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nyheder2019marts06

More evidence of sound waves carrying mass

A trio of researchers at Columbia University has found more evidence showing that sound waves carry mass. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, Angelo Esposito, Rafael Krichevsky and Alberto Nicolis describe using effective field theory techniques to confirm the results found by a team last year attempting to measure mass carried by sound waves.

6h

Microsatellite Borders and Micro-sequence Conservation in Juglans

Microsatellite Borders and Micro-sequence Conservation in Juglans Microsatellite Borders and Micro-sequence Conservation in Juglans , Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39793-z Microsatellite Borders and Micro-sequence Conservation in Juglans

9h

Frederiksberg Kommune til forældre: Sundhedspleje til dit barn? Hit med person-data

Samtykke til kommunal sundhedspleje i skolen kan kun ske ved også at give lov til anvendelse af data til generel viden om sundhed og trivsel samt i forskningsprojekter.

13h

Eating healthy on a limited budget is possible, researchers find

A new study found that with menu planning and access to stores selling items in bulk, the average daily cost for serving healthy meals to a family of four was $25 in 2010 dollars. This cost was consistent with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) low-income cost of food meal plan, but higher than the cost of the USDA Thrifty Food Plan.

4min

Mediterranean diet boosts endurance exercise within days, study finds

Researchers have found that eating a Mediterranean diet can improve athletes' endurance exercise performance after just four days.

4min

Mechanism through which bacteria attack white blood cells

A research team has discovered a mechanism with which bacteria activate white blood cells and attack an organism's immune system.

4min

Better regulation of the immune system may minimize preeclampsia symptoms

Boosting the body's levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4)–an immune system protein that controls inflammation — may help manage the pregnancy complication preeclampsia, according to a new rodent study.

4min

Women of childbearing age have staggeringly low rates of lipid screening

Eight out of 10 women of childbearing age have never had their cholesterol levels checked, despite clear guidelines to get a first lipid blood test early in adulthood, according to new research.

4min

AI study of risk factors in type 1 diabetes

In combination with conventional statistical methods, artificial intelligence (AI) has now been used in a study of risk factors in type 1 diabetes. The objective was to identify the most important indicators of elevated risk for cardiovascular disease and death.

4min

Researchers aim for spintronic applications thanks to great leap forward

Electric currents drive all our electronic devices. The emerging field of spintronics looks to replace electric currents with what are known as spin currents. Researchers have discovered that the magnetic spin Hall effect could lead to low-power, high-speed and high-capacity devices. They have created sample devices which can further research into potential applications.

4min

Chinese carmakers show goods in Geneva as sales tank at home

Chinese carmakers have flocked to this year's Geneva International Motor Show, eager to present new electric models to a global crowd as traditional car sales slip at home.

5min

Facebook CEO says he'll double down on privacy

Mark Zuckerberg said Facebook will start to emphasize new privacy-shielding messaging services, a shift apparently intended to blunt privacy criticisms of the company.

5min

Most microbes in hummingbird feeders do not pose health hazard

Many people set up hummingbird feeders in their yards to nurture and watch these high-energy pollinators. But could the sugar water they provide be impacting these tiny feathered friends?

5min

New study finds pop lyrics contain just as many references to violence as hip-hop music

Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that pop music lyrics contain the same amount of violent content as rap and hip-hop.

5min

Most microbes in hummingbird feeders do not pose health hazard

A study led by the University of California, Davis, is one of the first to address the potential for sugar water from hummingbird feeders to act as a vector for avian — or even zoonotic — pathogens. It found that the majority of microbes growing in feeders do not likely pose a significant health hazard to birds or humans.

5min

Improving molecular imaging using a deep learning approach

Generating comprehensive molecular images of organs and tumors in living organisms can be performed at ultra-fast speed using a new deep learning approach to image reconstruction developed by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

5min

Elegant interplay of coloration strategies is discovered in squid's smart skin

In the blink of an eye, the squid's skin changes color and pattern for the purpose of camouflage or sexual signaling, a virtuosic display that has long fascinated scientists. Now, collaborators from Northeastern University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, report a paradigm-shifting discovery in how specialized organs in squid skin, called chromatophores, contribute to the fe

5min

Kids with autism are doing okay at recess

Children with autism communicate with peers at recess and participate in recess activities more often than people might assume, report researchers. Jill Locke, a research assistant professor in the University of Washington department of speech and hearing sciences, and colleagues saw the potential in studying how children with autism experience recess, and how that could lead to opportunities for

6min

Most microbes in hummingbird feeders do not pose health hazard

Many people set up hummingbird feeders in their yards to nurture and watch these high-energy pollinators. But could the sugar water they provide be impacting these tiny feathered friends?

11min

Translocation of bighorn sheep in Arizona has positive genetic outcomes

Translocation is an important management tool that has been used for more than 50 years to increase bighorn sheep population numbers in Arizona and to restore herds to suitable habitat throughout their historical range. Yet, translocation also can alter the underlying genetic diversity and spatial structure of managed wildlife species in both beneficial and detrimental ways.

11min

Antibiotic resistance is spreading from wastewater treatment plants

The products of wastewater treatment have been found to contain trace amounts of antibiotic resistant DNA. These products are often reintroduced to the environment and water supply, potentially resulting in the spread of antibiotic resistance. As such, researchers at the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering have been studying the development of these potentially harmful

11min

Translocation of bighorn sheep in Arizona has positive genetic outcomes

Translocation is an important management tool that has been used for more than 50 years to increase bighorn sheep population numbers in Arizona and to restore herds to suitable habitat throughout their historical range. Yet, translocation also can alter the underlying genetic diversity and spatial structure of managed wildlife species in both beneficial and detrimental ways.

11min

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Hundreds of children and llamas sacrificed in a ritual event in 15th century Peru

A mass sacrifice at a 15th century archaeological site in Peru saw the ritual killing of over 140 children and over 200 llamas, according to a new study. This is the largest known mass sacrifice of children — and of llamas — in the New World.

19min

Rain is important for how carbon dioxide affects grasslands

Vegetation biomass on grasslands increases in response to elevated carbon dioxide levels, but less than expected. Vegetation on grasslands with a wet spring season has the greatest increase.

19min

Seawater bacteria provides leads to fight melanoma

Malignant melanoma can be a particularly dangerous form of cancer, and more therapeutic options are needed. Now, researchers reportthat a bacteria from seawater has inspired promising leads for an entirely new way to treat the disease.

19min

Antibiotic resistance is spreading from wastewater treatment plants

The products of wastewater treatment have been found to contain trace amounts of antibiotic resistant DNA. Researchers have found that even low concentrations of just a single type of antibiotic in the water supply leads to resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics.

21min

Why Volvo’s Capping Top Speed at 112 mph: The Elusive Quest for Zero Deaths

Come 2020, Volvo will cap the top speed of its cars at 180 kph / 120 mph in the interest of safety. Speed, intoxication /drugs, distraction are Volvo's top safety concerns. The post Why Volvo’s Capping Top Speed at 112 mph: The Elusive Quest for Zero Deaths appeared first on ExtremeTech .

21min

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Haleh weakening

Tropical Cyclone Haleh continued to move in a southerly direction in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead.

23min

Effects of spaceflight on heart cell formation from stem cells

Researchers used time-lapse imaging to show that mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown during spaceflight differentiated into cardiomyocytes significantly faster than similar cells grown at Earth's gravity.

27min

Scientists Want to Shock Prisoners’ Brains to Fight Aggression

Curbing Violence Prisons are often rife with violence . But that might change if an upcoming experiment has the desired effect — and if society can stomach the ethical implications of tinkering with inmates’ brains. Researchers from Spain’s University of Huelva told New Scientist they’ll soon launch a study to see if they can calm the violent urges of Huelva Prison’s inmates by treating them with

31min

How viruses outsmart their host cells

Viruses depend on host cells for replication, but how does a virus induce its host to transcribe its own genetic information alongside that of the virus, thus producing daughter viruses? For decades, researchers have been studying a type of bacteriophage known as 'lambda' to try and find an answer to this question. Using high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, a research group has now successful

33min

Climate-driven evolution in trees alters their ecosystems

A new study explores how climate, evolution, plants, and soils are linked. The research is the first to show how climate-driven evolution in tree populations alters the way trees directly interact with their immediate soil environment.

33min

Antibiotic resistance is spreading from wastewater treatment plants

The products of wastewater treatment have been found to contain trace amounts of antibiotic resistant DNA. Researchers have found that even low concentrations of just a single type of antibiotic in the water supply leads to resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics.

33min

States with strict gun laws see more homicides when they border states with lax ones

Gun-related homicide rates in states with strict gun laws increase when neighboring states have less restrictive laws as a result of gun trafficking across state lines, suggests a new study. A review of gun tracing data also revealed that 65 percent of the guns recovered in the most restrictive states originated from other states.

33min

Anti-inflammatory drug is the key to boosting cardiac reprogramming

Researchers have developed a high-throughput screening system to identify the NSAID diclofenac as a factor responsible for enhancing cardiac reprogramming in postnatal and adult fibroblasts. Diclofenac functioned during early-stage reprogramming by silencing the cellular signature associated with fibroblasts and inhibiting COX-2 and other molecules associated with inflammation. Ant-inflammation co

33min

Blue-enriched white light to wake you up in the morning

Here is good news for those who have difficulty with morning alertness. A research team proposed that a blue-enriched LED light can effectively help people overcome morning drowsiness. This study will provide the basis for major changes in future lighting strategies and thereby help create better indoor environments.

33min

Matrix could ensure vital copper supplies

Researchers have identified a matrix of risks that the mining industry must overcome to unlock vitally important copper reserves. Geologists have said copper would be crucial in a renewable-powered future, but global supplies were far from guaranteed.

33min

Waymo’s Move to Sell Lidar Units Is a Bet on a Bigger Market

The shift to sell its technology to robotics and security companies is an indication that Waymo isn’t placing all its bets on self-driving cars.

35min

NASA’s InSight Mars Rover Runs Into Trouble Digging a Hole

Stop the Hammer Time More bad news for NASA’s Mars InSight Lander: its thermal probe, which is supposed to dig 16 feet into the Martian surface, only got partway out of its protective tube before encountering a problem — a startling reminder of the incredible challenges of operating a robotic mission on a distant world where there’s nobody to repair broken equipment for millions of miles. Scienti

38min

Ultrasound for thrombosis prevention

Researchers established real-time ultrasonic monitoring of the blood's aggregate state using the in vitro blood flow model. Based on collected data, computer automatically injected a thrombolytic drug if needed. As a result, the system was able to quickly and completely dissolve the forming blood clots. The team believes that their work will help open new prospects for the creation of wearable dev

41min

Rabbit bones suggest Neanderthals were better hunters than we thought

Rabbit fossils suggest that Neanderthals had a varied diet including hunting small, fast prey, meaning they were very adaptable

41min

A Third Patient Is Now Reportedly Cured of HIV

submitted by /u/Ayrane [link] [comments]

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Folic acid might actually reduce the risk of autism

Health Mounting evidence suggests nutrition right around conception matters for neurodevelopment. Folic acid has long been touted as an important prenatal vitamin to help prevent certain birth defects. Recent studies are now suggesting it could reduce the risk of…

44min

W.H.O. Chief Plans to Reorganize a Vast Bureaucracy

A fundamental problem — tension between regional offices and the headquarters in Geneva — cannot be fixed by fiat. Still, staffers are set to move around the globe.

44min

Stunning 'Superbloom' of Flowers Is Set to Arrive in Southern California

The hills of Southern California will soon be alive with a massive "superbloom" of wildflowers, thanks to an unusually rainy fall and winter, news sources report.

46min

Animal Migrations Track With Wikipedia Searches

By analyzing nearly 2.5 billion Wikipedia page views, researchers found that species searches reflect seasonal animal migrations and plant blooming. Christopher Intagliata reports.

49min

Uncovered: the sacrifice of 140 children

The largest mass sacrifice of children ever discovered took place in Peru 550 years ago. The reasons why remain a mystery. Andrew Masterson reports.

50min

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg says he’ll reorient the company towards encryption and privacy

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg announced sweeping changes to Facebook’s services on Wednesday, saying in a blog post that he would spend the next several years reorienting the company’s …

50min

What Is the Ark of the Covenant?

Said to have magical powers, the ark vanished 2,600 years ago and, according to some stories, it may not appear until the end times.

51min

One device, many frequencies: Researchers create a unique, tiny resonator

A new finding could ultimately help improve the army of tiny, vibrating components found in a range of electronics and even create devices that mimic biological processes. Researchers have pioneered a micromechanical device that responds to external signals in an entirely new way.

51min

New surprises from Jupiter and Saturn

The latest data sent back by the Juno and Cassini spacecraft from giant gas planets Jupiter and Saturn have challenged a lot of current theories about how planets in our solar system form and behave.

54min

The Stigma of Choosing Trade School Over College

Toren Reesman knew from a young age that he and his brothers were expected to attend college and obtain a high level degree. As the children of a radiologist—a profession that requires 12 years of schooling—his father made clear what he wanted for his boys: “Keep your grades up, get into a good college, get a good degree,” as Reesman recalls it. Of the four Reesman children, one brother has follo

56min

Slut med danske torsk? Fisk svømmer i dårligt nyt

Verdens fiskebestande er under alvorligt pres fra stigende havtemperaturer og marine hedebølger. I Danmark skal vi måske vinke farvel til torsken, siger forskere.

1h

Animal Migrations Track With Wikipedia Searches

By analyzing nearly 2.5 billion Wikipedia page views, researchers found that species searches reflect seasonal animal migrations and plant blooming. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Alzheimer's-like symptoms reversed in mice

A diet containing compounds found in green tea and carrots reversed Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice genetically programmed to develop the disease.

1h

1 + 1 does not equal 2 for graphene-like 2D materials

Physicists have discovered that when two atomically thin graphene-like materials are placed on top of each other their properties change, and a material with novel hybrid properties emerges, paving the way for design of new materials and nano-devices.

1h

Some worms recently evolved the ability to regrow a complete head

New study reveals regeneration of amputated body parts is not always an ancient trait and scientists might need to rethink the way they compare animals with regenerative abilities.

1h

Impact of urbanization on wild bees underestimated

Wild bees are indispensable pollinators, supporting both agricultural productivity and the diversity of flowering plants worldwide.

1h

ECG rhythm and airway management make all the difference during a heart attack

New research examined a large-scale national registry of cardiac arrest cases to measure the effects of advanced airway management (AAM) on one-month outcomes after patients survived. The deep statistical analysis found that patients not needing electrical defibrillation (based on ECG rhythm) and receiving AAM had better outcomes, such as hospital discharge. The results suggest ECG rhythm is a val

1h

Goals for collecting and studying samples from Mars

A new article defines specific scientific objectives for a Mars Sample Return campaign, to describe the critical measurements that would need to be done on returned samples to address the objectives, and to identify the kinds of samples that would be most likely to carry the key information.

1h

Dinosaurs were thriving before asteroid strike that wiped them out

Dinosaurs were unaffected by long-term climate changes and flourished before their sudden demise by asteroid strike, according to new research.

1h

Mass. General-led study provides new insights into the role of aging in heart failure

A team led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found that activity of an important signaling pathway increases with aging and with heart failure and that inhibiting that pathway can improve cardiac function in mouse models.

1h

Small molecule inhibitors show treatment potential for EBV-associated cancers

Wistar researchers have created a drug candidate for cancers associated with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis.

1h

Potential new therapy for Crohn's, colitis identified

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a compound that may treat inflammatory bowel disease without directly targeting inflammation. The compound tamps down the activity of a gene linked to blood clotting. They discovered that the gene was turned on at sites of intestinal inflammation and damage, and blocking its activity reduces IBD symptoms in mice.

1h

Evidence for human involvement in extinction of megafauna in the late Pleistocene

By re-dating giant ground sloth remains found in the Argentinian Pampas region using more advanced technology, scientists say they have provided evidence that humans hunted and butchered this animal near a swamp during the end of the Pleistocene.

1h

Key genetic component may be linked to more aggressive cases of inflammatory bowel disease

A comprehensive analysis involving 14 different groups of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients and 1,800 intestinal biopsies has pinpointed a key genetic component linked to more aggressive cases of the condition.

1h

New insights into the geographical landscape of prehistoric central Tibet

A team of scientists from the UK and China have uncovered new evidence, using recently-discovered 25-million-year-old fossilized palm leaves, that Tibet's geography was not as 'high and dry' as previously thought.

1h

Molecular connection between nutrient availability and embryonic growth identified

Investigators of the CRG discover that AHCY, a nutrient metabolism sensor protein, is a direct activator of the genes involved in the proliferation of embryo stem cells. The study has been published in Science Advances and opens the doors to molecular diagnosis and the prediction of possible fertility problems in human beings.

1h

Migrating snowline plays outsized role in setting pace of Greenland ice melt

Meltwater from Greenland's ice sheet is a leading contributor to global sea level rise, and a Brown University study shows that an underappreciated factor — the position of the snowline on the ice sheet — plays a key role in setting the pace of melting.

1h

Greenland’s snow cover will help to determine ice sheet’s fate

Greenland’s snow cover will help to determine ice sheet’s fate Greenland’s snow cover will help to determine ice sheet’s fate, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00785-8 A snowy blanket helps shield one of the world’s largest ice sheets from the Sun.

1h

Esketamine, a Treatment for Depression, Receives FDA Approval

The nasal spray to ease intractable depression appears on the US market after decades without novel antidepressant treatments.

1h

1h

Animal Migrations Track With Wikipedia Searches

By analyzing nearly 2.5 billion Wikipedia page views, researchers found that species searches reflect seasonal animal migrations and plant blooming. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

1h

Trilobites: Massacre of Children in Peru Might Have Been a Sacrifice to Stop Bad Weather

Nearly 140 child skeletons were revealed at the site last year. And now researchers say it may have been a response to an El Niño event.

1h

Good News: Opioid Prescribing Fell. The Bad? Pain Patients Suffer, Doctors Say.

Doctors and insurers are using federal guidelines as cover to turn away patients, experts tell the C.D.C. and Congress.

1h

Alabama Tornado Devastation in Photos

On March 3, a tornado outbreak struck several southern states in the U.S., including Alabama, where a monster of a tornado reached estimated wind speeds of 170 mph. It left a path of destruction more than 20 miles long in Lee County, killing 23 people and injuring at least 100 others. In the days since, survivors have been picking through the pieces of their homes, recovering what they can, as th

1h

Can entangled qubits be used to probe black holes?

Information escapes from black holes via Hawking radiation, so it should be possible to capture it and use it to reconstruct what fell in: if given time longer than the age of the universe. However, if information is scrambled rapidly when it falls in, it may be possible to resurrect it by capturing Hawking radiation from entangled qubits. Physicists confirmed scrambling in a quantum computer, bas

1h

One device, many frequencies: Researchers create a unique, tiny resonator

A new finding could ultimately help improve the army of tiny, vibrating components found in a range of electronics and even create devices that mimic biological processes. Researchers have pioneered a micromechanical device that responds to external signals in an entirely new way.

1h

Sleep tight! Researchers identify the beneficial role of sleep

Why do animals sleep? Why do humans 'waste' a third of their lives sleeping? Researchers now reveal a novel and unexpected function of sleep that they believe could explain how sleep and sleep disturbances affect brain performance, aging and various brain disorders. Using 3D time-lapse imaging techniques in live zebrafish, they were able to define sleep in a single chromosome resolution and show t

1h

Genetically engineered immune cells wipe out lupus in mice

Chimeric antigen receptor–T cell therapy—already approved for some cancers—might help human patients with the autoimmune disorder

1h

Mechanics of coronal mass ejections revealed

The genesis of enormous explosions on the sun has long been a mystery, but no more. Lauren Fuge reports.

1h

Uncovered: the sacrifice of 140 children

The largest mass sacrifice of children ever discovered took place in Peru 550 years ago. The reasons why remain a mystery. Andrew Masterson reports.

1h

Molecular connection between nutrient availability and embryonic growth identified

The union of an ovule and a spermatozoon initiates a complex cell division process that will ultimately yield a new living being. In fact, all the body's cells come from embryonic stem cells that must divide in a controlled and exact fashion to give rise to proper organ and tissue formation in the embryo. However, phenomena as yet understood by science include the way that stem cells manage to con

1h

Hundreds of children and llamas sacrificed in a ritual event in 15th century Peru

A mass sacrifice at a 15th century archaeological site in Peru saw the ritual killing of over 140 children and over 200 llamas, according to a study released March 6, 2019 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Gabriel Prieto of the National University of Trujillo, Peru and colleagues. This is the largest known mass sacrifice of children—and of llamas—in the New World.

1h

Culturally sensitive conservation approaches needed to protect Ethiopian church forests

Human disturbance reduces forest density, biomass, and richness of species in sacred church forests of northern Ethiopia, according to new research by Catherine L. Cardelús of Colgate University in Hamilton, NY, and colleagues. These findings appear in PLOS ONE.

1h

Molecular connection between nutrient availability and embryonic growth identified

The union of an ovule and a spermatozoon initiates a complex cell division process that will ultimately yield a new living being. In fact, all the body's cells come from embryonic stem cells that must divide in a controlled and exact fashion to give rise to proper organ and tissue formation in the embryo. However, phenomena as yet understood by science include the way that stem cells manage to con

1h

Fish diversity linked to Caribbean coral reef health

The health of coral reefs can be impacted as much by the diversity of fish that graze on them as by the amount of fish that do so, according to a new study by scientists at Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences. In the Science Advances paper, the researchers untangle and unveil the powerful effects that biodiversity has on Caribbean coral reefs.

1h

New insights into the geographical landscape of prehistoric central Tibet

A team of scientists from the UK and China have uncovered new evidence, using recently-discovered 25-million-year-old fossilised palm leaves, that Tibet's geography was not as 'high and dry' as previously thought.

1h

Migrating snowline plays outsized role in setting pace of Greenland ice melt

In a finding that may help scientists better predict sea-level rise in a warming world, Brown University researchers have found an underappreciated factor that controls the rate at which Greenland's ice sheet melts.

1h

The endogenous retrovirus-derived long noncoding RNA TROJAN promotes triple-negative breast cancer progression via ZMYND8 degradation

Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) play pivotal roles in the development of breast cancer. However, the detailed mechanisms of noncoding HERVs remain elusive. Here, our genome-wide transcriptome analysis of HERVs revealed that a primate long noncoding RNA, which we dubbed TROJAN, was highly expressed in human triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). TROJAN promoted TNBC proliferation and invasion

1h

Biodiversity recovery of Neotropical secondary forests

Old-growth tropical forests harbor an immense diversity of tree species but are rapidly being cleared, while secondary forests that regrow on abandoned agricultural lands increase in extent. We assess how tree species richness and composition recover during secondary succession across gradients in environmental conditions and anthropogenic disturbance in an unprecedented multisite analysis for th

1h

Type III interferon signaling restricts enterovirus 71 infection of goblet cells

Recent worldwide outbreaks of enterovirus 71 (EV71) have caused major epidemics of hand, foot, and mouth disease with severe neurological complications, including acute flaccid paralysis. EV71 is transmitted by the enteral route, but little is known about the mechanisms it uses to cross the human gastrointestinal tract. Using primary human intestinal epithelial monolayers, we show that EV71 infec

1h

Campo Laborde: A Late Pleistocene giant ground sloth kill and butchering site in the Pampas

The extinction of Pleistocene megafauna and the role played by humans have been subjects of constant debate in American archeology. Previous evidence from the Pampas region of Argentina suggested that this environment might have provided a refugium for the Holocene survival of several megamammals. However, recent excavations and more advanced accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dating at Ca

1h

Sea ice variability in the southern Norwegian Sea during glacial Dansgaard-Oeschger climate cycles

The last glacial period was marked by pronounced millennial-scale variability in ocean circulation and global climate. Shifts in sea ice cover within the Nordic Seas are believed to have amplified the glacial climate variability in northern high latitudes and contributed to abrupt, high-amplitude temperature changes over Greenland. We present unprecedented empirical evidence that resolves the nat

1h

The birth of a coronal mass ejection

The Sun’s atmosphere is frequently disrupted by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), coupled with flares and energetic particles. The coupling is usually attributed to magnetic reconnection at a vertical current sheet connecting the flare and CME, with the latter embedding a helical magnetic structure known as flux rope. However, both the origin of flux ropes and their nascent paths toward eruption rem

1h

A methylation-phosphorylation switch determines Plk1 kinase activity and function in DNA damage repair

Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a crucial regulator of cell cycle progression; but the mechanism of regulation of Plk1 activity is not well understood. We present evidence that Plk1 activity is controlled by a balanced methylation and phosphorylation switch. The methyltransferase G9a monomethylates Plk1 at Lys209, which antagonizes phosphorylation of T210 to inhibit Plk1 activity. We found that the

1h

A lateral hypothalamus to basal forebrain neurocircuit promotes feeding by suppressing responses to anxiogenic environmental cues

Animals must consider competing information before deciding to eat: internal signals indicating the desirability of food and external signals indicating the risk involved in eating within a particular environment. The behaviors driven by the former are manifestations of hunger, and the latter, anxiety. The connection between pathologic anxiety and reduced eating in conditions like typical depress

1h

No high Tibetan Plateau until the Neogene

The Late Paleogene surface height and paleoenvironment for the core area of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP) remain critically unresolved. Here, we report the discovery of the youngest well-preserved fossil palm leaves from Tibet. They were recovered from the Late Paleogene (Chattian), ca. 25.5 ± 0.5 million years, paleolake sediments within the Lunpola Basin (32.033°N, 89.767°E), central QTP at

1h

Chromatin capture links the metabolic enzyme AHCY to stem cell proliferation

Profiling the chromatin-bound proteome (chromatome) in a simple, direct, and reliable manner might be key to uncovering the role of yet uncharacterized chromatin factors in physiology and disease. Here, we have designed an experimental strategy to survey the chromatome of proliferating cells by using the DNA-mediated chromatin pull-down (Dm-ChP) technology. Our approach provides a global view of

1h

Greenland Ice Sheet surface melt amplified by snowline migration and bare ice exposure

Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss has recently increased because of enhanced surface melt and runoff. Since melt is critically modulated by surface albedo, understanding the processes and feedbacks that alter albedo is a prerequisite for accurately forecasting mass loss. Using satellite imagery, we demonstrate the importance of Greenland’s seasonally fluctuating snowline, which reduces ice sheet albe

1h

CRISPR-Cas9 corrects Duchenne muscular dystrophy exon 44 deletion mutations in mice and human cells

Mutations in the dystrophin gene cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is characterized by lethal degeneration of cardiac and skeletal muscles. Mutations that delete exon 44 of the dystrophin gene represent one of the most common causes of DMD and can be corrected in ~12% of patients by editing surrounding exons, which restores the dystrophin open reading frame. Here, we present a simple

1h

Tropical fish diversity enhances coral reef functioning across multiple scales

There is now a general consensus that biodiversity positively affects ecosystem functioning. This consensus, however, stems largely from small-scale experiments, raising the question of whether diversity effects operate at multiple spatial scales and flow on to affect ecosystem structure in nature. Here, we quantified rates of fish herbivory on algal turf communities across multiple coral reefs s

1h

New evidence of broader diets for archaic Homo populations in the northwestern Mediterranean

Investigating diet breadth is critical for understanding how archaic Homo populations, including Neanderthals, competed for seasonally scarce resources. The current consensus in Western Europe is that ungulates formed the bulk of the human diet during the Lower and Middle Paleolithic, while small fast prey taxa were virtually ignored. Here, we present a multisite taphonomic study of leporid assem

1h

A groove is better with rhythm and harmony, new research shows

PhD candidate Tomas Mathews finds that the sensation that makes people want to move when they listen to music – the groove – is more enjoyable with moderate rhythm and harmony complexity.

1h

Hominids may have hunted rabbits as far back as 400,000 years ago

Stone Age groups in Europe put small game on the menu surprisingly early.

1h

CAR T Cells Treat Lupus in Mice

T cells modified to target disease-contributing B cells improved survival in two mouse models of the autoimmune disease.

1h

Hare today, gone tomorrow. Early hominins loved a rabbit or two

Research in France finds that rabbits and their relatives were on the menu more than two million years ago. Andrew Masterson reports.

1h

As sea level rises, wetlands crank up their carbon storage

Some wetlands perform better under pressure. A new study revealed that when faced with sea-level rise, coastal wetlands respond by burying even more carbon in their soils.

1h

Almost half of all Americans have had family in prison

Nearly 1 in 2 Americans have had a brother or sister, parent, spouse, or child spend time in jail or prison—a far higher figure than previously estimated. The new study illuminates the extensive scope of mass incarceration in the US. It is the first to accurately measure the share of Americans—45 percent—who have ever had an immediate family member jailed or imprisoned for one night or more. The

1h

Coating could mean the end of foggy glasses

A new coating prevents fogging on transparent surfaces, researchers report. Going into a warm humid environment from the cold can cause eyeglasses or camera lenses to fog up, but the new coating uses sunlight to clear things up. Since the only energy source required is the sun, the coating works especially well for wearable items such as glasses and goggles. Researchers made the transparent durab

1h

Q&A: New light pollution tracking tool is a physicist’s bright idea

Christopher Kyba wants to enable anyone to easily analyze changes in night light

1h

Why non-conformists always end up looking alike

Anti-conformists have an odd way of ending up looking like each other. A Brandeis mathematician looks at how this synchronicity occurs. Understanding the mechanism behind non-conformist conformity has applications in other areas, like the stock market. None We're here for such a short time, and we'd like to think we matter. "I'm not just one more person — I'm different." That's true, and also… no

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Discount store produce as healthy as counterparts in Whole Foods

Fourteen percent of Americans currently live in a food desert with little access to fresh fruits and vegetables. A new study in Las Vegas food deserts shows that dollar discount stores offer produce equal in quality to chain grocers. While food availability in discount stores is an issue, these stores beat chains in terms of price. None The term "food desert" signifies areas with limited access a

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IBD: A low-calorie plant diet relieves inflammation, repairs gut

Cycles of a low-calorie, plant-based diet reduced inflammation, prompted tissue repair, and promoted good bacteria in intestines of mice with IBD symptoms.

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People track when talkers say 'uh' to predict what comes next

Speakers tend to say 'uh' before uncommon words ('uh… automobile') rather than common words ('car'). In a new eye-tracking study, researchers show that listeners use this information to predict an uncommon word upon hearing 'uh.' Moreover, when an 'atypical' speaker says 'uh' before common words ('uh… car'), listeners learn to predict common words after 'uh' — but only with a native speaker.

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Male bottlenose dolphins form bachelor groups with their relatives

New research has analysed the behavior of 12 dolphin social groups in South Australia's Coffin Bay region and shows males who team up in groups of two to five to form beneficial alliances may have more success.

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Alzheimer's-like symptoms reversed in mice, USC researchers say

A diet containing compounds found in green tea and carrots reversed Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice genetically programmed to develop the disease, USC researchers say

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New hepatitis C cases down by almost 70 percent in HIV-positive men in London

New cases of hepatitis C amongst HIV-positive men in London have fallen by nearly 70 percent in recent years. The new analysis of data from three clinics in London found 256 men were diagnosed between 2013-2018. New infections peaked at 17 for every 1,000 people studied in 2015 and fell to six by 2018.

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Latest trailer for Good Omens gives us our first look at the Antichrist

Armageddon is just days away, and someone has lost the Antichrist.

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1 + 1 does not equal 2 for graphene-like 2D materials

Physicists from the University of Sheffield have discovered that when two atomically thin graphene-like materials are placed on top of each other their properties change, and a material with novel hybrid properties emerges, paving the way for design of new materials and nano-devices.

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Ion experiment aces quantum scrambling test

Researchers at the Joint Quantum Institute have implemented an experimental test for quantum scrambling, a chaotic shuffling of the information stored among a collection of quantum particles.Their experiments on a group of seven atomic ions demonstrate a new way to distinguish between scrambling and true information loss. The protocol may one day help verify the calculations of quantum computers,

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As sea level rises, wetlands crank up their carbon storage

Some wetlands perform better under pressure. A new Nature study revealed that when faced with sea-level rise, coastal wetlands respond by burying even more carbon in their soils.

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Can entangled qubits be used to probe black holes?

Information escapes from black holes via Hawking radiation, so it should be possible to capture it and use it to reconstruct what fell in: if given time longer than the age of the universe. However, if information is scrambled rapidly when it falls in, it may be possible to resurrect it by capturing Hawking radiation from entangled qubits. Physicists confirmed scrambling in a quantum computer, bas

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Cancer most frequently spreads to the liver; here's why

When cancer spreads to another organ, it most commonly moves to the liver, and now researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they know why.

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Old drugs bring new hope to a cancer that lacks precision therapy

Two older drugs, designed for other purposes, produced promising results in the treatment of mice with triple negative breast cancer.

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UTSW researchers determine structures of elusive innate immunity protein

UT Southwestern researchers used cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to determine the near-atomic structure of the smallest membrane protein solved to date. Their work could lead to better immunotherapies in cancer and improved treatments for autoimmune diseases like lupus.

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Designing for accessibility: From Frida Kahlo's corsets to Franklin Roosevelt's leg braces

Technology Small innovations can go a long way. To make the most out of life, people turn to design. Here are the stories of some of history’s most famous individuals and the state-of-the-art designs that helped them…

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Earth's Magnetic Field and Wandering Poles

Earth's magnetic poles are rather inconsistent.

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FDA approves ketamine-like nasal spray for depression

The drug is closely related to the anesthetic ketamine, and it's likely to be covered by many insurance plans. It's to be used in addition with antidepressants, and only by patients who've tried two antidepressants and still don't feel better. Intravenous ketamine treatments are already available in the U.S., but they're not approved by the FDA. None The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has app

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The Message in R. Kelly’s Meltdown

Accused of dominating and manipulating dozens of women, R. Kelly defended himself on CBS This Morning by interrupting, talking over, and talking past Gayle King. When the reporter asked the singer whether he imprisoned women, he exploded, “I don’t need to—why would I?” His hands shot to his temples as his voice climbed. “How stupid would I be to do that? That’s stupid, guys!” Guys —with that, Kel

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Podcast: coastal carbon-sinks, mobile health, and Mileva Marić

Podcast: coastal carbon-sinks, mobile health, and Mileva Marić Podcast: coastal carbon-sinks, mobile health, and Mileva Marić, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00804-8 Benjamin Thompson and Nick Howe bring you the latest science updates.

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Scrambling of quantum information validated by quantum teleportation

Scrambling of quantum information validated by quantum teleportation Scrambling of quantum information validated by quantum teleportation, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00743-4 The delocalization of information in interacting quantum systems seems to play a key part in their evolution. A method has been developed that could enable the dynamics of this process to be direc

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Hepatocytes direct the formation of a pro-metastatic niche in the liver

Hepatocytes direct the formation of a pro-metastatic niche in the liver Hepatocytes direct the formation of a pro-metastatic niche in the liver, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1004-y Pancreatic cancer activates IL-6–STAT3 signalling in hepatocytes to induce the formation of a pro-metastatic niche in the liver.

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Gboxin is an oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor that targets glioblastoma

Gboxin is an oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor that targets glioblastoma Gboxin is an oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor that targets glioblastoma, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0993-x Gboxin and its chemical derivatives inhibit the growth of primary human and mouse glioblastoma cells, but not of mouse embryonic fibroblasts or neonatal astrocytes, by targeting mitocho

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TRAIP is a master regulator of DNA interstrand crosslink repair

TRAIP is a master regulator of DNA interstrand crosslink repair TRAIP is a master regulator of DNA interstrand crosslink repair, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1002-0 The E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAIP governs the choice between the NEIL3 or the Fanconi anaemia pathway for the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

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Molecular envoys pave the way for pancreatic cancer to invade the liver

Molecular envoys pave the way for pancreatic cancer to invade the liver Molecular envoys pave the way for pancreatic cancer to invade the liver, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00710-z Pancreatic cancer usually spreads to the liver. The identification of signals from cells adjacent to pancreatic tumours that boost liver colonization might suggest ways to block this deadly

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Single-neuron perturbations reveal feature-specific competition in V1

Single-neuron perturbations reveal feature-specific competition in V1 Single-neuron perturbations reveal feature-specific competition in V1, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0997-6 A combination of optogenetics and calcium imaging at the single-neuron level provides evidence for feature-specific competition among neurons in primary visual cortex.

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The influence of a single neuron on its network

The influence of a single neuron on its network The influence of a single neuron on its network, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00687-9 The contribution of a single neuron to brain function might seem negligible. But a map of the influence of single neurons reveals a complex pattern that prevents redundancy and enables clear messaging.

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Structural basis of STING binding with and phosphorylation by TBK1

Structural basis of STING binding with and phosphorylation by TBK1 Structural basis of STING binding with and phosphorylation by TBK1, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1000-2 The cryo-electron microscopy structure of human TBK1 in complex with cyclic GMP–AMP-bound chicken STING reveals a binding mode that suggests that STING phosphorylation by TBK1 requires oligomerization

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Wetland carbon storage controlled by millennial-scale variation in relative sea-level rise

Wetland carbon storage controlled by millennial-scale variation in relative sea-level rise Wetland carbon storage controlled by millennial-scale variation in relative sea-level rise, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0951-7 Wetlands exposed to rapid sea-level rise over the late Holocene contain more soil carbon than those that experienced a long period of sea-level stability

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Autophagy induction via STING trafficking is a primordial function of the cGAS pathway

Autophagy induction via STING trafficking is a primordial function of the cGAS pathway Autophagy induction via STING trafficking is a primordial function of the cGAS pathway, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1006-9 The authors report that the cGAS–STING pathway drives a form of autophagy that is independent of interferon induction and distinct from the conventional autophag

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Effective breast cancer combination therapy targeting BACH1 and mitochondrial metabolism

Effective breast cancer combination therapy targeting BACH1 and mitochondrial metabolism Effective breast cancer combination therapy targeting BACH1 and mitochondrial metabolism, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1005-x The transcription factor BACH1, which targets mitochondrial metabolism, is expressed at high levels in several types of cancer; reducing its expression in tu

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Materials in flatland twist and shine

Materials in flatland twist and shine Materials in flatland twist and shine, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00704-x Four studies demonstrate the vast opportunities provided by stacking pairs of monolayer materials and changing the resulting optical properties by twisting one material with respect to the other.

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Molecular streaming and its voltage control in ångström-scale channels

Molecular streaming and its voltage control in ångström-scale channels Molecular streaming and its voltage control in ångström-scale channels, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0961-5 Pressure-driven transport of aqueous salts through ångström-scale channels created from two-dimensional materials shows a transistor-like effect in which applying a tiny bias voltage can increa

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Cryo-EM structures of STING reveal its mechanism of activation by cyclic GMP–AMP

Cryo-EM structures of STING reveal its mechanism of activation by cyclic GMP–AMP Cryo-EM structures of STING reveal its mechanism of activation by cyclic GMP–AMP, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0998-5 Cryo-electron microscopy structures of full-length STING show that cyclic GMP–AMP induces a half-turn rotation of the ligand-binding domain relative to the transmembrane dom

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Resonantly hybridized excitons in moiré superlattices in van der Waals heterostructures

Resonantly hybridized excitons in moiré superlattices in van der Waals heterostructures Resonantly hybridized excitons in moiré superlattices in van der Waals heterostructures, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0986-9 Excitonic bands in MoSe2/WS2 heterostructures can hybridize, resulting in a resonant enhancement of moiré superlattice effects.

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S-Geranylgeranyl-l-glutathione is a ligand for human B cell-confinement receptor P2RY8

S -Geranylgeranyl- l -glutathione is a ligand for human B cell-confinement receptor P2RY8 S -Geranylgeranyl- l -glutathione is a ligand for human B cell-confinement receptor P2RY8, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1003-z S-geranylgeranyl-l-glutathione (GGG) is identified as a cell signalling molecule that interacts with the receptor P2RY8 to mediate migration inhibition and

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Structures of STING protein illuminate this key regulator of inflammation

Structures of STING protein illuminate this key regulator of inflammation Structures of STING protein illuminate this key regulator of inflammation, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00707-8 The STING protein aids intracellular defences by triggering inflammation. Studies that uncover how STING is activated might lead to strategies for targeting this protein in the treatment

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Verified quantum information scrambling

Verified quantum information scrambling Verified quantum information scrambling, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0952-6 A quantum circuit in an ion-trap quantum computer provides a positive test for the scrambling features of a given unitary process.

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p53 regulation of ammonia metabolism through urea cycle controls polyamine biosynthesis

p53 regulation of ammonia metabolism through urea cycle controls polyamine biosynthesis p53 regulation of ammonia metabolism through urea cycle controls polyamine biosynthesis, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0996-7 p53 regulates the metabolism of ammonia by repressing genes of the urea cycle that function to eliminate excess ammonia.

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Wetland mud is 'secret weapon' against climate change

Muddy, coastal marshes could store more carbon as sea levels rise, scientists reveal.

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Cinebench R20 launches for PC and Mac

Cinebench Release 20, or Cinebench R20 for short, uses a much larger and more complex test scene compared to its predecessor, Cinebench R15. According to Maxon, it requires roughly 8x the computational …

2h

Democrats unveil bill to restore US 'net neutrality'

Democratic US lawmakers Wednesday unveiled legislation to restore so-called "net neutrality" rules requiring internet providers to treat all online traffic equally.

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Good news! Europe's electric grid will still work even as the world crumbles

Temperatures may climb and seas may rise, but the lights (and, undoubtedly, the air conditioning) will still be on in nations with high capacities for wind and solar energy. New research suggests that these electricity systems should work almost equally well in both historical and future European climates despite changing weather patterns.

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New satellite keeps close watch on Antarctic ice loss

A recently-launched satellite mission has captured precision data on the elevation of the Antarctic ice sheet proving a valuable addition to monitoring efforts in the region, according to new work.

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Low-carb diet tied to common heart rhythm disorder

Low-carb diets are all the rage, but can cutting carbohydrates spell trouble for your heart? People getting a low proportion of their daily calories from carbohydrates such as grains, fruits and starchy vegetables are significantly more likely to develop atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common heart rhythm disorder, according to a new study.

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As sea level rises, wetlands crank up their carbon storage

Some wetlands perform better under pressure. A new study revealed that when faced with sea-level rise, coastal wetlands respond by burying even more carbon in their soils.

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1 + 1 does not equal 2 for graphene-like 2-D materials

Physicists from the University of Sheffield have discovered that when two atomically thin graphene-like materials are placed on top of each other their properties change, and a material with novel hybrid properties emerges, paving the way for design of new materials and nano-devices.

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Can entangled qubits be used to probe black holes?

Physicists have used a seven-qubit quantum computer to simulate the scrambling of information inside a black hole, heralding a future in which entangled quantum bits might be used to probe the mysterious interiors of these bizarre objects.

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This Jet-Powered Flying Motorcycle Is a Cyberpunk Dream Come True

Take Flight California startup Jetpack Aviation (JPA) is best known for — you guessed it — creating futuristic jetpacks designed to let you channel your inner Iron Man. But the aerospace company has a flying car in development, too, and it’s also apparently channeled its knowledge of jet turbines into creating a flying motorcycle called the Speeder . The “Return of the Jedi”-esque craft is now av

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Entangled particles might reveal the interior of black holes

A new quantum approach arises to the question of whether information can escape black holes. Phil Dooley reports.

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NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Haleh weakening

Tropical Cyclone Haleh continued to move in a southerly direction in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead.

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Ecological vineyards help protecting bird population in the environment

Ecological farmlands help protecting bird populations and reducing the effects of global change on the environment. The ecological viticulture increases the abundance and amount of species of farmland birds, and favors the insectivore bird populations that help the natural control of plagues in ecological crops.

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Translocation of bighorn sheep in Arizona has positive genetic outcomes

Research shows it is possible to re-establish bighorn sheep populations without a reduction of genetic diversity over a short period and without erosion of ancestral lineage.

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A 'Post-Antibiotic World?'

The products of wastewater treatment have been found to contain trace amounts of antibiotic resistant DNA. Researchers from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering have found that even low concentrations of just a single type of antibiotic in the water supply leads to resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics.

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Blowing Up Doomsday Asteroids Could Be Even Harder Than Thought

Uncountable sci-fi movies have told us that explosions are the answer to an impending asteroid strike, but a new analysis from Johns Hopkins University suggests that asteroids are probably considerably harder to damage than we thought, and even if you blow one up, it could simply reform. The post Blowing Up Doomsday Asteroids Could Be Even Harder Than Thought appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Your 5G guide: Will we all benefit from super-quick mobile internet?

We're told that switching phone networks to the fifth-generation of wireless tech will give us blistering speeds, but it's not clear anyone actually needs an upgrade

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An HIV cure may one day be possible

The cases of three people who are HIV-free following bone marrow transplants suggests genetics could be the answer to long-term elimination of the virus

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US Military to Develop Hypersonic “Tactical Boost Glide” Weapon

Mach 5 Missiles Defense contractor Raytheon just signed a $63.3 million contract with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop a “tactical boost glide” (TBG) hypersonic weapons program. The weapon system could reach hypersonic speeds of up to five times the sound barrier thanks to a rocket engine. A payload will then glide the rest of the way to the intended target — compl

2h

There's A Good Reason for Why We 'Uh' and 'Um' When We Talk

Our Um's and Uh's Aren't Totally Useless Ever catch yourself saying “uhhh” too many times? Many people vow to cut back on relying on such verbal crutches once they realize they’re using them, but they're not just filler. It seems they act as a cue of sorts for your conversational partners. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics found that listeners actively track when a sp

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A Better Solar Panel Through Buckets of Water, Rocks

Rare is the tech story whose main development is decidedly low-tech – but not impossible. Rather than a fancy atomic clock or rat cyborgs, for instance, this tech story deals with buckets of rocks and water. Well, solar panels too, but that’s not the cool new part. Today, at a meeting of the American Physical Society, Colgate University physicist Beth Parks described a new way to wring even more e

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A Map to Planet Nine: Hunting Our Solar System's Most Distant Worlds

Last December, a trio of astronomers set the record for the most distant object ever discovered in the solar system. Because the small world is located about three times farther from the sun than Pluto, the researchers dubbed it Farout. Now, not to be outdone (even by themselves), the same group of boundary pushers have announced the discovery of an even more far-flung object. And since the new fi

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The Servant Economy

In March 2009, Uber was born. Over the next few years, the company became not just a disruptive, controversial transportation company, but a model for dozens of venture-funded companies. Its name became a shorthand for this new kind of business : Uber for laundry ; Uber for groceries ; Uber for dog walking ; Uber for (checks notes) cookies . Larger transformations swirled around—the gig economy,

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FDA Approves Ketamine-Based Nasal Spray to Treat Depression

Ketamine Cleared On Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a prescription treatment for depression that’s based on ketamine — and though they’re advocating caution, researchers appear excited about a new avenue of treatment for stubborn symptoms of depression, anxiety, and suicidal thinking. “We’ve had nothing new in 30 years,” Steven Hollon, a researcher at Vanderbilt Univers

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Democrats unveil bill to restore US 'net neutrality'

Democratic US lawmakers Wednesday unveiled legislation to restore so-called "net neutrality" rules requiring internet providers to treat all online traffic equally.

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As Russian Military Moves into Thawing Arctic, U.S. Strategy Shifts

Two generals told a Senate panel that climate change is already affecting the U.S. military — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What's the Link Between Recalled Blood Pressure Meds and Cancer?

A number of drugs have been recalled in recent months.

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Intel pushes AI-based check-out for 24/7 autonomous shop

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GFG Kangaroo concept explores the idea of an all-electric, all-terrain supercar

Giorgetto and Fabrizio Giugiaro may have left Italdesign behind, but they never left behind the idea of an all-terrain supercar a la the Italdesign Parcour/Audi Nanuk Quattro. In fact, …

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Google Image Searches Get Shoppable Ads

Google is looking to encourage visitors to shop through its search results and it’s taking some inspiration from services like Instagram and Pinterest for this. Google has started …

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Waymo to sell its self-driving tech to outside firms

Waymo, the former Google car division developing self-driving technology, said Wednesday it would sell a key innovation to companies that don't compete with its autonomous cars.

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Stereotypes can shape how far students go in STEM

The extent to which students look racially stereotypical—that is, more or less like members of their racial group—influences how likely they are to persist in a STEM-related field, according to a new study. The researchers did not look at differences across races. Rather, they focused on differences within races. Examining five years’ worth of students who entered college intending to pursue a ST

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Does Prior Dengue Exposure Help or Hurt a Zika Infection?

Animal and cell culture studies show evidence that dengue antibodies can both neutralize and enhance Zika, but human investigations have only found protective effects.

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Climate-driven evolution in trees alters their ecosystems

A new study published in Global Change Biology and coauthored by researchers from UT, explores how climate, evolution, plants, and soils are linked. The research is the first to show how climate-driven evolution in tree populations alters the way trees directly interact with their immediate soil environment.

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Daily briefing: The fight for control over virtual fossils

Daily briefing: The fight for control over virtual fossils Daily briefing: The fight for control over virtual fossils, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00810-w Why some palaeontologists don’t share, head of FDA resigns, innovative experiments in peer review.

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William Happer Courts the Trump Administration

An eminent physicist leads a political effort to undermine climate science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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U.S. Senate Republicans hold rare climate hearing, and more might be coming

Global warming gets bipartisan recognition from leaders of energy panel

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Climate-driven evolution in trees alters their ecosystems

A new study explores how climate, evolution, plants, and soils are linked. The research is the first to show how climate-driven evolution in tree populations alters the way trees directly interact with their immediate soil environment.

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How one small village in Germany reinvented itself to ensure its survival

How can communities living together in rural areas ensure that they continue to exist and thrive? Much emphasis is placed on innovation within urban areas. However, new research shows that rural communities also play a pivotal role in generating solutions for sustainability. Studying the village of Heckenbeck in southern Lower Saxony, researchers from the University of Göttingen investigated what

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Fake warnings on e-cigarette ads distract kids from truth

When adolescent boys viewed fake-warning ads with messages such as "IMPORTANT: Contains flavor," those marketing messages stuck with them, according to the new study, which appears in the journal Tobacco Control and was led by Brittney Keller-Hamilton of The Ohio State University.

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Improving solar cell efficiency with a bucket of water

Beth Parks has devised an astonishingly simple way to overcome a limitation of solar cells — a bucket of water. As she will describe at the 2019 APS March Meeting, she developed a frame that holds the solar cell with a bucket suspended on either end. By controlling the leak of water from one of the buckets, the solar cell shifts, tracking the arc of the sun throughout the day.

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Internet, intuition can help businesses spot next big thing

When small business owners want to divine what consumer spending trends will be months from now, their methods can be as sophisticated as internet analytics or as basic as plain old intuition.

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What London’s police can learn from Glasgow’s approach to knife crime

A rise in violent knife crime in the UK has led to calls for an increase in police numbers, but Scotland is taking an alternative approach to tackle the issue

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Electrifying wound care: Better bandages to destroy bacteria

Bandages infused with electricity can help heal wounds faster than typical bandages or antibiotics — but for years, researchers have not really understood why. A recent study is offering new clues about the science behind those bandages, and researchers say the findings could help lead to better wound treatment.

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How brain cells in microscopic worm send electrical signals

It's the small pieces that make the big picture, and in this case, the pieces can't be seen by the naked eye. New research used microscopy techniques to piece together the brain of the millimeter-long Caenorhabditis elegans, revealing that their neurons fire action potentials – a spike in voltage due to neurons sending sensory information in the cell membrane. Their results could lead to better un

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Rethinking old-growth forests using lichens as an indicator of conservation value

Biologists propose a better way to assess the conservation value of North American old-growth forests — using lichens, sensitive bioindicators of environmental change. Old-growth forests are usually defined by tree age, but the authors argue this overlooks the importance of biodiversity in those habitats. Lichens are the ideal candidates to measure this biodiversity. Scorecards with suites of lic

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Biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation

Using host-specific parasites isolated on individual pigeon 'islands,' the scientists showed that descendants of a single population of feather lice adapted rapidly in response to preening. They found that preening drives rapid and divergent camouflage in feather lice transferred to different colored rock pigeons. Over four years and 60 generations, the lice evolved heritable color differences tha

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Samsung Galaxy S10 teardown shows what's behind the hole-punch display

Samsung's Galaxy S10 may be all display on the surface, but what's underneath that enigmatic exterior? Quite a lot, apparently. iFixit has torn down the entire S10 family, …

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Solar Wind Leaves 'Sunburn' Scars on Lunar Surface, NASA Missions Reveals

People on Earth are familiar with the sun's powerful rays — but the moon suffers from sunburn, too.

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Inside the ‘Black Box’ of a Neural Network

New research from Google and OpenAI offers insight into how neural networks "learn" to identify images.

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The Black Death may have transformed medieval societies in sub-Saharan Africa

New evidence questions the assumption that plague bacterium didn’t cross the Sahara

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William Happer Courts the Trump Administration

An eminent physicist leads a political effort to undermine climate science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Third Patient Is Now Reportedly Cured of HIV

Another Success There was a 12 year gap between the announcement of the first and second patients reportedly cured of their HIV infections. But now, just two days after doctors claimed that that second patient was HIV-free, another team is saying they’ve cleared the infection in a third patient — and there’s a chance a fourth and a fifth might be following soon behind. Three’s Company According t

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Neuroscience Readies for a Showdown Over Consciousness Ideas

Some problems in science are so hard, we don’t really know what meaningful questions to ask about them — or whether they are even truly solvable by science. Consciousness is one of those: Some researchers think it is an illusion; others say it pervades everything. Some hope to see it reduced to the underlying biology of neurons firing; others say that it is an irreducibly holistic phenomenon. The

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Here's Your Chance to Name 5 Jupiter Moons! (No Moon McMoonfaces, Please)

Last summer, scientists announced the discovery of a dozen new moons orbiting Jupiter. But now comes the hard part: naming them.

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Autism: Brain activity as a biomarker

Researchers have discovered specific activity patterns in the brains of people with autism. These consistent patterns of functional connectivity might be used in the long term as therapeutic biomarkers. The idea behind this is that in future, doctors would be able to investigate whether certain treatments can shift brain patterns in the direction of healthy patterns, potentially achieving an impro

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Disrupting wolf movement may be more effective at protecting caribou

Woodland caribou populations have been dwindling towards local extinction across much of their range and scientists believe that predators, and specifically wolves, are a leading cause of the decline. Wolf populations are thought to have increased and expanded into caribou range due to the expansion of linear features, such as pipelines and roads, resulting from oil, gas and forestry development.

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Disrupting wolf movement may be more effective at protecting caribou

Woodland caribou populations have been dwindling towards local extinction across much of their range and scientists believe that predators, and specifically wolves, are a leading cause of the decline. Wolf populations are thought to have increased and expanded into caribou range due to the expansion of linear features, such as pipelines and roads, resulting from oil, gas and forestry development.

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How viruses outsmart their host cells

Viruses depend on host cells for replication, but how does a virus induce its host to transcribe its own genetic information alongside that of the virus, thus producing daughter viruses? For decades, researchers have been studying a type of bacteriophage known as 'lambda' to try and find an answer to this question. Using high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, a research group from Charité — Un

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Scientists identify genetic factors that may cause some people to become obese

New research on leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, reveals a previously unknown mechanism that may be responsible for at least 10 percent of obesity cases. The findings could help identify individuals with treatable forms of the condition.

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Hubble Spots Gassy Objects Jetting Away from Newborn Star

Young stars can hide, but Hubble's good at seeking them out. The famed space telescope spotted the "smoking gun" of a newborn star about 1,000 light-years away from Earth.

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Omdefinition av livets släktträd

Genom att studera byggstenarna i DNA från organismers arvsanlag (genom) kan forskarna bestämma hur arterna utvecklats och är släkt med varandra. Fram träder då en bild, ett livets släktträd som visar hur liv på jorden har utvecklats, från de enklaste livsformer till djur och människor. Till vänster livets träd med den nya metoden, till höger den fram tills nu etablerad bilden av livets träd. De p

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Swifts are born to eat and sleep in the air

Nearly 100 species of swift are completely adapted to life in the air. That is the conclusion of researchers after having studied a third species and observing that some individuals did not land for over three months.

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How Engineered Nanoparticles Gave Mice Infrared Vision

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How a Distant Alien World Was Saved from an Interstellar Exile

A distant alien world that was potentially on its way into exile in interstellar space was rescued by the gravitational pull of a passing pair of stars, a new study argues.

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Europe’s power grid will survive climate change. The US, not so much

Modelling shows big European investment in renewables will deliver long-term stability. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Harman awarded patent for flying robotic speakers

The US Patent and Trademark Office this week awarded audio specialist Harman a patent for a mobile speaker system for virtual reality environments.

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Socially Acceptable Anti-Semitism

On Sunday, a float rolled down the streets of Aalst, a Belgian town, for carnival. It featured two grotesque caricatures of Hasidic Jews, hooked noses, hands reaching out for money, and a rat sitting on money bags. That’s 2019. A second float, pictured above—in Marburg, Germany, in 1936—featured celebrants dressed as Orthodox Jews. The only real difference is that the former was more elaborately

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Disrupting wolf movement may be more effective at protecting caribou

Researchers used motion-triggered cameras to capture photographs of wolves, caribou, and other wildlife species in the Canadian Oil Sands to study the habitat use patterns of these animals and test management strategies aimed at reducing the impacts of the linear developments on caribou.

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SLU study: Mediterranean diet boosts endurance exercise within days

Researchers at Saint Louis University have found that eating a Mediterranean diet can improve athletes' endurance exercise performance after just four days.

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Eating healthy on a limited budget is possible

A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that with menu planning and access to stores selling items in bulk, the average daily cost for serving healthy meals to a family of four was $25 in 2010 dollars. This cost was consistent with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) low-income cost of food meal plan, but higher than the cost of the USDA Thrifty Food Plan

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In fiction young people choose traditional love and gender stereotypes

Fictional television series can have an influence on the construction of young people's identities and values. In relation to the depiction of love in television series, young people express a preference for traditional gender stereotypes, reveals a study conducted to identify gender and love stereotypes displayed by young people compared to those they prefer in fictional television series in thre

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CAMH study reveals a new target for developing treatments for depression

A new CAMH study shows for the first time that people experiencing clinical depression have higher levels of a brain protein called MAO-B. The finding — published online today in JAMA Psychiatry — opens the door to a new area of exploration for developing depression treatments. Depression affects an estimated 15 per cent of people over their lifetime, and is the leading cause of disability world

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Bone fractures increasing as seniors walk dogs to stay active

Between 2004 and 2017, dog-walking-related fractures in people 65-or-older more than doubled.

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Do weight-loss surgery outcomes differ between black and white patients?

Researchers examined the association of race on outcomes of weight-loss surgery for black and white patients in Michigan by analyzing data from a statewide clinical registry.

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Estimates of older patients with fractures associated with walking leashed dogs

Dog walking is often suggested as something older adults can do to improve their health. But older adults are at increased risk of fractures. This observational study estimated the number of patients (65 or older) nationwide with fractures associated with walking leashed dogs. Researchers used an injury surveillance database for patients at about 100 US emergency departments to make their annual n

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Good news! Europe's electric grid will still work even as the world crumbles

Temperatures may climb and seas may rise, but the lights (and, undoubtedly, the air conditioning) will still be on in nations with high capacities for wind and solar energy. New research, published March 6 in the journal Joule, suggests that these electricity systems should work almost equally well in both historical and future European climates despite changing weather patterns.

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Improving Preclinical Discovery of CRISPR Engineered Immune Cell Therapies

There is an urgent need to characterize the potency and efficacy of CRISPR-Cas9-modified inducible pluripotent stem cell-derived natural killer cells for preclinical cancer immunotherapy research. IsoPlexis' single-cell proteomics system addresses this challenge by connecting each immune cell to cytokine secretion and thereby correlating them to in vivo outcome across a range of disease areas.

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Hearts Ripped from 140 Children and 200 Llamas in Largest Child Sacrifice in Ancient World

The largest child sacrifice on record took place after a torrential rainfall, when about 140 children and 200 young llamas likely had their hearts ripped out by the ancient Chimú culture in A.D. 1450, in what is now Peru.

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Teens need more sleep than you realize

Health Adolescents' growing brains and unique sleep-wake patterns mean they might need more snooze time than adults. How much sleep do adolescents really need and how can parents help them achieve it?

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Topledere om 2019: Det går fremad, men hvor skal vi skaffe ingeniører?

Ingeniørvirksomhedernes topchefer forventer øget omsætning i 2019. Samtidig er det blevet lettere at finde og holde på medarbejdere – men det er stadig virksomhedernes største udfordring.

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Wind and solar will still work in a climate-change ravaged Europe

Even in the worst climate change scenarios, wind and solar power generation levels in Europe can be maintained, despite UN predictions that cloudier and stormier weather will affect output

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A New FDA Commissioner, Suddenly

The big news late yesterday afternoon was the resignation of Scott Gottleib as FDA commissioner. I have no idea why he’s leaving, naturally. He’s spoken about wanting to spend more time with his family and being dissatisfied with going back and forth between Connecticut and DC, and I have no doubt that both of those are true. But one has to wonder if they’re the full story. Gottleib has done a go

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States with strict gun laws see more homicides when they border states with lax ones

Gun-related homicide rates in states with strict gun laws increase when neighboring states have less restrictive laws as a result of gun trafficking across state lines, suggests a new study from Penn Medicine. A review of gun tracing data also revealed that 65 percent of the guns recovered in the most restrictive states originated from other states.

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Graphene quantum dots for single electron transistors

Scientists from the Higher School of Economics, Manchester University, the Ulsan National Institute of Science & Technology and the Korea Institute of Science and Technology have developed a novel technology, which combines the fabrication procedures of planar and vertical heterostructures in order to assemble graphene-based single-electron transistors of excellent quality.

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Tiny bits of iron may explain why some icebergs are green

Scientists originally thought the green hue of some icebergs came from carbon particles. Instead, iron oxides may color the ice.

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Dog walking dangers for the old

US figures show taking a pet for a stroll could have devastating consequences. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Europe’s power grid will survive climate change. The US, not so much

Modelling shows big European investment in renewables will deliver long-term stability. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Manual pipetting of 384-well plates made easy!

Once throughput increases and sample volumes decrease, users face a dilemma. The so-called “alternate well pipetting method”, which uses 8- and 12- channel pipettes to fill 384-well plates, demands intense concentration; furthermore, it is time-consuming and carries a high risk of error.

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Fracking: Government guidance 'unlawful' rules High Court

A judge ruled that the government had failed to take into account the latest scientific evidence.

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How belief in punitive gods may have helped large societies cooperate

Belief in a punitive god may make people more likely to give money to someone who lives far away, which could help cohesion in large societies

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iPhone sales are falling, and Apple's app fees might be next (Update)

As iPhone sales slip , Apple has been positioning its booming digital-services business as its new profit engine. But there could be a snag in that plan.

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Breast milk as drug-delivery device

Treating sick babies with engineered breast milk could someday be a reality, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. Modified cells in the liquid could potentially deliver vaccines, fix birth defects or provide proteins that some babies can't make on their own.

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Seawater bacteria provides leads to fight melanoma

Malignant melanoma can be a particularly dangerous form of cancer, and more therapeutic options are needed. Now, researchers report in ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters that a bacteria from seawater has inspired promising leads for an entirely new way to treat the disease.

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How we can store digital data in DNA | Dina Zielinski

From floppy disks to thumb drives, every method of storing data eventually becomes obsolete. What if we could find a way to store all the world's data forever? Bioinformatician Dina Zielinski shares the science behind a solution that's been around for a few billion years: DNA.

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Scientists find worms that recently evolved the ability to regrow a complete head

An international group of researchers including biologists from the University of Maryland found that at least four species of marine ribbon worms independently evolved the ability to regrow a head after amputation.

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Seawater bacteria provides leads to fight melanoma

Malignant melanoma can be a particularly dangerous form of cancer, and more therapeutic options are needed. Now, researchers report in ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters that a bacteria from seawater has inspired promising leads for an entirely new way to treat the disease.

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Scientists find worms that recently evolved the ability to regrow a complete head

An international group of researchers including biologists from the University of Maryland found that at least four species of marine ribbon worms independently evolved the ability to regrow a head after amputation.

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New satellite keeps close watch on Antarctic ice loss

A recently-launched satellite mission has captured precision data on the elevation of the Antarctic ice sheet proving a valuable addition to monitoring efforts in the region, according to work published this week in The Cryosphere.

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Scientists tackle major challenges to sending astronauts to search for life on Mars

An international team of researchers, which includes scientists from McMaster's School of Geography & Earth Sciences, NASA, and others, is tackling one of the biggest problems of space travel to Mars: what happens when we get there?

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Barbara Bosworth’s best photograph: midsummer moon over Boston

‘Light pollution is making it increasingly hard to find a really dark night sky that lets you see the stars. It’s a shame for humanity’ I took this shot in a big open field near my home in Boston, Massachusetts. It was Midsummer and the sky was perfectly clear – or as clear as it gets near cities these days. Light pollution is changing how we see the stars and not for the better. I work on a larg

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Rått kött till hunden kan vara en risk för ägaren

Att utfodra hundar med dieter baserade på rått kött har blivit allt mer populärt under senare år. Den köttråvara man kan hitta i foderbutikernas frysdiskar består dock av slaktbiprodukter som inte har behandlats för att minska det mikrobiella innehållet, och som därför kan innehålla sjukdomsframkallande mikroorganismer. För att få en bild av hur stor denna risk harforskare från Sveriges lantbruks

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The evolution of grain yield

A high grain yield is undoubtedly a desirable trait in cereal crops. Floret fertility is a key factor that determines the number of grains per inflorescence of cereals such as bread, wheat or barley. Nonetheless, until recently, little was known about its genetic basis. While investigating floret fertility, a group of researchers from Japan, Germany and Israel have now discovered the locus Grain N

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Scientists reveal Pacific North Equatorial Countercurrent weak biases in ocean models

The Pacific North Equatorial Countercurrent (NECC) is a major upper-ocean zonal flow of the wind-driven circulation in the tropical Pacific, flowing eastward across the Pacific Ocean basin between 2°N and 10°N. The NECC transport is about 10-30 Sv eastward out of the warm pool region to the relatively cold eastern Pacific on average. It plays important roles in the volume and heat budget of the wa

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New 3-in-1 furniture option for urban living, restaurants, open offices

Anyone who has tried to live the urban lifestyle knows living space can be a scarce resource. The average size of a new apartment in the U.S. in 2018 is 941 square feet, 5 percent smaller than 10 years ago, according to RENTCafe Blog, and in Seattle, Manhattan and Chicago they are substantially smaller, leaving little space beyond a bed and kitchen table.

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The evolution of grain yield

A high grain yield is undoubtedly a desirable trait in cereal crops. Floret fertility is a key factor that determines the number of grains per inflorescence of cereals such as bread, wheat or barley. Nonetheless, until recently, little was known about its genetic basis. While investigating floret fertility, a group of researchers from Japan, Germany and Israel have now discovered the locus Grain N

4h

Breast milk as drug-delivery device

Treating sick babies with engineered breast milk could someday be a reality, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. Modified cells in the liquid could potentially deliver vaccines, fix birth defects or provide proteins that some babies can't make on their own.

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Breast cancer patients weigh in on addressing financial burdens

A qualitative study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health yielded nine patient-driven recommendations across circumstances that include changes to insurance, supportive services and financial assistance to reduce long-term, breast cancer-related economic burden.

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New satellite keeps close watch on Antarctic ice loss

A recently-launched satellite mission has captured precision data on the elevation of the Antarctic ice sheet proving a valuable addition to monitoring efforts in the region, according to work published this week in The Cryosphere.

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Seawater bacteria provides leads to fight melanoma

Malignant melanoma can be a particularly dangerous form of cancer, and more therapeutic options are needed. Now, researchers report in ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters that a bacteria from seawater has inspired promising leads for an entirely new way to treat the disease.

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Diagnostic uncertainty in children with fever impacts health service resources

The management of febrile illness (fever) in children has a substantial impact on National Health Services resources, predominantly due to diagnostic uncertainty resulting from a lack of accurate tests to distinguish between viral and bacterial illness, a new study reports.Uncertainty over the causes of fever, and associated added cautiousness by clinicians, results in increased observation times,

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Scientists find worms that recently evolved the ability to regrow a complete head

New study reveals regeneration of amputated body parts is not always an ancient trait and scientists might need to rethink the way they compare animals with regenerative abilities.

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Binding with consequences

Researchers from Freiburg and Ulm discover mechanism through which bacteria attack white blood cells.

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Scientists tackle major challenges to sending astronauts to search for life on Mars

An international team of researchers, which includes scientists from McMaster's School of Geography & Earth Sciences, NASA, and others, is tackling one of the biggest problems of space travel to Mars: what happens when we get there?

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Goodyear’s new Aero tire is built with flying cars in mind

submitted by /u/IanHurley7 [link] [comments]

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Mercedes-Benz Enters Formula E Electric Racing This Year

Win on Sunday, sell EVs on Monday: Major automakers flock to Formula E racing. Mercedes-Benz will use the "EQ" moniker to brand its EVs and its Formula E racers. The post Mercedes-Benz Enters Formula E Electric Racing This Year appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Are Insects Going Extinct? The Debate Obscures the Real Dangers They Face

Insects, the most abundant and diverse animals on Earth, are facing a crisis of epic proportions, according to a growing body of research and a rash of alarmist media reports that have followed. If left unchecked, some scientists say, recent population declines could one day lead to a world without insects. “The Insect Apocalypse Is Here,” New York Times Magazine avowed in an in-depth story examin

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Las Vegas Wants Elon Musk’s Boring Co to Dig a Massive Tunnel

Vegas, Baby! Elon Musk’s Boring Company is coming for Las Vegas. The Las Vegas tourism board announced today that it is recommending the building of an underground tunnel system — and the Boring Company is its number one choice, the Associated Press reports . “It’s really innovative,” president and CEO of the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority Steve Hill told the AP . “I think it will be

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Dust affects tooth wear and chewing efficiency in chimpanzees

In a new study, Leipzig researchers collected feces from chimpanzees living at Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, and analyzed chewing efficiency during dry and rainy periods. They found that increased dust loads during dry periods result in decreased chewing efficiency. Moreover, dust affects tooth wear (surface texture) of the chimpanzees. The researchers found that consumption of dust-covered food

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Dust affects tooth wear and chewing efficiency in chimpanzees

In a new study, Leipzig researchers collected feces from chimpanzees living at Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, and analyzed chewing efficiency during dry and rainy periods. They found that increased dust loads during dry periods result in decreased chewing efficiency. Moreover, dust affects tooth wear (surface texture) of the chimpanzees. The researchers found that consumption of dust-covered food

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FDA Approves Esketamine, the First Major Depression Treatment to Reach U.S. Market in Decades

Nasal spray related to the anesthetic/street drug ketamine targets treatment-resistant patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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FDA Approves Esketamine, the First Major Depression Treatment to Reach U.S. Market in Decades

Nasal spray related to the anesthetic/street drug ketamine targets treatment-resistant patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Spin devices rev up

Electric currents drive all our electronic devices. The emerging field of spintronics looks to replace electric currents with what are known as spin currents. Researchers from the University of Tokyo have made a breakthrough in this area. Their discovery of the magnetic spin Hall effect could lead to low-power, high-speed and high-capacity devices. They have created sample devices which can furthe

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Electrifying wound care: Better bandages to destroy bacteria

Bandages infused with electricity can help heal wounds faster than typical bandages or antibiotics — but for years, researchers have not really understood why.A recent study by a team at The Ohio State University is offering new clues about the science behind those bandages, and researchers say the findings could help lead to better wound treatment.

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Autism: Brain activity as a biomarker

Researchers from Jülich, Switzerland, France, the Netherlands, and the UK have discovered specific activity patterns in the brains of people with autism. These consistent patterns of functional connectivity might be used in the long term as therapeutic biomarkers. The idea behind this is that in future, doctors would be able to investigate whether certain treatments can shift brain patterns in the

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Menopause symptoms nearly double the risk of chronic pain

In addition to the other health conditions affected by estrogen, it has also been shown to affect pain sensitivity. This finding was the basis of a study of more than 200,000 records from the Veterans Health Administration that demonstrated a link between menopause symptoms and chronic pain. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society

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Rain is important for how carbon dioxide affects grasslands

Vegetation biomass on grasslands increases in response to elevated carbon dioxide levels, but less than expected. Vegetation on grasslands with a wet spring season has the greatest increase. This has been demonstrated in a new study published in the scientific journal Nature Plants.

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Swifts are born to eat and sleep in the air

Nearly 100 species of swift are completely adapted to life in the air. That is the conclusion of researchers at Lund University in Sweden after having studied a third species and observing that some individuals did not land for over three months.

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People track when talkers say 'uh' to predict what comes next

Speakers tend to say 'uh' before uncommon words ('uh… automobile') rather than common words ('car'). In a new eye-tracking study, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics show that listeners use this information to predict an uncommon word upon hearing 'uh.' Moreover, when an 'atypical' speaker says 'uh' before common words ('uh… car'), listeners learn to predict common

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Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions

The decline in biodiversity and the associated loss of plant species are greatly affecting ecosystems. Thus far, this has been shown by studies in the so-called grasslands, i.e. in areas that are not covered by buildings or are dominated by woody vegetation. A team of biologists from the University of Freiburg has now been able to show that the loss of tree species in forests destabilizes insect c

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Are viruses the best weapon for fighting superbugs?

Antibiotics won the battle against resistant bacteria, but they may not win the war.

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Project reveals genome of celebrity cat Lil BUB

Lil BUB has drawn millions of followers across the internet for her cute appearance. Behind the celebrity cat's unique features is a combination of two rare genetic variants, three molecular biologists from Germany and the US report. The results of their crowdfunded project "LilBUBome" are now available on the preprint server bioRxiv.

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Swifts are born to eat and sleep in the air

"They eat and sleep while they are airborne. This is something that researchers have believed since the 1950s, and now we can show that it's true", says Anders Hedenström, professor at the Department of Biology at Lund University.

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Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions

The decline in biodiversity and the associated loss of plant species are greatly affecting ecosystems. Thus far, this has been shown by studies in the so-called grasslands, i.e. in areas that are not covered by buildings or are dominated by woody vegetation. A team of biologists from the University of Freiburg has now been able to show that the loss of tree species in forests destabilizes insect c

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Download the Big Bang on your smartphone

Experience the 13.8-billion-year-old story of the universe in just seven minutes with CERN's new Big Bang app. Launched today at the Google Arts and Culture event in Washington D.C., the app, free and available for download, uses augmented or mixed reality to create an immersive adventure to our origin.

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A self-healing composite

Researchers from EPFL's Laboratory for Processing of Advanced Composites have developed a material that can easily heal after being damaged. This cutting-edge composite could be used in aircraft, wind turbines, cars and sports equipment.

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Democrats who won 2018 midterms were more negative than Republicans on Twitter, research finds

It was a mantra first popularized by Michelle Obama in 2016 and echoed again and again by Democratic politicians who vowed to rebuke the negative speech they said their Republican counterparts espoused.

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Sensory tests suggest 'liking' wines made with native grapes a learned response

Consumer preference or aversion to wines made from native grapes—such as Concord, Niagara and Catawba, which are grown in North America—may depend on early exposure to the fruits' sweet, ultra "grapey" taste and aroma, according to researchers who conducted sensory tests with wine drinkers in Pennsylvania and California.

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Video: Satellites and the modern economy

Satellites bring immense benefits to everyone on Earth. From monitoring our changing planet and increasingly severe natural disasters, to providing resilient telecom networks and delivering services such as precise navigation that help economies grow and humans in need, satellites are the 'eyes and ears' in space that help us to help ourselves.

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Are viruses the best weapon for fighting superbugs?

Antibiotics won the battle against resistant bacteria, but they may not win the war.

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Earliest animals developed later than assumed

Sponges belong to our earliest ancestors. However, fossils, molecules and genes disagree on the rise of these early animals. A large international team of researchers around Christian Hallmann and Benjamin Nettersheim from the Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry now found new molecular clues suggesting that sponges may have appeared much later than commonly assumed.

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Video: What does space have to do with the 5G revolution?

Everybody is talking about 5G, the new generation of wireless communication. We are at the start of a revolution in connectivity for everything, everywhere, at all times.

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Project reveals genome of celebrity cat Lil BUB

Lil BUB has drawn millions of followers across the internet for her cute appearance. Behind the celebrity cat's unique features is a combination of two rare genetic variants, three molecular biologists from Germany and the US report. The results of their crowdfunded project "LilBUBome" are now available on the preprint server bioRxiv.

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Swifts are born to eat and sleep in the air

"They eat and sleep while they are airborne. This is something that researchers have believed since the 1950s, and now we can show that it's true", says Anders Hedenström, professor at the Department of Biology at Lund University.

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Dinosaur tracks make fresh impression at Valley Forge park

The national park on the site where George Washington and the struggling Continental Army endured a tough winter during the American Revolution boasts a new feature that's a couple of hundred million years old—dozens of fossilized dinosaur footprints discovered on rocks used to pave a section of hiking trail.

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US Military: Our “Lethality Automated System” Definitely Isn’t a Killer Robot

Autonomous Killing Machine In February, the U.S. Army asked experts for ideas on how to build a system that would allow tanks and other ground-combat vehicles to quickly and automatically “acquire, identify, and engage” targets. Some saw this as a step toward autonomous killer robots, leading the Army to now tweak its request. Yes, it now says, it wants bots to be able to identify and kill target

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This spider slingshots itself at extreme speeds to catch prey

By winding up its web like a slingshot, the slingshot spider achieves an acceleration rate far faster than a cheetah’s.

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Financial illiteracy and irrational thinking are causing a dangerous shortfall in retirement savings

The majority of people in Western countries fail to plan sufficiently for retirement, and most will face large social security expenditures to support aging populations as life expectancy increases, according to Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan laver man alkoholfrit øl?

En læser vil gerne vide, hvordan man laver øl uden alkohol. Det svarer Carlsberg på.

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Doctor or nurse in the family? You’re more likely to hit 80

A question as simple as “Are you taking your medicine?” could conceivably prolong your life, research shows. A new study offers concrete evidence on the power of exposure to health-related expertise—not only in improving mortality rates and lifelong health outcomes, but also in narrowing the vexing health gap between the rich and poor. The findings, which appear in a National Bureau of Economic R

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The Stress of a Natural Disaster Can Take a Toll on Babies in Utero

Pregnant women are often told to avoid stress. Easier said than done. Work, school, life—stress is inevitable. And now researchers are saying they can even document an ill effect on babies when mothers confront one of the most unavoidable stressors: natural disasters. In 2009, researchers from the City University of New York received a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to better

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Think These Are Planets? They're Something Far More Sinister

Valentyn Odnvoium's series _Surveillance_ creates beauty out of something very grim.

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Building an energy corridor along the border instead of just a wall

Instead of a wall, build a first-of-its-kind energy park that spans the 1,954 miles of the border between the United States and Mexico to bring energy, water, jobs and border security to the region.

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Weight loss can reverse type 2 diabetes, study suggests

A third of people put on low-calorie diet in trial stayed in remission after two years A third of people who went on a low-calorie diet to lose substantial amounts of weight reversed their type 2 diabetes and were still in remission two years later, a study on the long-term implications has found. The number of people with type 2 diabetes has been soaring on the back of the obesity epidemic sweep

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Elon Musk firm pitched to build transit system in Las Vegas

Entrepreneur Elon Musk's dream of an express tunnel transit system could finally become a reality in Las Vegas after major setbacks in other cities.

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Tony's Final Gold Weigh of the Season | Gold Rush

With winter approaching, Tony and his family count their last gold of the season. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're

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Rain is important for how carbon dioxide affects grasslands

Vegetation biomass on grasslands increases in response to elevated carbon dioxide levels, but less than expected. Vegetation on grasslands with a wet spring season has the greatest increase. This has been demonstrated in a new study published in the scientific journal Nature Plants.

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New technologies could help conservationists keep better track of Serengeti wildebeest herds

New methods of counting wildlife could provide conservationists with fast and accurate methods for estimating the abundance of natural populations.

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New technologies could help conservationists keep better track of Serengeti wildebeest herds

New methods of counting wildlife could provide conservationists with fast and accurate methods for estimating the abundance of natural populations.

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Hashtags are a potential tool for fashion designers

Social media data can help fashion companies determine upcoming trends and if celebrity endorsements are working, research shows. According to the research, fashion designers could use hashtags as a tool to forecast trends in the industry and better connect with consumers. “We know that people talk and are interested in fashion, so it makes sense that they talk about it on social media,” says Li

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How Engineered Nanoparticles Gave Mice Infrared Vision

Efforts to use technology to enhance humans’ natural capabilities are moving out of the scientific fringes. A recent study on mice suggests it may eventually be possible to imbue people with infrared vision by injecting nanoparticles into their eyeballs. The visual range of mammals encompasses a tiny sliver of the electromagnetic spectrum referred to as visible light. But other animals, like cert

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These motorcycles look intimidating but are actually easy to ride

Technology Menacing machines with a soft side. Motorcycles that hold your license hostage while flattering your ego.

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AI study of risk factors in type 1 diabetes

In combination with conventional statistical methods, artificial intelligence (AI) has now been used in a study of risk factors in type 1 diabetes. The objective was to identify the most important indicators of elevated risk for cardiovascular disease and death.

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Insect food webs

Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions.

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Preliminary estimation of undesired substances in diapers

The French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health & Safety (ANSES) has published a comprehensive report on hazardous substances in disposable panty diapers on January, 23, 2019 entitled "Sécurité des couches pour bébé". Here, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) evaluated the results of this report. However, a complete and conclusive assessment is currently imposs

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Scientists reveal Pacific North Equatorial Countercurrent weak biases in ocean models

The Pacific North Equatorial Countercurrent is not well simulated in many ocean models because of its complex dynamics. A research team led by IAP scientists found the surface wind stress and its curl is the most important forcing term for correctly simulating the NECC in ocean models.

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Cancer death rate higher for patients with mental health history

Cancer patients who have been hospitalised for mental health problems prior to their cancer diagnosis were 73 percent more likely to die from their cancer compared to those who had never had psychiatric help, according to new research published in the British Journal of Cancer.

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Blue-enriched white light to wake you up in the morning

Here is good news for those who have difficulty with morning alertness. A KAIST research team proposed that a blue-enriched LED light can effectively help people overcome morning drowsiness. This study will provide the basis for major changes in future lighting strategies and thereby help create better indoor environments.

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Dust affects tooth wear and chewing efficiency in chimpanzees

Periodical dust loads on foods places dietary-physiological stress on the digestive system in chimpanzees. This is the conclusion reached by an international research team headed by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (MPI-EVA) in Leipzig. Their study implicates that extrinsic abrasive particles carried by dust-laden winds affect tooth wear and evolutionary fitne

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How belief in vengeful gods may have helped large societies cooperate

Belief in a vengeful god may make people more likely to give money to someone who lives far away, which could help cohesion in large societies

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At last, US dream of resuming human space launches are within reach

For nearly a decade the US has relied on Russia to get its astronauts into space. With the test of SpaceX's crew capsule, it looks set to bring launches home again soon

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Syddanmark tager første skridt til at udrydde Hepatitis C

Nu tager vi det første og nemme skridt, siger infektionslæger. Næste skridt bliver at finde alle de 68’ere, der i deres unge dage eksperimenterede med stoffer og muligvis er smittet med Hepatitis C uden at vide det.

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Alternativet ude: Reform­forhandlinger fortsætter i smalt spor

Efter Alternativets farvel forhandler regeringen videre med Dansk Folkeparti om en smal sundhedsreform.

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Einstein 'puzzle' solved as missing page emerges in new trove

An Albert Einstein "puzzle" has been solved thanks to a missing manuscript page emerging in a trove of his writings newly acquired by Jerusalem's Hebrew University, officials announced Wednesday.

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The evolution of grain yield

A high grain yield is undoubtedly a desirable trait in cereal crops. Floret fertility is a key factor which determines the number of grains per inflorescence of cereals such as bread wheat or barley. Nonetheless, until recently little was known about its genetic basis. Whilst investigating floret fertility, a group of researchers from Japan, Germany and Israel have now discovered the locus Grain N

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Gut microbiota helps to maintain core body temperature under cold exposure

A research group led by Professor John R. Speakman from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has revealed the important role of gut microbiota in thermoregulation — the way animals respond to cold exposure.

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Anti-inflammatory drug is the key to boosting cardiac reprogramming

University of Tsukuba researchers and colleagues developed a high-throughput screening system to identify the NSAID diclofenac as a factor responsible for enhancing cardiac reprogramming in postnatal and adult fibroblasts. Diclofenac functioned during early-stage reprogramming by silencing the cellular signature associated with fibroblasts and inhibiting COX-2 and other molecules associated with i

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ECG rhythm and airway management make all the difference during a heart attack

Japan-based research examined a large-scale national registry of cardiac arrest cases to measure the effects of advanced airway management (AAM) on one-month outcomes after patients survived. The deep statistical analysis found that patients not needing electrical defibrillation (based on ECG rhythm) and receiving AAM had better outcomes, such as hospital discharge. The results suggest ECG rhythm

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Financial illiteracy and irrational thinking are causing a dangerous shortfall in retirement savings

Since individuals do not make rational decisions in complex matters such as retirement planning, the researchers suggest an alternative behavioral approach. Instead, they would focus on affecting a few particular attitudes that guide individuals' savings decisions or raising awareness about the needs for retirement, which is harder to ignore.

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Deep learning merges advantages of holography and bright-field microscopy for 3D imaging

Researchers at UCLA have developed an artificial neural network-based 3D imaging method, termed Bright-field Holography, which combines the image contrast advantage of bright-field microscopy and the snapshot volumetric imaging capability of holography. This data-driven deep-learning-based imaging method bridges the contrast gap between coherent and incoherent imaging systems and enables the snaps

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Low-cost 'cancer probe' could spot deadly melanoma early

Work is being done at UBC on a tool to help in the early detection of melanoma: a simple, compact laser probe that can distinguish between harmless moles and cancerous ones — in a matter of seconds.

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Male bottlenose dolphins form bachelor groups with their relatives

New research has analysed the behaviour of 12 dolphin social groups in South Australia's Coffin Bay region and shows males who team up in groups of two to five to form beneficial alliances may have more success.

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Matrix could ensure vital copper supplies

Researchers have identified a matrix of risks that the mining industry must overcome to unlock vitally important copper reserves.University of Queensland geologist Professor Rick Valenta said copper would be crucial in a renewable-powered future, but global supplies were far from guaranteed.

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Spin devices rev up

Electric currents drive all our electronic devices. The emerging field of spintronics looks to replace electric currents with what are known as spin currents. Researchers from the University of Tokyo have made a breakthrough in this area. Their discovery of the magnetic spin Hall effect could lead to low-power, high-speed and high-capacity devices. They have created sample devices which can furthe

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An easy route to polymer coatings with potential use in biofouling prevention

A simple method for growing non-toxic antifouling polymer coatings has been developed by A*STAR researchers. This could lead to longer lasting coatings suitable for use over large surfaces, such as ship hulls or medical devices.

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Percolation thresholds for photonic quantum computing

Percolation thresholds for photonic quantum computing Percolation thresholds for photonic quantum computing, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08948-x Universal cluster states for quantum computing can be assembled without feed-forward by fusing n-photon clusters with linear optics if the fusion success probability is above a threshold p. The authors bound p in terms of n an

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Genetic dissection of Nodal and Bmp signalling requirements during primordial germ cell development in mouse

Genetic dissection of Nodal and Bmp signalling requirements during primordial germ cell development in mouse Genetic dissection of Nodal and Bmp signalling requirements during primordial germ cell development in mouse, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09052-w How Nodal and Bmp pathways interact during primordial germ cell (PGC) formation remains unclear. Here, the authors s

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Author Correction: Subclonal mutation selection in mouse lymphomagenesis identifies known cancer loci and suggests novel candidates

Author Correction: Subclonal mutation selection in mouse lymphomagenesis identifies known cancer loci and suggests novel candidates Author Correction: Subclonal mutation selection in mouse lymphomagenesis identifies known cancer loci and suggests novel candidates, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09109-w Author Correction: Subclonal mutation selection in mouse lymphomagenes

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Ufbp1 promotes plasma cell development and ER expansion by modulating distinct branches of UPR

Ufbp1 promotes plasma cell development and ER expansion by modulating distinct branches of UPR Ufbp1 promotes plasma cell development and ER expansion by modulating distinct branches of UPR, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08908-5 IRE1 and PERK, both important mediators of the unfold protein response pathway, are differentially regulated during plasma cell differentiation.

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Hippocampal pattern separation supports reinforcement learning

Hippocampal pattern separation supports reinforcement learning Hippocampal pattern separation supports reinforcement learning, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08998-1 When learning about rewards and threats in the environment, animals often need to learn the value associated with conjunctions of features, not just individual features. Here, the authors show that the hippoc

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High performance planar germanium-on-silicon single-photon avalanche diode detectors

High performance planar germanium-on-silicon single-photon avalanche diode detectors High performance planar germanium-on-silicon single-photon avalanche diode detectors, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08830-w By incorporating germanium, single-photon avalanche diode detectors using silicon-based platforms are applied to infrared light detection. Here, a cost-effective pl

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Reversible defect engineering in graphene grain boundaries

Reversible defect engineering in graphene grain boundaries Reversible defect engineering in graphene grain boundaries, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09000-8 Engineering the grain boundary size of chemical vapor deposited monolayer graphene can reversibly tune its electronic properties. Here, the authors report a thermodynamic correlation for 100 μm long channels in graph

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Halide lead perovskites for ionizing radiation detection

Halide lead perovskites for ionizing radiation detection Halide lead perovskites for ionizing radiation detection, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08981-w Halide lead perovskites have emerged recently as possible candidates for high performance radiation detectors besides efficient solar cells. Here Wei et al. review the recent progress on perovskite based radiation detect

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Fitbit Versa Lite and Inspire HR cost $160 or less – CNET

Fitbit's priced all of its newest fitness trackers at $160 or less in a mission to get on more wrists.

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That Meizu Zero phone with no buttons or ports was just a big tease – CNET

It raised less than half its crowdfunding goal, and now the CEO says it was just a research project.

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The optomechanical Kerker effect: Controlling light with vibrating nanoparticles

For the Kerker effect to occur, particles need to have electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the same strength. This, however, is very challenging to achieve, as magnetic optical resonances in small particles are relatively weak. Researchers at Ioffe Institute, in St. Petersburg, have recently shown that a similar effect can be attained when small particles are trembling in space.

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Luxuriating in aspiration

Many people enjoy luxury and those that don't have access to luxury goods and services often aspire to it. Writing in the International Journal of Indian Culture and Business Management, a team explain how in the "West" the notion of luxury, which has existed for millennia was perhaps considered sinful or wasteful but is now a way of life for many people and as mentioned an aspiration for others.

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Impact of urbanization on wild bees underestimated

Wild bees are indispensable pollinators, supporting both agricultural productivity and the diversity of flowering plants worldwide.

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Gabon seizes haul of 'sacred' wood: NGO

Customs officers have seized a major haul of kevazingo, a precious wood whose exploitation is banned in Gabon where it is considered sacred, a report said Wednesday.

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Forsøgsordning skal skaffe akutmedicinere til Region Syddanmark

Sygehus Sønderjylland skal være vært for ny forsøgsordning med sammenhængende uddannelse i akutmedicin. Det skal sikre flere akutmedicinere i regionen.

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Why the meat industry could win big from the switch to veggie lifestyles

One of the largest meat processors in the UK, supplying supermarkets across the country with beef, pork, and lamb, has launched a plant-based meat alternative. ABP is the first UK meat producer to do so and its decision marks a significant shift for the industry. Before long, the meat producers could take over this growing market for meat-free alternatives.

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What a failed Johannesburg project tells us about mega cities in Africa

Six years ago a major development was announced in South Africa. Billed as a game changer, it was meant to alter the urban footprint of Johannesburg, Africa's richest city, forever.

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Billions wasted in Australian water recovery subsidies, study finds

A study from ANU has found billions of dollars are being wasted in water recovery subsidies to increase irrigation efficiency across the Murray-Darling Basin.

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Impact of urbanization on wild bees underestimated

Wild bees are indispensable pollinators, supporting both agricultural productivity and the diversity of flowering plants worldwide.

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Gabon seizes haul of 'sacred' wood: NGO

Customs officers have seized a major haul of kevazingo, a precious wood whose exploitation is banned in Gabon where it is considered sacred, a report said Wednesday.

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US zooms past Europe in electric car sales

The United States overtook Europe to become the world's second largest market for electric cars last year, according to a report Wednesday that accused EU carmakers of holding back sales ahead of new emissions rules.

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Tesla's Chinese rival NIO scraps factory plan after losses

Chinese electric vehicle start-up NIO has abandoned plans to build a manufacturing plant in Shanghai after net losses doubled to $1.4 billion last year.

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Elon Musk firm pitched to build transit system in Las Vegas

Entrepreneur Elon Musk's dream of an express tunnel transit system could finally become a reality in Las Vegas after major setbacks in other cities.

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The science of knitting, unpicked

Dating back more than 3,000 years, knitting is an ancient form of manufacturing, but Elisabetta Matsumoto of the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta believes that understanding how stitch types govern shape and stretchiness will be invaluable for designing new "tunable" materials. For instance, tissuelike flexible material could be manufactured to replace biological tissues, such as torn li

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Women of childbearing age have staggeringly low rates of lipid screening

Eight out of 10 women of childbearing age have never had their cholesterol levels checked, despite clear guidelines to get a first lipid blood test early in adulthood, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Impact of urbanization on wild bees underestimated

Wild bees are indispensable pollinators, supporting both agricultural productivity and the diversity of flowering plants worldwide.

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Healthier dairy products with bacterial films and nanofiber membranes

Bacterial biofilms are typically the target of heavy-duty cleaning regimens, but these films aren't always bad news. In fact, growing them on thin sheets of nanofibers is a great way to produce a fermented milk product that can deliver hardy probiotics to the digestive tract, according to research just published in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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New Study: Microdosing DMT Reduces Depression and Anxiety

submitted by /u/seanDL_ [link] [comments]

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Light from an exotic crystal semiconductor could lead to better solar cells

Scientists have found a new way to control light emitted by exotic crystal semiconductors, which could lead to more efficient solar cells and other advances in electronics, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Materials Today.

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Chemists synthesize electrodes for accumulators from coffee grounds

A chemist from RUDN suggested a cheap and eco-friendly way of manufacturing electrodes for lithium-ion batteries from coffee production waste. An article describing this study was published in the Journal of Cleaner Production.

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Bugs or dust? New method quickly reveals whether a surface is truly clean

Aalto University researchers have developed a real-time optical technique for identifying dirt and bacteria on surfaces. The AutoDet method, which stands for automatic biological contamination detection, can be used in healthcare and public spaces to ensure the cleanliness of facilities during norovirus outbreaks or flu season or that operating tools are sterile before an operation begins.

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These robots are small, shape-shifting, and they adapt to their surroundings

With its low ceiling draped in soft, green netting, Jianguo Zhao's lab at the Colorado State University Powerhouse Energy Campus is hard to miss. Watch the lab's walking, grasping, flying, perching, shape-shifting robots in motion, and the reason for the netting becomes all too clear.

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Key instrument on NASA's InSight lander is stuck. A Martian rock may be to blame

NASA's Mars InSight mission has hit a snag: Its heat probe appears to have struck an obstacle just below the surface of the red planet.

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Nasa InSight probe: Mars 'mole' hits blockage in its burrow

The Insight probe's efforts to drill down below the surface of Mars appear to have hit some stony obstructions.

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Dinosaurs were thriving before asteroid strike that wiped them out

Dinosaurs were unaffected by long-term climate changes and flourished before their sudden demise by asteroid strike.

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Track a Tank Shell With a Mirror and Polar Coordinates

Ultimately you get a differential equation that you can solve with a bit of code I wrote for you.

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Fitbit Versa Lite and Fitbit Inspire: Price, Specs, Release Date

Instead of competing with Cupertino on features, Fitbit competes on price with a new $160 smartwatch and several new wearable trackers under $100.

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Researchers suggest LISA should be able to see ultralight bosons near supermassive black holes

An international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) should be able to "see" ultralight bosons if they exist. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, the group describes calculations they made to assess whether ultralight boson clouds forming outside of the event horizons of black holes could be detected by LISA, and

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Scientists study neutron scattering for researching magnetic materials

Physicists from the University of Luxembourg and their research partners have demonstrated for the first time in a comprehensive study how magnetic materials can be examined using neutron scattering techniques. The scientists have published their insights in Reviews of Modern Physics, the journal of the American Physical Society.

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Fingerprint and face scanners aren't as secure as we think they are

Despite what every spy movie in the past 30 years would have you think, fingerprint and face scanners used to unlock your smartphone or other devices aren't nearly as secure as they're made out to be.

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High-tech agriculture: Farmers risk being 'locked in' to unsustainable practices

Since World War II, Europe's agricultural sector has been very receptive to new technology, and the result has been staggering productivity gains – for four generations, farmers have produced more than their parents did. At the same time, however, agricultural prices have fallen around the world and price subsidies have been cut. This has led to a cruel paradox: while farmers have never produced s

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This fix could take regular violins to Stradivari levels

A modification to violins could enhance their tonal quality and how musicians play, according to new research. The fundamental design of the violin has changed only once since the times of Antonio Stradivari, considered the ultimate master craftsman of the instrument. The new findings could rock the music world, so to speak, and alter the way we construct the stringed instruments in the future. J

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If you open up online, include your partner

Sharing information on social media can do more harm to romantic relationships than good, research finds—unless you include your significant other in your posts. “Prior research has shown that self-disclosure positively affects offline relationships,” says Juwon Lee, a postdoctoral researcher in Carnegie Mellon University’s Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences. “We wanted to explore

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The weirdest things we learned this week: starting fires with astronaut farts and dancing yourself to death

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s hit podcast.

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Better regulation of the immune system may minimize preeclampsia symptoms

Boosting the body's levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4)–an immune system protein that controls inflammation–may help manage the pregnancy complication preeclampsia, according to a new rodent study. The research, published in the American Journal of Physiology–Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for March.

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Hypertension-related changes may occur earlier in young women with family history

New research suggests that young women with a family history of high blood pressure (hypertension) have decreased baroreflex function, which may increase their risk for hypertension later in life. The article, published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology (JNP), was chosen as an APSselect article for March.

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Molecular puzzle reveals unknown stages of fetal development

By applying gene analysis to individual cells from early mouse embryos, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered previously unknown cellular stages of fetal development from fertilised egg to living being. The study is published in the scientific journal Cell Reports.

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Post-Hurricane Harvey, NASA tried to fly a pollution-spotting plane over Houston. The EPA said no

In the weeks after Hurricane Harvey's catastrophic sweep through the Houston area—which resulted in chemical spills, fires, flooded storage tanks and damaged industrial plants—rescue crews and residents complained of burning throats, nausea and dizziness.

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Molecular puzzle reveals unknown stages of fetal development

By applying gene analysis to individual cells from early mouse embryos, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered previously unknown cellular stages of fetal development from fertilised egg to living being. The study is published in the scientific journal Cell Reports.

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A process that improves repair of carbon fiber airplane components

A team from A*STAR is helping Singapore companies that specialize in the maintenance, repair, and overhaul of airplanes to deepen their understanding of a technology for repairing high-tech carbon fiber components.

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Full-day kindergarten—the best of what we imagined is happening in classrooms

The classroom is bright with enough room for 26 kindergarten kids to move around their stations of discovery. A girl plays with water, pouring too much from a big container into a smaller one, watching the overflow, trying again. It's easy to imagine her 30 years later in her post-doc science lab.

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The Twins That Are Neither Identical nor Fraternal

A few years ago, Michael Gabbett got a call from a very confused ob-gyn. A woman had come in pregnant with twins who should have been identical—they shared a placenta, meaning they must have split from a single fertilized egg. But doctors could also see, as plain as day on the ultrasound, that one looked like a boy, and the other, a girl. How could the twins be identical but different sexes? “My

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Engineers uncover strength, toughness of hexagonal boron nitride

From smartphones that bend to solar panels that wrap around houses, flexible electronics could make consumers very happy. But first, someone has to figure out how to make them. One important question is which materials are tough enough to maintain their electronic properties under such harsh conditions?

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Biopsy frozen in seconds in the operating room

For rapid freezing of a biopsy sample taken from a patient, the standard procedure uses liquid nitrogen. However, this is not allowed inside the operating room. The consequence is a laborious procedure causing unnecessary delay. Researchers of the University of Twente developed a 'snap freezing' apparatus that cools a vial even faster than in liquid nitrogen, and is safe for use inside the operati

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Why the 'perfect' office temperature is a myth

It might be blisteringly hot outside, but if you work in an office building, the chances are it's always reassuringly cool (or cold, depending on your preference) once you walk inside.

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‘The Place Is Extraordinary’: Well-Preserved Artifacts Are Found Under Maya Ruins

In a cave under the ancient city of Chichén Itzá, Mexican archaeologists discovered a trove of ceramic artifacts that appear to be over 1,000 years old.

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Research sparks calls for tougher enforcement on social media companies

Research into the use of Russian-linked social media accounts following the 2017 UK terrorist attacks has led to calls for greater regulation of technology companies.

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Receiving a login code via SMS and email isn't secure. Here's what to use instead

When it comes to personal cybersecurity, you might think you're doing all right. Maybe you've got multi-factor authentication set up on your phone so that you have to enter a code sent to you by SMS before you can log in to your email or bank account from a new device.

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Mercury exposure found to alter the migration behavior of birds

Mercury pollution is a global problem caused by coal combustion, gold mining, and other human activities, and has myriad adverse impacts to biodiversity. A new study by researchers at the Great Hollow Nature Preserve & Ecological Research Center (New Fairfield, CT, USA) and Western University (London, ON, Canada) has shown for the first time that exposure to methylmercury – the highly toxic form o

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Could robots protect us in the surf?

Imagine there's a flock of aerial robots searching for a lost hiker. They have to cover a large area of remote bush and a central commander won't work because they're so spread out.

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Physiological Oxygen and its Importance in Redox Biology

Download this application note from The Baker Company to learn about how oxygen concentrations and reactive oxygen species impact cell metabolism, differences in oxygen levels between experimental and physiological conditions, and how to control experimental oxygen levels.

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Mercury exposure found to alter the migration behavior of birds

Mercury pollution is a global problem caused by coal combustion, gold mining, and other human activities, and has myriad adverse impacts to biodiversity. A new study by researchers at the Great Hollow Nature Preserve & Ecological Research Center (New Fairfield, CT, USA) and Western University (London, ON, Canada) has shown for the first time that exposure to methylmercury – the highly toxic form o

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High-intensity interval training helps trim belly fat in cardiac rehab

A popular exercise routine that alternates intense bursts of activity with short recovery periods to rapidly enhance exercise performance is now finding its way into programs to strengthen the heart after a heart attack. The regimen, known as high-intensity interval training (HIIT), showed significant benefits over a more moderate exercise program among patients in a cardiac rehabilitation program

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Opioid use associated with dramatic rise in dangerous heart infection

Hospital admissions for a dangerous heart infection related to intravenous drug use increased by 436 percent from 2012-2017 at a medical center in a region hit hard by the nation's opioid crisis, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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CT scans offer clues to preventing heart problems after cancer treatment

An imaging procedure commonly performed before starting cancer treatment can provide valuable clues about a patient's risk for heart problems in the months and years after treatment. However, this information is not always reported and is rarely acted upon in current practice, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Want a healthy heart? Turn off the TV and eat a good breakfast

The small lifestyle choices we make each day add up when it comes to heart health. In a new two-pronged study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session, people who spent less time watching TV and regularly ate an energy-rich breakfast showed significantly less plaque and stiffness in their arteries, indicating a lower chance of developing heart disease

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Higher fitness level can determine longer lifespan after age 70

Researchers have uncovered one more reason to get off the couch and start exercising, especially if you're approaching your golden years. Among people over age 70, physical fitness was found to be a much better predictor of survival than the number of traditional cardiovascular risk factors in a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Remote blood pressure monitoring via smartphone app shows promise

People with both diabetes and uncontrolled high blood pressure who used a smartphone app to monitor their blood pressure remotely, get tips on healthful living and connect with a health coach saw significant declines in their blood pressure within six weeks, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Low-carb diet tied to common heart rhythm disorder

Low-carb diets are all the rage, but can cutting carbohydrates spell trouble for your heart? People getting a low proportion of their daily calories from carbohydrates such as grains, fruits and starchy vegetables are significantly more likely to develop atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common heart rhythm disorder, according to a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 6

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App uses smartphone camera, flashlight to detect diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is among the strongest risk factors for heart disease, yet up to 1 in 3 people living with diabetes don't know they have it and go untreated. But soon there may be an app for that. New research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session shows a popular smartphone application that measures heart rate using the phone's built-in camera may h

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NFL players show heart abnormalities decades after retiring from football

While elite athletes are often at peak fitness, they are not immune to–and may even face a higher risk for–potentially detrimental heart conditions later in life. Former National Football League (NFL) players, particularly those with larger body sizes, were found to have heart abnormalities specifically associated with high blood pressure in a study being presented at the American College of Car

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Healthier dairy products with bacterial films and nanofiber membranes

Bacterial biofilms are typically the target of heavy-duty cleaning regimens, but these films aren't always bad news. In fact, growing them on thin sheets of nanofibers is a great way to produce a fermented milk product that can deliver hardy probiotics to the digestive tract, according to research just published in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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The science of knitting, unpicked

Knitting may be an ancient manufacturing method, but Elisabetta Matsumoto believes that understanding how different stitch types determine shape and mechanical strength will be invaluable for designing materials for future technologies, and a more detailed understanding of the knitting 'code' could benefit manufacturers around the world. Members of the Matsumoto group are delving through the surpr

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Regionshospitalet Viborg henter ny ledende overlæge i Aalborg

Jette Hoffmann-Petersen er ny ledende overlæge på Børn og Unge på Regionshospitalet Viborg.

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ESA's space weather mission to be protected against stormy sun

ESA is planning Earth's first dedicated space weather observatory to warn of potentially harmful turbulence in our parent star. Like a referee at a sports game, the Lagrange spacecraft will be able to observe both the sun and Earth as well as the space in between – but will itself be in the space weather line of fire.

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The science circling above us on the Space Station

The International Space Station orbits Earth, 400 km above our heads, running scientific experiments that cannot be done anywhere else. Read on for our bi-weekly update on European science in space.

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Israeli Moon Lander Snaps Epic Space Selfie with a Full Earth

The newly released photo shows the robotic lander, known as Beresheet, looking back at Earth from a distance of 23,363.5 miles (37,600 kilometers).

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Climate change: Satellite fix safeguards Antarctic data

Scientists ensure the constant monitoring of the White Continent will continue unbroken into the 2030s.

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The AI-Art Gold Rush Is Here

T he images are huge and square and harrowing: a form, reminiscent of a face, engulfed in fiery red-and-yellow currents; a head emerging from a cape collared with glitchy feathers, from which a shape suggestive of a hand protrudes; a heap of gold and scarlet mottles, convincing as fabric, propping up a face with grievous, angular features. These are part of “ Faceless Portraits Transcending Time

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The Tunisian-Italian Rapper Who Won Over Europe’s Most Anti-Immigrant Country

Rami Niemi O ne rainy Monday evening in October, a cheering crowd welcomed Ghali Amdouni back to Milan, his hometown. Born to Tunisian immigrants, Ghali, as he is known, was raised by his mother in a poor neighborhood where for a time they slept on carpets and cooked with camping stoves. Tonight, she stood beside him onstage and blew kisses to the nearly 13,000 people who had come to hear him per

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MMR vaccine does not cause autism, study once again confirms

A study of 650,000 children has confirmed yet again that the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine does not increase the risk of getting autism

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Audi, Volvo and Aston Martin are all expected to reveal electric cars

Over half a million people will descend on the Geneva Motor Show this week to glimpse their future car, which increasingly looks likely to be electric

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Making long-lived positronium atoms for antimatter gravity experiments

The universe is almost devoid of antimatter, and physicists haven't yet figured out why. Discovering any slight difference between the behaviour of antimatter and matter in Earth's gravitational field could shed light on this question. Positronium atoms, which consist of an electron and a positron, are one type of antimatter atoms being considered to test whether antimatter falls at the same rate

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Robot 3-D prints replacement bracket on headlamp

In a world first, Swinburne's Repairbot project has achieved a major milestone, using a robot to successfully 3-D print a replacement lug on an automotive headlamp assembly.

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Less-educated men face declining labor prospects

When it comes to finding their place in the labor market, men without a college education in the United States face a complex array of forces including declining wages and fewer stable jobs.

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Polymers join forces to deliver

An affordable, heavy metal- and odor-free method for making hollow polymer nanostructures has been designed by A*STAR researchers. These structures could find use as delivery systems for personal care products, drugs and agrochemicals.

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Elon Musk wants to replace airplanes with rockets

submitted by /u/RemoteRaspberry [link] [comments]

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After watching Alita, I thought of something interesting. Would you sever your head and place it on a cyborg body if it meant you would live longer? Or would you feel immoral discarding your original body?

I imagined waking up after my head was transplanted on a robot body. I wouldn't have any of my normal senses, but the body would still trick my brain into thinking that I could feel. It simply won't be the same as having a real body. You would feel as if a part of you was killed in the most literal sense of the phrase. You would be a floating head with a synthetic torso and limbs and heart. You c

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The last child

The last child The last child, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00749-y Time for a rethink.

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Space mannequin, Hubble error and climate criticism

Space mannequin, Hubble error and climate criticism Space mannequin, Hubble error and climate criticism, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00738-1 The week in science: 1–7 March 2019.

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How a school of fish is like a rubber band

A simple experiment describes animal swarms as materials

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An ancient tattoo kit

Polynesian tools, some made from human bone, discovered.

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How human networks drive inequality, social immobility

To understand why people succeed or fail, look at their circle of friends. Like it or not, said Stanford economist Matthew Jackson, people's fates are closely connected to their human networks.

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The Life-Threatening Consequences of Overhyping AI

Artificial intelligence will profoundly change the health care industry. But there are many more questions around how AI can best serve our public health needs.

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Image of the Day: Making Waves

Slithering snakes mimic waves of light, "diffracting" as they pass by an obstacle.

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The secret behind maximum plant height—water

Physiological coordination between plant height and xylem hydraulic traits is aligned with habitat water availability across Earth's terrestrial biomes, according to a new study. Ecologists from the South China Botanical Garden (SCBG), Chinese Academy of Sciences, conclude that such coordination plays an important role in determining global sorting of plant species, and can be useful in predicting

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Discovering the next generation of catalysts

The use of solar and wind energy must be doubled to meet the world's demand for clean energy over the next 30 years. Catalysts that can ensure the storage of solar and wind energy in fuels and chemicals will therefore play an increasingly important role. The catalysts used today are, however, often expensive and ineffective. Now, researchers at the University of Copenhagen and DTU have developed a

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Physicists analyze rotational dynamics of galaxies and influence of the photon mass

The rotation of stars in galaxies such as the Milky Way is puzzling. The orbital speeds of stars should decrease with their distance from the center of the galaxy, but in fact, stars in the middle and outer regions of galaxies have the same rotational speed. This may be due to the gravitational effect of matter that we can't see. But although researchers have been seeking it for decades, the exist

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Image: Aurora Australis

Many people hope to catch a glimpse of these reddish-green swirls of colour floating in the polar skies. Few are as lucky as ESA astronaut Tim Peake, who captured this dazzling display of the aurora Australis from the International Space Station during his mission in 2016.

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A scholar's book uncovers new material about the effects of the infamous Chernobyl meltdown

Not long after midnight on April 26, 1986, the world's worst nuclear power accident began. Workers were conducting a test at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukraine when their operations spun out of control. Unthinkably, the core of the plant's reactor No. 4 exploded, first blowing off its giant concrete lid, then letting a massive stream of radiation into the air.

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The secret behind maximum plant height—water

Physiological coordination between plant height and xylem hydraulic traits is aligned with habitat water availability across Earth's terrestrial biomes, according to a new study. Ecologists from the South China Botanical Garden (SCBG), Chinese Academy of Sciences, conclude that such coordination plays an important role in determining global sorting of plant species, and can be useful in predicting

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How do insects feel the heat?

Every year, nearly 700 million people contract mosquito-borne illnesses such as malaria, dengue, West Nile virus or yellow fever.

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Study shows that many who experience trauma of war become increasingly religious

It's been said that there are no atheists in foxholes, but a new study led by Joseph Henrich has shown that the impact of war on religion extends well beyond the front lines.

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How do insects feel the heat?

Every year, nearly 700 million people contract mosquito-borne illnesses such as malaria, dengue, West Nile virus or yellow fever.

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Is climate change already making hurricanes stronger?

Scientists generally agree that, by the year 2100, climate change will most likely make hurricanes stronger. But what about the hurricanes of this year and next—is climate change already worsening those? The science is much less clear in that regard. And what about other factors, like hurricane frequency and where they make landfall?

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US remains stagnant in climate change vulnerability and readiness, new data show

For the fourth year in a row, the United States has ranked 15th in the University of Notre Dame's Global Adaptation Initiative (ND-GAIN) Country Index. The annual index ranks 181 countries on vulnerability to extreme climate events such as droughts, superstorms and other natural disasters as well as readiness to successfully implement adaptation solutions. Since the index launched in 1995, the U.S

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3-D-printed live cells convert glucose to ethanol, carbon dioxide to enhance catalytic efficiency

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have 3-D printed live cells that convert glucose to ethanol and carbon dioxide gas (CO2), a substance that resembles beer, demonstrating a technology that can lead to high biocatalytic efficiency.

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Study shows that many who experience trauma of war become increasingly religious

It's been said that there are no atheists in foxholes, but a new study led by Joseph Henrich has shown that the impact of war on religion extends well beyond the front lines.

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Canada Is Sending Homeopaths to Honduras

The Canadian government is sending homeopaths to Honduras as part of an aid program. They dropped the ball on this one, and should just admit error and correct it, but they are doubling-down instead.

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Kolesterolsänkande skydd vid typ 2-diabetes – även i mindre dos

– Resultaten är viktiga och användbara för såväl patient som vårdgivare, för att försöka motivera patienten att följa den rekommenderade behandlingen även om hen glömmer bort att ta sina tabletter emellanåt, konstaterar Sofia Karlsson, disputerad i farmaci vid Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet. Syftet med hennes avhandling var att undersöka risken för hjärt-kärlsjukdom och död i relatio

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The secret of a squid's ability to change colors may lie in an unexpected sparkle on its skin

In the blink of an eye, squid can change from sandy brown to vibrant red or ripple with bright metallic rainbows. Their color-changing abilities (and those of their fellow cephalopods, octopus and cuttlefish) are more sophisticated than any found in the animal kingdom.

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Matrix could ensure vital copper supplies

Researchers have identified a matrix of risks that the mining industry must overcome to unlock vitally important copper reserves.

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With insights from Hollywood luminaries, report examines why social impact entertainment works

The Skoll Center for Social Impact Entertainment (Skoll Center SIE) at the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television (UCLA TFT), in partnership with Participant Media, has released a world-class report titled "The State of Social Impact Entertainment." The extensive report not only defines social impact entertainment, but discusses how it works, why it matters and how it can be created.

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Individuals with visual impairment can 'see' through device that turns digital images into physical sensations

David Schwarte, an assistive technology specialist on the Innovative Learning Team at Purdue University, knows what it is like to learn in a classroom when challenged with a visual impairment.

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The secret of a squid's ability to change colors may lie in an unexpected sparkle on its skin

In the blink of an eye, squid can change from sandy brown to vibrant red or ripple with bright metallic rainbows. Their color-changing abilities (and those of their fellow cephalopods, octopus and cuttlefish) are more sophisticated than any found in the animal kingdom.

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A study researches the limits of topological insulators using sound waves

In these kinds of structures, sound signals remain robust and insensitive to noise caused by impurities and defects in the material. In the framework of this research, scientists have discovered that the acoustic topological insulator could act as an extremely robust waveguide, capable of radiating sound in a very narrow ray towards the far field. This focused acoustic ray could be extremely impor

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While China robotizes its workforce, Latin America is falling behind

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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After the Galaxy Fold, Samsung has two more foldable smartphones coming

Samsung is developing a Mate X-style wraparound display phone and a flip phone.

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Exclusive: Brain zap therapy for aggression to be tested on prisoners

Researchers are about to begin testing whether electrical brain stimulation can reduce violent thoughts among convicts in a Spanish prison

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How Alexa Learns

Researchers are finding new ways to help the voice service improve its performance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Lärarresponsen viktig i svenska som andraspråk

Internationell forskning om lärarrespons i andraspråksklassrummet har i hög grad behandlat språklig korrekthet, vilket Liivi Jakobson menar är alldeles för snävt. I sin avhandling fokuserar hon på helhetsperspektivet. Hon analyserar lärarrespons för nybörjarstuderande i svenska som andraspråk och delar upp det i två dimensioner: responsfokus och responssätt. – Min avhandling visar att andraspråks

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Morrhår av tenn kortsluter satelliter och pacemakers

Förhoppningsvis kan kunskapen bidra till att lösa ett problem som kostar många miljarder varje år, menar Johan Hektors vid Lunds tekniska universitet, som nu doktorerar inom hållfasthetslära. Avhandlingen berättar om de elakartade morrhåren på mikronivå. Och varnar för ökade problem med whiskers i framtiden eftersom elektronikkomponenter blir allt vanligare och mindre. Fakta/Whiskers Fenomenet ob

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Bål, mados og stearinlys: Daginstitutionens luft er fyldt med partikelforurening

Børn, der har en hverdag i daginstitutioner, bliver i halvdelen af tilfældene udsat for lige så mange sundhedsskadelige ultrafine partikler, som hvis de befandt sig på en befærdet vej, viser en ny undersøgelse.

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Professor: Kun 235 har højt specialiseret it-viden på de højere læreanstalter

En lang række OECD-lande bruger flere penge på forskning inden for det naturvidenskabelig og tekniske område end Danmark, viser ny analyse fra Dansk Industri,

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Reality Bites Captured Gen X With Perfect Irony

If Reality Bites has a defining moment, it’s got to be that scene at the gas station . Four 20-something friends with uncertain futures are bearing armfuls of chips, soda, and cigarettes as The Knack’s “My Sharona” starts up on the radio; three of them immediately drop everything to bop along to the song. Cut to exterior: The trio dance in the glowing light of the Food Mart, their car abandoned a

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Future Samsung TVs Could Be Completely Wireless

At the moment the majority of our electronics required wired connections to keep them powered on. However Samsung appears to be exploring technology that could potentially one day result …

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How to Use TikTok: Tips for New Users

Step one: turn up the volume on your phone.

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Why Chinese Companies Plug a US Test for Facial Recognition

A US government agency tests the accuracy of facial recognition programs. The top spots are routinely filled by Chinese and Russian companies.

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How Alexa Learns

Researchers are finding new ways to help the voice service improve its performance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Diet may be an important factor for Influenza A virus exposure in wild African mammals

Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. A new study led by Alex D. Greenwood and Gábor Á. Czirják of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin sheds light on which species are commonly infected and why. The scientists detected virus exposure among wild African mammals

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China plans world's first deep sea base, complete with robot subs

Plans for a permanent lab far beneath the waves, crewed by autonomous underwater rovers, are gathering pace in China – here's what the facility might be like

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Diet may be an important factor for Influenza A virus exposure in wild African mammals

Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. A new study led by Alex D. Greenwood and Gábor Á. Czirják of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin sheds light on which species are commonly infected and why. The scientists detected virus exposure among wild African mammals

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Faux Fish Might Help Aquaculture Keep Feeding the World

Some unexpected alternatives could avoid depleting the wild fish that farmed seafood eats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Födda att äta och sova i luften

– De äter i luften och sover i luften. Det här är något som forskare har trott sedan 1950-talet, vi bevisar att det är så, säger Anders Hedenström, professor vid biologiska institutionen i Lund. I den nya studien har han tillsammans med Susanne Åkesson, Gabriel Norevik, Arne Andersson och Johan Bäckman vid Lunds universitet, samt Giovanni Boano från Italien studerat fyra individer av arten blek t

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To statsrevisorer kræver svar: Hvorfor blev Femern-undersøgelse afbrudt?

Over syv måneder kulegravede Rigsrevisionen sidste år økonomien bag Femernforbindelsen, indtil undersøgelsen i juni pludselig blev sat i bero.

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Faux Fish Might Help Aquaculture Keep Feeding the World

Some unexpected alternatives could avoid depleting the wild fish that farmed seafood eats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What Really Makes a Difference in Vaccination Rates?

Social media platforms play a role in spreading misinformation, but state legislatures have the power of law.

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This Miniature Boat Was Meant for King Tut's Fishing Trips in the Afterlife

Missing pieces of Tut's miniature boat were found hidden in museum storage.

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Vaccine opponents attack U.S. science panel

Meetings of a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention vaccine committee have become the latest front in a national battle over immunization

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Light from an exotic crystal semiconductor could lead to better solar cells

Scientists have found a new way to control light emitted by exotic crystal semiconductors, which could lead to more efficient solar cells and other advances in electronics, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Materials Today.

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MBL scientists identify gene partnerships that promote spinal cord regeneration

Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have identified gene 'partners' in the axolotl salamander that, when activated, allow the neural tube and associated nerve fibers to functionally regenerate after severe spinal cord damage. Interestingly, these genes are also present in humans, though they are activated in a different manner. Their results are published this week in Nature Commu

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Inside the high-stakes race to make quantum computers work

submitted by /u/ibmzrl [link] [comments]

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Studenter behöver stöd att hantera informationsflödet

Studenter och elever använder regelbundet internet när de exempelvis förbereder essäer eller presentationer. Nyckeln för att lyckas är förmågan att navigera och kritiskt bedöma innehållet i det stora informationsflödet. Det konstaterar Anne Solli som i sin avhandling undersöker hur elever och studenter inom naturvetenskaplig utbildning hanterar digital information när de arbetar med stora och kon

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Hofor melder sig som havmølle-ejer: Undersøger to projekter i Øresund

To nye tilladelser kan danne grundlag for nye havvindmølleparker i Øresund ejet af forsyningsselskabet Hofor. Selskabet kan ende med at opstille over 100 vindmøller i området.

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The New Deal Wasn’t What You Think

The term Green New Deal might remind Americans of high-school history class. What was the original New Deal about, again ? Most kids are taught that it was a decidedly left-wing project to end the Great Depression, a series of big-spending government programs such as the Public Works Administration, with its schools and stadiums. That impression colors the debate over the Democrats’ important new

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California Is at War with the Trump White House

LOS ANGELES—From the moment Donald Trump took office, California has been ground zero for the resistance against him and his administration, in terms of both grassroots citizen activism and legal and administrative action by its Democratic-dominated state government. But since the inauguration of Governor Gavin Newsom in January, the Golden State has often seemed to be in a state of total war wit

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A university thought its misconduct investigation was complete. Then a PubPeer comment appeared.

When Venkata Sudheer Kumar Ramadugu, then a postdoc at the University of Michigan, admitted to the university on June 28 of last year that he had committed research misconduct in a paper that appeared in Chemical Communications in 2017, he also “attested that he did not manipulate any data in his other four co-authored publications … Continue reading A university thought its misconduct investigati

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Master the art of networking, from entrance to exit

This crash course in communication will help you turn an opportunity into a real outcome. There are 4 progressive stages to networking: Ask curious questions, listen and probe (or share), connect and find similarities, and the close. The exit is one of the most important stages; a good close means managing the mood memory – leave the person with a positive mood connected to your conversation, eve

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UN finds herpes killed millions of Iraqi carp

The sudden death last year of millions of Iraqi carp, used in the country's signature dish, was caused by a strain of herpes harmless to humans, the United Nations said Wednesday.

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Scientists identify gene partnerships that promote spinal cord regeneration

Researchers are one step closer to solving the mystery of why some vertebrates can regenerate their spinal cords while others, including humans, create scar tissue after spinal cord injury, leading to lifelong damage.

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France unveils new tax for global internet giants

France is set to unveil legislation Wednesday to increase taxes on global internet giants such as Google and Facebook, putting it among a vanguard of countries seeking to force the companies to pay more in the markets where they operate.

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Scientists begin quest to explore Indian Ocean depths

Scientists have set off early Wednesday on a mission to explore the depths of the Indian Ocean, one of the planet's last great unexplored frontiers. Here's a look at what the Nekton Mission hopes to achieve and why the people of the Seychelles, the first stop on this three-year expedition, are excited about its launch.

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A New Method of DNA Testing Could Solve More Shootings

Criminologists thought it was impossible to get DNA off of shell casings, but a technique pioneered in The Netherlands is having notable results.

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The fight for control over virtual fossils

The fight for control over virtual fossils The fight for control over virtual fossils, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00739-0 Palaeontologists have been urged to share 3D scans of fossils online, but a Nature analysis finds that few researchers do so.

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Scientists identify gene partnerships that promote spinal cord regeneration

Researchers are one step closer to solving the mystery of why some vertebrates can regenerate their spinal cords while others, including humans, create scar tissue after spinal cord injury, leading to lifelong damage.

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Dinosaurs were thriving before asteroid strike that wiped them out

Dinosaurs were unaffected by long-term climate changes and flourished before their sudden demise by asteroid strike.

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Vast record of past climate fluctuations now available thanks to laser imaging of shells

Shellfish played a significant role in the diet of prehistoric coastal populations, providing valuable nutrients. They are a common find in archaeological sites all over the world, usually in huge numbers, and researchers have long explored how they could be used to make inferences about the environments that humans experienced at those locations in the past. However, although techniques were deve

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Kombinationsstillinger skal lokke læger til Vollsmose

Efter flere kuldsejlede forsøg skal kombinationsstillinger med indvandrermedicinsk klinik på OUH og Odense Kommune nu lokke de første praktiserende læger til Vollsmose i mere end et årti.

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What will the Internet look like in 2050?

On March 12, 2019, CERN will host a 30th anniversary event of the world wide web in partnership with the W3C and world wide web foundation . We have come a long way since Tim Berners-Lee proposal for linking information across different computers. What are your thoughts about the Internet in 2050? submitted by /u/mgmanalyst [link] [comments]

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Perovskite ferroelectric tuned by thermal strain

Perovskite ferroelectric tuned by thermal strain Perovskite ferroelectric tuned by thermal strain, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40260-y Perovskite ferroelectric tuned by thermal strain

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Detection of chromosome structural variation by targeted next-generation sequencing and a deep learning application

Detection of chromosome structural variation by targeted next-generation sequencing and a deep learning application Detection of chromosome structural variation by targeted next-generation sequencing and a deep learning application, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40364-5 Detection of chromosome structural variation by targeted next-generation sequencing and a deep learnin

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Improving maize grain yield by matching maize growth and solar radiation

Improving maize grain yield by matching maize growth and solar radiation Improving maize grain yield by matching maize growth and solar radiation, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40081-z Improving maize grain yield by matching maize growth and solar radiation

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Wrist morphology reveals substantial locomotor diversity among early catarrhines: an analysis of capitates from the early Miocene of Tinderet (Kenya)

Wrist morphology reveals substantial locomotor diversity among early catarrhines: an analysis of capitates from the early Miocene of Tinderet (Kenya) Wrist morphology reveals substantial locomotor diversity among early catarrhines: an analysis of capitates from the early Miocene of Tinderet (Kenya), Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39800-3 Wrist morphology reveals substanti

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Standard Audiograms for Koreans Derived through Hierarchical Clustering Using Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009–2012

Standard Audiograms for Koreans Derived through Hierarchical Clustering Using Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009–2012 Standard Audiograms for Koreans Derived through Hierarchical Clustering Using Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009–2012, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40300-7 Standard Audiogram

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The degradation of levofloxacin in infusions exposed to daylight with an identification of a degradation product with HPLC-MS

The degradation of levofloxacin in infusions exposed to daylight with an identification of a degradation product with HPLC-MS The degradation of levofloxacin in infusions exposed to daylight with an identification of a degradation product with HPLC-MS, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40201-9 The degradation of levofloxacin in infusions exposed to daylight with an identific

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Temporal variability of diazotroph community composition in the upwelling region off NW Iberia

Temporal variability of diazotroph community composition in the upwelling region off NW Iberia Temporal variability of diazotroph community composition in the upwelling region off NW Iberia, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39586-4 Temporal variability of diazotroph community composition in the upwelling region off NW Iberia

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Koengisegg Jesko pushes the combustion "megacar" towards its absolute limit, targeting 300 mph

Beating some 1,600 horsepower out of a 5-liter twin-turbo V8 is no small achievement. Creating a new multi-clutch transmission that can skip instantly from any gear to any other is amazing. …

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Self driving cars will be the tipping point that takes humans out of the loop in all life and death decision making.

With people entrusting their lives to machines everyday, they"l have no problem allowing Ai to check Archicad architectural plans for public health and safety. To conduct final visual health and safety on site spot checks, of buildings, food preparation, licence applications. It would mean Ai giving final approval on everything accept the firing of autonomous weapons. Or would it? The Ai systems

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Surprise billing debate continues to transfix state and federal policy makers

This briefing paper seeks to bring needed clarity to the feverish, ongoing surprise billing debate underway on the state and federal level. In this brief, we tease apart the threads to the surprise billing debate with the intent of increasing clarity about the implications of various legislative choices. To that end, we include data visualizations that use our independent data as a lens to illumin

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Vast record of past climate fluctuations now available thanks to laser imaging of shells

An international team has developed newly refined techniques for obtaining past climate data from mollusc shells. Mollusc shells are abundant in archaeological sites spanning the last 160,000 years. Using laser imaging, researchers have now found new ways of reconstructing how climate changed during a mollusc's lifetime, down to the seasonal level. Their technique makes it cheaper and faster to an

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NYU Abu Dhabi study finds grasping motions led by visuo-haptic signals are most effective

NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have found that the availability of both visual and haptic information for a target object significantly improves reach-to-grasp actions, demonstrating that the nervous system utilizes both types of information to optimize movement execution. The findings are featured in the journal Scientific Reports.

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Dinosaurs were thriving before asteroid strike that wiped them out

Dinosaurs were unaffected by long-term climate changes and flourished before their sudden demise by asteroid strike.

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More than just memories: a new role for the hippocampus during learning

Without an intact hippocampus, forming new memories is impossible. Researchers from Arizona State University and Stanford University found an equally important role for the hippocampus: feeding information to brain areas responsible for learning. Using fMRI, the research team found it was the hippocampus that encoded associations between relevant features of the environment during learning and tha

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Bedtime protein for bigger gains? Here's the scoop

According to a review published in Frontiers in Nutrition, overnight sleep provides a unique nutritional window for boosting the muscle response to resistance training — without increasing body fat.

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Region Hovedstaden vil låne el-bil ud til praktiserende læger

En el-bil med udvalgt klinikudstyr vil til sommer blive stillet til rådighed for hovedstadens praktiserende læger. Forsøgsordningen indeholder dog også en række modkrav til lægerne.

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Svält sätter sig i barnbarnens gener

Enligt FN hotas var sjunde människa av svält. I Jemen varnar hjälporganisationer för den värsta svältkatastrofen på 100 år och 13 miljoner människor riskerar att dö på grund av för lite mat. Förra året hotades 50 miljoner människor på Afrikas horn av svält och det är troligtvis inte sista gången, bland annat på grund av den globala uppvärmningen som förstärker både torka och översvämningar. Svält

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Det militära våldet utförs allt oftare i kontorsmiljö

Tack vare den teknologiska utvecklingen inom det militära området är det idag möjligt att fjärrstyra våldsinsatser med hjälp av obemannade farkoster. Det har gjort att en stor del av västvärldens militära organisationer har centraliserat sina operativa verksamheter, vilket också innebär att det militära våldet har byråkratiserats. Tidigare har forskningen av byråkratiseringen av militärt våld beg

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Sju råd om motion och åldrande till världens regeringar

Det finns mycket kunskap om hur vi med enkla medel kan förbättra förutsättningarna för att äldre ska röra sig mer, som inte tillämpas i tillräckligt stor utsträckning idag. – Vi vill nu ge konkreta råd till beslutsfattare om hur man kan anpassa till exempel städer för att öka möjligheterna att vara fysisk aktiv. Ett exempel är att signalen för att gå över bevakade övergångsställen skulle kunna va

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Huawei åbner cybercenter i EU’s hjerte: Kom og se vores kildekoder

Kom og studér kildekoderne bag vores netværksudstyr, lyder beskeden fra Huawei til regeringer og erhvervskunder.

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Stop talking about testosterone – there’s no such thing as a ‘true sex’ | Katrina Karkazis

Sports bodies want a biological criterion to indicate an athlete’s sex. But it’s mind-bogglingly more complicated than that Debates are raging again over who should be allowed to compete in women’s sport. Take two recent examples that inflamed the internet. First the Sunday Times reported that the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) intended to classify women with higher natu

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Can't stand the rain? How wet weather affects human behaviour

Rainfall affects our mood, our propensity to commit crime and how hungry we feel – but why? It’s raining, it’s pouring, the old man is snoring. He bumped his head when he went to bed, and he couldn’t get up in the morning. This was possibly because in the absence of sunlight his body was still producing the hormone melatonin, which makes you sleepy. There are many ways that rainfall affects human

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Terrawatch: 'think like a rock' to help safeguard our survival

Geologist Marcia Bjornerud encourages us to look at evolution through deep time How far ahead do your thoughts tend to stray? Tomorrow, next week, summer holidays? Perhaps some fleeting thoughts about the years ahead? But what if we stared deeper into the future? Reframing our thinking in this way would go a long way to saving the world, according to the geologist Marcia Bjornerud. In her mind-ex

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How research erases women, the prehistory of Polynesia, and everything you wanted to know about beer: Books in brief

How research erases women, the prehistory of Polynesia, and everything you wanted to know about beer: Books in brief How research erases women, the prehistory of Polynesia, and everything you wanted to know about beer: Books in brief, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00742-5 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

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Doubts on countries to visit using a scholarship.

Since I applied for a scholarship I'll probably win next mont, I was looking for places to visit. The scholarship has to be spent in a 2 weeks "vacancy" but with language lessons on working days. I won the scholarship an year ago and went to New York City, so distance is not a problem. I am also looking for a place that makes me want to go live in that place, since after uni, my plan is to move o

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For Health and Habitat: Rescuing the Great Lakes

In 1987, the U.S. and Canada signed a treaty designating environmental hotspots in need of remediation. It helped clean rivers, restore wetlands, and boost economies. But supporters agree that there's still much work to be done to improve Great Lakes watersheds after decades of industrial contamination.

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Ant larvae defend their homes by eating eggs laid by intruders

When ant nests are invaded by parasitic intruders, larvae may try to protect their family by eating the invaders’ eggs

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'Digital sobriety' can halt tech-fuelled global warming, says report

Making and using smartphones, computers and TVs will soon produce 4 per cent of global emissions. The figure will double to 8 per cent by 2025

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A third person may have become HIV-free after a bone marrow transplant

Following news of a man who has been free of HIV since cancer treatment, a third case has now been reported, adding to evidence it may be possible to cure HIV

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Danske kedler skal bruges i gigantisk solenergiprojekt i Dubai

Et Aalborg-firma skal levere tre kedelsystemer til et kæmpe solenergianlæg, der vil kunne levere en effekt på 600 MW døgnet rundt og går i drift ved udgangen af næste år.

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Engineers develop inexpensive, smart stop sign to improve driver safety

According to the US Department of Transportation, more than half of all roadway fatalities occur on rural roads. Now engineers at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) are building and testing a low-cost, self-powered thermal system that will detect vehicles, improve the visibility of stop signs and prevent deaths.

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Publisher Correction: Synergistic interaction of sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis during zebrafish caudal vein plexus development

Publisher Correction: Synergistic interaction of sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis during zebrafish caudal vein plexus development Publisher Correction: Synergistic interaction of sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis during zebrafish caudal vein plexus development, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36663-y Publisher Correction: Synergistic interaction of sprou

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Publisher Correction: Mental template matching is a potential cultural transmission mechanism for New Caledonian crow tool manufacturing traditions

Publisher Correction: Mental template matching is a potential cultural transmission mechanism for New Caledonian crow tool manufacturing traditions Publisher Correction: Mental template matching is a potential cultural transmission mechanism for New Caledonian crow tool manufacturing traditions, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37178-2 Publisher Correction: Mental template

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Publisher Correction: Response dynamics of rat barrel cortex neurons to repeated sensory stimulation

Publisher Correction: Response dynamics of rat barrel cortex neurons to repeated sensory stimulation Publisher Correction: Response dynamics of rat barrel cortex neurons to repeated sensory stimulation, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-33000-1 Publisher Correction: Response dynamics of rat barrel cortex neurons to repeated sensory stimulation

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Policies designed for drugs won’t work for AI

Policies designed for drugs won’t work for AI Policies designed for drugs won’t work for AI, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00737-2 Health authorities are overlooking risks to systems and society in their evaluations of new digital technologies, says Melanie Smallman.

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Scientists can strengthen nuclear agreements

Scientists can strengthen nuclear agreements Scientists can strengthen nuclear agreements, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00787-6 Knowledge is needed to help keep the peace as tensions rise between powers from India and Pakistan to the United States and North Korea.

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Danmark har fået 11 nye øer på bare tre år

Særligt fuglene kan glæde sig over, at der er kommet 11 nye øer til syne i de danske farvande siden 2015.

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Did Plant Cell learn from Voinnet Affair?

The Plant Cell is an elite journal, its authors and editors are some serious heavyweights whose labs cannot be associated with data manipulation.

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UK cash system ‘on the verge of collapse’, report finds | Money

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Eating the flu

Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. A new study led by Alex D. Greenwood and Gábor Á. Czirják of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin sheds light on which species are commonly infected and why.

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The Climate Change Paper So Depressing It's Sending People to Therapy

submitted by /u/strangeattractors [link] [comments]

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China to tighten rules on gene editing in humans

China to tighten rules on gene editing in humans China to tighten rules on gene editing in humans, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00773-y In the wake of the gene-edited-baby scandal, scientists and institutions could face tough penalties for breaking the rules.

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China's Hainan province to end fossil fuel car sales in 2030

China's southern Hainan island will end sales of fossil fuel-only cars in 2030, officials said, becoming the first province to announce a target end date for a transition away from gas guzzlers.

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Houston, we're here to help the farmers

Farmers irrigating their crops may soon be getting some help from space. In 2018, scientists launched ECOSTRESS, a new instrument now attached to the International Space Station. Its mission: to gather data on how plants use water across the world.

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Researchers investigate the variability of gas prices in Santa Barbara County

Those of us who drive regularly are keenly aware of gas prices and their daily fluctuations. Many of the factors that influence the price per gallon—the cost of crude oil, regional taxes and processing and transportation charges—affect all pumps in a given area. Why then do some stations charge more for fuel than others in the same general geographic location?

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China's Huawei steps up charm offensive, rejects security fears

Chinese telecom giant Huawei insisted on Wednesday its products feature no security "backdoors" for the government, as the normally secretive company gave foreign media a peek inside its state-of-the-art facilities.

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Origin and species: fighting illegal logging with science

A timeworn laboratory in Britain's Royal Botanic Gardens may not seem like the obvious epicentre of efforts to halt international illegal logging.

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Climate change forces Arctic animals to shift feeding habits: study

Seals and whales in the Arctic are shifting their feeding patterns as climate change alters their habitats, and the way they do so may determine whether they survive, a new study has found.

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Researchers outline goals for collecting and studying samples from Mars

Returning samples from the surface of Mars has been a high-priority goal of the international Mars exploration community for many years. Although randomly collected samples would be potentially interesting, they would not be sufficient to answer the big questions that have motivated Mars exploration for decades.

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One device, many frequencies: Researchers create a unique, tiny resonator

It's one thing for humans to lose track of time, but what happens when our clocks do In an increasingly networked world, devices need to be more punctual than ever. To keep them running as we expect, they depend on an army of tiny, vibrating components.

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Climate change forces Arctic animals to shift feeding habits: study

Seals and whales in the Arctic are shifting their feeding patterns as climate change alters their habitats, and the way they do so may determine whether they survive, a new study has found.

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Ride-hailing firm Grab secures $1.5 billion in funding

Southeast Asian ride-hailing firm Grab said on Wednesday it has secured $1.5 billion in fresh financing from a fund run by Japan's SoftBank and will use a significant portion of it to expand in Indonesia.

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France tries to set trend with internet tax bill

France will introduce a bill Wednesday to tax internet and technology giants on their digital sales, and thus curb efforts to pay global levies in countries with lower tax rates.

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Moon shot: Toyota, Japan space agency plan lunar mission

Toyota is teaming up with Japan's space agency on a planned mission to the Moon, with the Japanese auto giant expected to develop a lunar rover, officials and local media said Wednesday.

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S. Korea proposes rain project with China to clean Seoul air

South Korean President Moon Jae-in has proposed a joint project with China to use artificial rain to clean the air in his country, where an acute increase in pollution has caused alarm.

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'Sharing economy' goes mainstream as IPOs loom

The "sharing economy" is becoming mainstream with the anticipated stock listings from services such as Uber, Lyft and Airbnb, signs that the trend is gaining momentum and impacting multiple sectors.

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A Dermatologist Breaks Down 7 Common 'Facts' About Our Skin

What do those white marks on your nails really mean?

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Roterende edderkoppespind kan forbedre fremtidens robotter

Høj luftfugtighed får edderkoppens tråde til at rotere og sno sig, viser undersøgelse. Det kan åbne op for ny robot-teknologi.

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The U.S.-China Tech War Is Being Fought in Central Europe

PRAGUE—When Chinese President Xi Jinping and his Czech counterpart, Miloš Zeman, raised a beer from a terrace overlooking the spires of Prague in 2016, they were hailing an era of deepened economic cooperation: Beijing would invest billions of dollars in the Czech Republic, and Zeman, in turn, would tout China as a business partner for Europe. Zeman has been a staunch supporter of Beijing ever si

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One Step Closer to Deep Learning on Neuromorphic Hardware

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Diabetes' sworn enemy could ultimately be a valuable ally

Montreal research team unravels an adaptive mechanism involved in controlling insulin action, showing that glucagon plays a crucial part in it and can thus be a protective asset.

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Houston, we're here to help the farmers

The International Space Station's ECOSTRESS gathers plant data.

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Researchers outline goals for collecting and studying samples from Mars

A new paper published in Meteoritics & Planetary Science describes the results of a major collaboration among 71 scientists from throughout the international science community to define specific scientific objectives for a Mars Sample Return campaign, to describe the critical measurements that would need to be done on returned samples to address the objectives, and to identify the kinds of samples

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New findings may help guide treatment of patients with asthma

Asthma patients often undergo tests involving inhaled methacholine, a drug that can cause narrowing of the airways, similar to what occurs in asthma. In a Respirology analysis of data on patients undergoing such tests, obesity and older age were linked with higher risks of airway closure.

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Study examines which schoolchildren are most likely to skip breakfast

Skipping breakfast was common in an observational study of schoolchildren in Greece, and children who skipped breakfast tended to have an unhealthy lifestyle profile. The Nutrition & Dietetics findings may be useful for developing policies designed to increase breakfast consumption in children.

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Study reveals disparities in osteoporosis treatment by sex and race/ethnicity

New research indicates that elderly men are significantly undertreated for osteoporosis compared with elderly women, and blacks have the lowest treatment rates among racial/ethnic groups. The findings are published in the Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research.

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Resistance training may help prevent type 2 diabetes

A new study published in Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews points to the benefits of exercise, especially resistance training (RT), for preventing type 2 diabetes.

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Social anxiety disorder may increase risk of alcoholism

New research published in Depression and Anxiety indicates that, unlike other anxiety disorders, social anxiety disorder may have a direct effect on alcoholism.

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Does cognitive function affect oral health during aging?

In a Community Dentistry & Oral Epidemiology study, poor cognitive function in older adults was associated with poorer oral health and higher risk of tooth loss in later life.

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Timing of Medicare loss may affect long-term success of kidney transplantation

Kidney transplant recipients under 65 years of age qualify for Medicare coverage following transplantation, but coverage ends after three years. A new American Journal of Transplantation study found that failure of the transplanted kidney was 990 percent to 1,630 percent higher for recipients who lost Medicare coverage before this three-year time point compared with recipients who lost Medicare on

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Knee pain not linked with activity levels in adults with knee osteoarthritis

Knee pain was not associated with daily walking levels in an Arthritis Care & Research study of individuals with mild to moderate symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

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Many patients with atopic dermatitis experience symptoms of anxiety and depression

A British Journal of Dermatology study has found substantially higher rates of anxiety and depression among US adults with atopic dermatitis, compared to those without. The study also found that anxiety and depression often go undiagnosed in these individuals.

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Statins linked to higher diabetes risk

Individuals who take cholesterol-lowering statins may be at higher risk for developing high blood sugar levels, insulin resistance, and eventually type 2 diabetes, according to an analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Over half of ED visits for nonmedical prescription drug use are patients under 35

Using nationally representative public health surveillance data to characterize US ED visits for harm caused by nonmedical prescription drug use, investigators at CDC and FDA report in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine that over half these visits are by young adults under 35, and over 40 percent of patients arrive unconscious or after cardiorespiratory failure. They include recommendatio

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Nye legeringers gode egenskaber skyldes tilfældighed

PLUS. Interessen for legeringer med fem eller flere grundstoffer, såkaldte højentropi­legeringer, er eksploderet. Forskere på Københavns Universitet undersøger, hvordan de kan fungere som katalysatorer inden for elektrokemi.

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This VR demo is incredible.

submitted by /u/Diirtyvato [link] [comments]

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Uber won't be held criminally liable for death in autonomous car crash – CNET

The backup driver, who was reportedly distracted, could face vehicular manslaughter charges.

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The NSA Makes Ghidra, a Powerful Cybersecurity Tool, Open Source

No one's better at hacking than the NSA. And now one if its powerful tools is available to everyone for free.

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The marine worms that can sprout new heads — including brains

The marine worms that can sprout new heads — including brains The marine worms that can sprout new heads — including brains, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00768-9 Lop off the heads of these ribbon worms, then watch.

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Heatwaves take their toll on the high seas

Heatwaves take their toll on the high seas Heatwaves take their toll on the high seas, Published online: 04 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00759-w Long hot spells have affected every ocean on Earth, and are likely to grow in severity.

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Quantum Monism Could Save the Soul of Physics

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Scientists Just Found a Way to Extract Rare-Earth Elements From a Plentiful Resource

This could make our devices so much more eco-friendly.

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Another Obstacle for Women in Science: Men Get More Federal Grant Money

A study finds that female scientists who win grants from the National Institutes of Health get $41,000 less than men.

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Fast-Acting Depression Drug, Newly Approved, Could Help Millions

A nasal spray version of the drug ketamine has shown promise as an antidepressant, even if its properties still aren’t well understood.

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Back To The Earth: Carbon Farming & The Green New Deal

submitted by /u/davidwholt [link] [comments]

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Artificial Intelligence & the Future of Automated Jobs – Kevin's Law

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People Staring At Screens Still Interested In Natural Wonders

In today’s world, it might seem like people aren’t connected to nature at all, instead opting to spend their time with modern conveniences like the world wide web. But new research shows that …

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Head of US food and drug agency resigns

Head of US food and drug agency resigns Head of US food and drug agency resigns, Published online: 06 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00803-9 Former physician Scott Gottlieb will leave the Food and Drug Administration in one month.

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Mighty mites give scrawny beetles the edge over bigger rivals

Smaller beetles who consistently lose fights over resources can gain a competitive advantage over their larger rivals by teaming up with another species.

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Common chest infection puts babies at risk of hospitalization for asthma in preschool years

Infants who are admitted to hospital with the common infection bronchiolitis are at increased risk of further emergency hospital admissions for asthma, wheezing and respiratory illness in the first five years of their life.

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Scientists put ichthyosaurs in virtual water tanks

Using computer simulations and 3D models, paleontologists from the University of Bristol have uncovered more detail on how Mesozoic sea dragons swam.

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The grassroots revolution making it normal for children to 'play out' again

Children's physical activity levels are at an all-time low, with only one in five children getting the minimum recommended one hour a day of moderate to vigorous physical exercise.However, for the last 10 years a grassroots organization called 'Playing Out' has been working hard to change this, allowing children across the UK to take back their streets.

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