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nyheder2019marts08

46min

Need an Ohm's Law Party Trick? Take a Light Bulb's Temperature

We can measure the temperature of an incandescent bulb's filament while it's connected to a variable DC power supply.

46min

Google research shows how AI can make ophthalmologists more effective

As artificial intelligence continues to evolve, diagnosing disease faster and potentially with greater accuracy than physicians, some have suggested that technology may soon replace tasks that physicians currently perform. But a new study shows that physicians and algorithms working together are more effective than either alone.

38min

Toyota will be first to use NVIDIA's self-driving simulator

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Researchers predict 1.4 million deaths from all cancers in 2019 in the EU

Death rates from breast cancer are predicted to fall in all European Union (EU) countries in 2019 with the exception of Poland, according to new research published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology. In their annual predictions for cancer deaths in the EU, Carlo La Vecchia and colleagues predict there will be 1.4 million deaths from all cancers in 2019.

5min

Inflammation links heart disease and depression, study finds

People with heart disease are more likely to suffer from depression, and the opposite is also true. Now, scientists at the University of Cambridge believe they have identified a link between these two conditions: inflammation — the body's response to negative environmental factors, such as stress.

5min

Use forecast to talk about climate change, urges ex-BBC presenter

Bill Giles calls on broadcasters to add slot explaining humans’ impact on climate The veteran weatherman Bill Giles is calling on the BBC and other major broadcasters to radically overhaul their forecasts to incorporate information about climate change. The former head of BBC weather presenters has said more needs to be done by broadcasters to highlight climate change to face the “reality more sq

7min

Healthy fats improve nerve function in obese mice

Swapping dietary saturated fats for monounsaturated fats reverses nerve damage and restores nerve function in male mice, finds new preclinical research. These data support further investigation of diets rich in healthy fats as a potential treatment for the nerve damage that occurs with diabetes, known as diabetic neuropathy.

10min

Evidence for ancient magnetic sense in humans

The human brain can unconsciously respond to changes in Earth's magnetic fields, according to a team of geoscientists and neurobiologists. This interdisciplinary study revives a research area in neuroscience that has remained dormant for decades.

10min

Protective antibodies also found in premature babies

Even premature babies carry anti-viral antibodies transferred from the mother, researchers report in a paper on maternal antibodies in newborns. The results should change our approach to infection sensitivity in newborns, they say.

10min

Common treatment for multiple sclerosis may prolong life

Researchers have found that a widely prescribed drug for multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with longer survival for patients.

10min

Surgery using ultrasound energy found to treat high blood pressure

A one-off operation that targets the nerves connected to the kidney has been found to maintain reduced blood pressure in hypertension patients for at least six months, according to the results of a clinical trial.

24min

Unity follows Unreal's lead, adds early RTX support to its popular game engine

With that in mind, it will probably come as no surprise to learn that game engine maker Unity is following in competitor Unreal's footsteps today by baking support for Nvidia's RTX technology …

26min

Molecular motors run in unison in a metal-organic framework

For molecular motors to be exploited effectively, they need to be able to operate in unison. However, integrating billions of these nanometre-sized motors into a single system, and getting them to operate in unison has proved to be quite a challenge. Organic chemists have now succeeded in integrating numerous unidirectional light-driven rotary motors into a metal-organic framework (a solid materia

38min

Germany Looks to Put Thermal Storage Into Coal Plants

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The Atlantic Daily: A Crisis of Representative Democracy

What We’re Following France’s “yellow-vest” protests continued onto their fourth month, with protestors torching banks and businesses in Paris over the weekend. The spate of violence coincided with the end of a series of town-hall meetings that President Emmanuel Macron convened across the country to regain the trust of locals who view him as a member of a smug, out-of-touch elite. But how should

45min

Trump proposes slashing science spending at NSF

Trump proposes slashing science spending at NSF Trump proposes slashing science spending at NSF, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00851-1 President wants to cut funding for US research operations in Antarctica, as well as studies in Earth science, math and physical sciences at the US National Science Foundation.

48min

Sing Solo For Higher Fidelity

By tracking duetting choir singers, researchers found that when an individual singer's pitch drifts off tune their partner’s tend to too. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

56min

Excessive phosphate fertilizer use can reduce microbial functions critical to crop health

Scientists set out to determine if nutrient history changed the function of soil microorganisms. The answer seems to be yes, and that soil treated with high amounts of phosphate can result in poorer plant performance, but even more intriguing, it appears that the soil microorganisms from this conditioned soil can negatively impact plant yield.

1h

Materials could delay frost up to 300 times longer than existing anti-icing coatings

Researchers have described several unique properties of materials known as phase-switching liquids, or PSLs, that hold promise as next-generation anti-icing materials. PSLs can delay ice and frost formation up to 300 times longer than state-of-the-art coatings being developed in laboratories.

1h

Echocardiograms may help with patient selection for transcatheter mitral valve repair

Clinicians should use echocardiography, an ultrasound that shows the heart's structure and function, when determining whether patients with heart failure and a leaking heart valve are likely to benefit from valve repair, according to new research.

1h

Partial oral antibiotic therapy safe and effective in infectious endocarditis

Patients with an infection of the inner lining on the left side of the heart (endocarditis) who were switched from intravenous to oral antibiotic therapy had better long-term survival and fewer complications than similar patients who remained on conventional intravenous antibiotic therapy, according to new research.

1h

Presidential candidate says driverless trucks will cause 'mass riots'

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Meningitis changes immune cell makeup in the mouse brain lining

Meningitis, a group of serious diseases which infect the brain's lining, leaves its mark and can affect the body's ability to fight such infections in the future. According to a new study, infections can have long-lasting effects on a population of meningeal immune cells, replacing them with cells from outside the meninges that then change and become less likely to recognize and ward off future at

1h

ACC/AHA guidance for preventing heart disease, stroke released

Adopting a heart healthy eating plan, getting more exercise, avoiding tobacco and managing known risk factors are among the key recommendations in the 2019 Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease guideline from the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA). Also, it is recommended that aspirin should only rarely be used to help prevent heart attacks and str

1h

The White House Still Can't Get the President's Tweeting Under Control

Long before he got into politics, Donald Trump relished the power and reach of his Twitter feed. And not long after he took office aides recognized the damage that unvetted tweets could inflict, with the president using them to set policy, settle scores, and steer the national conversation. Worried about misfires, aides have implored him to use social media more sparingly. At times, they’ve given

1h

SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Rocket May Launch Its First Commercial Flight Soon

SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket may fly again as soon as April 7, if the reporting of CNBC proves accurate. The news outlet cites anonymous sources in its story, and SpaceX so far hasn't confirmed the launch. The rocket’s first and last flight was in February 2018, when it successfully launched Elon Musk’s Tesla roadster into space. Falcon Heavy’s next mission would fly a communications satellite int

1h

CBD Is In Jelly Beans, Pet Food and Shampoo. But Many Benefits Are Untested

CBD, or cannabidiol, has exploded onto the market in recent years. Sometime in the past decade, this purportedly medicinal marijuana extract went from being an obscure stoner oil to the wellness product du jour, flooding from holistic markets to the mainstream. Analysts at the investment bank Cowen Inc. predict the industry will balloon to $16 billion by 2025. In comparison, CBD sales totaled less

1h

Turkish Meteorite Turns Out to be a Free Sample from Asteroid Vesta

Twenty-two million years ago, something crashed into the asteroid Vesta, carving out a large crater and throwing the debris high into space. In 2015, a three-foot meteor streaked through the sky above Turkey before fragmenting into pieces and falling near a village called Sariçiçek. Scientists who studied a whopping 343 pieces of the recovered meteorite now think it originated in that long-ago col

1h

What Are Tholins? The Mysterious Substance That Turned Ultima Thule Red

On New Year's Day, NASA's New Horizons probe streaked by a tiny world dubbed MU69, or Ultima Thule, the farthest object humankind has studied up close. With most of the data still on the spacecraft waiting to be transmitted, scientists are still getting to know this distant body. We know that it's composed of two chunks of rock loosely stuck together. We know that it doesn't have moons or rings th

1h

Refugee women have healthier pregnancies than US women — why? An unhealthy US culture

African refugee women experience healthier pregnancies than women born in the United States, despite receiving less prenatal care, found a recent study.

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The story of GARP: A potential target for cancer immunotherapy

Researchers reveal how the cell surface receptor GARP plays a role in T regulatory cell function and migration to the gut. Because the presence of T regulatory cells in the gut is generally associated with negative outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer, GARP could have potential as a therapeutic target for patients with this type of cancer.

1h

Uncertain projections help to reveal the truth about future climate change

Scientists explain how differing climate model projections can be used collectively to reduce uncertainties in future climate change.

1h

Advances point the way to smaller, safer batteries

New research advances the design of solid-state batteries, a technology that is inherently safer and more energy-dense than today's lithium-ion batteries, which rely on flammable liquid electrolytes for fast transfer of chemical energy stored in molecular bonds to electricity. By starting with liquid electrolytes and then transforming them into solid polymers inside the electrochemical cell, the r

1h

Ticagrelor is as safe and effective as clopidogrel after heart attack

Patients given clot busters to treat a heart attack fared equally well if they were given the standard blood thinning medication clopidogrel versus the newer, more potent drug ticagrelor, according to new research.

1h

Fertility app 'Dot' found to be as effective as other family planning methods

Results of a first-of-its-kind prospective study with a family planning app find it to be as effective as other modern methods for avoiding an unplanned pregnancy, according to researchers.

1h

Scientists hunt down the brain circuit responsible for alcohol cravings

Scientists have found that they can reverse the desire to drink in alcohol-dependent rats — with the flip of a switch. The researchers were able to use lasers to temporarily inactivate a specific neuronal population, reversing alcohol-seeking behavior and even reducing the physical symptoms of withdrawal.

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On-chip, electronically tunable frequency comb

Now, researchers have developed an integrated, on-chip frequency comb that is efficient, stable and highly controllable with microwaves.

1h

New perspective on changing travel conditions in Arctic communities

Inuit communities' travel skills and regional knowledge have helped mitigate the effects of Arctic climate change on travel conditions, according to a new study.

1h

Lowering blood pressure prevents worsening brain damage in elderly

Elderly people with high blood pressure, or hypertension, who took medicine to keep their 24-hour systolic blood pressure around 130 mm Hg for three years showed significantly less accumulation of harmful brain lesions compared with those taking medicine to maintain a systolic blood pressure around 145 mm Hg, according to new research.

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A meteor exploded over the Bering Sea with the energy of 10 atomic bombs

Space And we never saw it coming. Scientists recently observed a meteor exploding over the Bering Sea with the energy of 10 atomic bombs. It’s officially the second largest fireball of its kind to occur…

2h

Mini tremors detected on Mars for first time

Faint “microseisms” may help scientists understand the Red Planet’s subsurface

2h

Daily Low-Dose Aspirin No Longer Recommended by Doctors, if You’re Healthy

New guidelines suggest the risk of bleeding outweighs the heart benefits among healthy adults who take low-dose aspirin.

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Ultima Thule latest: an ancient red worldlet, dancing lobe to lobe

Findings from New Horizons continue to shed light on the Kuiper Belt Object. Richard A Lovett reports.

2h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: She’s (Also) Running

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, March 18. ‣ Historic floods are engulfing midwestern states, including Nebraska, Iowa, and Missouri, after a bomb cyclone and high levels of melting snow and ice caused rivers to overflow their banks. Here’s what else we’re watching: On the Campaign Trail: At Beto O’Rourke’s latest events, the candidate’s celebrity status seemed to make up for his inability

2h

Key to common cancer pathway

Cancer researchers report the discovery of an unexpected regulator of the critical protein protein p53, opening the door to the development of drugs that could target it.

2h

Why do we feel schadenfreude — and who it feels it the most?

Few words convey as much meaning as Schadenfreude , or the joy that arises from seeing harm come to others. Schadenfreude is a complex psychological phenomenon, and researchers have only begun to look into rigorously. Psychology can tell us why we feel schadenfreude, when we feel it, and who feels it the most. None Anybody would admit that they like it when an opposing sports team makes a critica

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Will We Destroy the Future? – Sam Harris interviews Nick Bostrom

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Sneaky Meteor Evades Earthling Detection, Explodes with Force of 10 Atomic Bombs

One of the largest meteor impacts in modern history occurred over Russia on Dec. 18, 2018. Hardly anyone noticed it — and nobody saw it coming.

2h

Spaceflight Triggers Herpes Viruses to 'Reawaken'

Being in outer space can have some odd effects on the body, including triggering dormant herpes viruses to reawaken.

2h

FDA Head: Anti-Vaxxers Could Soon Cause an Epidemic

Shots Shots Shots According to FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb, the one single thing that would vastly improve the healthcare system is if people would get vaccinated. Otherwise, Gottlieb told Business Insider , America could find itself in the midst of an epidemic of dangerous, preventable diseases that have already started to resurface thanks to anti-vaxxers. “It’s not going to be a gradual evo

2h

When it comes to monarchs, fall migration matters

New research shows that a critical piece of the butterfly's annual cycle was missing — the fall migration.

2h

Bartonella and sudden-onset adolescent schizophrenia

In a new case study, researchers describe an adolescent human patient diagnosed with rapid onset schizophrenia who was found instead to have a Bartonella henselae infection (associated with cat scratch fever).

2h

New potential approach to treat atopic dermatitis

Researchers have demonstrated that the same immune cells that protect us against skin fungi also encourage the inflammatory symptoms of atopic dermatitis. An antibody therapy could alleviate this chronic inflammatory skin disease.

2h

Eggs are again linked to heart problems — though the study has problems

A new study at Northwestern University found a link between egg consumption and cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The research relied on self-reporting at the beginning of observation, with no follow-up reporting. Correlation is likely, not causation, as larger studies have found the opposite to be true. None Here we go again. Few foods have taken a beating like eggs. (Sorry, it was

2h

Ultima Thule may be a frankenworld

The first geologic map of Ultima Thule shows it might be made of many smaller rocks that clumped together under the force of their own gravity.

2h

New Horizons team unravels the many mysteries of Ultima Thule

The farthest object ever explored is slowly revealing its secrets, as scientists piece together the puzzles of Ultima Thule – the Kuiper Belt object NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past on New Year's Day, four billion miles from Earth.

2h

From dollars to bytes: Digital payment tech companies merge

Fidelity National Information Services is buying Worldpay for about $35 billion to combine forces as financial transactions increasingly move online.

2h

Giant squid gets makeover before showtime

A little elbow grease, some formaldehyde, and a lot of ingenuity—that's what it took for taxidermists at the Museum of Natural History to prettify a giant squid along with a coelacanth, a rare fish known as the "living fossil".

3h

US probing certification of Boeing 737 MAX

Boeing and US aviation regulators are coming under intense scrutiny over the certification of the 737 MAX aircraft after news that two recent crashes of share similarities.

3h

NASA sees Savannah lose its tropical eye

Tropical Cyclone Savannah weakened and "lost" its eye as high clouds filtered over it. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of the tropical storm that revealed high clouds had moved over its eye.

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The Truth About Wasabi

Have you ever eaten wasabi? If you answered “yes” to that question, you are likely mistaken. Most sushi eaters—even in Japan—are actually being served a mixture of ground horseradish and green food coloring, splashed with a hint of Chinese mustard. Worldwide, experts believe that this imposter combination masquerades as wasabi about 99 percent of the time . The reason boils down to supply and dem

3h

Binge-watching political dramas with female characters could get you hooked on politics

Don't feel so bad for binge-watching a political drama—it might lead to more civic participation, as long as the show features a female lead character.

3h

When it comes to monarchs, fall migration matters

Scientists studying monarch butterflies have traditionally focused on two sources for their decline—winter habitat loss in Mexico and fewer milkweed plants in the Midwest.

3h

Bromethalin is poisoning the parrots of Telegraph Hill

Bromethalin, a common rat poison, is the agent responsible for a neurological disease that has sickened or killed birds from a popular flock of naturalized parrots that reside primarily in the Telegraph Hill area in north San Francisco, according to a new study led by the University of Georgia Infectious Diseases Laboratory and funded by Mickaboo Companion Bird Rescue.

3h

Stress is contagious. Resilience can be too.

Stress is contagious, and the higher up in an organization you are the more your stress will be noticed and felt by others. Kelly McGonigal teaches "Reset your mindset to reduce stress" for Big Think Edge. Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships. None It turns out that mindsets are contagious – and the higher up you are in an organiza

3h

When it comes to monarchs, fall migration matters

Scientists studying monarch butterflies have traditionally focused on two sources for their decline—winter habitat loss in Mexico and fewer milkweed plants in the Midwest.

3h

Bromethalin is poisoning the parrots of Telegraph Hill

Bromethalin, a common rat poison, is the agent responsible for a neurological disease that has sickened or killed birds from a popular flock of naturalized parrots that reside primarily in the Telegraph Hill area in north San Francisco, according to a new study led by the University of Georgia Infectious Diseases Laboratory and funded by Mickaboo Companion Bird Rescue.

3h

New Technique Turns Seawater Into Hydrogen Fuel

Hydroelectric A chemical reaction you learned about in middle school could help solve the energy crisis. Running an electrical current through water splits it into oxygen and hydrogen, the latter of which can be used as a reliable, zero-emission fuel source. In the past, the process of purifying water beforehand was too energy intensive for this process to be useful — but now scientists have figu

3h

XO exoskeleton from Sarcos wins another U.S. contract

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Gripper Origami Robot

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Russian Arms Maker Invents Drone With Built-In Rifle

Is it a Bird? Is it a Drone? A February 2018 patent filed with the Russian Federal Service for Intellectual Property suggest that Russian arms maker Almaz-Antey has invented a flying drone that features a rifle reminiscent of Kalashnikov’s iconic AK-47. Details are predictably sparse: a series of images show an extremely rudimentary design, featuring a center fuselage with a built-in rifle sectio

3h

Women With Twin Brothers Are More Likely to Face Penalties at School and Work

Research shows they might act more like boys when they’re young, struggling in school, but then face sexism when they’re grown.

3h

DNA from 200-Year-Old Pipe Connects Enslaved Woman to West Africa

Genetic material from old artifacts can link people to their ancestral communities and potentially help descendants find their roots.

3h

NASA sees Savannah lose its tropical eye

Tropical Cyclone Savannah weakened and "lost" its eye as high clouds filtered over it. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of the tropical storm that revealed high clouds had moved over its eye.

3h

Super bloom tourists cause small town 'safety crisis'

Tourists hoping to photograph a bloom of wild poppies briefly shut down a California canyon.

3h

Researchers discover new material to help power electronics

Electronics rule our world, but electrons rule our electronics. A research team at The Ohio State University has discovered a way to simplify how electronic devices use those electrons—using a material that can serve dual roles in electronics, where historically multiple materials have been necessary.

3h

Algal library lends insights into genes for photosynthesis

It isn't easy being green. It takes thousands of genes to build the photosynthetic machinery that plants need to harness sunlight for growth. And yet, researchers don't know exactly how these genes work.

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My third book, HARNESSED, in the hands of a reader.

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Algal library lends insights into genes for photosynthesis

It isn't easy being green. It takes thousands of genes to build the photosynthetic machinery that plants need to harness sunlight for growth. And yet, researchers don't know exactly how these genes work.

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NASA Reports Undetected Asteroid Explosion in Upper Atmosphere

NASA has reported a significant meteor explosion in Earth's atmosphere several months ago — and we didn't see it coming. The post NASA Reports Undetected Asteroid Explosion in Upper Atmosphere appeared first on ExtremeTech .

3h

The midwest is in the midst of record-breaking, deadly floods

Environment It's the perfect storm. Historic flooding in the Central Plains, set off by last week’s “bomb cyclone,” devastated cities from Texas to Wisconsin this weekend, and will continue to inundate…

3h

Semimetals are high conductors

Researchers in China and at UC Davis have measured high conductivity in very thin layers of niobium arsenide, a type of material called a Weyl semimetal. The material has about three times the conductivity of copper at room temperature, said Sergey Savrasov, professor of physics at UC Davis. Savrasov is a coauthor on the paper published March 18 in Nature Materials.

3h

NASA finds heavy rainfall potential in new Tropical Cyclone Trevor

Tropical Cyclone Trevor formed in the Coral Sea of the Southwestern Pacific Ocean on March 18. NASA's Terra satellite analyzed cloud top temperatures in the storm which gave an indication of the storm's strength. Trevor has already triggered warnings in Queensland, Australia.

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Parts of US Midwest deluged in historic deadly floods

The US Midwest struggled Monday with historic flooding that claimed at least three lives, displaced residents and damaged hundreds of homes and businesses.

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NASA finds heavy rainfall potential in new Tropical Cyclone Trevor

Tropical Cyclone Trevor formed in the Coral Sea of the Southwestern Pacific Ocean on March 18. NASA's Terra satellite analyzed cloud top temperatures in the storm which gave an indication of the storm's strength. Trevor has already triggered warnings in Queensland, Australia.

3h

Stor undersøgelse: Rotter får kræft af mobilstråling

Rotterne blev udsat for elektromagnetisk stråling, der ligner den fra mobiltelefoner. Det er samme type stråling som udgår fra det kommende 5G-netværk. Men resultatet kan ikke overføres direkte til mennesker.

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'The Inventor,' Theranos, and Multiplatform Schadenfreude

With so many ways to consume stories, consumers are increasingly using them all in order to wring every possible microdrop of schadenfreude out of the most enduring story of all: hubris.

4h

5 short podcasts to boost your creativity and success

Podcasts can educate us on a variety of topics, but they don't have to last an hour or more to have an impact on the way you perceive the world . Here are five podcasts that will boost your creativity and well-being in 10 minutes or less. The Slowdown with Tracy K. Smith Smith, a U.S. Poet Laureate, narrates this podcast , which features poetry readings. The episodes are mostly just five minutes

4h

Mining the Moon

If you were transported to the Moon this very instant, you would surely and rapidly die. That's because there's no atmosphere, the surface temperature varies from a roasting 130 degrees Celsius (266 F) to a bone-chilling minus 170 C (minus 274 F). If the lack of air or horrific heat or cold don't kill you then micrometeorite bombardment or solar radiation will. By all accounts, the Moon is not a

4h

Why James Gunn Won His Job Back

When Disney fired James Gunn last July, it seemed like an object lesson of that ever-relevant and oft-repeated internet maxim: Never tweet . Gunn, the director of Marvel’s popular Guardians of the Galaxy movies, had joined Twitter in 2008 when it was a little-scrutinized sounding board for half-baked jokes and unprintable thoughts. He had also long worked in the transgressive world of Troma Enter

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The New Space Age: Experts Ponder the Future of Cosmic Exploration

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The space ‘snowman’ at the edge of our solar system is actually two lumpy pancakes

MU69’s flat lobes support a new theory of planetary formation

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Binge-watching political dramas with female characters could get you hooked on politics

Don't feel so bad for binge-watching a political drama — it might lead to more civic participation, as long as the show features a female lead character.A survey of fans of the TV shows 'Madam Secretary' 'The Good Wife' and 'Scandal' found that viewers who felt most connected to the storyline and characters also reported increased political interest and participation. The findings are published o

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Algal library lends insights into genes for photosynthesis

To identify genes involved in photosynthesis, researchers built a library containing thousands of single-celled algae, each with a different gene mutation. The library, which took nine years to construct, has already helped researchers identify 303 genes associated with photosynthesis including 21 newly discovered genes with high potential to provide new insights into this life-sustaining process.

4h

How live streaming connects New Zealand attack and ISIS

There are a number of parallels, particularly the use of live streaming, with the March 14 attack on two mosques in New Zealand and those that groups like Al-Qaeda and ISIS carry out, Jytte Klausen says. Klausen is a politics professor at Brandeis University studying jihadism and radicalization, and the director and lead researcher for the Western Jihadism Project, a web database designed to stud

4h

Elephants: Earth's Largest Living Land-Animals

With their big ears and long noses, the elephant is one of the most recognizable animals in the world.

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Intel and Cray are building a $500 million ‘exascale’ supercomputer for Argonne National Lab

In a way, I have the equivalent of a supercomputer in my pocket. But in another, more important way, that pocket computer is a joke compared with real supercomputers — and Intel and Cray are …

4h

New Zealand shooting: Inside Youtube's struggle to stop attack videos spreading online

Video-sharing website takes drastic steps to shut down footage of shooting

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Elon Musk Shows Off Glowing Hot “Hex Tile” Starship Heatshield

Hex Tiles In a video posted on Twitter yesterday, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk showed off the newest feature of the company’s much-anticipated Starship spacecraft: “heatshield hex tiles” that will keep it cool during re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere. In the video, SpaceX engineers heated the hexagonal tiles to a maximum temperature of 1,650 degrees Kelvin (2,500 Fahrenheit.) According to Musk, that’s “or

4h

Energiselskab tester sten-energilager i skala 1:3000

Frem til sommer skal et pilotanlæg på DTU-Risø teste lagerevne og varmefordeling i et diabas- stenlager, som skal opvarmes vil 600 grader af vindmøllestrøm. Pilotanlægget blev indviet i dag.

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“Provocative” Research: Some People Can Sense Magnetic Fields

Paging Magneto Many animals, including certain birds and turtles, can find their way while migrating by sensing the Earth’s magnetic field. But humans never seemed to possess the ability to feel the earth’s magnetism — up until scientists pulled off a new experiment published Monday in the journal eNeuro . “For the first time in humans, clear responses to magnetic field changes were observed,” Mi

4h

Grow a better jawbone in your ribs

Researchers have developed a technique to grow custom-fit bone implants to repair jawbone injuries from a patient's own rib.

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Grow a better jawbone in your ribs

Researchers have developed a technique to grow custom-fit bone implants to repair jawbone injuries from a patient's own rib.

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Ultrasound provides precise, minimally invasive way to measure heart function in children

Currently, a practical, precise, minimally invasive way to measure cardiac output or heart function in children undergoing surgery does not exist. New research published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), illustrates how a novel minimally invasive method using catheter-based ultrasound to measure hear

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When it comes to monarchs, fall migration matters

New research conducted by Michigan State University and published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows that a critical piece of the butterfly's annual cycle was missing — the fall migration.

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Case study: Bartonella and sudden-onset adolescent schizophrenia

In a new case study, researchers describe an adolescent human patient diagnosed with rapid onset schizophrenia who was found instead to have a Bartonella henselae infection.

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About the Skinny on Epilepsy

Although a common brain disorder that affects almost four million people nationwide, many people know little about epilepsy. Stephanie Rogers, a doctoral candidate at New York University (NYU), attempted to demystify the disorder with a thorough overview of “ The Science of Epilepsy: What Is It and How Can We Understand It? ” at Columbia University’s Zuckerman Institute during Brain Awareness Wee

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New evidence suggests we should eat fewer eggs

Adults who eat more dietary cholesterol—such as that in eggs—have a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease and of death from any cause, a new study reports. “The take-home message is really about cholesterol, which happens to be high in eggs and specifically yolks,” says co-corresponding study author Norrina Allen, associate professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University

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Securing a future for humanities: the clue is in the name| Letters

Prof Joe Smith , director of the Royal Geographical Society, Prof Sir David Cannadine , president of the British Academy, and Prof Norman Gowar respond to a Guardian editorial Your editorial in defence of the humanities (13 March) is well timed and well argued. The UK needs the contribution of Stem graduates and that made by graduates with knowledge, skills and understanding gained through study

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Kevin Tsujihara is stepping down as Warner Bros CEO

Kevin Tsujihara is leaving his role as chairman and CEO of Warner Bros. Entertainment. He joined Warner Bros. back in 1994 and took charge of the film and TV studio in 2013. As part of broader …

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Intel will build the first exascale supercomputer in the US

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Apple iPad Air 2019 and iPad Mini 2019: Price, Specs, Release Date

Apple's newest additions to its tablet line include a refreshed 10.5-inch iPad Air and a long-awaited update to the 7.9-inch iPad Mini. Also today, the 10.5-inch iPad Pro is no more.

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Can people learn to embrace risk?

Studies have shown women are more risk-averse than men, a trait experts say could help to explain the persistent wage gap between men and women. New research suggests those gender differences are shaped by culture and the social environment and that those differences can shift, at least in children.

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Researchers create hydrogen fuel from seawater

Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen presents an alternative to fossil fuels, but purified water is a precious resource. A Stanford-led team has now developed a way to harness seawater — Earth's most abundant source — for chemical energy.

5h

Prenatal testosterone linked to long-term effects in females who share womb with male twin

Women who shared their mother's womb with a male twin are less likely to graduate from high school or college, have earned less by their early 30s, and have lower fertility and marriage rates when compared with twins who are both female, according to new Northwestern University research.

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Mammals' unique arms started evolving before the dinosaurs existed

One of the things that makes mammals special is our diverse forelimbs — bat wings, whale flippers, gibbon arms, and cheetah legs have evolved to do different, specialized tasks. Scientists wanted to see where this mammalian trait started evolving, so they examined fossils from early mammal relatives to see when the upper arm bones started diversifying. They discovered that the trait took root 270

5h

Grow a better jawbone in your ribs

Researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston develop a technique to grow custom-fit bone implants to repair jawbone injuries from a patient's own rib.

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'Inflamm-aging' causes loss of bone healing ability in the elderly

Increases in chronic inflammation — not the passage of time — is the main reason why injured bones do not heal as well with age.

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Rising global shipping traffic could lead to surge in invasive species

Rising global maritime traffic could lead to sharp increases in invasive species around the world over the next 30 years, according to a new study. The findings suggest that shipping growth will far outweigh climate change in the spread of non-indigenous pests to new environments in coming decades.

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The Dr. Is In: Cat-loving Paleontologist Answers Your Questions in New YouTube Series

Paleontologist Hans Sues answers your questions about dinosaurs, humans and cats in the Smithsonian's new YouTube series, "The Dr. Is In."

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Ancient Monkey Bone Tools Shake Up the Narrative of Early Human Migration to the Rain Forest

New evidence pushes back the date for human settlement in jungles, challenging the idea that our ancestors preferred the savannas and plains

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Boys and girls may have differing attitudes to risk thanks to society

Risk taking levels between boys are girls are far from written in stone, but are shaped by society, according to a new study

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Women with a twin brother are more likely to drop out of school

Decades of data from Norway show that girls with a twin brother are less likely to finish school or university, which may be due to testosterone exposure in the womb

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Mammals' unique arms started evolving before the dinosaurs existed

Bats fly, whales swim, gibbons swing from tree to tree, horses gallop, and humans swipe on their phones—the different habitats and lifestyles of mammals rely on our unique forelimbs. No other group of vertebrate animals has evolved so many different kinds of arms: in contrast, all birds have wings, and pretty much all lizards walk on all fours. Our forelimbs are a big part of what makes mammals sp

5h

Researchers create hydrogen fuel from seawater

Stanford researchers have devised a way to generate hydrogen fuel using solar power, electrodes and saltwater from San Francisco Bay.

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Can people learn to embrace risk?

Studies have shown women are more risk-averse than men, more likely to opt for the smaller sure thing than gamble on an all-or-nothing proposition, a trait experts say could help to explain the persistent wage gap between men and women.

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Prenatal testosterone linked to long-term effects in females who share womb with male twin

Women who shared their mother's womb with a male twin are less likely to graduate from high school or college, have earned less by their early 30s, and have lower fertility and marriage rates when compared with twins who are both female, according to new Northwestern University research.

5h

Alligator study reveals insight into dinosaur hearing

A biologist finds alligators build neural maps of sound the way birds do, suggesting the hearing strategy existed in their common ancestor, the dinosaurs.

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Key discovery on how alpine streams work

A new study has showed that until now, scientists have been substantially underestimating how quickly gases are exchanged between mountain streams and the atmosphere. Based on research in the Swiss cantons of Vaud and Valais, researchers have shed new light on the role of mountain streams to emit greenhouse gases.

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Diabetes drug effective against heart failure in wide spectrum of patients

The cardiovascular benefits of the diabetes drug dapagliflozin extend across a wide spectrum of patients and are especially pronounced in those with reduced ejection fraction, a measure of the heart's pumping ability indicative of poor heart functioning, according to new research.

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Spiraling giants: Witnessing the birth of a massive binary star system

Scientists have made observations of a molecular cloud that is collapsing to form two massive protostars that will eventually become a binary star system. The observations showed that already at this early stage, the cloud contains two objects, a massive 'primary' central star and another 'secondary' forming star, also of high mass.

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Girls who share a womb with boys tend to make less money than those with twin sisters

Provocative study looked at more than 700,000 births over more than a decade

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Are Some Fruits More Fattening Than Others?

It’s time to clear up some confusion about fruit, sugar, fructose and how this all fits together into a healthy diet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mammals' unique arms started evolving before the dinosaurs existed

Bats fly, whales swim, gibbons swing from tree to tree, horses gallop, and humans swipe on their phones—the different habitats and lifestyles of mammals rely on our unique forelimbs. No other group of vertebrate animals has evolved so many different kinds of arms: in contrast, all birds have wings, and pretty much all lizards walk on all fours. Our forelimbs are a big part of what makes mammals sp

5h

Researchers discover new material to help power electronics

A research team at The Ohio State University has discovered a way to simplify how electronic devices use those electrons — using a material that can serve dual roles in electronics, where historically multiple materials have been necessary. The team published its findings March 18, 2019 in the journal Nature Materials.

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Study finds test of protein levels in the eye a potential predictor of (future) Alzheimer's disease

Low levels of amyloid-β and tau proteins, biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), in eye fluid were significantly associated with low cognitive scores, according to a new study. These findings indicate that proteins in the eye may be a potential source for an accessible, cost-effective test to predict future Alzheimer's disease.

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Political dramas with female stars draw fans to politics

Viewers of political dramas with female lead characters who felt most connected to the storyline and characters also reported increased political interest and participation, according to new research. “A lot of times, people think of entertainment television as being just that: purely entertainment,” says Jennifer Hoewe, an assistant professor in Purdue University’s Brian Lamb School of Communica

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Diggar det digitala – men småbarnen lär sig inte det vi tror

– Vad vi än tycker så är digitaliseringen här för att stanna och barnen behöver lära sig att använda digitala resurser. Annars finns risk att de hamnar i ett digitalt utanförskap, säger Susanne Kjällander som forskar om hur digital teknik används på förskolan. Från och med första juli 2019 finns det inskrivet I förskolans läroplan att barnen ska få förutsättningar att utveckla digital kompetens,

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Tesla Says New Firmware Update Will Make Its Cars Faster

Higher Power Output After officially announcing a $35,000 Model 3 base model, electric car maker Tesla had another ace up its sleeve: a firmware update it says will increase the power output of all Model 3 vehicles — actually making them faster with nothing but the power of software. It could mark the beginning of a new era, in which companies are able to enhance features of already-sold devices

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Why experts now say daily aspirin could do more harm than good

Health If you've never had a heart attack, you probably shouldn't be taking it. We seem to think of low-dose aspirin as so innocuous, we call it baby aspirin.

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Parkinson’s Disease on the Mind

People often associate tremor with Parkinson’s disease (PD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder originally named “shaking palsy ,” but did you know that one-quarter to one-third of patients don’t exhibit this symptom? At Wednesday night’s event for Brain Awareness Week, “On the Mind: Parkinson’s, Movement, and Dance,” we heard from top NYU doctors about symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment, b

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Brain research reveals a circuit for cocaine relapse

Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina have identified which neurons are responsible for cocaine-seeking behaviors in rodents and where these neurons exert their effects within the brain. Their findings were published in March 13, 2019 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. This work opens a new line of addiction research that could lead to novel therapeutic approaches for preventi

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New research identifies potential PTSD treatment improvement

Researchers may have found a way to improve a common treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by changing how the brain learns to respond less severely to fearful conditions, according to research published in Journal of Neuroscience.

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Bromethalin is poisoning the parrots of Telegraph Hill

Bromethalin, a common rat poison, is the agent responsible for a neurological disease that has sickened or killed birds from a popular flock of naturalized parrots that reside primarily in the Telegraph Hill area in north San Francisco.

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SpaceX Tests Starship Heat Shield as It Prepares for Test Flight

The Starship will use a network of hexagonal tiles to guard against the heat of re-entry, and CEO Elon Musk just shared a short video of those tiles being tested under intense heat. The post SpaceX Tests Starship Heat Shield as It Prepares for Test Flight appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Supercrystal: A hidden phase of matter created by a burst of light

'Frustration' plus a pulse of laser light resulted in a stable 'supercrystal.'

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Back to the drawing board for conservationists battling against infectious parrot disease

A study into the effectiveness of disinfecting birds' nests has led to a breakthrough in the understanding of biosecuity measures for the endangered echo parakeet in Mauritius. The research team found that annual disinfection of parakeet nest sites prior to the breeding season, intended to reduce the spread of infectious disease in endangered parrot species, didn't have the impact conservationists

5h

Rising global shipping traffic could lead to surge in invasive species

Rising global maritime traffic could lead to sharp increases in invasive species around the world over the next 30 years, according to a new study. The findings suggest that shipping growth will far outweigh climate change in the spread of non-indigenous pests to new environments in coming decades.

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Virtual reality could improve your balance, study finds

Virtual Reality technology could become an efficient tool for older people with balance problems or for rehabilitation following injuries or illness that affect balance and movement. In a new study, researchers have studied how the human balance system is affected by watching Virtual Reality videos.

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New global standard counts the cost of environmental damage

Environmental damage costs society enormous amounts of money — and often leaves future generations to foot the bill. Now, a new ISO standard will help companies valuate and manage the impact of their environmental damage, by providing a clear figure for the cost of their goods and services to the environment.

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A laser technique proves effective to recover material designed to protect industrial products

The system has been validated for non-stick and anticorrosive coatings used in the manufacturing of a wide range of objects from car engines to kitchen utensils.

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Scientists reactivate cells from 28,000-year-old woolly mammoth

The team managed to stimulate nucleus-like structures to perform some biological processes, but not cell division. Unless better technology and DNA samples emerge in the future, it's unlikely that scientists will be able to clone a woolly mammoth. Still, studying the DNA of woolly mammoths provides valuable insights into the genetic adaptations that allowed them to survive in unique environments.

6h

Nitric oxide-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation

Nitric oxide-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation Nitric oxide-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09268-w Anammox bacteria couple nitrite reduction to ammonium oxidation, with nitric oxide (NO) and hydrazine as intermediates, and produce N2 and nitrate. Here, Hu et al. show that an anammox bacterium can grow in the absence of nitrite

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Low genetic variation is associated with low mutation rate in the giant duckweed

Low genetic variation is associated with low mutation rate in the giant duckweed Low genetic variation is associated with low mutation rate in the giant duckweed, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09235-5 While the role of effective population size (Ne) in explaining variation in genetic diversity has received much attention, the role of spontaneous mutation rate is largely

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UFL1 promotes histone H4 ufmylation and ATM activation

UFL1 promotes histone H4 ufmylation and ATM activation UFL1 promotes histone H4 ufmylation and ATM activation, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09175-0 Ufmylation is a ubiquitylation-like protein modification but only a few ufmylation substrates and functions have been discovered so far. Here, the authors demonstrate ufmylation of histone H4 upon DNA damage and show that th

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Chronic Chlamydia infection in human organoids increases stemness and promotes age-dependent CpG methylation

Chronic Chlamydia infection in human organoids increases stemness and promotes age-dependent CpG methylation Chronic Chlamydia infection in human organoids increases stemness and promotes age-dependent CpG methylation, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09144-7 Chronic infections of the fallopian tubes with Chlamydia trachomatis can cause scarring and infertility. Here, the a

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Clonal architectures predict clinical outcome in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

Clonal architectures predict clinical outcome in clear cell renal cell carcinoma Clonal architectures predict clinical outcome in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09241-7 Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is a urogenital cancer with a well-defined genetic landscape. Here, the authors analyse the clonal architecture of ccRCC patients fr

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Inactivation of a CRF-dependent amygdalofugal pathway reverses addiction-like behaviors in alcohol-dependent rats

Inactivation of a CRF-dependent amygdalofugal pathway reverses addiction-like behaviors in alcohol-dependent rats Inactivation of a CRF-dependent amygdalofugal pathway reverses addiction-like behaviors in alcohol-dependent rats, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09183-0 Withdrawal from alcohol activates neurons in the central amygdala (CeA) and increases craving for alcohol.

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Generic synthesis of small-sized hollow mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles for oxygen-independent X-ray-activated synergistic therapy

Generic synthesis of small-sized hollow mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles for oxygen-independent X-ray-activated synergistic therapy Generic synthesis of small-sized hollow mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles for oxygen-independent X-ray-activated synergistic therapy, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09158-1 A common failure of many cancer treatments is attributed to

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Effects of infection history on dengue virus infection and pathogenicity

Effects of infection history on dengue virus infection and pathogenicity Effects of infection history on dengue virus infection and pathogenicity, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09193-y Lack of knowledge of individual infection history hinders understanding of immunological interactions among DENV serotypes. Here, the authors introduce a framework to infer the relationshi

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Molecular motors run in unison in a metal-organic framework

For molecular motors to be exploited effectively, they need to be able to operate in unison. However, integrating billions of these nanometer-sized motors into a single system, and getting them to operate in unison has proved to be quite a challenge. Organic chemists at the University of Groningen have now succeeded in integrating numerous unidirectional light-driven rotary motors into a metal-org

6h

Where are teens getting their electronic cigarettes?

A UC researcher performed a secondary analysis of the 2016 National Youth Tobacco Survey, finding that of 1,579 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 who had admitted to using electronic cigarettes within the last 30 days of the survey, 13.6 percent were daily users. She further found that daily users were far more likely to obtain their electronic cigarettes and accessories from commercial so

6h

Google research shows how AI can make ophthalmologists more effective

As artificial intelligence continues to evolve, diagnosing disease faster and potentially with greater accuracy than physicians, some have suggested that technology may soon replace tasks that physicians currently perform.

6h

Godishalsband inspirerade ny läkemedelsteknik

Kommer du ihåg de där godishalsbanden du hade som barn? Sådana med pastellfärgade tabletter med hål i uppträdda på en resårtråd. Niclas Roxhed, docent vid avdelningen mikro- och nanosystem på KTH, minns dem. Det var med sådana godishalsband i åtanke som han kom på idéen med läkemedelsspiralen. Forskningsarbetet, som precis resulterat i en vetenskaplig artikel i tidskriften Science Translational M

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Analys av variation i hjärtfrekvens ger bättre uppföljning av enkammarhjärta

– Att tidigt kunna identifiera rubbningar i hjärtrytmen är värdefullt för att ytterligare förbättra prognosen för dessa barn, säger Jenny Alenius Dahlqvist, doktorand vid Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap vid Umeå universitet. Överlevnaden har förbättrats mycket kraftigt för personer som föds med allvarliga hjärtfel. Många fler än tidigare når nu vuxen ålder och kan leva ett relativt normalt li

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Letters: ‘I Have Not Fallen Out of Love With My Cabbage’

The People Who Eat the Same Meal Every Day The Atlantic staff writer Joe Pinsker eats the same bean-and-cheese soft tacos every day for lunch. Curious as to what drives others who share his proclivity for routine, Pinsker talked to a handful of people who also eat the same meal every day. One source found solace in the regularity; another liked that it makes grocery shopping simpler. And, one his

6h

Dead Whale Washes Ashore with Shocking 88 lbs. of Plastic in Its Stomach

His stomach "had the most plastic we have ever seen in a whale"

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Do Science. Pump. Repeat.

How to improve scientist-moms’ breastfeeding experience — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Green tech startups see boost in patents and investment when partnering with government

Collaboration between government and startups could help meet the climate challenge while growing small businesses. Findings could inform discussions on Green New Deal or any 'forward-looking policy package', say researchers.

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Humans Can Sense Earth's Magnetic Field, Brain Imaging Study Says

Do human beings have a magnetic sense? Biologists know other animals do. They think it helps creatures including bees, turtles and birds navigate through the world. Scientists have tried to investigate whether humans belong on the list of magnetically sensitive organisms. For decades, there’s been a back-and-forth between positive reports and failures to demonstrate the trait in people, with seemi

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Japan Announces Plan to Bomb Asteroid

Big Kaboom Last Month, Japan’s robotic spacecraft Hayabusa2 landed on an asteroid . Now, the Japanese space agency, JAXA, says that Hayabusa2 will return with an explosive vengeance. Next month, Hayabusa2 will drop a bomb on the asteroid and mine some of the exploded fragments, according to The Associated Press , blowing a huge crater in the space rock — which, no matter how you look at it, sound

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JPMorgan Chase tests neuroscience-based video games to recruit interns

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Semimetals are high conductors

Researchers in China and at UC Davis have measured high conductivity in very thin layers of niobium arsenide, a type of material called a Weyl semimetal. The material has about three times the conductivity of copper at room temperature.

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Rising temps could devastate painted turtles

Changes in temperature as a result of climate change could devastate a range of species for which temperature determines sex during critical stages of development, according to new research. Rising temperatures, along with wider oscillations in temperature, could disrupt the ratio of males to females in painted turtle populations and threaten the survival of the species, says Nicole Valenzuela, a

6h

New Harvard Research Could Be a Step to Human Limb Regeneration

Miracle Grow Harvard researchers say they’ve identified a “DNA switch” enabling animals to regrow entire portions of their bodies — a finding that, with a few important caveats, could pave the way to helping human lost limb regeneration. Like lizards, basically. Limb Bulb The just-published research in the prestigious journal Science details how Gehrke and colleagues sequenced the genetic code of

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Do Science. Pump. Repeat.

How to improve scientist-moms’ breastfeeding experience — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Climate change negatively affects waterbirds in the American West

New research shows that recent climate change is having profound effects on wetlands across the American West – affecting birds that use these wetlands for breeding, migration and wintering.

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Green tech startups see boost in patents and investment when partnering with government

Collaboration between government and startups could help meet the climate challenge while growing small businesses. Findings could inform discussions on Green New Deal or any 'forward-looking policy package', say researchers.

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Horseshoe crabs are captured for their blue blood. That practice will soon be over.

Horseshoe crabs' blue blood is so valuable that a quart of it can be sold for $15,000. This is because it contains a molecule that is crucial to the medical research community. Today, however, new innovations have resulted in a synthetic substitute that may end the practice of farming horseshoe crabs for their blood. None One of humanity's strangest and most macabre activities is slowly coming to

6h

Foxconn says Wisconsin factory will be operational in 2020

Foxconn Technology Group said Monday that its manufacturing facility in Wisconsin will be producing flat-screen panels by the end of 2020, with construction starting later this year.

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Cyprus bird trapping hits record low, says NGO

The mass killing of migratory birds in Cyprus has reached a record low mainly due to a clampdown on illegal trapping in British military-controlled areas, a conservationist group said Monday.

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Scientists reactive cells from 28,000-year-old woolly mammoth

The team managed to stimulate nucleus-like structures to perform some biological processes, but not cell division. Unless better technology and DNA samples emerge in the future, it's unlikely that scientists will be able to clone a woolly mammoth. Still, studying the DNA of woolly mammoths provides valuable insights into the genetic adaptations that allowed them to survive in unique environments.

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Cyprus bird trapping hits record low, says NGO

The mass killing of migratory birds in Cyprus has reached a record low mainly due to a clampdown on illegal trapping in British military-controlled areas, a conservationist group said Monday.

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Excessive phosphate fertilizer use can reduce microbial functions critical to crop health

Phosphorus is crucial for plant growth—with it, plants can acquire, transfer, and store the energy that helps them flourish in full health. Without it, plants flounder: they're stunted, discolored, and produce low yields. For this reason, farmers and gardeners often apply phosphate fertilizers (P-fertilizer) to increase the amount of phosphorous in their soil. However, a recent study finds that ex

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Step-up or break out: How firms in unstable countries can secure overseas business

Offshoring services providers (OSPs) operating in unstable countries can secure overseas projects and deliver on their promises if they understand the issues overseas clients may have when doing business with OSPs and work to address these a priority within the business relationship.

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Uncertain projections help to reveal the truth about future climate change

A team of four scientists from the US and the UK explain how differing climate model projections can be used collectively to reduce uncertainties in future climate change, in a paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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Supercrystal: A hidden phase of matter created by a burst of light

"Frustration" plus a pulse of laser light resulted in a stable "supercrystal" created by a team of researchers led by Penn State and Argonne National Laboratory, together with University of California, Berkeley, and two other national laboratories.

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Our brains might sense Earth's magnetic field just like birds do

Some magnetic field alterations cause changes in brain activity, suggesting a magnetic sense could have played a role in the nomadic lives of our hunter-gatherer ancestors

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Materials could delay frost up to 300 times longer than existing anti-icing coatings

Most techniques to prevent frost and ice formation on surfaces rely heavily on heating or liquid chemicals that need to be repeatedly reapplied because they easily wash away. Even advanced anti-icing materials have problems functioning under conditions of high humidity and subzero conditions, when frost and ice formation go into overdrive.

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On-chip, electronically tunable frequency comb

Lasers play a vital role in everything from modern communications and connectivity to bio-medicine and manufacturing. Many applications, however, require lasers that can emit multiple frequencies—colors of light—simultaneously, each precisely separated like the tooth on a comb.

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Trump Fears Self-Driving Cars: “You Can’t Stop the F*cking Thing”

Corroborating Stories Donald Trump has aligned himself with the 71 percent of Americans wary of self-driving cars, reportedly telling a number of people he doesn’t trust autonomous vehicle tech, according to Axios . Axios spoke to four anonymous sources who all heard Trump say he doesn’t believe self-driving technology will ever be perfected. When a fellow golf club member expressed excitement fo

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Is NASA's Golden Age of Space Telescopes Ending?

For the second year in a row, the White House is seeking to cancel one of the space agency’s top-priority astrophysics projects, the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NSF hopes Jason can lead it through treacherous waters

Research agency wants famed advisory group to look at balancing national security and open science

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Stem cell work could stem the aging process

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Excessive phosphate fertilizer use can reduce microbial functions critical to crop health

A team of scientists at Penn State University set out to determine if nutrient history changed the function of soil microorganisms. The answer seems to be yes, and that soil treated with high amounts of phosphate can result in poorer plant performance, but even more intriguing, it appears that the soil microorganisms from this conditioned soil can negatively impact plant yield.

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Materials could delay frost up to 300 times longer than existing anti-icing coatings

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Engineering describe for the first time several unique properties of materials known as phase-switching liquids, or PSLs, that hold promise as next-generation anti-icing materials. PSLs can delay ice and frost formation up to 300 times longer than state-of-the-art coatings being developed in laboratories.

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Breastfeeding can erase effects of prenatal violence for newborns

Notre Dame researchers found that breastfeeding through the first six weeks of life acts as a protective factor, effectively negating the risk of IPV the mother experienced during pregnancy on early infant difficult temperament.

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Alligator study reveals insight into dinosaur hearing

UMD biologist finds alligators build neural maps of sound the way birds do, suggesting the hearing strategy existed in their common ancestor, the dinosaurs.

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Evidence for ancient magnetic sense in humans

The human brain can unconsciously respond to changes in Earth's magnetic fields, according to a team of geoscientists and neurobiologists. Reported in eNeuro, this interdisciplinary study revives a research area in neuroscience that has remained dormant for decades.

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Healthy fats improve nerve function in obese mice

Swapping dietary saturated fats for monounsaturated fats reverses nerve damage and restores nerve function in male mice, finds new preclinical research published in JNeurosci. These data support further investigation of diets rich in healthy fats as a potential treatment for the nerve damage that occurs with diabetes, known as diabetic neuropathy.

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Alligator study supports convergent evolution of spatial hearing

Alligators encode a sound's location in space like birds but differently than mammals, according to a comparative animal study published in JNeurosci. This finding provides evidence for the evolution of distinct strategies for spatial hearing.

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Daily briefing: Top tips for undergraduates looking to break into the lab

Daily briefing: Top tips for undergraduates looking to break into the lab Daily briefing: Top tips for undergraduates looking to break into the lab, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00940-1 How to find research work and make the most of it, stem-cell therapy for corneas and controversial deep-sea mining is about to be put to the test

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A Damaged Soul and a Disordered Personality

Donald Trump is not well. Over the weekend, he continued his weird obsession with a dead war hero. This time, his attacks on John McCain came two days after the anniversary of McCain’s release from a North Vietnamese prison camp. He tweeted this: Spreading the fake and totally discredited Dossier “is unfortunately a very dark stain against John McCain.” Ken Starr, Former Independent Counsel. He h

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Pole position: human body might be able to pick up on Earth's magnetic field

Scientists say there are signs of humans having a subconscious magnetic sense It sounds like a power to be boasted of by the X-Men, but researchers say humans might have the ability to pick up on Earth’s magnetic field. Many animals, from pigeons to turtles, use it to navigate, while research has shown cattle prefer to align themselves with the field when standing in, well, a field. Even dogs mak

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Biologists Discover Unknown Powers in Mighty Mitochondria

Of all the organelles to be found inside eukaryotic cells, the DNA-sheltering nuclei might be the best-known, but the mitochondria are surely not far behind. Mitochondria are familiar as bean-shaped structures floating in the cytoplasm, and they are almost inevitably referred to as “powerhouses” of the cell because they generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the fuel for most metabolic processes.

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Scientists Find Evidence That Your Brain Can Sense Earth's Magnetic Field

The Earth's magnetic field might be influencing the brain.

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Humans—like other animals—may sense Earth’s magnetic field

But does this subconscious sense help us find our way?

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Blind mice get their sight back after gene insertion

Scientists inserted a gene for a green-light receptor into the eyes of blind mice and, a month later, the mice were navigating around obstacles as easily as those with no vision problems. The mice could see motion, brightness changes over a thousandfold range, and fine detail on an iPad sufficient to distinguish letters. The researchers say that, within as little as three years, the gene therapy—

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People can sense Earth’s magnetic field, brain waves suggest

An analysis of brain waves offers new evidence that people subconsciously process information about the planet’s magnetism.

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Fertility app 'Dot' found to be as effective as other family planning methods

Results of a first-of-its-kind prospective study with a family planning app find it to be as effective as other modern methods for avoiding an unplanned pregnancy, according to Georgetown researchers.

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Ticagrelor is as safe and effective as clopidogrel after heart attack

Patients given clot busters to treat a heart attack fared equally well if they were given the standard blood thinning medication clopidogrel versus the newer, more potent drug ticagrelor, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Study: Research ties common heartburn medications to kidney disease and failure

Common medications prescribed to treat heartburn, acid reflux and ulcers are linked to increased risks for kidney failure and chronic kidney disease, found a recent University at Buffalo study.

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Stopping aspirin three months after stenting does not increase risk of death

Patients who stopped taking aspirin three months after receiving a stent to open the heart's arteries but continued taking a P2Y12 inhibitor — clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor — did not experience higher rates of death from any cause, heart attack or stroke after a year compared with those receiving standard therapy, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68t

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Stopping DAPT after one-month improved outcomes in stent patients

Patients who stopped taking aspirin one month after receiving a stent in the heart's arteries but continued taking the P2Y12 inhibitor clopidogrel fared significantly better after one year compared with those who followed the standard practice of continuing both medications, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Advances point the way to smaller, safer batteries

New Cornell research advances the design of solid-state batteries, a technology that is inherently safer and more energy-dense than today's lithium-ion batteries, which rely on flammable liquid electrolytes for fast transfer of chemical energy stored in molecular bonds to electricity. By starting with liquid electrolytes and then transforming them into solid polymers inside the electrochemical cel

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Scientists hunt down the brain circuit responsible for alcohol cravings

Scientists at Scripps Research have found that they can reverse the desire to drink in alcohol-dependent rats — with the flip of a switch. The researchers were able to use lasers to temporarily inactivate a specific neuronal population, reversing alcohol-seeking behavior and even reducing the physical symptoms of withdrawal.

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Angiography timing does not impact survival after cardiac arrest for NSTEMI patients

In patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest who do not show evidence of the type of heart attack known as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), receiving immediate coronary angiography did not improve survival at 90 days compared to waiting a few days before undergoing the procedure, based on findings presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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The story of GARP: a potential target for cancer immunotherapy

In an article published in the March issue of Cancer Research, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina reveal how the cell surface receptor GARP plays a role in T regulatory cell function and migration to the gut. Because the presence of T regulatory cells in the gut is generally associated with negative outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer, GARP could have potential as a th

7h

Meningitis changes immune cell makeup in the mouse brain lining

Meningitis, a group of serious diseases which infect the brain's lining, leaves its mark and can affect the body's ability to fight such infections in the future. According to a new study published in Nature Immunology, infections can have long-lasting effects on a population of meningeal immune cells, replacing them with cells from outside the meninges that then change and become less likely to r

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Radial, femoral access for PCI found equal in terms of survival

Doctors can use either an artery in the arm (the radial approach) or in the groin (the femoral approach) to safely perform percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on patients presenting with a heart attack, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session. The research, which was stopped early, suggests the radial and femoral approach are equi

7h

Heading in the right direction: humans have an inbuilt compass

Research suggests that people – like migratory birds – can sense the magnetic pull of the poles. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Alligator study reveals insight into dinosaur hearing

To determine where a sound is coming from, animal brains analyze the minute difference in time it takes a sound to reach each ear—a cue known as interaural time difference. What happens to the cue once the signals get to the brain depends on what kind of animal is doing the hearing.

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Alligator study reveals insight into dinosaur hearing

To determine where a sound is coming from, animal brains analyze the minute difference in time it takes a sound to reach each ear—a cue known as interaural time difference. What happens to the cue once the signals get to the brain depends on what kind of animal is doing the hearing.

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The Private Sector Is Returning to the Flood Insurance Game

New technology and increased investment could help expand paltry flood coverage — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Russian Military Confirms New Weapon Causes “Hallucinatory Symptoms”

“Barf-Inducing Lights” A non-lethal Russian weapon called the Filin 5P-42 system picked up a run of press coverage by Western media last month — including by Futurism — reporting that the Russian Navy is “ fitting ships with barf-inducing lights .” Now, new details are emerging about the weapon. Russian state-owned news agency Sputnik News confirmed yesterday that the Russian Navy is developing a

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What Are Superfoods?

Superfoods, although nutritious, shouldn't be considered a silver bullet.

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In Photos: Deadly Floods Sweep the Midwest

At least three people are confirmed to have lost their lives so far amid record-setting floods affecting parts of Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, and other nearby states. Thousands of people have been asked to evacuate, and many have been away from their homes for days in hard-hit Nebraska, following last week’s “bomb cyclone” weather system that dropped huge amounts of precipitation—adding to existing

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Cave full of rat bones reveals ‘Hobbit’ habitat

The rat body size has shifted over time offers a glimpse into the habitat of the mysterious hominin Homo floresiensis —nicknamed the “Hobbit” due to its diminutive stature, a new study reports. The findings, based on an analysis of thousands of rodent bones, mainly fore- and hind-limbs, from an Indonesian cave where scientists discovered H. floresiensis in 2003, indicate that the local habitat wa

7h

Water-resistant electronic skin with self-healing abilities created

Inspired by jellyfish, researchers have created an electronic skin that is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and repairs itself in both wet and dry conditions. The novel material has wide-ranging uses, from water-resistant touch screens to soft robots aimed at mimicking biological tissues.

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Trump Plans to End the AIDS Epidemic. In Places Like Mississippi, Obstacles Are Everywhere.

The administration will focus on more than 50 “hot spots” in the U.S. that annually account for half of new H.I.V. infections. A clinic in the Deep South sees the challenges every day.

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Have sleep apnea? Using your CPAP device consistently may slow memory loss

A growing number of studies suggest that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), or 'sleep-disordered breathing,' is associated with a higher risk for memory problems and for problems with thinking and making decisions. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), a pressurized mask worn during sleep, eliminates obstructive sleep apnea. Now researchers in a new study examined whether using CP

7h

Low-risk patients may benefit from less invasive transcatheter valve replacement

A new study by a team of cardiologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) led by senior and corresponding author Jeffrey Popma, M.D., suggests that a minimally invasive procedure currently reserved for patients too frail to undergo surgery may in fact be a safe and effective alternative for healthier patients.

7h

On-chip, electronically tunable frequency comb

Now, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Stanford University have developed an integrated, on-chip frequency comb that is efficient, stable and highly controllable with microwaves.

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New research explores value-based medicine, integrative health, and whole systems research

Two decades ago, the popular movement for integrative health practices prompted researchers to advance 'whole systems research' (WSR).

7h

Surgery using ultrasound energy found to treat high blood pressure

A one-off operation that targets the nerves connected to the kidney has been found to maintain reduced blood pressure in hypertension patients for at least six months, according to the results of a clinical trial led in the UK by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust, and supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

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Refugee women have healthier pregnancies than US women — why? An unhealthy US culture

African refugee women experience healthier pregnancies than women born in the United States, despite receiving less prenatal care, found a recent University at Buffalo study.

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DeepMind will control any AGI it creates, not Alphabet/Google

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Now this is what I believe is REAL Artificial Intelligence!

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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On the Job: Artificial Intelligence Goes to School

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Save on smart home gadgets, camping gear, and other good deals happening today

Gadgets Sizzlin' savings. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Rukwa Rift Basin Project names new Cretaceous mammal from East African Rift System

Researchers announced a new species of mammal from the Age of Dinosaurs, representing the most complete mammal from the Cretaceous Period of continental Africa, and providing tantalizing insights into the past diversity of mammals on the planet.

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Water-resistant electronic skin with self-healing abilities created

Inspired by jellyfish, researchers have created an electronic skin that is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and repairs itself in both wet and dry conditions. The novel material has wide-ranging uses, from water-resistant touch screens to soft robots aimed at mimicking biological tissues.

7h

7 essential Eastern philosophy books

The books of Zen, Tao and Confucius thought dispense with wisdom. Read fundamental texts like the I Ching, which are thousands of years old. Thought-provoking views from Ram Dass and Herman Hesse's classic books on coming of age and enlightenment. All cultures in the world have sought to develop an understanding of themselves, their realities and seek deeper truths. While the scientific and reduc

8h

Psyche: Metal world mission targets 'iron volcanoes'

What exotic processes occur on the world known as 16 Psyche? A Nasa mission will soon find out.

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Soggy Ben Nevis can be remarkably dry

Old weather data reveals how the UK's highest mountain can experience periods of near-zero humidity.

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Pandanomics is a grey area, but to us the value of giant pandas is black and white

Wang Wang and Funi came to Australia from China a decade ago. Their relationship is best described as complicated. Despite considerable medical assistance, they have never managed to produce offspring. It has put a big question mark over whether they will be permitted to remain in Australia.

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Attosecond angular streaking and tunnelling time in atomic hydrogen

Attosecond angular streaking and tunnelling time in atomic hydrogen Attosecond angular streaking and tunnelling time in atomic hydrogen, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1028-3 Simulation and measurement of the photoionization of atomic hydrogen at attosecond resolution confirm that the tunnelling of the ejected electron is instantaneous.

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Visualizing DNA folding and RNA in embryos at single-cell resolution

Visualizing DNA folding and RNA in embryos at single-cell resolution Visualizing DNA folding and RNA in embryos at single-cell resolution, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1035-4 Optical reconstruction of chromatin architecture and multiplex RNA labelling traces the DNA path in single cells and its relationship to transcription.

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Beto O’Rourke Was Right, and Democrats Might Not Forgive Him

Beto O’Rourke has been doing a lot of apologizing since entering the race for the Democratic presidential nomination just days ago. Among other things, the former Texas congressman has expressed regret for having made light of his negligent parenting, for the extent to which he had benefited from “white privilege,” and for having penned a gruesome murder story as a teenager. Given the mood of the

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Statin add-on may offer new/another option for reducing LDL-C in high-risk patients

Patients at high risk for a heart attack or stroke who took an investigational drug in addition to a statin had significantly lower LDL, or 'bad' cholesterol, after 12 weeks compared to similar patients who took a placebo in addition to statin therapy, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Two-drug combos using popular calcium channel blocker show superiority in lowering BP

In the largest randomized controlled trial of treatment for high blood pressure ever conducted in sub-Saharan Africa, two frontline two-drug combinations that included the long-acting calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, were able to drive down blood pressure levels more than a third two-drug combination that did not include amlodipine, according to research presented at the American College of Ca

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Fast-acting psychedelic associated with improvements in depression/anxiety

Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that use of the synthetic psychedelic 5-methocy-N,-N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) appears to be associated with unintended improvements in self-reported depression and anxiety when given in a ceremonial group setting. 5-MeO-DMT is a psychedelic that is found in the venom of Bufo Alvarius toads, in a variety of plants species, and can be produced syntheti

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Diabetes drug effective against heart failure in wide spectrum of patients

The cardiovascular benefits of the diabetes drug dapagliflozin extend across a wide spectrum of patients and are especially pronounced in those with reduced ejection fraction, a measure of the heart's pumping ability indicative of poor heart functioning, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Step-up or break out: How firms in unstable countries can secure overseas business

Offshoring services providers (OSPs) operating in unstable countries can secure overseas projects and deliver on their promises if they understand the issues overseas clients may have when doing business with OSPs and work to address these a priority within the business relationship.

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Uncertain projections help to reveal the truth about future climate change

A team of four scientists from the US and the UK explain how differing climate model projections can be used collectively to reduce uncertainties in future climate change, in a paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change.

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Supercrystal: A hidden phase of matter created by a burst of light

'Frustration' plus a pulse of laser light resulted in a stable 'supercrystal' created by a team of researchers led by Penn State and Argonne National Laboratory, together with University of California, Berkeley, and two other national laboratories.

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EPFL researchers make a key discovery on how alpine streams work

An EPFL study has showed that until now, scientists have been substantially underestimating how quickly gases are exchanged between mountain streams and the atmosphere. Based on research in the Swiss cantons of Vaud and Valais, an EPFL laboratory has shed new light on the role of mountain streams to emit greenhouse gases.

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Zika study may 'supercharge' vaccine research

Scientists looking at the genetics of Zika virus have found a way to fast-track research which could lead to new vaccines.The study, led by The University of Queensland and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, used a new technique to uncover Zika mutations that help foster virus replication in mosquito hosts, while hindering its ability to replicate in mammals.

8h

Common treatment for multiple sclerosis may prolong life

Researchers from the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute have found that a widely prescribed drug for multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with longer survival for patients.

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Protective antibodies also found in premature babies

Even premature babies carry anti-viral antibodies transferred from the mother, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in a paper on maternal antibodies in newborns, published in the journal Nature Medicine. The results should change our approach to infection sensitivity in newborns, they say.

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New perspective on changing travel conditions in Arctic communities

Inuit communities' travel skills and regional knowledge have helped mitigate the effects of Arctic climate change on travel conditions, according to a new study.

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Spiraling giants: Witnessing the birth of a massive binary star system

Scientists have made observations of a molecular cloud that is collapsing to form two massive protostars that will eventually become a binary star system. The observations showed that already at this early stage, the cloud contains two objects, a massive 'primary' central star and another 'secondary' forming star, also of high mass.

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Rising global shipping traffic could lead to surge in invasive species

Rising global maritime traffic could lead to sharp increases in invasive species around the world over the next 30 years, according to a new study by McGill University researchers. The findings, published in the journal Nature Sustainability, suggest that shipping growth will far outweigh climate change in the spread of non-indigenous pests to new environments in coming decades.

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UW team finds key to common cancer pathway

A team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison cancer researchers Richard A. Anderson and Vincent Cryns reports the discovery of an unexpected regulator of the critical protein protein p53, opening the door to the development of drugs that could target it.

8h

Pandanomics is a grey area, but to us the value of giant pandas is black and white

Wang Wang and Funi came to Australia from China a decade ago. Their relationship is best described as complicated. Despite considerable medical assistance, they have never managed to produce offspring. It has put a big question mark over whether they will be permitted to remain in Australia.

8h

The Cuban "Sonic Attack" and Journalistic Ethics

A session at a recent scientific meeting exposed the dangers not of mythical high-tech weapons but of the heedless rush to sensationalize — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why you shouldn't bury your pet in the backyard

Companion animals are part of our families, but inevitably the time comes for us to say goodbye to them due to old age or disease.

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Scientists grow 'mini-brain on the move' that can contract muscle

Cambridge researchers grew ‘organoid’ that spontaneously connected to spinal cord Scientists have grown a miniature brain in a dish with a spinal cord and muscles attached, an advance that promises to accelerate the study of conditions such as motor neurone disease. The lentil-sized grey blob of human brain cells were seen to spontaneously send out tendril-like connections to link up with the spi

8h

Why you shouldn't bury your pet in the backyard

Companion animals are part of our families, but inevitably the time comes for us to say goodbye to them due to old age or disease.

8h

Systems Immunology: Understanding Responses to Vaccination and Infection

The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to discuss their research and experiences in systems immunology.

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Curious Kids: why bats sleep upside down, and other stories of animal adaptation

Why do bats sleep upside down? – Questions from Year 5 at Brandon Park Primary School, Victoria. The class has been studying animal adaptation.

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Curious Kids: why bats sleep upside down, and other stories of animal adaptation

Why do bats sleep upside down? – Questions from Year 5 at Brandon Park Primary School, Victoria. The class has been studying animal adaptation.

8h

Rising global shipping traffic could lead to surge in invasive species

Rising global maritime traffic could lead to sharp increases in invasive species around the world over the next 30 years, according to a new study by McGill University researchers.

8h

New perspective on changing travel conditions in Arctic communities

Inuit communities' travel skills and regional knowledge have helped mitigate the effects of Arctic climate change on travel conditions, according to a new study.

8h

Zika study may 'supercharge' vaccine research

Scientists looking at the genetics of Zika virus have found a way to fast-track research which could lead to new vaccines.

8h

Spiraling giants: Witnessing the birth of a massive binary star system

Scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research in Japan, Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden and the University of Virginia in the USA and collaborators have made observations of a molecular cloud that is collapsing to form two massive protostars that will eventually become a binary star system.

8h

Back to the drawing board for conservationists battling against infectious parrot disease

A study into the effectiveness of disinfecting birds' nests, carried out by the University of Kent, has led to a breakthrough in the understanding of biosecuity measures for the endangered echo parakeet in Mauritius. The research team found that annual disinfection of parakeet nest sites prior to the breeding season, intended to reduce the spread of infectious disease in endangered parrot species,

8h

Zika study may 'supercharge' vaccine research

Scientists looking at the genetics of Zika virus have found a way to fast-track research which could lead to new vaccines.

8h

Back to the drawing board for conservationists battling against infectious parrot disease

A study into the effectiveness of disinfecting birds' nests, carried out by the University of Kent, has led to a breakthrough in the understanding of biosecuity measures for the endangered echo parakeet in Mauritius. The research team found that annual disinfection of parakeet nest sites prior to the breeding season, intended to reduce the spread of infectious disease in endangered parrot species,

8h

Dead whale found with 40kg of plastic in its stomach

A dead whale found in the Philippines with 40kg of plastic inside its body is the latest example of the problem of plastic pollution

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A third of fish sold is mislabelled — here’s how to avoid being duped

Working out if you’re eating wild cod or farmed catfish is hard as mislabelling is rampant, but there are ways to make sure you're not swindled

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The Cuban "Sonic Attack" and Journalistic Ethics

A session at a recent scientific meeting exposed the dangers not of mythical high-tech weapons but of the heedless rush to sensationalize — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Thin and powerful

Graphene film promises high-efficiency solar harvesting.

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Quantum tunnelling is instantaneous, researchers find

Physicists establish that electrons waste no time bashing through a barrier. Alan Duffy reports.

8h

Elite Colleges Constantly Tell Low-Income Students That They Do Not Belong

Last Tuesday, the Justice Department charged 50 people with involvement in an elaborate scheme to purchase spots in some of the country’s top schools. The tactics described in the indictment were complex and multipronged, requiring multiple steps of deception and bribery by parents and their co-conspirators to secure their children’s admission to the schools of their choice. The plot purportedly

8h

Dead whale found with 40kg of plastic in its stomach

A dead whale found in the Philippines with 40kg of plastic inside its body is the latest example of the problem of plastic pollution

8h

Prophylactic cranial irradiation: Improvements for advanced NSCLC

Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI), a technique used to prevent the clinical development of brain metastases, is established as a standard approach for many patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) after initial therapy. While studies established that PCI decreases the incidence of brain metastases for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC), there is no establi

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Lowering blood pressure prevents worsening brain damage in elderly

Elderly people with high blood pressure, or hypertension, who took medicine to keep their 24-hour systolic blood pressure around 130 mm Hg for three years showed significantly less accumulation of harmful brain lesions compared with those taking medicine to maintain a systolic blood pressure around 145 mm Hg, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scien

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Machine learning scientists to collaborate on AI-powered drug discovery

The laboratories of Jianfeng Pei at Peking University and Alex Zhavoronkov at Insilico Medicine partner with Frontiers in Pharmacology, a leading open science platform on the research topic "AI for drug discovery and development"

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Back to the drawing board for conservationists battling against infectious parrot disease

A study into the effectiveness of disinfecting birds' nests, carried out by the University of Kent, has led to a breakthrough in the understanding of biosecuity measures for the endangered echo parakeet in Mauritius. The research team found that annual disinfection of parakeet nest sites prior to the breeding season, intended to reduce the spread of infectious disease in endangered parrot species,

8h

NASA-NOAA Satellite catches last burst of energy in Tropical Depression 03W

Tropical Depression 03W has dissipated in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, but not without one last show of strength on infrared satellite imagery.

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Blood pressure control reduces dementia risk in mid-life patients with atrial fibrillation

Dementia risk in mid-life patients with atrial fibrillation can be reduced by controlling high blood pressure, according to a study presented today at EHRA 2019, a congress of the European Society of Cardiology.

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NASA-NOAA Satellite catches last burst of energy in Tropical Depression 03W

Tropical Depression 03W has dissipated in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, but not without one last show of strength on infrared satellite imagery.

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Systems Immunology: Understanding Responses to Vaccination and Infection

The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to discuss their research and experiences in systems immunology.

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Pure Omega-3 prescription drug markedly reduces first, repeat and total CV events

Taking a high dose of icosapent ethyl — a pure and stable prescription form of the omega-3 fatty acid known as EPA — significantly reduces the occurrence of first, subsequent and total ischemic events, including heart attacks, strokes and related deaths, among people at high cardiovascular risk despite already being on statin therapy, according to new research.

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Who should Fido fear? Depends on relationship

As states around the country move to stiffen punishments for animal cruelty, researchers have found a correlation between the types of animal abuse committed and the perpetrator's relationship to an animal and its owner.

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Taking statins for heart disease cuts risk in half, yet only 6 percent of patients taking as directed

A new study finds that taking statins for heart disease cuts risk of second serious event in half, yet only 6 percent of patients are following as directed.

8h

How heavy elements come about in the universe

Heavy elements are produced during stellar explosion or on the surfaces of neutron stars through the capture of hydrogen nuclei (protons). This occurs at extremely high temperatures, but at relatively low energies.

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Eight new unique gene mutations in patients with hereditable heart muscle disease

Researchers have identified eight new gene mutations that may cause or contribute to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease not caused by known external influences, such as high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, or diseased coronary arteries.

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Bill Carter Jenkins (1945–2019)

Bill Carter Jenkins (1945–2019) Bill Carter Jenkins (1945–2019), Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00900-9 Tuskegee whistle-blower who drove social justice in biomedicine.

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Ni ud af ti medlemmer blæser på IDA-demokratiet

Stemmeprocenten er et problem for de IDA-valgtes legitimitet – og ærgerligt for medlemmerne, mener en nuværende og to tidligere formænd for foreningens valgudvalg.

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Some patients with A-fib should skip aspirin

The drugs apixaban and clopidogrel—without aspirin—comprise the safest treatment regimen for certain patients with atrial fibrillation (A-fib), according to new research. The finding—which applies specifically to patients with A-fib who have had a heart attack and/or are undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention—should reassure clinicians and patients that dropping aspirin results in no signi

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Virtual reality could improve your balance, study finds

Virtual Reality technology could become an efficient tool for older people with balance problems or for rehabilitation following injuries or illness that affect balance and movement. In a new study published in Scientific Reports, researchers from Lund University in Sweden have studied how the human balance system is affected by watching Virtual Reality videos.

8h

CDC researchers report on trends in hospital breastfeeding policies

A new study from the CDC showed modest improvement in optimal hospital breastfeeding policy from 2009 to 2015, with more than 2 times as many hospitals having a model breastfeeding policy and increases in early initiation of breastfeeding and limitation of non-breast milk feeds of breastfed infants.

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Who should Fido fear? Depends on relationship

As states around the country move to stiffen punishments for animal cruelty, Michigan State University researchers have found a correlation between the types of animal abuse committed and the perpetrator's relationship to an animal and its owner.

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Pure Omega-3 prescription drug markedly reduces first, repeat and total CV events

Taking a high dose of icosapent ethyl — a pure and stable prescription form of the omega-3 fatty acid known as EPA — significantly reduces the occurrence of first, subsequent and total ischemic events, including heart attacks, strokes and related deaths, among people at high cardiovascular risk despite already being on statin therapy, according to research presented at the American College of Ca

8h

Who should Fido fear? Depends on relationship

As states around the country move to stiffen punishments for animal cruelty, Michigan State University researchers have found a correlation between the types of animal abuse committed and the perpetrator's relationship to an animal and its owner.

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Some Viruses May Infect by Inserting Different Portions of Genetic Material

Viruses that infect plants and occasionally insects appear to cause infection with a divide-and-conquer strategy, multiplying separate segments of genetic material in different host cells.

8h

Trembling aspen leaves could save future Mars rovers

Researchers have been inspired by the unique movement of trembling aspen leaves, to devise an energy harvesting mechanism that could power weather sensors in hostile environments and could even be a back-up energy supply that could save and extend the life of future Mars rovers.

8h

Long-distance quantum information exchange — success at the nanoscale

Researchers have realized the swap of electron spins between distant quantum dots. The discovery is a step towards applications of quantum information, as the dots leave enough room for delicate control electrodes, enabling integration with traditional microelectronics and perhaps, a future quantum computer.

8h

New practice corrects pump function in heart failure

New results pave the way for a new standard of care to improve the heart's pump function in selected patients with heart failure.

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Scientists identify compounds in coffee which may inhibit prostate cancer

For the first time, scientists have identified compounds found in coffee which may inhibit the growth of prostate cancer. This is a pilot study, carried out on drug-resistant cancer cells in cell culture and in a mouse model; it has not yet been tested in humans.

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Most teens report using marijuana less often after legalization

Only one group of teenagers used marijuana more often after retail sales were legalized in Washington than they did before — high school seniors who work 11 or more hours per week, according to new research led by a WSU College of Nursing professor.

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The robots that dementia caregivers want: Robots for joy, robots for sorrow

A team of scientists spent six months co-designing robots with informal caregivers for people with dementia, such as family members. They found that caregivers wanted the robots to fulfill two major roles: support positive moments shared by caregivers and their loved ones; and lessen caregivers' emotional stress by taking on difficult tasks, such as answering repeated questions and restricting unh

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Who should Fido fear? Depends on relationship

As states around the country move to stiffen punishments for animal cruelty, Michigan State University researchers have found a correlation between the types of animal abuse committed and the perpetrator's relationship to an animal and its owner.

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Why Zion Williamson Is Poised to Change the Course of NCAA History

Currently there is no more exciting player in college basketball—in all of basketball, perhaps—than Duke’s Zion Williamson. He dunks with power and grace. He blocks shots that most defenders would consider lost causes . He literally dents basketballs. To learned hoops druids such as The Ringer ’s Jason Concepcion, the 6-foot-7, 285-pound freshman forward seems like something out of a comic book,

8h

Trilobites: Honey as a Pollution Detector? It’s a Sweet Idea

Beehives and their contents are a sensitive detector of lead emissions, a study of Canadian urban apiaries showed.

8h

Opening up the analysis behind Elizabeth Warren's wealth tax plan

Senator Elizabeth Warren declared her 2020 presidential bid on a platform based on policies to rebuild the American middle-class. A key part of her campaign will be a progressive wealth tax on the net worth of American households, including a 2% tax on net worth above $50 million, and an additional 1% tax on net worth above $1 billion. UC Berkeley economists Emmanuel Saez and Gabriel Zucman—the re

8h

If You’re Still Not Using a Password Manager and VPN App, You’re Officially Out of Excuses

Major cyber attacks and data breaches are occurring at an alarming rate. In 2018 alone over 1.3 billion records were compromised in high-profile hacking incidents involving Twitter, Marriott, Exactis, and MyFitnessPal. So it’s no wonder 90 percent of consumers say they are “ very concerned ” about internet privacy. Unfortunately, all of this supposed concern about violations of online privacy has

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Billig, hvid fisk sælges som torsk: Gå efter MSC-mærket, hvis du ikke vil snydes

Ny undersøgelse viser, at der er langt mindre snyd med fisk, der bærer MSC-mærket.

8h

Boeing: 737 MAX certification followed US rules

Boeing said Monday that the flight stabilization system under scrutiny following two deadly 737 MAX plane crashes, met all US regulations.

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Sundhedsminister vil udvide Medicinrådet med behandlingsråd

I lyset af lægernes kald på politisk prioritering, foreslår sundhedsministeren en udvidelse af Medicinrådet, som kun skal kigge på behandlinger. Sundhedsøkonom og formand for Lægevidenskabelige Selskaber bakker op om et behandlingsråd.

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AI-Based App Could Screen for Cervical Cancer

An algorithm that can diagnose the disease from photographs would be especially useful in developing countries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Seafood mislabeling rate less than 1 percent for products with MSC ecolabel vs. global average of 30 percent

DNA barcoding of more than 1,400 Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) labelled products has shown that less than 1 percent were mislabeled, compared with a reported average global seafood mislabeling rate of 30 percent. These results published in the journal Current Biology suggests that the MSC's ecolabeling and Chain of Custody program is an effective deterrent for systematic and deliberate species

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Landstrøm til krydstogtskibe kan halvere NOx-forurening i København

PLUS. Ny rapport viser, at NOx forureningen i København kan blive halveret, hvis der etableres landstrømanlæg i Nordhavnen. Dog er der fortsat en del ubekendte i anlægsomkostningerne.

9h

Apple refreshes iPad lineup, with larger entry-level model

Apple has unveiled a new iPad that's thinner and slightly larger than its current entry-level tablet.

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Micro-robots could go inside the body and track vital signs, professor says

Every time University of Pennsylvania engineer Marc Miskin speaks about his research on miniature robots, someone asks the question: How does it compare to the submarine in "Fantastic Voyage"?

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EasyJet withdraws from potential Alitalia consortium rescue

British no-frills airline easyJet said Monday it had withdrawn from a possible partnership with Italy's Ferrovie dello Stato (FS) and Delta Air Lines to rescue troubled national carrier Alitalia.

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Seafood mislabeling rate less than 1 percent for products with MSC ecolabel vs. global average of 30 percent

DNA barcoding of more than 1400 Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) labelled products has shown that less than 1% were mislabelled, compared with a reported average global seafood mislabelling rate of 30 percent. These results published in the journal Current Biology suggests that the MSC's ecolabelling and Chain of Custody program is an effective deterrent for systematic and deliberate species subst

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Seafood mislabeling rate less than 1 percent for products with MSC ecolabel vs. global average of 30 percent

DNA barcoding of more than 1400 Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) labelled products has shown that less than 1% were mislabelled, compared with a reported average global seafood mislabelling rate of 30 percent. These results published in the journal Current Biology suggests that the MSC's ecolabelling and Chain of Custody program is an effective deterrent for systematic and deliberate species subst

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Hepatitis B virus sheds light on ancient human population movements into Australia

Australian researchers have used current hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome sequences to deduce ancient human population movements into Australia, adding weight to the theory that the mainland Aboriginal population separated from other early humans at least 59 thousand years ago and possibly entered the country near the Tiwi Islands.

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Old stone walls hold secrets to Earth's wandering magnetic north

Science New England is full of granite that has locked away a record of how north has evolved over the centuries. In addition to being part of an American legacy, these stone walls and their locations record a centuries-long history of the Earth’s wandering magnetic field.

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Hepatitis B virus sheds light on ancient human population movements into Australia

Australian researchers have used current hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome sequences to deduce ancient human population movements into Australia, adding weight to the theory that the mainland Aboriginal population separated from other early humans at least 59 thousand years ago and possibly entered the country near the Tiwi Islands.

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Teenage Priestess from the Bronze Age Was Probably No Globetrotter

Two Bronze Age women — one likely a teenage priestess — probably didn't travel far and wide across Europe, as previous research suggested, but instead were real homebodies who likely never left what is now modern-day Denmark, a new study finds.

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Sperma kan bevaras i decennier

Sir Freddie var en bagge av rasen Merino som levde på en fårfarm i Australien under 1960-talet. Sperma från Sir Freddie frystes ned i flytande kväve 1968. Förra året provade forskare från Sydneys universitet om det gick att inseminera tackor med den 50-åriga sperman. Det visade sig att hälften av de tackorna blev dräktiga och födde friska lamm. Det är samma utfall som vid inseminering med sperma s

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Trembling aspen leaves could save future Mars rovers

Researchers at the University of Warwick have been inspired by the unique movement of trembling aspen leaves, to devise an energy harvesting mechanism that could power weather sensors in hostile environments and could even be a back-up energy supply that could save and extend the life of future Mars rovers.

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ZTE Axon S Might Have Horizontal Slider For Cameras

Smartphone manufacturers are trying all sorts of things in a race to build “full-screen” smartphones. This has involved notches, punch holes, pop-up mechanisms, and now sliders. …

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Elon Musk: SpaceX Hopes to Launch Starship “Test Hopper” This Week

Test Hopper In a series of tweets yesterday, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk confirmed that the space company is about to start testing an early prototype of its Starship spacecraft . The so-called “hopper” test vehicle will feature only a single Raptor engine, as opposed to three for the final version. The test vehicle won’t enter orbit, but its low altitude test flights help prepare for future journeys as

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The secret to scientific discoveries? Making mistakes | Phil Plait

Phil Plait was on a Hubble Space Telescope team of astronomers who thought they may have captured the first direct photo of an exoplanet ever taken. But did the evidence actually support that? Follow along as Plait shows how science progresses — through a robust amount of making and correcting errors. "The price of doing science is admitting when you're wrong, but the payoff is the best there is:

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France’s Yellow Vests Are Rebels Without a Cause

PARIS—A crisis of representative democracy is unfolding in France . For months now, President Emmanuel Macron has been crisscrossing the country for a grand débat , a series of town meetings he called in January to address the discontent embodied by the “yellow vest” movement. These demonstrations began as a protest of a fuel-tax hike and have now evolved into a wave of economic anxiety and anti-

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Trembling aspen leaves could save future Mars rovers

Researchers at the University of Warwick have been inspired by the unique movement of trembling aspen leaves, to devise an energy harvesting mechanism that could power weather sensors in hostile environments and could even be a back-up energy supply that could save and extend the life of future Mars rovers.

9h

How heavy elements come about in the universe

Heavy elements are produced during stellar explosion or on the surfaces of neutron stars through the capture of hydrogen nuclei (protons). This occurs at extremely high temperatures, but at relatively low energies. An international research team headed by Goethe University has now succeeded in investigating the capture of protons at the storage ring of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforsc

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A laser technique proves effective to recover material designed to protect industrial products

The system has been validated for non-stick and anticorrosive coatings used in the manufacturing of a wide range of objects from car engines to kitchen utensils.

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Long-distance quantum information exchange — success at the nanoscale

At the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, researchers have realized the swap of electron spins between distant quantum dots. The discovery is a step towards applications of quantum information, as the dots leave enough room for delicate control electrodes, enabling integration with traditional microelectronics and perhaps, a future quantum computer. The result is achieved via collabor

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New potential approach to treat atopic dermatitis

How does the immune system respond to fungi on our skin? Researchers at the University of Zurich have demonstrated that the same immune cells that protect us against skin fungi also encourage the inflammatory symptoms of atopic dermatitis. An antibody therapy could alleviate this chronic inflammatory skin disease.

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New practice corrects pump function in heart failure

Late-breaking results from the ElectroCRT trial presented today at EHRA 2019 a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress, pave the way for a new standard of care to improve the heart's pump function in selected patients with heart failure.

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Remote monitoring keeps heart failure patients out of hospital

Remote monitoring keeps heart failure patients out of hospital, according to late-breaking findings from the RESULT trial presented today at EHRA 2019, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress. The set-up is so effective that it has won reimbursement from the national health system.

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New record: Over 16 percent efficiency for single-junction organic solar cells

Two non-fullerene acceptors, namely BTPT-4F and BTPTT-4F, were selected to match with a wide-bandgap polymer donor P2F-EHp consisting of an imide-functionalized benzotriazole moiety, as these materials presented complementary absorption and well-matched energy levels. By delicately optimizing the blend film morphology, an unprecedented power conversion efficiency of over 16% was achieved for the d

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Microbes can grow on nitric oxide

Nitric oxide (NO) is a central molecule of the global nitrogen cycle. A study reveals that microorganisms can grow on NO. Their results change our view of the earth's nitrogen cycle and how microorganisms regulate the release of greenhouse gases from natural and human-made environments.

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Tilt training prevents fainting, study suggests

Tilt training effectively prevents fainting, according to new research. The program also improved quality of life, reduced the worry and fear about future fainting and enabled patients to return to work.

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Hair holds clues to puberty’s hormone changes

Hair may hold clues to the hormonal changes that come along with puberty, report researchers. Puberty is something we all go through and yet there is limited science to explain what happens inside our bodies during this transition, and how it affects our physical and mental health. The research that does exist focuses primarily on girls and often ignores the changes for boys, African Americans, a

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How Do We Feel About Working Next To Robots?

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How This Robotics Wizard Is Shaping the Restaurants of Tomorrow

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The importance of being introspective in the lab

The importance of being introspective in the lab The importance of being introspective in the lab, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00925-0 Question your own point of view first to avoid career-damaging conflict, says Benjamin Tsang.

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World’s biggest telescope to chart the cosmic dawn

The Square Kilometre Array will be a network of thousands of dishes and 1m antennas

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Air simulations pave way for quieter supersonic flight

Researchers are working to solve the deafening noise problems associated with aircraft exceeding the speed of sound, roughly 767 mph. “Imagine flying from New York City to Los Angeles in an hour. Imagine incredibly fast unmanned aerial vehicles providing more updated and nuanced information about Earth’s atmosphere, which could help us better predict deadly storms,” says James Chen, an assistant

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NASA: Meteor Exploded Over Russia With 10x Energy of Atomic Bomb

Massive Fireball A meteor caused a massive explosion in Earth’s atmosphere in December 2018, according to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) . The fireball was so powerful that it released ten times the energy of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, BBC reports . The explosion occurred over the Bering Sea, off Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula — an area so remote that no observers apparently saw or repo

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What DNA Hidden in a Plantation Tobacco Pipe Reveals

The great thing about tobacco pipes, according to Julie Schablitsky , is that they are hard to not find. They were ubiquitous in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries—to the point, she says, that “wherever you have people during this historic period, you’ll find these clay tobacco pipes in the ground.” And wherever these people left broken tobacco pipes, they were also unwittingly leaving their DNA.

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The People Trying to Make Internet Recommendations Less Toxic

Recommendation algorithms on sites like Facebook and YouTube can send users down rabbit holes, spread falsehoods, and foster conspiracy theories.

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Odense Universitetshospital har ansat ny professor med fokus på hjernekræft

Bjarne Winther Kristensen er ny professor og overlæge på Afdeling for Klinisk Patologi på Odense Universitetshospital og Syddansk Universitet.

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Research into aphasia reveals new interactions between language and thought

Knowledge of the facts is called factive knowledge. In the phrase 'He knows [that it is warm outside]', the embedded clause is assumed to be true. However, in the phrase 'It seems [that it is warm outside]', the embedded clause is presupposed to be false or counterfactive.

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Pharmacists have wider clinical role in casualty, concludes study

The first evaluation of pharmacists based in accident and emergency departments has concluded that with additional clinical skills, they are able to take on overall clinical responsibility for patients. Daniel Greenwood a Ph.D. student from the University of Manchester studied the work of people they termed Emergency Department Pharmacist Practitioners (EDPPs) from 15 NHS Trusts across the UK over

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ACC/AHA guidance for preventing heart disease, stroke released

The choices we make every day can have a lasting effect on our heart and vascular health. Adopting a heart healthy eating plan, getting more exercise, avoiding tobacco and managing known risk factors are among the key recommendations in the 2019 Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease guideline from the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA). Also, it is

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NUS researchers create water-resistant electronic skin with self-healing abilities

Inspired by jellyfish, NUS researchers have created an electronic skin that is transparent, stretchable, touch-sensitive, and repairs itself in both wet and dry conditions. The novel material has wide-ranging uses, from water-resistant touch screens to soft robots aimed at mimicking biological tissues.

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Antibiotic envelope markedly cuts risk of cardiac device-related infection

Encasing cardiac devices such as pacemakers or defibrillators in an 'envelope' –a mesh sleeve embedded with antibiotics — reduces the risk of major device-related infection by 40 percent within one year with no increase in complications, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Apixaban plus P2Y12 inhibitor and no aspirin safest for patients with both AFib and ACS

Patients at high risk for heart attacks, strokes and blood clots who were treated with a novel blood thinner (apixaban) and an antiplatelet drug such as clopidogrel had a significantly lower risk of bleeding and being hospitalized compared with patients who received an older blood-thinning medication such as warfarin, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Ann

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CardioMEMS sensor reliably safe, cuts hospitalizations by more than half

In the year following placement of a CardioMEMS heart failure sensor — designed to wirelessly measure and monitor pulmonary artery pressures that can signal worsening heart failure — patients experienced a 58 percent reduction in hospitalization for heart failure, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session. Reductions in hospitalization

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Novel heart pump shows superior outcomes in advanced heart failure

Severely ill patients with advanced heart failure who received a novel heart pump — the HeartMate 3 left ventricular assist device (LVAD) — suffered significantly fewer strokes, pump-related blood clots and bleeding episodes after two years, compared with similar patients who received an older, more established pump, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th An

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Partial oral antibiotic therapy safe and effective in infectious endocarditis

Patients with an infection of the inner lining on the left side of the heart (endocarditis) who were switched from intravenous to oral antibiotic therapy had better long-term survival and fewer complications than similar patients who remained on conventional intravenous antibiotic therapy, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Hepatitis B virus sheds light on ancient human population movements into Australia

Australian researchers have used hepatitis B virus genome sequences to deduce that the mainland Aboriginal population separated from other early humans at least 59,000 years ago.

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Elite-College Admissions Were Built to Protect Privilege

At the very first Harvard College commencement ceremony, nearly 400 years ago, markers of exclusivity were front and center. The graduating class consisted of just nine students: no women, no people of color; only, in the words of a Boston historian , “young men of good hope.” The order in which they received their degrees was determined “not according to age, or scholarship, or the alpheber [ si

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For Northern Irish farmers, no-deal Brexit would be a calamity | Ivor Ferguson

Without an exit deal with the EU, the whole NI agricultural industry will be destroyed • Ivor Ferguson is president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union As president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU), my last three years have been dominated by Brexit and what it means for farming families . More than 33 months on from the referendum all we have are unanswered questions and uncertainty. The threat of a n

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Techathlon podcast: The best way to stream, web history, and internet story time

Technology Play along and talk trash about tech. Are you smarter than a tech editor?

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Psychedelic Portraits Made With a Hunk of Beveled Glass

Photographer Mikayla Whitmore creates these images without any apps or effects filters.

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Like Animals, AI Is Learning From Experience

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Human surgeons are "barely trained" on operating room robots

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Strength in numbers for 3-D printing

Additive manufacturing, also called 3-D printing, is commonly used to build complex three-dimensional objects, layer by layer. A*STAR researchers have shown that the process can also help to make a high-performance alloy even stronger.

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Cable cars could reshape urban landscapes

Cable cars are one of the hallmarks of Switzerland, along with funiculars and paddlewheel boats. They adorn the country's mountaintops like garlands. While cable cars are most often associated with leisure activities in the winter and summer, Fernando Simas has looked at how they could become a common mode of urban transportation. Simas, a researcher at EPFL's Urban Sociology Laboratory (LASUR), r

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Green tech startups see boost in patents and investment when partnering with government

Latest research on hundreds of new green technology companies in the US shows the patenting activity of a startup climbs by over 73% on average every time they collaborate with a government agency on "cleantech" development—from next-generation solar cells to new energy storage materials.

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Like Animals, AI Is Learning From Experience

Trial and error is one of the most fundamental learning strategies employed by animals, and we’re increasingly using it to teach intelligent machines too. Boosting the flow of ideas between biologists and computer scientists studying the approach could solve mysteries in animal cognition and help develop powerful new algorithms, say researchers. Some of the most exciting recent developments in AI

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Echocardiograms may help with patient selection for transcatheter mitral valve repair

Clinicians should use echocardiography, an ultrasound that shows the heart's structure and function, when determining whether patients with heart failure and a leaking heart valve are likely to benefit from valve repair, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Repairing leaky valve improves heart failure patients' quality of life

Patients with heart failure and a leaking heart valve reported feeling better and experiencing fewer heart failure symptoms if they underwent a procedure to repair their valve than patients who received standard treatment alone, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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TAVR as good as surgery for patients at low surgical risk

A new trial comparing self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) to standard open-heart surgery for valve replacement — this time in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are considered low surgical risk — found no difference in the combined rate of disabling stroke or death from any cause at two years. The findings were presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th

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'Back to basics' atrial fibrillation procedure could slash waiting lists

A day case catheter ablation procedure which includes only the bare essentials and delivers the same outcomes could slash waiting lists for atrial fibrillation patients, according to late-breaking results from the AVATAR-AF trial presented today at EHRA 2019, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress. With the simplified protocol, 30 percent more patients could receive catheter ablation for

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Gene medication to help treat spinal cord injuries

The two-gene medication has been proven to recover motor functions in rats. After several months of treatment, rodents were able to use previously paralyzed limbs. Researchers at Kazan Federal University are now seeking pre-clinical trial investment.

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Expansion of transposable elements offers clue to genetic paradox

A research group led by Professor GUO Yalong from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with SONG Ge, and Sureshkumar Balasubramanian from the School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Australia, has revealed that transposable element insertions could potentially help species with limited genetic variation adapt to novel environments.

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Prevention of alcohol use in older teens

A recently released publication in the journal Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 'Prevention of Alcohol Use in Older Teens: A Randomized Trial of an Online Family Prevention Program' reveals successful results for an online, family-based prevention program, Smart Choices 4 Teens, which is designed to reduce alcohol use among 16- and 17-year-old teens.

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TAVR outperforms surgery in younger, low risk patients with AS

Among patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis who were at low surgical risk, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) using the SAPIEN 3 valve compared with conventional surgery significantly reduced the primary endpoint of death, stroke and re-hospitalizations by 46 percent at one year, according to data from the latest PARTNER trial presented at the American College of Cardiology'

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Transcatheter valve replacement safe in those with unusual valve anatomy

Compared with patients who had a typical tricuspid aortic valve, patients with a more unusual bicuspid aortic valve had a similar rate of death but a higher likelihood of stroke after undergoing a procedure to replace the valve by threading surgical equipment through an artery, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session.

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Meet India’s starry dwarf frog — a species with no close relatives

The newly identified starry dwarf frog represents a new species, genus and potentially even a new family.

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A Sea Change in Plus-Size Fashion

On Friday, the Philadelphia-based clothing retailer Anthropologie did something that would have been nearly unthinkable for an aspirational brand even a few years ago: It added a plus-size clothing line. The collection, which is now available online and in 10 of Anthropologie’s biggest stores, arrived complete with a New York City launch party, the support of plus-size social-media personalities,

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Bernie Sanders Thinks He Can Vanquish Health Insurers. He’s Wrong.

Whether they’re running for president or just hoping to hold on to their seats, Democratic lawmakers face growing pressure to endorse one of Bernie Sanders’s signature causes. “Doc, they keep coming—pressing me to sign onto Medicare for all,” a somewhat hesitant and confused congressman told me recently. “Should I?” “It all depends what you mean by ‘Medicare for all,’” I said. He was hoping for a

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Facebook says service hindered by lack of local news

Facebook's effort to establish a service that provides its users with local news and information is being hindered by the lack of outlets where the company's technicians can find original reporting.

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Regioner og kommuner må selv til lommerne for at få del i pulje til læge- og sundhedshuse

Ønsker landets kommuner og regioner del i regeringens nye pulje på over 200 mio. kr. til læge- og sundhedshuse er det ikke længere valgfrit at bidrage til finansieringen, men et kriterie. Borgmester kalder kravet et »principielt problem«

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Sesgos Cognitivos Y Estupidez Humana

submitted by /u/KukeLito [link] [comments]

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Powerful machine-learning technique enables biologists to analyze enormous data sets

Researchers at A*STAR have compared six data-analysis processes and come up with a clear winner in terms of speed, quality of analysis and reliability. The top performer took large, complex biological data sets and spat out key relations between parameters (such as grouping blood and marrow cells according to cell type) in a fraction of the time of the other techniques.

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Mass manufacturing of metasurfaces

The mass production of flat optical devices with sub-wavelength structures could soon be a reality, thanks to a metasurface fabrication technique developed by researchers at A*STAR.

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Powerful machine-learning technique enables biologists to analyze enormous data sets

Researchers at A*STAR have compared six data-analysis processes and come up with a clear winner in terms of speed, quality of analysis and reliability. The top performer took large, complex biological data sets and spat out key relations between parameters (such as grouping blood and marrow cells according to cell type) in a fraction of the time of the other techniques.

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Turning an organic molecule into a coherent two-level quantum system

Researchers at Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light and Friedrich Alexander University in Erlangen, Germany have recently demonstrated that a molecule can be turned into a coherent two-level quantum system. In their study, published in Nature Physics, they placed an organic molecule inside an optical microcavity and found that it behaved as a coherent two-level quantum system.

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New global standard counts the cost of environmental damage

Environmental damage costs society enormous amounts of money—and often leaves future generations to foot the bill. Now, a new ISO standard will help companies valuate and manage the impact of their environmental damage, by providing a clear figure for the cost of their goods and services to the environment.

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Map tracks overlap of sharks, tuna, and ships

Researchers have combined maps of marine predator habitats with satellite tracks of fishing fleets to identify regions where they overlap—a step toward more effective wildlife management on the high seas. To create the map, scientists analyzed the habitats that more than 800 sharks and tunas and 900 industrial fishing vessels occupy. Focusing on international waters in the northeast Pacific, they

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Low-power chips get robots to work together and learn

An ultra-low power hybrid chip that gets inspiration from the brain could help give palm-sized robots the ability to collaborate and learn from their experiences, researchers report. Combined with new generations of low-power motors and sensors, the new application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC)—which operates on milliwatts of power—could help intelligent swarm robots operate for hours instea

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Most teens report using marijuana less often after legalization

Only one group of teenagers used marijuana more often after retail sales were legalized in Washington than they did before — high school seniors who work 11 or more hours per week, according to new research led by a WSU College of Nursing professor.

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The robots that dementia caregivers want: Robots for joy, robots for sorrow

A team of scientists spent six months co-designing robots with informal caregivers for people with dementia, such as family members. They found that caregivers wanted the robots to fulfill two major roles: support positive moments shared by caregivers and their loved ones; and lessen caregivers' emotional stress by taking on difficult tasks, such as answering repeated questions and restricting unh

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Researchers find eight new unique gene mutations in patients with hereditable heart muscle disease

In a new study from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers have identified eight new gene mutations that may cause or contribute to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease not caused by known external influences, such as high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, or diseased coronary arteries.

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Depression screening does not impact quality of life after heart attack

After suffering a heart attack or unstable angina (chest pain caused by blocked arteries), patients who were systematically screened for depression and referred for treatment when appropriate did not show a significant improvement in quality of life compared with those who received no depression screening, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientif

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Study gives glimpse into how wearable tech may help flag heart rhythm problems

According to preliminary data from the study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 68th Annual Scientific Session, the Apple Watch was able to detect AFib in a small group of people who had been alerted by the app as having an irregular heartbeat.

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Low-risk patients benefit from minimally invasive transcatheter aortic valve replacement

Results from a New England Journal of Medicine paper, released March 17 and co-authored by S. Chris Malaisrie, MD, cardiac surgeon at Northwestern Medicine and co-chair of the PARTNER 3 case review board, demonstrated that patients who were at low-risk for surgical complications benefited significantly from a minimally invasive, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).

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Abnormal heart rhythm detected by smartwatch: What does it mean?

Should an abnormal heart rhythm detected by a smartwatch in otherwise healthy young adults be treated? Are the benefits of this new technology worth the risks? Where is the technology headed?

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A new Einstein cross is discovered

This study, which has combined images from the Hubble Space Telescope with spectroscopic observations from the GTC, has confirmed the existence of a new example of a gravitational lens, a phenomenon predicted by Albert Einstein's theory of General Relativity. In this case, the observed effect is due to the alteration caused by a galaxy that acts like a magnifying glass amplifying and distorting, i

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Chemical probe can regulate signaling pathway and block cell invasion by arboviruses

Cells in humans and other vertebrates, as well as invertebrates, have signaling pathways that play essential roles in embryo development, cell proliferation and tissue structuring. Dysregulation in one of these signaling pathways, known as the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling pathway, can cause embryo malformation and diseases such as breast cancer and cervical cancer.

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Tasty or putrid? A repellent odor inhibits the perception of a pleasant odor in vinegar flies

In nature, vinegar flies are exposed to a wide variety of odor mixtures, which contain both attractive and repellent odors. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology have now discovered that repellent odors suppress the perception of pleasant smells. This happens because certain brain structures that respond to attractive odors are inhibited by a repellent one. These processes in

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Chemical probe can regulate signaling pathway and block cell invasion by arboviruses

Cells in humans and other vertebrates, as well as invertebrates, have signaling pathways that play essential roles in embryo development, cell proliferation and tissue structuring. Dysregulation in one of these signaling pathways, known as the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling pathway, can cause embryo malformation and diseases such as breast cancer and cervical cancer.

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Tasty or putrid? A repellent odor inhibits the perception of a pleasant odor in vinegar flies

In nature, vinegar flies are exposed to a wide variety of odor mixtures, which contain both attractive and repellent odors. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology have now discovered that repellent odors suppress the perception of pleasant smells. This happens because certain brain structures that respond to attractive odors are inhibited by a repellent one. These processes in

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US fintech giant FIS acquires payment firm Worldpay

US financial technology giant FIS will acquire British payment processing company Worldpay for an estimated $43 billion (38 billion euros), the two firms said Monday, creating an international payments powerhouse.

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Counterfeit and pirated goods represent 3.3% of global trade: report

Global sales of counterfeit and pirated goods have soared to 460 billion euros ($522 billion) a year, amounting to a whopping 3.3 percent of world trade, according to a report published Monday.

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Boeing crashes cast spotlight on US aviation regulator

Was the United States complacent in its certification of the Boeing 737 MAX?

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Facebook says service hindered by lack of local news

Facebook's effort to establish a service that provides its users with local news and information is being hindered by the lack of outlets where the company's technicians can find original reporting.

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Lyft revs up for an IPO seeking to raise $2.4bn

Lyft said Monday it would seek to raise as much as $2.4 billion in its public share offering, in the first major listing in the fast-growing ride-hailing sector.

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Japan to make crater on asteroid to get underground samples

Japan's space agency said Monday that its Hayabusa2 spacecraft will follow up last month's touchdown on a distant asteroid with another risky mission—dropping an explosive on the asteroid to make a crater and then collect underground samples for possible clues to the origin of the solar system.

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Mining pollution limits access to clean water in Papua New Guinea

A new report titled Red Water documents the social, environmental, economic, and health impacts of gold mining in Porgera, Papua New Guinea. The report finds that the communities affected by mining do not have access to consistent and safe drinking water. This is due, in part, to the fact that the PNG government has not met its human rights obligations to respect, protect, and fulfill the right to

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Experimental blood test accurately spots fibromyalgia

For the first time, researchers have evidence that fibromyalgia can be reliably detected in blood samples — work they hope will pave the way for a simple, fast diagnosis.

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Reattaching to work is just as important as detaching from work, study finds

Employees who mentally reattach to work in the morning are more engaged at work, according to a new study.

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Earliest known Mariner's Astrolabe research

Guinness World Records have independently certified an astrolabe excavated from the wreck site of a Portuguese Armada Ship that was part of Vasco da Gama's second voyage to India in 1502-1503 as the oldest in the world, and have separately certified a ship's bell (dated 1498) recovered from the same wreck site also as the oldest in the world.

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Ugens hype: Forskerne vender tiden – eller gør de?

PLUS. Forskningsresultat er blevet slået som et gennembrud, men er i virkeligheden helt som forventet.

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Ovanligt med höga halter kemikalier i återvunnen plast

Allt mer plast återvinns och EU diskuterar skärpta gränsvärden. Elektronikskrot (WEEE) och uttjänta fordon (ELV) innehåller ofta signifikanta mängder plast. Såväl industri som samhällsaktörer har ett intresse av att ta tillvara kasserad plast i produktion av nya produkter. Både för att öka resurseffektiviteten och för att minska klimatpåverkan. En utmaning är att plaster från elektronik och fordo

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StemExpress Announces New Distribution Partnerships

To continue meeting the needs of clients around the world, StemExpress announces the expansion of its global distribution network to include the Asia Pacific and Australia, adding to their existing networks in North America, Europe, and North Africa.

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Climate change negatively affects waterbirds in the American West

New research shows that recent climate change is having profound effects on wetlands across the American West – affecting birds that use these wetlands for breeding, migration and wintering.

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Rukwa Rift Basin Project names new Cretaceous mammal from East African Rift System

Ohio University researchers announced a new species of mammal from the Age of Dinosaurs, representing the most complete mammal from the Cretaceous Period of continental Africa, and providing tantalizing insights into the past diversity of mammals on the planet.

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Icosapent ethyl drug reduces risk of recurrent cardiovascular events

Further insights from the REDUCE-IT trial show that high-dose, pure and stable EPA omega 3 drug not only reduces the burden of first cardiovascular events but also subsequent and total heart attacks, strokes, and other measures.

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Green tech startups see boost in patents and investment when partnering with government

Collaboration between government and startups could help meet the climate challenge while growing small businesses. Findings could inform discussions on Green New Deal or any 'forward-looking policy package,' say researchers.

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Blockchain: sharing data and breaking with traditional networks

Blockchain as a technology is seeing tremendous innovation and is impacting almost all industries from supply chain to gaming and, perhaps the most recognizable, cryptocurrency.

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Rethinking what sets humans apart starts with asking if we're special at all

Animals Excerpt: Humanimal All the things that we consider as part of the human condition—speech, language, consciousness, tool use, art, music, material culture, commerce, agriculture,…

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Half-century-old sperm still up to the job

Researchers defrost sheep sperm frozen in the 60s, and successfully impregnate ewes. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Rich or poor, the perils of childbirth persist

Studies reveal that in the US and Africa many women are dying from preventable pregnancy complications. Samantha Page reports.

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Name that moon!

Public invited to suggest names for not one, but five satellites discovered orbiting Jupiter. Brian Pulling reports.

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Holocaust survivors with PTSD transmit negative views on aging to their adult offspring

A new study provides first evidence that negative views on aging are transmitted in families of Holocaust survivors suffering from PTSD. They view themselves as aging less successfully compared to survivors without PTSD and older adults who weren't exposed to the Holocaust. Furthermore, offspring of post-traumatic Holocaust survivors negatively perceive the aging of their parents and consequently

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Our brains may ripple before remembering

In a study of epilepsy patients, researchers at the National Institutes of Health found that split seconds before we recall past experiences tiny electrical waves, called ripples, may flow through key parts of our brains that help store our memories, setting the stage for successful retrieval.

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Monopoly was designed 100 years ago to teach the dangers of capitalism

Have you played Monopoly lately? Or maybe snakes and ladders? These board games are examples of 100-year-old games that many still play today.

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Star Wars News: Here's What One Dude Has Seen of 'Episode IX'

Disney showed a bit of the next 'Star Wars' movie to shareholders. This guy tweeted about it.

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Drug Industry Consolidation Refuses To Arrive So Quickly

Anyone who’s watched the biopharmaceutical landscape over the years is familiar with two large forces that reshape the list of companies in the area: on one end, you have mergers and acquisitions that decrease the number of firms, and on the other you have startups that increase it. How have these two been balancing out? This paper in Nature Reviews Drug Discovery has some numbers. Since 2000, th

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Doctors need to bone up on spaceflight risks

Space tourists will ask their GPs for advice, and they need to be ready to give it, researchers say. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Mariners’ tool certified as world’s oldest

A relic of Vasco da Gama’s journeys enters the record books. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Higher consumption of sugary beverages linked with increased risk of early mortality

The more sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) people consumed, the greater their risk of premature death–particularly death from cardiovascular disease, and to a lesser extent from cancer, according to a large long-term study of US men and women. The risk of early death linked with drinking SSBs was more pronounced among women.

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How a positive work environment leads to feelings of inclusion among employees

Fostering an inclusive work environment can lead to higher satisfaction, innovation, trust and retention among employees, according to new research.

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MySpace Reportedly Deleted Years of Music by Accident—and It Took People Months to Notice

MySpace, one of the first social networking sites that allowed bands to share their music directly with fans, reportedly lost years of songs during a server transfer last year. Tellingly, however, …

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iPad Air 2019 replaces 2017 iPad Pro 10.5, not $329 iPad – CNET

The old Pro has disappeared from the Apple Store

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How Retailers Can Adapt To A.I. And The Future Of Shopping

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As Costs Skyrocket, More U.S. Cities Stop Recycling

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MIT Robot can pick and place objects it has never seen before

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Kattens stresshormoner kan mätas utan att åka till veterinären

Adrenalin och noradrenalin är hormoner som bland annat utsöndras vid smärta och stress. Utsöndringen ökar också i samband med vissa cancertyper och hormonerna har därför potential att fungera som markörer för tumörbildning. Adrenalin och noradrenalin bryts snabbt ner i blodet men vissa nedbrytningsprodukter är stabila och kan hos flera djurslag mätas i urin. Denna möjlighet har dock hittills inte

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Dear Therapist: A Professor Is Abusing My Friend

Dear Therapist, My best friend is currently in a romantic and sexual relationship with a 50-year-old professor at our university. I'm extremely worried, since I suspect the professor is emotionally manipulating her so he can sexually exploit her. Over the summer, my friend started working as a nanny for the professor and his wife. After three days on the job, he told her that he "fell in love wit

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Ethiopian Airlines Black Box Data Retrieved, Shows Similarities to Lion Air Crash

An analysis of the black box data from Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 shows similarities with Lion Air 610. Meanwhile, Boeing may have changed how the MCAS system works without informing the FAA. The post Ethiopian Airlines Black Box Data Retrieved, Shows Similarities to Lion Air Crash appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Mercury Is Actually the Closest Planet to Every Other Planet

Numerous websites, and even NASA itself, say Venus is our closest planetary neighbor. A new article in Physics Today lays out a more accurate way to determine which planets are closest together. The post Mercury Is Actually the Closest Planet to Every Other Planet appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Meteor blast over Bering Sea was 10 times size of Hiroshima

Fireball over Kamchatka peninsula in December went largely unnoticed at the time A meteor explosion over the Bering Sea late last year unleashed 10 times as much energy as the atomic bomb that destroyed Hiroshima, scientists have revealed. The fireball tore across the sky off Russia’s Kamchatka peninsula on 18 December and released energy equivalent to 173 kilotons of TNT. It was the largest air

11h

Fisker relaunches Tesla rivalry with $40k electric car

Fisker, the electric car brand which was an early rival to Tesla, announced Monday it would produce a new sport utility vehicle priced below $40,000 that will be available next year.

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Revealed: First image of huge meteor explosion over Earth last year

The huge meteor explosion which hit Earth in December was caught on camera by the Japanese Himawari-8 weather satellite

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Norge køber Sundhedsplatformen for milliarder: Skriver under med Epic i denne uge

Epics EPJ-system er nu endegyldigt på vej til de Norske hospitaler. Helse Midt-Norge underskriver kontrakt på Helseplattformen, som den norske version kommer til at hedde, i denne uge.

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Sorte bokse viser ligheder mellem Boeing 737 Max-ulykker

Den første analyse af data fra de sorte bokse på flyet, der styrtede ud for Etiopien, indikerer, at piloterne havde samme problemer med at rette flyet op som ved et tidligere styrt med samme fly.

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What Would a Dog Do on Mars?

Recently, NASA released colorful, dreamy illustrations depicting an imagined future in which human beings have made it to other worlds. A curly-haired astronaut floats inside a lunar space station, with the crater-pocked moon behind her. A lunar explorer steadies a camera on a tripod to photograph Earth in the distance. And an astronaut stands on the dunes of Mars with her hands in the pockets of

12h

The Fertility Doctor’s Secret

Updated at 5:23 p.m. ET on March 18, 2019. The first Facebook message arrived when Heather Woock was packing for vacation, in August 2017. It was from a stranger claiming to be her half sibling. She assumed the message was some kind of scam; her parents had never told her she might have siblings. But the message contained one detail that spooked her. The sender mentioned a doctor, Donald Cline. W

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Earth is a less volatile version of the Sun, study finds

ANU scientists have found that Earth is made of the same elements as the Sun but has less of the volatile elements such as hydrogen, helium, oxygen and nitrogen.

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Sugary Drinks Linked to Heart Disease

A new study adds confirmation to what we have already been seeing in the data – drinking a lot of sugar-sweetened drinks, like soda, is linked to an increased risk of heart disease and death in men and women. This may seem obvious, but it is worth repeating precisely because it is a pretty straightforward bit of health advice that tends to get lost in the noise of bad health advice. For example,

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The Uncanny Valley Nobody's Talking About: Eerie Robot Voices

We've all heard of the uncanny valley, in which realistic humanoid robots freak us out. But what might be even freakier is how those robots speak to us.

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HP Spectre x360 Review: A Laptop With Near-Universal Appeal

For the 2019 version of its Spectre x360 laptop, HP updates an already winning design and adds an exceptional 14-hour battery.

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Image of the Day: Sperm Donors

Asexual female nematodes use their male offsprings' sperm to fertilize eggs, but cast away their genes.

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President Trump Says 'I Don't Trust Some Computer to Drive Me Around' According to New Report

A whopping 71 percent of Americans don’t trust autonomous cars to drive them around, according to a new survey by AAA. And it looks like the most famous man in America stands with the 71 percent. …

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Better Living Through ‘Active’ Building Design

A growing number of researchers have become convinced that rates of type 2 diabetes, several types of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease can be curbed with better building design, and they are actively looking to classic examples of early 20th-century urban planning for inspiration.

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Bright X-ray galactic nuclei

All massive galaxies are believed to host supermassive black holes (SMBH) at their centers that grow by accreting mass from their environment. The current picture also imagines that the black holes grow in size as their host galaxy evolves, perhaps because galaxy evolution includes accretion triggered, for example, by galaxy mergers. This general picture has been substantiated by two lines of data

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A “halo drive” could accelerate interstellar spacecraft to close to the speed of light

Borrowing energy from black holes would offer a highly efficient way to navigate our galaxy, an astronomer says.

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Microbes can grow on nitric oxide

Nitric oxide is a fascinating and versatile molecule, important for all living things as well as our environment. It is highly reactive and toxic; it is used as a signaling molecule; it depletes the ozone layer in our planet's atmosphere; and it is the precursor of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). Nitrogen oxides are also pollutants discharged with exhaust gases, for example from combustion

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Hackers are making personalised ransomware to target the most profitable and vulnerable

Once a piece of ransomware has got hold of your valuable information, there is very little you can do to get it back other than accede to the attacker's demands. Ransomware, a type of malware that holds a computer to ransom, has become particularly prevalent in the past few years and virtually unbreakable encryption has made it an even more powerful force.

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Lyft seeks to raise some $2 bn in IPO

Lyft said Monday it would seek to raise as much as $2.4 billion in its public share offering, in the first major listing in the fast-growing ride-hailing sector.

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Danmark beder om mere tid: »Naturgivne« forhold gør, at vi misser vandmiljømål

Stort set alle lande har udfordringer med at nå målene, argumenterer ministeren, så uden udsættelsen risikerer vi den folkelige opbakning.

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Techtopia #96: Danish AI Design

Regeringen har fremlagt sin strategi for kunstig intelligens. Der er tale om at lave dansk design på AI.

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Därför ser stora humlor små blommor

Forskare vid Lunds universitet håller på att ta reda på vad bin i olika klimatzoner i skilda delar av världen ser bäst. Sedan tidigare är det känt att stora bin ser bättre än små individer, men det har varit oklart varför. – Vi har undersökt olika stora jordhumlors fasettögon. Vilket synfält har de och med vilken upplösning ser de? Nu vet vi hur stora blommor måste vara för att individer av olika

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Skolmusikaler förbereder eleverna för yrkeslivet

Skolmusikaler är en populär verksamhet i många svenska skolor och engagerar ett stort antal lärare och elever. Lorentz Edbergs har i en avhandling vid Umeå universitet undersökt den moderna musikalen i skolmiljö, det vill säga skolmusikalen. Dagens musikaler hämtar inspiration från ett populärkulturellt landskap som ständigt förändras. Lorentz Edberg har följt två svenska skolmusikalprojekt under

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Krympande livsrum för torsk och skrubbskädda

– Östersjön är ett av de mest studerade havsområdena i världen och det fanns viss kunskap om utbredningen av vuxen torsk, men vi visste i stort sett ingenting om den historiska utbredningen av skrubbskädda eller ungtorsk, säger Alessandro Orio, doktorand vid SLU. – Torsk och skrubbskädda är två nyckelarter i Östersjön som dessutom kan påverka varandra i hög utsträckning. Dels konkurrerar de om sa

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Blockchain Firm Waves is going all in on Web 3.0 decentralisation

submitted by /u/Yams3000 [link] [comments]

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What's Holding Smart Cities Back?

A tech-empowered urban renaissance is possible—if five challenges can be overcome — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The rise and fall of scientific authority — and how to bring it back

The rise and fall of scientific authority — and how to bring it back The rise and fall of scientific authority — and how to bring it back, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00872-w Robert P. Crease harks back to the shapers of our scientific infrastructure and what they can tell us about how to handle the threat we now face.

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Drinking Sugary Beverages Linked with Early Death

A new study finds that drinking sugar-sweetened beverages is tied to an increased risk of early death.

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Here's What It's Like to Accidentally Expose the Data of 230M People

The owner of Exactis, a 10-person firm that exposed a database including nearly every American, tells the story of his company's downfall.

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Resurrecting woolly mammoth cells is hard to do

Japanese scientists say some proteins in frozen mammoth cells may still work after 28,000 years. But that activity may be more mouse than mammoth.

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What's Holding Smart Cities Back?

A tech-empowered urban renaissance is possible—if five challenges can be overcome — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bitter cold in January likely won't reduce field crop pests

Despite record cold air temperatures, soil temperatures averaged slightly warmer than normal in Illinois this winter. Consequently, the arctic conditions are expected to have little effect on overwintering field crop insect pest populations.

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Grafting tomatoes protects plants, increases yields

Grafting vegetables is a time-tested way for growers to protect plants from soil-borne diseases as well as potentially improve yields, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

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Dexterous MIT Robot Picks Up, Puts Down Objects It’s Never Seen Before

Ask a human to hang a mug by its handle on a hook, and they won’t hesitate. Ask a robot to carry out the same task, and you’ll be waiting a long while. […] The post Dexterous …

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Grafting tomatoes protects plants, increases yields

Grafting vegetables is a time-tested way for growers to protect plants from soil-borne diseases as well as potentially improve yields, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

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'Impossible' Rocks Found on Remote Volcanic Island

Geoscientists tracking down reports of curious, out-of-place rocks on Anjouan island have found a mountain-size mystery.

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In Photos: Impossible Rocks on a Remote Island

Scientists have found a motherlode of "impossible" rocks on a ridgeline on Anjouan island, off eastern coast of Africa.

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Do Rusty Nails Really Give You Tetanus?

Stepping on clean nails is also bad.

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83 Gargantuan Black Holes Spotted Guzzling Down Dinner at the Edge of the Universe

The supermassive black holes were birthed during the universe's infancy.

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Motion control at the nanoscale

NUS Physicists have designed a bipedal nanowalker that can change its walking manner and direction by adjusting the length of its stride. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based nanowalkers are a class of molecular motors which are being explored for a wide range of potential nanoscale applications. This includes automated sequence dependent synthesis, nanoscale assembly lines and walker-guided surface

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Dansk iltrobot klar til at hjælpe KOL-patienter i Europa

Efter ni års offentlig-privat samarbejde er iltrobotten O2matic nu godkendt til automatisk iltbehandling af KOL-patienter på hospitaler i hele Europa.

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Dead Whale Found With 88 Pounds of Plastic Inside Body in the Philippines

The whale’s grisly death renewed focus on the problem of plastics ending up in oceans. The Philippines is the third-biggest contributor of such waste.

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Mutually-assured destruction in heated coral-algae war

Global warming and acidifying oceans are creating an intense competition between coral and algae that both are set to lose.

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Plantronics is transforming into a 'new' brand called Poly – CNET

Plantronics and Polycom are relaunching as Poly to focus on providing collaboration and communication tools for the modern workspace.

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Nala has built a hassle-free, offline mobile money payment platform for Africa

Benjamin Fernandes, the Tanzanian co-founder chief executive of Nala, spent hundreds of hours talking to local Tanzanians about their frustrations with mobile money payment services before he …

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Microbes can grow on nitric oxide

Nitric oxide (NO) is a central molecule of the global nitrogen cycle. A study by Boran Kartal from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Germany, and colleagues reveals that microorganisms can grow on NO. Their results, which are now published in Nature Communications, change our view of the earth's nitrogen cycle and how microorganisms regulate the release of greenhouse gases from nat

14h

Företagens miljöfakturor till framtiden

Vi vet vad våra varor och tjänster kostar, men vad får miljön betala? Redan för 30 år sedan togs det så kallade EPS-verktyget fram för att översätta miljöskador till pengar. – En anledning till att hållbar utveckling inte går tillräckligt snabbt är att den inte är hopkopplad med ekonomin. Experten talar sitt språk, företagsledningen sitt och de negativa miljöeffekterna förblir ofta siffror på ett

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A Racial Pattern So Obvious, Even the Supreme Court Might See It

The American legal system pretends to marble-and-mahogany majesty, but is in fact often a rickety, underfunded contraption, run by overworked mortals who are sometimes incompetent and sometimes actually ill-intentioned. But even amid law’s cratered landscape, sometimes a specific case presents facts simply beyond belief; sometimes the “system” stands revealed as nothing more than one human being

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The Bombastic Matriarch of Schitt’s Creek

Shakespeare had it wrong: All the world’s a script, and all the men and women merely players missing opportunities to zhuzh up their dialogue. At least, that’s what he might’ve meant if he’d had the ear for chin-wagging that the actor and matriarch Moira Rose (played by Catherine O’Hara) regularly displays on the Canadian series Schitt’s Creek . It’s not often that a modern-day sitcom entwines a

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Prenatal Allergen Exposure Perturbs Sexual Differentiation and Programs Lifelong Changes in Adult Social and Sexual Behavior

Prenatal Allergen Exposure Perturbs Sexual Differentiation and Programs Lifelong Changes in Adult Social and Sexual Behavior Prenatal Allergen Exposure Perturbs Sexual Differentiation and Programs Lifelong Changes in Adult Social and Sexual Behavior, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41258-2 Prenatal Allergen Exposure Perturbs Sexual Differentiation and Programs Lifelong Cha

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Anatomic Conformation of Renal Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in Living Human Tissues

Anatomic Conformation of Renal Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in Living Human Tissues Anatomic Conformation of Renal Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in Living Human Tissues, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41159-4 Anatomic Conformation of Renal Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in Living Human Tissues

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Effect of graphene substrate type on formation of Bi2Se3 nanoplates

Effect of graphene substrate type on formation of Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates Effect of graphene substrate type on formation of Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41178-1 Effect of graphene substrate type on formation of Bi 2 Se 3 nanoplates

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Uncovering the potential of novel micromonosporae isolated from an extreme hyper-arid Atacama Desert soil

Uncovering the potential of novel micromonosporae isolated from an extreme hyper-arid Atacama Desert soil Uncovering the potential of novel micromonosporae isolated from an extreme hyper-arid Atacama Desert soil, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-38789-z Uncovering the potential of novel micromonosporae isolated from an extreme hyper-arid Atacama Desert soil

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A neonicotinoid pesticide impairs foraging, but not learning, in free-flying bumblebees

A neonicotinoid pesticide impairs foraging, but not learning, in free-flying bumblebees A neonicotinoid pesticide impairs foraging, but not learning, in free-flying bumblebees, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39701-5 A neonicotinoid pesticide impairs foraging, but not learning, in free-flying bumblebees

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Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection with probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055

Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection with probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection with probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39602-7 Prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection with probiotic lactic acid bacterium Lactoba

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The DNA damage induced by the Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3A Leads to the production of ROS

The DNA damage induced by the Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3A Leads to the production of ROS The DNA damage induced by the Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3A Leads to the production of ROS, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40941-8 The DNA damage induced by the Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3A Leads to the production of ROS

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Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 is a unique prophylactic agent that suppresses infection-induced myometrial cell responses

Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 is a unique prophylactic agent that suppresses infection-induced myometrial cell responses Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 is a unique prophylactic agent that suppresses infection-induced myometrial cell responses, Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41133-0 Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 is a unique prophylactic agent that

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To avert environmental disaster, we need to return to the trees

We need to radically rethink how we obtain energy, move ourselves around, build cities and use land. Wood has plausible answers for all of these

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Are you an overbuyer or an underbuyer?

Overbuyers are people who love to buy — they stockpile things as a result. These are individuals who are prone to run out of space in trying to store their stuff and they may even lose track of what — and how much of what — they have. One way overbuyers can limit their waste, both money and space wise, is by storing items at the store, and then buy them when they really need them. Underbuyers ten

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Late researcher faked Kumamoto earthquake data, university finds

A researcher in Japan who published at least five papers about a deadly 2016 earthquake faked some of the data, Osaka University announced late last week. Yoshiya Hata resigned his Osaka post and later died, according to media outlet NHK. He claimed to have studied the April 2016 Kumamoto earthquake, which killed at least 50 … Continue reading Late researcher faked Kumamoto earthquake data, univer

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Dead Philippines whale had 40kg of plastic in stomach

The whale that washed up in the Philippines had ingested 16 rice sacks and "multiple" shopping bags.

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UK space internet firm OneWeb ready for lift-off

OneWeb secures new funding enabling it to speed up plans for a global high-speed broadband network.

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Fermilab, partners break ground on particle accelerator to study ghostly particles, new forces

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory officially broke ground March 15 on a major new particle accelerator project that will power cutting-edge physics experiments for many decades to come.

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From dollars to bytes: Digital payment tech companies merge

Fidelity National Information Services is buying Worldpay for about $35 billion to combine forces as financial transactions increasingly move online.

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Crew Dragon: Astronauternes egen rum-Tesla

PLUS. Mere benplads og kontrol over fartøjet fra et iPad-lignende panel. Crew Dragon er et stort spring i retning af selvstyring på rumrejser.

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PoreDesigner improves protein channel design for water treatment, bioseparations

PoreDesigner, a fully automated computational workflow process for altering the pore size of a bacterial channel protein, is the result of a collaboration between researchers from Penn State and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This process enables assembly of the proteins into artificial membranes for precise sub-nanometer scale separation of solutes of marginal size difference, wh

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Starwatch: a supermoon to celebrate the vernal equinox

Full moon marks the midway point of the moon’s cycle, and this month it will be a supermoon – the third supermoon of the year Spring arrives this week in the form of the vernal equinox . This marks the moment when day and night are of approximately equal length. From here on, there will be more daylight hours in the northern hemisphere than night time ones. This situation continues until the next

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Space Is Very Big. Some of Its New Explorers Will Be Tiny.

The success of NASA’s MarCO mission means that so-called cubesats likely will travel to distant reaches of our solar system.

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Climate change negatively affects waterbirds in the American West

New research shows that recent climate change is having profound effects on wetlands across the American West – affecting birds that use these wetlands for breeding, migration and wintering.

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No worries, go catch your flight, a robot is parking your car

Many air travelers, whether frequent or infrequent, find that boarding, checking luggage and clearing documents at busy airports are not as stressful as one more experience—trying to find a …

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Hvorfor blev der ikke ryddet ordentligt op i Midt?

Ledelseskulturen i Region Midtjylland er fortsat under al kritik og uacceptable problemer har på det nærmeste stået i kø. Der er absolut brug for en reform.

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Climate change negatively affects waterbirds in the American West

New research shows that recent climate change is having profound effects on wetlands across the American West – affecting birds that use these wetlands for breeding, migration and wintering.

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Higher consumption of sugary beverages linked with increased risk of mortality

The more sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) people consumed, the greater their risk of premature death–particularly death from cardiovascular disease, and to a lesser extent from cancer, according to a large long-term study of US men and women. The risk of early death linked with drinking SSBs was more pronounced among women.

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Sugary drinks may be associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular diseases

There was an association among people who drank the most sugary drinks and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other causes of death. Substituting one sugary drink a day with an artificially sweetened drink was associated with a slightly lower risk of dying, but drinking four or more artificially sweetened drinks a day was associated with a higher risk of death among women.

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Misophonia: When Life's Noises Drive You Mad

Some people experience intense rage or fear when they hear the sound of people chewing, spitting, or throat-clearing. Turns out they may have a rare condition known as misophonia. (Image credit: Photo illustration by Meredith Rizzo/NPR)

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Belgian pigeon flies high in record 1.25 million euros auction

A star racing pigeon named Armando has fetched a record 1.25 million euros in an online auction, Belgian media reported Sunday.

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Tilt training prevents fainting

Tilt training effectively prevents fainting, according to research presented today at EHRA 2019, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress. The program also improved quality of life, reduced the worry and fear about future fainting and enabled patients to return to work.

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Belgian pigeon flies high in record 1.25 million euros auction

A star racing pigeon named Armando has fetched a record 1.25 million euros in an online auction, Belgian media reported Sunday.

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Remote Cape with 'world's cleanest air' offers smog respite

As much of Asia wheezes, coughs and sniffles its way through another smog season, one isolated and windswept corner of Australia is serving as the global standard for clean air.

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Ethiopian Airlines crash: What is the MCAS system on the Boeing 737 Max 8?

Similarities between the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines crashes, confirmed by black box data, have focused attention on an anti-stalling system used in the new Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft.

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#59 Digitial afhængig

Stetoskopet taler med læge Imran Rashid om digital afhængighed og konsekvenserne af digitalisering.

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Efter stroke – fokus på mobilitet utanför hemmet

Efter stroke är det vanligt att man drabbas av både fysiska och kognitiva funktionsnedsättningar som kan påverka förmågan att hantera vardagsaktiviteter, leda till aktivitetsbegränsningar och minskad delaktighet. Rehabilitering med fokus på mobilitet utanför hemmet kan ge personer som drabbats av stroke bättre förutsättningar för ett aktivt och socialt liv.

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Boeing 'finalizing' anti-stall update after Ethiopia crash

Boeing is finalizing a software update and pilot training linked to the MCAS anti-stalling feature, under scrutiny after two 737 Max 8 crashes, the company's CEO said on Sunday.

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'Clear similarities' between Boeing crashes in Ethiopia, Indonesia

Flight recorder data recovered from the wreckage of Boeing 737 MAX planes that crashed in Ethiopia and Indonesia shows "clear similarities," Addis Ababa said Sunday as the US maker announced it was finalizing a software update for its under fire anti-stall system.

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Facebook scrubs 1.5mn Christchurch attack videos but criticism goes viral

Facebook says it removed a staggering 1.5 million videos showing harrowing viral footage of the Christchurch mosque rampage but criticism of social media giants for failing to block images of the "real-time terror attack" is also spreading fast.

16h

Be Kind, Please Rewind: Oregon Blockbuster is last on Earth

There are challenges that come with running the last Blockbuster Video on the planet.

16h

The Oncology Association of Naturopathic Physicians publishes Principles of Care Guidelines. Not surprisingly, they aren’t science-based.

Last week, the Oncology Association of Naturopathic Physicians (OncANP) published "principles of care" guidelines. Try as they might, naturopathic oncologists tried to represent their specialty as evidence-based. Unsurprisingly, they failed.

16h

How a positive work environment leads to feelings of inclusion among employees

Fostering an inclusive work environment can lead to higher satisfaction, innovation, trust and retention among employees, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

16h

Does 'pay-to-play' put sports, extracurricular activities out of reach for some students?

From choir and cheerleading to soccer and student council, extracurricular school activities keep students engaged—but cost may be among barriers that prevent some children from participating, a new national poll suggests.

16h

Reattaching to work is just as important as detaching from work, study finds

Research has increasingly shown that an employee's ability to mentally detach from work and recoup during non-work hours is important for their well-being. But a new study co-authored by a Portland State University professor suggests the opposite is just as important: employees who mentally reattach to work in the morning are more engaged at work.

16h

Earliest known Mariner's Astrolabe research published today to go in Guinness Book of Records

Guinness World Records have independently certified an astrolabe excavated from the wreck site of a Portuguese Armada Ship that was part of Vasco da Gama's second voyage to India in 1502-1503 as the oldest in the world, and have separately certified a ship's bell (dated 1498) recovered from the same wreck site also as the oldest in the world.

16h

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Is China the Next AI Superpower? – Knowledge@Wharton

submitted by /u/mgmanalyst [link] [comments]

17h

Den Digitale Prøvevagt giver ansatte mulighed for frit at kigge i opsamlede data

Der skal foreligge en konkret mistanke om snyd, før en ansat på en skole må kigge i opsamlede data fra en elev, fortæller Undervisningsministeriet. Men ministeriets egen brugervejledning beskriver hvordan ansatte kan »udtrække til stikprøvekontrol«

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18h

This Guy Spent an Entire Week in a VR Headset. Here's How It Went Down

"… quite possibly the dumbest thing I've ever done."

18h

The Wonderful Adventures of Nils Billestrup with Swedish gels

I obtained the full report on the case of Karin Dahlman-Wright, Vice-Rector of the Karolinska Institutet. The investigation by Danish researcher Nils Billestrup for CEPN found 6 out of 8 papers contained data manipulations, but only in 2 cases serious enough to affect the conclusions.

18h

Would CRISPR or similar techniques ever be able to modify an adult human to any significant degree?

I'm not just talking like the kind of things we fantasize about like superpowers and non-human features straight out of fantasy fiction or comic books, but about things like getting rid of diseases or undoing some modification their parents may have made to them in the womb that they don't like now submitted by /u/StarChild413 [link] [comments]

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These are the robots that help you get your Amazon packages on time

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

18h

Sir Freddie the ram's 50-year-old frozen sperm used to produce offspring

Australian researchers believe it is the oldest viable stored semen of any species in the world Decades after his 1960s heyday, Sir Freddie the ram has sired offspring from beyond the grave in what researchers believe is a project that shows the world’s oldest viable stored semen. A team at the University of Sydney has defrosted Sir Freddie’s 50-year-old semen and that of three other rams and suc

18h

18h

Does 'pay-to-play' put sports, extracurricular activities out of reach for some students?

Students from lower income households experience twice the rate of non-participation in sports and extracurricular activities than peers.

19h

19h

US detects huge meteor explosion

The fireball is the second most powerful in 30 years and the biggest since Chelyabinsk in 2013.

19h

Sådan retter du op på et elendigt CV

Find inspiration til at stille dit CV op på en måde, der fremhæver din teoretiske og praktiske erfaring. Se eksemplet før og efter hjælpen fra karrierekonsulenten.

19h

Fem tegn på, at du handler passiv-aggressivt på dit job

Det er let at genkende den passiv-aggressive kollega eller chef, der siger én ting til dig og noget helt andet om det bag din ryg. Men kan du kende tegnene hos dig selv? Tjek her, om du er passiv-aggressiv på jobbet.

19h

Landbrugsgiganters roste klimamål ligner en gratis omgang

PLUS. I sidste uge lancerede både Arla og Danish Crown ambitiøse klimamål på vegne af deres medlemmer. Men der er ingen tal, planer eller forpligtelser, der kan sandsynliggøre, at man når målet.

19h

Robot Coworkers Are Coming, and They're Going to Really Mess With Your Head

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

19h

Reattaching to work is just as important as detaching from work, study finds

Employees who mentally reattach to work in the morning are more engaged at work, according to a new study.

19h

Experimental blood test accurately spots fibromyalgia

For the first time, researchers have evidence that fibromyalgia can be reliably detected in blood samples — work they hope will pave the way for a simple, fast diagnosis.

19h

How a positive work environment leads to feelings of inclusion among employees

Fostering an inclusive work environment can lead to higher satisfaction, innovation, trust and retention among employees, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

19h

Clinical guidelines from specialty societies often biased

Clinical practice guidelines issued by specialty societies in North America often recommend health care services linked to their specialties, in contrast with European guidelines and those from independent organizations, argues a commentary published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

19h

New tool better at predicting death after cardiac admission than current indexes

A new tool designed for patients with heart disease is better at predicting death after hospital admission than current tools, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

19h

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Captain Marvel's early suit concepts are way different to the comic – CNET

Concept artist Aleksi Briclot releases early iterations of what Brie Larson's superhero could have looked like.

21h

Andrew Yang is the Bitcoin-Friendly U.S. 2020 Presidential Candidate

submitted by /u/TonyThreeTimes [link] [comments]

21h

What socialism is — according to Michael Harrington

Michael Harrington was a public intellectual who strove to help the poor and inspired a generation of socialists. He was the first chairman of the Democratic Socialists of America, and nearly ran for president in 1980. While he is far from the only influential thinker on the American left, his ideas have had an outsized influence over the last sixty years. The United States is seeing a renewed in

21h

21h

He had countless hit records. You never heard of him.

Hal Blaine, the behind-the-scenes heartbeat of over 40 #1 hits, has died at 90. Many records by 1960s and 1970s artists were secretly recorded by session musicians and singers. These unheralded performers were some of the most talented artists ever. None Drummer Hal Blaine died on March 11 at 90 years young. Though you may not know his name, he was arguably the most important drummer in the histo

22h

22h

Tesla Model 0

submitted by /u/CyberTrap [link] [comments]

23h

Internet Archive races to preserve public Google+ posts

Just because Google+ is shutting down on April 2nd doesn't mean your years of social posts will be lost in the void. The ArchiveTeam recently started caching public Google+ content …

23h

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