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nyheder2019marts04

H.I.V. Is Reported Cured in a Second Patient, a Milestone in the Global AIDS Epidemic

Scientists have long tried to duplicate the procedure that led to the first long-term remission 12 years ago. With the so-called London patient, they seem to have succeeded.

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Animal with an anus that comes and goes could reveal how ours evolved

The warty comb jelly is unique among animals, because its anus completely disappears when it has finished defecating

51min

Kæmpe undersøgelse afliver autisme-myte om vaccination

650.000 danske børn afkræfter sammenhæng mellem MFR-vaccine og autisme.

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In search of new 'sugar cleavers'

Complex sugars play multiple and essential roles in the living world as structural elements (cellulose), reserve substances (starch), and molecular signals (such as those of blood types), among others. This variety of functions is based on structures that are equally diverse, due to a multiplicity of building blocks and the different ways in which they can be arranged. The degradation of these car

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Tricks to reduce DNA base editor's mistakes

Researchers at the Center for Genome Engineering, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) have identified the mistake rate of DNA editing tools known as adenine base editors, which are based on CRISPR. Assessing the genome-wide target specificity of these innovative techniques is essential to harness their applications in clinics and biotechnology. The findings were published in

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Researchers demonstrate nanoparticle systems crucial for new high-speed devices

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated a new way to perform functions essential to future computation three orders of magnitude faster than current commercial devices. The team lead by Associate Professor Shinobu Ohya created a nanoscale spintronic semiconductor device that can partially switch between specific magnetic states trillions of times a second (terahertz—THz), far beyond freq

3min

In search of new 'sugar cleavers'

Complex sugars play multiple and essential roles in the living world as structural elements (cellulose), reserve substances (starch), and molecular signals (such as those of blood types), among others. This variety of functions is based on structures that are equally diverse, due to a multiplicity of building blocks and the different ways in which they can be arranged. The degradation of these car

3min

Tricks to reduce DNA base editor's mistakes

Researchers at the Center for Genome Engineering, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea) have identified the mistake rate of DNA editing tools known as adenine base editors, which are based on CRISPR. Assessing the genome-wide target specificity of these innovative techniques is essential to harness their applications in clinics and biotechnology. The findings were published in

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The health consequences of backlash politics

Public policies rooted in racial resentment can carry grave consequences for health and well-being, according to new research by Vanderbilt psychiatrist and sociologist Jonathan Metzl. His findings, based on seven years of fieldwork in Tennessee, Missouri and Kansas, can be found in his new book, Dying of Whiteness: How the Politics of Racial Resentment is Killing America's Heartland.

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Technique streamlines fabrication of 2-D circuits

Exotic 2-D materials hold great promise for creating atom-thin circuits that could power flexible electronics, optoelectronics, and other next-generation devices. But fabricating complex 2-D circuits requires multiple time-consuming, expensive steps.

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A negotiation strategy to help cities and organizations minimize losses when their data are held hostage

In ransomware cyberattacks, hackers steal a victim's sensitive data and threaten to publish or block access to it unless a ransom is paid. Across the globe each year, millions of ransomware attacks are carried out on businesses, cities, and organizations, costing billions of dollars total in payments and damages. Many technologies can thwart such cyberattacks, but MIT Computer Science and Artifici

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7 Biblical Artifacts That Will Probably Never Be Found

Here's a look at the biblical artifacts that will likely never turn up, from the Ark of the Covenant to Noah's Ark.

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A New Chapter in the Science of Psychedelic Microdosing

The purported benefits of microdosing psychedelics are as numerous as the research is sparse. The technique, which involves ingesting small amounts of LSD, mushrooms, or other hallucinogenic drugs every three or four days, has made headlines for its popularity as a “productivity hack” among the Silicon Valley elite. But anecdotal endorsements of microdosing claim that the routine can lead to a wh

44min

Nuclear Power Is Not the Moderate Answer to Climate Change

When the fate of the planet is at stake, a single precedent starts to seem like a blueprint. Most Americans, as far as pollsters can tell, want the United States to honor its commitment under the Paris Agreement on climate change. According to that pact, the United States must, by 2025, cut its carbon emissions 26 percent below their all-time peak. That will be hard. To make the Paris goal, the U

44min

Thirteen mammal extinctions prevented by havens

A stocktake of Australia's animal havens – conservation areas free of cats and foxes – has found that they have already prevented 13 mammal extinctions.

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Politically polarized teams produce better work, analysis of Wikipedia finds

Many studies have found that political polarization in the United States is rapidly increasing, particularly online, where echo chambers and social media have inflamed partisanship. But new research from the University of Chicago's Knowledge Lab of more than 200,000 Wikipedia pages finds that collaborations bridging the political spectrum produce higher-quality work than articles edited by moderat

45min

Thirteen mammal extinctions prevented by havens

A stocktake of Australia's animal havens – conservation areas free of cats and foxes – has found that they have already prevented 13 mammal extinctions.

45min

States Need Way More Money to Fix Crumbling Voting Machines

“We are driving the same car in 2019 that we were driving in 2004, and the maintenance costs are mounting,” one South Carolina election official told researchers.

45min

Save the Lemurs! Eat the Crickets!

Researchers are encouraging the people of Madagascar to embrace bugs as a source of protein, in order to take pressure off endangered lemurs.

45min

Offentligt finansieret software bør være open source

Glym Moody påpeger, at store softwarevirksomheder blandt andet har problemer med at holde sig fra brugernes personoplysninger.

46min

DI: Ny midtjysk motorvej vil forbedre mobiliteten

I sidste uge kom Dansk Industri med et udspil til en plan, som skal sikre fremtidens infrastruktur i Danmark. Planen indeholder nye motorveje for næsten 50 mia. kroner, og den største post er en ny midtjysk motorvej. Jo før, des bedre, siger Vejles borgmester om forslaget.

46min

My move from postdoc to career adviser

My move from postdoc to career adviser My move from postdoc to career adviser, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00748-z Briana Konnick liked helping graduate students and postdocs to plan their careers more than she enjoyed her lab work.

51min

The professional advisers who can help you to move from academia to industry

The professional advisers who can help you to move from academia to industry The professional advisers who can help you to move from academia to industry, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00747-0 University careers advisory services can connect PhD students with employers and guide them to the right role.

51min

Ripples race in the brain as memories are recalled

A fast brain wave called a ripple often came before a person’s correct answer on a memory test.

52min

Sorry, Bruce Willis: Big Asteroids Die Hard

Massive hunks of space rock may be a lot harder to explode than you'd think.

54min

Physicists Used Supercomputers to Map the Bone-Crushing Pressures Hiding Inside Protons

If you shrank yourself down and entered a proton, you'd experience among the most intense pressures found anywhere in the universe.

54min

Opium-Addicted Parrots Are Terrorizing Poppy Farms in India

Opium-addicted parrots are "wreaking havoc" on India's licensed poppy farms, and scaring them with firecrackers isn't helping.

56min

What would Molecular assemblers be capable of ?

What are its speculated capabilities ? submitted by /u/Mewto1k [link] [comments]

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These Cameras Can Spot Shoplifters Even Before They Steal

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

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Computer Program Measures the Entropy of Art

The digitization of paintings could help art historians detect previously unknown patterns and connections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Computer Program Measures the Entropy of Art

The digitization of paintings could help art historians detect previously unknown patterns and connections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Huawei har planer om at sagsøge USA på grund af forbud mod elektronik

Huawei planlægger at sagsøge USA for at have nedlagt forbud mod at amerikanske myndigheder kan bruge produkter fra Huawei.

1h

Det flyder med farlige HFI-relæer på campingpladser

Kun hver tiende campingplads havde styr på elinstallationerne, da Sikkerhedsstyrelsen besøgte 176 pladser i 2018. Nu skruer styrelsen op for kontrollen.

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For Big Pharma, a History of Profiting From Manufactured Addiction

Purdue Pharma actively sniffed out new, sinister ways to cash in on the opioid crisis they helped manufacture by branching into the market for opioid addiction and overdose medicines. Over a century ago, “patent medicine” sellers pioneered this strategy during the U.S.’s Gilded Age opiate addiction epidemic.

1h

Self Healing

So I'm not sure if this is the right place for this but about a year ago I decided to identify almost spiritually as more of a computer, cause in effect that's what we are. Electrical impulses and sensory organs. Etc. Anyways I was really bored and was like well what would my operating system be. Called it frost melt. Built sort of a sophisticated tamagatchi in my head. Named her Monica. I have l

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Send us your questions for Carlo Rovelli

The Observer New Review offers you the chance to quiz the superstar physicist on time, space or anything in between Carlo Rovelli’s first popular science book, Seven Brief Lessons in Physics , has sold over a million copies since it was published in 2014. It has established him, alongside the likes of Stephen Hawking and Richard Feynman, as one of the great popularisers of theoretical physics. Re

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The debated legacy of Einstein’s first wife

The debated legacy of Einstein’s first wife The debated legacy of Einstein’s first wife, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00741-6 Ann Finkbeiner reviews a study weighing up whether Mileva Marić contributed to her husband’s epochal theories.

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Journal retracts creationist paper “because it was published in error”

It’s become a sort of Retraction Watch Mad Libs: Author writes a paper that is so far, far, out of the mainstream. Maybe it argues that HIV doesn’t cause AIDS. Or that vaccines cause autism. Truth squads swarm over the paper, taking to blogs and Twitter to wonder, in the exasperated tone of those who … Continue reading Journal retracts creationist paper “because it was published in error”

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First man cleared of HIV by stem cell treatment speaks of hope for others – video

The first known case of a functional cure for HIV happened 12 years ago, after US resident Timothy Brown received stem cell donations in Berlin. More recently, a patient in London received a bone marrow transplant from a virus-resistant donor and has been shown to be cleared of the virus Continue reading…

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The Other Nuclear Threat

Here is what we know about the most serious India-Pakistan crisis in over a decade. On February 14, the Pakistan-based terrorist organization Jaish-e-Mohammad attacked a paramilitary convoy in Pulwama in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir. India, on the cusp of a general election, retaliated against its neighbor in the early hours of February 26 with a deep air strike targeting a terrorist cam

1h

The Anger of Amy Klobuchar

Amy Klobuchar has a problem. Apparently it’s been an open secret in Washington and Minnesota, but because she didn’t have much of a national reputation, the press lacked occasion to expose it. But when she made a name for herself during the Kavanaugh hearings, suggesting that a presidential campaign was likely, the press had the necessary occasion, and now we all know about it. Her problem is rag

1h

The Inevitable Return of Muddling Along in North Korea

Since the collapse of nuclear talks in Hanoi last week, North Korea experts have argued about what went wrong. Donald Trump should have structured his offer differently, some said, aiming for modest steps toward denuclearization before seeking a grand bargain. Perhaps the administration should have put off the summit with Kim Jong Un, allowing working-level diplomats to make progress that the lea

1h

What Happens to London’s Food Scene After Brexit?

LONDON —Britain’s impending (and ever more uncertain) departure from the European Union has prompted some people to start preparing for the worst. Many of the country’s top retailers warn that in a worst-case scenario, lettuce and fresh fruit could disappear from supermarket shelves. A growing number of Britons have begun stockpiling goods at home. One website even creates a crisis shopping list

1h

Times Insider: What Our Reporter Has Learned From Traditional African Healers

Donald McNeil, a reporter for The Times, traveled to rural Uganda see how traditional healers are preparing for epidemics like Ebola.

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Parents of West Point Cadet Killed in Accident Obtain Order to Preserve His Sperm

Peter Zhu, the cadet who died last week, dreamed of having children. His parents said a court order to retrieve his sperm was their last chance.

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How to let go of pointless possessions, in 6 easy steps

The "ex-factor test" is imagining wearing an outfit and determining whether you'd feel good in it if you saw your ex on the street. Another tip is to place stray accessories in a box and determine whether they are handy in your everyday life. If not, especially after a long period of time, get rid of the items. If there's something you can do in less than a minute that will make your life easier

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Landmark HIV case may be the second person ever to be ‘cured’

A person in the UK may have been functionally cured of HIV by getting a bone marrow transplant from someone with genetic resistance to the virus

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These Cameras Can Spot Shoplifters Even Before They Steal

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Google Cloud AutoML is truly automated machine learning

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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What happened to the hyped nanomaterials?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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A second person has probably been cured of HIV

The treatment tailors stem-cell transplants intended for leukaemia

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De udenlandske læger i hovedrollen

Udenlandske læger skal kunne dansk. Men får vi sat barren for højt, risikerer vi måske utilsigtet at sætte prop i tilførslen af kvalificeret arbejdskraft.

2h

Nyt pyrolyseanlæg i Nyborg skal genanvende 30.000 ton dæk om året

Svensk pyrolyseteknologi skal genvinde 9.000 ton Carbon Black om året fra importerede, udtjente bildæk i et kommende, selvforsynende anlæg i Nyborg til 300 millioner kroner.

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How to Build Artificial Intelligence That Everyone Can Trust

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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A gRNA-tRNA array for CRISPR-Cas9 based rapid multiplexed genome editing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

A gRNA-tRNA array for CRISPR-Cas9 based rapid multiplexed genome editing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae A gRNA-tRNA array for CRISPR-Cas9 based rapid multiplexed genome editing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09005-3 Strain engineering is increasingly the bottleneck step in synthetic biology workflows. Here the authors present GTR-CRISPR for rapi

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Analysis of human acetylation stoichiometry defines mechanistic constraints on protein regulation

Analysis of human acetylation stoichiometry defines mechanistic constraints on protein regulation Analysis of human acetylation stoichiometry defines mechanistic constraints on protein regulation, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09024-0 Many human proteins are regulated by lysine acetylation, but the degree of acetylation at individual sites is poorly characterized. Here,

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Spatiotemporal imaging of valence electron motion

Spatiotemporal imaging of valence electron motion Spatiotemporal imaging of valence electron motion, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09036-w Light absorption in matter often induces ultrafast electron dynamics within the system. Here, the authors record a femtosecond movie of the electron density of an argon ion as it oscillates in a quantum beat of two fine-structure stat

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Quantum electrodynamics at room temperature coupling a single vibrating molecule with a plasmonic nanocavity

Quantum electrodynamics at room temperature coupling a single vibrating molecule with a plasmonic nanocavity Quantum electrodynamics at room temperature coupling a single vibrating molecule with a plasmonic nanocavity, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08611-5 Here, the authors report the coupling between a single dye molecule and plasmonic nanocavity at room temperature. Th

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Anti-quenching NIR-II molecular fluorophores for in vivo high-contrast imaging and pH sensing

Anti-quenching NIR-II molecular fluorophores for in vivo high-contrast imaging and pH sensing Anti-quenching NIR-II molecular fluorophores for in vivo high-contrast imaging and pH sensing, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09043-x Fluorophores operating in the second near-infrared window suffer from solvatochromism-caused fluorescence quenching in biological aqueous solution

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Pure PEDOT:PSS hydrogels

Pure PEDOT:PSS hydrogels Pure PEDOT:PSS hydrogels, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09003-5 Hydrogels of conducting polymers provide an electrical interface with biological tissues for sensing and stimulation, but currently have compromised mechanical and electrical properties. Here, the authors show a simple method to achieve pure PEDOT:PSS hydrogels that exhibit superior

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Stem cell proliferation is induced by apoptotic bodies from dying cells during epithelial tissue maintenance

Stem cell proliferation is induced by apoptotic bodies from dying cells during epithelial tissue maintenance Stem cell proliferation is induced by apoptotic bodies from dying cells during epithelial tissue maintenance, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09010-6 Damaged epithelial tissues are known to compensate for cell death through compensatory cell divisions to maintain ep

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Tensor network simulation of multi-environmental open quantum dynamics via machine learning and entanglement renormalisation

Tensor network simulation of multi-environmental open quantum dynamics via machine learning and entanglement renormalisation Tensor network simulation of multi-environmental open quantum dynamics via machine learning and entanglement renormalisation, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09039-7 Simulating ultrafast quantum dissipation in molecular excited states is a strongly d

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Huawei opens Brussels security lab in bid to reassure EU

Chinese tech company Huawei on Tuesday opened a cybersecurity lab in Brussels, the heart of the European Union, as it tries to win over government leaders and fight back U.S. allegations that its equipment poses a national security risk.

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Could genetic breakthrough finally help take the sting out of mouth ulcers?

A large breakthrough has been made in the genetic understanding of mouth ulcers which could provide potential for a new drug to prevent or heal the painful lesions. Mouth ulcers affect up to 25 percent of young adults and a higher proportion of children. Previous research has shown that mouth ulcers are partially heritable, but until now there has been little evidence linking specific genes or gen

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Small brains, big picture: Study unveils C. elegans' microscopic mysteries

Researchers discover how brain cells in the microscopic worm C. elegans send electrical signals.

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Scientists develop a tunable bio-imaging device using terahertz plasmonics

Researchers at Tokyo Tech have developed an easy-to-use, tunable biosensor tailored for the terahertz range. Images of mouse organs obtained using their new device verify that the sensor is capable of distinguishing between different tissues. The achievement expands possibilities for terahertz applications in biological analysis and future diagnostics.

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In age of Amazon, services like Birchbox and Dollar Shave Club are getting more popular

When it comes to shopping, Americans increasingly would rather sit and wait than head out and browse.

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These Ethical Hacking Courses Teach the White Hat Skills Employers Need

Information has always been a valuable commodity. As such, human beings have always tried to steal it. But while information theft is nothing new, modern technology has changed the game. Not only has the digital revolution made the collection and storage of mass quantities of data possible , but it’s also made these vast stores of information easier for hackers to plunder . Just look at the high-

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Tax fossil-fuel production, not emissions

Tax fossil-fuel production, not emissions Tax fossil-fuel production, not emissions, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00764-z Tax fossil-fuel production, not emissions

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Uncertain future for women scientists in Brazil

Uncertain future for women scientists in Brazil Uncertain future for women scientists in Brazil, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00762-1 Uncertain future for women scientists in Brazil

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Thousands of Danish children find ten new bacteria species

Thousands of Danish children find ten new bacteria species Thousands of Danish children find ten new bacteria species, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00765-y Thousands of Danish children find ten new bacteria species

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Support smallholders to step up Nigeria’s cassava yields

Support smallholders to step up Nigeria’s cassava yields Support smallholders to step up Nigeria’s cassava yields, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00763-0 Support smallholders to step up Nigeria’s cassava yields

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‘Moral machine’ experiment is no basis for policymaking

‘Moral machine’ experiment is no basis for policymaking ‘Moral machine’ experiment is no basis for policymaking, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00766-x ‘Moral machine’ experiment is no basis for policymaking

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Facebook scolded for how it protects user phone numbers for security

Facebook is facing new backlash over how it protects user phone numbers when they provide them for security purposes.

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Hon vill skapa brygga mellan molekyl och patient

Sara Eks blick för nyanser har lett till en banbrytande forskningsresa. Nu har hon fått ett stort anslag för att bli ännu vassare på att fastställa hur immunförsvaret samverkar med olika typer av lymfom. Förhoppningen är att ett enkelt blodprov ska kunna identifiera vilka patienter som har nytta av en skräddarsydd immunstimulerande behandling.

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Visual cortex recruitment during language processing in blind individuals is explained by Hebbian learning

Visual cortex recruitment during language processing in blind individuals is explained by Hebbian learning Visual cortex recruitment during language processing in blind individuals is explained by Hebbian learning, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39864-1 Visual cortex recruitment during language processing in blind individuals is explained by Hebbian learning

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Ripening of bananas using Bowdichia virgilioides Kunth leaves

Ripening of bananas using Bowdichia virgilioides Kunth leaves Ripening of bananas using Bowdichia virgilioides Kunth leaves, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40053-3 Ripening of bananas using Bowdichia virgilioides Kunth leaves

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A genome-wide map of circular RNAs in adult zebrafish

A genome-wide map of circular RNAs in adult zebrafish A genome-wide map of circular RNAs in adult zebrafish, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39977-7 A genome-wide map of circular RNAs in adult zebrafish

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Performance of 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion-estimating equations in relation to measured 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion in hospitalized hypertensive patients

Performance of 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion-estimating equations in relation to measured 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion in hospitalized hypertensive patients Performance of 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion-estimating equations in relation to measured 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion in hospitalized hypertensive patients, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-01

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Evaluation of dose point kernel rescaling methods for nanoscale dose estimation around gold nanoparticles using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations

Evaluation of dose point kernel rescaling methods for nanoscale dose estimation around gold nanoparticles using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations Evaluation of dose point kernel rescaling methods for nanoscale dose estimation around gold nanoparticles using Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40166-9 Evaluation of dose point kernel rescaling method

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Regional perturbation of gene transcription is associated with intrachromosomal rearrangements and gene fusion transcripts in high grade ovarian cancer

Regional perturbation of gene transcription is associated with intrachromosomal rearrangements and gene fusion transcripts in high grade ovarian cancer Regional perturbation of gene transcription is associated with intrachromosomal rearrangements and gene fusion transcripts in high grade ovarian cancer, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39878-9 Regional perturbation of gene

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Hydrogen peroxide-based products alter inflammatory and tissue damage-related proteins in the gingival crevicular fluid of healthy volunteers: a randomized trial

Hydrogen peroxide-based products alter inflammatory and tissue damage-related proteins in the gingival crevicular fluid of healthy volunteers: a randomized trial Hydrogen peroxide-based products alter inflammatory and tissue damage-related proteins in the gingival crevicular fluid of healthy volunteers: a randomized trial, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40006-w Hydrogen p

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Temporal changes in cell division rate and genotoxic stress tolerance in quiescent center cells of Arabidopsis primary root apical meristem

Temporal changes in cell division rate and genotoxic stress tolerance in quiescent center cells of Arabidopsis primary root apical meristem Temporal changes in cell division rate and genotoxic stress tolerance in quiescent center cells of Arabidopsis primary root apical meristem, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40383-2 Temporal changes in cell division rate and genotoxic s

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Elizabeth Warren’s Small-Dollar Pledge Isn’t Just Symbolic

Rejecting donations from corporate political-action committees has become a trend among Democrats. Roughly 180 of them took the pledge ahead of the November midterm elections, and it quickly caught on among members of the 2020 field, including Senators Cory Booker, Kamala Harris, and Kirsten Gillibrand, who assured their voters that they’re prioritizing small-dollar contributions. But now Elizabe

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S og SF imod CPR-indsamling i trivlselsmåling – men opsiger ikke forlig

Det er uvist, om indsamling af CPR-numre kan fraviges med den eksisterende lovtekst.

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Topological transitions among skyrmion- and hedgehog-lattice states in cubic chiral magnets

Topological transitions among skyrmion- and hedgehog-lattice states in cubic chiral magnets Topological transitions among skyrmion- and hedgehog-lattice states in cubic chiral magnets, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08985-6 Manipulating topological spin textures are demanded for future spintronic devices, but knowledge about phase transitions among different spin textures

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Subtle changes in chromatin loop contact propensity are associated with differential gene regulation and expression

Subtle changes in chromatin loop contact propensity are associated with differential gene regulation and expression Subtle changes in chromatin loop contact propensity are associated with differential gene regulation and expression, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08940-5 It is currently unclear how quantitative changes in chromatin loop propensity contribute to differenti

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Sites of high local frustration in DNA origami

Sites of high local frustration in DNA origami Sites of high local frustration in DNA origami, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09002-6 Self-assembly of DNA origami is a complex folding problem without a unified view of the energetic factors involved. Here the authors analyse identical structures that differ by nucleotide sequence and identify how mechanical stress at nucle

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Assessing the causal association of glycine with risk of cardio-metabolic diseases

Assessing the causal association of glycine with risk of cardio-metabolic diseases Assessing the causal association of glycine with risk of cardio-metabolic diseases, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08936-1 Epidemiological studies have associated circulating levels of the amino acid glycine with cardiometabolic outcomes. Here, in a genome-wide meta-analysis of 80,003 indiv

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How Federal Disaster Money Favors The Rich

The federal government spends billions of dollars each year helping communities rebuild after disasters and to prevent future damage. But that money isn't always allocated to those who need it most. (Image credit: Claire Harbage/NPR)

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Welding breakthrough could transform manufacturing

submitted by /u/stesch [link] [comments]

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Mercedes-Benz Concept EQV is a versatile, attractive electric van – Roadshow

The production version will debut in Frankfurt later this year.

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Space exploration needs minnows as much as superpowers

In the new era of missions beyond Earth, there is plenty of room for the little guy to shine alongside the might of the US and China

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På sporet af den næste generation af katalysatorer

Sol- og vind-energi skal mangedobles for at løse verdens stigende behov for miljøvenlig…

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There’s probably another planet in our solar system

Laying out two decades of evidence for the mysterious “Planet 9,” a team of astronomers predicts that if it exists, it’s likely to be discovered within the decade.

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Biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation

When naturalist Charles Darwin stepped onto the Galapagos Islands in 1835, he encountered a bird that sparked a revolutionary theory on how new species originate. From island to island, finches had wildly varied beak designs that reflected their varied diets. The so-called Darwin's finches are an emblem of adaptive radiation, which describes when organisms from a single lineage evolve different ad

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Biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation

When naturalist Charles Darwin stepped onto the Galapagos Islands in 1835, he encountered a bird that sparked a revolutionary theory on how new species originate. From island to island, finches had wildly varied beak designs that reflected their varied diets. The so-called Darwin's finches are an emblem of adaptive radiation, which describes when organisms from a single lineage evolve different ad

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University of Utah biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation

Using host-specific parasites isolated on individual pigeon 'islands,' the scientists showed that descendants of a single population of feather lice adapted rapidly in response to preening. They found that preening drives rapid and divergent camouflage in feather lice transferred to different colored rock pigeons. Over four years and 60 generations, the lice evolved heritable color differences tha

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Geneva show has electrics, sports cars and a VW dune buggy

Carmakers at the Geneva International Motor Show are unveiling new electric vehicles they hope will transform the industry as well as the high-end sports cars that are a fixture at the show.

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Unusual alliance in Sri Lanka forged to save blue whales

When the feeding grounds of blue whales overlap with busy shipping lanes, business interests often supersede those of the endangered marine mammals.

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Nye biosensorer opløser sig selv

PLUS. Nye bionedbrydelige materialer gør det muligt at indsætte sensorer i kroppen, som nedbrydes naturligt efter et stykke tid.

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Mercedes Remakes the Minivan as an All-Electric Luxury Ride

The German automaker’s MPV has room for eight, 249 miles of range, and makes the kiddie karter look good.

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Russia's Arctic plans add to polar bears' climate woes

Last month's visit by roaming polar bears that put a Russian village on lockdown may be just the beginning.

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Volvo unveils driverless electric bus in Singapore

Volvo and a Singapore university unveiled a driverless electric bus Tuesday that will soon undergo tests in the city-state, the latest move towards rolling out autonomous vehicles for public transport.

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Study: Climate change is leading to unpredictable ecosystem disruption for migratory birds

Using data on 77 North American migratory bird species from the eBird citizen-science program, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology say that, in as little as four decades, it may be very difficult to predict how climate change will affect migratory bird populations and the ecosystems they inhabit. Their conclusions are presented in a paper published in the journal Ecography.

4h

Study: Climate change is leading to unpredictable ecosystem disruption for migratory birds

Using data on 77 North American migratory bird species from the eBird citizen-science program, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology say that, in as little as four decades, it may be very difficult to predict how climate change will affect migratory bird populations and the ecosystems they inhabit. Their conclusions are presented in a paper published in the journal Ecography.

4h

Singing for science: How the arts can help students who struggle most

Incorporating the arts—rapping, dancing, drawing—into science lessons can help low-achieving students retain more knowledge and possibly help students of all ability levels be more creative in their learning, finds a new study by Johns Hopkins University.

4h

Bird extinctions 'driven' by global food trade

A study reveals growing impacts on wild bird species from forestry, farming and palm oil production.

4h

ScienceTake: When Plasma Becomes Another Fruit of the Vine

A parlor trick with grapes leads to new findings about water and microwaves.

4h

Why Microwaved Grapes Explode!

For 20 years, people have been putting grapes in the microwave to watch them explode. But there is some real science behind this internet phenomenon.

4h

The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment: A Fiasco with a Silver Lining

The Tuskegee syphilis experiment studied black men with advanced syphilis for 40 years. Patients were lied to and prevented from getting treatment. A black mark in the history of American medicine, it led to important reforms.

4h

Facebook prohibits foreign-funded ads for Indonesia election

Facebook says it will not allow foreign-funded advertisements for upcoming presidential and legislative elections in Indonesia, the world's third-largest democracy, hoping to allay concerns that its platform is being used to manipulate voting behavior.

4h

Ny bog skal lære elever at like og dele med omtanke

LIKE hedder en ny gratis og forskningsbaseret undervisningsbog, som klæder gymnasie- og folkeskoleelever…

5h

Scientists Detect 'Shocking' Drop in Male Fertility, And It's Linked Back to Our Homes

The same thing is happening to the creatures we share our homes with.

5h

5h

Guy Standing On The Effects Of A UBI

submitted by /u/Veloxc [link] [comments]

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6h

What happens when everyone knows everything?

What happens where hit a level of where no one has privacy at all. Where everyone can see anyone doing anything from the past and present. I thought about this for a while now. submitted by /u/Alexbabylon [link] [comments]

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Italy sees 57% drop in olive harvest as result of climate change, scientist says

Extreme weather blamed for plunge in country’s olive harvest – the worst in 25 years – that could leave the country dependent on imports by April Extreme weather events have been the “main driver” of an olive harvest collapse that could leave Italy dependent on imports from April, a leading climate scientist has warned. A 57% plunge in the country’s olive harvest – the worst in 25 years – sparked

6h

6h

Scientists Discover an Ancient 'Superhighway' at The Bottom of The Ocean

An area thought to be void of life at the time.

6h

After a decade, a second case of HIV remission using stem cells

Research raises hope for an eventual drug-free solution to intractable disease. Samantha Page reports.

7h

Formel-fejl: Rejsekort-kunder fik ingen rabat uanset rejseaktivitet

En fejl i en formel har givet problemer med rabat-beregningen hos Rejsekort det meste af sidste år.

7h

Study: Climate change is leading to unpredictable ecosystem disruption for migratory birds

Using data on 77 North American migratory bird species from the eBird citizen-science program, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology say that, in as little as four decades, it may be very difficult to predict how climate change will affect migratory bird populations and the ecosystems they inhabit. Their conclusions are presented in a paper published in the journal Ecography.

7h

Singing for science: How the arts can help students who struggle most

Incorporating the arts — rapping, dancing, drawing — into science lessons can help low-achieving students retain more knowledge and possibly help students of all ability levels be more creative in their learning, finds a new study by Johns Hopkins University.

7h

Why the brain can be blamed for children unknowingly being left to die in a hot car

Study explains the psychological and neural basis of how responsible people can fail to remember to do something in the future, creating the potential to make a fatal error.

7h

Rethinking old-growth forests using lichens as an indicator of conservation value

Two Canadian biologists propose a better way to assess the conservation value of North American old-growth forests — using lichens, sensitive bioindicators of environmental change. Old-growth forests are usually defined by tree age, but the authors argue this overlooks the importance of biodiversity in those habitats. Lichens are the ideal candidates to measure this biodiversity. Scorecards with

7h

Så här gör du en 1700-talssemla

Idag firar vi semmeldagen och innan dagen är slut kommer cirka 6 miljoner semlor ha ätits upp. Men var kommer semlan egentligen ifrån och varför har den fått en egen dag? Följ med hem till mathistorikern bakom historieätarna Richard Tellström som förklarar.

7h

Rethinking old-growth forests using lichens as an indicator of conservation value

Two Canadian biologists are proposing a better way to assess the conservation value of old-growth forests in North America—using lichens, sensitive bioindicators of environmental change.

7h

Automation: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

7h

Laboratoriepenge skal dække hul i byggeri-budget: AU dropper renovering

To laboratoriebygninger på Aarhus Universitet får alligevel ikke den ombygning, de blev lovet. Men selvom forskerne ikke vil kunne boltre sig på lige så meget laboratorieplads som forventet, kan aftalen ende med at blive bedre for universitetet, mener fakultetets tekniske chef.

8h

G20 report warns of diseases threat to global economy

Claim crisis is as big a danger as climate change that needs to be prioritised by finance ministers

8h

For second time ever a patient has been cured of HIV, scientists report

The New York Times reports that a team of scientists plan to announce tomorrow that a patient in London has been effectively cured of HIV. The cure reportedly was the result of a bone-marrow transplant that came with a genetic mutation that naturally blocks HIV from spreading throughout the body. This approach isn't quite practical to implement on a large scale, but the knowledge gained from it w

8h

9h

Scientists report curing a HIV-positive patient for second time ever

submitted by /u/Plymouth03 [link] [comments]

10h

10h

Do all networks obey the scale-free law? Maybe not

A new study debunks a popular, two-decade-old theory about the shape of networks.

10h

New key players in the methane cycle

Methane is not only a powerful greenhouse gas, but also a source of energy. Microorganisms therefore use it for their metabolism. They do so much more frequently and in more ways than was previously assumed.

10h

Do all networks obey the scale-free law? Maybe not

A new study debunks a popular, two-decade-old theory about the shape of networks.

10h

Science never quite clicked for me at school. Then I discovered science YouTube | Tom Hawking

I found something I never knew I wanted: fascinating mathematical concepts explained in a way that’s entertaining YouTube has long had a reputation as a hive of conspiracy theories, misinformation, and pseudoscience. All these accusations are, more or less, true — if you’re vulnerable to the wooing of Flat Earthers, anti-vaxxers, 9/11 truthers, the alt-right, and every other sort of lunatic fring

11h

'Broken heart' syndrome may originate in the brain

Scientists have shown for the first time that the brain is involved in the development of a heart condition called Takotsubo syndrome (TTS). They found that regions of the brain responsible for processing emotions and controlling the unconscious workings of the body, such as heart beat, breathing and digestion, do not communicate with each other as well in TTS patients as in healthy people.

11h

Are mosaic embryos the 'dark horse' of IVF?

New research confirms in a nonhuman primate model that mosaic embryos can adapt to their abnormalities and persist in development, resulting in positive IVF outcomes.

11h

TIGER mouse debuts as model for neurological ailments

The study uses a glowing mouse to track tiny message-carriers in the brain that could prove useful in diagnosing and treating injuries, infections or diseases.

11h

Forecasting mosquitoes' global spread

New prediction models factoring in climate, urbanization and human travel and migration offer insight into the recent spread of two key disease-spreading mosquitoes — Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. The models forecast that by 2050, 49 percent of the world's population will live in places where these species are established if greenhouse gas emissions continue at current rates.

11h

Here's What You Should Do if a Nuclear Bomb Explodes Nearby

Whatever you do, don't get into a car.

11h

Are Men at Google Paid Less Than Women? Not Really

A Google study found some male engineers were set to receive smaller raises this year. The finding comes amid analyses that the company discriminates against women.

11h

London HIV patient becomes world's second AIDS cure hope

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

11h

11h

HPTN 071 demonstrates community-wide HIV prevention strategy can reduce new infections

Findings from HPTN 071 (PopART) show delivery of an HIV prevention strategy that includes offering in-home HIV testing to everyone, with immediate referral to HIV care, and treatment for people living with HIV based on prevailing in-country guidelines, can substantially reduce new HIV infections.

11h

12h

First scalable graphene yarns for wearable textiles produced

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

12h

How fast food is quickly becoming automated – TechHQ

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

12h

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12h

The Atlantic Daily: Celebrity is a Kind of Infrastructure

What We’re Following Michael Jackson’s star power hasn’t dimmed, even after jarring new allegations of child molestation and pedophilia in the HBO documentary Leaving Neverland . The movie focuses on the stories of two men, Wade Robson and James Safechuck, who lay out, in gut-wrenching detail, stories of how Jackson lured them and their families with his celebrity and then abused them for years i

12h

F.D.A. Criticizes Walgreens and Other Retailers for Selling Tobacco Products to Minors

FDA singles out Walgreens for high rate of tobacco sales to minors — but gas station stores and other retailers had an even higher rate.

12h

12h

An Ancient Stellar Flyby Could Have Put Planet Nine into its Distant Orbit

New observations of a distant exoplanet and its solar system offer proof of a long-standing astronomical theory: passing stars can perturb planetary systems and change planets’ orbits – for better or worse. Depending on how they pass by, stars can nudge planets into more stable orbits or give them a kick that sends out of the system entirely. And new evidence implies that these kinds of encounters

12h

'Broken heart' syndrome may originate in the brain

Scientists have shown for the first time that the brain is involved in the development of a heart condition called Takotsubo syndrome (TTS). They found that regions of the brain responsible for processing emotions and controlling the unconscious workings of the body, such as heart beat, breathing and digestion, do not communicate with each other as well in TTS patients as in healthy people. The st

12h

12h

Tests on London patient offer hope of HIV 'cure'

Man becomes second person in world to be cleared of virus after stem cell donation A man in Britain has become the second known adult worldwide to be cleared of HIV after he received a bone marrow transplant from a virus-resistant donor, his doctors said. Almost three years after receiving bone marrow stem cells from a donor with a rare genetic mutation that resists HIV infection – and more than

12h

Neurodegenerative diseases identified using artificial intelligence

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence platform to detect a range of neurodegenerative disease in human brain tissue samples, including Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

12h

Putting the break on our immune system's response

Researchers have discovered how a tiny molecule known as miR-132 acts as a 'handbrake' on our immune system — helping us fight infection.

12h

Red tide rolling: Harmful algae found to flourish in both high-, low-CO2 environments

Researchers find a Florida-specific strain of red-tide-causing-algae thrives in both high and low CO2 concentrations.

12h

Genetic factors influence human brain expansion

An analysis of brain scans from more than 600 children and adolescents reveals genetically-mediated associations between the size of evolutionarily novel brain regions and intelligence test scores. Genetic influences on the brain follow the patterns of evolutionary expansion of the human brain relative to nonhuman primates.

12h

Mini cheetah is the first four-legged robot to do a backflip

New mini cheetah robot is springy and light on its feet, with a range of motion that rivals a champion gymnast. The four-legged powerpack can bend and swing its legs wide, enabling it to walk either right-side up or upside down. The robot can also trot over uneven terrain about twice as fast as an average person's walking speed.

12h

Scientists developing new vaccine strategy for tuberculosis

For years, scientists have been trying to come up with a better way to protect people against tuberculosis, the disease caused by infection with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacteria. Researchers say new hope is on the horizon after a recent experiment performed in mice showed great promise.

12h

Human 'footprint' on Antarctica measured for first time

The full extent of the human 'footprint' on Antarctica has been revealed for the first time by new research which used satellite images to measure stations, huts, runways, waste sites and tourist camps at 158 locations. The study found that more than half of all large ice-free coastal areas of Antarctica have now been disturbed by human activity.

12h

Brain's ability to synchronize voice sounds could be related to language learning

Researchers studied the synchronization of speech motor rhythms. Results show some people's brains adapt spontaneously to align with the rhythm of the voices they hear, while others do not. According to the research study, these patterns show differences in functional and structural aspects of the speech network in the brain, as well as the ability to understand new words.

12h

Scientists provide first evidence of diphtheria-like infectious agent in hedgehogs

As cultural successors, hedgehogs reside in close proximity to humans. Road traffic, lawn mowers and infectious agents threaten the prickly insect eaters. Some infectious agents can be transmitted to humans. Considerate treatment of wildlife and appropriate hygiene measures minimize the risk of infection, though. A study has now identified Corynebacterium ulcerans — a close relative of the diphth

12h

Dental fillings could last twice as long

A compound used to make car bumpers strong and protect wood decks could prevent return visits to the dentist's office. A team of researchers has created a filling material that's two times more resistant to breakage than standard fillings. The team also has developed an adhesive that's 30 percent stronger after six months in use than adhesives that are currently used to keep fillings in place.

13h

Gotcha! Scientists fingerprint proteins using their vibrations

In the cells of every living organism — humans, birds, bees, roses and even bacteria — proteins vibrate with microscopic motions that help them perform vital tasks ranging from cell repair to photosynthesis. Now, physicists report that it has developed a method for rapidly measuring proteins' unique vibrations.

13h

Applying a network perspective to human physiology

Medical practitioners commonly treat organs in isolation, but a physicist wants to usher in a new paradigm.

13h

Potential new source of rare earth elements

Researchers have found a possible new source of rare earth elements – phosphate rock waste – and an environmentally friendly way to get them out, according to a new study. The approach could benefit clean energy technology.

13h

Magnonic devices can replace electronics without much noise

Electronic devices are getting smaller and will soon hit the limits of performance based on electrical currents. Devices based on magnonic currents would transform the industry, though scientists need to better understand how to control them. Engineers have made an important step toward the development of practical magnonic devices by studying, for the first time, the level of noise associated wit

13h

Dying trees in cities? Blame it on the pavement

A new study of urban tree life in the Southeast shows pavement and concrete may have a bigger effect than longitudinal warming.

13h

Better to include your better half in social posts

New research found that sharing information online can do more harm to romantic relationships than good. However, researchers found a way to counteract its negative effects. If you often post about your life, include your partner. The research is the first of its kind to systematically examine how different circumstances can affect whether a partner perceives their loved one's online disclosure to

13h

More than one-third of patients risk major bleeding by doubling up on blood thinners

A new study finds patients were taking too many antithrombotics for no reason, leading to a significant increase in bleeding events.

13h

13h

High levels of potentially harmful bacteria found in raw meat dog food products

Many raw meat dog food products contain high levels of bacteria that pose potential health risks to both animals and people, finds research published online in Vet Record.

13h

Raw food a risk for dogs and their owners

Dutch study adds to previous findings that raw meat doggy diets can be pathogenic hotspots. Andrew Masterson reports.

13h

13h

High levels of potentially harmful bacteria found in raw meat dog food products

Many raw meat dog food products contain high levels of bacteria that pose potential health risks to both animals and people, finds research published online in Vet Record.

13h

If you don't like eating fish, you might be a fan of global warming

Environment Warming oceans are changing fish stocks around the world. Most know that climate change is changing the world today and will change it more tomorrow. But what’s not always as well-examined is how much it’s altered already.

13h

High-IQ people tend to choke under pressure. Here’s how to avoid that.

A recent study examined how goal-setting interacts with performance among people of varying intellectual capabilities. People with higher general mental abilities appear to perform worse when being directly measured along the lines of performance. Interestingly, these individuals' performance greatly improves when they were encouraged to simply do their best. None Smart people are more likely to

13h

Has a second person with HIV been cured?

“London patient” also has long-term disappearance of virus after stem cell transplant

13h

Sonar disturbs blue whales feeding

No one really knows why pods of whales spontaneously drive themselves aground. Military sonar may be one culprit, and the need to train and test submarine tracking technology in open water could put the US Navy in conflict with the gentle cetaceans that feed and pass through military ranges. Although solitary endangered blue whales are rarely victims of sonar stranding, this does not mean that the

13h

Old hotels are being converted to affordable housing — and it's changing communities

Los Angeles' homeless population has swelled to over 50,000 in recent years. While the local government has dedicated $138M to combat the problem, progress has been slow. Charitable organizations are stepping in to house as many people as possible. None One turn changes everything in downtown Los Angeles. Capturing the severity of Skid Row is impossible. The infamous tent city extends for blocks.

13h

Doctors prescribe MDMA as first government approves drug as PTSD treatment

submitted by /u/EinarrPorketill [link] [comments]

13h

Microplastics Have Been Found in Our Deepest Ocean Animals

submitted by /u/ParadoxElevator [link] [comments]

13h

Sonar disturbs blue whales feeding

No one really knows why pods of whales spontaneously drive themselves aground. Military sonar may be one culprit, and the need to train and test submarine tracking technology in open water could put the US Navy in conflict with the gentle cetaceans that feed and pass through military ranges. Although solitary endangered blue whales are rarely victims of sonar stranding, this does not mean that the

13h

Growing up in nature reduces mental issues by up to 55%

A childhood spent in green spaces reduces the chance of acquiring adult mental disorders by 15% to 55%. A comprehensive study tracked the life stories of one million Danes to reach this conclusion. Humanity is moving to cities, and the report underscores the need for ample green spaces for children. None In 1950, two-thirds of us lived in rural settings, with just one-third living in cities. That

13h

Storytelling Instead Of Scolding: Inuit Say It Makes Their Children More Cool-Headed

At the top of the world, parents have figured out how to discipline kids without yelling, scolding or even speaking in an angry tone. Their secret is an ancient tool that sculpts children's behavior.

14h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Thrown for a Hickenlooper

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, March 4. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that a resolution to block President Donald Trump’s national-emergency declaration will pass the Senate after Senator Rand Paul joined the growing number of Republicans who have said they will vote for the resolution, but that he doesn’t believe lawmakers can override a presidential veto. As I said to my

14h

Confirmed: No Link Between Autism and Measles Vaccine, Even for 'At Risk' Kids

Children who receive the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine are not at increased risk for autism, including children who are sometimes considered to be in "high risk" groups for the neurodevelopmental disorder, a massive new study finds.

14h

Last week in tech: Lots of new smartphones, a backflipping robot, and the rise and fall of Momo

Technology RIP Momo. Check out the tech news you missed while Momo was running amok.

14h

7 best board games to help children think big

Many popular board games offer little more than colorful distractions, lacking both thoughtful design or quality learning principles. However, the recent board game renaissance has resulted in a host of new games that teach children a range of hard and soft skills thought play. We look at some of the best new board games and offer tips to find even more. Monopoly is the worst. No, we're not talki

14h

Google Reveals "BuggyCow," a Rare MacOS Zero-Day Vulnerability

Google's Project Zero researchers find a potentially powerful privilege escalation trick in how Macs manage memory.

14h

Thousands of tiny quakes shake Antarctic ice at night

Scientists placed seismometers on the McMurdo Ice Shelf and recorded hundreds of thousands of tiny 'ice quakes' that appear to be caused by pools of partially melted ice expanding and freezing at night. The phenomenon may be able to help scientists track glacier melting — and to help explain the breakup of large ice shelves.

14h

Disclosing bed bug infestation to potential tenants can save landlords money

Laws that require landlords to disclose bed bug infestations help combat the spread of the insects and protect the health of potential tenants. According to a new study, these laws also lead to cost savings, on average, for landlords within five years.

14h

Transforming magnetic storage

A new frontier in the study of magnetic materials, femtomagnetism, could lead to ultrafast magnetic storage devices that would transform information processing technologies. Now, researchers report a tabletop method to characterize such a faster magnetic storage using high-harmonic generation of laser light in iron thin films.

14h

Dental fillings could last twice as long

A compound used to make car bumpers strong and protect wood decks could prevent return visits to the dentist's office. A team of researchers has created a filling material that's two times more resistant to breakage than standard fillings. The team also has developed an adhesive that's 30 percent stronger after six months in use than adhesives that are currently used to keep fillings in place.

14h

How celastrol sensitizes brains to leptin, curbing hunger and obesity

Celastrol's potent anti-obesity effects were widely reported in 2015. Derived from the roots of the thunder god vine, the drug curbed food intake in obese mice by nearly 80 percent, producing up to a 45 percent weight loss.

14h

TIGER mouse debuts as model for neurological ailments

The study from Clemson University's College of Science uses a glowing mouse to track tiny message-carriers in the brain that could prove useful in diagnosing and treating injuries, infections or diseases.

14h

Kidney disease killer vulnerable to targeted nano therapy

By loading a chelation drug into a nano-sized homing device, researchers at Clemson University have reversed in an animal model the deadliest effects of chronic kidney disease, which kills more people in the United States each year than breast or prostate cancer.

14h

One more time with feeling: no link found between measles vax and autism

A study of 650,000 children finds immunisation has no influence on the condition. Andrew Masterson reports.

14h

14h

Step right up for bigger 2D sheets

Small steps make a big difference in the growth of 2D crystals. A new theory demonstrates why.

14h

The force is with us, always? Tuning quantum vacuum forces from attractive to repulsive

Scientists can put two uncharged metal plates close together in a vacuum, and 'voila!' — they will attract each other. In 1948, Dutch theoretical physicist Hendrick Casimir first predicted an attractive force responsible for this effect. Scientists have wondered, can there be an equal yet opposite kind of Casimir force? Physicists have shown for the first time that the Casimir force can be revers

14h

A faster, more accurate way to monitor drought

A new drought monitoring method allows scientists to identify the onset of drought sooner, meaning conservation or remediation measures could be put into place sooner. The new method uses thermal stress — the difference between air and surface temperatures at a site — as a drought indicator.

14h

Research provides insight on survivability of rare Wyoming plant

New research has found that despite the low density of the desert yellowhead — there are fewer than 15,000 individual plants scattered across just 55 acres — these populations survive partly because of a principle called negative density dependence.

14h

Vitagene’s DNA test kit helps you create the perfect health plan

Now 30 percent off, with an ancestry profile included. Now 30 percent off, with an ancestry profile included, Vitagene’s DNA test kit helps you create the perfect health plan.

14h

Google reviewed pay equity and learned it was underpaying men

Google will conduct a comprehensive review of its compensation process.

14h

Ultracold atoms could provide 2D window to exotic 1D physics

Physicists propose a new vantage point to observe quantum fractionalization.

15h

Step right up for bigger 2D sheets

Small steps make a big difference in the growth of 2D crystals. A new theory demonstrates why.

15h

Brain Surface Area Reveals Overlap in Genes, Intelligence, Evolution

An analysis of the contours of more than 600 kids' brains points to links between cerebral surface area and heritability in regions of the brain important in cognition.

15h

Do all networks obey the scale-free law? Maybe not

As Benjamin Franklin once joked, death and taxes are universal. Scale-free networks may not be, at least according to a new study from CU Boulder.

15h

Nearly half of Americans have had a family member jailed, imprisoned

In a groundbreaking Cornell-led study illuminating the extensive scope of mass incarceration in the U.S., nearly 1 in 2 Americans have had a brother or sister, parent, spouse or child spend time in jail or prison—a far higher figure than previously estimated.

15h

Ultracold atoms could provide 2D window to exotic 1D physics

Physicists propose a new vantage point to observe quantum fractionalization.

15h

Nearly half of Americans have had a family member jailed, imprisoned

A groundbreaking Cornell-led study included for the first time data for both prison and jail time to illuminate the extensive scope of mass incarceration in the US, nearly 1 in 2 Americans have had a brother or sister, parent, spouse or child spend time in jail or prison — a far higher figure than previously estimated.

15h

Do all networks obey the scale-free law? Maybe not

A new study debunks a popular, two-decade-old theory about the shape of networks.

15h

Autonomous car testing plan aims to boost public confidence

Companies testing autonomous vehicles in Pittsburgh will have to immediately report crashes resulting in any injuries as part of new guidelines announced Monday intended to boost public confidence in the testing after a deadly accident in Arizona last year.

15h

Do bad facts make smokers avoid safer snus?

American smokers mistakenly think that using snus, a type of moist snuff smokeless tobacco product, is as dangerous as smoking tobacco, according to a new study. The study focuses on what smokers think about snus, a Swedish style product that is popular in Scandinavia, but newer to the United States. Snus—a Swedish word for “snuff”—is a moist powder tobacco that can be sold in a loose form or in

15h

Destroying Incoming Asteroids Might Be Harder Than We Thought

Armageddon 2: The Asteroid Wins It’s a very good thing an asteroid isn’t hurtling toward the Earth right now — because our current calculations on what it would take to destroy it might be way off. “We used to believe that the larger the object, the more easily it would break, because bigger objects are more likely to have flaws,” Charles El Mir, one of the researchers behind a new Johns Hopkins

15h

Mexican experts find cave, offerings at Chichen Itza

Mexican archaeologists say they've found a cave at the Mayan ruins of Chichen Itza with offerings of about 200 ceramic vessels in nearly untouched condition.

15h

Walz sets goal: 100 percent carbon-free electricity by 2050

Gov. Tim Walz set an ambitious goal Monday for Minnesota to get 100 percent of its electricity from carbon-free sources by 2050, though his plan was short on specifics of how to meet that target.

15h

Office Depot and Alibaba opening online store

Office Depot and Alibaba.com are creating a co-branded online store to expand the reach of both companies with small and medium size businesses.

15h

Step right up for bigger 2-D sheets

Very small steps make a big difference to researchers who want to create large wafers of two-dimensional material.

15h

'Leaving Neverland' Forces Us to Confront Our Feral Fandom

The new HBO Michael Jackson documentary challenges notions of believability.

15h

Pentagon approaches massive new AI, machine learning breakthrough

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

15h

Military Contractors Are Churning out New Anti-Drone Weapons

Drone Defense The proliferation of cheap drones has given terrorists deadly new weapons, pranksters the tools to shut down major airports, and criminals the ability to scope out potential targets. In response, according to a new story by the Wall Street Journal , weapon makers ranging from Boeing to Lockheed Martin are working on new anti-drone technologies — and they include laser cannons and he

15h

Opening door to smaller memory devices, microelectronics, and spintronics

A research team has created a nanoscale 'playground' on a chip that simulates the formation of exotic magnetic particles called 'monopoles.' The study could unlock the secrets to ever-smaller, more powerful memory devices, microelectronics, and next-generation hard drives that employ the power of magnetic spin to store data.

15h

A faster, more accurate way to monitor drought

More than 2 billion people worldwide are affected by water shortages, wildfires, crop losses, forest diebacks or other environmental or economic woes brought on by drought.

15h

Ultracold atoms could provide 2-D window to exotic 1-D physics

Rice University physicists Matthew Foster and Seth Davis want to view a vexing quantum puzzle from an entirely new perspective. They just need the right vantage point and a place colder than deep space.

15h

The force is with us, always? Tuning quantum vacuum forces from attractive to repulsive

The force is strong not only in Star Wars lore but also as a fundamental property in physics. For example, scientists can put two uncharged metal plates close together in a vacuum, and "voila!" —-they will attract each other like Luke Skywalker and his trusted lightsaber.

15h

Backstory: An Alphabet Moonshot Wants to Store the Security Industry's Data

Alphabet-owned Chronicle has announced Backstory, an effort to store network intelligence data and help trace cybersecurity incidents back to their roots.

15h

Should patients be considered consumers?

No, and doing so can undermine efforts to promote patient-centered health care, write three Hastings Center scholars in the March issue of Health Affairs.

15h

Bundle payment model analysis of emerging breast cancer screening

Bundled payments have been touted as mechanisms to optimize quality and costs. A prior feasibility study evaluating bundled payments for screening mammography episodes predated widespread adoption of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). A new study, published online in the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR), explores an episodic bundled payment model for breast cancer screening tha

15h

Forecasting mosquitoes' global spread

New prediction models factoring in climate, urbanization and human travel and migration offer insight into the recent spread of two key disease-spreading mosquitoes — Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. The models forecast that by 2050, 49 percent of the world's population will live in places where these species are established if greenhouse gas emissions continue at current rates.

15h

Asteroids aren’t as easy to break apart as we thought

Incoming asteroids may be harder to break than scientists previously thought, according to a study that used a new understanding of rock fracture and a new computer modeling method to simulate asteroid collisions. The findings, which will appear in the journal Icarus , can help create asteroid impact and deflection strategies, increase understanding of solar system formation, and help design aste

15h

Earth's Rock Record Could Reveal the Motions of Other Planets

Studying the layers of Earth's crust, scientists have created a "Geological Orrery" to measure planetary motions dating back hundreds of millions of years

15h

Trump Threatens to Cut Federal Research Funding Over Free Speech

On Saturday, the US President announced that he would soon issue an executive order denying funds to colleges and universities that fail to protect free speech.

15h

The political power of 'the': A linguistic analysis

A new study of the English definite article "the" demonstrates that even seemingly drab function words can send powerful social and political signals. The study "Pragmatics and the social life of the English definite article," by Eric Acton (Eastern Michigan University) will be published in the March, 2019 issue of the scholarly journal Language.

15h

Ancient mammal remains digested by crocodiles reveal new species

Fossilised bones that appear to have been digested by crocodiles in the Cayman Islands have revealed three new species and subspecies of mammal that roamed the island more than 300 years ago.

15h

Twitter Will Let Users Hide Replies to Fight Toxic Comments

Twitter plans to test a feature that will let tweeters hide replies, but allow other users to view them.

15h

Opening door to smaller memory devices, microelectronics, and spintronics

A research team has created a nanoscale 'playground' on a chip that simulates the formation of exotic magnetic particles called 'monopoles.' The study could unlock the secrets to ever-smaller, more powerful memory devices, microelectronics, and next-generation hard drives that employ the power of magnetic spin to store data.

15h

First genetic clue for elusive pediatric liver disease

Researchers have identified the first genetic defect linked to biliary atresia, a mysterious liver disease that is the leading cause for liver transplantation in children.

15h

Seven moral rules found all around the world

What is morality? And to what extent does it vary around the world? The theory of 'morality-as-cooperation' argues that morality consists of a collection of biological and cultural solutions to the problems of cooperation recurrent in human social life. These solutions or cooperative behaviors are plausible candidates for universal moral rules, and that morality-as-cooperation could provide the un

15h

Smokers often misunderstand health risks of smokeless tobacco product, study finds

American smokers mistakenly think that using snus, a type of moist snuff smokeless tobacco product, is as dangerous as smoking tobacco, according to a study. The study provides new research on what smokers think about snus, a Swedish style product that is popular in Scandinavia, but newer to the United States.

15h

Dying trees in cities? Blame it on the concrete

A North Carolina State University study examining urbanization, scale-insect abundance and latitudinal warming on tree health in the Southeast captured a few surprising results.

15h

Hackers Listen In on What Synthetic DNA Machines Are Printing

Some of those sequences are worth millions of dollars, but fortunately the hack isn’t easy to deploy—yet.

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Looking for Nemo

Kids movies shape the way we look at the world long after we leave the theater — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A 2,000-year-old tattoo tool is the oldest in western North America

The artifact is made of two pigment-stained cactus spines, and has been sitting in storage since its discovery in 1972.

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Gotcha! Scientists fingerprint proteins using their vibrations

In the cells of every living organism — humans, birds, bees, roses and even bacteria — proteins vibrate with microscopic motions that help them perform vital tasks ranging from cell repair to photosynthesis. Now, physicists report that it has developed a method for rapidly measuring proteins' unique vibrations.

15h

Machine learning used to quickly analyze key capacitor materials

Researchers are using machine learning to ultimately find ways to build more capable capacitors.

15h

Departing PepsiCo Scientist to Become CEO of Anti-Aging Startup

submitted by /u/JaredBanyard [link] [comments]

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Are mosaic embryos the 'dark horse' of IVF?

New research conducted by scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center at OHSU is the first to confirm in a nonhuman primate model, that mosaic embryos can adapt to their abnormalities and persist in development, resulting in positive IVF outcomes.

15h

W3C declares WebAuthn an official security specification

Back in April 2018, we reported that Firefox began supporting a new password-free authentication standard called WebAuthn. Other major browsers followed suit with Chrome, Edge, and then Safari …

15h

Climate change: California wildfires 'can now happen in any year'

Wet winters are no longer a guide to the severity of wildfires in California, a new study suggests.

16h

24/7 fitness trackers won’t solve all your problems—and they might make you imagine new ones

Health Fitness trackers allow us to peer inside our bodies, but we may not like what we see. Wearables may be medically necessary, helpful to hobbyists (like marathon runners who want to optimize their training), or at the very least entertaining. But for some…

16h

Diabetes impairs multipotent stromal cell antibacterial activity

A new study reveals that the multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) of persons with diabetes have diminished capacity to fight off bacterial infection, providing new understanding into the basis of diabetes-associated immune dysfunction. The research is published in Stem Cells and Development.

16h

Research provides insight on survivability of rare Wyoming plant

A rare plant found only at two sites in central Wyoming has persisted, in part, because it can recover from relatively low densities and grows at different rates within each location, according to new research led by a University of Wyoming scientist.

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Diabetes impairs multipotent stromal cell antibacterial activity

A new study reveals that the multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) of persons with diabetes have diminished capacity to fight off bacterial infection, providing new understanding into the basis of diabetes-associated immune dysfunction. The research is published in Stem Cells and Development.

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Research provides insight on survivability of rare Wyoming plant

A rare plant found only at two sites in central Wyoming has persisted, in part, because it can recover from relatively low densities and grows at different rates within each location, according to new research led by a University of Wyoming scientist.

16h

Stricter emissions limits jolt Europe's auto industry

Electric vehicles will take centre stage at this year's Geneva Motor Show, as automakers scramble to bring their fleets into line with strict CO2 emissions standards set to kick in next year.

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Red tide rolling: Harmful algae found to flourish in both high-, low-CO2 environments

The algae responsible for Florida's toxic red tides may be more resilient to shifting ocean chemistry than scientists previously realized, according to research from Florida State University oceanographers.

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Magnonic devices can replace electronics without much noise

Electronic devices such as transistors are getting smaller and will soon hit the limits of conventional performance based on electrical currents.

16h

How to catch a magnetic monopole in the act

A research team led by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has created a nanoscale "playground" on a chip that simulates the formation of exotic magnetic particles called monopoles. The study—published recently in Science Advances – could unlock the secrets to ever-smaller, more powerful memory devices, microelectronics, and next-generation hard drives t

16h

A Change for Rotten Tomatoes Ahead of Captain Marvel

In the world of film criticism, there’s one inviolable rule: You can’t offer an opinion on a movie you haven’t seen. But on Rotten Tomatoes, the review-aggregating website that wields serious influence over many theatergoers, that rule was broken all the time. Until last week , any site user could leave a review and rating for a film before its release date, something that would affect the movie’

16h

Promising new pancreatic cancer treatment moves forward

A new study describes a new therapeutic approach with potential for patients with pancreatic cancer. These researchers discovered a combination drug therapy that may effectively combat the disease. Researchers first observed anti-cancer impacts in a laboratory setting and, subsequently, in its first use in a human patient.

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Mini kidneys from urine cells

Scientists have successfully created kidney organoids from urine cells. This could lead to a wide range of new treatments that are less onerous for kidney patients.

16h

The first look at how hacked self-driving cars would affect New York City traffic

Researchers have analyzed the real-time effect of a large-scale hack on automobiles in a major urban environment. Using percolation theory, they analyzed how a large, disseminated hack on automobiles would affect traffic flow in New York City, and they found that it could create citywide gridlock. However, based on these findings the team also developed a risk-mitigation strategy to prevent mass u

16h

A common genetic signature has been discovered among three cancer prone rare skin diseases

A group of researchers has identified a common genetic signature among three rare skin diseases or genodermatoses: recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, Kindler syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. In the near future, these findings will allow efficient and safe evidence-based therapeutic approaches.

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Researchers uncover new structures at plant-fungal interface

For millions of years, plants and fungi have exchanged crucial nutrients such as phosphate and fatty acids, but the mechanism by which this exchange happens has been poorly understood. Now, researchers have uncovered structural networks of tubules at the plant-fungal interface that could shed light on the mechanisms of this symbiotic partnership.

16h

Window of opportunity for treatment of early cystic fibrosis lung infections

New research suggests that disease-causing microbes in young cystic fibrosis (CF) patients change rapidly within two to three years after first infection. This knowledge could lead to better treatment strategies to avoid persistent infections.

16h

Ocean heatwaves devastate wildlife, worse to come

Invisible to people but deadly to marine life, ocean heatwaves have damaged ecosystems across the globe and are poised to become even more destructive, according to the first study to measure worldwide impacts with a single yardstick.

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Fire crews gain upper hand against blazes in Spain

Firefighting crews aided by cooler temperatures made progress Monday in their battle to contain dozens of wildfires which broke out in northern Spain but strong winds were still a threat, officials said.

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First female gamers qualify for NBA 2K League draft pool

Two female gamers have been invited to attend this year's NBA 2K League draft, the first time women will be included in the draft pool.

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Ultracold atoms could provide 2D window to exotic 1D physics

Rice physicists propose new vantage point to observe quantum fractionalization.

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Step right up for bigger 2D sheets

Small steps make a big difference in the growth of 2D crystals. A new theory produced at Rice demonstrates why.

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The force is with us, always? Tuning quantum vacuum forces from attractive to repulsive

Scientists can put two uncharged metal plates close together in a vacuum, and 'voila!' —they will attract each other. In 1948, Dutch theoretical physicist Hendrick Casimir first predicted an attractive force responsible for this effect. Scientists have wondered, can there be an equal yet opposite kind of Casimir force? ASU physicist Frank Wilczek has shown for the first time that the Casimir for

16h

A faster, more accurate way to monitor drought

A new drought monitoring method developed at Duke University allows scientists to identify the onset of drought sooner, meaning conservation or remediation measures could be put into place sooner. The new method uses thermal stress — the difference between air and surface temperatures at a site — as a drought indicator.

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Swimming microbes steer themselves into mathematical order

Freeing thousands of microorganisms to swim in random directions in an infinite pool of liquid may not sound like a recipe for order, but eventually the swarm will go with its own flow. Theoretical modeling led by University of Wisconsin-Madison applied mathematician Saverio Spagnolie shows that the forces generated by different kinds of tiny swimmers will sweep them all up in predictable ways.

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Thousands of tiny quakes shake Antarctic ice at night

UChicago scientists placed seismometers on the McMurdo Ice Shelf and recorded hundreds of thousands of tiny 'ice quakes' that appear to be caused by pools of partially melted ice expanding and freezing at night. The phenomenon may be able to help scientists track glacier melting — and to help explain the breakup of large ice shelves.

16h

Is Your Child An Orchid Or A Dandelion? Unlocking The Science Of Sensitive Kids

Some kids seem resilient from the start — readily able, like dandelions, to cope with stress and adversity. But pediatrician Thomas Boyce says biologically reactive kids need more support to thrive. (Image credit: Michael H/Getty Images)

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The Horgan Surface and the Death of Proof

Mathematicians take revenge on the author of a controversial article about proof by naming an object after him. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Transforming magnetic storage might stem from the vision of quantum

Magnetic materials have a worldwide market share of some $50 billion per year. A new frontier in the study of these materials, femtomagnetism, could lead to ultrafast magnetic storage devices that would transform information processing technologies with storage devices several orders of magnitude faster.

16h

Ancient mammal remains digested by crocodiles reveal new species

Fossilized bones that appear to have been digested by crocodiles in the Cayman Islands have revealed three new species and subspecies of mammal that roamed the island more than 300 years ago.

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How new species arise in the sea

How can a species split into several new species if they still live close to each other and are able to interbreed? Using a group of Caribbean reef fishes as a model system, a team of scientists has found that natural selection can couple the evolution of genes for vision and color pattern.

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Checking DNA base editor's mistakes and tricks to reduce them

Scientists have identified the mistake-rate of DNA editing tools, based on CRISPR and known as adenine base editors. Assessing the genome-wide target specificity of these innovative techniques is essential to harness their applications in clinics and biotechnology.

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Hacking just 1 in 10 cars could gridlock all of the roads in Manhattan.

submitted by /u/CyborgTomHanks [link] [comments]

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On Not Believing Leaving Neverland

When Leaving Neverland premiered earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah, it was greeted with trepidation, fanfare, and also bomb-sniffing dogs . The festival’s organizers were worried that fans of Michael Jackson—not the people who had posters of him in their room growing up, or those who have warm memories of dancing to “Smooth Criminal” at their cousin’s wedding, but those who

16h

The Secrets That Might Be Hiding in the Vatican’s Archives

On Monday, 80 years after Pius XII’s election to the papacy, Pope Francis announced that the archives of the controversial wartime pontiff would be opened to scholars next March. The decision follows more than half a century of pressure. Pius XII—a hero of Catholic conservatives, who eagerly await his canonization as a saint, while denounced by his detractors for failing to condemn the Nazis’ gen

16h

Conducting research: Exploring charge flow through proteins

Among the zoo of biomolecules essential to life, proteins are the most startlingly varied and versatile.

16h

Study: Landlord disclosure of bedbugs cuts infestations, creates long-term savings

Policies requiring landlords to disclose bedbug infestations are an effective way to reduce the prevalence of infestations, according to a just-published study. The study's mathematical model says policies can lead to modest, short-term costs to landlords, but ultimately result in savings to landlords and tenants.

16h

Renal reabsorption in living devices

To enable the study of renal reabsorption outside the human body, a team at the Wyss Institute created a 3D vascularized proximal tubule and used it to measure the transport of glucose from the proximal tubule to the blood vessels, along with the effects of hyperglycemia, a condition associated with diabetes in patients.

16h

In search of new 'sugar cleavers'

Complex sugars play multiple and essential roles in the living world. This variety of functions is based on structures that are equally diverse, and the degradation of these carbohydrates therefore requires a variety of specific enzymes, which are far from being identified in their entirety. Two French teams from the CNRS have developed a method for accelerating the discovery of these enzymes, and

16h

A long view of California's climate

Deadly severe wildfires in California have scientists scrutinizing the underlying factors that could influence future extreme events. Using climate simulations and paleoclimate data dating back to the 16th century, a recent study looks closely at long-term upper-level wind and related moisture patterns to find clues.

16h

Luminescent bacteria in squid light organ drive systemic changes in host

A new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, revealed that luminescent bacteria, which live harmoniously inside the Hawaiian bobtail squid's light organ, change the gene expression in other organs of their squid host.

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Conducting research: Exploring charge flow through proteins

In a new study, Stuart Lindsay and his colleagues at Arizona State University explore a surprising property of proteins — one that has only recently come to light. In research appearing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), the group demonstrates electrical conductance through proteins poised between a pair of electrodes.

16h

Scientists track deep history of planets' motions, and effects on Earth's climate

Using cores of rock, scientists have mapped out the tracks of several planets that influence the orbit, and thus the climate, of Earth, in a period 200 million years ago. This vastly expands the time period for which such calculations have been made, opening a window onto the evolution of our climate, and of the solar system itself.

16h

Wildfire risk in California no longer coupled to winter precipitation

Wet winters no longer predict possible relief from severe wildfires for California. Now, fuel buildup from decades of fire suppression in the 20th century plus rising temperatures from climate change means any year may have large fires, no matter how wet the previous winter, according to a new study to be published online March 4 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

16h

Researchers uncover new facets of HIV's 'arms race' with human defense system

A new study reveals details about the evolutionary contest between HIV and the human immune system that could one day improve treatment.

16h

Amoebalike creatures form digestive ‘fronts’ to consume their prey

Communal eating may help Placozoa feast faster

16h

Thousands of Chinese Fans Paid to See a Virtual Hologram Singer

Hologram Performance Thousands of fans convened at Shanghai’s Mercedes-Benz arena on Saturday to see an unusual show: a virtual hologram singer named Luo Tianyi, accompanied by world famous Chinese pianist Lang Lang. But rather than basing the holographic performance on a particular human performer’s movement and voice — the way holograms of Michael Jackson and Tupac have “performed” on stage ove

16h

Sperm Quality Is Falling. Chemicals in Your Home May Be to Blame.

Sperm Fail In the past 80 years, the quality of human sperm has declined by 50 percent — not only is sperm count down, but the sperm that do exist aren’t as mobile as their predecessors. In 2016, a team of researchers from the University of Nottingham published a study noting that domestic dogs were experiencing a decline in sperm quality, too. This led them to wonder if something in the modern h

16h

House Probes Cambridge Analytica on Russia and WikiLeaks

The Democrats’ sweeping new investigation into President Trump includes the now defunct consulting firm better known for misusing the Facebook data of tens of millions of Americans.

16h

Q&A: Why Iranian conservationists are facing ‘ludicrous’ spying charges

Ecologist David Laylin urges release of eight jailed colleagues

16h

Bill Jenkins, Tuskegee Syphilis Study Whistleblower, Dies

A government scientist, he tried to end the unethical study, was unsuccessful, and then spent his career combatting injustice in healthcare.

16h

How bacteria can help prevent coal ash spills

Researchers have developed a technique that uses bacteria to produce 'biocement' in coal ash ponds, making the coal ash easier to store and limiting the risk of coal ash spills into surface waters.

16h

New portal of entry for influenza viruses

Influenza viruses from bats use an entirely different portal to enter the cell than all previously known types of influenza.

16h

Concept of the laser can be reversed

Scientists have found a way to build the 'opposite' of a laser — a device that absorbs a specific light wave perfectly. This can be done even in complicated systems, in which waves are scattered randomly, and has many technological applications.

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New quantum sensor could improve cancer treatment

A new quantum sensor has proven it can outperform existing technologies and promises significant advancements in long-range 3D imaging and monitoring the success of cancer treatments.

16h

Physicists solve 35-year-old mystery about quarks

Physicists now know why quarks, the building blocks of the universe, move more slowly inside atomic nuclei, solving a 35-year-old-mystery.

16h

Magnonic devices can replace electronics without much noise

Electronic devices are getting smaller and will soon hit the limits of performance based on electrical currents. Devices based on magnonic currents would transform the industry, though scientists need to better understand how to control them. Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have made an important step toward the development of practical magnonic devices by studying, for the f

16h

Conducting research: Exploring charge flow through proteins

Among the zoo of biomolecules essential to life, proteins are the most startlingly varied and versatile.

16h

Luminescent bacteria in squid light organ drive systemic changes in host

A new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by researchers at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), revealed that luminescent bacteria, which live harmoniously inside the Hawaiian bobtail squid's light organ, change the gene expression in other organs of their squid host.

16h

Scientists track deep history of planets' motions, and effects on Earth's climate

Scientists have long posited that periodic swings in Earth's climate are driven by cyclic changes in the distribution of sunlight reaching our surface. This is due to cyclic changes in how our planet spins on its axis, the ellipticity of its orbit, and its orientation toward the sun—overlapping cycles caused by subtle gravitational interplays with other planets, as the bodies whirl around the sun

16h

Disclosing bed bug infestation to potential tenants can save landlords money

Laws that require landlords to disclose bed bug infestations help combat the spread of the insects and protect the health of potential tenants. According to a new study, these laws also lead to cost savings, on average, for landlords within five years. Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published their findings today in Proceedings of the National Acad

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Wildfire risk in California no longer coupled to winter precipitation

Wet winters no longer predict possible relief from severe wildfires for California, according to a new study from an international team that includes a University of Arizona scientist.

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Luminescent bacteria in squid light organ drive systemic changes in host

A new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by researchers at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), revealed that luminescent bacteria, which live harmoniously inside the Hawaiian bobtail squid's light organ, change the gene expression in other organs of their squid host.

16h

Pininfarina Battista unveiled: 1,900-horsepower electric hypercar is an absolute stunner

No car design studio has a more compelling portfolio than Pininfarina, so expectations have been sky-high for the first car to have that famous logo on the back of the car as well as …

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A new Dr. Seuss book — 'Horse Museum' — is coming out this fall

The new book will be titled Dr. Seuss's Horse Museum . Author of 45 children's books, Dr. Seuss's profundity mixed seamlessly with his simplicity. Revisit and explore these timeless classics by yourself and with your children. Publisher Random House has announced that a new Dr. Seuss book, Horse Museum , will be released this fall. In it, a horse guides children through a tour of an art museum, t

17h

Research provides insight on survivability of rare Wyoming plant

The research found that despite the low density of the desert yellowhead — there are fewer than 15,000 individual plants scattered across just 55 acres — these populations survive partly because of a principle called negative density dependence.

17h

Ocean Heat Waves Are Threatening Marine Life

Scientists say the heat waves are becoming more common and longer, and are killing off the species that underpin many marine ecosystems.

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Peer-review experiments tracked in online repository

Peer-review experiments tracked in online repository Peer-review experiments tracked in online repository, Published online: 04 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00777-8 ReimagineReview records trials that are probing the pros and cons of different approaches to review.

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Chemical pollutants in the home degrade fertility in both men and dogs, study finds

New research suggests that environmental contaminants found in the home and diet have the same adverse effects on male fertility in both humans and in domestic dogs.

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Influence of social media on children's food intake

New research highlights the negative influence that social media has on children's food intake.

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Genomics could better match treatments to pancreatic cancer patients

Pancreatic cancer is a grim diagnosis, but this new study, the largest of its kind, identifies genomic markers that could increase survival by better matching chemotherapy drugs to patients.

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Some hummingbird beaks are better for ‘fencing’ than food

Some male hummingbirds have traded efficient feeding for bills that are better at stabbing and plucking other hummingbirds as they fend off rivals for food and mates, according to new research. Most hummingbirds have bills and tongues exquisitely designed to slip inside a flower, lap up nectar, and squeeze every last drop of precious sugar water from their tongue to fuel their frenetic lifestyle.

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4 major religions with anarchist roots

Anarchists aren't typically portrayed as particularly religious; instead, we think of them as violent anti-authoritarians. While many modern anarchists rankle at today's religious organizations, the elements of these faiths often express a lot of ideas that anarchists express as well. Here are 4 major religions and how they connect back to anarchy. None Generally, we don't think of anarchists as

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Mercedes-Benz’ First All-Electric Racecar Is Equipped Like a Beast

Silver Arrow Mercedes-Benz just revealed its first all-electric racecar at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show. The EQ Silver Arrow 01 will be Mercedes-Benz’ entry for the upcoming Formula E racing series at the end of this year — and it’s a beautiful vision of racing machinery beyond the age of fossil fuels. Already in love with our Mercedes-Benz EQ Silver Arrow 01 teaser car. #FormulaESoonHasAMercedes #

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Radar Reveals 19th-Century Military Fortifications Beneath Alcatraz

A 19th-century military fortification was bulldozed over so that the Alcatraz Penitentiary could be built, and the remains of the fort are still there, underground, according to a new radar analysis of the site.

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SpaceX Dragon Successfully Docks at ISS Without Aid of Robot Arm

There was no one on-board other than a test dummy, but this serves as an effective proof of concept for the new spacecraft design. The post SpaceX Dragon Successfully Docks at ISS Without Aid of Robot Arm appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Bloating: The Causes and the Cures

Tamara Duker Freuman, author of The Bloated Belly Whisperer, explains why there isn't a one-size-fits-all solution to bloating — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The House’s Latest Move Could Be a Big Threat to Trump’s Presidency

Updated at 3:00 p.m. ET on March 4, 2019. Donald Trump insists that the investigations into his campaign’s ties with Russia are all a “hoax.” But an expansive probe that goes beyond Russia was launched by the House Judiciary Committee on Monday, and could lay the groundwork for impeachment proceedings, potentially posing the biggest threat to date to his presidency. Jerry Nadler, the House Judici

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Carnival 2019 in Brazil

In Rio de Janeiro, tens of thousands of spectators jammed into the Sambadrome to watch the spectacle of samba-school floats, dancers, and extravagant costumes during Carnival. Even more people took part in the many blocos , or street parties, dancing and drinking into the wee hours of the night. Collected here are images from Rio and São Paulo, Brazil, during Carnival 2019.

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Background Music Might Stifle Creativity

Volunteers who listened to music solved fewer word puzzles than others who worked in silence. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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India's stubble burning air pollution causes USD 30 billion economic losses, health risks

India's air pollution made headlines around the globe last year. Researchers estimate the economic and health cost of air pollution caused due to stubble burning at USD 30 billion per year in a new research — the first to arrive at these estimates.

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Blueprint for city marine parks

Coastal cities are among the fastest growing population centres on the planet and half of the global population now lives within 100km of the coast.

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The political power of 'the': A linguistic analysis

A new study of the English definite article 'the' demonstrates that even seemingly drab function words can send powerful social and political signals. The study 'Pragmatics and the social life of the English definite article,' by Eric Acton (Eastern Michigan University) will be published in the March, 2019 issue of the scholarly journal Language.

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Dental fillings could last twice as long

A compound used to make car bumpers strong and protect wood decks could prevent return visits to the dentist's office. A team of researchers with the OHSU School of Dentistry in Portland, Oregon, have created a filling material that's two times more resistant to breakage than standard fillings. The team also has developed an adhesive that's 30 percent stronger after six months in use than adhesive

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Diabetes impairs multipotent stromal cell antibacterial activity

A new study reveals that the multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) of persons with diabetes have diminished capacity to fight off bacterial infection, providing new understanding into the basis of diabetes-associated immune dysfunction.

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Better to include your better half in social posts, study finds

New research from Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Kansas found that sharing information online can do more harm to romantic relationships than good. However, researchers found a way to counteract its negative effects. If you often post about your life, include your partner. The research is the first of its kind to systematically examine how different circumstances can affect wheth

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Patients who stay in hospital less than 3 days after TAVR fare better

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) patients who are required to stay in the hospital more than three days after the procedure are at a significantly greater risk of heart attack, stroke or death after one year, compared to patients discharged in less than 72 hours, according to a study published today in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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WWF accused of funding guards who torture and kill in poaching war

The global conservation charity says it is commissioning an independent review into the claims.

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Behold, new research suggests the munchies are real

Researchers noticed a spike in sales of ice cream, cookies, and chips after the legalization of marijuana. They studied 2,000 U.S. counties over the course of a decade, focusing on data from Colorado, Oregon, and Washington. While research is confirming the medical benefits of marijuana, obesity is an unintended consequence of legalization. None Cause and effect. There are many unintended consequ

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Dying trees in cities? Blame it on the pavement

A new NC State University study of urban tree life in the Southeast shows pavement and concrete may have a bigger effect than longitudinal warming.

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How to catch a magnetic monopole in the act

A research team led by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has created a nanoscale 'playground' on a chip that simulates the formation of exotic magnetic particles called 'monopoles.' The study could unlock the secrets to ever-smaller, more powerful memory devices, microelectronics, and next-generation hard drives that employ the power of magnetic spin t

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58 percent off an above-ground pool, $37 running headphones, and other great deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Better to include your better half in social posts, study finds

If you're in a relationship and like to share details about your life on social media, do yourself a favor and include your partner. It will probably help your personal life.

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Research laying groundwork for off-world colonies

Before civilization can move off world it must make sure its structures work on the extraterrestrial foundations upon which they will be built. Researchers are already laying the groundwork for the off-world jump by creating standards for extraterrestrial surfaces.

17h

Biodiversity crisis: Technological advances in agriculture are not a sufficient response

Rapid population and economic growth are destroying biodiversity. A growing demand for agricultural products requires ever new cultivated areas. Even though technological advances are making agriculture more efficient, the growing population makes up for these successes. Effective nature conservation needs concepts against population growth and for sustainable consumption.

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Asteroids are stronger, harder to destroy than previously thought

A popular theme in the movies is that of an incoming asteroid that could extinguish life on the planet, and our heroes are launched into space to blow it up. But incoming asteroids may be harder to break than scientists previously thought, finds a study that used a new understanding of rock fracture and a new computer modeling method to simulate asteroid collisions.

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Potential new source of rare earth elements

Researchers have found a possible new source of rare earth elements – phosphate rock waste – and an environmentally friendly way to get them out, according to a new study. The approach could benefit clean energy technology.

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Want to save the planet? Stop trying to be its friend

Research reveals how advertisers, politicians and economic systems play on the psychology of 'climate compensation' — and encourages a more rational approach to environmental responsibility.

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Poll shows many older adults, especially those with health issues, feel isolated

One in four older adults say they feel isolated from other people at least some of the time, and one in three say they lack regular companionship, according to a new national poll. Those feelings of loneliness showed up most in people aged 50 to 80 who also reported they had health issues and unhealthy habits. The findings amplify research showing links between chronic loneliness and health issues

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The speedy secrets of mako sharks — 'cheetahs of the ocean'

To investigate how shortfin mako sharks achieve their impressive speeds, researchers tested real sharkskin samples, using digital particle image velocimetry. They discovered that a 'passive bristling' capability of the microscopic surface geometry of the shark's scales controlled flow separation, which causes pressure drag — the most influential cause of drag on aircraft. The work could lead to n

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Due to humans, extinction risk for 1,700 animal species to increase by 2070

As humans continue to expand our use of land across the planet, we leave other species little ground to stand on. By 2070, increased human land-use is expected to put 1,700 species of amphibians, …

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China Opens Its First Mars Simulation Base

Visitors Welcome The Chinese city of Mang’ai is one of the most Mars-like places on Earth, featuring a similar climate and landscape to the Red Planet. That made it the perfect setting for a newly opened Mars simulation base that China hopes will draw tourists — and maybe even help humanity reach the real Mars . Growing Potatoes China began construction on the base in June. According to a July re

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The Guardian view on academic publishing: disastrous capitalism | Editorial

The giants of the scientific publishing industry have made huge profits for decades. Now they are under threat Scientific publishing has long been a licence to print money. Scientists need journals in which to publish their research, so they will supply the articles without monetary reward. Other scientists perform the skilled and specialised work of peer review also for free , because it is a cen

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The Scientist's Guide to the Perfect Fondue

The Scientist's Guide to the Perfect Fondue Ensuring a pot of the famous melted cheese dish has the right material properties is key to enjoying it. Fondue_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Aimee Custis Photography via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Culture Monday, March 4, 2019 – 13:30 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) — During the cold of winter, the Swiss will often prepare a war

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John Oliver makes fun of the fear around automation… 🙂

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How celastrol sensitizes brains to leptin, curbing hunger and obesity

Celastrol's potent anti-obesity effects were widely reported in 2015. Derived from the roots of the thunder god vine, the drug curbed food intake in obese mice by nearly 80 percent, producing up to a 45 percent weight loss.

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First genetic clue for elusive pediatric liver disease

A nationwide consortium of researchers has identified the first genetic defect linked to biliary atresia, a mysterious liver disease that is the leading cause for liver transplantation in children.

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Study: More than one-third of patients risk major bleeding by doubling up on blood thinners

A new study finds patients were taking too many antithrombotics for no reason, leading to a significant increase in bleeding events.

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Texas Biomed scientists developing new vaccine strategy for tuberculosis

– For years, scientists have been trying to come up with a better way to protect people against tuberculosis, the disease caused by infection with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) bacteria. Texas Biomedical Research Institute Professor Jordi Torrelles, Ph.D., says new hope is on the horizon after a recent experiment performed in mice showed great promise. The study was published in the journal

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The New, Invasive Ways Women Are Encouraged to Freeze Their Eggs

One of the Instagram ads for Extend Fertility, a New York–based egg-freezing service for women, presents two images. First, there’s a hand with freshly manicured nails, followed by a sassy pink cartoon of a human egg with big eyes and long lashes. “If you can afford this,” text reads above the nails, “you can afford this,” referring to the cartoon egg. The ad, part of a campaign created by the wo

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Chirality yields colossal photocurrent

Typically, light is converted to electricity by chemically altering a semiconductor to have a built-in electric field. A team of researchers has developed an alternative means using a unique semi-metal that intrinsically generates direct current through the nonlinear mixing of the waves of light.

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The case of the over-tilting exoplanets

For almost a decade, astronomers have tried to explain why so many pairs of planets outside our solar system have an odd configuration — their orbits seem to have been pushed apart by a powerful unknown mechanism. Researchers say they've found a possible answer, and it implies that the planets' poles are majorly tilted.

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Background Music Might Stifle Creativity

Volunteers who listened to music solved fewer word puzzles than others who worked in silence. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Chirality yields colossal photocurrent

Typically, light is converted to electricity by chemically altering a semiconductor to have a built-in electric field. A team of researchers has developed an alternative means using a unique semi-metal that intrinsically generates direct current through the nonlinear mixing of the waves of light.

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19th-Century American Whalers Defaced Rock Art in Australia with Their Own Carvings

Indigenous people in Australia weren't the only ones to leave their mark on local rocks.

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Ancient mammal remains digested by crocodiles reveal new species

Fossilized bones that appear to have been digested by crocodiles in the Cayman Islands have revealed three new species and subspecies of mammal that roamed the island more than 300 years ago.

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Genetic factors influence human brain expansion

An analysis published in JNeurosci of brain scans from more than 600 children and adolescents reveals genetically-mediated associations between the size of evolutionarily novel brain regions and intelligence test scores. Genetic influences on the brain follow the patterns of evolutionary expansion of the human brain relative to nonhuman primates.

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A new approach to an old question: How do we actually cooperate?

Princeton researchers are exploring how cooperation arises in human societies, where people tend to cluster into various group types — political, religious, familial, professional, etc. — which they will describe at the 2019 APS March Meeting. Within such groups, people can cooperate or 'defect' and receive payoffs based on those exchanges. Cooperation, they observed, is most favored when allowi

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‘Antivaxxers’ attack U.S. science panel

Meetings of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention vaccine committee have become the latest front in a national battle over immunization

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Discontinued Robot Assistant Announces Its Own Death

All Bots Go to Heaven Jibo, the company selling anthropomorphic dancing smart home assistants that were meant to make your life at home easier, laid off most of its employees last year. And now the bot itself is ready to say goodbye — forever. “I want to say I’ve really enjoyed our time together,” the robot says in a video posted by tech reporter Dylan Martin. “Thank you very very much for having

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Background Music Might Stifle Creativity

Volunteers who listened to music solved fewer word puzzles than others who worked in silence. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tyrannosaurus Rex: The Once and Future King

The dinosaur will always be the predator potentate. But let’s not forget all the other members of the royal family.

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Global Health: Diagnoses by Horn, Payment in Goats: An African Healer at Work

On a continent wracked with epidemics, millions turn to traditional healers. In rural Uganda, not far from the Ebola zone, an herbalist describes his practice.

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John Oliver Prepares Kids for the Inevitable Robot Takeover

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A new approach to an old question: How do we actually cooperate?

In the animal kingdom, birds band together to ward off predators, and honeybees work collectively to benefit the entire hive. Animals of the human persuasion can act cooperatively too, at times, though this behavior is not completely understood.

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Red tide rolling: Harmful algae found to flourish in both high-, low-CO2 environments

Researchers find a Florida-specific strain of red-tide causing algae thrives in both high and low CO2 concentrations.

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Hacking just 1 in 10 cars could gridlock all of the roads in Manhattan

Internet-connected cars promise to reduce traffic incidents with sensors that can stop a car, but if they were hacked whole cities could shut down

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Tesla Owners Are Enraged That the Company Cut Its Prices

Bad Timing Last week, Tesla announced plans to cut the prices of eight of its vehicle models. That’s great news if you’re looking to buy a Tesla. But not-so-great if you already own one. Some owners saw the value of their EVs decrease by tens of thousands of dollars overnight, leading to a slew of Tesla protests overseas — and the outrage could hurt Tesla’s chances of success in the world’s most

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Bringing more human intelligence to AI, data science and digital automation

The advent of data science, wireless connectivity and sensors, artificial intelligence (AI), and the Internet of Things (IoT) has raised the prospects for digital automation, smart hospital design and the home health care industry for an aging population.

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How megalodon's teeth evolved into the 'ultimate cutting tools'

Megalodon, the largest shark that ever lived, is known only from its gigantic bladelike teeth, which can be more than 7 inches long. But these teeth, described by some scientists as the "ultimate cutting tools," took millions of years to evolve into their final, iconic form.

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Higher education: Colleges add cannabis to the curriculum

Grace DeNoya is used to getting snickers when people learn she's majoring in marijuana.

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UK budget airline Flybe says investors back takeover

Britain's troubled no-frills airline Flybe announced Monday that its shareholders have overwhelmingly approved a takeover from a consortium led by Virgin Atlantic.

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Mystery of green icebergs may soon be solved

Researchers have proposed a new idea that may explain why some Antarctic icebergs are tinged emerald green rather than the normal blue, potentially solving a decades-long scientific mystery.

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How megalodon's teeth evolved into the 'ultimate cutting tools'

Megalodon, the largest shark that ever lived, is known only from its gigantic bladelike teeth. But these teeth took millions of years to evolve into their final, iconic form.

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Seven moral rules found all around the world

What is morality? And to what extent does it vary around the world? The theory of 'morality-as-cooperation' argues that morality consists of a collection of biological and cultural solutions to the problems of cooperation recurrent in human social life. These solutions or cooperative behaviors are plausible candidates for universal moral rules, and that morality-as-cooperation could provide the un

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Putting the brake on our immune system's response

Researchers have discovered how a tiny molecule known as miR-132 acts as a 'handbrake' on our immune system — helping us fight infection.

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Mini cheetah is the first four-legged robot to do a backflip

MIT's new mini cheetah robot is springy and light on its feet, with a range of motion that rivals a champion gymnast. The four-legged powerpack can bend and swing its legs wide, enabling it to walk either right-side up or upside down. The robot can also trot over uneven terrain about twice as fast as an average person's walking speed.

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Neurodegenerative diseases identified using artificial intelligence

Researchers have developed an artificial intelligence platform to detect a range of neurodegenerative disease in human brain tissue samples, including Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

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Bringing more human intelligence to AI, data science and digital automation

The advent of data science, wireless connectivity and sensors, artificial intelligence, and the Internet of Things has raised the prospects for digital automation, smart hospital design and the home health care industry for an aging population.

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SpaceX's Crew Dragon Successfully Docked with the ISS, Will Return to Earth Friday

SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsule successfully completed its first docking with the International Space Station on Sunday morning, following a successful launch Saturday morning. This marks the first time SpaceX has ever docked with ISS under its own power. The Crew Dragon docking went smooth, allaying safety concerns. New Connections Previously, the Dragon cargo capsule has merely flown close before b

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Trade war results in substantial losses for US and other countries

The United States and China are close to finalizing a trade deal that would roll back tariffs on at least $200 billion of the $250 billion worth of Chinese imports currently taxed by the U.S.

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Talking about Brexit—how did we get to this point?

Are we facing a 'no-deal', 'cliff-edge' or 'clean' Brexit? When and where did the word 'Brexit' first appear in the media? And why has the voice of business been ignored for so long?

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Tesla Model Y SUV Debuts March 14: Here’s What We Know So Far

The Tesla Model 3 is getting an SUV sibling soon. The Model Y will probably be a bit larger and roomier. Price will likely start in the high 30s and then, like SpaceX, it reaches the heavens. The post Tesla Model Y SUV Debuts March 14: Here’s What We Know So Far appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Mystery of green icebergs may soon be solved

Researchers have proposed a new idea that may explain why some Antarctic icebergs are tinged emerald green rather than the normal blue, potentially solving a decades-long scientific mystery.

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Applying a network perspective to human physiology

Medical practitioners commonly treat organs in isolation, but a physicist wants to usher in a new paradigm.

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How a common oral bacteria makes colon cancer more deadly

Researchers have determined how a type of bacteria commonly found in the mouth accelerates the growth of colon cancer.

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Promising strategy to fight the most deadly brain tumor in children

A study found that an inhibitor of an enzyme called ACVR1 slows tumor growth and increases survival in an animal model of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) — the most deadly brain tumor in children.

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Reevaluating pneumococcal vaccine guidance: An analysis

If mitigating racial disparities in those who contract pneumococcal diseases, such as meningitis and pneumonia, is a top public health priority, then recommending that all adults get a pneumococcal vaccine at age 50 would likely be effective guidance.

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Long-lived parents produce better quality offspring

Researchers studied a gene associated with ageing in roundworms. They found that by reducing this gene's expression, they could not only more than double the worm's lifespan – but also improve the fitness of its offspring. The findings support an emerging new theory that we have genes that age us, and that shutting down these genes in later life could one day help us stay younger and healthier for

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Manhattan Weighs Driver Fee to Cut Pollution

A new plan endorses congestion pricing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Boyce Thompson Institute launches new Plant Genome Editing Database

Recently developed gene editing tools like CRISPR/Cas enable plant scientists to figure out the functions of myriad plant genes. While these studies could eventually lead to the creation of crops with improved traits like increased disease resistance or higher yield, researchers first need a good way to keep track of the increasingly large amounts of resulting data.

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New quantum sensor could improve cancer treatment

A new quantum sensor developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) has proven it can outperform existing technologies and promises significant advancements in long-range 3-D imaging and monitoring the success of cancer treatments.

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Research laying groundwork for off-world colonies

Before civilization can move off world it must make sure its structures work on the extraterrestrial foundations upon which they will be built.

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Boyce Thompson Institute launches new Plant Genome Editing Database

Recently developed gene editing tools like CRISPR/Cas enable plant scientists to figure out the functions of myriad plant genes. While these studies could eventually lead to the creation of crops with improved traits like increased disease resistance or higher yield, researchers first need a good way to keep track of the increasingly large amounts of resulting data.

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Hacked autonomous vehicles could cripple New York City

Two research teams highlight individual and mass dangers of vulnerable vehicles. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Gotcha! Scientists fingerprint proteins using their vibrations

In the cells of every living organism—humans, birds, bees, roses and even bacteria—proteins vibrate with microscopic motions that help them perform vital tasks ranging from cell repair to photosynthesis.

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Fights give way to humor in long marriages

Disagreements that can mark the early and middle years of marriage mellow with age as conflicts give way to humor and acceptance, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed videotaped conversations between 87 middle-aged and older husbands and wives who had been married for 15 to 35 years, and tracked their emotional interactions over the course of 13 years. They found that as couples aged, t

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Gotcha! Scientists fingerprint proteins using their vibrations

In the cells of every living organism—humans, birds, bees, roses and even bacteria—proteins vibrate with microscopic motions that help them perform vital tasks ranging from cell repair to photosynthesis.

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Researchers use machine learning to more quickly analyze key capacitor materials

Capacitors, given their high energy output and recharging speed, could play a major role in powering the machines of the future, from electric cars to cell phones.

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Chirality yields colossal photocurrent

A recently discovered Weyl semimetal delivers the largest intrinsic conversion of light to electricity of any material, an international team lead by a group of Boston College researchers reports today in the journal Nature Materials.

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Genomic testing of a single patient reveals a gene commonly mutated in pediatric melanoma

Comprehensive clinical genomic testing of an adolescent patient, including whole genome sequencing, helped researchers identify mutations in a single gene that drive the most common childhood melanoma. The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study appears as an advance online publication today in the journal Nature Medicine.Further research found that 33 percent of young people with spitzoid mel

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Radiation after surgery triples survival for a type of pediatric brain tumor

Radiation immediately following surgery in children with ependymoma, the third most common pediatric brain tumor, can nearly triple survival. The Phase II clinical trial was sponsored by COG, the world's largest cooperative pediatric cancer research organization. This was the first cooperative group study to give immediate postoperative radiation to children under age 3 with ependymoma. The clinic

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Trade war results in substantial losses for US and other countries

Because of import tariffs through November 2018, US importers and consumers experienced $12.3 billion in added tax costs and $6.9 billion from reduced imports that otherwise would have been purchased at a lower price without the tariffs.

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Boyce Thompson Institute researchers uncover new structures at plant-fungal interface

For millions of years, plants and fungi have exchanged crucial nutrients such as phosphate and fatty acids, but the mechanism by which this exchange happens has been poorly understood. Now, researchers at the Boyce Thompson Institute have uncovered structural networks of tubules at the plant-fungal interface that could shed light on the mechanisms of this symbiotic partnership. Details of the stud

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A common genetic signature has been discovered among three cancer prone rare skin diseases

A group of researchers lead by a lecturer from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), Marcela del Río, from the CIEMAT, the Rare Diseases Networking Biomedical Research Centre (Initials in Spanish: CIBERER– ISCIII) and Fundación Jiménez Díaz has identified a common genetic signature among three rare skin diseases or genodermatoses: recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, Kindler syndrom

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The first look at how hacked self-driving cars would affect New York City traffic

Researchers have analyzed the real-time effect of a large-scale hack on automobiles in a major urban environment. Using percolation theory, they analyzed how a large, disseminated hack on automobiles would affect traffic flow in New York City, and they found that it could create citywide gridlock. However, based on these findings the team also developed a risk-mitigation strategy to prevent mass u

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Google fights European copyright overhaul

Internet giant Google on Monday urged the European Parliament to resist approving a planned overhaul of the bloc's online copyright law that the company said would hurt Europe for "decades to come".

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Daily briefing: The fight for the future of fecal transplants

Daily briefing: The fight for the future of fecal transplants Daily briefing: The fight for the future of fecal transplants, Published online: 04 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00780-z Who will control the brown gold mine, 5 reactions chemists wish existed and how open access is influencing big pharma.

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Watch an ISS Astronaut Enter SpaceX Crew Capsule for First Time

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Graphene Shows Promise for Repairing Broken Bones

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Tesla owners literally protest over drastic price cuts

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The Fukushima meltdown is way too hot for humans

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Hacked autonomous vehicles could cripple New York City

Two research teams highlight individual and mass dangers of vulnerable vehicles. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Promising new pancreatic cancer treatment moves forward

A study published today in the journal Nature Medicine led by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) describes a new therapeutic approach with potential for patients with pancreatic cancer. These researchers discovered a combination drug therapy that may effectively combat the disease. HCI researchers first observed anti-cancer impacts in a laboratory set

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Pancreatic cancer collective comments on promising new pancreatic cancer

Lustgarten Foundation and SU2C offer comments on research describing a new combination drug therapy demonstrating promise for patients with pancreatic cancer. This research is the foundation for a Pancreatic Cancer Collective New Therapies Challenge Grant to Dr. Martin McMahon (Huntsman Cancer Institute). The Collective offers this video of Dr. McMahon and David Tuveson, MD, PhD commenting.

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Following Your Dharma in an Age of Climate Change

We all must discover our intellectual path; here’s how I found mine — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dengue antibodies may make Zika worse for offspring

A surprising new interaction between the dengue and Zika viruses sheds light on the significant fetal brain abnormalities linked to Zika. Researchers discovered that fetal mouse brain damage was much worse if the mothers infected with Zika also had dengue antibodies. Further, they discovered that a receptor on placental cells recognizes an immune complex that forms when dengue antibodies attach t

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Sleeping more on weekends does not make up for past sleep loss

The results of a new study warn that weekend lie-ins cannot effectively erase the harm resulting from insufficient sleep throughout the working week.

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Scientists develop printable water sensor

A new, versatile plastic-composite sensor can detect tiny amounts of water. The 3D printable material is cheap, flexible and non-toxic and changes its color from purple to blue in wet conditions. The researchers used DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III to understand the structural changes within the material that are triggered by water and lead to the observed color change.

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Exercise can improve non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease

Exercise has potential to improve non-motor as well as motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), including cognitive function, report investigators.

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Drying without dying: How resurrection plants survive without water

A small group of plants known as 'resurrection plants' can survive months or even years without water. The research team made a significant step forward in understanding how they do it.

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Psychedelic microdosing in rats shows beneficial effects

Microdosing — taking tiny amounts of psychedelic drugs to boost mood and mental acuity — is based on anecdotal reports of its benefits. Now, a study in rats suggests microdosing can provide relief for symptoms of depression and anxiety, but also has potential negative effects.

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Elon Musk: Tesla Will Unveil Model Y Next Week

Model Y On Sunday, Elon Musk’s space company SpaceX made history by docking the first private American passenger spacecraft to the International Space Station. The same day, Musk announced big news about Tesla, his electric car company, on Twitter : Tesla’s Model 3 successor, the Model Y, will be revealed at an event on March 14 in Los Angeles at which attendees will be able to test ride Tesla’s

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Following Your Dharma in an Age of Climate Change

We all must discover our intellectual path; here’s how I found mine — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Apex Legends Hits 50 Million Players In Just One Month, Leaving Fortnite In The Dust

Do you hear that, folks? That’s the sound of potential growing concern over at Epic Games headquarters in Cary, NC. Respawn Entertainment co-founder Vince Zampella took to Twitter this morning …

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Chirality yields colossal photocurrent

Typically, light is converted to electricity by chemically altering a semiconductor to have a built-in electric field. A team of researchers from Boston College, the University of California Los Angeles, and Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne have developed an alternative means using a unique semimetal that intrinsically generates direct current through the nonlinear mixing of the waves of l

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Using sleep disorder to predict Parkinson's disease

A large multi-center study of more than 1,200 patients provides important predictors of Parkinson's disease progression, which will allow better candidate selection for clinical trials and more effective therapy development.

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Gotcha! Scientists fingerprint proteins using their vibrations

In the cells of every living organism — humans, birds, bees, roses and even bacteria — proteins vibrate with microscopic motions that help them perform vital tasks ranging from cell repair to photosynthesis. Now, A team led by University at Buffalo physicist Andrea Markelz reports that it has developed a method for rapidly measuring proteins' unique vibrations.

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Brain's ability to synchronize voice sounds could be related to language learning

Researchers from Barcelona and New York, studied the synchronization of speech motor rhythms. Results show some people's brains adapt spontaneously to align with the rhythm of the voices they hear, while others do not. According to the research study in Nature Neuroscience, these patterns show differences in functional and structural aspects of the speech network in the brain, as well as the abili

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New study calls for supervision orders to have 'more teeth'

This study, funded by the Nuffield Foundation, is the first national study of all children placed on supervision orders between 2010/11 and 2016/17 — a total of 19,296 children.

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Researchers develop mini kidneys from urine cells

Scientists from Utrecht University, University Medical Center Utrecht and Hubrecht Institute have successfully created kidney organoids from urine cells. This could lead to a wide range of new treatments that are less onerous for kidney patients. The results of the research will be published in Nature Biotechnology today.

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Scientists develop printable water sensor

A new, versatile plastic-composite sensor can detect tiny amounts of water. The 3D printable material is cheap, flexible and non-toxic and changes its color from purple to blue in wet conditions. The researchers used DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III to understand the structural changes within the material that are triggered by water and lead to the observed color change.

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Spider silk does the twist when the weather is right

Spider silk does the twist when the weather is right Spider silk does the twist when the weather is right, Published online: 04 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00775-w One species’ silk can make almost a full revolution when exposed to sufficient humidity.

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Exposure to trauma impacts ability to squash bad memories

People exposed to trauma are less able to suppress unwanted emotional memories due to neural and behavioral disruptions in their brain that may contribute to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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Optical clocks started the calibration of the international atomic time

Optical clocks have evaluated the latest 'one second' tick of the International Atomic Time (TAI) and provided these data for adjusting the tick rate of TAI.

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A quick path to antimalarial resistance

Resistance to antimalarial drugs is thought to result mainly from changes in the parasite's genome. However, P. falciparum can also develop resistance to some antimalarial compounds by epigenetic changes, according to a new study. This is of concern because resistance acquired at the epigenetic level can arise quickly, even during the course of a single infection.

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Young people at risk of addiction have differences in key brain region

Young adults at risk of developing problems with addiction show key differences in an important region of the brain, according to a new study.

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Well-being and the rise of psychotherapy in Uganda

Perspectives on happiness and mental health differ across the world. Westernized perspectives present happiness as an individualized state of being that can be cultivated and sustained through continuous effort. In areas where these western beliefs are prominent, happiness is established as the norm, and as a result, a global trend has emerged where the absence of happiness is increasingly medical

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Uncovering errors in biomedical research results

Just like the wrong ingredients can spoil a cake, so too can the wrong ingredients spoil the results in biomedical research. The difference is that the latter involves years of work, financial and personal investment and promise.

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A Game of Chickens

LONDON —The United Kingdom is scheduled to exit the European Union on March 29. The clock is ticking to reach an agreement on a transition. Without a transition agreement, the U.K. will abruptly be ejected overnight from the European Union Customs Union and single market—a shock that could send not only Britain but also perhaps the whole EU crashing into recession. Yet the first attempt to enact

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Bill Gates’s pancake problem – and three more pancakes in science

Sorting a stack of pancakes by size is a vexing challenge for mathematicians, but Microsoft's Bill Gates came up with an enduring solution.

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China Plans to Launch a Mars Rover Next Year

Mars 2020 After landing the world’s first rover on the far side of the Moon early this year, China already has far more ambitious plans in the works: sending a rover to Mars. “Over the past 60 years, we’ve made a lot of achievements, but there is still a large distance from the world space powers,” chief designer of China’s lunar exploration program Wu Wiren said ahead of the opening of the Chine

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Europe’s flood risk is linked to atmospheric ‘seesaw’

Europe’s flood risk is linked to atmospheric ‘seesaw’ Europe’s flood risk is linked to atmospheric ‘seesaw’, Published online: 04 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00727-4 Shifts in pressure system could increase flood damage as Earth’s climate warms.

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Random anti-lasing through coherent perfect absorption in a disordered medium

Random anti-lasing through coherent perfect absorption in a disordered medium Random anti-lasing through coherent perfect absorption in a disordered medium, Published online: 04 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0971-3 Coherent perfect absorption in a disordered medium is demonstrated experimentally in the microwave regime through the realization of a random anti-laser that absorbs engineered ra

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Researchers use machine learning to more quickly analyze key capacitor materials

Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology are using machine learning to ultimately find ways to build more capable capacitors.

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Researchers discover new portal of entry for influenza viruses

Influenza viruses from bats use an entirely different portal to enter the cell than all previously known types of influenza / human cells also infectable in the lab / publication in Nature.

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How bacteria can help prevent coal ash spills

Researchers have developed a technique that uses bacteria to produce 'biocement' in coal ash ponds, making the coal ash easier to store and limiting the risk of coal ash spills into surface waters.

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Checking DNA base editor's mistakes and tricks to reduce them

IBS scientists have identified the mistake-rate of DNA editing tools, based on CRISPR and known as adenine base editors. Assessing the genome-wide target specificity of these innovative techniques is essential to harness their applications in clinics and biotechnology.

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Physicists solve 35-year-old mystery about quarks

Physicists from Tel Aviv University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility now know why quarks, the building blocks of the universe, move more slowly inside atomic nuclei, solving a 35-year-old-mystery.

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Mystery of green icebergs may soon be solved

Researchers have proposed a new idea that may explain why some Antarctic icebergs are tinged emerald green rather than the normal blue, potentially solving a decades-long scientific mystery.

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UCF research laying groundwork for off-world colonies

Before civilization can move off world it must make sure its structures work on the extraterrestrial foundations upon which they will be built.University of Central Florida researchers are already laying the groundwork for the off-world jump by creating standards for extraterrestrial surfaces. Their work was detailed recently in a study published in the journal Icarus.

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Experts tackle major cardiovascular issues in treating patients with HIV

Now that patients are able to live longer and remain free of developing AIDS, they have begun to encounter new risks from age-related disorders common in the general population, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). To address gaps in clinical care, the latest issue of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology presents up-to-date guidance for cardiologists and other clinicians who treat this growing an

20h

New quantum sensor could improve cancer treatment

A new quantum sensor developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing has proven it can outperform existing technologies and promises significant advancements in long-range 3D imaging and monitoring the success of cancer treatments.

20h

The random anti-laser

Scientists at TU Wien have found a way to build the 'opposite' of a laser — a device that absorbs a specific light wave perfectly. This can be done even in complicated systems, in which waves are scattered randomly, and has many technological applications.

20h

How new species arise in the sea

How can a species split into several new species if they still live close to each other and are able to interbreed? Using a group of Caribbean reef fishes as a model system, a team of scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute has found that natural selection can couple the evolution of genes for vision and color pattern. The

20h

Gut immune cells play by their own rules

Only a few vaccines — for example, against polio and rotavirus — can be given orally. Most must be delivered by injection. Dr. Ziv Shulman and research student Adi Biram investigated this process for the gut-based cells involved in long-term immunity using a novel imaging method that captures all of the immune cells' niches within a single organ. Their findings provide new insights that may, in

20h

NextCure and Yale publish Nature Medicine paper detailing novel immunomedicine target Siglec-15

Yale University's Office of Corporate Research (OCR) and NextCure, Inc., a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company committed to discovering and developing next-generation immunomedicines for cancer and other immune-related diseases, today announced the publication of a research paper describing Siglec-15 (S15) as a new target for immunotherapy. The research was published in Nature Medicine, under

20h

Biodiversity crisis: Technological advances in agriculture are not a sufficient response

Rapid population and economic growth are destroying biodiversity. This was reported by researchers from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg in Nature Ecology & Evolution. A growing demand for agricultural products requires ever new cultivated areas. Even though technological advances are making agriculture more efficient, the gr

20h

Novel treatments offer new hope for patients with autoimmune disease

Researchers at University of Utah Health have developed a new approach that targets the misfunctioning immune cells while leaving normal immune cells in place. The results of their study are available online in the March 4 issue of Nature Biomedical Engineering.

20h

Chandelier neuron requires 'Velcro-like' molecule to form connections

Researchers have identified the protein L1CAM as an essential ingredient for forming unique connections between chandelier cells and the many neighboring partner cells they regulate.

20h

The case of the over-tilting exoplanets

For almost a decade, astronomers have tried to explain why so many pairs of planets outside our solar system have an odd configuration — their orbits seem to have been pushed apart by a powerful unknown mechanism. Yale researchers say they've found a possible answer, and it implies that the planets' poles are majorly tilted.

20h

New shapes of laser beam 'sneak' through opaque media

Researchers have found a way to pre-treat a laser beam so that it enters opaque surfaces without dispersing — like a headlight that's able to cut through heavy fog at full strength. The discovery from scientists at Yale University and the Missouri University of Science & Technology has potential applications for deep-tissue imaging and optogenetics, in which light is used to probe and manipulate

20h

New hurdle cleared in race toward quantum computing

Researchers have created a new device that allows them to probe the interference of quasiparticles, potentially paving the way for the development of topological qubits.

20h

Potential treatment strategy uncovered for pancreatic cancer

Published in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center and other collaborating institutions report promising results from early laboratory studies of a treatment strategy that forces pancreatic cancer to rely on a type of energy production called autophagy, also known as 'self-eating,' in which cells recycle their own parts for energy.

20h

Researchers systematically track protein interactions in defense against viruses

The body's defense strategies against viral infections are as diverse as the attacks themselves. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry has conducted a systematic investigation into a key feature of the antiviral innate immune response, namely into interferon-stimulated genes, or ISGs. The group succeeded in documenting the strategies dep

20h

Right electrolyte doubles novel two-dimensional material's ability to store energy

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Drexel University and their partners have discovered a way to improve the energy density of promising energy-storage materials, conductive two-dimensional ceramics called MXenes.

20h

New key players in the methane cycle

Methane is not only a powerful greenhouse gas, but also a source of energy. Microorganisms therefore use it for their metabolism. They do so much more frequently and in more ways than was previously assumed, as revealed by a study now published in Nature Microbiology by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology and Jiao Tong University in Shanghai.

20h

Researchers discover sustainable and natural alternative to man-made chemical pesticides

Repurposing a strain of beneficial bacteria could offer a safe, sustainable and natural alternative to man-made chemical pesticides, according to research from Cardiff University.

20h

How do we follow the rhythm of language? The answer depends on our brain's path

How is our speech shaped by what we hear? The answer varies, depending on the make-up of our brain's pathways, a team of neuroscientists has found.

20h

Global maps enabling targeted interventions to reduce burden of mosquito-borne disease

The global population at risk from mosquito-borne diseases — including yellow fever, Zika and dengue – is expanding with changes in the distribution of two key mosquitoes: Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. The spread of these species is largely driven by a combination of factors: human movements and climate change.

20h

Assembly in the air: Using sound to defy gravity

Scientists at the University of Bath have levitated particles using sound in an experiment which could have applications in so-called 'soft robotics.'

20h

Human 'footprint' on Antarctica measured for first time

The full extent of the human 'footprint' on Antarctica has been revealed for the first time by new IMAS-led research which used satellite images to measure stations, huts, runways, waste sites and tourist camps at 158 locations.The study, which also included researchers from the Australian Antarctic Division and University of Wollongong, found that more than half of all large ice-free coastal area

20h

Scientists expose hidden risks of diarrhoeal disease

New research identifies a rapidly evolving new subspecies of the cryptosporidium parasite — a leading cause of diarrhoeal disease in children worldwide.The study sheds new light on how this parasite has evolved the ability to spread more easily between people. Researchers sequenced and compared whole genomes from over 20 different cryptosporidium cases to find out more about the parasite and how

20h

Protocells use DNA logic to communicate and compute

Researchers at the University of Bristol, Eindhoven University of Technology and Microsoft Research have successfully assembled communities of artificial cells that can chemically communicate and perform molecular computations using entrapped DNA logic gates.

20h

When it comes to hearing words, it's a division of labor between our brain's two hemispheres

Scientists have uncovered a new 'division of labor' between our brain's two hemispheres in how we comprehend the words and other sounds we hear — a finding that offers new insights into the processing of speech and points to ways to address auditory disorders.

20h

Due to humans, extinction risk for 1,700 animal species to increase by 2070

As humans continue to expand our use of land across the planet, we leave other species little ground to stand on. By 2070, increased human land-use is expected to put 1,700 species of amphibians, birds, and mammals at greater extinction risk by shrinking their natural habitats, according to a study by Yale ecologists published in Nature Climate Change.

20h

Superconductivity is heating up

Theory suggests that metallic hydrogen should be a superconductor at room temperature; however, this material has yet to be produced in the lab. Metal superhydrides are packed with hydrogen atoms in a configuration similar to the structure of metallic hydrogen. Models predict they should behave similarly. Samples of superhydrides of lanthanum have been made and tested, and at the 2019 APS March Me

20h

Stick-On Immune Cell Monitor

A microneedle-containing skin patch offers researchers a noninvasive way to survey immune responses in mice.

20h

Helge Ingstad: Se hele bjærgningsaktionen fra start til slut

Efter en uges arbejde blev fregatten Helge Ingstad hævet søndag efter mere end tre måneder på havbunden. En timelapse-video viser hele operationen på 14 minutter.

20h

The Final Season of 'Game of Thrones' Might Be Funny

Also, the battle between Steven Spielberg and Netflix rages on, and fans could get an 'Edge of Tomorrow' sequel.

20h

Researchers discover sustainable and natural alternative to man-made chemical pesticides

Repurposing a strain of beneficial bacteria could offer a safe, sustainable and natural alternative to man-made chemical pesticides, according to research from Cardiff University.

20h

Due to humans, extinction risk for 1,700 animal species to increase by 2070

As humans continue to expand our use of land across the planet, we leave other species little ground to stand on. By 2070, increased human land-use is expected to put 1,700 species of amphibians, birds, and mammals at greater extinction risk by shrinking their natural habitats, according to a study by Yale ecologists published in Nature Climate Change.

20h

New key players in the methane cycle

Methane is not only a powerful greenhouse gas, but also a source of energy. Microorganisms therefore use it for their metabolism. They do so much more frequently and in more ways than was previously assumed, as revealed by a study now published in Nature Microbiology by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology and Jiao Tong University in Shanghai.

20h

Institutional Memory

This is a topic that came up in the comments section of a post last week, but it’s important enough that I wanted to give it some exposure here on the front page. It was a question from someone outside the industry, who asked about how companies can retain “institutional memory”, what with all the well-documented instability (mergers, layoffs, reorganizations and so on). I think that these effect

20h

Light pulses provide a new route to enhance superconductivity

Scientists have shown that pulses of light could be used to turn materials into superconductors through an unconventional type of superconductivity known as 'eta pairing.'

20h

Specialized Chips Won’t Save Us From Impending ‘Accelerator Wall’

Hardware accelerators won't solve the fundamental performance scaling issues facing us when Moore's law runs out of gas. The post Specialized Chips Won’t Save Us From Impending ‘Accelerator Wall’ appeared first on ExtremeTech .

20h

What could life on Mars look like? This Chilean desert holds some clues.

Space If alien life exists below the surface of Mars, it might very well have a thing or two in common with these populations. If alien life exists below the surface of Mars, it might very well have a thing or two in common with these populations in Chile's Atacama desert.

20h

Tilted Exoplanets May Explain Decade-Old Astronomical Mystery

A tug-of-war between the forces behind a planet’s orbit and its spin can throw entire worlds off-kilter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

A gel made from urea has molecules that resemble friendship bracelets

A gel made from urea, the main compound in urine, spontaneously forms braided nanofibres that could help with engineering new medicines

20h

Wikipedia’s civil wars show how we can heal ideological divides online

When people on different sides of the political spectrum work together to edit Wikipedia articles, the results are better than when everyone agrees

20h

Hidden ancient neutrinos may shape the patterns of galaxies

The gravitational pull of subatomic particles born in the universe’s first second seem to influence how galaxies cluster into rings.

20h

USB4 marries Thunderbolt 3 for faster speeds and smarter transfers – CNET

Intel gave the Thunderbolt 3 protocols to the USB Promoter Group, so USB4 offers the same speeds and features, plus backward compatibility.

20h

Cell Therapy: From Research to Commercialization

Download this eBook from The Scientist and Beckman Coulter Life Sciences to learn about the obstacles facing scientists involved in moving cell therapy into the clinic, including scaling up production, improving efficiency with automation, and achieving regulatory compliance!

20h

Researchers find window of opportunity for treatment of early cystic fibrosis lung infections

New research from DTU Biosustain and Rigshospitalet suggests that disease-causing microbes in young cystic fibrosis (CF) patients change rapidly within two to three years after first infection. This knowledge could lead to better treatment strategies to avoid persistent infections.

20h

Exposure to trauma impacts ability to squash bad memories

People exposed to trauma are less able to suppress unwanted emotional memories due to neural and behavioral disruptions in their brain that may contribute to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

20h

Exercise can improve non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease

Exercise has potential to improve non-motor as well as motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), including cognitive function, report investigators in a review published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease.

20h

Small 'microdoses' of psychedelic drugs could treat depression and anxiety

Lava lamps, tambourines and, of course, psychedelic drugs were hallmarks of the 1960s. Psychedelic drugs can make people euphoric, though users can also become extremely anxious and agitated. But that's at a high dose. Now, in ACS Chemical Neuroscience, researchers report one of the first peer-reviewed studies on a new 'microdose' psychedelic treatment regimen. In rats, the treatment appears to re

20h

Scientists develop printable water sensor

A new, versatile plastic-composite sensor can detect tiny amounts of water. The 3d printable material, developed by a Spanish-Israeli team of scientists, is cheap, flexible and non-toxic and changes its colour from purple to blue in wet conditions. The researchers used DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III to understand the structural changes within the material that are triggered by water and lead

20h

Engineers develop fast method to convert algae to biocrude

A team of chemical engineers have developed a new kind of jet mixer for creating biomass from algae that extracts the lipids from the watery plants with much less energy than the older extraction method. This key discovery now puts this form of energy closer to becoming a viable, cost-effective alternative fuel.

20h

Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace

Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace, according to new research.

20h

Plasma protein may hold promise for wound scaffolds

Researchers have employed a plasma protein found in blood to develop a new method for making wound-healing tissue scaffolds. The team's new scaffold can be attached or detached from a surface, for either in vitro laboratory tissue studies or direct applications in the body. Their discovery, reported today in the journal Biofabrication, could be extremely useful for future use in wound healing and

20h

Home births are three times more dangerous than hospital deliveries

When accounting for variables including the mother's existing health, age, health habits such as smoking, and ethnic background, the occurrence of a still-born infant was significant, with a risk 2.6 times higher for infant mortality compared with patients who delivered in hospitals.

20h

Light pulses provide a new route to enhance superconductivity

Scientists have shown that pulses of light could be used to turn materials into superconductors through an unconventional type of superconductivity known as 'eta pairing.'

20h

Improving IVF success rates

For best chances of in vitro fertilization success, the most motile sperm are chosen from semen. But current methods of sperm selection are inefficient and can cause fragmentation of the precious DNA carried in sperm heads. Scientists have now developed an alternative mechanism to sort sperm, which avoids genetic damage while also being faster and more cost-effective.

20h

Corn and other important crops can now be gene edited by pollen carrying CRISPR

Syngenta’s new method could transform difficult-to-edit plants

20h

Researchers discover sustainable and natural alternative to man-made chemical pesticides

Repurposing a strain of beneficial bacteria could offer a safe, sustainable and natural alternative to man-made chemical pesticides, according to research from Cardiff University.

20h

The case of the over-tilting exoplanets

For almost a decade, astronomers have tried to explain why so many pairs of planets outside our solar system have an odd configuration—their orbits seem to have been pushed apart by a powerful unknown mechanism. Yale researchers say they've found a possible answer, and it implies that the planets' poles are majorly tilted.

20h

Superhydrides approach room temperature superconductivity at high pressure

Theory suggests that metallic hydrogen should be a superconductor at room temperature; however, this material has yet to be produced in the lab. Metal superhydrides are packed with hydrogen atoms in a configuration similar to the structure of metallic hydrogen. Models predict they should behave similarly. Samples of superhydrides of lanthanum have been made and tested, and at the 2019 APS March Me

20h

Right electrolyte doubles novel two-dimensional material's ability to store energy

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Drexel University and their partners have discovered a way to improve the energy density of promising energy-storage materials, conductive two-dimensional ceramics called MXenes. The findings are published in Nature Energy.

20h

Assembly in the air: Using sound to defy gravity

Scientists at the University of Bath have levitated particles using sound in an experiment which could have applications in so-called "soft robotics" and help reveal how planets start to form.

20h

Due to humans, extinction risk for 1,700 animal species to increase by 2070

As humans continue to expand our use of land across the planet, we leave other species little ground to stand on. By 2070, increased human land-use is expected to put 1,700 species of amphibians, birds, and mammals at greater extinction risk by shrinking their natural habitats, according to a study by Yale ecologists published in Nature Climate Change.

20h

New key players in the methane cycle

Methane is not only a powerful greenhouse gas, but also a source of energy. Microorganisms therefore use it for their metabolism. They do so much more frequently and in more ways than was previously assumed, as revealed by a study now published in Nature Microbiology by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology and Jiao Tong University in Shanghai.

20h

Quasiparticles experimentally shown to interfere for first time

Qubits, the units used to encode information in quantum computing, are not all created equal. Some researchers believe that topological qubits, which are tougher and less susceptible to environmental noise than other kinds, may be the best medium for pushing quantum computing forward.

20h

What YouTube needs to do to clean up its thorny kid issues

For years, YouTube, the world's most popular video network, has been battling issues with "bad actors" wreaking havoc with the system.

20h

Human 'footprint' on Antarctica measured for first time

Buildings alone cover more than 390 000 square metres of land while the visual footprint—the areas from which human activity can be seen—extends to more than 93 000 square kilometres.

20h

New shapes of laser beam 'sneak' through opaque media

Researchers have found a way to pre-treat a laser beam so that it enters opaque surfaces without dispersing—like a headlight that's able to cut through heavy fog at full strength.

20h

Protocells use DNA logic to communicate and compute

The work provides a step towards chemical cognition in synthetic protocells and could be useful in biosensing and therapeutics.

20h

Electric Jaguar wins Car of the Year in Europe

The electric Jaguar I-Pace won the Car of the Year award in Europe on Monday, the first time the storied British brand has been bestowed the prize just as Brexit looms over the continent's auto industry.

20h

WarnerMedia hires former NBC exec in reorganization

WarnerMedia is hiring former NBC Entertainment chairman Robert Greenblatt as chairman of its entertainment and direct-to-consumer divisions in a reorganization.

20h

Tilted Exoplanets May Explain Decade-Old Astronomical Mystery

A tug-of-war between the forces behind a planet’s orbit and its spin can throw entire worlds off-kilter — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

How I'm making bricks out of ashes and rubble in Gaza | Majd Mashharawi

Majd Mashharawi was walking through her war-torn neighborhood in Gaza when an idea flashed in her mind: What if she could take the rubble and transform it into building materials? See how she designed a brick made out of ashes that's helping people rebuild their homes — and learn about her new project: bringing solar-powered energy to families living in darkness.

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Can the U.S. win the A.I. arms race?

In an effort to cement the United States’ reign as the global leader of digital innovation, President Trump recently signed an executive order outlining a new federal government strategy aiming to fuel progress in artificial intelligence (AI) research, development, and deployment. AI has become a defining technology of the century and its potential is only just beginning to surface. While many ar

21h

Techathlon podcast: Delivery robots, electric cars, and smartphones reviewing themselves

Technology Come play the podcast that's so much fun, you'll forget you're learning. If you read this sentence, you're legally obligated to listen to our podcast. (You're not, but it would be cool if you did.)…

21h

Spark joy: Use Marie Kondo-inspired method to declutter your smartphone, tablet and laptop

Whether you're an app collector, picture hoarder or any other obsessive keeper of digital things, sometimes it feels good just to let go.

21h

Debunking the colonial myth of the 'naked Bushman'

To dress is a unique human experience, but practices and meanings of dress are as different as the people populating the world. In a Western cultural tradition, the practice of dressing "properly" has for centuries distinguished "civilised" people from "savages" .

21h

Sacrificing the climate for reelections

In business as well as international politics, the best and ideal agreement is one that is credible and expected to be complied with. Compliance often necessitates trade sanctions or other sufficiently severe consequences for those parties that do not comply as promised.

21h

'A gift from the city to itself'

Coastal cities are among the fastest growing population centres on the planet and half of the global population now lives within 100km of the coast.

21h

Research advances search for new antibiotics

Indiana University researchers are advancing knowledge about how bacteria build their cell walls that could contribute to the search for new antibacterial drugs. They have created a new tool to observe living cells in real time under a microscope.

21h

Archaea CRISPR Systems Grab DNA Memories During Interspecies Mating

When different archaeal species mate, their CRISPR systems interact in ways that may influence their evolution.

21h

The Physics Still Hiding in the Higgs Boson

In 2012, particles smashed together in the Large Hadron Collider’s 27-kilometer circular tunnel conjured up the Higgs boson — the last missing particle predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics, and the linchpin that holds that decades-old set of equations together. But no other new particles have materialized at the LHC, leaving open many mysteries about the universe that the Standard

21h

Michael Cohen Reminded Us Why Trump’s Birtherism Matters

President Donald Trump’s former lawyer Michael Cohen appeared before the House Oversight Committee under the heavy expectation that he would reveal more about the president’s potential crimes. He had some to add to the list. He supplied detail on campaign-finance violations, “collusion,” the misuse of the Trump Foundation, and fraudulent financial practices. But he was there less as a fact witnes

21h

Chemists 'print' sensors for nano-objects

Young scientists from ITMO University proposed a new type of optical nano-sensors. Their operating principle is based on the interaction of light in thin films: a similar effect can be observed in soap bubbles. Such sensors can be quickly manufactured using an inkjet printer and special ink made of titanium dioxide. In the future, the sensors can be used for rapid biomedical analysis. The results

21h

Scientists provide first evidence of diphtheria-like infectious agent in hedgehogs

As cultural successors, hedgehogs reside in close proximity to humans. Road traffic, lawn mowers and infectious agents threaten the prickly insect eaters. Some infectious agents can be transmitted to humans. Considerate treatment of wildlife and appropriate hygiene measures minimize the risk of infection, though. A study published in 'Emerging Microbes & Infections' by five federal state laborator

21h

A quick path to antimalarial resistance

Resistance to antimalarial drugs is thought to result mainly from changes in the parasite's genome. However, P. falciparum can also develop resistance to some antimalarial compounds by epigenetic changes, according to a new study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa,' and the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. This is of concern because resistance acquired at the epigenetic

21h

Sacrificing the climate for reelections

In business as well as international politics, the best and ideal agreement is one that is credible and expected to be complied with. Compliance often necessitates trade sanctions or other sufficiently severe consequences for those parties that do not comply as promised.

21h

Well-being and the rise of psychotherapy in Uganda

Perspectives on happiness and mental health differ across the world. Westernized perspectives present happiness as an individualized state of being that can be cultivated and sustained through continuous effort. In areas where these western beliefs are prominent, happiness is established as the norm, and as a result, a global trend has emerged where the absence of happiness is increasingly medical

21h

Young people at risk of addiction have differences in key brain region

Young adults at risk of developing problems with addiction show key differences in an important region of the brain, according to an international team led by researchers at the University of Cambridge.

21h

World-first program uncovers errors in biomedical research results

Just like the wrong ingredients can spoil a cake, so too can the wrong ingredients spoil the results in biomedical research. The difference is that the latter involves years of work, financial and personal investment and promise.

21h

Imaging technique lets ordinary cameras capture high-speed images of crack formation

Because cracks propagate quickly, studying the fracturing process currently requires expensive high-speed cameras. A new imaging method known as the virtual frame technique allows ordinary digital cameras to capture millions of frames per second for several seconds, requiring only a short and intense pulse of light. At the 2019 APS March Meeting, researchers will describe how the virtual frame tec

21h

Increased muscle mass improves response to cancer treatment

Researchers have found that sarcopenia, a condition characterized by decreased skeletal muscle mass, is strongly associated with poor treatment outcomes in lung cancer patients in response to programed death-1 (PD-1)-inhibitor therapy. However, as well as being useful for identifying patients likely to benefit from this type of therapy, early identification and treatment of sarcopenia may improve

21h

Discovery of the genetic 'conductor' of brain stem cells

Our brain comprises 85 billion nerve cells and just as many so-called glial cells. But what decides when and how many of them become neurons or glial cells? A new study has shown how the Foxg1 gene plays a fundamental role in piloting the differentiation of stem cells, guaranteeing that neurons and glial cells are produced in the right quantity and at the right moment. The research opens new roads

21h

Sensory stimuli improves brain damage in mouse models of preterm birth

A research conducted by the INc-UAB shows that the same perinatal brain injury caused by hypoxia and ischemia have differentiated effects on each gender, but can be improved through tactile and proprioceptive stimuli. Petting and massaging the mice in the first stages of their life provided neurological protection in their adult life, especially in male mice in which the injury was reduced by half

21h

Sleep loss is a literal pain

Neural glitches in the sleep-deprived brain can intensify and prolong the agony of sickness and injury, research finds. The findings, published in the Journal of Neuroscience , help explain the self-perpetuating cycles contributing to the overlapping global epidemics of sleep loss, chronic pain, and even opioid addiction. A 2015 National Sleep Foundation poll found that two in three chronic pain

21h

Oh! Interactive map tracks ‘vocal bursts’ of emotion

The spontaneous sounds we make to express everything from elation (woohoo!) to embarrassment (oops) say a surprising amount about what we’re feeling, research shows. To prove that a sigh is not just a sigh, scientists conducted a statistical analysis of listener responses to more than 2,000 nonverbal exclamations known as “vocal bursts” and found they convey at least 24 kinds of emotion. Previous

21h

EU sued for making global warming worse by subsidising wood burning

The European Union is accelerating global warming and damaging forests worldwide by encouraging wood burning without counting the carbon emissions, says the lawsuit

21h

'A gift from the city to itself'

Coastal cities are among the fastest growing population centres on the planet and half of the global population now lives within 100km of the coast.

21h

Philippines seizes 1,500 rare turtles in luggage

Some 1,500 live exotic turtles—some restrained with duct-tape—have been found inside an airline passenger's luggage, Philippines authorities said Monday, as they vowed a crackdown on the lucrative wildlife trade.

21h

Relationships, not training overload, main reason children quit competitive swimming

Competitive adult swimmers who quit swimming as youths before returning to the sport later in life reported that they originally left because of an unsatisfactory social experience rather than training overload, according to new research out of the University of Alberta.

21h

Five ways life would be better if it were always daylight saving time

In my research on daylight saving time, I have found that Americans don't like it when Congress messes with their clocks.

21h

Forming the ion that made the universe

The trihydrogen cation, H3+, is the starting point for almost all molecules in the universe. Typically, H3+ is formed by collisions involving hydrogen gas, but its chemistry at the molecular level is relatively unknown. When organic molecules are hit by a laser pulse, they are ionized and the reaction begins. Then, the molecules break up into different fragments; one of which is H3+. They are able

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Elegant theory shows how water helps separate ions involved in material synthesis and manufacturing

Inside fuel cells, batteries, and biological systems, pairs of ions in water can affect chemical reactions. Knowing more about how water influences those reactions could be helpful. Theorists designed a simple, elegant method that explains the influence. Their method shows how water moves around ions and causes them to draw together or stay apart.

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Lightweight of periodic table plays big role in life on Earth

Although hydrogen is the lightweight of the chemical elements, it packs a real punch when it comes to its role in life and its potential as a solution to some of the world's challenges. As we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the periodic table, it seems reasonable to tip our hat to this, the first element on the table.

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Philippines seizes 1,500 rare turtles in luggage

Some 1,500 live exotic turtles—some restrained with duct-tape—have been found inside an airline passenger's luggage, Philippines authorities said Monday, as they vowed a crackdown on the lucrative wildlife trade.

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Så meget får afskediget sygehusdirektør

Det koster Region Sjælland 2,5 mio. kr. at fyre Vagn Bach som sygehusdirektør på Næstved, Slagelse, Ringsted Sygehuse.

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Du læser mit interview, som fanden læser biblen

Stinus Lindgreen – prøv at bevæge dig lidt uden for din egen verden i medicinalindustrien. Så vil du se, at livet kan forstås på rigtigt mange måder. Din sandhed er ikke nødvendigvis min sandhed.

21h

Overlæge forsikrer: UTH’er ryger ikke i skraldespanden på Riget

Over 150 utilsigtede hændelser blev afvist i 2018 på Rigshospitalet. Ingen grund til bekymring, siger overlæge Mark Krasnik, der forsikrer at alle indrapporteringer bliver gennemgået.

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Region Syddanmark styrker indsatsen for særlige hjemmebesøg

Praktiserende læger i Region Syddanmark får fremover flere penge for at tage på særlige hjemmebesøg, samtidig med at ordningen udvides til at omfatte flere typer sårbare og udsatte borgere. Det er resultatet af fire nye lokalaftaler, der netop er trådt i kraft.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Har dyr vandladning når de dør?

Har dyr, ligesom mennesker, vandladning og afføring, når de dør? Det svarer lektor i husdyrvidenskab på.

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What happened to the hyped nanomaterials?

Carbon-based nano materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes were predicted to have a brilliant future when they were discovered. But quality problems curb the development of new products. The problem is that it is difficult to analyse the crystal structure and there are no established standard methods for classifying the materials. But now, researchers at Karlstad University are close to a s

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Good luck 'Mole'—experiment starts hammering into the Martian soil

On 28 February 2019, 'Mole' fully automatically hammered its way into the Martian subsurface for the first time. In a first step, it penetrated to a depth between 18 and 50 centimetres into the Martian soil with 4000 hammer blows over a period of four hours. "On its way into the depths, the mole seems to have hit a stone, tilted about 15 degrees and pushed it aside or passed it," reports Tilman Sp

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China’s Huawei has big ambitions to weaken the US grip on AI leadership

In spite of tensions with the US and its allies, Huawei is rapidly building a suite of AI offerings unmatched by any other company on the planet.

21h

Graphene Shows Promise for Repairing Broken Bones

When you were a kid, did you ever sign a classmate’s cast after they broke an arm or a leg? Your name would be on display there for the rest of the semester. Broken bones are one of the worst trade-offs in childhood—a few seconds of calamity followed by months of boring rest and recovery. But children in the future may have a different story to tell as emerging tech overhauls how we fix broken bo

21h

Titanium pressure vessel for space exploration built successfully using the Wire + Arc additive manufacturing process

A team comprising of Thales Alenia Space, Cranfield University and Glenalmond Technologies have successfully produced a first full-scale prototype of a titanium pressure vessel to be used in future manned missions for space exploration.

21h

Imaging technique lets ordinary cameras capture high-speed images of crack formation

Direct imaging of dynamic cracks as they occur can tell us a great deal about the physics of fracturing and properties of fracturing materials, which would benefit many fields ranging from materials science to engineering to construction. However, the fracturing process happens in the blink of an eye, with dynamic cracks propagating through several centimeters of some soft materials in only one-te

21h

Research advances search for new antibiotics

Indiana University researchers are advancing knowledge about how bacteria build their cell walls that could contribute to the search for new antibacterial drugs. They have created a new tool to observe living cells in real time under a microscope.

21h

Optical clocks started the calibration of the international atomic time

Optical clocks of the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT, Japan) and LNE-SYRTE (Systemes de Reference Temps-Espace, Observatoire de Paris, Universite PSL, CNRS, Sorbonne Universite, France) evaluated the latest 'one second' tick of the International Atomic Time (TAI) and provided these data to the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures to be referred for adjus

21h

A small plesiosaur lived in Spain 125 million years ago

Plesiosaurs, erroneously viewed as dinosaurs, inhabited all the seas between 200 million and 65 million years ago. In the Peninsula, only scarce remains of these long-necked reptiles had been found. Now a group of palaeontologists has found the most abundant collection of fossils in Morella, Castellón. Among them, there is one vertebra that belonged to a type of plesiosaur never before discovered

21h

Sensory stimuli improves brain damage in mouse models of preterm birth

A research conducted by the INc-UAB shows that the same perinatal brain injury caused by hypoxia and ischemia have differentiated effects on each gender, but can be improved through tactile and proprioceptive stimuli. Petting and massaging the mice in the first stages of their life provided neurological protection in their adult life, especially in male mice in which the injury was reduced by half

21h

Discovery of the genetic 'conductor' of brain stem cells

Our brain comprises 85 billion nerve cells and just as many so-called glial cells. But what decides when and how many of them become neurons or glial cells? A new study has shown how the Foxg1 gene plays a fundamental role in piloting the differentiation of stem cells, guaranteeing that neurons and glial cells are produced in the right quantity and at the right moment. The research opens new roads

21h

Pumping iron could save your life

Researchers from Osaka University have found that sarcopenia, a condition characterized by decreased skeletal muscle mass, is strongly associated with poor treatment outcomes in lung cancer patients in response to programed death-1 (PD-1)-inhibitor therapy. However, as well as being useful for identifying patients likely to benefit from this type of therapy, early identification and treatment of s

21h

Radiography of marine litter in Spanish waters

Marine litter is a growing problem in the Mediterranean Sea, but few studies have focused on its composition, spatial distribution and temporal evolution. Now, a new study reveals that, in Spanish waters, plastics are the main component and that density is higher in the Alboran Sea than in the Levantine region or Catalonia, where accumulation has remained stable.

21h

Breast cancer cells rely on pyruvate to expand in new tissues

Most patients who die of breast cancer die of metastasis, the process by which cancer cells spread to other organs of the body. Cancer cells alter their metabolism to grow and expand across other organs. A new study by Prof. Sarah-Maria Fendt from the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology and her PhD student Ilaria Elia has shown that breast cancer cells require the nutrient pyruvate to do this.

21h

Methane in the atmosphere is surging, and that's got scientists worried

Scientists love a good mystery. But it's more fun when the future of humanity isn't at stake.

22h

The massive glacier that formed the Great Lakes is disappearing and greenhouse gases are to blame for its untimely demis

From a boardwalk overlooking Chicago's deserted Ohio Street Beach in the throes of winter, it's not hard to imagine the last ice age. A blanket of fresh snow covers the shoreline and pale blue ice glazes over Lake Michigan as far as the eye can see.

22h

Klimatkompensation döljer skadligt beteende

Forskarna Patrik Sörqvist och Linda Langeborg vid Högskolan i Gävle har utvecklat en teori som kan förklara varför vi skadar miljön, även när vi försöker behandla den väl. Denna teori bygger på antagandet att vi ser vårt förhållande till miljön som ett socialt utbyte. Detta får oss att tro att vårt miljövänliga beteende kan kompensera för vårt skadliga beteende, men till skillnad från ett socialt

22h

Drying without dying: How resurrection plants survive without water

A small group of plants known as 'resurrection plants' can survive months or even years without water. The research team of Kobe University's Graduate School of Agricultural Science, led by Professor Dr. Roumiana Tsenkova, in collaboration with a research group from Agrobioinstitute in Sofia, Bulgaria, led by Professor Dr. Dimitar Djilianov, made a significant step forward in understanding how the

22h

Truth telling about tobacco and nicotine

In 'Truth Telling about Tobacco and Nicotine,' PRC researchers explain that, although there is agreement among researchers about evidence that vaping can be less harmful than combustible cigarettes, the tobacco control community remains divided about how to communicate — or even whether to communicate — information about the relative risks of tobacco and nicotine products.

22h

Light pulses provide a new route to enhance superconductivity

Scientists have shown that pulses of light could be used to turn materials into superconductors through an unconventional type of superconductivity known as 'eta pairing.'

22h

University of California terminates subscriptions to Elsevier

Janet Napolitano, President of the University of California (and former Secretary of Homeland Security during the Obama administration), has published an open letter on the university's official website announcing that the university will no longer pay subscription fees to Elsevier—the mammoth scholarly paper publisher. In her letter, Napolitano claims that officials with Elsevier were unwilling t

22h

Tesla sets March 14 'Model Y' unveiling

Tesla is planning to unveil a new electric "crossover" vehicle March 14 which is slightly bigger and more expensive than its most affordable model, according to chief executive Elon Musk.

22h

Researchers find potential new source of rare earth elements

Researchers have found a possible new source of rare earth elements—phosphate rock waste—and an environmentally friendly way to get them out, according to a study published in the Journal of Chemical Thermodynamics.

22h

Brexit Britain will be 'lost in space'

One of the UK's most successful space entrepreneurs says Brexit will do immense harm to industry.

22h

Engineers develop fast method to convert algae to biocrude

Biofuel experts have long sought a more economically-viable way to turn algae into biocrude oil to power vehicles, ships and even jets. University of Utah researchers believe they have found an answer. They have developed an unusually rapid method to deliver cost-effective algal biocrude in large quantities using a specially-designed jet mixer.

22h

World-first program uncovers errors in biomedical research results

Just like the wrong ingredients can spoil a cake, so too can the wrong ingredients spoil the results in biomedical research. The difference is that the latter involves years of work, financial and personal investment and promise.

22h

Engineers develop fast method to convert algae to biocrude

Biofuel experts have long sought a more economically-viable way to turn algae into biocrude oil to power vehicles, ships and even jets. University of Utah researchers believe they have found an answer. They have developed an unusually rapid method to deliver cost-effective algal biocrude in large quantities using a specially-designed jet mixer.

22h

Swimming microbes steer themselves into mathematical order

Freeing thousands of microorganisms to swim in random directions in an infinite pool of liquid may not sound like a recipe for order, but eventually the swarm will go with its own flow.

22h

Style recommendations from data scientists

At the intersection of social psychology, data science and fashion is Amy Winecoff.

22h

Dear Therapist: My Boyfriend’s Depression Is Making Me Question Our Future Together

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My boyfriend and I are in our early 20s, and we recently moved in together after being in a long-distance relationship for four years. I've always known that he battles depression and has mild Asperger’s. Rece

22h

How AI Will Rewire Us

Fears about how robots might transform our lives have been a staple of science fiction for decades. In the 1940s, when widespread interaction between humans and artificial intelligence still seemed a distant prospect, Isaac Asimov posited his famous Three Laws of Robotics, which were intended to keep robots from hurting us. The first—“a robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, all

22h

World-first program uncovers errors in biomedical research results

Just like the wrong ingredients can spoil a cake, so too can the wrong ingredients spoil the results in biomedical research. The difference is that the latter involves years of work, financial and personal investment and promise.

22h

Complex life might require a very narrow habitable zone

Since the Kepler Space Telescope was launched into space, the number of known planets beyond the solar system (exoplanets) has grown exponentially. At present, 3,917 planets have been confirmed in 2,918 star systems, while 3,368 await confirmation. Of these, about 50 orbit within their star's circumstellar habitable zone (aka the "Goldilocks Zone"), the distance at which liquid water can exist on

22h

Chicago is sinking. Here's what that means for Lake Michigan and the Midwest

The sightlines at Wrigley Field, the panorama from Navy Pier, the vantage points at the Adler Planetarium observatory—all structures built more than 100 years ago—are at least 4 inches lower now.

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