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nyheder2019marts07

Unvaccinated Oregon Boy Is Diagnosed with Tetanus, the State's 1st Child Case in 30 Years

An unvaccinated child fell down, and received the first diagnosis of tetanus in a child in Oregon in over 30 years.

3h

Facebook Will Crack Down on Anti-Vaccine Content

The company announced Thursday that it will combat the spread of vaccine misinformation on Facebook and Instagram, but not take posts down entirely.

1h

Researchers develop 'acoustic metamaterial' that cancels sound

Boston University researchers, Xin Zhang, a professor at the College of Engineering, and Reza Ghaffarivardavagh, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, released a paper in Physical Review B demonstrating it's possible to silence noise using an open, ringlike structure, created to mathematically perfect specifications, for cutting out sounds while maintaining airflow.

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Massive new study debunks a vaccination-autism link

A massive new study finds absolutely no link between MMR vaccination and autism. Some question the expenditure of yet more research money on convincing conspiracy theorists. There are already 206 measles cases this year in the U.S., and the disease is up by 30% globally, despite previous near-eradication. None Measles were eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. Those were the days. Now it's back, with 2

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Hubble and Gaia Measure the Weight of Our Milky Way Galaxy

Measuring the total mass of our home galaxy is a tough puzzle. It’s difficult to see it all at once, buried as we are within one of its spiral arms. And there’s a huge portion of the Milky Way we can never see, since it’s made up of dark matter, which doesn’t emit light at all. So to get an accurate number, researchers need to weigh both the visible and invisible material that makes up the galaxy.

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Coaches really do matter for success in sports

Coaches have a significant impact on success in both the professional and collegiate ranks, a new study finds. The study provides new insights into the never-ending debate over how much leadership matters in sports. Researchers analyzed hundreds of seasons of data, including wins and losses, scores, and other statistics, and estimated that coaches account for 20 percent to 30 percent of the varia

26min

Massive new study debunks a vaccination-autism link

A massive new study finds absolutely no link between MMR vaccination and autism. Some question the expenditure of yet more research money on convincing conspiracy theorists. There are already 206 measles cases this year in the U.S., and the disease is up by 30% globally, despite previous near-eradication. None Measles were eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. Those were the days. Now it's back, with 2

28min

Unlocking the untapped potential of light in optical communications

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have fabricated a multiplexer/demultiplexer module based on a property of light that was not being exploited in communications systems: the optical vortex. Such devices will be crucial for improving optical networks, which are the backbone of today's Internet, so that they can meet the traffic demands of tomorrow.

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Vaping is probably bad for your heart

Health Recent studies have all found frequent e-cigarette use could put users at an increased risk for a heart attack. Researchers still don’t know all of the health risks e-cigarettes might pose to adult users. However, according to new research, e-cigarette use is associated with an…

29min

Radio Atlantic: The Future of the Democratic Party

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play The Democratic party is in a battle with itself. After devastating losses in 2016, the party was resurgent in 2018, but the lessons from both elections remain unclear: should the Democratic party be one of progressive grassroots activism or should it try to win back suburban and moderate voters? Dan Pfeiffer — former

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Brown Out

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, March 7 . ‣ Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump’s former lawyer and fixer, is suing the Trump Organization, alleging that he was denied $1.9 million in legal fees after agreeing to cooperate with prosecutors. ‣ Paul Manafort , Trump’s former campaign manager, who was convicted last year on eight counts of tax and bank fraud, was sentenced. Here’s what e

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Alan Watts and the art of meditation

Alan Watts cuts to the root of what meditation really is all about. Meditative practice has no motive, except to experience the present moment. Practice a guided meditation by focusing on the now. Meditation has left the ashrams and become a fixture in the boardroom and livings rooms everywhere. The corporate analysts and Silicon Valley-types scramble for their next hit of improvement. Spiritual

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Jordan Peterson's 10-step process for stronger writing

The best way to improve your thinking is to learn how to write, says Jordan Peterson. His ten-step process for writing an essay is time consuming, but the benefits are worth it. From the granular to the macro, every facet of writing a solid essay is covered in his template. None Becoming a better writer is a means for becoming a better thinker, says Canadian professor Jordan Peterson. Arranging y

37min

Fireflies, heart beats, and the science of sync

New experiments in the 'science of sync' may ultimately lead to improved tools for controlling power grids and heart arrhythmias.

37min

Fireflies, heart beats, and the science of sync

New experiments in the 'science of sync' may ultimately lead to improved tools for controlling power grids and heart arrhythmias.

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SpaceX Dragon demo capsule set to return to Earth

In its next Nasa test, the new crew capsule will re-enter the atmosphere for an Atlantic splashdown.

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The Fight Over Ilhan Omar Is a Fight Over the Identity of the Democratic Party

The U.S. House of Representatives voted on Thursday to condemn anti-Semitism, along with a litany of bigotries against Muslims, immigrants, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, LGBT people, and members of other religious minorities. The resolution followed a week of drama in the Democratic Party, with members clashing over yet another controversial comment on Israel by Minnesota Representative

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An Email Marketing Company Left 809 Million Records Exposed Online

A exposed database belonging to Verifications.io contained both personal and business information, including 763 million unique email addresses.

55min

Bioprinting Skin Directly Onto a Wound

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Major mutation pattern in cancer occurs in bursts

Researchers have created a huge resource for investigating the biological mechanisms that cause cancer. Scientists identified the patterns of DNA damage — mutational fingerprints that represent the origins of cancer — present in over a thousand human cancer cell lines. They revealed that a major mutation pattern found in human cancer, occurred in bursts in cancer cell lines. Understanding these

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Researchers report high rate of viral suppression among people new to HIV care

Eighty-six percent of individuals who entered HIV care soon after diagnosis maintained viral suppression after 48 weeks during a clinical trial conducted at four National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Centers for AIDS Research (CFARs) across the United States. Participants in the clinical trial, called iENGAGE, achieved viral suppression in an average of just 63 days. The findings were present

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Zero-emission diesel combustion using a non-equilibrium-plasma-assisted MnO2 filter

Engineers have used ozone from an atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium plasma together with the desulfurization catalyst MnO2 to almost completely eliminate NOx and SOx from diesel exhaust gas at a low temperature of 473 K.

1h

Tiny DNA reader to advance development of anticancer drugs

Researchers have developed a novel method to determine exactly where anticancer drug molecules are incorporated into microscopic strands of DNA. By passing an electrical current between two tiny probes across a strand of DNA, the researchers successfully distinguished drug molecules from normal DNA bases, pinpointing the insertion sites. This technique will allow researchers to study the mechanism

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Child's elevated mental ill-health risk if mother treated for infection during pregnancy

Risks for autism and depression are higher if one's mother was in hospital with an infection during pregnancy. This is shown by a major Swedish observational study of nearly 1.8 million children.

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Ultra-low power chips help make small robots more capable

An ultra-low power hybrid chip inspired by the brain could help give palm-sized robots the ability to collaborate and learn from their experiences. Combined with new generations of low-power motors and sensors, the new application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) — which operates on milliwatts of power — could help intelligent swarm robots operate for hours instead of minutes.

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Plans for world’s next major collider stuck in limbo

Plans for world’s next major collider stuck in limbo Plans for world’s next major collider stuck in limbo, Published online: 07 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00824-4 Japan delays decision on whether to host a US$7-billion linear accelerator — but competing proposals are also in development.

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Ultra-low power chips help make small robots more capable

An ultra-low power hybrid chip inspired by the brain could help give palm-sized robots the ability to collaborate and learn from their experiences. Combined with new generations of low-power motors and sensors, the new application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) — which operates on milliwatts of power — could help intelligent swarm robots operate for hours instead of minutes.

1h

Several popular apps including Yelp automatically send data to Facebook, watchdog group says

Some Android apps including Yelp continue to send data to Facebook even if the device owner doesn't have a Facebook account, according to a privacy watchdog group.

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How the global gag rule stifles free speech

A new journal article by researchers in the Global Health Justice and Governance program at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health argues that the Expanded Global Gag Rule is having a chilling effect, dampening debate, advocacy, and collaboration around abortion and other sexual and reproductive rights.

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Coral reef parks protecting only 40 percent of fish biomass potential

Marine scientists from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and other groups examining the ecological status of coral reefs across the Indian and Pacific oceans have uncovered an unsettling fact: even the best coral reef marine parks contain less than half of the fish biomass found in the most remote reefs that lie far from human settlements.

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Ecologists find a 'landscape of fearlessness' in a war-torn savannah

Using a series of well-designed experiments in Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, a research team confirmed each step in a trophic cascade between the elimination of predators (including leopards, African wild dogs, and hyenas) and growth of local plants. They demonstrated that the fear of predators alone can drive change in herbivore behaviors in large-mammal ecosystems.

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‘The Internet Isn’t Interested in Nuance’

On April 4, 2015, Walter Scott, an unarmed black man, was fatally shot by Michael Slager, a police officer who had stopped Scott for a nonfunctioning brake light. A shaky video taken by a witness revealed some essential facts: Scott had been running away when he was shot from behind, and Slager appeared to toss an unidentified object near Scott’s body following the shooting. But that was where th

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New SETI Plan: Detect Alien Starships Powered by Black Holes

Alien Starships To detect alien civilizations, astronomers need to make some assumptions about the forms they might take — and the traces their technological artifacts could leave behind. An outrageous new paper by a mathematician at Kansas State University does just that, positing that a sufficiently advanced alien civilization would likely build starships powered by the radiation thrown off by

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Can Zuckerberg really make a privacy-friendly Facebook?

After building a social network that turned into a surveillance system, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg says he's shifting his company's focus to messaging services designed to serve as fortresses of privacy.

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Merging magnetic blobs fuel the sun’s huge plasma eruptions

Solar eruptions called coronal mass ejections grow from a series of smaller events, observations show.

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Potential treatment for cancer in butterfly disease

New research lays foundation for upcoming clinical trial for patients with epidermolysis bullosa.

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Crystal-clear view of a key neuronal receptor opens door for new, targeted drugs

One of the most important protein signaling systems that controls neuronal guidance consists of the cell surface receptor 'Robo' and its cognate external guidance cue 'Slit.' The deficit of either of these proteins results in defects in brain structure and function. Researchers have now discovered the intricate molecular mechanism that allows the guidance receptor 'Robo' to react to signals in its

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Spacewatch: ESA and China plan new sun-Earth mission

Smile mission could help reduce ‘space weather’ disruption to satellite services The European Space Agency has given the go-ahead to plans for a spacecraft to study the magnetic interaction between the sun and the Earth. The mission, known as Smile (Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer), will be conducted in collaboration with China. It will be a follow-on to their previous joint mis

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The “miracle” of eye movements: EMDR and PTSD

“Hold that image in your mind,” I say, “and follow my finger”. I proceed to wave my finger in front of your face, back and forth, back and forth, back and forth… Believe it or not, I’m not performing hypnosis in this hypothetical scenario. Instead, I’m describing one of the most successful behavioral treatments for … Continue reading The “miracle” of eye movements: EMDR and PTSD

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'Specialized' microbes within plant species promote diversity

It's widely accepted within agriculture that maintaining genetic diversity is important. In areas where crop plants are more diverse, pathogens might kill some plants but are less likely to wipe out an entire crop.

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Destroying an Incoming Asteroid is Even Harder Than Scientists Thought

You’ve likely heard by now that the movie Armageddon got it all wrong — it’s just not feasible to blow up an asteroid heading toward Earth with a bomb or few. But how unrealistic is it, really? New research set for publication March 15 in the planetary science journal Icarus is sending any hope humanity might have had to nuke an incoming asteroid threat even further into the realm of impossibility

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In Greenland, Retreating Snow is Making Ancient Ice Melt Faster

Greenland is a giant ice sheet covered in snow. Its snowline — the border where snow cover and bare ice abut — migrates with the seasons, sliding to lower elevations in the winter and shifting up in the summer. Now researchers find that not only does the snowline move much more dramatically than they thought, but it also accelerates melting of the ice sheet. That’s a problem because the Greenland

2h

Mixed emotions in emerging economies on smartphones, social media

A survey in 11 emerging economies showed people in those countries happy to be connected with smartphones and social media, even if they worry about the impact of digital lifestyles on society and on children.

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Facebook launches offensive to combat misinformation on vaccines

Facebook launched an offensive Thursday to suppress the spread of misinformation about vaccines on the 2.3-billion-member social network.

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New report on industrial physics and its role in the US economy

Industrial physics plays a significant role in driving the U.S. economy, according to a new report by the American Physical Society, which will be described this week at the 2019 APS March Meeting in Boston.

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'Specialized' microbes within plant species promote diversity

It's widely accepted within agriculture that maintaining genetic diversity is important. In areas where crop plants are more diverse, pathogens might kill some plants but are less likely to wipe out an entire crop.

2h

In developing nations, national parks could save endangered species

The West African chimpanzee population has declined by nearly 80 percent in recent decades. Habitat loss is threatening their livelihoods across the continent, and especially in Senegal, where corporate mining has started eating up land in recent years.

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Mysterious Type Of Killer Whales, Sought After For Years, Found In Southern Ocean

The notion that there might be some new kind of killer whale emerged in 1955, when photos from New Zealand showed a bunch of unusual-looking whales stranded on a beach. (Image credit: Courtesy of J.P. Sylvestre)

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In developing nations, national parks could save endangered species

The West African chimpanzee population has declined by nearly 80 percent in recent decades. Habitat loss is threatening their livelihoods across the continent, and especially in Senegal, where corporate mining has started eating up land in recent years.

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ENDO 2019 news conferences to feature breakthroughs in diabetes, reproductive health, aging

Researchers will explore the link between unhealthy snack intake and screen time, long-term opioid use and its impact on men's testosterone levels, and other emerging science during news conferences at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting taking place March 23-26 in New Orleans, La.

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'Specialized' microbes within plant species promote diversity

A Yale-led research team conducted an experiment that suggests microbes can specialize within plant species, which can promote plant species diversity and increased seed dispersal.

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The wallet as you know it may be dying

You grab your keys, smartphone and wallet when you leave the house. Would it be such a disaster if you left that last one behind?

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Fitbit introduces budget-friendly line of wearables for kids and adults

Four new wearables are joining the Fitbit family.

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Exhibition Review: T. Rex Like You Haven’t Seen Him: With Feathers

Make way for Tyrannosaurus rex, everyone’s favorite killer. A new show at the American Museum of Natural History places T. rex amid a global family of prehistoric predators.

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Ultima Thule in 3-D: New Horizons team uses stereo imaging to examine Kuiper Belt object's features

Cross your eyes and break out the 3-D glasses! NASA's New Horizons team has created new stereo views of the Kuiper Belt object nicknamed Ultima Thule – the target of the New Horizons spacecraft's historic New Year's 2019 flyby, four billion miles from Earth – and the images are as cool and captivating as they are scientifically valuable.

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Scientists want to shock prisoners' brains to fight aggression

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Scientists discover way to transform CO2 into coal at room temperature

submitted by /u/tachyonburst [link] [comments]

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In developing nations, national parks could save endangered species

A new study of animal populations inside and outside a protected area in Senegal, Niokolo-Koba National Park, shows that protecting such an area from human interaction and development preserves not only chimps but many other mammal species.

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Artificial Intelligence Helps Hunt Down Superconductors

Artificial Intelligence Helps Hunt Down Superconductors Researchers use machine learning to speed up the trial-and-error search for new materials that can conduct electricity without resistance. AI_Sorter_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: maxuser via Shutterstock Physics Thursday, March 7, 2019 – 15:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Finding the next miracle material can be a tedious proce

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The science of serial killers is changing, thanks to Sasha Reid

Science And her in-depth analysis might help the rest of us, too. Despite our fascination with serial killers, little is actually known about how they think and why they develop the way they do. Sasha Reid hopes to change that.

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'Goldilocks' stars may be 'just right' for finding habitable worlds

Scientists looking for signs of life beyond our solar system face major challenges, one of which is that there are hundreds of billions of stars in our galaxy alone to consider. To narrow the search, they must figure out: What kinds of stars are most likely to host habitable planets?

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Freud is renowned, but his ideas are ill-substantiated

Sigmund Freud stands alongside Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein as one of history's best-known scientists. Despite his claim of creating a new science, Freud's psychoanalysis is unfalsifiable and based on scant empirical evidence. Studies continue to show that Freud's ideas are unfounded, and Freud has come under scrutiny for fabricating his most famous case studies. None Few thinkers are as ce

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Germ-fighting catheter coating may help prevent infections

Brown University researchers have developed a new antibacterial coating for intravascular catheters that could one day help to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections, the most common type of hospital-acquired infection.

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Solar Dynamics Observatory catches lunar freeze frame

On the evening of March 6, 2019, the Moon started to transit the Sun, then doubled back and retraced its steps in the other direction—at least, that's what it looked like from the perspective of NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, in orbit around Earth.

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Germ-fighting catheter coating may help prevent infections

Brown University researchers have developed a new antibacterial coating for intravascular catheters that could one day help to prevent catheter-related bloodstream infections, the most common type of hospital-acquired infection.

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The power of one country to influence treaty ratification

New research shows just how powerful the United States' and other countries' influence can be on persuading other nations to ratify international treaties.

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Germ-fighting catheter coating may help prevent infections

In an innovation that may ultimately help to prevent deadly bloodstream infections, a team of biomedical engineers and infectious disease specialists at Brown University developed a coating to keep intravascular catheters from becoming a haven for harmful bacteria.

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The power of one country to influence treaty ratification

New research shows just how powerful the United States' and other countries' influence can be on persuading other nations to ratify international treaties. The first-of-its-kind study shows the influence of countries in treaty ratification can extend beyond their close allies and could even help persuade rivals to join agreements.

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'Goldilocks' stars may be 'just right' for finding habitable worlds

A new study finds a particular class of stars called K stars, which are dimmer than the Sun but brighter than the faintest stars, may be particularly promising targets for searching for signs of life.

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Researchers find high blood pressure link

The age a woman begins menstruation is associated with having high blood pressure later in her life, according to a team of researchers at the University of Georgia.

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Facebook steps up fight against vaccine misinformation

Social media giant Facebook says it will remove groups and pages that spread misinformation about vaccinations on its site.

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Boeing Is Prepping to Launch Astronauts to Space Station

Commercial Crew Program SpaceX isn’t the only company attempting to revolutionize the way we send astronauts to space. Boeing, the largest aerospace company in the world, is looking to send up its own take on a passenger spacecraft, which it calls the CST-100 Starliner, to the International Space Station. Boeing is planning to launch the capsule — uncrewed for now, as a test flight — on an Atlas

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Researchers make a million tiny robots

Nanofabbed bots are small enough to be delivered via syringe, raising all sorts of fantastic voyage possibilities. Nick Carne reports.

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Five Unanswered Questions About Paul Manafort

What did Robert Mueller want from Paul Manafort? Last September, the special counsel cut a deal with the former chair of Donald Trump’s campaign: If Manafort truthfully provided guidance to prosecutors, they would suggest a less onerous sentence for his crimes. There was a clear assumption in the trade, that Mueller believed Manafort had information valuable to his broader investigation of Russia

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China: New “Artificial Sun” Will Be Completed This Year

On the Horizon In November, Chinese researchers announced that the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) reactor — an “artificial sun” designed to mimic the nuclear fusion process the real Sun uses to generate energy — had hit a milestone by achieving an electron temperature of 100 million degrees Celsius. Now, officials are saying they believe they’ll wrap up construction on a new

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NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory catches lunar freeze frame

On March 6, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory watched a lunar transit in space — one in which the satellite's path made the Moon appear to stand still, then backtrack.

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Does awe lead to greater interest in science?

A new study finds that feeling awe leads to greater awareness of the things we don't know, which in turn makes us more likely to seek out a framework to fill those gaps. Science is one such framework.

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Cameras, AI on Self-Driving Cars May Miss Darker-Skinned Faces

Georgia Tech researchers found automotive grade AI systems for self-driving were less accurate identifying images as pedestrians when the faces had darker skin tones. The post Cameras, AI on Self-Driving Cars May Miss Darker-Skinned Faces appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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How to Keep Parents From Fleeing STEM Careers

A recent study finds that both new moms and new dads leave science, technology, engineering, and medicine at higher rates than their childless peers—and some never return.

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The Women Who Are Clearing the Minefields in Sri Lanka

It has been nearly 10 years since the end of the Sri Lankan civil war, a horrific conflict that lasted more than 25 years and claimed an estimated 100,000 lives. A decade later, land mines and unexploded ordnance still litter the northern landscape, endangering those who are trying to return to their previous lives. Allison Joyce , a photographer with Getty Images, recently spent time with some o

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Three ways studying organic chemistry changes the brain

A new study using multiple imaging modalities shows that learning scientific information results in changes in the actual structure of memory-related areas of the brain, changes due to the encoding of the new information in these memory-related brain areas, and changes in the coordination among the network nodes that jointly contain the new information.

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Using laser 'tweezers,' scientists grab and study tiny protein droplets

Physicists are using innovative tools to study the properties of a bizarre class of molecules that may play a role in disease: proteins that cluster together to form spherical droplets inside human cells. A new study sheds light on the conditions that drive such droplets to switch from a fluid, liquidy state to a harder, gel-like state.

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'Meta-mirror' reflects sound waves in any direction

Researchers have constructed a 'meta-mirror' device capable of perfectly reflecting sound waves in any direction. The proof-of-principle demonstration is analogous to looking directly into a mirror and only seeing the person next to you instead of your own face.

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How antifreeze proteins make ice crystals grow

Bacteria, plants, insects, or even fish use antifreeze proteins to protect themselves from the cold. The proteins block the growth of ice crystals. In a new study, researchers have confirmed that these proteins also possess an unusual second property: at low temperatures, they can promote rather than inhibit the growth of ice crystals.

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Human encroachment threatens chimpanzee culture

Human activity is affecting chimps’ behavioral repertoire, a new study suggests. Creating chimp cultural heritage sites might save unique behaviors.

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Airbnb buys HotelTonight app to broaden travel offerings

Airbnb said Thursday it was acquiring the last-minute lodging application HotelTonight, giving the home-sharing giant a broader range of offerings as a travel platform.

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Cytomegalovirus infection broadens spectrum of environmental allergens

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection can convert a harmless, inhaled protein antigen into an allergen, according to a new study.

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Researchers develop innovative, more cost-effective method to make drugs

Continuous manufacturing is a modern process that promises to enable the pharmaceutical industry to scale operations more easily in order to meet demand and help reduce drug shortages. A new research paper has been published about how to make a generic form of lomustine. The continuous manufacturing process can be applied to many other products.

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These mice got acne so future teens might not have to

Health When you give a mouse a zit… In order to study precisely how, why, and when acne forms, you really need some kind of animal model.

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Human encroachment threatens chimpanzee culture

Human activity is affecting chimps’ behavioral repertoire, a new study suggests. Creating chimp cultural heritage sites might save unique behaviors.

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Discovering bonus science with NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Spacecraft

The four Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft are flying out of their element. The spacecraft have just completed a short detour from their routine science—looking at processes within Earth's magnetic environment—and instead ventured outside it, studying something they were not originally designed for.

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How the microbiota controls neutrophil activity

A host protein called Serum Amyloid A (Saa) is a major factor mediating the effects of the microbiota on the function of immune cells called neutrophils, according to a new study.

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Chimpanzees lose their behavioral and cultural diversity

Chimpanzees are well known for their extraordinary diversity of behaviors, with some behaviors also exhibiting cultural variation. An international research team has investigated whether chimpanzee behavioral diversity is reduced under high human impact. By comparing sets of chimpanzee behaviors across a large number of social groups exposed to different levels of human disturbance, the scientists

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Three ways studying organic chemistry changes the brain

A new study using multiple imaging modalities shows that learning scientific information results in changes in the actual structure of memory-related areas of the brain, changes due to the encoding of the new information in these memory-related brain areas, and changes in the coordination among the network nodes that jointly contain the new information.

4h

Using laser 'tweezers,' scientists grab and study tiny protein droplets

Physicists are using innovative tools to study the properties of a bizarre class of molecules that may play a role in disease: proteins that cluster together to form spherical droplets inside human cells. A new study sheds light on the conditions that drive such droplets to switch from a fluid, liquidy state to a harder, gel-like state.

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50 is the new 40 for safe childbirth?

Researchers have determined that it is as safe to give birth after age 50 as age 40 without endangering the mother or the baby.

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'Meta-mirror' reflects sound waves in any direction

Researchers have constructed a 'meta-mirror' device capable of perfectly reflecting sound waves in any direction. The proof-of-principle demonstration is analogous to looking directly into a mirror and only seeing the person next to you instead of your own face.

4h

How antifreeze proteins make ice crystals grow

Bacteria, plants, insects, or even fish use antifreeze proteins to protect themselves from the cold. The proteins block the growth of ice crystals. In a new study, researchers have confirmed that these proteins also possess an unusual second property: at low temperatures, they can promote rather than inhibit the growth of ice crystals.

4h

Breakthrough could enable cheaper infrared cameras

A breakthrough in quantum dot technology may one day lead to much more cost-effective infrared cameras — which in turn could enable infrared cameras for common consumer electronics like phones, as well as sensors to help autonomous cars see their surroundings more accurately.

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Sleep loss leads to contagious loneliness

Sleep-deprived people feel lonelier and less inclined to engage with others, avoiding close contact in much the same way as people with social anxiety, according to a new study. Worse still, that alienating vibe makes sleep-deprived individuals more socially unattractive to others. Moreover, even well-rested people feel lonely after just a brief encounter with a sleep-deprived person, triggering

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From 'bling-bling' to 'hypercars', limitless luxury on show in Geneva

Luxury figured high on the menu as Europe's biggest annual car show opened to the public Thursday, featuring everything from "hypercars" to flying cars, and more traditional high-end automobiles, encrusted with diamonds.

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Airbnb buys HotelTonight app to broaden travel offerings

Airbnb said Thursday it was acquiring the last-minute lodging application HotelTonight, giving the home-sharing giant a broader range of offerings as a travel platform.

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Road upgrades to help humans drive alongside automated cars

As new self-driving vehicles appear on the streets, the traffic clogging our cities and highways could get a lot worse unless the roads themselves become smarter.

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2,700-Year-Old Polynesian Tattoo Kit Found — and the 'Needles' Were Made of Human Bone.

A set of four tiny combs from the Polynesian kingdom Tonga might be among the world's oldest tattoo kits.

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Geoengineering debate shifts to UN environment assembly

Geoengineering debate shifts to UN environment assembly Geoengineering debate shifts to UN environment assembly, Published online: 07 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00717-6 Countries will discuss whether to commission a study of technologies to blunt the effects of climate change.

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Leaving Neverland and the Burden of the Postmortem Exposé

“Can we continue to celebrate the genius in the face of the monster?” asked the writer Pearl Cleage in the title essay from her 1990 collection, Mad at Miles . Cleage was attempting to contend with both the cultural legacy of the jazz legend Miles Davis and the man himself, who had a history of domestic violence against women. Her question and palpable feelings of outrage at Davis are not unlike

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Zuckerberg's Privacy Manifesto is Actually About Messaging

It’s not about keeping you safe from Facebook’s data-hoovering efforts. It’s about competing with other messaging platforms.

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Human Activity Undermines Diverse World of Chimpanzee Culture

Human Activity Undermines Diverse World of Chimpanzee Culture Chimps that experience the most dramatic human impacts have less behavioral diversity. Chimpanzees.jpg Image credits: Harry1978/Shutterstock Creature Thursday, March 7, 2019 – 14:00 Joshua Learn, Contributor (Inside Science) — Humans aren’t the only primates that can boast an incredible array of cultural behavior. Chimpanzees in some

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Scientists find mystery killer whales off Cape Horn, Chile

In January 2019, scientists working off the tip of southern Chile got their first live look at what might be a new species of killer whale. Genetic samples will help determine whether this animal, with its distinctly different color pattern and body shape, is indeed new to science.

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New photography approach gives traditional cameras ultra-high imaging speeds

Researchers have developed a new imaging method that can capture images at speeds of up to 1.5 million frames per second using standard imaging sensors typically limited to 100 frames per second.

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Embryogenesis: Elucidating cellular responses to force

Accumulated evidence suggests that physical force plays an important role in various developmental processes of fertilized animal eggs. During embryogenesis, a variety of cell populations actively migrate and change their positions, generating various types of force (e.g., traction force, compression force) that influence the properties of surrounding tissues. This in turn enables normal developme

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Insects in decline: On farmland, latecomers lose out

Wild bees in Europe are in trouble — more than 50 percent of local species are now classified as endangered. Recent findings indicate that, in farming areas, species that emerge in late summer are most acutely threatened.

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Forgotten fathers: New dads also at risk for postpartum depression

A new study offers an in-depth view of new fathers' experiences with postpartum depression (PPD). The study explores issues they encounter and how they can move beyond barriers they face in receiving diagnoses and treatment of the little-known phenomenon.

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Little kids who talk about suicide know what death means

Depressed children ages 4 to 6 who think and talk about committing suicide understand what it means to die better than other kids, according to a new study. In the study, children with suicidal thoughts and words—what psychiatrists call suicidal ideation—were more than three times as likely to think about death as something caused by violence than young children with depression who don’t think or

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How helpful gut microbes send signals that they are friends, not foes

Some beneficial gut bacteria use unique form of communication to let immune cells know that they’re friendly.

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Super-Earths Have Weird Orbits Because They’re Permanently Off-Kilter

Researchers may have solved a long-standing mystery of some exoplanets' oddball orbits.

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Ecologists find a 'landscape of fearlessness' in a war-torn savannah

Using a series of well-designed experiments in Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, a Princeton-led research team confirmed each step in a trophic cascade between the elimination of predators (including leopards, African wild dogs, and hyenas) and growth of local plants. They demonstrated that the fear of predators alone can drive change in herbivore behaviors in large-mammal ecosystems.

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Chimpanzees lose their behavioral and cultural diversity

Chimpanzees are well known for their extraordinary diversity of behaviors, with some behaviors also exhibiting cultural variation. An international research team led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) investigated whether chimpanzee behavioral diversity is reduced under high human impact. By comparing sets of

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Fireflies, heart beats, and the science of sync

New experiments in the 'science of sync' may ultimately lead to improved tools for controlling power grids and heart arrhythmias.

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Human impacts erode behavioral diversity in chimpanzees

Much of the variation in the behavior among wild chimpanzee groups may be akin to 'cultural' variation in humans. Behavioral diversity is also a facet of biodiversity, but has not been considered as an additional concern until recently. Recent analysis revealed a strong and robust pattern — chimpanzee behavioral diversity was reduced by 88 percent when human impact was highest compared to locatio

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Exotic synchronization patterns emerge in a simple network

From the power grid to the PTA, society relies on networks connected to other networks at scales from across the office to around the world. Understanding how connected networks behave and how breakdowns can be identified, prevented or repaired involves mathematics, engineering and physics. Researchers at UC Davis and Caltech now show how complicated and surprising behavior can emerge in a ring of

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Human activity quickly killing cultural diversity of the chimpanzee

The impact human activities have on the cultural behaviors and traditions of our closest relative, the chimpanzee, is drastic, reports a new study — one based on an unprecedented data set of nearly 150 African chimpanzee communities.

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What triggered the 100,000-year Ice Age cycle?

A slowing of ocean circulation in the waters surrounding Antarctica drastically altered the strength and more than doubled the length of global ice ages following the mid-Pleistocene transition, a new study finds.

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An antibody-mimicking small molecule protects mice against lethal influenza

Researchers present a newly identified small molecule influenza inhibitor, which, when administered orally, is capable of protecting mice from extremely lethal doses of influenza.

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Landscapes of fear, and the large carnivores they feature, important in African ecosystems

A new study focused on Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park, where entire populations of large-mammal predators were nearly extinguished during the Mozambican Civil War, illustrates how the loss of an ecosystem's top carnivores can have far-reaching consequences for prey and plant populations, turning 'landscapes of fear' into 'landscapes of fearlessness' in which emboldened herbivores graze and s

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An Antibody-Inspired Small Molecule Could Make For A Better Flu Treatment

To outsmart influenza, researchers are leveraging the biological information encoded in infection-fighting antibodies to design new drugs. One attempt neutralizes near-lethal levels of flu in mice. (Image credit: Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source)

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A little molecule that can disarm a lethal dose of flu virus

A little molecule that can disarm a lethal dose of flu virus A little molecule that can disarm a lethal dose of flu virus, Published online: 07 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00783-w Drug candidate imitates a naturally occurring immune protein that binds to influenza virus.

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New Theory: Mass of Photons Could Explain Effects of Dark Matter

Mass Effect For many years, astrophysicists have theorized that an invisible material they call “dark matter” makes up the majority of the universe’s mass. Any behavior of objects in the universe that can’t be explained by ordinary mass — such as how galaxies rotate in space — could be due to the gravitational effects dark matter. But now, a bold new theory from European researchers suggests a st

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Facebook blocks manipulation efforts in Britain, Romania

Facebook said it blocked online manipulation efforts in Britain and Romania from faked accounts in the latest crackdown on "inauthentic" content on the huge social network.

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Study finds nonprofit partnerships can help solve bureaucratic tangles

Many nonprofit organizations steer clear of large, public-serving agencies due to concerns about becoming entangled in bureaucratic red tape. But new research suggests that some nonprofits may be able to better serve their constituents by partnering with public institutions in order to navigate the bureaucracy and access services more efficiently.

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Scientists find mystery killer whales off Cape Horn, Chile

In January 2019, an international team of scientists working off the tip of southern Chile got their first live look at what might be a new species of killer whale. Called Type D, the whales were previously known only from a beach stranding more than 60 years ago, fishermen's stories, and tourist photographs.

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Chimpanzees Are Going Through a Tragic Loss

Imagine that an alien species landed on Earth and, through their mere presence, those aliens caused our art to vanish, our music to homogenize, and our technological know-how to disappear. That is effectively what humans have been doing to our closest relatives—chimpanzees. Back in 1999, a team of scientists led by Andrew Whiten (and including Jane Goodall) showed that chimpanzees from different

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Unique chimpanzee cultures are disappearing thanks to humans

Chimpanzee groups have special behaviours like fishing for termites that are passed on by learning, but these are rarer in human-dominated areas

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A pill that mimics natural antibodies could fight many kinds of flu

An experimental drug that mimics the effect of antibodies produced by the immune system has saved animals given lethal doses of flu viruses

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Scientists find mystery killer whales off Cape Horn, Chile

In January 2019, an international team of scientists working off the tip of southern Chile got their first live look at what might be a new species of killer whale. Called Type D, the whales were previously known only from a beach stranding more than 60 years ago, fishermen's stories, and tourist photographs.

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Shifting away from coal is key to cutting greenhouse gas emissions

The United States could fulfill its greenhouse gas emission pledge under the Paris Climate Agreement by virtually eliminating coal as an energy source by 2024, according to new research.

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For Alex Trebek, the Toughest Question: Can He Face Down Pancreatic Cancer?

The iconic game show host has been handed a frightening diagnosis. Here’s what it means.

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Trilobites: Watch Video of Type D Killer Whales, Rarely Seen by Humans

Scientists have collected skin samples from the unusual orcas, which could help determine whether they are a distinct cetacean species.

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Dragon in graphics

How Elon Musk's Crew Dragon spaceship goes to, and returns from, the International Space Station.

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Gay and lesbian spaces in the city becoming more diverse, not going away

Gay and lesbian spaces in cities are dispersing and diversifying rather than disappearing, new University of British Columbia research has found.

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New graphene-based device is first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors

Researchers in the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have developed a unique new device using the wonder material graphene that provides the first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors to detect diseases at the molecular level with near perfect efficiency.

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Researchers develop innovative, more cost-effective method to make drugs

The Food and Drug Administration wants the pharmaceutical industry to get away from making drugs using the traditional batch method and switch to a more modern process known as continuous manufacturing.

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Facebook blocks manipulation efforts in Britain, Romania

Facebook said it blocked online manipulation efforts in Britain and Romania from faked accounts in the latest crackdown on "inauthentic" content on the huge social network.

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News at a glance

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Can we understand RB?

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Tuning superconductivity in twisted bilayer graphene

Materials with flat electronic bands often exhibit exotic quantum phenomena owing to strong correlations. An isolated low-energy flat band can be induced in bilayer graphene by simply rotating the layers by 1.1°, resulting in the appearance of gate-tunable superconducting and correlated insulating phases. In this study, we demonstrate that in addition to the twist angle, the interlayer coupling c

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Magneto-Seebeck tunneling on the atomic scale

The tunneling of spin-polarized electrons across a magnetic tunnel junction driven by a temperature gradient is a fundamental process for the thermal control of electron spin transport. We experimentally investigated the atomic-scale details of this magneto-Seebeck tunneling by placing a magnetic probe tip in close proximity to a magnetic sample at cryogenic temperature, with a vacuum as the tunn

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Coherent single-photon emission from colloidal lead halide perovskite quantum dots

Chemically made colloidal semiconductor quantum dots have long been proposed as scalable and color-tunable single emitters in quantum optics, but they have typically suffered from prohibitively incoherent emission. We now demonstrate that individual colloidal lead halide perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) display highly efficient single-photon emission with optical coherence times as long as 80 picos

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Observation and stabilization of photonic Fock states in a hot radio-frequency resonator

Detecting weak radio-frequency electromagnetic fields plays a crucial role in a wide range of fields, from radio astronomy to nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. In quantum optics, the ultimate limit of a weak field is a single photon. Detecting and manipulating single photons at megahertz frequencies presents a challenge because, even at cryogenic temperatures, thermal fluctuations are appreciab

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Volumetric additive manufacturing via tomographic reconstruction

Additive manufacturing promises enormous geometrical freedom and the potential to combine materials for complex functions. The speed, geometry, and surface quality limitations of additive processes are linked to their reliance on material layering. We demonstrated concurrent printing of all points within a three-dimensional object by illuminating a rotating volume of photosensitive material with

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The residence time of Southern Ocean surface waters and the 100,000-year ice age cycle

From 1.25 million to 700,000 years ago, the ice age cycle deepened and lengthened from 41,000- to 100,000-year periodicity, a transition that remains unexplained. Using surface- and bottom-dwelling foraminifera from the Antarctic Zone of the Southern Ocean to reconstruct the deep-to-surface supply of water during the ice ages of the past 1.5 million years, we found that a reduction in deep water

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AIBP-mediated cholesterol efflux instructs hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell fate

Hypercholesterolemia, the driving force of atherosclerosis, accelerates the expansion and mobilization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The molecular determinants connecting hypercholesterolemia with hematopoiesis are unclear. Here, we report that a somite-derived prohematopoietic cue, AIBP, orchestrates HSPC emergence from the hemogenic endothelium, a type of specialized endot

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Direct stimulation of NADP+ synthesis through Akt-mediated phosphorylation of NAD kinase

Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP + ) is essential for producing NADPH, the primary cofactor for reductive metabolism. We find that growth factor signaling through the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)–Akt pathway induces acute synthesis of NADP + and NADPH. Akt phosphorylates NAD kinase (NADK), the sole cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of NADP + from NAD + (the oxidiz

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Stoichiometry controls activity of phase-separated clusters of actin signaling proteins

Biomolecular condensates concentrate macromolecules into foci without a surrounding membrane. Many condensates appear to form through multivalent interactions that drive liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). LLPS increases the specific activity of actin regulatory proteins toward actin assembly by the Arp2/3 complex. We show that this increase occurs because LLPS of the Nephrin–Nck–N-WASP signal

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A molecular assembly phase transition and kinetic proofreading modulate Ras activation by SOS

The guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Son of Sevenless (SOS) is a key Ras activator that is autoinhibited in the cytosol and activates upon membrane recruitment. Autoinhibition release involves structural rearrangements of the protein at the membrane and thus introduces a delay between initial recruitment and activation. In this study, we designed a single-molecule assay to resolve the tim

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Structural basis for pH-dependent retrieval of ER proteins from the Golgi by the KDEL receptor

Selective export and retrieval of proteins between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi apparatus is indispensable for eukaryotic cell function. An essential step in the retrieval of ER luminal proteins from the Golgi is the pH-dependent recognition of a carboxyl-terminal Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu (KDEL) signal by the KDEL receptor. Here, we present crystal structures of the chicken KDEL receptor in th

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New Products

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Endocytosis of commensal antigens by intestinal epithelial cells regulates mucosal T cell homeostasis

Commensal bacteria influence host physiology, without invading host tissues. We show that proteins from segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are transferred into intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) through adhesion-directed endocytosis that is distinct from the clathrin-dependent endocytosis of invasive pathogens. This process transfers microbial cell wall–associated proteins, including an antigen

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A small-molecule fusion inhibitor of influenza virus is orally active in mice

Recent characterization of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against influenza virus identified the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stem as a target for development of universal vaccines and therapeutics. Although several stem bnAbs are being evaluated in clinical trials, antibodies are generally unsuited for oral delivery. Guided by structural knowledge of the interactions and mechanism of an

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Exotic states in a simple network of nanoelectromechanical oscillators

Synchronization of oscillators, a phenomenon found in a wide variety of natural and engineered systems, is typically understood through a reduction to a first-order phase model with simplified dynamics. Here, by exploiting the precision and flexibility of nanoelectromechanical systems, we examined the dynamics of a ring of quasi-sinusoidal oscillators at and beyond first order. Beyond first order

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cGAS in action: Expanding roles in immunity and inflammation

DNA is highly immunogenic. It represents a key pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) during infection. Host DNA can, however, also act as a danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) and elicit strong inflammatory responses. The cGAS-STING pathway has emerged as a major pathway that detects intracellular DNA. Here, we highlight recent advances on how cGAS and STING mediate inflammatory res

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Breakthrough could enable cheaper infrared cameras

There's an entire world our eyes miss, hidden in the ranges of light wavelengths that human eyes can't see. But infrared cameras can pick up the secret light emitted as plants photosynthesize, as cool stars burn and batteries get hot. They can see through smoke and fog and plastic.

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Tropical Cyclone Haleh weakening in NASA-NOAA satellite imagery

Tropical Cyclone Haleh continues to weaken while being battered by outside winds. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured an image the elongated storm.

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Panthers, propellers and catfish — February’s best science images

Panthers, propellers and catfish — February’s best science images Panthers, propellers and catfish — February’s best science images, Published online: 07 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00807-5 The month’s sharpest science shots — selected by Nature’s photo team.

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Monthly HIV injection could free patients from gruelling drug regimen

Monthly HIV injection could free patients from gruelling drug regimen Monthly HIV injection could free patients from gruelling drug regimen, Published online: 07 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00721-w A pair of trials reveals that long-acting treatment works just as well as daily pills — and is easier to stick to.

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Ecologists find a 'landscape of fearlessness' in a war-torn savannah

A team of Princeton ecologists took advantage of a rare opportunity to study what happens to an ecosystem when large carnivores are wiped out.

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Human impacts erode behavioral diversity in chimpanzees

Compared to other animals, chimpanzees show tremendous variation across groups in their behavior—from the types of tools they use in their feeding behavior to the specific gestures they use in communication. Research in captivity suggests that chimpanzees acquire information socially, learning to do things in a certain way based on how it is done by other members of their group. Thus, much of the

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Ancient microbes yield clues to ice age timing

Researchers close in on why glacial periods suddenly doubled in length. Samantha Page reports.

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The fall of chimp civilisation

Human impact has reduced cultural behaviours in some great ape communities by more than 80%. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Sovjetisk venus-sonde fra 70'erne kan ramme Jorden i år

En mislykket mission til Venus endte i kredsløb om Jorden. Nu nærmer tiden sig, hvor det 490 kg tunge landingsmodul ryger ud af sit kredsløb.

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SpaceX's Crew Dragon Returns Tomorrow, Testing the Future of Human Spaceflight

SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsule will depart the International Space Station and splash down in the Atlantic Ocean early tomorrow morning. It has been paired with the space station since Sunday, when it made its first docking under its own power after a successful Saturday launch atop a Falcon 9 rocket. This final phase of the Demo-1 mission will continue studying Crew Dragon’s new build. That include

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Pediatric onset multiple sclerosis study examines baffling, often-overlooked disease

Study examines families' functioning when a child is diagnosed with pediatric onset multiple sclerosis. Paper co-written by University of Illinois' Ted Cross.

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Människor förstör schimpansernas kultur

Schimpansers förmåga att bevara flockens traditioner och överföra sociala beteenden vidare till nästa generation minskar nu kraftigt. Forskare har upptäckt att ju mer mänsklig aktivitet det finns runt vilda schimpanser i Afrika desto mindre blir schimpansernas kulturella mångfald.

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Physicists discover surprisingly complex states emerging out of simple synchronized networks

Fireflies, heart cells, clocks, and power grids all do it—they can spontaneously sync up, sending signals out in unison. For centuries, scientists have been perplexed by this self-organizing behavior, coming up with theories and experiments that make up the science of sync. But despite progress being made in the field, mysteries still persist—in particular how networks of completely identical elem

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Ecologists find a 'landscape of fearlessness' in a war-torn savannah

A team of Princeton ecologists took advantage of a rare opportunity to study what happens to an ecosystem when large carnivores are wiped out.

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Human impacts erode behavioral diversity in chimpanzees

Compared to other animals, chimpanzees show tremendous variation across groups in their behavior—from the types of tools they use in their feeding behavior to the specific gestures they use in communication. Research in captivity suggests that chimpanzees acquire information socially, learning to do things in a certain way based on how it is done by other members of their group. Thus, much of the

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The war on ‘prediabetes’ could be a boon for pharma—but is it good medicine?

A third of Americans are considered prediabetic—but many may be better off without treatment

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Humans are wiping out chimpanzee cultures

Great ape groups living with more human influence show fewer distinct behaviors

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How a ‘landscape of fear’ transformed the ecosystem of this African wildlife park

In a Mozambique park, researchers test how predators can reshape an ecosystem by affecting prey behavior

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New pill shows early promise for blocking many strains of flu

Would-be oral drug protects mice from lethal flu challenges

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Why Are More Young People Having Heart Attacks?

Heart attack rates are increasing in what may seem like an unlikely group: adults in their 20s and 30s.

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Democracy fosters economic growth, study finds

A new study shows that when it comes to growth, democracy significantly increases development. Indeed, countries switching to democratic rule experience a 20 percent increase in GDP over a 25-year period, compared to what would have happened had they remained authoritarian states, the researchers report.

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What does the Milky Way weigh? Hubble and Gaia investigate

We can't put the whole Milky Way on a scale, but astronomers have been able to come up with one of the most accurate measurements yet of our galaxy's mass, using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite.

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Mouse model validates how 'good' and 'bad' bacteria affect acne

Researchers have generated a new mouse model that mimics human acne for the first time, and used it to validate the concept of 'good' and 'bad' acne bacteria and introduce new possibilities for targeted treatments and vaccines.

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Shifting away from coal is key to cutting greenhouse gas emissions

The United States could fulfill its greenhouse gas emission pledge under the Paris Climate Agreement by virtually eliminating coal as an energy source by 2024, according to new research.

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Crucial milestone for critically endangered bird

A team led by a conservation biologist has successfully relocated threatened Seychelles paradise flycatchers (Terpsiphone corvina) to a different island to help prevent their extinction. Four females and two males were caught on Denis Island and taken to Curieuse Island, where they joined 11 males and nine females who were moved there from La Digue Island at the end of last year. Four weeks after

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States with permissive gun laws have higher mass shooting rates, study finds

States with more permissive gun laws and greater gun ownership have higher rates of mass shootings, and a growing divide is emerging between states with restrictive versus permissive gun laws. A 10 percent higher state firearm ownership rate was associated with a 35 percent higher rate of mass shootings.

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E-cigarettes linked to heart attacks, coronary artery disease and depression

Concerns about the addictive nature of e-cigarettes — now used by an estimated 1 out of 20 Americans — may only be part of the evolving public health story surrounding their use, according to new data. New research shows that adults who report puffing e-cigarettes, or vaping, are significantly more likely to have a heart attack, coronary artery disease and depression compared with those who don'

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Using tiny organisms to unlock big environmental mysteries

Biological processes that influence climate and the environment, such as carbon fixation or nitrogen recycling are parts of these planet-wide processes are actually driven by the tangible actions of organisms at every scale of life, beginning at the smallest: the microorganisms living in the air, soil, and water. And now researchers have made it easier than ever to study these microbial communitie

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How restoration specialists protect vintage photographs from the ravages of time

Technology The hidden work of preserving photographs. Behind the scenes with the photo preservation team at the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Monthly jab for HIV treatment passes late-stage trials

ViiV Healthcare regimen hoped to offer less toxic alternative to daily tablets

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Chemical hydrogen storage system

Hydrogen is a highly attractive, but also highly explosive energy carrier, which requires safe, lightweight and cheap storage as well as transportation systems. Scientists have now developed a chemical storage system based on simple and abundant organic compounds. The liquid hydrogen carrier system has a high theoretical capacity and uses the same catalyst for the charging-discharging reaction.

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Spectroscopy on individual molecules

While spectroscopic measurements are normally averaged over myriad molecules, a new method provides precise information about the interaction of individual molecules with their environment. This will accelerate the identification of efficient molecules for future photovoltaic technologies, for example.

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How well do vaccines work? Research reveals measles vaccine efficacy

The recent measles outbreaks across the country emphasize the importance of vaccinations.

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Stars exploding as supernovae lose their mass to companion stars during their lives

Stars over eight times more massive than the sun end their lives in supernovae explosions. The composition of the star influences what happens during the explosion.

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Prosecutors: Uber Isn’t Criminally Liable for Self-Driving Car Death

No Basis On March 18, an Uber in self-driving mode struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Arizona. Uber reached a settlement with the pedestrian’s family within weeks, but there was still a lingering chance the company could face criminal charges for her death. Now, it doesn’t seem like that will happen. On Tuesday, prosecutors said they found “no basis for criminal liability” for Uber — possib

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Scientists discover what the Milky Way weighs

Most accurate measurement yet includes stars, dust, gas, planets and black hole Astronomers have hauled the Milky Wa y on to a cosmic scale of sorts, and found that our galaxy has as much mass as 1.5tn suns, give or take a few. The measurement, the most accurate yet, covers all the stars and planets, dust and gas, and the supermassive black hole that sits at the centre. It alone comes in at 4m ti

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Chemical hydrogen storage system

Hydrogen is a highly attractive, but also highly explosive energy carrier, which requires safe, lightweight and cheap storage as well as transportation systems. Scientists have now developed a chemical storage system based on simple and abundant organic compounds. The liquid hydrogen carrier system has a high theoretical capacity and uses the same catalyst for the charging-discharging reaction.

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Spectroscopy on individual molecules

While spectroscopic measurements are normally averaged over myriad molecules, a new method provides precise information about the interaction of individual molecules with their environment. This will accelerate the identification of efficient molecules for future photovoltaic technologies, for example.

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When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum

Researchers have developed a simple method that could turn ordinary semiconducting materials into quantum machines — superthin devices marked by extraordinary electronic behavior that could help to revolutionize a number of industries aiming for energy-efficient electronic systems — and provide a platform for exotic new physics.

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Scientists engineer mouse 'smart house' to study behavior

Researchers have developed a 'smart house' for mice, that allows them to study the animals' behavior with minimal disturbance for periods of up to 18 months.

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Digital child (on the future of AI)

Memory is the very core of human identity. All the experiences that I had and the life narrative that I choose to tell forms the reality of the current “me”. It is common knowledge that most humans don’t remember themselves or what they did until they turn 3.5 years old. The reasoning for that is the inability to speak and express your story in words and symbols. The presence of language determin

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Goodyear unveils Aero tyre for flying cars of the future

submitted by /u/jayliquori [link] [comments]

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When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum

Researchers have developed a simple method that could turn ordinary semiconducting materials into quantum machines — superthin devices marked by extraordinary electronic behavior that could help to revolutionize a number of industries aiming for energy-efficient electronic systems — and provide a platform for exotic new physics.

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New target for chronic pain relief confirmed by scientists

A research group has observed a potential new target for chronic pain treatment. Further research using this receptor could lead to new, more effective drugs to use in pain-relieving treatment for chronic pain.

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Debate on predator-prey relationships

Experts have shed new light on the relationship between predators and their prey after studying how elk responded to the risk posed by grey wolves in an American national park.

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Largest-ever study identifies gene regions associated with sleep duration

A study has identified 76 new gene regions associated with sleep duration.

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Purdue researchers develop innovative, more cost-effective method to make drugs

The Food and Drug Administration wants the pharmaceutical industry to get away from making drugs using the traditional batch method, saying the continuous process allows manufacturers to more easily scale operations to meet demand and should help reduce drug shortages. David H. Thompson, a Purdue University chemistry professor, has written a research paper about how to make a generic form of lomus

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Scientists find mystery killer whales off Cape Horn, Chile

In January 2019, an international team of scientists working off the tip of southern Chile got their first live look at what might be a new species of killer whale. Called Type D, the whales 'could be the largest undescribed animal left on the planet.'

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US Civil War-era tunnels and buildings found under Alcatraz prison

Civil War-era fortifications have been discovered just below the prison's recreation yard, a study shows.

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Why do we sleep? Scientists find brain repair mechanism

How does sleep act in the brain, at the cellular level? A new study in zebrafish identifies and explains the beneficial effects of slumber.

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Expert: SpaceX Just Made Russia’s Space Program “Null and Void”

Null and Void Russia’s space program is in trouble. SpaceX successfully launched its passenger spacecraft to the International Space Station this past weekend. And that’s bad news for Russia: astronauts from all corners of the Earth have been relying on Russian Soyuz spacecraft to get to the International Space Station ever since the end of NASA’s Space Shuttle program in 2011 — with Russia reapi

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The Battle Against One of the Worst Ebola Epidemics Ever Is in Trouble

The head of Doctors Without Borders said outside groups, including hers, had alienated Congo residents, prompting communities to spurn treatment and even attack medical centers.

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Scientists engineer mouse 'smart house' to study behavior

Researchers have developed a 'smart house' for mice, that allows them to study the animals' behavior with minimal disturbance for periods of up to 18 months.

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Increasingly complex mini-brains

Scientists improved the initial steps of a standard protocol and produced organoids displaying regionalized brain structures, including retinal pigmented cells.

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What Solange’s When I Get Home Shares With Stevie Wonder’s Most Esoteric Album

Last week, the eclectic, Houston-born musician Solange Knowles released her first studio album since 2016’s landmark A Seat at the Table . Titled When I Get Home , the record was accompanied by a film of the same name. The project, meditative and balmy, channels the singer’s roots to soothing effect. It’s a recursive love letter to Houston’s geography, the city’s musical pioneers, and the legacie

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Meet 'The Blobs': Two Continent-Size Mountains in Earth's Deep Mantle That Nobody Understands

There's a continent-size mystery lurking near the heart of the Earth.

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Violence in Congo Threatens Fight Against Ebola

After attacks on two Ebola treatment centers in Democratic Republic of Congo last week, Doctors Without Borders says public health workers are "failing" to control the epidemic.

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9 Questions for Facebook After Zuckerberg’s Privacy Manifesto

On Wednesday, Mark Zuckerberg laid out a vision for a very different Facebook—with a lot of unknowns about how to get there.

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How to prevent the 'robot apocalypse' from ending labor as we know it

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Breakthrough could enable cheaper infrared cameras

A new breakthrough by scientists with the University of Chicago may one day lead to much more cost-effective infrared cameras — which in turn could enable infrared cameras for common consumer electronics like phones, as well as sensors to help autonomous cars see their surroundings more accurately.

6h

Opioid misuse sending more older adults to emergency departments, study finds

Emergency department (ED) visits by people age 65 and older who were identified with opioid misuse and dependence more than tripled between 2006 and 2014, according to new research published by researchers at Towson University. The study also discovered that opioid misuse was associated with an increased number of chronic conditions, greater injury risk, and higher rates of alcohol dependence and

6h

New graphene-based device is first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors

Researchers in the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have developed a unique new device using the wonder material graphene that provides the first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors to detect diseases at the molecular level with near perfect efficiency.

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Tropical Cyclone Haleh weakening in NASA-NOAA satellite imagery

Tropical Cyclone Haleh continues to weaken while being battered by outside winds. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured an image the elongated storm.

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SHANK3: the good, the bad and the hopeful

New approach brings a better understanding of Phelan-McDermid syndrome and SHANK3.

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Gay and lesbian spaces in the city becoming more diverse, not going away

Gay and lesbian spaces in cities are dispersing and diversifying rather than disappearing, new University of British Columbia research has found. A common perception is that major urban centers have just one, singular gay neighborhood — or 'gayborhood' — where all gay people live, but the UBC research shows that LGBTQ people are increasingly living in 'cultural archipelagos' beyond the gayborhoo

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Study finds nonprofit partnerships can help solve bureaucratic tangles

Many nonprofit organizations steer clear of large, public-serving agencies due to concerns about becoming entangled in bureaucratic red tape. But new research suggests that some nonprofits may be able to better serve their constituents by partnering with public institutions in order to navigate the bureaucracy and access services more efficiently.

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Study: Democracy fosters economic growth

A new study co-authored by an MIT economist shows that when it comes to growth, democracy significantly increases development. Indeed, countries switching to democratic rule experience a 20 percent increase in GDP over a 25-year period, compared to what would have happened had they remained authoritarian states, the researchers report.

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Embryos' signals take multiple paths

Bioscientists uncover details about how embryonic stem cells respond to the collection of signals that direct their differentiation into blood, bone and tissue. They found two critical signaling pathways are treated differently by cells.

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Japan puts plans for the world’s next big particle collider on hold

The jury is still out on whether Japan will host the world’s first “Higgs factory” — the International Linear Collider.

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To Sleep With Anger Is a Masterpiece From an Overlooked Film Pioneer

To Sleep With Anger begins with a shot of a middle-aged African American man named Gideon (played by Paul Butler) dressed in his Sunday best: a crisp light-blue suit. On the table beside him are a bowl of fruit and a fading picture of a woman from another time. She’s looking sternly at the camera while he looks off into the middle distance. The fruit catches fire, followed by the table leg, then

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Japanese government punts on decision to host the International Linear Collider

Education ministry says it will continue seeking support from Japan’s scientific community

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Smart gear that’ll make your life easier

Gadgets Intelligent home devices I’m all about. Intelligent and "Smart Home" gear that'll make your life easier.

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Something fishy: study alleges fraud in US seafood labeling

One in five fish sold in America may be mislabeled, according to a report Thursday by an NGO that tested samples from several hundred markets and restaurants and alleged fraud runs through the entire fisheries supply chain.

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Culture Wars in the Lab

Scientists tend to embrace diversity in principle, but in practice it’s not always so easy to do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Do rural populations experience greater worry and fatalism about cancer?

Researchers will answer that question today at the Society of Behavioral Medicine's 40th Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions.People living in rural areas are more likely to have ambiguous beliefs and fears about getting cancer, as well as more fatalistic viewpoints than urban dwellers, reports a research team from Mayo Clinic.

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Something fishy: study alleges fraud in US seafood labeling

One in five fish sold in America may be mislabeled, according to a report Thursday by an NGO that tested samples from several hundred markets and restaurants and alleged fraud runs through the entire fisheries supply chain.

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Germany to require suppliers of 5G networks be 'trustworthy'

German authorities published a list of security requirements for telecoms networks Thursday, amid concerns about the possible involvement of China's Huawei in future 5G infrastructure.

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Stressing and straining: Geochemists answer fundamental question of mineral reactions

For geoscientists, looking at how minerals react in different conditions can provide a great deal of information about the characteristics of the materials that make up our world. In some cases, merely exposing minerals to water-based environments can yield interesting properties and results.

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Experiences With Phenotypic Screening?

Very little blogging time today, but I wanted to throw a question out to the readership instead. I’m at the Keystone conference on Phenotypic Drug Discovery, so here’s a relevant topic: what are your own experiences with phenotypic screening? Background for those outside the field: broadly speaking, you can sneak up on a drug by two big routes. If you have an idea of a particular target (protein,

6h

Facebook's vision of future? Looks like Chinese app WeChat

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is taking the social media company in a new direction by focusing on messaging. Chinese tech giant Tencent got there years ago with its app WeChat.

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Tesla: New Supercharger Features Will Cut Charge Time in Half

Fastest Charge Tesla apparently wants drivers to spend more time on the road and less time charging their vehicles. On Wednesday, the company announced several improvements to its Superchargers and vehicle software that it claims will work together to cut the time drivers spend charging their vehicles by 50 percent — and says the new upgrade “enables our vehicles to charge faster than any other e

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Does iron oxide turn blue icebergs green?

Scientists have come up with a new idea to explain a decades-long mystery: why some Antarctic icebergs are emerald green rather than the normal blue. Pure ice is blue because ice absorbs more red light than blue light. Most icebergs appear white or blue when floating in seawater, but since the early 1900s, explorers and sailors have reported seeing peculiar green icebergs around certain parts of

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I Quit My Job to Protest My Company’s Work on Killer Robots

submitted by /u/I_For_One_ [link] [comments]

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Cars are killing us. Within 10 years, we must phase them out

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Quiz: Do you know these great women of science?

For International Women's Day, test your knowledge of great scientists past and present

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Ancient Mass Child Sacrifice Discovered in Peru May Be World's Largest

The remains of nearly 140 children dating to the year 1450 have been unearthed along the northern coast of Peru. Archaeologists say the burial is the site of the largest known mass child sacrifice in the world. The children — as well as the remains of more than 200 young llamas — were found in a mass grave located on a cliff just a thousand feet from the Pacific Ocean in the small, present-day fis

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Stressing and straining: Geochemists answer fundamental question of mineral reactions

In a new study from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, scientists placed small iron oxide particles in an acidic solution, causing a reaction at the surface as iron atoms oxidized. As the reaction progressed, the researchers observed strain that built up and penetrated inside the mineral particle.

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'Meta-mirror' reflects sound waves in any direction

Researchers at Duke University have constructed a 'meta-mirror' device capable of perfectly reflecting sound waves in any direction. The proof-of-principle demonstration is analogous to looking directly into a mirror and only seeing the person next to you instead of your own face.

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When coral reefs change, researchers and local communities may not see eye to eye

Ecologists and local fishing populations may perceive major environmental shifts in fundamentally different ways.

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50 is the new 40 for safe childbirth, according to Ben-Gurion U. researchers

'It turns out that 50 is the new 40 when it comes to childbirth,' according to Dr. Sheiner. 'There is no doubt that medical teams will need to handle increasing numbers of birth for women over age 50.'

6h

Less-invasive procedure helps surgeons pinpoint epilepsy surgical candidates

A minimally invasive procedure to determine whether patients with drug-resistant epilepsy are candidates for brain surgery is safer, more efficient, and leads to better outcomes than the traditional method, according to new research by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

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How antifreeze proteins make ice crystals grow

Bacteria, plants, insects, or even fish use antifreeze proteins to protect themselves from the cold. The proteins block the growth of ice crystals. In a new study, a German-Israeli research team has confirmed that these proteins also possess an unusual second property: at low temperatures, they can promote rather than inhibit the growth of ice crystals.

6h

Culture Wars in the Lab

Scientists tend to embrace diversity in principle, but in practice it’s not always so easy to do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Daily briefing: Why science needs philosophy

Daily briefing: Why science needs philosophy Daily briefing: Why science needs philosophy, Published online: 07 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00815-5 Let’s get together to think better, phage therapy makes a comeback and why dinosaurs just had one (very) bad day.

6h

The Only Democrat Running to Challenge Trump on National Security

Democrats running for president have been so busy talking about how they’d change the country that they’ve barely talked about protecting it. They’re campaigning in Iowa and New Hampshire on health care and climate change. Reparations have become an issue. Meanwhile, the Afghan War is in its 18th year, President Donald Trump has gone from withdrawing U.S. forces in Syria to maybe changing his min

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When science inspires awe, people get curious

Feeling awe leads to greater awareness of the things we don’t know, which in turn makes us more likely to seek out a framework to fill those gaps, according to a new study. “The joy of science lies in pondering the magnificent and seeking answers to the unknown,” writes Jonathon McPhetres, a PhD candidate in psychology at the University of Rochester, and the author of a study in the journal Cogni

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'Undruggable' Parkinson's molecule spills its secrets

UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a strategy for targeting a key molecule implicated in Parkinson's disease, opening up a potential new treatment strategy for the currently incurable movement disorder.

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Using laser 'tweezers,' scientists grab and study tiny protein droplets

University at Buffalo physicists are using innovative tools to study the properties of a bizarre class of molecules that may play a role in disease: proteins that cluster together to form spherical droplets inside human cells.

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'Undruggable' Parkinson's molecule spills its secrets

UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a strategy for targeting a key molecule implicated in Parkinson's disease, opening up a potential new treatment strategy for the currently incurable movement disorder.

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New photography approach gives traditional cameras ultra-high imaging speeds

Researchers have developed a new imaging method that can capture images at speeds of up to 1.5 million frames per second using standard imaging sensors typically limited to 100 frames per second. This new technology will make it possible to capture extremely fast events for applications such as biomedical research or slow-motion scenes in a film.

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Chemical hydrogen storage system

Hydrogen is a highly attractive, but also highly explosive energy carrier, which requires safe, lightweight and cheap storage as well as transportation systems. Scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, have now developed a chemical storage system based on simple and abundant organic compounds. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the liquid hydrogen carrier system has a hi

7h

Hubble and Gaia accurately weigh the Milky Way

In a striking example of multi-mission astronomy, measurements from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the ESA Gaia mission have been combined to improve the estimate of the mass of our home galaxy the Milky Way: 1.5 trillion solar masses.

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Women’s first NIH grants tend to be $41K less

First-time women principal investigator scientists receive considerably less funding from the National Institutes of Health than their male peers do, even at top research institutions, according to a new study. Previous research showed women receive lower startup funds from their universities to launch their research, but this is the first study to show women get less money when they submit grant

7h

The Melting Arctic Is Covering Itself in a Warm Layer of Clouds

The Arctic autumn is getting cloudier. That's bad news.

7h

Reality Dating TV Still Has Some Growing Up to Do

Netflix's 'Dating Around' is a step in the right direction—but the genre has a long way to go.

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Using laser 'tweezers,' scientists grab and study tiny protein droplets

Physicists are using innovative tools to study the properties of a bizarre class of molecules that may play a role in disease: proteins that cluster together to form spherical droplets inside human cells. A new study sheds light on the conditions that drive such droplets to switch from a fluid, liquidy state to a harder, gel-like state.

7h

Changes are needed in teaching medical residents how to communicate patient handoffs

End-of-shift handoffs are complex interactions influenced by many factors, and changes need to be made to prepare medical residents to successfully execute the transitions. A team of research scientists highlighted the challenges and provided guidance on creating a systematic approach to teaching and carrying out transfers of care.

7h

Trilobites: Squid Share a Colorful Trick With Peacocks

With its skin using multiple strategies, the cephalopod becomes a chameleon of the ocean.

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NASA Snaps Stunning Photos of Hypersonic Aircraft

Any aircraft traveling faster than the speed of sound generates a pressure front that surrounds the frame and forces surrounding air out of the way. Now we can visualize it. The post NASA Snaps Stunning Photos of Hypersonic Aircraft appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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The People Who Eat the Same Meal Every Day

Vern Loomis, a retired structural draftsman in West Bloomfield, Michigan, had a standard office lunch: a peanut-butter sandwich, with various fruit, vegetable, and dessert accompaniments. He ate this, he estimates, nearly every workday for about 25 years. His meal underwent slight modifications over time—jelly was added to the sandwich in the final five or so years—but its foundation remained the

7h

Zuckerberg: Facebook is Building a Machine to Read Your Thoughts

Facebook Mind Reader According to CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook aims to access information about its users not just through their smartphones and computers, but directly from their brains as well. In a recent interview at Harvard University with Harvard law school professor Jonathan Zittrain, Zuckerberg bragged about technology the social giant is working on that could one day allow users to navi

7h

New research on the role of connectomics in brain development

Researchers are analyzing brain connectomes to understand how normal and abnormal interactions between functional brain networks affect healthy brain development and contribute to disorders such as epilepsy.

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What does the Milky Way weigh? Hubble and Gaia investigate

We can't put the whole Milky Way on a scale, but astronomers have been able to come up with one of the most accurate measurements yet of our galaxy's mass, using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite.

7h

New photography approach gives traditional cameras ultra-high imaging speeds

Researchers have developed a new imaging method that can capture images at speeds of up to 1.5 million frames per second using standard imaging sensors typically limited to 100 frames per second.

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Peeling back the data: NYS apple industry has larger economic impact

A Cornell University team has found that the economic impact of the apple industry in New York State is 21 percent larger than traditional models suggest. Researchers used the apple industry as a case study to test a new — more precise — framework for economic impact analysis.

7h

'Undruggable' Parkinson's molecule spills its secrets

UC San Francisco researchers have for the first time developed a strategy for targeting a key molecule implicated in Parkinson's disease, opening up a potential new treatment strategy for the currently incurable movement disorder.

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Major mutation pattern in cancer occurs in bursts

Researchers have created a huge resource for investigating the biological mechanisms that cause cancer. Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute identified the patterns of DNA damage — mutational fingerprints that represent the origins of cancer — present in over a thousand human cancer cell lines. They revealed that a major mutation pattern found in human cancer, occurred in bursts in canc

7h

Vitamin B3 analogue boosts production of blood cells

Scientists from EPFL and the UNIL/Ludwig Cancer Research have found that supplementing diet with nicotinamide riboside, an analogue of vitamin B3, boosts the production of blood cells by improving the function of their stem cells. This can help overcome problems in stem cell-based therapies that treat leukemia and aggressive lymphomas.

7h

Potential new treatment for heart attack

Scientists have found a potential new drug for treating the heart damage caused by a heart attack by targeting the way the heart reacts to stress, according to new research published in the journal, Cell Stem Cell and part-funded by the British Heart Foundation. The research team used stem cells to grow heart tissue and mimic a 'heart attack in a dish,' and were able to block the chemical signals

7h

Is dry eye disease associated with migraine headaches?

Dry eye disease is when tears can't adequately lubricate the eyes and patients may feel a stinging, burning or scratchy sensation. This study looked at whether there is association between dry eye disease and migraine headaches.

7h

How common is persistent opioid use after plastic, reconstructive surgery?

This study examined how common persistent opioid use was after plastic and reconstructive surgery procedures of the nose, eye, breast, abdomen and soft tissue.

7h

High-speed, 3D microscope captures stunning videos of fruit fly nerve cells in action

Columbia engineers and neuroscientists have joined forces to create 3D videos of individual nerve cells moving, stretching and switching on inside fruit fly larvae as they move. Data gleaned from these videos reveals how nerve cells called proprioceptive neurons work together to help the body sense where it is in space. To accomplish this feat, the researchers harnessed SCAPE, a cutting-edge micro

7h

Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV

A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus, a major cause of infant mortality worldwide, has been developed through computer design. Animal tests suggest the vaccine could provide potent, durable protection against RSV. The vaccine is being further developed for possible clinical trials. The nanoparticle platform will also be used to design potential vaccine

7h

Crystal-clear view of a key neuronal receptor opens door for new, targeted drugs

One of the most important protein signaling systems that controls neuronal guidance consists of the cell surface receptor 'Robo' and its cognate external guidance cue 'Slit.' The deficit of either of these proteins results in defects in brain structure and function.Researchers have now discovered the intricate molecular mechanism that allows the guidance receptor 'Robo' to react to signals in its

7h

Researchers discover a new mechanism used by bacteria to evade antibiotics

Antibiotics survival mechanism: UC San Diego researchers have discovered an unexpected mechanism that allows bacteria to defend themselves against antibiotics, a surprise finding that could lead to retooled drugs to treat infectious diseases. When under attack by antibiotics, bacteria were found to modulate magnesium ion uptake in order to stabilize their ribosomes — the fundamental molecular mac

7h

Spørg Fagfolket: Kan man tatovere med frugtfarve?

En læser vil gerne vide, om man kan bruge frugtfarve til at tatovere med. Det svarer Dansk Tatovør Laug på.

7h

Luxurious Space Hotel Will Import Water Instead of Recycling Pee

Space Hotel The people behind a would-be space hotel called Aurora Station say the space tourism getaway will spare no expense, according to a new BBC feature — it’ll even import its own water from Earth, so that guests won’t be forced to drink recycled urine like astronauts do on the International Space Station. The project, by a startup called Orion Span, has a hyper-ambitious vision for sellin

7h

Okay, Maybe Proofs Aren't Dying After All

Two experts argue that proofs are doing fine, contrary to a controversial 1993 prediction of their impending demise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Colonial legacies hobble progress on disease

Ethical problems arise when outsiders sweep in and out of health emergencies

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Ripple effect: Study reveals NYS apple industry's true economic impact

Economic development boards and policymakers often have to make tough decisions when trying to boost the economy of rural areas. Should they give the green light to, say, a manufacturing plant? Or would an agricultural operation, like a milk processing plant, better jump-start the local economy?

7h

Scientists engineer mouse 'smart house' to study behavior

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have developed a 'smart house' for mice, that allows them to study the animals' behaviour with minimal disturbance for periods of up to 18 months.

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Scientists discovered 103 beetles on one island, and got to name them all

Animals It's up to you whether that's a feature or a bug. Just as Michael Jordan is basketball's greatest player of all time, and Serena Williams is tennis’ , Alexander Riedel is the GOAT of finding, identifying, and naming…

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Scientists engineer mouse 'smart house' to study behavior

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have developed a 'smart house' for mice, that allows them to study the animals' behaviour with minimal disturbance for periods of up to 18 months.

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Design treatment of advanced metals producing better sculpting

Most people may not realize it but they encounter products made with exotic or advanced metals every day.

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Deep-sea mining: vital resource or environmental disaster

submitted by /u/Thefriendlyfaceplant [link] [comments]

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Next Gen VR demo showcasing finger tracking and improved physics.

submitted by /u/TransPlanetInjection [link] [comments]

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High-speed, 3-D microscope captures stunning videos of fruit fly nerve cells in action

Columbia engineers and neuroscientists have joined forces to create 3-D videos of individual nerve cells moving, stretching and switching on inside fruit fly larvae as they move. Data gleaned from these videos reveals how nerve cells called proprioceptive neurons work together to help the body sense where it is in space. To accomplish this feat, the researchers harnessed SCAPE, a cutting-edge micr

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Researchers discover a new mechanism used by bacteria to evade antibiotics

As bacteria continue to demonstrate powerful resilience to antibiotic treatments—posing a rising public health crisis involving a variety of infections—scientists continue to seek a better understanding of bacterial defenses against antibiotics in an effort to develop new treatments.

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Crystal-clear view of a key neuronal receptor opens door for new, targeted drugs

During brain development, billions of neuron nerve cells must find their accurate pathway in the brain in order to form trillions of neuronal circuits enabling cognitive, sensory and emotional wellbeing. To achieve this remarkable precision, migrating neurons use special protein receptors that sense the environment around them and guide the way so these neurons and their long extensions stay on th

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The most powerful woman you've never heard of | T. Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison

Everyone's heard of Martin Luther King Jr. But do you know the woman Dr. King called "the architect of the civil rights movement," Septima Clark? The teacher of some of the generation's most legendary activists — like Rosa Parks, Diane Nash, Fannie Lou Hamer and thousands more — Clark laid out a blueprint for change-making that has stood the test of time. Now T. Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison

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Hubble & Gaia accurately weigh the Milky Way

In a striking example of multi-mission astronomy, measurements from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the ESA Gaia mission have been combined to improve the estimate of the mass of our home galaxy the Milky Way: 1.5 trillion solar masses.

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VA study evaluates quality indicators for hormone therapy in menopausal women

Improvements are needed in VA's prescribing of hormone therapy for menopausal women veterans, concludes a study in the Journal for Healthcare Quality, the peer-reviewed journal of the National Association for Healthcare Quality. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Three ways studying organic chemistry changes the brain

A new study from Carnegie Mellon University researchers using multiple imaging modalities shows that learning scientific information results in changes in the actual structure of memory-related areas of the brain, changes due to the encoding of the new information in these memory-related brain areas, and changes in the coordination among the network nodes that jointly contain the new information.

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High-speed, 3-D microscope captures stunning videos of fruit fly nerve cells in action

Columbia engineers and neuroscientists have joined forces to create 3-D videos of individual nerve cells moving, stretching and switching on inside fruit fly larvae as they move. Data gleaned from these videos reveals how nerve cells called proprioceptive neurons work together to help the body sense where it is in space. To accomplish this feat, the researchers harnessed SCAPE, a cutting-edge micr

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Researchers discover a new mechanism used by bacteria to evade antibiotics

As bacteria continue to demonstrate powerful resilience to antibiotic treatments—posing a rising public health crisis involving a variety of infections—scientists continue to seek a better understanding of bacterial defenses against antibiotics in an effort to develop new treatments.

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Crystal-clear view of a key neuronal receptor opens door for new, targeted drugs

During brain development, billions of neuron nerve cells must find their accurate pathway in the brain in order to form trillions of neuronal circuits enabling cognitive, sensory and emotional wellbeing. To achieve this remarkable precision, migrating neurons use special protein receptors that sense the environment around them and guide the way so these neurons and their long extensions stay on th

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Inside the ant lab: Mutants and social genes

Inside the ant lab: Mutants and social genes Inside the ant lab: Mutants and social genes, Published online: 07 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00776-9 An unusual ant species is helping researchers understand the complex behaviour of social insects.

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How AI and satellites could help predict volcanic eruptions

How AI and satellites could help predict volcanic eruptions How AI and satellites could help predict volcanic eruptions, Published online: 07 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00752-3 Emerging monitoring methods will allow scientists to keep an eye on many more volcanoes.

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Återhämta dig – på arbetstid

Lina Ejlertssons avhandlingsarbete handlar om återhämtning för personal i en av de mest stressande arbetsmiljöerna – vårdcentralerna. Hon menar att vi har en viss mängd energi som antingen töms eller fylls på under arbetsdagen. – Jag vill gärna kunna se på mitt jobb och min fritid på samma sätt. Man gör saker som man tycker om att göra, med människor man trivs med, säger Lina Ejlertsson, doktoran

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Deep brain stimulation sites for OCD target distinct symptoms

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) reduces symptoms of severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) during stimulation of either the ventral capsule (VC) or anteromedial subthalamic nucleus (amSTN), according to a new study.

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Antibiotics and PPIs linked to increased risk of infectious diarrhea in children

Prior antibiotic exposure and use of acid suppressing medications known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk for hospitalized children to contract dangerous Clostridioides difficile infections, according to a new study.

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Growing evidence: Water as a potential treatment for inherited cause of kidney failure

People with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) could benefit from a moderate increase in water intake, according to new research.

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Star Wars and Asterix characters amongst 103 beetles new to science from Sulawesi, Indonesia

A total of 103 new species of weevils are added to the genus Trigonopterus from Sulawesi whereas. Prior to the study, there had only been a single species from this group documented on the Indonesian island. Having remained undercover due to their tiny size (2-3 mm) and close superficial resemblance, a team of scientists managed to identify the novel species thanks to modern DNA analyses.

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New 'acoustic metamaterial' cancels sound

Researchers have demonstrated it's possible to silence noise using an open, ringlike structure, created to mathematically perfect specifications, for cutting out sounds while maintaining airflow.

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Politics this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Business this week

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To cut calories overall, pick dessert first

Choosing an indulgent dessert at the start of your meal may lead you to pick healthier meal options, according to new research. Researchers conducted four experiments, both in a cafeteria and on a mock food-delivery website, to see if choosing a healthy or unhealthy dessert at the beginning of a meal would influence participants’ main and side dish selections. The researchers placed indulgent des

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Solcelleejere vil gemme strømmen

PLUS. Lagringskapacitet til solceller er en gamechanger for elmarkedet, og udviklingen er i fuld gang i USA. I Danmark kommer der fart på inden for få år, mener brancheforening.

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Disruptive technology may change the whisk(e)y industry

Decent grog will take days to make, instead of years

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In the cyber break-in stakes, the champion is Russia

Russian computer hackers are seven times faster than North Koreans

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A Dragon visits the ISS

This time, the crew is a dummy. Next time, people will be on board

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A cheap way to protect coffee crops from boring beetles

Build bridges to predatory ants’ nests using string

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Spacecrafts’ solar panels can serve double-duty as sails

Sometimes they used air molecules. Sometimes sunlight

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ESA helps firms large and small prosper in global satcom market

Hundreds of space companies in Europe and Canada—ranging from small and medium-sized enterprises to international consortia—have boosted their business by partnering with ESA.

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Be nice to your doctor — you may receive better care

Two new studies from a Tel Aviv University researcher find that positive interactions with patients drive improved medical team performance under most conditions, but positive interactions with professional superiors had no significant effect.

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Chemical hydrogen storage system

Hydrogen is a highly attractive, but also highly explosive energy carrier, which requires safe, lightweight and cheap storage as well as transportation systems. Scientists at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, have now developed a chemical storage system based on simple and abundant organic compounds. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the liquid hydrogen carrier system has a hi

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Stars exploding as supernovae lose their mass to companion stars during their lives

Stars over eight times more massive than the sun end their lives in supernovae explosions. The composition of the star influences what happens during the explosion.

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How well do vaccines work? Research reveals measles vaccine efficacy

'What we found was a bit of a shock — there are a very small number of studies that test whether vaccines are effective across multiple pathogen doses …' said Langwig.

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Design treatment of advanced metals producing better sculpting

A Purdue University team created a method for applying a designer surface-active agent to the surface of a metal to make it easier to cut and shape the material into parts and pieces.

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Promising new drug shows potential to stop progression of sepsis

Research into a new breakthrough therapy in the fight against sepsis has shown that the drug has potential to stop all sepsis-causing bacteria from triggering organ damage in the early stages of the condition.

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At the limits of detectability

While spectroscopic measurements are normally averaged over myriad molecules, a new method developed by researchers at the Technical University of Munich provides precise information about the interaction of individual molecules with their environment. This will accelerate the identification of efficient molecules for future photovoltaic technologies, for example.

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Pioneering research to deliver person-centred care

Researchers have developed a way to help people with progressive conditions receive better person-centred care. From overcoming loneliness and dealing with depression, to coping with financial problems and knowing what to expect in the future – the team identified a range of areas that patients need extra support with. They then created an intervention tool to help them express these needs to heal

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Antibiotics and PPIs linked to increased risk of infectious diarrhea in children

Prior antibiotic exposure and use of acid suppressing medications known as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk for hospitalized children to contract dangerous Clostridioides difficile infections, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

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Deep brain stimulation sites for OCD target distinct symptoms

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) reduces symptoms of severe obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) during stimulation of either the ventral capsule (VC) or anteromedial subthalamic nucleus (amSTN), according to a study in Biological Psychiatry.

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Embryos' signals take multiple paths

Rice University bioscientists uncover details about how embryonic stem cells respond to the collection of signals that direct their differentiation into blood, bone and tissue. They found two critical signaling pathways are treated differently by cells.

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Increasingly complex mini-brains

Scientists improved the initial steps of a standard protocol and produced organoids displaying regionalized brain structures, including retinal pigmented cells. The announcement was published today in BMC Developmental Biology by the D'Or Institute for Research and Education's team.

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Scientists engineer mouse 'smart house' to study behavior

Researchers have developed a 'smart house' for mice, that allows them to study the animals' behavior with minimal disturbance for periods of up to 18 months.

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How Imagination Will Save Our Cities – Issue 70: Variables

In Kim Stanley Robinson’s 2017 science-fiction novel New York 2140 , the city of the future has become a vertical super-Venice, after being flooded by rising seas caused by global warming melting the Arctic ice caps.1 While the lower stories of many of Manhattan’s skyscrapers have been overtaken by the sea, residents continue to live in those above, accessing them via boathouses and pontoons. A t

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Cloudy With a Chance of War – Issue 70: Variables

The burial detail, which had come for the corpses in the pigpen, was surprised. The “dead” were getting up and speaking English. Qu’est-ce que c’est? Ah, they were an ambulance crew. British volunteers, in the trenches with the French Army on the Western Front. In the ruins and wreckage near the front lines, they’d found nowhere else to sleep. The medical corpsmen were all pacifists, serving huma

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Star Wars and Asterix characters amongst 103 beetles new to science from Sulawesi, Indonesia

The Indonesian island of Sulawesi has been long known for its enigmatic fauna, including the deer-pig (babirusa) and the midget buffalo. However, small insects inhabiting the tropical forests …

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New study informs debate on predator-prey relationships

Experts have shed new light on the relationship between predators and their prey after studying how elk responded to the risk posed by grey wolves in an American national park.

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Trump Settles on His Reelection Message

In his marathon speech to a gathering of conservative activists last weekend, Donald Trump unloaded more than 16,000 words, according to the official White House transcript. But amid all the meandering and asides, the belittling taunts (“Little Shifty Schiff” for Democratic Representative Adam Schiff) and geysers of grievance, Trump may have synthesized the essence of his reelection strategy in j

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Saying Goodbye to the Most Beloved Father in Riverdale

Generation X wasn’t supposed to have icons. Of course, we wound up with plenty of them anyway—Whitney Houston, Kurt Cobain, Tupac Shakur, Heath Ledger. A humbler one showed up on our television screens in 1990 in the form of Luke Perry, who rolled into the cast of the teen drama Beverly Hills, 90210 like a James Dean–haired thundercloud. With smoldering looks and a poetic soul, Perry’s character,

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Tech That Can “Detect Emotion” Could Keep You From Getting a Job

Mixed Emotions Machines may not have emotions, but that doesn’t mean they can’t recognize them. At least, that’s one well-funded belief in the tech industry. From startups to big-name players such as Amazon and Microsoft , a number of tech companies are now offering “emotion analysis” products, which are systems designed to analyze a person’s face in order to determine how they’re feeling — thoug

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Artificial intelligence must know when to ask for human help

Artificial intelligence systems are powerful tools for businesses and governments to process data and respond to changing situations, whether on the stock market or on a battlefield. But there are still some things AI isn't ready for.

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ATLAS releases first result using full LHC Run 2 dataset

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is currently shut down for a major two-year upgrade programme. However, LHC researchers are busy analysing the large dataset they have collected during the machine's second run (Run 2), which took place between 2015 and 2018. The ATLAS collaboration at CERN has now released its very first result based on this dataset. The result sets bounds on so-called grand unifie

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New study informs debate on predator-prey relationships

Experts have shed new light on the relationship between predators and their prey after studying how elk responded to the risk posed by grey wolves in an American national park.

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Galaxy Simulations Offer a New Solution to the Fermi Paradox

As far as anyone knows, we have always been alone. It’s just us on this pale blue dot, “home to everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of,” as Carl Sagan so memorably put it. No one has called or dropped by. And yet the universe is filled with stars, nearly all those stars have planets, and some of those planets are surely livable. So where is everybody? The Italian physici

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Mosquito-Borne Disease Could Threaten Half the Globe by 2050

Environmental change, urbanization and human movement are helping mosquitos spread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Largest-ever study identifies gene regions associated with sleep duration

A study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the University of Exeter Medical School has identified 76 new gene regions associated with sleep duration.

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When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum

A team of researchers led by DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a simple method that could turn ordinary semiconducting materials into quantum machines — superthin devices marked by extraordinary electronic behavior that could help to revolutionize a number of industries aiming for energy-efficient electronic systems — and provide a platform for exotic new physics.

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New study informs debate on predator-prey relationships

Experts have shed new light on the relationship between predators and their prey after studying how elk responded to the risk posed by grey wolves in an American national park.

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The role of intuition in music performance

PHENICX, a project of the European Commission's 7th Framework Programme coordinated by Emilia Gómez, a researcher with the Musical Technology Research Group of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies at UPF, has attempted to create new digital experiences to enrich the experience of a classical music concert (before, during and after the concert itself) from different areas in

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Ocean life in 3D: Mapping phytoplankton with a smart AUV

Phytoplankton form the base of the marine food chain but are notoriously difficult for scientists to account for — a little like trying to identify and count motes of dust in the air. A truly independent underwater vehicle shows it can do the job.

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The calypso caliphate: How Trinidad and Tobago became an ISIS recruiting hotspot

Research from the University of Kent has shed new light on individuals from Trinidad and Tobago that have traveled to Iraq and Syria to join ISIS since 2013, finding that they do not conform to the stereotypical Western view of an ISIS fighter.

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Women are more successful at crowdfunding than men, says ESMT Berlin study

Women have higher success rates at crowdfunding scientific projects than men, according to new research from ESMT Berlin. The study suggests that the 'crowd' may apply different decision-making criteria than traditional funding agencies.

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Insects in decline: On farmland, latecomers lose out

Wild bees in Europe are in trouble — more than 50 percent of local species are now classified as endangered. Recent findings by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet researchers indicate that, in farming areas, species that emerge in late summer are most acutely threatened.

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BU researchers develop 'acoustic metamaterial' that cancels sound

Boston University researchers, Xin Zhang, a professor at the College of Engineering, and Ghaffarivardavagh, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, released a paper in Physical Review demonstrating it's possible to silence noise using an open, ringlike structure, created to mathematically perfect specifications, for cutting out sounds while maintaining airflow.

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Two for the price of one: Mechanistic insights lead to drug repositioning

A University of Tsukuba-led team confirmed that the binding of the cancer-promoting protein stratifin to phosphorylated SKP1 prevents the formation of a ubiquitinating enzyme complex. This hinders the degradation of several oncoproteins, which promotes lung adenocarcinogenesis. The team then used in silico, in vitro, and in vivo analyses to identify and test drugs that inhibit this binding, with t

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Potential treatment for cancer in butterfly disease

New research lays foundation for upcoming clinical trial for patients with epidermolysis bullosa.

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Barn till ekonomiskt utsatta EU-migranter saknar tydlig rätt till vård

— Svensk lagstiftning tar inte hänsyn till att de här barnen lever i vårt land. Den oklara lagstiftningen vi har är problematisk utifrån Barnkonventionen. Ett minimikrav borde vara att alla barn som lever i vårt land har rätt till subventionerad akutvård, säger bokens författare, Kavot Zillén, doktor i medicinsk rätt och universitetslektor vid Juridiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet. EU-m

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36 tornadoes confirmed in deadly Southeast outbreak

The number of tornadoes confirmed to have touched down in a deadly weekend outbreak across the Southeast has risen to at least 36.

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When semiconductors stick together, materials go quantum

A team of researchers led by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has developed a simple method that could turn ordinary semiconducting materials into quantum machines—superthin devices marked by extraordinary electronic behavior. Such an advancement could help to revolutionize a number of industries aiming for energy-efficient electronic systems—and prov

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Top jobs still don't come with top pay for top women

As we mark International Women's Day in Australia there is sure to be some celebration of progress.

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Racial bias matters on crowdfunding sites like Indiegogo, Kickstarter, and GoFundMe

When it comes to success on a crowdfunding site, race matters.

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Crucial milestone for critically endangered bird

A team led by a conservation biologist from the University of Kent has successfully re-located threatened Seychelles paradise flycatchers (Terpsiphone corvina) to a different island to help prevent their extinction.

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Why So Many Americans Are Turning to Buddhism

Dressed in flowing gold robes, the bald female meditation teacher told us to do nothing. We were to sit silently in our plastic chairs, close our eyes, and focus on our breath. I had never meditated, but I’d gone to church, so I instinctively bowed my head. Then I realized, given that this would last for 15 minutes, I should probably find a more comfortable neck position. This was the first of tw

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Crucial milestone for critically endangered bird

A team led by a conservation biologist from the University of Kent has successfully re-located threatened Seychelles paradise flycatchers (Terpsiphone corvina) to a different island to help prevent their extinction.

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Star Wars and Asterix characters amongst 103 beetles new to science from Sulawesi, Indonesia

The Indonesian island of Sulawesi has been long known for its enigmatic fauna, including the deer-pig (babirusa) and the midget buffalo. However, small insects inhabiting the tropical forests have remained largely unexplored.

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Microplastic pollution widespread in British lakes and rivers, study shows

New research by Bangor University and Friends of the Earth has found microplastic pollution in some of Britain's most iconic and remote rivers and lakes.

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Psychologist examines the effects of ethnic and political conflict on Israeli and Palestinian youth

Paul Boxer is a Professor of Psychology and Senior Fellow in the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University–Newark who studies the development, prevention and treatment of violent and nonviolent antisocial behavior, particularly among youths involved in the juvenile justice system.

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New optical imaging system could be deployed to find tiny tumors

Researchers have developed a near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging system that could enable them to find tiny tumors, as small as a couple of hundred cells, deep within the body.

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Star Wars and Asterix characters amongst 103 beetles new to science from Sulawesi, Indonesia

The Indonesian island of Sulawesi has been long known for its enigmatic fauna, including the deer-pig (babirusa) and the midget buffalo. However, small insects inhabiting the tropical forests have remained largely unexplored.

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Valve removes 'Rape Day' video game from Steam amid sexual assault outcry

The controversial game advertised scenes involving 'violence, sexual assault, non-consensual sex, obscene language, necrophilia, and incest'

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Political division can actually help us work together better

Collaborations that bridge the political spectrum produce higher-quality work than articles that moderate or one-sided teams edit, according to a new study of more than 200,000 Wikipedia pages. Many studies have found that political polarization in the United States is rapidly increasing, particularly online, where echo chambers and social media have inflamed partisanship. “…when we’re able to wo

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DeepMind is asking how Google helped turn the internet into an echo chamber

Researchers found that the more accurately a recommendation engine pegs your interests, the faster it traps you in an information bubble.

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New target for chronic pain relief confirmed by scientists

A research group at Hiroshima University observed a potential new target for chronic pain treatment. Further research using this receptor could lead to new, more effective drugs to use in pain-relieving treatment for chronic pain.

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Child's elevated mental ill-health risk if mother treated for infection during pregnancy

Risks for autism and depression are higher if one's mother was in hospital with an infection during pregnancy. This is shown by a major Swedish observational study of nearly 1.8 million children.

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Crucial milestone for critically endangered bird

A team led by a conservation biologist from the University of Kent has successfully relocated threatened Seychelles paradise flycatchers (Terpsiphone corvina) to a different island to help prevent their extinction.Four females and two males were caught on Denis Island and taken to Curieuse Island, where they joined 11 males and nine females who were moved there from La Digue Island at the end of l

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Elucidating cellular responses to force

Accumulated evidence suggests that physical force plays an important role in various developmental processes of fertilized animal eggs. During embryogenesis, a variety of cell populations actively migrate and change their positions, generating various types of force (e.g., traction force, compression force) that influence the properties of surrounding tissues. This in turn enables normal developme

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Australian study shows specialist clinics are cost-effective for chronic wound care

A study published in PLOS ONE by academics in Australia and the UK, shows that specialist wound management clinics are the most cost-effective route for the care of chronic wounds with better results for patients.

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Tiny DNA reader to advance development of anticancer drugs

Researchers at Osaka University have developed a novel method to determine exactly where anticancer drug molecules are incorporated into microscopic strands of DNA. By passing an electrical current between two tiny probes across a strand of DNA, the researchers successfully distinguished drug molecules from normal DNA bases, pinpointing the insertion sites. This technique will allow researchers to

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OpenAI’s Eerily Realistic New Text Generator Writes Like a Human

Trying to understand how new technologies will shape our lives is an exercise in managing hype. When technologists say their new invention has the potential to change the world, you’d hardly expect them to say anything else. But when they say they’re so concerned about its potential to change the world that they won’t release their invention, you sit up and pay attention. This was the case when O

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Gamma ray telescopes could detect starships powered by black hole

In the course of looking for possible signs of extra-terrestrial intelligence (ETI), scientists have had to do some really outside-of-the-box thinking. Since it is a foregone conclusion that many ETIs would be older and more technologically advanced than humanity, those engaged in the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) have to consider what a more advanced species would be doing.

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It's not (just) about the money. How R&D funds are spent matters, too

Research funding is a hot topic in Indonesia at the moment. The CEO of Bukalapak, an Indonesian e-commerce unicorn, recently criticised the government's lack of investment in R&D, prompting an invitation from the palace.

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The bioeconomy: Delivering sustainable green growth?

A recently published book from Italian academic Davide Viaggi of Bologna University takes an in depth look at the bioeconomy from an economic and policy perspective – as well as identifying key issues ahead.

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Rare butterfly species more abundant in older, wider seismic lines

Seismic lines—used to measure underground oil reserves in Northern Alberta—seem to be good for butterflies, including one rare species.

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Catching Fish in the Alaskan Tundra | Naked and Afraid

With one day until extraction, Laura and Steven are desperate to find one last meal in Alaska. Stream Full Episodes of Naked and Afraid: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/naked-and-afraid/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NakedandAfraid https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NakedAndAfraid

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Rare butterfly species more abundant in older, wider seismic lines

Seismic lines—used to measure underground oil reserves in Northern Alberta—seem to be good for butterflies, including one rare species.

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Trump Just Gave Himself More Power to Kill in Secret

After seven years spent presiding over many hundreds of secretive, extrajudicial CIA killings, President Barack Obama signed a 2016 executive order intended to increase transparency and reduce the “tragic” deaths of civilians. The order required the release each May 1 of the number of drone strikes undertaken by the United States “against terrorist targets outside areas of active hostilities,” al

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The decluttering trend could be a good thing for the environment

In the Netflix series "Tidying Up," Japanese organization specialist and author Marie Kondo helps people pare down clutter and create more orderly spaces. The show has inspired thousands of viewers to rethink how they fold T-shirts and toss belongings that don't "spark joy."

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Deep diving robots find warming accelerating in South Pacific Ocean waters

New research analyzing data from deep-diving ocean robots and research cruises shows that the coldest, near-bottom South Pacific waters originating from Antarctica are warming three times faster than they were in the 1990s.

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Opening the black box of dendritic computing

How do nerve cells compute? This fundamental question drives LMU neurobiologists led by Andreas Herz. They have now presented a novel method to disentangle complex neural processes in a much more powerful way than was previously possible.

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Researchers turn liquid metal into a plasma

Most laypersons are familiar with the three states of matter as solids, liquids, and gases. But there are other forms that exist. Plasmas, for example, are the most abundant form of matter in the universe, found throughout our solar system in the sun and other planetary bodies. Scientists are still working to understand the fundamentals of this state of matter, which is proving to be ever more sig

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Viljan att ta risker kan förändras när livet skakar

I biståndsarbete är det viktigt att förstå de bakomliggande faktorer som har betydelse för hur framgångsrika olika projekt blir. I en ny avhandling i nationalekonomi vid Uppsala universitet har kvinnors och mäns, äldres och yngres, hög- och lågutbildades attityder till risk undersökts före, under och efter en dramatisk händelse. Kunskapen kan bidra till att öka möjligheterna att göra rätt insats

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Disorder left ancient human relative with teeth pocked like golf balls

Pockmarked chompers were surprisingly common in the species

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Opening the black box of dendritic computing

How do nerve cells compute? This fundamental question drives LMU neurobiologists led by Andreas Herz. They have now presented a novel method to disentangle complex neural processes in a much more powerful way than was previously possible.

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Why extinct species seem to be returning from the dead

Like something out of a zombie movie, species that were once thought extinct seem to be rising from the dead. Between February 21 and March 4 2019, three notable rediscoveries were announced – the Fernandina Island Galápagos tortoise (Chelonoidis phantasticus), which was last seen in 1906; Wallace's giant bee (Megachile pluto), which had supposedly disappeared in 1980; and the Formosan clouded leo

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Rain may be causing a worrying amount of ice to melt in Greenland

Even in winter, rain is becoming more common across Greenland’s ice sheet, and it may be playing an important role in rising sea levels

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How one small village in Germany reinvented itself to ensure its survival

How can communities living together in rural areas be developed to ensure that they continue to exist and thrive? Much emphasis has been placed on innovation within urban areas. However, new research shows that rural communities can also play a pivotal role in generating solutions for sustainability. Using the village of Heckenbeck in southern Lower Saxony as an example, researchers from the Unive

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Why extinct species seem to be returning from the dead

Like something out of a zombie movie, species that were once thought extinct seem to be rising from the dead. Between February 21 and March 4 2019, three notable rediscoveries were announced – the Fernandina Island Galápagos tortoise (Chelonoidis phantasticus), which was last seen in 1906; Wallace's giant bee (Megachile pluto), which had supposedly disappeared in 1980; and the Formosan clouded leo

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Violent crime: Decades of research shows punishing 'risky' young people does not work – here's what does

Violent crime among young people has reached a worrying high in parts of the UK over recent years. There's been a year-on-year increase in knife offences committed by young people since March 2014. In 2017/18 alone, there were more than 100 knife-related homicides with victims under 24 years old. London, in particular, has experienced a surge in knife-related incidents in 2019.

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Using tiny organisms to unlock big environmental mysteries

When you hear about the biological processes that influence climate and the environment, such as carbon fixation or nitrogen recycling, it's easy to think of them as abstract and incomprehensibly large-scale phenomena. Yet parts of these planet-wide processes are actually driven by the tangible actions of organisms at every scale of life, beginning at the smallest: the microorganisms living in the

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Using tiny organisms to unlock big environmental mysteries

When you hear about the biological processes that influence climate and the environment, such as carbon fixation or nitrogen recycling, it's easy to think of them as abstract and incomprehensibly large-scale phenomena. Yet parts of these planet-wide processes are actually driven by the tangible actions of organisms at every scale of life, beginning at the smallest: the microorganisms living in the

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How to prevent the 'robot apocalypse' from ending labor as we know it

It seems not a day goes by without the appearance of another dire warning about the future of work.

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Automated disease detection in maize

Maize is perhaps the single, most-important cereal crop in the world. It is consumed by millions of people and is a staple for a large proportion of the global population. It is also used for animal feed and its total production far outstrips rice and wheat. It is also converted into other edible products such as corn syrup and corn starch as well as useful, but inedible products, like bioethanol.

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Data-driven modeling and AI-based image processing to improve production

At Hannover Messe 2019, Fraunhofer FIT will present data-driven modeling supporting production planning and optimizing resource utilization. The models help to understand and optimize complex processes, and can be used as predictive tools. In addition, we demo a system that uses AI-based image processing to monitor and evaluate, in real time, the situation and behavior of people, e.g. in a product

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Under the ice

Using the word summer to refer to Greenland is an insult to the idea of summer.

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Feline superheroes assemble to investigate tummy trouble

The Thundercats have nothing on this team of feline heroes.

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SWIM project maps potential sources of Mars water

Missions carrying humans to Mars will require on-site resources, and a project led by Planetary Science Institute (PSI) scientists Nathaniel Putzig and Gareth Morgan is mapping the availability of potential shallow water-ice sources across the surface of the Red Planet.

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New research could revolutionise fiber-optic communications

A team of researchers from the University of St Andrews has achieved a breakthrough in the measurement of lasers which could revolutionise the future of fiber-optic communications.

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It's raining on the Greenland ice — in the winter

Rainy weather is becoming increasingly common over parts of the Greenland ice sheet, triggering sudden melting events that are eating at the ice and priming the surface for more widespread future melting, says a new study. Some parts of the ice sheet are even receiving rain in winter — a phenomenon that will spread as climate continues to warm, say the researchers.

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Scientists teach machines to predict recovery time from sports-related concussions

Deciding when an athlete can return to the game after a head injury makes managing the treatment of sports-related concussions very complicated. Scientists are teaching machines how to predict recovery time from sports-related concussions based on symptoms like headache, dizziness and fatigue. Results from their study can be used as the foundation for a decision support system that would help clin

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Probing water's skin

Electrosprays of water cannot reliably probe the air-water interface.

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Researchers look to nature to unearth the secrets of cyclic imine cleavage

University of Tsukuba researchers have shown that enzymes can degrade cyclic imines. By isolating an enzyme able to degrade harmaline — a β-carboline alkaloid — from a soil microorganism, they identified the enzyme as copper amine oxidase and suggested a two-step mechanism for the process. It is hoped that the general applicability of the mechanism that was demonstrated will make this fundamenta

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Zero-emission diesel combustion using a non-equilibrium-plasma-assisted MnO2 filter

A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University have used ozone from an atmospheric-pressure non-equilibrium plasma together with the desulfurization catalyst MnO 2 to almost completely eliminate NO x and SO x from diesel exhaust gas at a low temperature of 473 K. This research shows that ozone can be used to remove not only SO x but also NO x from fossil fuel combustion exhaust streams.

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Shifting away from coal is key to cutting greenhouse gas emissions, PSU study finds

The United States could fulfill its greenhouse gas emission pledge under the Paris Climate Agreement by virtually eliminating coal as an energy source by 2024, according to new research from Portland State University.

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Star Wars and Asterix characters amongst 103 beetles new to science from Sulawesi, Indonesia

A total of 103 new species of weevils are added to the genus Trigonopterus from Sulawesi whereas. Prior to the study, there had only been a single species from this group documented on the Indonesian island. Having remained undercover due to their tiny size (2-3 mm) and close superficial resemblance, a team of scientists managed to identify the novel species thanks to modern DNA analyses. The stud

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Growing evidence: water as a potential treatment for inherited cause of kidney failure

People with polycystic kidney disease (PKD) could benefit from a moderate increase in water intake, according to new research.

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Feline superheroes assemble to investigate tummy trouble

The Thundercats have nothing on this team of feline heroes.

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Insects in decline—on farmland, latecomers lose out

The pollination services provided by wild bees are indispensable, not only for ecological but also for eminently economic reasons. However, over half of the more than 500 wild bee species found in Germany are either at risk of extinction, or have already died out in certain areas. On the basis of an analysis of changes in the Red List status of threatened species, researchers led by Ludwig-Maximil

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One of the last two Blockbusters in the world is closing down

Right now, there are just two Blockbusters left: one in the US and one in Australia. But the latter of these, located in the Perth suburb of Morley, is closing its doors forever at the end of …

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Treasure trove of new insects discovered on island

Meet Yoda, one of 103 new insect species discovered in remote forests on the island of Sulawesi.

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Early Europeans hunted hard-to-catch small game

Fleet of foot and lean of meat, rabbits are difficult to hunt and offer little sustenance. Yet research published in Science Advances by Trent University associate professor of Anthropology Dr. Eugene Morin has shown that they were frequently part of the diet of early humans and Neanderthals in the northwestern Mediterranean as far back as 400 hundred thousand years ago.

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Tricks of the trade – how slick websites and apps make borrowing easy

Payday loan companies design their websites and apps specifically to stop users dropping out of the application process, research led by Newcastle University experts has revealed.

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Ocean life in 3-D: Mapping phytoplankton with a smart AUV

Phytoplankton form the base of the marine food chain but are notoriously difficult for scientists to account for—a little like trying to identify and count motes of dust in the air. A truly independent underwater vehicle shows it can do the job.

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Insects in decline—on farmland, latecomers lose out

The pollination services provided by wild bees are indispensable, not only for ecological but also for eminently economic reasons. However, over half of the more than 500 wild bee species found in Germany are either at risk of extinction, or have already died out in certain areas. On the basis of an analysis of changes in the Red List status of threatened species, researchers led by Ludwig-Maximil

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Tiny DNA reader to advance development of anticancer drugs

DNA is small. Really, really, small. So, when researchers want to study the structure of a single-stranded DNA, they can't just pull out their microscopes: they have to get creative.

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SpaceX Dragon 2 set for nail-biting landing – here's the rocket science

If all goes to plan, a fiery Dragon will light up the sky over the Atlantic before hopefully cooling off with a watery splashdown on March 8. The SpaceX Dragon 2 capsule is of enormous significance for spaceflight as it has just become the first commercial vehicle to automatically dock with the International Space Station (ISS), and aims to carry astronauts there in a few months. Now it faces one

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Embryos' signals take multiple paths

Rice University scientists have found significant differences between the methods signaling pathways use to prompt cells to differentiate – that is, whether to become organs, bone, blood vessels, nerves or skin.

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Tiny DNA reader to advance development of anticancer drugs

DNA is small. Really, really, small. So, when researchers want to study the structure of a single-stranded DNA, they can't just pull out their microscopes: they have to get creative.

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Embryos' signals take multiple paths

Rice University scientists have found significant differences between the methods signaling pathways use to prompt cells to differentiate – that is, whether to become organs, bone, blood vessels, nerves or skin.

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Goodyear to unveil concept tires for flying cars at Geneva motor show

Goodyear isn't just prepping for self-driving cars—it's getting ready for ones that fly.

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Spider dragline silk as torsional actuator driven by humidity for applications as artificial muscle

Spider silk is a self-assembling biopolymer with hydrogen bonds underlying its chemical structure, yet despite weak chemical bonding it outperforms most materials relative to mechanical performance. The biopolymer is produced from the spider major ampullate gland and is an extraordinary fiber that can surpass most synthetic materials in mechanical toughness by balancing strength and extension/flex

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Closing the gender gap in the life sciences is an uphill struggle

The world is celebrating the 108th International Women's Day. The first rallies were held in Austria, Germany, Denmark and Switzerland on March 19, 1911, and focused on women's right to vote, work and hold public office.

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Gøtzsche åbner institut for uafhængig forskning

Peter Gøtzsche etablerer i samarbejde med en række forskere et nyt institut for uafhængig forskning. Instituttet skal forbedre ærlighed og integritet i videnskaben, siger Gøtzsche.

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Alle fem regioner er nu overgået til det nye landspatientregister

Landets fem regioner er nu alle overgået til den nye version af Landspatientregisteret. Region Nordjylland foretog, som en af de sidste, opdateringen i weekenden og det forløb ganske udramatisk.

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Riskærs sundhedsordfører: Sundhedsvæsnet skal tilføres milliarder

Bevillingerne til sundhedsvæsnet skal vokse med to pct. om året, afgifterne på alkohol og tobak skal op, og der skal skrues ned for bureaukratiet, mener partiet Klaus Riskær Pedersen. Det siger nyudnævnt sundhedsordfører Søren Søfelt, der har en baggrund som læge.

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New optical imaging system could be deployed to find tiny tumors

Researchers have developed a near-infrared fluorescent optical imaging system that could enable them to find tiny tumors, as small as a couple of hundred cells, deep within the body.

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A television in the bedroom?

Spending too much time watching TV in their room can harm preschoolers' development, a new study finds.

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Chances for life expand when passing stars push binaries together

Planetary systems can be harsh environments in their early history. Now astronomers find one positive of this tumultuous period; a model looks at how the habitable zone — the region around a star where the temperature allows liquid water to exist — changes around pairs of stars, so-called binary systems.

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Bullying bosses negatively impact employee performance and behavior

Employees bullied by their bosses are more likely to report unfairness and work stress, and consequently become less committed to their jobs or even retaliate, according to a new study.

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Green spaces can help you trust strangers

Simple, inexpensive urban design interventions can increase well-being and social connections among city residents, finds a new case study.

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New surprises from Jupiter and Saturn

The latest data from the giant planets has sent researchers back to the drawing board. Cassini orbited Saturn for 13 years before its dramatic final dive into the planet's interior, while Juno has been orbiting Jupiter for two and a half years; the data collected has been 'invaluable but also confounding,' said one of the researchers.

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Shifting away from coal is key to cutting greenhouse gas emissions, study finds

The United States could fulfill its greenhouse gas emission pledge under the Paris Climate Agreement by virtually eliminating coal as an energy source by 2024, according to new research from Portland State University.

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Luftens kemi under lupp

En typ av aerosoler kallas sekundära organiska aerosoler (se faktaruta). Partiklarna som ingår i dessa system bildas när flyktiga organiska ämnen, från exempelvis växtlighet eller vägtrafik, oxideras i atmosfären. När detta händer kan befintliga partiklar öka i storlek och nya partiklar kan bildas. De sekundära organiska aerosolerna kan ge negativa hälsoeffekter, försämra luftkvalitén och påverka

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Ökad risk för psykisk ohälsa om mamma vårdats för infektion under graviditeten

– Resultaten av vår studie tyder på att det kan finnas anledning att förebygga och förhindra infektion under graviditeten så långt som möjligt, exempelvis genom att följa rekommendationerna för influensavaccinering, konstaterar Verena Sengpiel, docent i obstetrik och gynekologi vid Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet, och sistaförfattare till studien som är publicerad i tidskriften JAMA P

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I Høje taastrup printer de elektronik med nanoblæk af kobber

Teknologisk Institut skal stå i spidsen for en stor europæisk innovationshub for printet elektronik, hvor industrielle inkjet-printere bruges til at fremstille små elektrisk ledende komponenter på papirstynde overflader.

9h

Researchers aiming to cure spina bifida get a step closer to their goal

Researchers on the path to finding a cure for spina bifida have identified specific elements in stem cell secretions as key to protecting neurons and ultimately reducing the lower-limb paralysis associated with the birth defect. The team will use the results to optimize the neuroprotective qualities of a stem cell treatment they developed that improves mobility in lab animals and dogs with spina b

9h

Forgotten fathers: New dads also at risk for postpartum depression

UNLV study provides an in-depth look at new fathers' experiences with PPD.

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Using tiny organisms to unlock big environmental mysteries

Biological processes that influence climate and the environment, such as carbon fixation or nitrogen recycling are parts of these planet-wide processes are actually driven by the tangible actions of organisms at every scale of life, beginning at the smallest: the microorganisms living in the air, soil, and water. And now Berkeley Lab researchers have made it easier than ever to study these microbi

9h

Scientists teach machines to predict recovery time from sports-related concussions

Deciding when an athlete can return to the game after a head injury makes managing the treatment of sports-related concussions very complicated. A team of scientists are teaching machines how to predict recovery time from sports-related concussions based on symptoms like headache, dizziness and fatigue. Results from their study can be used as the foundation for a decision support system that would

9h

SGLT-2 inhibitors work by inducing a fasting state that triggers metabolic benefits

This research shows how SGLT-2 inhibitors induce a fasting state that triggers many metabolic benefits, including lowering of blood glucose, weight loss, a reduction of fat accumulation in the liver and reduced body fat.

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Proof of pimple: Mouse model validates how 'good' and 'bad' bacteria affect acne

Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine generated a new mouse model that mimics human acne for the first time, and used it to validate the concept of 'good' and 'bad' acne bacteria and introduce new possibilities for targeted treatments and vaccines.

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Using precision medicine, researchers discover cause and treatment for specific lung disease

Researchers have identified that dysfunction of a specific immune cell, called B cells, underlies lung disease that affects patients with the rare immunological disorder known as common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Therapeutically targeting these B cells improved the lung disease in all patients they treated. This was the largest study ever conducted for treatment of CVID lung disease.

9h

It's raining on the Greenland ice — in the winter

Rainy weather is becoming increasingly common over parts of the Greenland ice sheet, triggering sudden melting events that are eating at the ice and priming the surface for more widespread future melting, says a new study. Some parts of the ice sheet are even receiving rain in winter — a phenomenon that will spread as climate continues to warm, say the researchers.

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Hurricane Maria had a significant impact on HIV care outcomes

Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico had a significant impact on HIV outcomes among people living with HIV and a history of substance use, particularly increased viral load and decreased CD4 counts. The average viral load following the Hurricane was significantly (11 percent) higher compared to the pre-Hurricane Maria viral load assessment.

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How the Microbiome Could Be the Key to New Cancer Treatments

The effectiveness of drugs that help the immune system fight cancer cells appears to depend on bacteria in the gut

9h

Would you trust a robot to mind your child?

With an anticipated 39.5 million domestic/household robots expected to be in our homes by 2021 (IFR, 2018), Cranfield University is calling for members of the public to comment on a survey launched to identify people's views on robot ethics.

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Researchers create 'smart steel,' 30% stronger

Researchers from South Ural State University are working on producing an innovative, super-light, and super-strong kind of steel called bainite. This new material has potential applications in the aviation industry, mechanical engineering and the defence industry.

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Even bubbly pop music contains lots of violence

Pop music lyrics contain the same amount of violent content as rap and hip-hop, research finds. Unlike hip-hop and rap music, which get the bulk of public criticism for harsh lyrics, antagonistic lyrics in pop music might be harder for listeners to pinpoint. The researchers suggest that parents can help their children and teens unpack tricky lyrics by having discussions about what they hear on th

9h

Nissan Leaf EV First to Pass 400,000 Sales, but Tesla Model 3 Topped 2018

For Nissan, slow and steady with the Leaf is the way to go with 400,000 sales so far, and possibly 100K global sales year in 2019. Meanwhile, Tesla is riding the wave of Model 3 popularity. The post Nissan Leaf EV First to Pass 400,000 Sales, but Tesla Model 3 Topped 2018 appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Remote Play Brings PlayStation 4 Games To iOS

The PlayStation Vita may be out of its misery at last with no portable PlayStation successor in sight, but that doesn’t mean Sony is totally abandoning the idea of handheld gaming. The most …

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Climate change: Rain melting Greenland ice sheet 'even in winter'

The sheer volume of ice covering Greenland means its fate has global repercussions.

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Ultra-low power chips help make small robots more capable

An ultra-low power hybrid chip inspired by the brain could help give palm-sized robots the ability to collaborate and learn from their experiences. Combined with new generations of low-power motors and sensors, the new application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) — which operates on milliwatts of power — could help intelligent swarm robots operate for hours instead of minutes.

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Conservation model benefits both ecological and economic needs of Great Salt Lake

In the United States, the Great Salt Lake in Utah is home to a multimillion-dollar brine shrimp industry, which collects and sells brine shrimp cysts, or eggs, as a food source for prawn farming around the world. However, the GSL and brine shrimp are also a key resource for waterbirds during migration and nesting. To balance the needs of the animals and the industry that rely on brine shrimp cysts

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Rain is melting Greenland’s ice, even in winter, raising fears about sea level rise

Earth’s warming climate is causing clouds to drop rain instead of snow, study says

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It's raining on the Greenland ice—in the winter

Rainy weather is becoming increasingly common over parts of the Greenland ice sheet, triggering sudden melting events that are eating at the ice and priming the surface for more widespread future melting, says a new study. Some parts of the ice sheet are even receiving rain in winter—a phenomenon that will spread as climate continues to warm, say the researchers. The study appears this week in the

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Millisecond pulsar PSR J0740+6620 has a white dwarf companion with helium atmosphere, study suggests

A new study published February 28 on arXiv.org suggests that a millisecond pulsar known as PSR J0740+6620 has a stellar companion. The research provides evidence indicating that this object is most likely accompanied by an ultracool white dwarf exhibiting a pure helium atmosphere.

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Conservation model benefits both ecological and economic needs of Great Salt Lake

In the United States, the Great Salt Lake in Utah is home to a multimillion-dollar brine shrimp industry, which collects and sells brine shrimp cysts, or eggs, as a food source for prawn farming around the world. However, the GSL and brine shrimp are also a key resource for waterbirds during migration and nesting. To balance the needs of the animals and the industry that rely on brine shrimp cysts

9h

The 'Green New Deal' contradiction – it may actually boost carbon emissions

The Green New Deal has broadened imaginations worldwide on the subject of climate change, encouraging people to consider what action to tackle it could do for society. U.S. congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez announced the Green New Deal resolution in February 2019, calling for a rapid transition to net zero greenhouse gas emissions, a massive investment in infrastructure and financial redistri

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Médecins Sans Medicine? “Homeopaths without borders” giving sugar pills for infectious diseases in Honduras

Canadian homeopaths are in Honduras, and claim their magic water remedies can prevent diseases such as Chagas, dengue, and chikungunya.

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Queen shares digital milestone with royal Instagram followers

Monarch posted image of 1843 Charles Babbage letter to Prince Albert during Science Museum visit on Thursday The Queen has proved she is in touch with the touch screen by sharing her first Instagram post in the latest personal technological milestone of her lengthy reign. The 92-year-old monarch shared an archive image to the 4.6 million followers of @theRoyalFamily’s Instagram account during a v

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Probing water's skin

From the wind-whipped surface of the open ocean, to trillions of tiny water drops in clouds, the air-water interface—water's skin— is the site for crucial natural processes, including ocean-atmosphere exchange and cloud acidification. The air-water interface has even been postulated as the cradle of life. However, factors such as its subnanometer size and dynamic nature, render the investigation o

9h

How viruses outsmart their host cells

Viruses depend on host cells for replication, but how does a virus induce its host to transcribe its own genetic information alongside that of the virus, thus producing daughter viruses? For decades, researchers have been studying a type of bacteriophage known as lambda to try and find an answer to this question. Using high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, a research group from Charité – Unive

9h

How viruses outsmart their host cells

Viruses depend on host cells for replication, but how does a virus induce its host to transcribe its own genetic information alongside that of the virus, thus producing daughter viruses? For decades, researchers have been studying a type of bacteriophage known as lambda to try and find an answer to this question. Using high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, a research group from Charité – Unive

10h

Programming in crayon

Electronic devices can spark kids' creativity, says Stéphane Magnenat from the Game Technology Center. But doing so requires apps that bridge the real and virtual worlds.

10h

Special surface manipulation forces dropped liquids to spiral when they rebound

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has found a way to force liquid drops to spiral as they rebound after landing on a manipulated surface. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes how their method works and possible applications.

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How species improve their success

Researchers Pim Edelaar at Pablo de Olavide University (Seville, Spain) and Daniel Bolnick at the University of Connecticut (U.S.) have developed a classification of the ways that species can improve their success in relation to their environment. This theoretical framework is a conceptual tool that helps to understand and contemplate the total range of options that an organism has to relate to it

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UK considers post-Brexit research fund open to world

UK considers post-Brexit research fund open to world UK considers post-Brexit research fund open to world, Published online: 07 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00808-4 The government will assess whether a UK granting scheme could help make up for lost EU research funding.

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Brusten hjärna ger brustet hjärta

Att sorg eller stark stress kan leda till att hjärtat brister och för tidig död har varit känt länge. Nu har forskare upptäckt en trolig förklaring. Stressen hindrar hjärnans olika delar från att kommunicera med varandra.

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How species improve their success

Researchers Pim Edelaar at Pablo de Olavide University (Seville, Spain) and Daniel Bolnick at the University of Connecticut (U.S.) have developed a classification of the ways that species can improve their success in relation to their environment. This theoretical framework is a conceptual tool that helps to understand and contemplate the total range of options that an organism has to relate to it

10h

Google Is Rewarding Users With In-App Items For Watching Ads

These days in-app purchases are a pretty common feature to see not just in games, but other apps as well where it could come in the form of unlocking additional features or purchasing …

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1 + 1 does not equal 2 for graphene-like 2-D materials

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Be braiNY in the Big Apple

Brain Awareness Week begins on Monday, and partners all around the world have been working hard coordinating events and activities—now it’s up to you to attend! If you live in the New York City area, our good friends at braiNY, the Greater NYC Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience, have put together a diverse series of events happening throughout the month of March. The BioBus will be parked up

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Hvis kvinden scorer 11 har hun sandsynligvis fødselsdepression

Forskere fra Københavns Universitets Center for Tidlig Indsats og familieforskning sikrer, at…

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How important is reciprocity for climate policy?

The Paris Agreement relies on voluntary and therefore weak commitments. But contrary to popular belief, if some countries "free-ride", this does not undermine the commitment of others, writes Thomas Bernauer.

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Messages of stewardship affect Christians' attitudes about climate change, study finds

Christians' attitudes toward the environment and climate change are shaped by whether they hold a view of humans as having stewardship of the Earth or dominion over the planet, and reading material from religious sources advocating a stewardship interpretation can increase their concern for environmental issues, a new study found.

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Study suggests giant sloth did not make it to Holocene

A team of researchers from the National University of Central Buenos Aires, Olavarría, Stafford Research and La Brea Tar Pits and Museum, has found evidence that suggests the giant sloth went extinct before the onset of the Holocene. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the team describes their study of giant sloth remains found in Argentina and what they found.

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Herlev og Gentofte Hospital har fået ny professor i pædiatri

Overlæge Klaus Bønnelykke er tiltrådt som professor i pædiatri, hvor han skal have særligt fokus på børneastma.

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E-cigarettes linked to heart attacks, coronary artery disease and depression

Concerns about the addictive nature of e-cigarettes — now used by an estimated 1 out of 20 Americans — may only be part of the evolving public health story surrounding their use, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session. New research shows that adults who report puffing e-cigarettes, or vaping, are significantly more likely to have

10h

Getting a flu shot while hospitalized lowers the chance of a heart attack

There's now another reason to get your yearly flu shot. Not only can it protect you from the body aches, fever and fatigue associated with a bout of influenza, it may even prevent you from having a heart attack, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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A nap a day keeps high blood pressure at bay

It seems that napping may do more than just reboot our energy level and improve our mood. New research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session found that people who took advantage of a midday snooze were more likely to have a noticeable drop in blood pressure compared with those who didn't nap.

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Heart attacks increasingly common in young adults

Even though fewer heart attacks are occurring in the US — in large part due to the use of medications like statins and a decline in smoking — these events are steadily rising in very young adults. New data not only validate this trend but also reveal that more heart attacks are striking those under age 40, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual

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Moderate alcohol consumption linked with high blood pressure

A study of more than 17,000 US adults shows that moderate alcohol consumption — seven to 13 drinks per week — substantially raises one's risk of high blood pressure, or hypertension, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Coal ash, earthquakes, and other hazards posed by fossil fuels

Environment There seems to be no end to the ways fossil fuels can harm us. A new study found that 91 percent of coal plants surveyed across the United States were contributing unsafe levels of pollutants to groundwater as well. It’s an example…

10h

Could waste materials insulate buildings?

The University of Bath is testing a number of waste materials to assess their thermal performance as potential materials for insulating buildings.

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Researchers find vast gains in productivity after countries democratize

As long as democracy has existed, there have been democracy skeptics—from Plato warning of mass rule to contemporary critics claiming authoritarian regimes can fast-track economic programs.

10h

Belfast Shows the Price of Brexit

BELFAST , Northern Ireland—If Monty Python ever produced an updated “What has the EU ever done for us?” sketch, Belfast would be as good a place as any to situate it. If any place in the British Isles risks being thrust into an economic and political crisis by impending Brexit, Belfast is that place. Three weeks before the United Kingdom’s scheduled exit from the European Union, I took a guided t

10h

Bad Dreams Are Good

Luci Gutiérrez W hat are dreams for? A handful of theories predominate. Sigmund Freud famously contended that they reveal hidden truths and wishes. [ 1 ] More recent research suggests that they may help us process intense emotions, [ 2 ] or perhaps sort through and consolidate memories, [ 3 ] or make sense of random neuron activity, [ 4 ] or rehearse responses to threatening situations. [ 5 ] Oth

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In fiction, young people choose traditional love and gender stereotypes

Fictional television series can have an influence on the construction of young people's identities and values. In relation to the depiction of love in television series, young people express a preference for traditional gender stereotypes, reveals a study conducted to identify gender and love stereotypes displayed by young people compared to those they prefer in fictional television series in thre

10h

Researchers describe the emergence of a coronal mass ejection from mini flux tubes

[VID=55657]Coronal mass ejections originating from the sun and propagating through interplanetary space are responsible for turbulent space weather. They can have severe effects on Earth, leading to disturbances in air traffic or even causing power outages. Astrid Veronig from the Institute of Physics and Kanzelhöhe Observatory for Solar and Environmental Research of the University of Graz studies

10h

Sea ice plays pacemaker role in abrupt climate change

A new study looking at variations in past sea ice cover in the Norwegian Sea found the shrinkage and growth of ice was instrumental in several abrupt climate changes between 32,000 and 40,000 years ago.

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Finding dark matter in the dark

Dark matter is the mysterious material that holds the Universe together, yet no one has seen it; or heard, smelled, tasted or touched it either.

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Older people can feel left behind by new technology – so we built a device especially for them

Only 20% of over-75s in the UK have a smartphone compared to 95% of 16-to-24-year-olds. Digital technologies change fast, become obsolete quickly and usually need you to spend a bit of time learning how to use them. This helps explain why most older adults tend to use what they know best when it comes to communicating, which usually means a phone call via a landline or basic mobile, instead of a q

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Coating graphene with wax makes for a less contaminated surface during device manufacturing

To protect graphene from performance-impairing wrinkles and contaminants that mar its surface during device fabrication, MIT researchers have turned to an everyday material: wax.

10h

Tropical forests naturally regrow quickly, but without species variety

Tropical forests are threatened by high levels of deforestation, mostly driven by agricultural expansion. But, once agricultural fields are abandoned, they tend to naturally regrow, leading researchers to ask whether that process reverses species loss and brings native species back.

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Tropical forests naturally regrow quickly, but without species variety

Tropical forests are threatened by high levels of deforestation, mostly driven by agricultural expansion. But, once agricultural fields are abandoned, they tend to naturally regrow, leading researchers to ask whether that process reverses species loss and brings native species back.

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Zuckerberg’s new privacy essay shows why Facebook needs to be broken up

Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t understand what privacy means—he can’t be trusted to define it for the rest of us.

10h

Controlling pressure-driven ionic flow by voltage at molecular scale

Similar to our computers which handle electrons to perform the calculations and logics, all the circuitry in living beings is based on the transport of ions, such as sodium, chloride, calcium, etc. Nature exploits incredibly subtle transport of these elementary charges and an artillery of ion channels to perform advanced functions by manipulating the—often exotic—behaviour of ion transport at mole

10h

Metabolite stimulates a crop while suppressing a weed

A newly discovered, naturally occurring metabolite that promotes growth in rice plants and thwarts infestation by a common parasitic plant could help improve global food security, say KAUST researchers. Plant scientists are working on methods for generating healthy, nutritious crops to feed the world's growing population. However, breeding strong plants that provide reliable, sustainable yields is

10h

Glacier 'tree rings' could hold clues for planet's future

Buried in the ice of Antarctica are records of what Earth looked like 130,000 years ago, when the glaciers last melted—and what it might look like again as global warming accelerates.

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Researchers look to nature to unearth the secrets of cyclic imine cleavage

Cyclic imines form a general class of chemical compounds that includes the metabolites of drugs used to treat a wide variety of conditions. β-carboline alkaloids in particular have been extensively studied as medicines, showing excellent bioactivities, and have been used in treatments for hypertension. However, despite significant understanding of the biosynthesis that forms cyclic imines, the deg

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Metabolite stimulates a crop while suppressing a weed

A newly discovered, naturally occurring metabolite that promotes growth in rice plants and thwarts infestation by a common parasitic plant could help improve global food security, say KAUST researchers. Plant scientists are working on methods for generating healthy, nutritious crops to feed the world's growing population. However, breeding strong plants that provide reliable, sustainable yields is

10h

Ecological vineyards help protecting bird population in the environment

Ecological farmlands help protecting bird populations and reducing the effects of global change on the environment, according to a study published in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment by the experts Joan Real, Àlex Rollan and Antonio Hernández-Matías, from the Conservation Biology Group of the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelo

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Machine Learning Can Use Tweets to Automatically Spot Critical Security Flaws

Researchers built an AI engine that uses tweets to predict the severity of software vulnerabilities with 86 percent accuracy.

10h

Roborock E20 Review: An Affordable Robovac You Might Like

It has a problem with stairs, but this budget robot vacuum and mop offers a lot of bang for your buck.

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Oceans Are 'Spiking a Fever' With Record Heat Waves

More frequent and more severe ocean heat waves are behaving like wildfires, wiping out sea life across large areas.

10h

Scooter Startup Spin Ditches Gig Workers for Real Employees

In Los Angeles, Spin is experimenting with a move away from gig workers in favor of proper employees, with health insurance and everything.

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Road upgrades to help humans drive alongside automated cars

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Is there life on Mars? Let's assess the evidence

Since the nineteenth century, people have been obsessed with finding life on the Red Planet, but is there any real basis for supposing is does, or did, exist? Richard A Lovett sifts through the data.

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Supersonic shock syndrome

New imaging system produces artful results.

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Ten years after: Kepler’s first planet confirmed

Months after NASA’s orbiting telescope shut down, its work is verified. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Ecological vineyards help protecting bird population in the environment

Ecological farmlands help protecting bird populations and reducing the effects of global change on the environment, according to a study published in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment by the experts Joan Real, Àlex Rollan and Antonio Hernández-Matías, from the Conservation Biology Group of the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelo

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Image of the Day: An Infectious Glow

In CRISPRed fruit flies that lack certain antimicrobial peptides, bacterial infections flourish, as revealed by fluorescent markers.

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Lost productivity to March Madness a real phenomenon, study finds

Every spring, the NCAA basketball tournament tips off and people around the country call in sick, take long lunch hours or watch games at their desk, sometimes in a clandestine fashion, sometimes in the open. And just as regularly, stories follow about the lost productivity due to March Madness and how much it costs in wages and unfinished work. A group of University of Kansas researchers co-wrote

10h

Why we’re creating Wikipedia profiles for BAME scientists

Why we’re creating Wikipedia profiles for BAME scientists Why we’re creating Wikipedia profiles for BAME scientists, Published online: 07 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00812-8 How an ‘editathon’ can help black, Asian and minority ethnic scientists — and science as a whole, explains Nicola O'Reilly.

11h

When coral reefs change, researchers and local fishing communities see different results

Results of a new study looking at coral reef disturbances, fish abundance and coastal fishers' catches suggest that ecologists and community anglers may perceive environmental disruptions in very different ways.

11h

Graphene quantum dots for single electron transistors

Scientists from the Higher School of Economics, Manchester University, the Ulsan National Institute of Science & Technology and the Korea Institute of Science and Technology have developed a novel technology that combines the fabrication procedures of planar and vertical heterostructures in order to assemble graphene-based single-electron transistors of excellent quality.

11h

'Radiance Light Trends' shows changes in Earth's light emissions

Many scientific datasets from satellites are in principle available for free, but that doesn't mean that they are actually accessible to the wider public. A new web application aims to change that, at least for satellite imagery of Earth at night. An app called Radiance Light Trends allows anyone with an internet connection to quickly select a region or a site and analyse the trends in light emiss

11h

Deep learning merges advantages of holography and bright-field microscopy for 3-D imaging

Digital holographic microscopy is an imaging modality that can digitally reconstruct the images of 3-D samples from a single hologram by digitally refocusing it through the entire 3-D sample volume. In comparison, scanning through a sample volume with a conventional light microscope requires using a mechanical stage to shift the sample and taking multiple images at various depths, which sets a con

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Scientists begin exploring Indian Ocean depths in Seychelles

An unprecedented mission to explore the Indian Ocean and document changes taking place beneath the waves began its research on Thursday, in Seychelles waters.

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When coral reefs change, researchers and local fishing communities see different results

Results of a new study looking at coral reef disturbances, fish abundance and coastal fishers' catches suggest that ecologists and community anglers may perceive environmental disruptions in very different ways.

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"Infinitely" charging drone

submitted by /u/chinwi96 [link] [comments]

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Finland approves ban on coal for energy use from 2029

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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Stanford professor: Don’t let artificial intelligence pick your employees

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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EU-Domstolen: EU's studier om glyphosat skal være offentligt tilgængelige

EU-Domstolen har i dag vurderet, at der skal være offentlig adgang til de data og studier, som EU’s fødevareagentur, Efsa, har benyttet sig af, når de har vurderet sundhedsrisikoen ved glyphosat, den aktive ingrediens i Roundup.

11h

Miljøorganisation: Bilers CO2-tal kan stadig presses kunstigt ned

PLUS. Den nye test WLTP skulle erstatte den gamle metode NEDC for at sikre et mere retvisende billede af bilers CO2-udslip. Men ifølge miljøorganisationen Transport & Environment kan bilproducenterne stadig snyde testen, så den får bilerne til at se mere miljøvenlige ud, end de i virkeligheden er.

11h

Is it Better to Intern at Google or Launch a Start-Up?

Big frogs, small ponds and the nature of success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tons of Pressurized Oxygen Could Be Hiding Out in Earth's Molten Iron Core

Earth's vast magma oceans, roiling deep beneath our feet, seem to be pumping oxygen into the planet's liquid core.

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Is it Better to Intern at Google or Launch a Start-Up?

Big frogs, small ponds and the nature of success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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These robots are small, shape-shifting, and they adapt to their surroundings

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The AI doctor won't see you now

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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New "FarFarOut" World Is the Most Distant Solar System Object Known

Pinning down the object’s orbit could reveal it to be a crucial clue in the search for undiscovered planets—or just another frozen space rock — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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CERN splits with scientist over offensive remarks on women

Europe's physics lab CERN on Thursday cut ties with a scientist over a lecture that suggested physics was "built by men" and accused women of demanding jobs without proper qualifications.

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Best Keyboard Alternatives: Wacom Bamboo, Surface Pen, Dragon Home, Tap

Our writer tests six alternative input methods for users who find it difficult to type on a keyboard.

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Zuckerberg Wants Facebook to Build a Mind-Reading Machine

If the Facebook CEO's reflection tour has revealed anything it is that even as he wrestles with the harms the platform has wrought, he is busy dreaming up new ones.

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Nanosponges sop up toxins and help repair tissues

Nanoparticles coated with blood cell membranes can move through the body to clean up toxins or heal tissues — without instigating an immune reaction.

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Is it Better to Intern at Google or Launch a Start-Up?

Big frogs, small ponds and the nature of success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New "FarFarOut" World Is the Most Distant Solar System Object Known

Pinning down the object’s orbit could reveal it to be a crucial clue in the search for undiscovered planets—or just another frozen space rock — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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