liquid Water Underground

Signs of ammonia on Pluto's surface may hint at liquid water underground. (Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI) The New Horizons spacecraft, which flew past Pluto in 2015, is still making new findings. Most recently, researchers used its data to find traces of ammonia on Pluto’s surface. Intriguingly, the ammonia lines up with a cracked region called Virgil Fossae, which has mounds of water ice and shows sig

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California Lawmakers Move to Protect Gig-Economy Workers

The state Assembly passes a bill that would require services such as Uber and Lyft to classify their workers as employees, rather than contractors.

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The Lancet: Health progress threatened by neglect of gender

Today, The Lancet published a new Series on 'Gender Equality, Norms and Health', which finds that governments and health institutions have persistently failed to make progress towards gender equality, despite the impact of gender — and the spoken and unspoken rules of societies about acceptable gender behaviors — on health throughout life. Set to be launched at the annual 'Women Deliver 2019' [1

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'Slothbot' takes a leisurely approach to environmental monitoring

For environmental monitoring, precision agriculture, infrastructure maintenance and certain security applications, slow and energy efficient can be better than fast and always needing a recharge. That's where 'SlothBot' comes in.

23h

Does Twitter Even Know How to Tweet?

Twitter's accepting applicants for a new "Tweeter in Chief." Good luck to the doomed soul who gets the job.

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Should ‘ultra-processed’ foods include health warnings?

A growing body of research, including two recent studies, shows how ultra-processed foods can lead to multiple diseases and shorten lifespan. Ultra-processed foods include soft drinks, packaged snacks, reconstituted meat, pre-prepared frozen meals, and more. Other research suggests that warning labels on food can affect what people choose to eat. None The U.S. government requires sellers of cigar

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Wildfire smoke is particularly bad for you—here's why

Health Smoke from so-called 'prescribed burns' is less detrimental than smoke from wildfires. When it comes to health, not all fires are created equal, according to a preliminary study published this week—which found that smoke from prescribed burns affects…

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Why These Human-Sized Beavers Suddenly Died Out 10,000 Years Ago

The giant rodents' taste for aquatic plants may have done them in.

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The most complete study of battery failure sees the light

An international team of researchers just published the widest study on what happens during battery failure, focusing on the different parts of a battery at the same time.

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New evidence links ultra-processed foods with a range of health risks

Two large European studies find positive associations between consumption of highly processed ('ultra-processed') foods and risk of cardiovascular disease and death.

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Fastest-Growing Nuclear Business Is Tearing Down U.S. Plants

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Dear Person In The Year 2219…

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Lightning forced human ancestors to become bipedal, Kansas researchers say

A new paper proposes that a couple of supernovae led to the loss of our tree habit, forcing us down to the savannah. The telltale clues are iron-60 isotopes and lots of unexplained charcoal and soot in the geologic record. The theory is an intriguing combination of astronomy, physics, geology, and anthropology. None As humankind branched off from other primates, there were a few key thresholds we

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World's Tiniest Baby Was the Size of an Apple. Here's How She Survived.

As far as tiny babies go, "Saybie" is the smallest of the small.

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Uber's first post-IPO earnings report shows another $1 billion lost

Uber's first earnings report as a public company shows that while its revenue is higher than last year; the company is still hemorrhaging money. Still, there's no doubt that …

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Bipartisan bill would create forum for discussing how to counter U.S. academic espionage

Congress asked to set up National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine roundtable and White House panel

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The I Word

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, May 30. ‣ President Donald Trump renewed his attacks on former Special Counsel Robert Mueller, and balked at the suggestion that Congress might move to impeach him. “To me it’s a dirty word, the word impeach. It’s a dirty, filthy, disgusting word,” he said. ‣ New documents cited in a federal-court filing offer evidence that the administration proposed the

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Measles Cases Reach Highest Level in More Than 25 Years, C.D.C. Says

There have been 971 known cases of measles in the United States so far this year.

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Measles Cases Reach Highest Level in More Than 25 Years, C.D.C. Says

There have been 971 known cases of measles in the United States so far this year.

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You’re getting sleepy: Brain mechanisms of anesthesia and natural sleep

“Take a deep breath and count backwards from 10…” “10…9…8…7….” If you are one of the many people that have had surgery under general anesthesia, you may remember these words from your anesthesiologist, beginning the countdown yourself, then probably ….nothing. When you awoke later, you were already out of surgery and in a recovery […]

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DeepMind’s Gamer AI is Better At Co-op Mode Than Human Players

Capture the Flag It’s old news that DeepMind’s artificial intelligence has become a champion at video games like StarCraft II and Dota 2 . But now, the AI has figured out how to ace cooperative multiplayer mode as well. While playing rounds of capture the flag in the classic first person shooter Quake III Arena , DeepMind was able to outperform human teammates — and with the reaction time slowed

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Watch the oldest surviving film of a total solar eclipse

A short film of the 1900 total solar eclipse was restored by conservation experts and is now available to view online.

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Hate iCloud? Degoo makes Cloud storage easy and affordable

Get lifetime cloud backup for $49.99. Hate iCloud? Degoo makes Cloud storage easy and affordable and you can get lifetime cloud backup for $49.99.

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African mole-rats immune to 'wasabi pain'

A new report in Science provides the first evidence of a mammal — the highveld mole-rat — being immune to pain from exposure to allyl isothiocyanate, or AITC, the active ingredient of wasabi.

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Godzilla is back and he's bigger than ever: The evolutionary biology of the monster

Godzilla first made his debut in 1954 as a 50-meter tall metaphor for indiscriminate destruction, particularly US hydrogen-bomb testing in the Marshall Islands, which, in the film, destroyed Godzilla's deep-sea ecosystem. Sixty-five years and 35 films later, Godzilla is back and bigger than ever in Godzilla: King of the Monsters. In fact, Godzilla has evolved 30 times faster than other organisms o

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New way to protect against high-dose radiation damage discovered

Intensive radiotherapy can be toxic in 60 percent of patients with tumors located in the gastrointestinal cavity. Increases in levels of the protein URI protect mice against high-dose ionizing radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome and enhance mouse intestinal regeneration and survival in 100 percent of the cases. This finding could be useful to mitigate side effects of other sources of inten

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State Attempts to Nix Public School’s Facial Recognition Plans

Chaos Reigns New York’s Lockport City School District (CSD) was all set to become the first public school district in the U.S. to test facial recognition on its students and staff. But just two days after the school district’s superintendent announced the project’s June 3 start date, the New York State Education Department (NYSED) attempted to put a stop to the trial, citing concerns for students

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HELMET VISION VR headset – designed to reduce motion sickness

submitted by /u/bobheartless [link] [comments]

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5G speed tests hit another breakthrough, this time on Sprint with LG V50 phone – CNET

Sprint's 5G tests are impressive. They clocked less than half the speeds of CNET's tests on Verizon 5G, but coverage was broader and more consistent.

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News pics of refugees don’t tell the whole story

A majority of photos depicting the 2015 Syrian refugee crisis portrayed the refugees as victims, research shows. This finding has implications for how the public perceives migratory events, including the influx of migrants arriving at the US-Mexico border. The study also underscores the responsibility of photojournalists to convey a broader story with their pictures. “Photojournalists and news or

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Human contact plays big role in spread of some hospital infections, but not others

An observational study conducted in a French hospital showed that human contact was responsible for 90 percent of the spread of one species of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to new patients, but less than 60 percent of the spread of a different species.

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Wild boars, hunting dogs and hunters carry tick-borne bacteria

Rickettsia bacteria cause a number of human and animal infections, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Now, researchers have for the first time surveyed the prevalence of Rickettsia antibodies and Rickettsia-carrying ticks in wild boars, hunting dogs and hunters in Brazil.

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How the immune system keeps the Epstein-Barr virus in check

A protein called PD-1, which is found on immune cells called CD8+ T cells, plays a key role in controlling infection with the Epstein-Barr virus, according to a study published May 30 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Christian Münz of the University of Zurich, and colleagues. The results from this study indicate that monitoring PD-1 signaling during future vaccination and immunotherapy

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New way to protect against high-dose radiation damage discovered

Intensive radiotherapy can be toxic in 60 percent of patients with tumors located in the gastrointestinal cavity. Increases in levels of the protein URI protect mice against high-dose ionizing radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome and enhance mouse intestinal regeneration and survival in 100 percent of the cases. This finding could be useful to mitigate side effects of other sources of inten

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Unknown mini-proteins in the heart

Scientists have observed the human heart cells' 'protein factories' in action, examining the entire tissue for the very first time. The group reveals their surprising discoveries and the possibilities they contain for the future treatment of heart disease.

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Resistance to Fusarium head blight holding in Illinois, study says

Illinois wheat growers, take heart. A new study shows no evidence of a highly toxic Fusarium head blight (FHB) variant, known as NA2, in the wheat-growing region of the state. The study also reinforces the effectiveness of wheat resistance to the fungal disease.

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