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nyheder2019marts01

High-fat diet causes thickening of arteries down to the cellular level

Researchers at the University of Illinois show that the membranes of cells surrounding arteries get stiffer and thicker in response to a high fat diet, due to both LDLs and oxidized LDLs.

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»Man kæmper jeres sag, og så får man lort i hovedet«

‘Læger er pivede og bør tage ansvar’. ‘Du er arrogant og nedladende’. Bølgerne gik højt, da DF’s sundhedsordfører Liselott Blixt kommenterede den nye lægeunderskriftindsamling og fik svar på tiltale fra lægeformand Andreas Rudkjøbing. Hvor langt står de fra hinanden? Vi satte dem stævne på Slotsholmen og fandt bl.a. ud af, at Blixt synes, at hun står på lægernes side.

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500 km rækkevidde: Polestar 2 vil udfordre Tesla Model 3

Volvo vil med sit brand Polestar gå efter samme segment som Tesla – med Tesla-virkemidler.

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Traumatic brain injury and kids: New treatment guidelines issued

To help promote the highest standards of care, and improve the overall rates of survival and recovery following TBI, a panel of pediatric critical care, neurosurgery and other pediatric experts today issued the third edition of the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines for the Management of Pediatric Severe TBI.

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Nimble humanoid robot threads needle, pours drink

submitted by /u/vrael101 [link] [comments]

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Canada will allow US extradition of Huawei CFO to move forward

Huawei financial chief Meng Wanzhou is one step closer to facing sanctions-related fraud charges in the US. Canada's Department of Justice has issued an Authority to Proceed measure …

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DNA Ancestry Startups Have a New Target Market: The Long-Dead

Dance With the Dead Startups that sequence your DNA to help piece together your ancestry have a new target market, according to a story in The Atlantic : your long-dead ancestors, who may have inadvertently left behind genetic material when they licked stamps and envelopes. “Maybe our ancestors did not realize it,” MyHeritage founder Gilad Japhet said at an industry conference last year, accordin

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Rare sea creature washes ashore in Southern California

A big sea creature that washed ashore in Southern California has been identified as a hoodwinker sunfish, a recently identified rare species thought to live in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Countdown as SpaceX, NASA prepare to test new astronaut capsule

Eight years after the last manned US space flight, NASA and SpaceX are preparing to test a new space capsule for astronauts on Saturday—although for now the only occupant will be a dummy named Ripley.

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Pentagon submits Space Force proposal to Congress

The Pentagon has submitted a proposal to Congress that, if approved, would see the creation of a new "Space Force," officials said Friday.

29min

Rare sea creature washes ashore in Southern California

A big sea creature that washed ashore in Southern California has been identified as a hoodwinker sunfish, a recently identified rare species thought to live in the Southern Hemisphere.

29min

Some vaccinated adults may not be protected against measles

Health If you got your measles shot in the '60s, you might need another one. People born from the late '50s until the mid '70s are in something of a grey zone.

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Jay Inslee: Washington governor to run on climate change

The two-term governor will focus his campaign on "defeating climate change" and creating energy jobs.

44min

T-Mobile delays 5G network launch until the second half of the year, report

T-Mobile users may need to wait a little longer for 5G than those on AT&T, Sprint or Verizon.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: A Deep Dive into Microsoft’s HoloLens 2

Microsoft's second-generation mixed reality headset has made a significant leap. Microsoft's Alex Kipman goes into details on the Gadget Lab podcast.

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Botswana elephant poaching 'no hoax'

A study confirms one of the last elephant sanctuaries in Africa has "a significant poaching problem".

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WSJ: Amazon to open new US grocery chain separate from Whole Foods

A report from The Wall St. Journal today claims Amazon is preparing to open a new chain of grocery stores across the U.S. that won’t be associated with Whole Foods. The retailer is expected …

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New chemical probes advance search for new antibiotics

Researchers at Indiana University have invented a new method to observe bacterial build cell walls in real time that could contribute to the search for new antibacterial drugs.

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Australia to build 'independently thinking' drones

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Photos of the Week: Night Surfing, Burning Moorland, Trapped Rat

Ice mounds on the Great Lakes, an aurora above Finland, Spike Lee at the Oscars, a super bloom in California, the Museum of Illusions in Kosovo, battles at Venezuela’s borders, bullfighting in Portugal, the Vienna Opera Ball in Austria, testimony on Capitol Hill, an aquatic endurance challenge in El Salvador, flooding in California, and much more

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SpaceX Ready to Launch First Dragon Crew Capsule Early Tomorrow

SpaceX’s Dragon Crew Capsule is set to launch from Cape Canaveral in a pivotal test flight for human-crewed missions that could happen as soon as this summer. The only passengers for this mission are a mannequin and some cargo for the International Space Station. It will dock on Sunday, stay for five days, and then depart before splashing down in the Atlantic Ocean on March 8. This flight is a mil

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Apollo 9's Alternate Plans

Apollo 9 launched 50 years ago, on March 3, 1969, and it might be the most important but least celebrated of the early Apollo missions. In fact, it was so important to NASA’s ultimate lunar landing goal that the space agency had a series of contingency missions in place to ensure it could get as much data as possible if something went wrong. Apollo 9’s mission wasn’t necessarily glamorous. Command

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Domain topology, stability, and translation speed determine mechanical force generation on the ribosome [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The concomitant folding of a nascent protein domain with its synthesis can generate mechanical forces that act on the ribosome and alter translation speed. Such changes in speed can affect the structure and function of the newly synthesized protein as well as cellular phenotype. The domain properties that govern force…

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Assembling responsive microgels at responsive lipid membranes [Physics]

Directed colloidal self-assembly at fluid interfaces can have a large impact in the fields of nanotechnology, materials, and biomedical sciences. The ability to control interfacial self-assembly relies on the fine interplay between bulk and surface interactions. Here, we investigate the interfacial assembly of thermoresponsive microgels and lipogels at the surface…

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Spatiotemporal coupling of attosecond pulses [Physics]

The shortest light pulses produced to date are of the order of a few tens of attoseconds, with central frequencies in the extreme UV range and bandwidths exceeding tens of electronvolts. They are often produced as a train of pulses separated by half the driving laser period, leading in the…

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Optimal errors and phase transitions in high-dimensional generalized linear models [Statistics]

Generalized linear models (GLMs) are used in high-dimensional machine learning, statistics, communications, and signal processing. In this paper we analyze GLMs when the data matrix is random, as relevant in problems such as compressed sensing, error-correcting codes, or benchmark models in neural networks. We evaluate the mutual information (or “free…

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Task-driven visual exploration at the foveal scale [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Humans use saccades to inspect objects of interest with the foveola, the small region of the retina with highest acuity. This process of visual exploration is normally studied over large scenes. However, in everyday tasks, the stimulus within the foveola is complex, and the need for visual exploration may extend…

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Formylglycine-generating enzyme binds substrate directly at a mononuclear Cu(I) center to initiate O2 activation [Biochemistry]

The formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) is required for the posttranslational activation of type I sulfatases by oxidation of an active-site cysteine to Cα-formylglycine. FGE has emerged as an enabling biotechnology tool due to the robust utility of the aldehyde product as a bioconjugation handle in recombinant proteins. Here, we show that…

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Archaeological science brightens Mediterranean dark age [Commentaries]

Recent advancements in the integration of methods from the exact and natural sciences are the foundation on which an ongoing revolution in the archaeological research of the Levant is being built, mirroring similar trends in other places around the world (1, 2). After more than a century of large-scale excavations…

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QnAs with Anne L’Huillier [QnAs]

Lund University atomic physicist Anne L’Huillier has been at the forefront of ultrafast laser science since its inception. In 1988, she collaborated on an experiment at the French Saclay Nuclear Research Centre with a solid-state, picosecond laser system that was one of the first to generate high-order harmonics in gases….

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Interactive programming paradigm for real-time experimentation with remote living matter [Engineering]

Recent advancements in life-science instrumentation and automation enable entirely new modes of human interaction with microbiological processes and corresponding applications for science and education through biology cloud laboratories. A critical barrier for remote and on-site life-science experimentation (for both experts and nonexperts alike) is the absence of suitable abstractions and…

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Tree rings tell climate stories that technology can't

A new study shows how information revealed by a new method of analyzing tree rings matches the story told by more high-tech equipment over the short-term. Because trees are long-lived, looking back in their rings with this new approach may add decades or even centuries to our understanding of carbon storage and climate change in forests.

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Parts Suppliers Are Boycotting Russia’s Pistol-Shooting Android

Android Gunslinger Russia’s gun toting robot has hit a major snag: it’s scrambling for parts after foreign suppliers cut off sales, Defense One reports . In 2017, videos went viral of the Terminator-like android dubbed FEDOR (Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research) firing handguns at a variety of targets. Apparently foreign suppliers weren’t impressed — leaving the robot’s maker, Androi

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Lyft outlines IPO plans that may pay big for some of its drivers

The ride-hailing company Lyft filed paperwork Friday with Securities and Exchange Commission, closing in on its highly anticipated initial public offering. And, in an usual move, it had a little …

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Udrulning af 5G vækker uro: Skal du bekymre dig om mobilstråling?

Nej, siger eksperter og myndigheder. Men der er brug for mere forskning og bedre information til borgerne.

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Quick Round-up Of Monthly Science Stories

Quick Round-up Of Monthly Science Stories A month's worth of cool science stories summed up. Summed up science stories for the month. Video of Summed up science stories for the month. Earth Friday, March 1, 2019 – 14:30 Alistair Jennings, Contributor 1 – Massive Bolivian earthquake reveals mountains 660 kilometers below our feet: Seismologists found mountains and smooth plains on a boundary layer

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Bacteria in frog skin may help fight fungal infections in humans

Scientists in Panama explored the compounds produced by frog skin bacteria as potential novel antifungal sources for the benefit of humans and amphibians.

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More humans always mean fewer African carnivores, right? Nope

African carnivores face numerous threats from humans. So, it's a fair assumption that the presence of more humans automatically equates to decreases across the board for carnivores. New research, however, shows that's not always the case.

1h

Tracking firefighters in burning buildings

Researchers have created a motion-powered, fireproof sensor that can track the movements of firefighters, steelworkers, miners and others who work in high-risk environments where they cannot always be seen.

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The sneaky way estrogen drives brain metastasis in non-estrogen-dependent breast cancers

A new study shows that while estrogen doesn't directly affect triple-negative breast cancer cells, it can affect surrounding brain cells in ways that promote cancer cell migration and invasiveness

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Wearable sensors designed for premature babies could make us all healthier

Health Wireless, biometric sensors give preemies more freedom and needed mom time A team of researchers at Northwestern University created small, sticker-like wireless biosensors that monitor necessary vital signs—all without the need for large…

1h

Energizer’s Brick-Like New Phone Has a Battery That Lasts 50 Days

Wish Granted More than anything else, adult smartphone users in the U.S. wish their devices had longer battery lives . Avenir Telecom appears to have had that desire in mind while developing the Power Max P18K Pop smartphone for Energizer. The French telecom company unveiled the new phone at the 2019 Mobile World Congress (MWC) this week, and it’s an absolute beast of a device, containing what Av

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Detailed new primate brain atlas could lead to disease insights

An international project based in Japan and co-led by CSHL Professor Partha Mitra has mapped connections in the marmoset brain at an unprecedented level of detail. A better understanding of primate neural connectivity promises to lead to fundamental therapeutic advances for human diseases.

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'Don't call me before you text': The new rules of communicating in the digital era

Connecting with people has become so much easier with advancing technology. Tasks that once required an operator, postage stamp or carrier pigeon are now as simple as tapping a name or even a face on your screen, and, voila, you're connected.

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See MIT’s Robot Land a Perfect Backflip — and Mangle Many Others

Mini Cheetah Kudos to researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for having a sense of humor. On Thursday, a team from the illustrious tech school released a video showcasing the abilities of its latest robot creation: a 20-pound Mini Cheetah capable of executing perfect backflips — the first four-legged robot to demonstrate that skill. But the best part of the video isn’t seeing

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With No Open Access Deal, UC Breaks with Elsevier

After negotiating for eight months, the University of California becomes one of the first research institutions in the US to stop paying for access to the publisher’s journals.

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A tribute to gaffer tape in honor of its late creator, Ross Lowell

Technology Lowell passed away at 92, but his inventions will live on. Shout out to the best sticky stuff around.

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China’s war on pollution

submitted by /u/jondavidbrooks [link] [comments]

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Sjældent fund: Narreklumpfisken er dukket op på den forkerte side af kloden

Klumpfiskearten kan blive mindst 2,4 meter lang. Den blev opdaget af den danske marinebiolog Marianne Nyegaard.

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Researchers discover clues to brain differences between males and females

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have discovered a mechanism for how androgens — male sex steroids — sculpt brain development. The research, conducted by Margaret M. McCarthy, Ph.D., who Chairs the Department of Pharmacology, could ultimately help researchers understand behavioral development differences between males and females.

1h

How the humble marigold outsmarts a devastating tomato pest

Researchers from Newcastle University's School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, carried out a study to prove what gardeners around the world have known for generations — marigolds repel tomato whiteflies.

1h

Spider silk could be used as robotic muscle

Researchers at MIT and other universities have found that spider silk produces a strong twisting motion when exposed to humidity, and may be usable for future artificial muscles or actuators.

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What causes that peak? Answering a long-standing question for covalent liquids

Researchers at the University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science have demonstrated a link between local structural ordering and scattering pattern features for tetrahedral liquids. It is hoped that the findings will lead to facile experimental approaches for characterizing materials for fundamental research as well as for applications such as the production of semiconductor materials.

1h

More efficient chemical processes across spectrum of industries

Chemical processes that are more efficient and less expensive may be coming to industries ranging from battery manufacturing to detergent production thanks to work that advances the use of metal oxides as catalysts.

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Four Stars: Who Are Movie Reviews For?

Watching a recommended movie is risky business. If the stars don’t align in your favor, you might find yourself nurturing a distrust of your source, forever altering conversations with friends and colleagues. Even when Oscar season rolls around, which should reliably provide lists of “good” movies, you might question if everyone sat through the same movie after scanning a few social media feeds.

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More efficient chemical processes across spectrum of industries

Chemical processes that are more efficient and less expensive may be coming to industries ranging from battery manufacturing to detergent production thanks to work that advances the use of metal oxides as catalysts.

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Rise of European populism and vaccine hesitancy

There is a significant association between the rise of populism across Europe and the level of mistrust around vaccines, according to a new study.

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Machine learning expands to help predict and characterize earthquakes

Researchers describe how they are using machine learning methods to hone predictions of seismic activity, identify earthquake centers, characterize different types of seismic waves and distinguish seismic activity from other kinds of ground 'noise.'

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Cells use sugars to communicate at the molecular level

Research reveals how cells communicate at the molecular level. They found that sugar molecules play a key role in cellular communication, serving as the 'channels' that cells and proteins use to talk to one another. This work also provides researchers with a new tool to study other living systems in incredible detail, enabling future breakthroughs in fields from materials science to nanomedicine.

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Direct visualization of coexisting channels of interaction in CeSb

Our understanding of correlated electron systems is vexed by the complexity of their interactions. Heavy fermion compounds are archetypal examples of this physics, leading to exotic properties that weave magnetism, superconductivity and strange metal behavior together. The Kondo semimetal CeSb is an unusual example where different channels of interaction not only coexist, but have coincident phys

2h

Detection of thermodynamic "valley noise" in monolayer semiconductors: Access to intrinsic valley relaxation time scales

Together with charge and spin, many novel two-dimensional materials also permit information to be encoded in an electron’s valley degree of freedom—that is, in particular momentum states in the material’s Brillouin zone. With a view toward valley-based (opto)electronic technologies, the intrinsic time scales of valley scattering are therefore of fundamental interest. Here, we demonstrate an entir

2h

Spider dragline silk as torsional actuator driven by humidity

Self-powered actuation driven by ambient humidity is of practical interest for applications such as hygroscopic artificial muscles. We demonstrate that spider dragline silk exhibits a humidity-induced torsional deformation of more than 300°/mm. When the relative humidity reaches a threshold of about 70%, the dragline silk starts to generate a large twist deformation independent of spider species.

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Increasing bulk photovoltaic current by strain tuning

Photovoltaic phenomena are widely exploited not only for primary energy generation but also in photocatalytic, photoelectrochemistry, or optoelectronic applications. In contrast to the interface-based photovoltaic effect of semiconductors, the anomalous or bulk photovoltaic effect in ferroelectrics is not bound by the Shockley-Queisser limit and, thus, can potentially reach high efficiencies. Her

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Outstanding radiation resistance of tungsten-based high-entropy alloys

A body-centered cubic W-based refractory high entropy alloy with outstanding radiation resistance has been developed. The alloy was grown as thin films showing a bimodal grain size distribution in the nanocrystalline and ultrafine regimes and a unique 4-nm lamella-like structure revealed by atom probe tomography (APT). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction show certain blac

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Making flexible spin caloritronic devices with interconnected nanowire networks

Spin caloritronics has recently emerged from the combination of spintronics and thermoelectricity. Here, we show that flexible, macroscopic spin caloritronic devices based on large-area interconnected magnetic nanowire networks can be used to enable controlled Peltier cooling of macroscopic electronic components with an external magnetic field. We experimentally demonstrate that three-dimensional

2h

Distinct signature of local tetrahedral ordering in the scattering function of covalent liquids and glasses

Tetrahedral amorphous materials such as SiO 2 , GeO 2 , Si, Ge, C, and chalcogenides are extremely important in nature and technology. It is known that covalent bonding favors local tetrahedral order in these materials. However, how to extract information on this structural order from the scattering function has remained elusive. By analyzing the structure of simulated SiO 2 and experimental data

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Manipulating surface magnetic order in iron telluride

Control of emergent magnetic orders in correlated electron materials promises new opportunities for applications in spintronics. For their technological exploitation, it is important to understand the role of surfaces and interfaces to other materials and their impact on the emergent magnetic orders. Here, we demonstrate for iron telluride, the nonsuperconducting parent compound of the iron chalc

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Ultrafast electron calorimetry uncovers a new long-lived metastable state in 1T-TaSe2 mediated by mode-selective electron-phonon coupling

Quantum materials represent one of the most promising frontiers in the quest for faster, lightweight, energy-efficient technologies. However, their inherent complexity and rich phase landscape make them challenging to understand or manipulate. Here, we present a new ultrafast electron calorimetry technique that can systematically uncover new phases of quantum matter. Using time- and angle-resolve

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Experimentally reducing the quantum measurement back action in work distributions by a collective measurement

In quantum thermodynamics, the standard approach to estimating work fluctuations in unitary processes is based on two projective measurements, one performed at the beginning of the process and one at the end. The first measurement destroys any initial coherence in the energy basis, thus preventing later interference effects. To decrease this back action, a scheme based on collective measurements

2h

Spider silk could be used as robotic muscle

Spider silk, already known as one of the strongest materials for its weight, turns out to have another unusual property that might lead to new kinds of artificial muscles or robotic actuators, researchers have found.

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How the humble marigold outsmarts a devastating tomato pest

Scientists have revealed for the first time the natural weapon used by marigolds to protect tomato plants against destructive whiteflies.

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What causes that peak? Answering a long-standing question for covalent liquids

Materials that have a disordered structure with no regular repeating pattern are described as amorphous. Such materials can be found in nature and also have a variety of applications in technology. However, the disordered nature of these materials makes them more challenging to characterize than crystalline structures.

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You Told Us the Holidays You Would Create. Now It’s Time to Vote.

Late last year, The Atlantic ’s Family section asked readers to share some of the unique traditions they take part in during the year-end holiday season. The rituals you shared were fun and inspiring, and they made us think: Wouldn’t it be fantastic to celebrate them, or events like them, in a broader way? Wouldn’t it be great to have—in addition to, of course, upcoming microholidays such as Nati

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NIH letters asking about undisclosed foreign ties rattle U.S. universities

Investigation prompted by fears that other countries are exploiting open-door policies in the United States

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How the humble marigold outsmarts a devastating tomato pest

Scientists have revealed for the first time the natural weapon used by marigolds to protect tomato plants against destructive whiteflies.

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Sunfish Bigger Than a Hot Tub Got Lost and Washed Up in the Wrong Hemisphere

A fish so mysterious that scientists named it the "hoodwinker" because it had eluded them for decades has washed ashore in California, thousands of miles from its home in the Southern Hemisphere.

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Is the mysterious Planet Nine really out there?

Scientists may be close to detecting the mysterious Planet Nine, the hypothesized ninth planet in our solar system, researchers report. When it comes to actually seeing Planet Nine, however, the complex calculations of space objects’ behavior, careful observation of orbital anomalies, and watchful observation of the region beyond Neptune will have to do for now, according to a new paper. “The str

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Cell editors correct genetic errors

Almost all land plants employ an army of editors who correct errors in their genetic information. Researchers have now transferred parts of this machinery into a bacterium. Their results confirm a controversial thesis on the functioning of this widespread mechanism.

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Mystery of human skull defleshed and boiled by ancient farmers

Mystery of human skull defleshed and boiled by ancient farmers Mystery of human skull defleshed and boiled by ancient farmers , Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00756-z Polished ‘skull cup’ and human bones bearing tooth marks point to cannibalism in Europe in around 3000 BC.

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Theodore Bayless, Pathbreaker on Dairy Intolerance, Dies at 87

His research led to commercial innovations for people whose bodies reject milk products, and to better treatments for other gastrointestinal diseases.

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New research opens door to more efficient chemical processes across spectrum of industries

Chemical processes that are more efficient and less expensive may be coming to industries ranging from battery manufacturing to detergent production thanks to work that advances the use of metal oxides as catalysts.

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What’s So Special About the Next SpaceX Launch

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER , Fla.—The Space Coast, lined with idyllic beaches and swaying palm trees, faced a quiet future when the Space Shuttles stopped flying nearly eight years ago, and the famed spacecraft rolled off the launchpad and into museums. Then Elon Musk and SpaceX moved in, under a lease with NASA, and brought their own rockets. The company tweaked the launchpads to support its own opera

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Yeast can make marijuana’s valuable ingredients

Synthetic biologists have engineered brewer’s yeast to produce marijuana’s main ingredients—mind-altering THC and non-psychoactive CBD—as well as novel cannabinoids not found in the plant itself. Feeding only on sugar, the yeast are an easy and cheap way to produce pure cannabinoids that today are costly to extract from the buds of the marijuana plant, Cannabis sativa . “For the consumer, the ben

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TikTok better positions itself as a Facebook rival

Watch out, Facebook. The social video app TikTok just hit a major milestone as it sets its sights on global teen domination.

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A Hollow Fiber Bioreactor Allows Any Lab to Efficiently Express Recombinant Proteins in Mammalian Cells

Hollow fiber bioreactors provide a more physiologic, in vivo-like 3-D environment than other cell culture methods, and can result in higher and more concentrated protein yields. Find out more with this white paper from FiberCell Systems!

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Rising Seas Soaked Home Owners for $16 Billion over 12 Years

The threat of flooding has driven some buyers away and caused losses in property values — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hundreds of thousands of ‘ice quakes’ shake Antarctica nightly

When scientists placed seismometers on the McMurdo Ice Shelf, they recorded hundreds of thousands of tiny “ice quakes” that pools of partially melted ice expanding and freezing at night appear to cause. The phenomenon may help scientists track glacier melting—and explain the breakup of large ice shelves. “In these areas we would record tens, hundreds, up to thousands of these per night,” says stu

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Matter: One Twin Committed the Crime — but Which One? A New DNA Test Can Finger the Culprit

A handful of criminal prosecutions have stalled because DNA tests cannot distinguish between suspects who are twins. Then scientists decided to create one.

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How the Weather Gets Weaponized in Climate Change Messaging

Both climate advocates and deniers of global warming are increasingly using bouts of extreme weather to support their positions.

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Balloons the number 1 marine debris risk of mortality for seabirds

A new study has found that balloons are the highest-risk plastic debris item for seabirds — 32 times more likely to kill than ingesting hard plastics. Researchers looked at the cause of death of 1733 seabirds from 51 species and found that one in three of the birds had ingested marine debris.

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Conceiving within a year of stillbirth does not increase risks for next pregnancy

The results are from the first large-scale observational study to investigate the interval between stillbirth and subsequent pregnancy, including almost 14,500 births in women from Australia, Finland and Norway who had a stillbirth in their previous pregnancy.

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Junk food purchases increase after recreational marijuana legalization

New research found a link between state recreational marijuana legalization and increased consumption of certain high-calorie foods.

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Breast milk microbiome contains yeast and fungi: Do these benefit the infant?

Investigators have now shown that the breast milk microbiome contains fungi. Multiple previous studies had found bacteria in breast milk. Certain fungi and bacteria have been shown to be important probiotics for infant health. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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'Equine strep throat' kills 4,000 donkeys in Niger

A contagious bacterial infection known as "equine strep throat" has killed more than 4,000 donkeys in northern Niger since early December, local officials said Friday.

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More humans always mean fewer African carnivores, right? Nope

African carnivores face numerous threats from humans. So, it's a fair assumption that the presence of more humans automatically equates to decreases across the board for carnivores.

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Cells use sugars to communicate at the molecular level

The human body is made up of 30 to 40 million cells, a large and complex network of blood cells, neurons, and specialized cells that make up organs and tissues. Until now, figuring out which mechanisms control communication between them has proven a significant challenge for the field of cell biology.

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Tesla defies convention and pays for it as shares slide

Tesla is suffering one of its worst sell-offs of the year after announcing it would begin closing all of its stores in favor of selling its electric cars exclusively online.

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Study proposes gates to close inlets, curb back bay flooding

Storm surge barriers to temporarily close off inlets and portions of bays during severe storms are among measures envisioned in a new study to protect New Jersey coastal areas from back bay flooding.

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'Equine strep throat' kills 4,000 donkeys in Niger

A contagious bacterial infection known as "equine strep throat" has killed more than 4,000 donkeys in northern Niger since early December, local officials said Friday.

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Science vessel for ocean mission arrives in Seychelles

The science vessel of British-based Nekton Mission arrived in the Seychelles on Friday to begin the first stage of a multi-year mission to explore the depths of the Indian Ocean and document the effects of global warming on one of the planet's last major unexplored frontiers.

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Lyft reveals big growth but no profits as it readies for IPO

Lyft revealed that it is growing quickly ahead of its initial public offering but continues to bleed money and may struggle to turn a profit, according to a federal filing.

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More humans always mean fewer African carnivores, right? Nope

African carnivores face numerous threats from humans. So, it's a fair assumption that the presence of more humans automatically equates to decreases across the board for carnivores.

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New X-ray measurement approach could improve CT scanners

A new measurement approach proposed by scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) could lead to a better way to calibrate computed tomography (CT) scanners, potentially streamlining patient treatment by improving communication among doctors.

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Cells use sugars to communicate at the molecular level

The human body is made up of 30 to 40 million cells, a large and complex network of blood cells, neurons, and specialized cells that make up organs and tissues. Until now, figuring out which mechanisms control communication between them has proven a significant challenge for the field of cell biology.

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Machine learning expands to help predict and characterize earthquakes

With a growing wealth of seismic data and computing power at their disposal, seismologists are increasingly turning to a discipline called machine learning to better understand and predict complicated patterns in earthquake activity.

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Video: How hair dye works

Whether you need a disguise to run from the law or are just trying to emulate *NSYNC-era frosted tips, you may need some chemical assistance to put the hue in your do.

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To Fight Pedophiles, YouTube Disables Comments on Videos Featuring Kids

All or Nothing YouTube is taking a scorched-Earth approach to its pedophile problem. In February, YouTube personality Matt Watson posted a video exposing what he called a “soft-core pedophilia ring” on the Google-owned video sharing website. Now, in an effort to address the problem, YouTube says it’s removing the ability for anyone, pedophile or not, to comment on videos of children — though how

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Advanced Educational Technology Eliminates the Gap Between Masters and the Masses

When it comes to education, the internet has made distance nearly irreverent, leveling the playing field for millions of individuals who don’t have easy access to schools or universities. But aside from distance, the advanced educational technology is also helping solve two other issues that plague education: scarcity and exclusivity. While everyone wants to learn from the best in a particular fi

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Mars Rover Resumes Science Mission After Computer Glitch

Curiosity is still going strong after more than six years, but there was a bit of a scare earlier this month. NASA says it has verified the rover is fully operational, and it's resuming science operations. The post Mars Rover Resumes Science Mission After Computer Glitch appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Scientists Give Mice Infrared Night Vision With Nanoparticles

The team thinks a similar procedure could work on humans, giving you night vision without any bulky goggles. You just need to be willing to get nanoparticles injected into your eye. The post Scientists Give Mice Infrared Night Vision With Nanoparticles appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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$100 off a Microsoft Surface Laptop 2 and other great deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Human presence means more hyenas, fewer lions

Does the presence of more humans equate to fewer African carnivores? Not necessarily. New research in Ecological Applications shows that some species decrease while others increase, which reveals how varying conservation and management policies can affect carnivores. Matthew Farr, a quantitative ecologist at Michigan State University and lead author of the study, sought to evaluate how human dist

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Eating a lot of fiber could improve some cancer treatments

A high-fiber diet, which boosts the diversity of gut microbes, may make an immune therapy against skin cancer more effective.

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Trump-Era Congressional Hearings Have Succumbed to Conspiracy Politics

Attention legislators left and right: Hearings like Michael Cohen’s should be fact-finding missions, not conspiracy-minded fishing expeditions.

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Asteroids hitting Mars could have made hot rain fall for decades

Asteroids hitting the surface of Mars billions of years ago would have produced enough energy to vaporise ice, creating clouds of hot rain that took decades to clear

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The Atlantic Hires Mike Giglio as Staff Writer Covering National Security

Mike Giglio will join The Atlantic as a staff writer covering national security with a focus on U.S. intelligence, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and editor of TheAtlantic.com Adrienne LaFrance announced today. Giglio comes to The Atlantic from BuzzFeed, where he served as senior national security correspondent. He begins with The Atlantic in May, and joins a growing national security team led

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Nyupptäckt protein oumbärligt vid reparation av DNA

– Att misslyckas med att reparera DNA-strängar kan hos människor i förlängningen leda till infertilitet, andra sjukdomar, tillstånd som Downs syndrom, och till och med cancer, säger Hiroki Shibuya, forskare inom kemi och molekylärbiologi vid Göteborgs universitet. I könsceller förekommer dubbelsträngbrytningar i DNA naturligt. Dessa är nödvändiga för att skapa genetisk variation mellan individer.

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Murödlans personlighet har kopplingar till gult och rött

Reptiler visar upp en häpnadsväckande färgvariation och inom vissa arter förekommer olika färgvarianter. Murödlan, som är vanlig i stora delar av södra Europa, har en ovansida som gör den väl kamouflerad. Färgen på undersidan varierar däremot mycket mellan olika individer. Den kan vara vitaktig, starkt orange eller bjärt gul. – Det som är särskilt intressant med denna färgvariation är att den är

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Daily briefing: Sleeping in on the weekend doesn’t undo the effects of sleep deprivation

Daily briefing: Sleeping in on the weekend doesn’t undo the effects of sleep deprivation Daily briefing: Sleeping in on the weekend doesn’t undo the effects of sleep deprivation, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00769-8 A weekend lie-in won’t overcome negative metabolic effects, nanoparticles give mice infrared night vision and NIH replaces 14 scientists over harassment.

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iPad 2019 rumors: Price, specs, features and everything else we know – CNET

Will Apple finally, at long last, update the iPad Mini?

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How Security Experts Track North Korea's Nuclear Activity

Remote techniques can detect signs of active testing—but they don’t tell us everything — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Opinion: Ethical Boundaries Needed on the Uses of Synthetic DNA

A newly expanded genetic alphabet that includes four synthetic nucleotides highlights the need for strict boundaries on their use.

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The US has started burning recycling but it should only be temporary

Last year China banned imports of foreign waste, temporarily disrupting US recycling efforts. In the meantime, some US communities are burning their waste

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Research shows link between rise of European populism and vaccine hesitancy

There is a significant association between the rise of populism across Europe and the level of mistrust around vaccines, according to a study by Queen Mary University of London.

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New X-ray measurement approach could improve CT scanners

A new measurement approach proposed by NIST scientists could lead to a better way to calibrate computed tomography (CT) scanners, potentially streamlining patient treatment by improving communication among doctors.

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Tree rings tell climate stories that technology can't

A new study in Nature Communications by scientists from the Harvard Forest, Columbia University, ETH Zürich, and elsewhere shows how information revealed by a new method of analyzing tree rings matches the story told by more high-tech equipment over the short-term. Because trees are long-lived, looking back in their rings with this new approach may add decades or even centuries to our understandin

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The sneaky way estrogen drives brain metastasis in non-estrogen-dependent breast cancers

University of Colorado Cancer Center study shows that while estrogen doesn't directly affect triple-negative breast cancer cells, it can affect surrounding brain cells in ways that promote cancer cell migration and invasiveness

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SpaceX set for crew demo launch

The US is about to take a major step towards being able to fly its astronauts into space once again.

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Monthly Stats for Eyewire: February 2019

February… a short month, but we always manage to take care of quite a few things! This time we completed 27 cells, including two very fast marathon cells (6 hrs 44 mins and 6 hrs 26 mins respectively!). We also had a great time swimming around in our Undersea Odyssey, and we’ve welcomed quite a few players to the higher ranks of Eyewire. Onward and upward, for science! New Scouts: orch TheAtom417

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The New Old Age: Supplements Won’t Prevent Dementia. But These Steps Might.

Scientists still have no magic shield against Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Yet there is evidence that some strategies may help.

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How Will We Prevent AI-Based Forgery?

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HONDA e Prototype | Fully Charged

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How Much Does the Combine Reveal About Future NFL Players?

Sports How well future pros sprint, jump and lift weights at the NFL Scouting Combine may tell us only a little bit about their career success. 03/01/2019 Marcus Woo, Contributor To read more…

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Time's Up Tackles Gender Bias and Harassment in Health Care

The nonprofit is launching a new affiliate to address these issues, with the backing of major medical institutions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Strategic Lab Design Can Accelerate Our Fight against Cancer

For the best minds to solve some of medicine’s biggest problems, the right environment can make a big difference — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Elon Musk Declares War on Dealer Network, Launches For-Real $35K Tesla Model 3

Tesla's plan to sell direct (no more factory stores) is a challenge to the established dealer network. If Tesla succeeds, other startups or market newcomers may follow suit. The post Elon Musk Declares War on Dealer Network, Launches For-Real $35K Tesla Model 3 appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Bacteria in frog skin may help fight fungal infections in humans

In the past few decades, a lethal disease has decimated populations of frogs and other amphibians worldwide, even driving some species to extinction. Yet other amphibians resisted the epidemic. Based on previous research, scientists at the INDICASAT AIP, Smithsonian and collaborating institutions knew that skin bacteria could be protecting the animals by producing fungi-fighting compounds. However

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An abundance of beneficial mutations

Despite its importance, the genetic architecture of adaptive processes remains largely unresolved. Now, a team of researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna, experimenting with fruit flies, has succeeded in solving at least a part of this puzzle. They were able to show that many genes can contribute to adaptation even though only some of them are actually being used (genetic redundancy).

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The scientific reason you find that Momo picture so creepy

Health Your brain doesn't like uncertainty. The human brain is wired to read faces and Momo doesn't fit the patterns.

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How Strategic Lab Design Can Accelerate Our Fight against Cancer

For the best minds to solve some of medicine’s biggest problems, the right environment can make a big difference — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers combining animate and inanimate substances

Modern cosmetics and medical implants contain many inorganic substances. Studies by South Ural State University researchers are aimed at understanding how biological molecules of the human body will interact with new, foreign, inorganic molecules and implants. A study by the SUSU team of nanotechnologists published in Langmuir could advance international medicine, cosmetology and transplantology.

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Tesla Is Closing Its Dealerships to Only Sell Cars Online

Online Only Tesla is closing most of its physical stores, except for a small number in “high-traffic locations” that will serve as “showcases and Tesla information centers,” according to an official update . The news comes alongside Tesla’s announcement that the long-awaited $35,000 Model 3 is finally here. In order to dip the price that low, Tesla argues that it had to shift all of its sales to

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Astronomers Predict Planet Nine Has 5x the Earth’s Mass

Pluto 2.0 In 2006, the downgrading of Pluto left a planet-sized hole in our hearts. Then, in 2014, astronomers proposed that there could be a mysterious “Planet Nine” that’s never been observed and which could maybe, possibly, be lurking at the distant edge of our solar system — and that it could explain our system’s orbital dynamics. Now, California Institute of Technology (Caltech) astronomers

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In Proposed Climate Panel Leader, Trump Finds a Defender of CO2

The White House is considering establishing an "adversarial" panel to review the scientific evidence on climate change. Leading the charge would be a Princeton physicist who in 2015 founded the CO2 Coalition, a nonprofit that highlights what it calls carbon dioxide’s “vital role” in our everyday lives.

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Drinking Alcohol May Be More Harmful Than Thought for Young Adults

Alcohol consumption may be more harmful than thought, particularly for young and middle-age adults, a new study suggests.

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Members of Youth vs. Apocalypse Defend Their Exchange With Dianne Feinstein

Dianne Feinstein Doesn’t Need a Do-Over Last week, a group of children and teenagers from organizations including Youth vs. Apocalypse and the Sunrise Movement went to Senator Dianne Feinstein’s office in San Francisco to ask her to vote for the Green New Deal. A video of the exchange—in which Feinstein explains her objections to the legislation—soon went viral. “At the 13th hour of a long career

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Frailty may be a new screening criterion for fitness for an operation

Frailty is linked to more complications after an operation among adults of all ages, according to researchers of a large new study.

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High-fat diet and age alter microflora and cause inflammation in heart failure

Growing older and a high-fat diet enriched with omega 6 fatty acids are major contributors to health risks ranging from diabetes to heart failure. How these factors regulate the immune response is now described — a calorie-dense, obesity-generating diet in aging mice disrupts the composition of the gut microbiome. This correlates with development of a system-wide nonresolving inflammation in acut

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Tracking firefighters in burning buildings

McMaster researchers, working with partners at other universities, have created a motion-powered, fireproof sensor that can track the movements of firefighters, steelworkers, miners and others who work in high-risk environments where they cannot always be seen.

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Cells use sugars to communicate at the molecular level

Research from the University of Pennsylvania reveals how cells communicate at the molecular level. They found that sugar molecules play a key role in cellular communication, serving as the 'channels' that cells and proteins use to talk to one another. This work also provides researchers with a new tool to study other living systems in incredible detail, enabling future breakthroughs in fields from

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Bioluminescence sensors make new approaches to drug discovery possible

Canadian and Brazilian researchers describe the use of 13 molecular tools for measuring different intracellular signaling pathways and evaluating the action mechanisms of new drugs.

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Machine learning expands to help predict and characterize earthquakes

In a focus section published in the journal Seismological Research Letters, researchers describe how they are using machine learning methods to hone predictions of seismic activity, identify earthquake centers, characterize different types of seismic waves and distinguish seismic activity from other kinds of ground 'noise.'

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Researchers search for solutions to 'invisible threat' that affects cancer care workers

A study from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center sought to improve nurses' handling of chemotherapy by delivering an educational intervention with quarterly reminders and tailored messages. But despite the strong study design and quality intervention, it did not increase use of protective gear.

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More humans always mean fewer African carnivores, right? Nope

African carnivores face numerous threats from humans. So, it's a fair assumption that the presence of more humans automatically equates to decreases across the board for carnivores. New research led by Michigan State University and published in the current issue of Ecological Applications, however, shows that's not always the case.

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Sophisticated 3-D measurement technology permits gesture-based human-machine interaction in real time

Humans and machines will increasingly support each other in the workplace. For processes to be efficient, the machine must respond to the human worker without any time delay. Thanks to sophisticated high-speed 3-D measurement and sensor technology, researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering IOF are making this real-time interaction possible. They will be d

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Smart solutions to join carbon fiber reinforced plastics and metal

The engineering of lightweight vehicles requires manufacturers to combine functional metal components with lightweight, highly durable carbon fiber reinforced plastics. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a variety of solutions for joining such disparate materials – and will be showcasing their technology at this year's Hannover Messe on April 1-5, 2019 using an e-scooter demonstrator (Hall 17,

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A map of Kim Jong-un’s slow train trip to Vietnam

Kim Jong-un is already traveling for his summit with Trump on Wednesday. Rather than flying, he's taking a 60-hour train trip through China. The trip is a closely guarded secret, but this map shows the most likely itinerary. None This Wednesday and Thursday, Kim Jong-un and Donald Trump will have their second summit, this time in Vietnam. But while the U.S. president is still in DC, North Korea's

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Drug delivery system works like ‘paint by numbers’

A new drug delivery system, called cavitation dose painting, would make getting drugs where they need to go more like “paint by numbers” and less like paintball. If the drug needs to enter the bloodstream and circulate throughout your body for treating disease wherever it may be, the paintball-like delivery system may work, but it won’t work for targeted and precise drug delivery. A technique mor

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Method may predict if radiation will work on tumors

Doctors may someday be able to advise cancer patients to skip potentially grueling radiation therapy that won’t work on their specific tumors, a new study suggests. The findings, which appear in Cancer Research , could potentially lead to a non-invasive method for identifying patients are who ill-suited for radiation treatment, which would reduce medical overtreatment and help patients avoid adve

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How a new species of ancestors is changing our theory of human evolution | Juliet Brophy

In 2013, a treasure trove of unusual fossils were uncovered in a cave in South Africa, and researchers soon realized: these were the remains of a new species of ancient humans. Paleoanthropologist Juliet Brophy takes us inside the discovery of Homo naledi, explaining how this mysterious ancestor is forcing us to rethink where we come from — and what it means to be human.

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Here’s how long the periodic table’s unstable elements last

Most elements on the periodic table have at least one stable form. But some don’t. Here’s how long those unstable members endure.

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MIT's backflipping Mini Cheetah robot is too cute to fear

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How Tech Will Let You Learn Anything, Anytime, at Any Age

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Meet Ripley, SpaceX's Dummy Astronaut Riding on Crew Dragon Test Flight

SpaceX's famous "Starman" dummy onboard the inaugural Falcon Heavy launch is about to have some competition — from a new dummy, named Ripley, strapped into the company's first Crew Dragon capsule.

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How plastic wends its way to ocean garbage patches

How plastic wends its way to ocean garbage patches How plastic wends its way to ocean garbage patches, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00729-2 Wind and wave action drive the build-up of microplastics at remote ocean sites.

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Why Americans Might Never Notice Climate Change’s Hotter Weather

In the past 50 years, climate change has altered the weather of the United States, leading to milder winters, warmer nights, and sweltering summer heat waves. These changes will intensify in the decades to come; by the end of the century, for instance, Philadelphia could feel a lot like Memphis . But a new study suggests that most Americans have not noticed these changes—and they never will. For

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High-speed 3-D printer for high-performance plastics

The additive manufacture of large-volume plastic components is a time-consuming undertaking. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU have now developed Screw Extrusion Additive Manufacturing (SEAM), a system and process that is eight times faster than conventional 3-D printing. Visitors will be able to see the ultrafast 3-D printer in action at the Frau

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Bacteria in frog skin may help fight fungal infections in humans

In the past few decades, a lethal disease has decimated populations of frogs and other amphibians worldwide, even driving some species to extinction. Yet other amphibians resisted the epidemic. Based on previous research, scientists at the INDICASAT AIP, Smithsonian and collaborating institutions knew that skin bacteria could be protecting the animals by producing fungi-fighting compounds. However

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A high-precision test bench for LISA technology

For the first time, it has been possible to test laser measurement technology for LISA in laboratories almost under mission conditions. A team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute; AEI) and the Institute for Gravitational Physics at Leibniz Universität in Hannover, Germany, achieved the breakthrough with a novel experiment. The work ti

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Promising far-infrared detectors better protected against cosmic rays

Astronomers need ever more sensitive detectors to broaden their understanding of the universe. Microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKID) could make far-infrared telescopes 1 million times more sensitive. Scientists from SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research and TU Delft have now taken a step toward the development of these detectors by protecting them against harmful cosmic rays. Publi

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Researchers combining animate and inanimate substances

Modern cosmetics and medical implants contain many inorganic substances. Studies by South Ural State University researchers are aimed at understanding how biological molecules of the human body will interact with new, foreign, inorganic molecules and implants. A study by the SUSU team of nanotechnologists published in Langmuir could advance international medicine, cosmetology and transplantology.

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Supercomputing enables sound prediction model for controlling noise

Combining principles from computational fluid dynamics and acoustics, researchers at the TU Berlin have developed an analytical model that could simplify the process of designing Helmholtz resonators, a type of noise cancelling structure used in airplanes, ships, and ventilation systems. The model can predict a potential Helmholtz cavity's sound spectrum as turbulent air flows over it, and could p

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Scientists develop bubble diameter prediction model for industrial use

Gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid reactors have been widely applied in fermentation, photosynthetic culture, metallurgy, and many other processes in chemical industries. Accurate prediction of bubble diameter is crucial for the proper design, optimization, and scale-up of gas-liquid apparatuses. Most previous research focused only on orifice superficial gas velocity < 10 m/s, which is too low for in

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Scientists learn how to manage the properties of amorphous microwires

Amorphous ferromagnetic microwires are thin, glass-coated wires used to manufacture magnetic safety tags and in medicine. A team of physicists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and MISIS controlled their properties by adjusting internal mechanical stress. Their article was published in the Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials.

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An abundance of beneficial mutations

Despite its importance, the genetic architecture of adaptive processes remains largely unresolved. Now, a team of researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna, experimenting with fruit flies, has succeeded in solving at least a part of this puzzle. They were able to show that many genes can contribute to adaptation even though only some of them are actually being used (genetic redundancy).

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New research from Arctic: Thawing permafrost peatlands may add to atmospheric CO2 burden

A new study led by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Montreal, in cooperation with researchers from various Nordic research institutions, finds that peatlands may strengthen the permafrost-carbon feedback by adding to the atmospheric CO2 burden post-thaw.

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Robotic solutions aim to improve rail bridge safety and carriage cleanliness

Scientists at Heriot-Watt University, in partnership with rail industry body RSSB, are developing robotic solutions to improve rail carriage cleanliness in hard to reach places and to facilitate closer inspection of railway bridge arches.

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Go-anywhere cleanroom

CAPE is a transportable, tent-like cleanroom facility developed by researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA. It can be installed both indoors and in unexposed outdoor locations, and takes less than an hour to set up. The inspiration for this innovative new development came from a project with OHB System AG, one of the key players in the European spac

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A smart soft orthosis for a stronger back

When workers in Germany call in sick, back pain is often to blame. It frequently affects employees in logistics, manufacturing and services where physically strenuous patterns of movement are part of the daily job routine. In a bid to prevent back problems, Fraunhofer researchers have come up with ErgoJack to offer a smart soft orthosis that supports workers with real-time motion detection. A prot

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Agrochemist doubles the speed of organic substance decomposition in the soil

A RUDN agrochemist provides a detailed description of decomposition of organic substances in soil under the influence of carbon-bearing additives. In the course of the study, the authors found that adding glucose and plant remains to the soil at a particular moment doubles the speed of decomposition. The results of the work could speed up agricultural production. The article was published in Soil

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Parker's Tense Meeting With Tony | Gold Rush

In hopes to broker a deal, Parker meets with Tony after a contentious season. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on I

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Bacteria in frog skin may help fight fungal infections in humans

Scientists at the Smithsonian and INDICASAT in Panama explored the compounds produced by frog skin bacteria as potential novel antifungal sources for the benefit of humans and amphibians.

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Embryos' signaling proteins go with the flow

Protein signaling in the rapidly differentiating cells of embryos is far more complex than previously thought, as pathways take cues from many other players. Rice University researchers used new tools to gain a better understanding of the dynamic mechanisms involved.

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A new technique allows researchers to focus the action of drugs via infrared light

A scientific team led by the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona manages to efficiently activate molecules located inside cell tissues using two-photon excitation of with infrared light lasers. The results of the study, published in Nature Communications, represent a breakthrough in photopharmacology and open new lines of research in molecular neurob

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Two genes explain variation in color and behavior in the wall lizard

How are reptiles capable of generating such a diversity of bright colors? And how is it possible that within a single population of the same species, different individuals exhibit strikingly different coloration patterns? In a new paper published in the journal PNAS an international team of scientists, led by researchers from CIBIO/InBIO (University of Porto) and Uppsala University, reveal two gen

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The Most Important—And Neglected—Moment of the Michael Cohen Hearing

Michael Cohen’s long-awaited testimony before the House Oversight Committee offered a tour of the grimier corners of American politics. Over six hours, Donald Trump’s former fixer told Congress stories of the president’s cruelty, greed, and possible criminal conduct. President Trump, he said, had lied to the American people about many things—most notably his involvement in payments to Stormy Dani

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'Mama's Last Hug' Makes Case That Humans Are Not Alone In Experiencing Emotions

In his new book, primate behavior researcher Frans de Waal writes that "emotions are everywhere in the animal kingdom, from fish to birds to insects and even in brainy mollusks such as the octopus." (Image credit: AFP/Getty Images)

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Your Questions About Italy's GMO Mosquito Experiment, Answered

What are some of the leading arguments against this experiment? What happens to other species in the food chain? Isn't developing a vaccine a better way to go? (Image credit: Pierre Kattar for NPR)

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Sfinx hittad i verkstad vid utgrävningarna i Gebel el-Silsil

– Upptäckten är unik eftersom det är den första intakta kriosfinxen som hittats i en verkstad, tillsammans med en kobra och visar den ungefärliga storleken för sfinxerna längs sfinxavenyn mellan Khonsutemplet i Karnak och Luxortemplet, säger John Ward som är biträdande projektledare. Den stora kriosfinxen grävdes fram under flera meter av stenbrytaravfall. Bara huvudet var synligt tidigare. Krios

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Two genes explain variation in color and behavior in the wall lizard

How are reptiles capable of generating such a diversity of bright colors? And how is it possible that within a single population of the same species, different individuals exhibit strikingly different coloration patterns? In a new paper published in the journal PNAS an international team of scientists, led by researchers from CIBIO/InBIO (University of Porto) and Uppsala University, reveal two gen

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Clover improves soil quality, feeds biofuels crop

A four-leaf clover might bring good luck, but a stand of Kura clover can produce healthier soil—in the long run, according to a South Dakota State University study.

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Large Hadron Collider pushing computing to the limits

At the end of 2018, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) completed its second multi-year run ("Run 2") that saw the machine reach a proton–proton collision energy of 13 TeV, the highest ever reached by a particle accelerator. During this run, from 2015 to 2018, LHC experiments produced unprecedented volumes of data with the machine's performance exceeding all expectations.

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Catastrophic outlook for African savannahs due to rise in CO2 levels

A ground-breaking research study looking at modern and ancient landscapes has discovered African plants could be facing mass extinction faster than once thought.

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Smart voice assistant answers your questions

Voice assistants are becoming more and more prevalent in every area of our lives. At this year's Hannover Messe, researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Intelligent Analysis and Information Systems IAIS are teaming up with au-tomaker Volkswagen to showcase a new voice interaction system that caters to domain-specific knowledge. Drawing on the techniques of "informed" machine learning, the sy

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What makes natural gas bottlenecks happen during extreme cold snaps

When temperatures in Minneapolis fell to 27 below zero during the January 2019 polar vortex, the Xcel Energy utility urged all Minnesota customers to lower their thermostats to conserve natural gas needed for power generation. In Michigan, where it was also colder than the North Pole, General Motors even shut several factories as a precaution against outages.

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Two genes explain variation in color and behavior in the wall lizard

How are reptiles capable of generating such a diversity of bright colors? And how is it possible that within a single population of the same species, different individuals exhibit strikingly different coloration patterns? In a new paper published in the journal PNAS an international team of scientists, led by researchers from CIBIO/InBIO (University of Porto) and Uppsala University, reveal two gen

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Clover improves soil quality, feeds biofuels crop

A four-leaf clover might bring good luck, but a stand of Kura clover can produce healthier soil—in the long run, according to a South Dakota State University study.

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Catastrophic outlook for African savannahs due to rise in CO2 levels

A ground-breaking research study looking at modern and ancient landscapes has discovered African plants could be facing mass extinction faster than once thought.

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The Books Briefing: Let’s Go to the Movies

Raymond Chandler, who wrote both screenplays and the novels that inspired them, had mixed feelings about the movies. On the one hand, he was inspired by the sheer range of artistic possibilities in cinema; on the other, true to hard-boiled form, he took a cynical view of the glitz and politics of show business (as well as the censorship that 1940s filmmakers faced under the Hays Code ). Indeed, a

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How 14 Friends From the Vietnam War Lost and Found One Another Again

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with a group of Vietnam veterans who have been having regular reunions since the 1980s. They call themselves "The Cavily"—a portmanteau of cavalry and family . There are 14 vets in the Cavily, and the

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Paleontology: Diversification after mass extinction

A team led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich paleontologist Adriana López-Arbarello has identified three hitherto unknown fossil fish species in the Swiss Alps, which provide new insights into the diversification of the genus Eosemionotus.

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Considerably reduced toxicant levels in heated tobacco prototype compared to cigarettes

New research conducted by Imperial Brands suggests that toxicants of notable public health interest are substantially reduced in the aerosol from our heated tobacco product (HTP) prototype, compared to smoke from a standard reference cigarette.

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SpaceX is about to launch a dummy astronaut called Ripley to the ISS

SpaceX plans an uncrewed test flight of the Dragon spacecraft on 2 March, which will carry cargo and an astronaut dummy to the International Space Station

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Philippines to charge Sanofi staff over dengue drug

Officials say fear of vaccines after Dengvaxia scandal is main reason for measles epidemic

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Giant Amazonian spiders hunt some surprising prey

Researchers have documented 15 rare and disturbing predator-prey interactions in the Amazon rainforest including keep-you-up-at-night images of a dinner plate-size tarantula dragging a young opossum across the forest floor. Warning to arachnophobes and the faint of heart: This is the stuff of nightmares, so you might want to proceed with caution. The photos are part of a new article in Amphibian

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How Tech Will Let You Learn Anything, Anytime, at Any Age

Today, over 77 percent of Americans own a smartphone with access to the world’s information and near-limitless learning resources. Yet nearly 36 million adults in the US are constrained by low literacy skills , excluding them from professional opportunities, prospects of upward mobility, and full engagement with their children’s education. And beyond its direct impact, low literacy rates affect u

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Meet “Ripley,” the Dummy SpaceX Is Sending to the Space Station

Ripley SpaceX CEO Elon Musk tweeted a picture early this morning of “Ripley,” a dummy the spacetech company plans to send to the International Space Station on board the Crew Dragon space capsule this weekend. Ripley will be an integral part of Demo-1, the first uncrewed test flight of SpaceX’s futuristic passenger craft that could one day ferry astronauts to the ISS — and the dummy, which is alr

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Chemical noses to detect and rid pollutants

Scientists across Europe are joining forces to develop next-gen "chemical noses" that will detect and rid pollutants from the environment as part of a collaborative €2.9 million Horizon2020 FET-OPEN project (INITIO) that will bring together researchers from Trinity College Dublin and five other universities as well as experts from two SMEs.

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Electronic nose to sniff dogs for deadly tropical disease in Brazil

Fewer dogs in Brazil may be euthanized unnecessarily after researchers showed that a new test is 95 percent accurate in identifying the deadly disease Leishmaniasis.

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A small plesiosaur lived in Spain 125 million years ago

Plesiosaurs, erroneously viewed as dinosaurs, inhabited all Earth's oceans between 200 million and 65 million years ago. In the Peninsula, only scarce remains of these long-necked reptiles had been found. Now, a group of palaeontologists has found the most abundant collection of fossils in Morella, Castellón. Among them, there is one vertebra that belonged to a type of plesiosaur never before disc

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Greta Is a Twisted, Urban Fairy Tale About Stalking

The abode of Greta Hideg (played by Isabelle Huppert), the kindly seeming French widow at the heart of the new film Greta , is a Brooklyn real-estate agent’s dream. Tucked away in a little alley, recessed behind the other buildings, and complete with a piano and a lovely kitchen, it’s like something out of an urban fairy tale—which is, indeed, exactly what Greta is. But the movie isn’t one of tho

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New Senate Bill Would Legalize Marijuana Nationwide

Take Two For the second time, Senator Cory Booker announced a bill to make recreational marijuana use legal across the entire U.S. The Marijuana Justice Act, which Booker and Representatives Barbara Lee and Ro Khanna announced on Thursday, would not only legalize marijuana but also retroactively erase marijuana possession charges from Americans’ criminal records, according to Rolling Stone — a mo

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New research from Arctic: Thawing permafrost peatlands may add to atmospheric CO2 burden

A new study led by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Montreal, in cooperation with researchers from various Nordic research institutions, finds that peatlands may strengthen the permafrost-carbon feedback by adding to the atmospheric CO2 burden post-thaw.

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BFU scientists learned how to manage the properties of amorphous microwires

Amorphous ferromagnetic microwires are thin glass coated wires used to manufacture magnetic safety tags and in medicine. A team of physicists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and MISIS learned how to manage their properties by adjusting internal mechanical stress.

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Towards a blood test for early-stage liver disease

One in four people in Western and Asian societies develop a build-up of fat in the liver as a result of an unhealthy diet. This disease — non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) — causes no symptoms initially but can develop into end-stage liver cirrhosis. A discovery, published today in Molecular Systems Biology, paves the way for a simple blood test to detect early stages of NAFLD, opening u

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An abundance of beneficial mutations

Despite its key importance, the genetic architecture of adaptive processes remains largely unresolved. Now a team of researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna, experimenting with fruit flies, has succeeded in solving at least a part of this puzzle. They were able to show that many genes can contribute to adaptation even though only some of them are actually being used (genetic redundancy).

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Supercomputing enables sound prediction model for controlling noise

Combining principles from computational fluid dynamics and acoustics, researchers at the TU Berlin have developed an analytical model that could simplify the process of designing Helmholtz resonators, a type of noise cancelling structure used in airplanes, ships, and ventilation systems. The model can predict a potential Helmholtz cavity's sound spectrum as turbulent air flows over it, and could p

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Blood test developed to predict spontaneous preterm birth

Results from a multicenter study show that five circulating microparticle proteins found in first-trimester blood samples may provide important clues about risk of spontaneous preterm birth.

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Koala-spotting drones proves a flying success

QUT researchers have developed an innovative method for detecting koala populations using drones and infrared imaging that is more reliable and less invasive than traditional animal population monitoring techniques.

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A clearer view of past climate from tree rings

To see where the Earth's climate is headed, we have to see where it's been—and a new San Francisco State University study could offer a clearer picture. The study outlines a way to use a basic law of plant growth to improve estimates of historical temperature and rainfall from tree rings. The results could help answer one of the biggest questions facing climate scientists today.

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Koala-spotting drones proves a flying success

QUT researchers have developed an innovative method for detecting koala populations using drones and infrared imaging that is more reliable and less invasive than traditional animal population monitoring techniques.

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Diversification after mass extinction

A team led by LMU paleontologist Adriana López-Arbarello has identified three hitherto unknown fossil fish species in the Swiss Alps, which provide new insights into the diversification of the genus Eosemionotus.

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Radiography of marine litter in Spanish waters

Marine litter is a growing problem in the Mediterranean Sea, but few studies have focused on its composition, spatial distribution and temporal evolution. Now, a new study reveals that plastics are the main component in Spanish waters, and density is higher in the Alboran Sea than in the Levantine region or Catalonia, where accumulation has remained stable.

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Regeringen klar til at styrke borgerinddragelse i sundhedsreform

Sundhedsforhandingerne mellem regeringen Dansk Folkeparti og Alternativet fortsætter.

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Tina Seelig: Can We Control Our Own Luck?

Are there things we can do to increase our luck? Through taking tiny risks, showing gratitude, and being open to new ideas, Tina Seelig says we can capture luck in our everyday lives. (Image credit: Ryan Lash/TED)

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How to block toxic comments all over the web

DIY Because you don’t need to be angry or sad every time you go online. If you’re tired of feeling your blood boil every time you get to the bottom of an article or open up your social media app of choice, here’s how to clean up your…

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Spana in en flyttfågel nära dig

Få saker är så spektakulära som när flyttfåglarna kommer tillbaka från sina övervintringsplatser. Fågelkalendern omsätter detta intresse för vårtecken till en organiserad miljöövervakning, och alla kan hjälpa till. Nu finns det en mobil-app (än så länge bara för android-telefoner) som gör det möjligt att enkel rapportera direkt till Artportalen – en webbplats för observationer av Sveriges växter,

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A clearer view of past climate from tree rings

To see where the Earth's climate is headed, we have to see where it's been. A new Francisco State University study outlines a mathematical technique that uses a basic law of plant growth to improve estimates of historical temperature and rainfall from tree rings.

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Endangered eel located using DNA from one liter of water

Researchers have shed light on the distribution of Japanese eel by analyzing environmental DNA (eDNA) from small samples of river water. This could enable faster and more effective surveys of Japanese eel populations, and help to conserve this endangered species. The finding was published on Feb. 27 in Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems.

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Climate change: Narrate a history beyond the 'triumph of humanity' to find imaginative solutions

One reason why people find it difficult to think about climate change and the future may be their understanding of human history. The present day is believed to be the product of centuries of development. These developments have led to a globalised world of complex states, in which daily life for most people is highly urbanised, consumerist and competitive.

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Technique allows researchers to focus the action of drugs via infrared light

Having absolute control of the activity of a molecule in an organism, or deciding when, where and how a drug is activated—these are some of the goals possible with so-called photoswitchable molecules, compounds that change their properties in the presence of certain light waves. The results of a study led by the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC) together with the Universitat Autònom

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New research area: How protein structures change due to normal forces

Proteins made in our cells are folded into specific shapes so they can fulfill their functions. Scientists have discovered the static structures of over 100,000 proteins, but how they change in response to forces on the cell, like muscle contractions, is largely unknown. Matthias Wilmanns and colleagues at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, developed methods to study th

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The End of an Era for HBO—And for Television

AT&T’s plans to turn its new acquisition HBO into a Netflix-size juggernaut have been brewing for months while the telephone company completed its purchase of Time Warner . Last July, the AT&T executive John Stankey gathered HBO’s employees and lectured them about how the company would need to get bigger and broader to compete with other streaming giants; the reaction in the room was reportedly l

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Former Missouri Professor Stole Student’s Research to Sell New Drug, Lawsuit Alleges

The University of Missouri said the former pharmacy professor could make millions from the sale of the drug, which treats dry eyes.

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How Much Does the Combine Reveal About Future NFL Players?

How Much Does the Combine Reveal About Future NFL Players? How well future pros sprint, jump and lift weights at the NFL Scouting Combine may tell us only a little bit about their career success. Tom-Brady-Image.jpg Tom Brady (center), against the Dallas Cowboys in 2011. Image credits: Joseph Sohm/ Shutterstock Sports Friday, March 1, 2019 – 09:00 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) — Despi

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China’s Ambitious Plan to Build the World’s Biggest Supergrid

submitted by /u/Djngrndk [link] [comments]

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Finland approves ban on coal for energy use from 2029

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'Soft' robotic hand runs on air pressure and AI

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Researchers move closer to practical photonic quantum computing

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NASA is going back to the future with nuclear rockets

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Atmospheric scientists offer climate change clues in new studies

Two new studies authored by atmospheric scientists at UAlbany and published in Nature Communications may offer us clues for future climate change projections.

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Should online users be bound by their privacy agreements?

The political economy of digital capitalism is largely premised on a new exchange: individuals enjoy cheap or free services and goods in exchange for their personal information.

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Flipping the Script In Action: The Nick Gundersen Case

The tragic consequences of a boy with leukemia and a mother who believed an alternative medicine documentary-maker over her son's oncologist.

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Review: Standout 2020 Toyota Corolla Adds Safety, Performance, Hybrid

No longer just the safe choice for an affordable sedan, the new Corolla looks good inside, rides quieter, and the hybrid begs the question, "Why do I need a Prius?" The post Review: Standout 2020 Toyota Corolla Adds Safety, Performance, Hybrid appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Togoverfarten Rødby-Puttgarden stopper til december

Afviklingen af togoverfarten til Tyskland via Rødby-Puttgarden skyldes fremtidig sporarbejde. På sigt vil togoverfarten i stedet ske via Fyn og Jylland.

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New research area: How protein structures change due to normal forces

Proteins made in our cells are folded into specific shapes so they can fulfill their functions. Scientists have discovered the static structures of over 100,000 proteins, but how they change in response to forces on the cell, like muscle contractions, is largely unknown. Matthias Wilmanns and colleagues at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, developed methods to study th

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Scientists rejuvenate stem cells in the aging brain of mice

Scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg and from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been able to rejuvenate stem cells in the brain of aging mice. The revitalised stem cells improve the regeneration of injured or diseased areas in the brain of old mice. The researchers expect that their approach will provide fresh impetus in r

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Koala-spotting drones proves a flying success

QUT researchers have developed an innovative method for detecting koala populations using drones and infrared imaging that is more reliable and less invasive than traditional animal population monitoring techniques.

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Gene transcription machinery constrains DNA movements, study suggests

Researchers in Japan have discovered that the DNA inside human cells moves around less when its genes are active. The study, which will be published March 1 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that RNA polymerase II — the key enzyme required to produce messenger RNA molecules from active genes — restricts the movement of DNA by organizing it into a network of interconnected domains.

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New device mimics beating heart with tiny pieces of heart tissue

Researchers at Imperial College London created a bioreactor to allow heart tissue to experience mechanical forces in sync with the beats, like it would in the body, to study the mechanics of healthy and diseased hearts.

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A highly sensitive new blood test can detect rare cancer proteins

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University developed a new blood test that can identify proteins-of-interest down to the sub-femtomolar range with minimal errors.

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Scientists discover how surfaces may have helped early life on Earth begin

Researchers at the University of Oslo find that when lipids land on a surface they form tiny cell-like containers without external input, and that large organic molecules similar in size to DNA's building blocks can spontaneously enter these protocells while they grow. Both of these are crucial steps towards forming a functioning cell.

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New research area: How protein structures change due to normal forces

Proteins made in our cells are folded into specific shapes so they can fulfill their functions. Matthias Wilmanns and colleagues at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, developed methods to study the structure of a protein 'strain absorber' as it changes during muscle contractions. They will present their work at the 63rd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, to be held Mar

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Ducks offer researchers a unique opportunity to study human touch

If it walks like a duck (or a goose or a swan), it can find food in mud without seeing or smelling it. These waterfowl bills are covered in skin that's a lot like the sensitive skin on the palms of our hands, and it can feel food in mud and murky water. Slav Bagriantsev, Eve Schneider, and Evan Anderson at Yale University are researching duck skin to learn more about how our sense of touch works.

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Python hearts reveal mechanisms relevant to human heart health and disease

Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder study fast-growing python hearts, which could provide insights to aid those with diseased heart growth. Their latest work reveals ways to study python heart cells.

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An inner ear protein speaks volumes about how sound is converted to a brain signal

Researchers at Rockefeller University characterized a molecular spring attached to the membrane of inner ear cells that converts bending forces created by a sound wave to electrical signals that the brain can interpret.

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Sex and aggression in mice controlled by cold-sensor in brain

Researchers at the University of Illinois College of Medicine find that TRPM8, long ago identified as a cold-temperature sensor, regulates aggressive and hypersexual behavior in response to testosterone.

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Researchers develop techniques to track the activity of a potent cancer gene

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute use novel tools to reveal that cancer gene MYC causes global changes in gene activation, with subtle differences between individual cells.

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Scientists develop bubble diameter prediction model for industrial use

A research team led by Prof. YANG Chao from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology systematically investigated the influence of orifice diameter, liquid viscosity, surface tension and orifice superficial gas velocity on the bubble diameter of gas spargers under industrial jetting conditions.

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China-led research collaboration develops new way to test gene-editing safety

Chinese and international scientists have developed a new technique to evaluate the safety of genome-editing tools — a method that could become the industry standard. The technique — known as 'GOTI,' for Genome-wide Off-target analysis by Two-cell embryo Injection – was developed by researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the CAS-MPG Partner Institute f

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Immigrant Asian American women may be at higher risk for breast cancer

According to the results of a new study led by a researcher from the University of California, Riverside, a subset of women living in the US may be at higher risk for breast cancer than previously observed. The study identified differences in how Asian American women experience breast cancer risk; more specifically, it found that Asian American women who had immigrated had significantly higher ris

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Mother's dengue immunity worsens baby's response to Zika

New research uncovers previously unknown mechanism behind why some, but not all, Zika virus infections during pregnancy lead to fetal brain abnormalities.

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Alternativets sundhedspolitik: Mere alternativ behandling, flere varer på hylderne og et bredere syn på evidens

Alternativet er pludselig endt i en nøglerolle ved forhandlingerne om en sundhedsreform, men få ved, hvad partiet står for på området. Dagens Medicin har spurgt partiets sundhedsordfører om grundholdninger til sundhed.

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Psykiatrisk afdeling Svendborg får ledende overlæge for første gang i to år

Overlæge Rikke Laulund Schultz er konstitueret som ledende overlæge på psykiatrisk afdeling Svendborg. Jagten på en fast i stillingen er fortsat i gang.

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Twitter could soon let users hide unwanted replies to their tweets

The feature would be accessed in the menu button on each tweet. It wouldn't mean the reply is permanently hidden, however, as users can view all replies by clicking 'View Hidden Tweets.'

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Maps: These states get less federal money for fires

Some states receive an outsized share of federal fire protection money, new research suggests. The federal government considers many factors when dividing money nationwide to prevent structure fires. The key driver, however, is economic losses—for example, the greater the cost of fire within a state, the more aid that state is likely to receive. A new model emphasizes an additional factor: the lo

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Playing with Space – Rina R Wehbe – University of Waterloo

submitted by /u/rinarene [link] [comments]

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A new approach to keeping crops, people safe

Weeds cause tremendous damage in yield and productivity of crop plants. Losses from weeds account for more than $40 billion in annual revenue for corn and soybean crops alone in North America, according to the Weed Science Society of America.

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A new approach to keeping crops, people safe

Weeds cause tremendous damage in yield and productivity of crop plants. Losses from weeds account for more than $40 billion in annual revenue for corn and soybean crops alone in North America, according to the Weed Science Society of America.

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How do we save ageing Australians from the heat? Greening our cities is a good start

Heatwaves have killed more Australians than road accidents, fires, floods and all other natural disasters combined. Although recent research shows extreme cold is a worry in some parts of Australia, our hottest summer on record points to more heat-related deaths to come. The record heatwaves have highlighted the damaging effects of heat stress. Understandably, it's becoming a major public health c

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A highly sensitive new blood test can detect rare cancer proteins

Proteins that normally reside inside cell nuclei have never been found in the blood, until now. A new blood test developed at the Johns Hopkins University by Shih-Chin Wang and Chih-Ping Mao—graduate students in Jie Xiao's lab in the Department of Biophysics and Chien-Fu Hung's lab in the Department of Pathology—can identify individual molecules in human blood samples with minimal detection errors

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Scientists discover how surfaces may have helped early life on Earth begin

On early earth, a series of spontaneous events needed to happen in order for life as we know it to begin. One of those phenomena is the formation of compartments enclosed by lipid membranes. New research by Irep Gözen, Elif Koksal, and colleagues at the University of Oslo reveals, for the first time, how these vesicles can self-assemble on surfaces without external input. The team discovered the m

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Ducks offer researchers a unique opportunity to study human touch

If it walks like a duck (or a goose or a swan), it can find food in mud without seeing or smelling it. These waterfowl bills are covered in skin that's a lot like the sensitive skin on the palms of our hands, and it can feel food in mud and murky water. Slav Bagriantsev, Eve Schneider, and Evan Anderson at Yale University are researching duck skin to learn more about how our sense of touch works.

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Are All Our Organs Vital?

Even the appendix and tonsils are less expendable than we thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Other Tool Users

Excavations of stone tools left behind by nonhuman primates are illuminating the origins of technological innovation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Most Microbial Species Are "Dark Matter"

Microbes that have never been studied in the lab make up the vast majority of such life-forms outside the human body — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Orca's Sorrow

A spate of new observations of grief in animals hints at why some species mourn and others do not — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Untangling the Formation of DNA Loops

New discoveries on ancient loops in DNA offer clues into gene regulation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A highly sensitive new blood test can detect rare cancer proteins

Proteins that normally reside inside cell nuclei have never been found in the blood, until now. A new blood test developed at the Johns Hopkins University by Shih-Chin Wang and Chih-Ping Mao—graduate students in Jie Xiao's lab in the Department of Biophysics and Chien-Fu Hung's lab in the Department of Pathology—can identify individual molecules in human blood samples with minimal detection errors

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Gene transcription machinery constrains DNA movements, study suggests

Researchers in Japan have discovered that the DNA inside human cells moves around less when its genes are active. The study, which will be published March 1 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)—the key enzyme required to produce messenger RNA molecules from active genes—restricts the movement of DNA by organizing it into a network of interconnected domains.

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Scientists discover how surfaces may have helped early life on Earth begin

On early earth, a series of spontaneous events needed to happen in order for life as we know it to begin. One of those phenomena is the formation of compartments enclosed by lipid membranes. New research by Irep Gözen, Elif Koksal, and colleagues at the University of Oslo reveals, for the first time, how these vesicles can self-assemble on surfaces without external input. The team discovered the m

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Ducks offer researchers a unique opportunity to study human touch

If it walks like a duck (or a goose or a swan), it can find food in mud without seeing or smelling it. These waterfowl bills are covered in skin that's a lot like the sensitive skin on the palms of our hands, and it can feel food in mud and murky water. Slav Bagriantsev, Eve Schneider, and Evan Anderson at Yale University are researching duck skin to learn more about how our sense of touch works.

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A polka-dot pattern appears in superfluid helium-3 in a thin cell when exposed to a magnetic field

A team of researchers from Royal Holloway University of London and Cornell University has found that a polka-dot pattern emerges in superfluid helium-3 when it is placed in a thin cavity and subjected to a magnetic field. They have published their findings in the journal Physical Review Letters.

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Green New Deal critics can't see the forest for the trees

Everyone, it seems, has an opinion about the (new) Green New Deal. It's an ambitious plan to make America carbon-neutral —as well as more equitable —in a mere 10 years.

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The Chinese coal 'ban' carries a significant political message

As a standoff over Australian coal shipments through the northern Chinese port of Dalian continues, it underscores the extent of Australia's economic dependence on China.

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New tree ring analysis method may open insights to past climate

Satellite imagery of earth's vegetation, measurements of carbon dioxide in the air and computer models all help scientists understand how climate is affecting carbon dynamics and the world's forests. But these technologies stretch back only decades, limiting our picture of long-term changes.

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Scientists produce colorless reservoir of platinum metal-like single atoms in liquid

Supported single metal atoms have attracted broad interest for their demonstrated high efficiency in single metal catalysis. The preparation of such catalysts, however, remains challenging, as the neutral metal atoms have a strong tendency to agglomerate to metal particles in typical preparations.

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Better battery recycling can cut electric car emissions

Better recycling processes can help ensure that lithium-ion batteries don’t undo the environmental benefits of electric cars, according to new research. The widespread implementation of electric vehicles will go a long way toward eliminating the greenhouse gas emissions of the transportation sector. But emissions don’t just come from the tailpipe. There’s another major culprit of greenhouse gases

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It's a Planet Party! See Venus, Saturn and Jupiter with the Moon This Weekend

This weekend, a brilliant display of objects will shine in the night sky when the crescent moon moves into conjunction with Saturn and Venus.

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All the Gear We Loved This Month: HoloLens 2, the Galaxy Fold, and More

Plus: a blockchain smartphone, a new way to buy glasses, and your new favorite multicooker.

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'Guild Wars' Developer Layoffs Hit as 'Fortnite' Launches Season 8

Those things are unrelated. Also happening this week in videogames? Pokémon!

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Is DNA Left on Envelopes Fair Game for Testing?

Last fall, Gilad Japhet, the founder of a DNA-testing company, got up at an industry conference to talk about his grandmother Rosa’s love letters. Japhet’s company, MyHeritage, sells cheek swabs to people interested in their family history. It now has 2.4 million people in its DNA database, making it the third largest behind 23andMe and AncestryDNA. But Japhet wasn’t satisfied with only testing t

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California Tells Elsevier to Take a Hike

The science publishing struggles are not calming down – just the opposite. As of yesterday , the entire University of California system is no longer subscribing to Elsevier journals. That’s a mighty big university system and a mighty big publisher; this is Godzilla vs. Megalon. The dispute is around two mighty big issues as well. The first one, naturally, is cost. Subscribing to scientific journa

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AI Trained on Decades of Food Research Is Making Brand-New Foods

FlavorBot You may not think that Tuscan chicken’s creamy, garlicky flavor is due for a high-tech upgrade, but advanced artificial intelligence is on the case all the same. An AI algorithm is about to analyze and improve that and other classic recipes before designing some brand-new foods as well. And if it goes well, we can expect AI to play a bigger role in developing the foods we eat every day.

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People Drawn to Conspiracy Theories Share a Cluster of Psychological Features

Baseless theories threaten our safety and democracy. It turns out that specific emotions make people prone to such thinking — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mania May Be a Mental Illness in Its Own Right

Hundreds of thousands of people experience mania without ever getting depressed. Why does psychiatry insist on calling them bipolar? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ultrasound Beams and Nanoparticle Cages: Toward More Targeted Brain Treatments

A new technique lets scientists accurately direct drugs to specific regions of the brain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Vision Helps Cyclists Communicate in a Pack

Riders in a peloton benefit more from the eyes of their peers than from a neighbor’s drag reduction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Are All Our Organs Vital?

Even the appendix and tonsils are less expendable than we thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Volunteers Jumped with or without a Parachute to Gauge Its Effectiveness

Someone finally did a study on the efficacy of parachutes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hating Daylight Savings in 1919; Plans for the Panama Canal in 1869

Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Other Tool Users

Excavations of stone tools left behind by nonhuman primates are illuminating the origins of technological innovation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Most Microbial Species Are "Dark Matter"

Microbes that have never been studied in the lab make up the vast majority of such life-forms outside the human body — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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People Drawn to Conspiracy Theories Share a Cluster of Psychological Features

Baseless theories threaten our safety and democracy. It turns out that specific emotions make people prone to such thinking — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The True Story of Einstein's Wife, a Revised History of Humans, and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Neutron Stars: Nature's Weirdest Form of Matter

The insides of neutron stars—the densest form of matter in the universe—have long been a mystery, but it is one that scientists are starting to crack — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mania May Be a Mental Illness in Its Own Right

Hundreds of thousands of people experience mania without ever getting depressed. Why does psychiatry insist on calling them bipolar? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Orca's Sorrow

A spate of new observations of grief in animals hints at why some species mourn and others do not — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Technology Is Upending How Music Is Made

Technology is upending how music gets made — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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“Outrageous” Objects and Other Adventures in Science

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Don't Let Robots Pull the Trigger

Weapons that kill enemies on their own threaten civilians and soldiers alike — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Readers Respond to the November 2018 Issue

Letters to the editor from the November 2018 issue of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ultrasound Beams and Nanoparticle Cages: Toward More Targeted Brain Treatments

A new technique lets scientists accurately direct drugs to specific regions of the brain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In Many Places, the Sun Peaks Well after 12:00 Noon

In many places, the sun reaches its highest point in the sky well after 12 o’clock — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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More Data Don't Necessarily Help You Make Small Decisions

For individuals a deluge of facts can be a problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Vision Helps Cyclists Communicate in a Pack

Riders in a peloton benefit more from the eyes of their peers than from a neighbor’s drag reduction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We Need More Diversity in Genomic Databases

A heavy skew toward white people makes precision medicine imprecise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Untangling the Formation of DNA Loops

New discoveries on ancient loops in DNA offer clues into gene regulation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Climate Change Is Having a Major Impact on Global Health

Warming temperatures are exposing more people to heat waves and increasing the risk of disease spread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Droughts and Floods May Level Off until 2050, but Then Watch Out

Strange waves in the jet stream foretell a future full of heat waves and floods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study first to show processes determining fate of new RNA pesticide in soils

Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis develop a method to learn more about how a new type of pesticide degrades in the environment.

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Gene transcription machinery constrains DNA movements, study suggests

Researchers in Japan have discovered that the DNA inside human cells moves around less when its genes are active. The study, which will be published March 1 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that RNA polymerase II (RNAPII)—the key enzyme required to produce messenger RNA molecules from active genes—restricts the movement of DNA by organizing it into a network of interconnected domains.

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Cell editors correct genetic errors

Almost all land plants employ an army of cellular editors who correct errors in their genetic information. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now transferred parts of this machinery into a bacterium. Their results confirm a controversial thesis on the functioning of this widespread mechanism. They have now been published in the journal Communications Biology of the Nature Publishing Group.

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Cell editors correct genetic errors

Almost all land plants employ an army of cellular editors who correct errors in their genetic information. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now transferred parts of this machinery into a bacterium. Their results confirm a controversial thesis on the functioning of this widespread mechanism. They have now been published in the journal Communications Biology of the Nature Publishing Group.

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A trap for positrons

For the first time, scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) have succeeded in losslessly guiding positrons, the antiparticles of electrons, into a magnetic field trap. This is an important step toward creating a matter-antimatter plasma of electrons and positrons like the plasmas believed to occur near neutron stars and black h

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eBay rethinking future of StubHub and classified business

eBay is initiating review concerning the future of its StubHub and its classified ads business.

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China touts engineering feats of new international airport

Construction of a new airport in China's capital that promises to be one of the largest in the world is speeding toward completion.

7h

Scientist investigates the mystery of secondary ice production

Christine Chiu of Colorado State University investigates clouds. She calls them "complicated 3-D objects that evolve fast."

7h

Food tracking apps actually work for weight loss

Without following a particular diet, overweight people in a new study who tracked what they ate with a free smartphone app lost a significant amount of weight. The participants achieved their results using automated, free tools, rather than expensive in-person interventions. This suggests a possible low-cost route to effective weight loss. “Free and low-cost weight loss apps have changed the ways

7h

'Micro snails' scraped from sidewalk cracks help unlock details of ancient Earth's biological evolution

Every step you take, you're likely walking on a world of unseen and undescribed microbial diversity. And you don't need to head out into nature to find these usually unnoticed microscopic organisms.

7h

Balloons the biggest risk to seabirds

Soft plastics mistaken as food cause fatal obstructions, research shows. Nick Carne reports.

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Ska alla få gentesta sig innan de skaffar barn?

Redan idag erbjuds par som har ärftliga sjukdomar i familjen gentestning för att se om de har anlag som kan göra deras barn sjuka. Men vad händer om samtliga par som planerar att skaffa barn erbjuds screening för upp till 1 500 genetiska sjukdomar? – Med fler val kommer mer ansvar. Det kan i sin tur skapa moralisk stress. Istället för att par frågar sig om det är dags att starta en familj kan de

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'Micro snails' scraped from sidewalk cracks help unlock details of ancient Earth's biological evolution

Every step you take, you're likely walking on a world of unseen and undescribed microbial diversity. And you don't need to head out into nature to find these usually unnoticed microscopic organisms.

7h

Living together: How legume roots accommodate two distinct microbial partners

Legumes such as peas and beans form intimate and mutually beneficial partnerships (symbioses) with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, rhizobia. The plant benefits from an enhanced supply of nitrogen, 'fixed' from the air by the rhizobia, while the bacteria benefit from protective accommodation inside special structures, called root nodules, that supply nutrients from the host plant. A different type of sym

7h

New antibiotic named after Leiden

Increasing resistance and a lack of new antibiotics are a serious problem for public health. Against this background, Gilles van Wezel of the Institute of Biology Leiden is looking for new medicines. Together with former Ph.D. student Changsheng Wu and colleagues he discovered the special antibiotic lugdunomycin, which they named after Leiden. The discovery was recently published in the journal An

7h

Putting photons in jail

A miniature prison for photons—that is the nanocavity discovered by scientists of the University of Twente. It is an extremely small cavity surrounded by an optical crystal, a structure of pores etched in two perpendicular directions. Confining photons in this 3-D cavity may lead to tiny and efficient lasers and LEDs, storage of information or ultrasensitive light sensors. The results are publishe

7h

Layering titanium oxide's different mineral forms for better solar cells

Researchers have layered different mineral forms of titanium oxide on top of one another to improve perovskite-type solar cell efficiency by one-sixth. The titanium oxide layer was better able to transport electrons from the center of the cell to its electrodes. This novel approach could be used to fabricate even more efficient perovskite-type solar cells in the future.

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Living together: How legume roots accommodate two distinct microbial partners

Legumes such as peas and beans form intimate and mutually beneficial partnerships (symbioses) with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, rhizobia. The plant benefits from an enhanced supply of nitrogen, 'fixed' from the air by the rhizobia, while the bacteria benefit from protective accommodation inside special structures, called root nodules, that supply nutrients from the host plant. A different type of sym

7h

New antibiotic named after Leiden

Increasing resistance and a lack of new antibiotics are a serious problem for public health. Against this background, Gilles van Wezel of the Institute of Biology Leiden is looking for new medicines. Together with former Ph.D. student Changsheng Wu and colleagues he discovered the special antibiotic lugdunomycin, which they named after Leiden. The discovery was recently published in the journal An

7h

Your car is more likely to be hacked by your mechanic than a terrorist

When it comes to car hacking, you should be more worried about dodgy dealers than one-off hackers with criminal intent.

7h

India's WhatsApp election: Political parties risk undermining democracy with technology

India's 2019 national elections are widely anticipated to be the "WhatsApp elections". Against a backdrop of rapidly improving internet connectivity and rising smartphone use, the number of people using private messaging service WhatsApp has soared since its India launch in mid-2010 to more than 200m – more users than in any other democracy. And now the country's political parties are moving to ca

7h

Spill at a nuclear facility shows potential burn risks from a household chemical

Three people were taken to hospital following a chemical spill at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation facility at Lucas Heights this morning.

7h

Endangered eel located using DNA from one litre of water

Researchers have shed light on the distribution of Japanese eel by analyzing environmental DNA (eDNA) from small samples of river water. This could enable faster and more effective surveys of Japanese eel populations, and help to conserve this endangered species. The finding was published on February 27 in Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems.

7h

Negativ omtale i medierne fik danskere til at fravælge HPV-vaccinen

Da vaccinen blev introduceret i 2009, var den populær. Men det ændrede sig, da en række negative indslag dukkede op i de danske medier.

7h

Endangered eel located using DNA from one litre of water

Researchers have shed light on the distribution of Japanese eel by analyzing environmental DNA (eDNA) from small samples of river water. This could enable faster and more effective surveys of Japanese eel populations, and help to conserve this endangered species. The finding was published on February 27 in Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems.

7h

Spain logs hundreds of shipwrecks that tell story of maritime past

Weather rather than pirates caused majority of sinkings, says culture ministry team The treacherous waters of the Americas had their first taste of Spanish timber on Christmas Day 1492, when Christopher Columbus’ flagship, the Santa María, sank off the coast of what is now Haiti . Over the following four centuries, as Spain’s maritime empire swelled, peaked and collapsed, the waves on which it wa

7h

Survey shows more work needs to be done on diversity and inclusion in workplaces

A new study commissioned by Smith School of Business and Catalyst Canada found that while a majority of working Canadians have positive attitudes towards diversity and inclusion programs (69 per cent), many employees don't know whether their companies even have D&I initiatives (40 per cent). Further, men are significantly more likely than women to believe that organizational diversity and inclusio

7h

SpaceX's Crew Dragon launch is a pivotal moment for American spaceflight—here's how to watch

Space Get ready to stay up past your bedtime for this historic moment. SpaceX has never launched a human being into space, but on March 2, it will take a massive step forward towards finally reaching that goal.

8h

Data transfer by controlled noise

In information technology, multiplexing schemes are used to transmit more signals than the number of available transmission channels. Researchers at ETH in Zurich have invented a novel method whereby information is encoded in the correlated noise between spatially separated light waves.

8h

Embryos' signaling proteins go with the flow

How cells in developing embryos communicate depends a great deal on context, according to scientists at Rice University.

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Embryos' signaling proteins go with the flow

How cells in developing embryos communicate depends a great deal on context, according to scientists at Rice University.

8h

Study first to show processes determining fate of new RNA pesticides in soils

A new generation of pesticides can be used to control pest insects by compromising the bug's ability to create essential proteins. These gene-silencing pesticides can be genetically engineered into agricultural crops such that these crops can literally grow their own defense.

8h

Structural insights into tiny bacterial harpoons

New research sheds light onto how different bacterial species can build complex nano-harpoons with different protein building blocks. Bacteria use these harpoons called Type VI secretion systems to inject toxins into nearby cells. Researchers from the University of Sheffield found that while the proteins varied, there were structurally similar portions that interacted with the machinery.

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Study first to show processes determining fate of new RNA pesticides in soils

A new generation of pesticides can be used to control pest insects by compromising the bug's ability to create essential proteins. These gene-silencing pesticides can be genetically engineered into agricultural crops such that these crops can literally grow their own defense.

8h

Stock analysts accentuate the negative so firms can achieve more positives, study finds

A common assumption is that stock analysts gather earnings and other pertinent information to communicate to current and potential stockholders, and then incorporate that information by revising their current-quarter earnings forecasts.

8h

How I Became a Robot in London—From 5,000 Miles Away

Wearing a haptic feedback glove, I pilot a robotic hand from across the world, feeling what it feels. The sensation is almost too weird to be real.

8h

DJI Osmo Pocket Review: Great-Looking Handheld Video, Minus the Shakes

This mobile gadget puts a stabilized, drone-style camera into a handheld grip, enabling you to shoot super-smooth video as you walk, run, ski, or skydive.

8h

Utilities have little financial incentive to plug methane leaks

Natural gas distribution firms lack incentives to reduce methane leaks, which contribute to climate change, a new University of Michigan study shows.

8h

Structural insights into tiny bacterial harpoons

New research sheds light onto how different bacterial species can build complex nano-harpoons with different protein building blocks. Bacteria use these harpoons called Type VI secretion systems to inject toxins into nearby cells. Researchers from the University of Sheffield found that while the proteins varied, there were structurally similar portions that interacted with the machinery.

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Gallery: Big spiders eating small vertebrates

Images collected by a team of biologists show that the Amazon rainforest is a very bad place for arachnophobes.

8h

Balloons the biggest risk to seabirds

Soft plastics mistaken as food cause fatal obstructions, research shows. Nick Carne reports.

8h

Image of the Day: Imposter Neurons

Researchers have implanted electronics masquerading as neurons in the brains of mice.

8h

The hipster effect: Why anti-conformists always end up looking the same

You've probably seen this effect—perhaps you are a victim of it. You feel alienated from mainstream culture and want to make a statement that you are not part of it. You think about wearing different clothes, experimenting with a new hairstyle, or even trying unconventional makeup and grooming products.

8h

Sleeping in on the weekend can’t make up for lost sleep

Using the weekend to catch up on sleep is ineffective at making-up for lost sleep and offsetting the consequences to a person’s health.

8h

Where Are All the 'Sparticles' That Could Explain What's Wrong with the Universe?

A recent search for oddball supersymmetric particles, which could explain some of the weirdness of the universe, came up empty-handed.

8h

FT Health: High noon for the Pharma Seven

Drugmakers grilled, Naisola Likimani of SheDecides, marijuana breathalyser

8h

Novel DNA repair mechanism preserves genome integrity

As David Cortez, Ph.D., tells the story of his research team's latest discovery, he shakes his head in disbelief.

8h

Congressional report outlines a path for reducing child poverty in the U.S.

Child poverty in the U.S. is pervasive, expensive, and, according to Johns Hopkins economist Robert Moffitt, avoidable.

8h

Child poverty rate could be cut in half in next decade following proposals in new expert report

In light of the significant costs generated by child poverty for the United States, a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine provides evidence-based policy and program packages that could cut the child poverty rate by as much as 50 percent while at the same time increasing employment and earnings among adults living in low-income families.

8h

Novel DNA repair mechanism preserves genome integrity

As David Cortez, Ph.D., tells the story of his research team's latest discovery, he shakes his head in disbelief.

8h

70 high-tech cameras installed in Southern California provide eyes on fire prone areas

A multi-hazard camera technology developed at the University of California San Diego and the University of Nevada, Reno that improves fire detection and response capabilities is expanding to include 70 cameras in high fire risk areas throughout Southern California.

8h

The mechanism for Arctic cold air outbreaks into Eurasia

It is a reliable occurrence now: every time we have a cold event here in the United States, two public conversations begin, both of which deploy the term "polar vortex." Those who are suspicious of the reality of climate change and persist in calling it "global warming" argue that these polar vortex-driven cold events are evidence the warming is fake news. Other people know polar sea ice is vanish

8h

Broken bones in mice healed faster by heat-releasing implant

A biodegradable bone implant stimulates bone regrowth using heat, doubling the amount of bone tissue regrowth in mice

8h

Scientists find first evidence of huge Mars underground water system

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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How Retail Workers View Tech and Automation Will Affect Their Jobs

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

8h

Ancient plants escaped the end-Permian mass extinction

Ancient plants escaped the end-Permian mass extinction Ancient plants escaped the end-Permian mass extinction, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00744-3 A global biodiversity crash 251.9 million years ago has revealed how ecosystems respond to extreme perturbation. The finding that terrestrial ecosystems were less affected than marine ones is unexpected.

8h

Pluto's Battle Scars Reveal a Wild West at Solar System's Far Reaches

The battle scars on Pluto may reveal secrets about the formation of the early solar system.

8h

Science as a Cold War Propaganda Tool

In her new book “Freedom's Laboratory," the Philadelphia-based science historian Audra J. Wolfe examines the participation — both knowing and sometimes unwitting — of American scientists in the anti-communist propaganda campaigns that shaped Cold War diplomatic policy and cultural interactions.

8h

A New Idea about How Cancer Begins

It appears to happen more readily than we once believed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Hjärncellerna som styr rytmer i aptiten

Varje cell i kroppen uppvisar molekylära rytmer på cirka 24 timmar, så kallade cirkadianska rytmer. Dessa styrs av rytmer i så kallade klockgener, och har visat sig vara viktiga för att reglera ämnesomsättningen. Möss som helt saknar en molekylär dygnsrytm utvecklar fetma, typ 2-diabetes och det metabola syndromet. Den molekylära dygnsrytmen har också visat sig interagera med kosten, då möss som

9h

Team develops thermoelectric device that generates electricity using human body heat

The Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) in South Korea developed a thermoelectric module that generates electricity using human body heat. The module, which is 5 cm in width and 11 cm in length, can convert body heat energy into electricity and amplify it to power wearable devices.

9h

Thermodynamic properties of hevein

Hevein is a small protein (4.7 kDa) consisting of forty-three amino acid residues. It is the main component of the bottom fraction of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) latex that has a pronounced antimicrobial activity, thus attracting researchers' attention.

9h

PE, PP and PS: The most abundant type of microplastics in Mediterranean coastal waters

Polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene are the most abundant microplastics in the Mediterranean coastal waters, according to a new study published by the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin -by the experts Miquel Canals, William P. de Haan, and Anna Sànchez-Vidal, from the Consolidated Research Group on Marine Geosciences of the Faculty of Earth Sciences of the University of Barcelona,.

9h

Organic electronics: Scientists develop a high-performance unipolar n-type thin-film transistor

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) report on a unipolar n-type transistor with a breakthrough electron mobility performance of up to 7.16 cm2 V-1 s-1. This achievement heralds an exciting future for organic electronics, including the development of innovative flexible displays and wearable technologies.

9h

Fit for Mars

Rovers are versatile explorers on the surface of other planets, but they do need some training before setting off. A model of Rosalind Franklin rover that will be sent to Mars in 2021 is scouting the Atacama Desert, in Chile, following commands from mission control in the United Kingdom, over 11 000 km away.

9h

Ancient myths reveal early fantasies about artificial life

Thousands of years before machine learning and self-driving cars became reality, the tales of giant bronze robot Talos, artificial woman Pandora and their creator god, Hephaestus, filled the imaginations of people in ancient Greece.

9h

Thermodynamic properties of hevein

Hevein is a small protein (4.7 kDa) consisting of forty-three amino acid residues. It is the main component of the bottom fraction of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) latex that has a pronounced antimicrobial activity, thus attracting researchers' attention.

9h

Susceptibility to Mental Illness May Have Helped Humans Adapt over the Millennia

Psychiatrist Randolph Nesse, one of the founders of evolutionary medicine, explains why natural selection did not rid our species of onerous psychiatric disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

What is cryptocurrency’s role in the future of money?

The best technology fades into the background of our lives. Cryptocurries will do the same, becoming a new asset class for investors like stocks and bonds. Soon people will ask: "Do you have cryptocurrency in your investment porfolio?" High Growth Handbook List Price: $20.00 New From: $15.41 in Stock Used From: $31.15 in Stock

9h

Anarchy, Bitcoin, and Murder in Acapulco

The once-thriving resort city of in Mexico has become a somewhat lawless place. It is, in many ways, a perfect yet imperfect place for crypto-loving anarchists to gather each year.

9h

SpaceX Is Sending Its First Crew-Ready Capsule to the ISS

No humans will be onboard this time, but SpaceX hopes this trip will show it can be trusted with people's lives.

9h

Jay Inslee’s Risky Bet for 2020

In the crowded 2020 Democratic presidential field, sticking out is hard. Whatever qualification makes a candidate seem special, another boasts the same distinctive trait or experience. Governors? A bunch of them are circling the race. Senators? The list of announced candidates keeps growing. Progressives, women, African Americans, midwesterners—the field has multiples of everything. Except in the

9h

The Problems That Home Cooking Can’t Solve

The family dinner as it’s known today was contentious from the start. When, about 150 years ago, the evening meal began to replace the large midday fuel-ups that were common when people didn’t work outside the home , some traditionalists were concerned. One 19th-century cookbook author fretted that “six o’clock dinners destroy health” and that women, in the absence of their typical food-preparati

9h

A New Idea about How Cancer Begins

It appears to happen more readily than we once believed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Susceptibility to Mental Illness May Have Helped Humans Adapt over the Millennia

Psychiatrist Randolph Nesse, one of the founders of evolutionary medicine, explains why natural selection did not rid our species of onerous psychiatric disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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FBI Confiscated Thousands of Plundered Human Bones and Artifacts from Man's Home

Federal agents seek assistance in identifying confiscated artifacts and bones.

9h

KU-forskning ændrer regler for krænkelser på jobbet

Arbejds- og organisationspsykolog Mille Mortensens forskning ænder nu Arbejdstilsynets vejledning…

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Video fra forlist fregat: Tilstanden er bedre end frygtet

Besætningsmedlemmer fra KNM Helge Ingstad har været om bord med kameraer.

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New method of synthesising nanographene on metal oxide surfaces

Nanostructures based on carbon are promising materials for nanoelectronics. However, to be suitable, they would often need to be formed on non-metallic surfaces, which has been a challenge—up to now. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have found a method of forming nanographenes on metal oxide surfaces. Their research, conducted within the framework of collabora

9h

Hiding black hole found

Astronomers have detected a stealthy black hole from its effects on an interstellar gas cloud. This intermediate-mass black hole is one of over 100 million quiet black holes expected to be lurking in the galaxy. These results provide a new method to search for other hidden black holes and help us understand the growth and evolution of black holes.

9h

Hybrid material may outperform graphene in several applications

Materials that are hybrid constructions (combining organic and inorganic precursors) and quasi-two-dimensional (with malleable and highly compactable molecular structures) are on the rise in several technological applications, such as the fabrication of ever-smaller optoelectronic devices.

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First evidence of planet-wide groundwater system on Mars

Mars Express has revealed the first geological evidence of a system of ancient interconnected lakes that once lay deep beneath the Red Planet's surface, five of which may contain minerals crucial to life.

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Tibetan plateau rose later than we thought

The Tibetan Plateau today is on average 4,500 meters above sea level. It is the biggest mountain-building zone on Earth. Most analyses to date indicated that, back in the Eocene period some 40 million years ago, the plateau was about as high as it is today. Dr. Svetlana Botsyun of the University of Tübingen's Geoscience Department tested this theory using comprehensive tools. Working with an inter

9h

Human genome editing is here – now we have to decide who is in charge

The announcement of a WHO committee to discuss the scientific, ethical and legal issues surrounding human genome editing is to be welcomed, says Andy Greenfield

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Susceptibility to Mental Illness May Have Helped Humans Adapt over the Millennia

Psychiatrist Randolph Nesse, one of the founders of evolutionary medicine, explains why natural selection did not rid our species of onerous psychiatric disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Scope of Solar Energy In India 🇮🇳 is broad

submitted by /u/majeed33 [link] [comments]

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The Royal Society by Adrian Tinniswood — social science

How did an eccentric gathering of professional scientists and aristocratic amateurs create a groundbreaking academy?

9h

Researchers achieve solid state thermochemiluminescence with crystals

The findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, demonstrate that this fundamental process of transduction of energy—heat, applied to a material, generates light—can be achieved in pure solid materials of millimeter or centimeter size.

9h

Balloons the number one marine debris risk of mortality for seabirds

The data showed that a seabird ingesting a single piece of plastic had a 20 per cent chance of mortality, rising to 50 per cent for nine items and 100 per cent for 93 items.

9h

Sårbarhed i Chrome udnyttes af cyber kriminelle

Det anbefales at bruge en anden PDF-læser.

9h

Amazon stops selling Dash buttons

Amazon stops selling its Dash buttons because shoppers are using other methods to buy products.

10h

Martin Birchall innocent, UCL decides once again

In yet another investigation, UCL whitewashed Martin Birchall of all responsibilities. I publish here the confidential report and excerpts from a secret PhD thesis, which the UCL committee carefully avoided to read.

10h

Retraction Watch readers, we need your help to be able to continue our work

Dear Retraction Watch readers: Maybe you’re a researcher who likes keeping up with developments in scientific integrity. Maybe you’re a reporter who has found a story idea on the blog. Maybe you’re an ethics instructor who uses the site to find case studies. Or a publisher who uses our blog to screen authors who submit … Continue reading Retraction Watch readers, we need your help to be able to co

10h

Michael Cohen’s Made-for-TV Mea Culpa

It was a frenetic scene on Wednesday morning outside hearing room 2154 in the Rayburn building of the U.S. Capitol complex: Reporters, producers, cameramen, and members of the public clogged the hallways as the Capitol Police barked at everyone to Stay to the side! and Clear a pathway! as the congresspeople of the House Oversight Committee made their way into the room, invariably flanked with an

10h

The Abortion Debate Needs Moral Lament

W e are in the postabortion-debate phase of the abortion debate. Earlier this week, Senator Ben Sasse’s Born-Alive Abortion Survivors’ Act was debated on the Senate floor, and failed to receive the 60 votes necessary for cloture. The bill was supported by all present Republicans and three Democrats: Senators Bob Casey, Doug Jones, and Joe Manchin. All other Senate Democrats opposed the legislatio

10h

Offset, Cardi B, and the Spectacle of Male Introspection

One of the only genuinely funny SNL parodies of hip-hop came last year, when the show imagined a rap trio, The Friendos, in therapy. “I feel like every time I bring up emotional conflict, he wanna talk about the Lambo’,” Chris Redd’s chains-and-florals-wearing rapper told the bespectacled psychologist played by Cecily Strong. Kenan Thompson immediately hooted, in a clear send-up of Migos’s famous

10h

What It’s Like to Report on Rights Abuses Against Your Own Family

Soon after Radio Free Asia (RFA) broke the news that thousands of Uighurs were being interned in China’s far-western Xinjiang province, Shohret Hoshur, a reporter with RFA’s Uighur Service , set out to determine just how many people authorities intended to detain. On the phone with a Communist Party secretary in one village, he pressed for a number. Forty percent of adults , came the reply. Was t

10h

Live: Se SpaceX sende sin første snart-bemandede rumkapsel afsted

Kl. 8.49 dansk tid lørdag morgen kan du følge affyringen af Crew Dragon Demo-1 fra SpaceX, som om få måneder skal fragte de første astronauter til rumstationen. Klik ind og følg med her.

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GRAFIK: Sådan ser Crew Dragon fra SpaceX ud

Crew Dragon fra SpaceX er en modificering af Dragon-kapslen, som siden 2012 har sendt gods til rumstationen. Se den nye model her.

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Cell editors correct genetic errors

Almost all land plants employ an army of editors who correct errors in their genetic information. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now transferred parts of this machinery into a bacterium. Their results confirm a controversial thesis on the functioning of this widespread mechanism. They have now been published in the journal Communications Biology of the Nature Publishing Group.

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Scientists produce colorless reservoir of platinum metal-like single atoms in liquid

Researchers at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the University of Delaware have reported a way to produce a colorless liquid reservoir of metal-like discrete platinum atoms.

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Balloons the No. 1 marine debris risk of mortality for seabirds

A new IMAS and CSIRO collaborative study has found that balloons are the highest-risk plastic debris item for seabirds — 32 times more likely to kill than ingesting hard plastics.Researchers from IMAS, CSIRO and ACE CRC looked at the cause of death of 1,733 seabirds from 51 species and found that one in three of the birds had ingested marine debris.

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NYUAD researchers achieve solid state thermochemiluminescence with crystals

Researchers from NYU Abu Dhabi's Chemistry Program have developed macroscopic organic crystals that emit light when heated, a process referred to as thermochemiluminescence that was previously reported only in solution.

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Can machines find the creative spark?

Marcus de Sautoy’s The Creativity Code makes the case for why algorithms could match Beethoven

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Podcast: Grøn beton fra dansk fabrik og en forsinket elektrificeringen af jernbanen

Banedanmarks tidsplan for elektrificeringen af den danske jernbane ser ud til at skride på flere strækninger.

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Pilotanlæg skal teste sten som muligt energilager

Etablering af en model i skala 1:10 på DTU Risø skal vise, om stenlageret opfører sig som idemagerne regner med

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Prioritizing Parkinson’s disease genes using population-scale transcriptomic data

Prioritizing Parkinson’s disease genes using population-scale transcriptomic data Prioritizing Parkinson’s disease genes using population-scale transcriptomic data, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08912-9 GWAS have identified over 41 susceptibility loci for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here, the authors integrate PD GWAS summary statistics with transcriptome data from monocyt

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Genesis of electron deficient Pt1(0) in PDMS-PEG aggregates

Genesis of electron deficient Pt1(0) in PDMS-PEG aggregates Genesis of electron deficient Pt1(0) in PDMS-PEG aggregates, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08804-y Synthesis of discrete reduced metal atoms weakly coordinated and stabilized in liquid media remains challenging. Here, the authors report the genesis of mononuclear electron deficient Pt1(0) in polydimethylsiloxane

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Ultrafast energy relaxation dynamics of amide I vibrations coupled with protein-bound water molecules

Ultrafast energy relaxation dynamics of amide I vibrations coupled with protein-bound water molecules Ultrafast energy relaxation dynamics of amide I vibrations coupled with protein-bound water molecules, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08899-3 Vibrational energy relaxation of proteins helps us to understand ultrafast protein dynamics. Here, the authors determine the vibra

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Thermochemiluminescent peroxide crystals

Thermochemiluminescent peroxide crystals Thermochemiluminescent peroxide crystals, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08816-8 Chemiluminescence is known in solution, but has remained undetected in macroscopic crystalline solids so far. Here the authors demonstrate direct transduction of heat into light by thermochemiluminescence in a centimeter-size lophine hydroperoxide crys

11h

Rapid one-step 18F-radiolabeling of biomolecules in aqueous media by organophosphine fluoride acceptors

Rapid one-step 18 F-radiolabeling of biomolecules in aqueous media by organophosphine fluoride acceptors Rapid one-step 18 F-radiolabeling of biomolecules in aqueous media by organophosphine fluoride acceptors, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08953-0 The synthesis of 18F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracers is difficult and typically requires anhydrous condit

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Structural dynamics of a metal–organic framework induced by CO2 migration in its non-uniform porous structure

Structural dynamics of a metal–organic framework induced by CO 2 migration in its non-uniform porous structure Structural dynamics of a metal–organic framework induced by CO 2 migration in its non-uniform porous structure, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08939-y Metal–organic frameworks that undergo structural transitions in response to external stimuli are promising for g

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Modularity and predicted functions of the global sponge-microbiome network

Modularity and predicted functions of the global sponge-microbiome network Modularity and predicted functions of the global sponge-microbiome network, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08925-4 Lurgi et al. analyse the distribution of microbial symbionts across many sponge species and reveal modules of non-random associations which are primarily driven by host features and mi

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Unveiling the operation mechanism of layered perovskite solar cells

Unveiling the operation mechanism of layered perovskite solar cells Unveiling the operation mechanism of layered perovskite solar cells, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08958-9 It is well-accepted that the two dimensional layered halide perovskite can improve the device stability of perovskite solar cells but the operation mechanism remains unclear. Here Lin et al. reveal

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Laser-wakefield accelerators for high-resolution X-ray imaging of complex microstructures

Laser-wakefield accelerators for high-resolution X-ray imaging of complex microstructures Laser-wakefield accelerators for high-resolution X-ray imaging of complex microstructures, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39845-4 Laser-wakefield accelerators for high-resolution X-ray imaging of complex microstructures

11h

Coherence and pulse duration characterization of the PAL-XFEL in the hard X-ray regime

Coherence and pulse duration characterization of the PAL-XFEL in the hard X-ray regime Coherence and pulse duration characterization of the PAL-XFEL in the hard X-ray regime, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39765-3 Coherence and pulse duration characterization of the PAL-XFEL in the hard X-ray regime

11h

Late effect of larval co-exposure to the insecticide clothianidin and fungicide pyraclostrobin in Africanized Apis mellifera

Late effect of larval co-exposure to the insecticide clothianidin and fungicide pyraclostrobin in Africanized Apis mellifera Late effect of larval co-exposure to the insecticide clothianidin and fungicide pyraclostrobin in Africanized Apis mellifera , Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39383-z Late effect of larval co-exposure to the insecticide clothianidin and fungicide pyr

11h

Time-resolved decoding of metabolic signatures of in vitro growth of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Colletotrichum sublineolum

Time-resolved decoding of metabolic signatures of in vitro growth of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Colletotrichum sublineolum Time-resolved decoding of metabolic signatures of in vitro growth of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Colletotrichum sublineolum , Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38692-7 Time-resolved decoding of metabolic signatures of in vitro growth of the hemibiotroph

11h

Prospects for Bioinspired Single-Photon Detection Using Nanotube-Chromophore Hybrids

Prospects for Bioinspired Single-Photon Detection Using Nanotube-Chromophore Hybrids Prospects for Bioinspired Single-Photon Detection Using Nanotube-Chromophore Hybrids, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39195-1 Prospects for Bioinspired Single-Photon Detection Using Nanotube-Chromophore Hybrids

11h

Relative abundance of Akkermansia spp. and other bacterial phylotypes correlates with anxiety- and depressive-like behavior following social defeat in mice

Relative abundance of Akkermansia spp. and other bacterial phylotypes correlates with anxiety- and depressive-like behavior following social defeat in mice Relative abundance of Akkermansia spp. and other bacterial phylotypes correlates with anxiety- and depressive-like behavior following social defeat in mice, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40140-5 Relative abundance of

11h

Predicting seasonal influenza epidemics using cross-hemisphere influenza surveillance data and local internet query data

Predicting seasonal influenza epidemics using cross-hemisphere influenza surveillance data and local internet query data Predicting seasonal influenza epidemics using cross-hemisphere influenza surveillance data and local internet query data, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39871-2 Predicting seasonal influenza epidemics using cross-hemisphere influenza surveillance data a

11h

miR-193b regulates tumorigenesis in liposarcoma cells via PDGFR, TGFβ, and Wnt signaling

miR-193b regulates tumorigenesis in liposarcoma cells via PDGFR, TGFβ, and Wnt signaling miR-193b regulates tumorigenesis in liposarcoma cells via PDGFR, TGFβ, and Wnt signaling, Published online: 01 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39560-0 miR-193b regulates tumorigenesis in liposarcoma cells via PDGFR, TGFβ, and Wnt signaling

11h

Meet The White House's New Chief Climate Change Skeptic

William Happer, a Princeton scientist who is doubtful of the dangers of climate change, appears to be leading a White House challenge to the government's conclusion that global warming is a threat. (Image credit: Gage Skidmore/Flickr )

11h

The Mirror Test Peers Into the Workings of Animal Minds

submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]

12h

When Concorde first took to the sky 50 years ago

When the misty skies cleared over southern France on the afternoon of Sunday March 2, 1969, the green light was signalled for the highly anticipated first ever flight of the Concorde.

12h

Huawei invites foreign media to see for itself on spy claims

Chinese telecom giant Huawei has issued an unusual invitation to foreign media outlets to visit its facilities and meet staff as the company pushes back against global pressure arising from US accusations that it spies for Beijing.

12h

Concorde: technical feat, financial fiasco

The Concorde airliner first took to the skies 50 years ago promising a revolution in air travel with its technical prowess and supersonic speed.

12h

Business leaders, lawmakers to Amazon: please come back to NY

Top business leaders, lawmakers and others are urging Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos to reconsider his decision not to move forward with plans for a new headquarters in New York, to build an "exciting future" for the city.

12h

Grounded ship leaks 80 tons of oil near Pacific UNESCO site

An environmental disaster is unfolding in the Pacific after a large ship ran aground and began leaking oil next to a UNESCO World Heritage site in the Solomon Islands, Australian officials said Friday.

12h

Tesla to close stores to reduce costs for $35,000 Model 3

Tesla will only sell its electric cars online as it accelerates its cost cutting so it can realize its long-running goal of selling a mass-market sedan for $35,000.

12h

Regioner har svært ved at leve op til kvalitetskrav for atrieflimren

Første årsrapport om atrieflimren påviser regionale forskelle i kvaliteten af både udredning og behandling. Bedre patientuddannelse kan forbedre prognosen for de mange danskere med atrieflimren

12h

Researcher studies impact of drug-trafficking violence

A UMass Lowell researcher who analyzes the causes and impacts of violence fueled by drug trafficking has won critical acclaim for her work and is bringing a fresh understanding of these issues from the streets into the classroom.

12h

Silicon carbide 'stardust' in meteorites leads to understanding of erupting stars

What do tiny specks of silicon carbide stardust, found in meteorites and older than the solar system, have in common with pairs of aging stars prone to eruptions?

12h

Kraftig ökning av antalet mässlingsfall i Europa

Antalet fall av mässling har mångdubblats i Europa och även i Sverige har det den senaste tiden rapporterats in ett antal fall. Kristian Riesbeck, professor och överläkare i klinisk mikrobiologi, framhåller vikten av att människor vaccinerar sig mot sjukdomen, som kan få allvarliga följder.

13h

Blixtkrig

Kæmper Liselott Blixt så lægernes sag? Det er en sandhed med modifikationer af hidtil usete dimensioner.

13h

Rebellæger takkede nej til møde med Blixt

»Vi har ingen ret til at tale på lægernes vegne«

13h

Skændes om møde

Blixt til Rudkjøbing: Hvorfor kommer du ikke noget oftere?

13h

Vi tager den ­sidste tørn for Frederikshavn

En stor del af Frederikshavns ældre praksislæger var sidste år ved at resignere. I stedet slog de klinikkerne sammen, gik ned i tid og har netop åbnet en ny lægepraksis i byen med et patienttal svarende til Skagens befolkning. Det skal lokke yngre læger til, og det ser omsider ud til at kunne lykkes.

13h

PLO: Licensklinikker kan være en ­fornuftig løsning

I de egne af landet, hvor lægemanglen er stor, kan licensklinikker være en god løsning. Også selvom regionen står for en del af driften. Det mener Jonatan Schloss, direktør i PLO.

13h

Almen medicinere strømmer til socialmedicinske enheder

Landets fem socialmedicinske enheder ekspanderer kraftigt i disse år. Det har medført en øget rekruttering af speciallæger i almen medicin i en tid, hvor regeringen ønsker at drive dem den modsatte vej – væk fra hospitalssektoren og ud i almen praksis.

13h

Fysioterapeut har ansvar for 65.000 borgere i almen praksis

Alles Lægehuse A/S overtager 1. april driften af Fursund Lægehus, som bliver virksomhedens 18. klinik i porteføljen. Det betyder, at ejeren, Thomas Helt, vil stå med ansvaret for 65.000 borgere i almen praksis. Og den udvikling vil et større antal speciallæger i almen medicin ikke nødvendigvis ændre på, vurderer han.

13h

Scientists Just Pulled CO2 From Air And Turned It Into Coal

submitted by /u/passintimendgas [link] [comments]

14h

Udenlandske læger er en gave

Antallet af udenlandske læger er steget de senere år, og det har været problematiseret i udsendelserne – men for mig at se er de udenlandske læger i langt de fleste tilfælde en gave.

14h

Even The Creatures in The Ocean's Deepest Chasms Are Now Eating Plastic

There are no terrestrial frontiers left to pollute.

14h

14h

Even a 'Limited' Nuclear War Could Wreck Earth's Climate And Trigger Global Famine

Tensions are boiling over between India and Pakistan.

14h

15h

Farewell to Nasa's Mars rover Opportunity – Science Weekly podcast

Nicola Davis bids a fond farewell to the Mars rover Opportunity after Nasa declared the mission finally over, 15 years after the vehicle landed on the red planet.. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

15h

The Cheater's Guide to Interstellar Travel: A Conversation with Slava Turyshev

Science fiction is a genre committed to the concept of "run before you can walk." Long before anyone knew whether heavier-than-air flight was possible, writers were imagining travel to other planets. By the time interplanetary space probes were a reality in the 1960s, the storytellers had long since moved on to thinking interstellar. Today, two or three generations of happy nerds have grown up in

15h

I Left a Piece of My Heart on the Dusty Sands of Mars

"Any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in mankind, and therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee." The quote is so familiar that most people have no idea where it originally comes from (I'll admit, I had to look it up myself to be sure: It is Mediation XVII from John Donne's Devotions upon Emergent Occasions.) In recent years, though, the words have tak

15h

Farewell to Nasa's Mars rover Opportunity – Science Weekly podcast

Nicola Davis bids a fond farewell to the Mars rover Opportunity after Nasa declared the mission finally over, 15 years after the vehicle landed on the red planet. On 25 January 2004 , a robot rover crashed through the atmosphere of Mars and bounced to a standstill on the surface of the red planet. The moment was greeted with scenes of jubilation as Nasa scientists celebrated the successful landin

15h

An Atlas of Our Cells

Hundreds of researchers team up to map the human body's trillions of cells, and how they all get along.

15h

20 Things You Didn't Know About Chocolate

Scientists are still sorting out the chemistry, health effects and origins of this tasty treat, first enjoyed in South America more than 5,000 years ago.

15h

15h

Flade flasker af genbrugsplast gør vinen mere klimavenlig

Der kan være 10 flade vinflasker i en kasse – mod fire af runde glas. Det sparer en hel del CO2.

15h

15h

Diseased Duck

Watch the video, which shows a duck infected with H5N1 and showing signs of Parkinson's disease, that inspired Thomas Jefferson University researcher Richard Smeyne to explore the connection between viral infection and neurodegeneration.

15h

Kári Stefánsson Speaks

See the Decode Genetics founder discuss the genetic basis of human diversity.

15h

Innovation en Masse

Biotech entrepreneur and Reading Frames author Safi Bahcall speaks about the emergent nature of invention.

15h

15h

Tool reveals molecular causes of disease, including infant cancer

Demonstrating a new tool with a broad ability to reveal molecular causes and markers of diseases, a Princeton University-led team has found connections between four genes and a rare cancer affecting babies and young children.

15h

Organic electronics: Scientists develop a high-performance unipolar n-type thin-film transistor

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) report a unipolar n-type transistor with a world-leading electron mobility performance of up to 7.16 cm2 V-1 s-1. This achievement heralds an exciting future for organic electronics, including the development of innovative flexible displays and wearable technologies.

15h

Major genetic study confirms that many genes contribute to risk for Tourette's syndrome

A meta-analysis of multiple studies into the genetic background of Tourette's syndrome (TS) — a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by chronic involuntary motor and vocal tics — finds that variants in hundreds of genes, working in combination, contribute to the development of the syndrome and suggests that Tourette's is part of a continuous spectrum of tic disorders, ranging from mild, som

15h

Novel sleep index, wakefulness may predict if patients able to breathe on their own

Critically ill patients are more likely to be successfully weaned from a mechanical ventilator, or breathing machine, if they have higher levels of wakefulness and both their right and left brains experience the same depth of sleep, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

15h

Classic Mechanism of Epigenetic Inheritance Is Rare, Not the Rule

A study suggests that the direct transfer of DNA methylation marks from one generation to the next is much less common than scientists previously thought.

16h

Without This Enzyme, Insertions Thrive in the Yeast Genome

A study underscores the importance of Dna2 in maintaining the integrity of the genetic code.

16h

Master Decoder: A Profile of Kári Stefánsson

A neurologist by training, Stefánsson founded Iceland-based deCODE Genetics to explore what the human genome can tell us about disease and our species’ evolution.

16h

Stick-On Immune Cell Monitor

A microneedle-containing skin patch offers researchers a noninvasive way to survey immune responses in mice.

16h

Opinion: Individuals Are Greater Than the Sum of Their Parts

The study of evolution requires consideration of organisms’ microbiomes.

16h

The Challenge of Using CRISPR to Knock In Genes

Researchers are developing an array of techniques for accurately and efficiently inserting genes into DNA

16h

Contributors

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2019 issue of The Scientist.

16h

March 2019 Crossword Answers

See how well you did.

16h

Drugs, Developed

In an era of instant communication, we must be careful how word of new and untested treatments is shared.

16h

In Praise of Crazy Ideas

The author of a new book explains the dangers of orthodoxy in science and beyond.

16h

Prehistoric Microbes Inhabit an Oasis in the Northern Mexican Desert

The blue lagoons of the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin provide a glimpse into the planet’s ancient past.

16h

Is Mandatory Retirement the Answer to an Aging Workforce?

For many, it's not a question of when senior academics should leave their posts, it's about how to distribute scarce resources such as grants and faculty positions more fairly.

16h

Humans Made Tools Atop the Tibetan Plateau More than 30,000 Years Ago

A finding pushes back the timeline on humankind's conquest of one of Earth's harshest environments, and may provide clues about interactions with their hominin relatives.

16h

Infographic: How Stray DNA Can Land in Double-Strand Breaks

A study on yeast illuminates how insertions may occur.

16h

Primordial RNA May Have Contained Inosine

The discovery that the adenosine derivative aids self-replication adds weight to the theory that life on Earth originated from a mixture of RNA molecules.

16h

How Chromosomes X and Y Got Their Names, 1891

A quirk of nomenclature originates in the study of insect cells.

16h

Ten-Minute Sabbatical

Take a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.

16h

Emily Derbyshire Looks for Malaria’s Vulnerabilities

The Duke University professor studies the parasite to find a way to thwart infection before it takes hold.

16h

March 2019 Crossword

Try your hand at a sciency brain teaser.

16h

Infographic: Immune Cell Monitoring Via a Skin Patch

A stick-on patch enables sampling of immune cells in the skin.

16h

Archaea CRIPSR Systems Grab DNA Memories During Interspecies Mating

When different archaeal species mate, their CRISPR systems interact in ways that may influence their evolution.

16h

GPS-Tagged Seabirds Track the Tides

Birds drifting on the surface of the sea could provide valuable data for oceanographers.

16h

General Anesthesia Causes Telltale Brain Activity Patterns

The drugs lead to widespread, predictable changes in brain waves that can help anesthesiologists personalize anesthesia and develop anesthetic-based treatments.

16h

Infographic: Fighting Malaria Drug Resistance

The parasite that causes malaria has evolved to evade many of the drugs that researchers have developed to fight the tropical disease.

16h

Infographic: Viruses on the Brain

Pathogens can take various routes to pass the blood brain barrier and damage cells.

16h

Can the Flu and Other Viruses Cause Neurodegeneration?

Scientists may need to seriously reconsider the cast-aside hypothesis that pathogens can play a part in diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

16h

Are We Headed for a New Era of Malaria Drug Resistance?

Plasmodium falciparum has shown an ability to evade everything we throw at it, most recently artemisinin-based combination therapies, today’s front-line treatment.

16h

Infographic: How General Anesthesia Works

Drugs that doctors use to sedate patients during traumatic medical procedures act on neural receptors to alter brain activity.

16h

Ophavsretsforsker om EU-direktiv: Svært at forudsige konsekvenserne

Bølgerne går højt i debatten om den nye europæiske copyright-lov, og der er stor uenighed om, hvad konsekvenserne af loven vil blive. Og det er heller ikke nemt at vide, siger forsker.

16h

Usynlig revolution skal gøre grå beton grønnere

PLUS. Op mod 10 procent af verdens CO2-udledning skyldes cementproduktion – og verdens cementbehov vokser og vokser. Dansk forsøg viser nu, at ler og kalk kan mindske problemet.

17h

Gene Editing Is Trickier Than Expected—but Fixes Are in Sight

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

17h

17h

When Does Intelligence Peak?

Maybe that's not even the right question — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Budding Yeast Produce Cannabis Compounds

Biologists have taken the genes that produce cannabinoids in weed and plugged them into yeast, making rare and novel compounds more accessible. Christopher Intagliata reports.

17h

Graphite offers up new quantum surprise

Researchers have discovered the quantum Hall effect in bulk graphite — a layered crystal consisting of stacked graphene layers.

18h

18h

Graphite offers up new quantum surprise

Researchers have discovered the quantum Hall effect in bulk graphite — a layered crystal consisting of stacked graphene layers.

18h

In-depth insights into glass corrosion

Silicate glass has many applications, including the use as a nuclear waste form to immobilize radioactive elements from spent fuel. However, it has one disadvantage — it corrodes when it comes into contact with aqueous solutions. Scientists were able to observe in detail which processes take place.

18h

Integrated silicon photonic switch has lowest signal loss in high-speed data transmission

Experimental photonic switches tested by researchers show promise toward the goal of fully optical, high-capacity switching for future high-speed data transmission networks.

18h

Elon Musk Declares War on Dealer Network, Launches For-Real $35K Tesla Model 3

Tesla's plan to sell direct (no more factory stores) is a challenge to the established dealer network. If Tesla succeeds, other startups or market newcomers may follow suit. The post Elon Musk …

18h

An atlas of an aggressive leukemia

Researchers have applied single-cell genomics and machine learning to create a clinically relevant map of cell types in acute myeloid leukemia.

18h

HDAC11 regulates type I interferon signaling through defatty-acylation of SHMT2 [Biochemistry]

The smallest histone deacetylase (HDAC) and the only class IV HDAC member, HDAC11, is reported to regulate immune activation and tumorigenesis, yet its biochemical function is largely unknown. Here we identify HDAC11 as an efficient lysine defatty-acylase that is >10,000-fold more efficient than its deacetylase activity. Through proteomics studies, we…

19h

Synergy with TGF{beta} ligands switches WNT pathway dynamics from transient to sustained during human pluripotent cell differentiation [Developmental Biology]

WNT/β-catenin signaling is crucial to all stages of life. It controls early morphogenetic events in embryos, maintains stem cell niches in adults, and is dysregulated in many types of cancer. Despite its ubiquity, little is known about the dynamics of signal transduction or whether it varies across contexts. Here we…

19h

Regulatory changes in pterin and carotenoid genes underlie balanced color polymorphisms in the wall lizard [Evolution]

Reptiles use pterin and carotenoid pigments to produce yellow, orange, and red colors. These conspicuous colors serve a diversity of signaling functions, but their molecular basis remains unresolved. Here, we show that the genomes of sympatric color morphs of the European common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis), which differ in orange…

19h

Weevil pgrp-lb prevents endosymbiont TCT dissemination and chronic host systemic immune activation [Evolution]

Long-term intracellular symbiosis (or endosymbiosis) is widely distributed across invertebrates and is recognized as a major driving force in evolution. However, the maintenance of immune homeostasis in organisms chronically infected with mutualistic bacteria is a challenging task, and little is known about the molecular processes that limit endosymbiont immunogenicity and…

19h

Neural crest-derived neurons invade the ovary but not the testis during mouse gonad development [Developmental Biology]

Testes and ovaries undergo sex-specific morphogenetic changes and adopt strikingly different morphologies, despite the fact that both arise from a common precursor, the bipotential gonad. Previous studies showed that recruitment of vasculature is critical for testis patterning. However, vasculature is not recruited into the early ovary. Peripheral innervation is involved…

19h

Double-negative T cells remarkably promote neuroinflammation after ischemic stroke [Cell Biology]

CD3+CD4−CD8− T cells (double-negative T cells; DNTs) have diverse functions in peripheral immune-related diseases by regulating immunological and inflammatory homeostasis. However, the functions of DNTs in the central nervous system remain unknown. Here, we found that the levels of DNTs were dramatically increased in both the brain and peripheral blood…

19h

COX-2 mediates tumor-stromal prolactin signaling to initiate tumorigenesis [Cell Biology]

Tumor-stromal communication within the microenvironment contributes to initiation of metastasis and may present a therapeutic opportunity. Using serial single-cell RNA sequencing in an orthotopic mouse prostate cancer model, we find up-regulation of prolactin receptor as cancer cells that have disseminated to the lungs expand into micrometastases. Secretion of the ligand…

19h

Femtosecond covariance spectroscopy [Chemistry]

The success of nonlinear optics relies largely on pulse-to-pulse consistency. In contrast, covariance-based techniques used in photoionization electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry have shown that a wealth of information can be extracted from noise that is lost when averaging multiple measurements. Here, we apply covariance-based detection to nonlinear optical spectroscopy,…

19h

Cryo-electron microscopy structure of the filamentous bacteriophage IKe [Biochemistry]

The filamentous bacteriophage IKe infects Escherichia coli cells bearing IncN pili. We report the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the micrometer-long IKe viral particle at a resolution of 3.4 Å. The major coat protein [protein 8 (p8)] consists of 47 residues that fold into a ∼68-Å-long helix. An atomic model of…

19h

Long-term population spike-timing-dependent plasticity promotes synaptic tagging but not cross-tagging in rat hippocampal area CA1 [Neuroscience]

In spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), the direction and degree of synaptic modification are determined by the coherence of pre- and postsynaptic activities within a neuron. However, in the adult rat hippocampus, it remains unclear whether STDP-like mechanisms in a neuronal population induce synaptic potentiation of a long duration. Thus, we asked…

19h

Human cytomegalovirus haplotype reconstruction reveals high diversity due to superinfection and evidence of within-host recombination [Microbiology]

Recent sequencing efforts have led to estimates of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome-wide intrahost diversity that rival those of persistent RNA viruses [Renzette N, Bhattacharjee B, Jensen JD, Gibson L, Kowalik TF (2011) PLoS Pathog 7:e1001344]. Here, we deep sequence HCMV genomes recovered from single and longitudinally collected blood samples from…

19h

Stepwise 5' DNA end-specific resection of DNA breaks by the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2 nuclease ensemble [Biochemistry]

To repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination, the 5′-terminated DNA strands must first be resected to produce 3′ overhangs. Mre11 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a 3′ → 5′ exonuclease that is responsible for 5′ end degradation in vivo. Using plasmid-length DNA substrates and purified recombinant proteins, we show that…

19h

Interleukin-37 monomer is the active form for reducing innate immunity [Biochemistry]

Interleukin-37 (IL-37), a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines, is a fundamental suppressor of innate and acquired immunities. Here, we used an integrative approach that combines biophysical, biochemical, and biological studies to elucidate the unique characteristics of IL-37. Our studies reveal that single amino acid mutations at the IL-37…

19h

Lipid transporter TMEM24/C2CD2L is a Ca2+-regulated component of ER-plasma membrane contacts in mammalian neurons [Neuroscience]

Close appositions between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane (PM) are a general feature of all cells and are abundant in neurons. A function of these appositions is lipid transport between the two adjacent bilayers via tethering proteins that also contain lipid transport modules. However, little is known…

19h

Motional dynamics of single Patched1 molecules in cilia are controlled by Hedgehog and cholesterol [Cell Biology]

The Hedgehog-signaling pathway is an important target in cancer research and regenerative medicine; yet, on the cellular level, many steps are still poorly understood. Extensive studies of the bulk behavior of the key proteins in the pathway established that during signal transduction they dynamically localize in primary cilia, antenna-like solitary…

19h

Theory of mechanochemical patterning in biphasic biological tissues [Developmental Biology]

The formation of self-organized patterns is key to the morphogenesis of multicellular organisms, although a comprehensive theory of biological pattern formation is still lacking. Here, we propose a minimal model combining tissue mechanics with morphogen turnover and transport to explore routes to patterning. Our active description couples morphogen reaction and…

19h

Infection by the parasitic helminth Trichinella spiralis activates a Tas2r-mediated signaling pathway in intestinal tuft cells [Cell Biology]

The parasitic helminth Trichinella spiralis, which poses a serious health risk to animals and humans, can be found worldwide. Recent findings indicate that a rare type of gut epithelial cell, tuft cells, can detect the helminth, triggering type 2 immune responses. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully…

19h

NF-{kappa}B activation is a turn on for vaccinia virus phosphoprotein A49 to turn off NF-{kappa}B activation [Microbiology]

Vaccinia virus protein A49 inhibits NF-κB activation by molecular mimicry and has a motif near the N terminus that is conserved in IκBα, β-catenin, HIV Vpu, and some other proteins. This motif contains two serines, and for IκBα and β-catenin, phosphorylation of these serines enables recognition by the E3 ubiquitin…

19h

Statistics of noisy growth with mechanical feedback in elastic tissues [Developmental Biology]

Tissue growth is a fundamental aspect of development and is intrinsically noisy. Stochasticity has important implications for morphogenesis, precise control of organ size, and regulation of tissue composition and heterogeneity. However, the basic statistical properties of growing tissues, particularly when growth induces mechanical stresses that can in turn affect growth…

19h

Encoding biological recognition in a bicomponent cell-membrane mimic [Chemistry]

Self-assembling dendrimers have facilitated the discovery of periodic and quasiperiodic arrays of supramolecular architectures and the diverse functions derived from them. Examples are liquid quasicrystals and their approximants plus helical columns and spheres, including some that disregard chirality. The same periodic and quasiperiodic arrays were subsequently found in block copolymers,…

19h

19h

Budding Yeast Produce Cannabis Compounds

Biologists have taken the genes that produce cannabinoids in weed and plugged them into yeast, making rare and novel compounds more accessible. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

19h

Budding Yeast Produce Cannabis Compounds

Biologists have taken the genes that produce cannabinoids in weed and plugged them into yeast, making rare and novel compounds more accessible. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Protein content as a marker for response to therapy in brain cancer

Brain tumors vary widely in how they respond to treatment. However, early assessment of therapy response is essential in order to choose the best possible treatment for the patient. Scientists have now been able to show in a study using non-invasive high-resolution 7-Tesla MRI scans that the protein content of tumors correlates with response to treatment and survival.

19h

Colon cancer growth reduced by exercise

Exercise may play a role in reducing the growth of colon cancer cells according to new research. The study found that after a short session of high intensity interval training (HIIT), growth of colon cancer cells was reduced, and this also increased indicators of inflammation.

19h

Stop de annoncer selv, Google

I sidste uges opsats om den usaglige annonce for et varmeapparat, der med en effekt på kun 350 watt hævdedes at kunne opvarme et helt parcelhus, udtrykte jeg det fromme håb, at Forbrugerombudsmanden ville kaste sig over synderen. Men min forgænger i embedet, som heldigvis stadig holder øje med er…

20h

Tænkeboks – løsning: Tennisbold hopper i 3,2 sekunder

Her kommer løsningen på opgaven fra uge 7.

20h

Bagsiden: Sporbarhed på klokkeslæt

To læsere har en har en god forklaring på klokkeslættet i holdbarhedsmærkningen på marmeladelåget i sidste uge:

20h

20h

Lyft reveals financial details ahead of its IPO

Ride-hailing giant Lyft released financial details in a federal filing before it begins selling its stock to the public, giving investors the first chance to buy into the ride-hailing phenomenon.

20h

PE, PP and PS: The most abundant type of microplastics in Mediterranean coastal waters

Polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene are the most abundant microplastics in the Mediterranean coastal waters, according to a new study.

20h

'Mutation hotspot' allows common fungus to adapt to different host environments

A new study finds that samples of Candida albicans from patients frequently lack one copy of a vital master regulator, which gives them flexibility to lose the other copy and adapt to different environments.

20h

New machine learning approach could give a big boost to the efficiency of optical networks

New work leveraging machine learning could increase the efficiency of optical telecommunications networks. As our world becomes increasingly interconnected, fiber optic cables offer the ability to transmit more data over longer distances compared to traditional copper wires.

20h

Exchanging information securely using quantum communication in future fiber-optic networks

Searching for better security during data transmission, governments and other organizations around the world have been investing in and developing technologies related to quantum communication and related encryption methods. Researchers are looking at how these new systems — which, in theory, would provide unhackable communication channels — can be integrated into existing and future fiber-optic

20h

Open-source software tracks neural activity in real time

A software tool called CaImAn automates the arduous process of tracking the location and activity of neurons. It accomplishes this task using a combination of standard computational methods and machine-learning techniques. In a new paper, the software's creators demonstrate that CaImAn achieves near-human accuracy in detecting the locations of active neurons based on calcium imaging data.

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By blocking protein, researchers keep brain tumors from repairing themselves

Researchers report inhibiting activity of a specific protein in glioblastomas boosts their sensitivity to radiation, improving treatment prospects for one of the most common and aggressive forms of brain cancer.

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Exchanging information securely using quantum communication in future fiber-optic networks

Searching for better security during data transmission, governments and other organizations around the world have been investing in and developing technologies related to quantum communication and related encryption methods. Researchers are looking at how these new systems — which, in theory, would provide unhackable communication channels — can be integrated into existing and future fiber-optic

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The Scientific Adventures of Ben Barres Part II: Superstar of the Star Cells

This post is the second half of a two-part series on the work of Dr. Ben Barres. Did you miss the first half of our adventure? No problem. Click here to start from the beginning! Welcome back! Last week the adventure through Ben Barres’ lab’s discoveries wound through their exciting advances in cell culture, their […]

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How to Not Fall for Viral Scares Like Momo

The Momo challenge isn’t the first hoax about kids to go viral, and it won’t be the last. Don’t panic: Here’s what to remember.

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Radio Atlantic: President Trump’s New Legal Nightmare

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play On Wednesday, before the House Oversight Committee, Michael Cohen called the president a racist, a con man, and a cheat. He also brought documents. Donald Trump’s onetime confidant testified for seven hours. He laid a trail of legal bread crumbs that are likely to be followed by House Democrats and federal investigato

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The Atlantic Daily: And the Winner of the Trump-Kim Summit Was …

What We’re Following The art of the no-deal: In a much-hyped meeting with Kim Jong Un, the North Korean leader, in Vietnam, President Donald Trump did something he’s rarely done since taking office —he walked away instead of folding and accepting a lesser deal. On Thursday, the second confab between the two heads of state ended in a failure, with no agreement on denuclearization and without a dec

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Scientists gene-hacked yeast to make THC Instead of booze

submitted by /u/quietthomas [link] [comments]

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New lipid shape atlas holds key to early disease detection

Chemists started decoding the total human molecular picture by examining 456 variations of one class of molecule, lipids, bellwethers of disease.

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The Age of Congestion Pricing May Finally Be Upon Us

Some US cities might start charging extra to drive on crowded, busy roads.

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Tesla’s controversial ‘full self-driving’ version of Autopilot is back

Tesla is bringing back its “full self-driving” feature, after removing the option from its website in October amid criticism the company was overstating the autonomy of its vehicles. …

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Using stardust grains, scientists build new model for nova eruptions

Researchers have uncovered the connection and pinpointed the kind of stellar outburst that produced the stardust grains.

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Genetic test to detect antimicrobial resistance developed

Researchers have developed a new, highly sensitive rapid genetic test that can determine whether bacteria carries a gene that causes resistance to two common antibiotics used to treat strep throat and other respiratory illnesses.

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Could medical marijuana help older people with their ailments?

Medical marijuana may bring relief to older people who have symptoms like pain, sleep disorders or anxiety due to chronic conditions including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, neuropathy, spinal cord damage and multiple sclerosis, according to a new preliminary study.

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Forests, carbon sinks cannot make up for delays in decarbonizing the economy, experts argue

To stabilize the Earth's climate for people and ecosystems, it is imperative to ramp up natural climate solutions and, at the same time, accelerate mitigation efforts across the energy and industrial sectors, experts argue in a new article.

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How Capsella followed its lonely heart

The Brassicaceae plant family boasts a stunning diversity of fruit shapes. But even in this cosmopolitan company, the heart-shaped seed pods of the Capsella genus stand out.

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A new method for developing artificial ovaries

Researchers have taken an important step towards developing artificial ovaries for patients suffering from cancer.

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2015-2016 El Niño triggered disease outbreaks across globe

The 2015-2016 El Niño event brought weather conditions that triggered regional disease outbreaks throughout the world, according to a new study.

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New blueprint for understanding, predicting and optimizing complex nanoparticles

Northwestern University researchers have developed a blueprint for understanding and predicting the properties and behavior of complex nanoparticles and optimizing their use for a broad range of scientific applications. These include catalysis, optoelectronics, transistors, bio-imaging, and energy storage and conversion.

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New lipid shape atlas holds key to early disease detection

Chemists started decoding the total human molecular picture by examining 456 variations of one class of molecule, lipids, bellwethers of disease.

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New study uses big data to analyze the international food trade

A new study looks at international food trade and whether it enhances or erodes equitable access to food across the planet. The researchers analyzed annual United Nations data on international food trade from 1986 to 2010 in nearly 180 countries, and focused on 266 commodities such as rice, wheat, maize, and soybeans as well as animal products.

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Despite export bans global seahorse trade continues

Many countries are engaged in a vast illegal and unrecorded international trade in seahorses, one that circumvents global regulations, according to new study that has implications for many other animal species.

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New sanitation system halves healthcare associated infections and cuts costs by 75 percent

The spread of antimicrobial resistance in hospitals can be limited by sanitation methods that remodulate the hospital microbiota, leading to lower antimicrobial consumption and costs, according to an article. In particular, an experiment conducted in five Italian hospitals led to a 52 percent decrease in healthcare associated infections, a 60.3 percent reduction in associated drug consumption and

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Tesla’s Model 3 Is Now Selling for $35,000

Elon Musk’s automaker is also introducing a slightly more capable version of the car, moving its sales process online, and shuttering many of its stores.

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University of California boycotts publishing giant Elsevier over journal costs and open access

The move could aid a global movement for immediate free access to scientific articles

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