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nyheder2019marts11

Trump once again requests deep cuts in U.S. science spending

But 2020 budget request likely to meet strong opposition in Congress

6h

Brain stimulation improves depression symptoms, restores brain waves in clinical study

With a weak alternating electrical current sent through electrodes attached to the scalp, UNC School of Medicine researchers successfully targeted a naturally occurring electrical pattern in a specific part of the brain and markedly improved depression symptoms in about 70 percent of participants in a clinical study.

8h

Statens konsulentforbrug eksploderer: Bruger 1,5 milliarder mere om året

Finansminister Kristian Jensen kritiserede konsulentudgifterne inden han selv blev minister. I hans ministertid er forbruget imidlertid steget yderligere.

12h

Twitter launches first user tests of radical new features like chat bubbles and color-coded replies

The first tests will be focused on conversations and include new tools like chat bubbles and color-coded replies. Twitter could later test status indicators, as well as icebreakers.

3min

‘Micro snails’ we scraped from sidewalk cracks help unlock details of ancient Earth’s biological evolution

Every step you take, you're likely walking on a world of unseen and undescribed microbial diversity. And you don't need to head out into nature to find these usually unnoticed microscopic organisms. As biologists , we know this firsthand. A meetup for coffee several years ago ended with our using makeshift sampling tools – actually a coffee stirrer and a coffee cup lid – to collect some of the bl

9min

College campuses are thinking about lactation spaces — but could be doing more

Breastfeeding mothers in higher-education environments can typically find a place to pump, but only recently have institutions begun to prioritize access to this resource.

24min

US black and Hispanic minorities bear disproportionate burden from air pollution

Black and Hispanic Americans bear a disproportionate burden from air pollution caused mainly by non-Hispanic white Americans, according to a new study. The research quantifies for the first time the racial gap between who causes air pollution and who breathes it.

24min

Fossil teeth from Kenya solve ancient monkey mystery

The teeth of a new fossil monkey, unearthed in the badlands of northwest Kenya, help fill a 6-million-year void in Old World monkey evolution, according to a new study.

24min

Forgetting uses more brain power than remembering

Choosing to forget something might take more mental effort than trying to remember it, researchers discovered through neuroimaging.

24min

Many Families With High Breast Cancer Risk Await a Genetic Explanation

For decades, Piri Welcsh has had professional and personal stakes in understanding the genetics of breast cancer. In the 1990s, the molecular geneticist participated in an international race to clone BRCA1, the first gene linked to breast cancer risk, and she works to this day in the lab of pioneering breast cancer geneticist Mary-Claire King at the University of Washington. And then there’s Welcs

30min

Can Men Tell When Women are Ovulating? Decades of Creepy Experiments Still Can't Prove It

For most animals, sex time is obvious. During the fertile phase of their reproductive cycles, females go into heat. They act, smell and look different, sending an unambiguous signal to males: “Come impregnate me.” But what about humans? Women have sex throughout their menstrual cycles, and don’t show conspicuous outward changes around ovulation — the time of month when pregnancy can occur. Yet man

30min

NASA Budget Proposal Funds Mars Sample Return, Slashes Other Missions

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine was at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Monday to talk about the proposed NASA budget for 2020. While Bridenstine referred to the Trump administration's proposed NASA budget as “strong,” and emphasized that funding for spaceflight exploration is high, the budget proposal also strikes funding from some missions. And, in total, it allocates $500 million less than

30min

Are eyes the window to our mistakes?

When humans make certain types of mistakes, the size of their pupils change. This may offer clues as to what's going on in the brain when people make suboptimal decisions, researchers have found.

38min

Brain stimulation improves depression symptoms, restores brain waves in clinical study

With a weak alternating electrical current sent through electrodes attached to the scalp, researchers successfully targeted a naturally occurring electrical pattern in a specific part of the brain and markedly improved depression symptoms in about 70 percent of participants in a clinical study.

38min

53min

When coyote parents get used to humans, their offspring become bolder, too

When coyote parents are habituated to humans, their offspring are more habituated, too — potentially leading to negative interactions between coyotes and humans.

1h

When green 'fixes' actually increase the carbon footprint

New research shows that when tech companies move in, they often encourage a sustainability mindset, but can lead to gentrification and stable or higher emissions.

1h

Research connects dots among ocean dynamics, drought and forests

A new study has found predictable, traceable connections between changes in how the Atlantic Ocean flowed and operated with centuries-long droughts and changes in forest makeup.

1h

How Engineers Move Massive Structures Without Breaking Them

Relocating historic structures can be tricky business.

1h

Where you should move to feel young forever, in one chart

Health How old will you be when you start to feel 65? It depends on where you live. It’s one thing to live longer, and another to live it well. Few of us would want to reach 100 if we already felt like we were ancient by age 60.

1h

Apple sets March 25 event, hints at streaming

Apple announced plans Monday for a March 25 media event, hinting at a widely expected plan to unveil its own Netflix-style streaming service with original video.

1h

Apple's March 25 Event Will Be Its Biggest One This Year

Services will define the future of the company.

1h

NASA Prioritizes Moon Landings Under Trump Budget Proposal

The agency would get $600 million for infrastructure and research in support of lunar missions, but astronauts won’t return until 2028 at the earliest.

1h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Oh NATO They Didn't

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, March 11. The White House released its 2020 budget proposal, which calls for budget cuts and work requirements across social-safety-net programs as well as $8.6 billion in funding for a wall across the southern border. Through invoking a national emergency last month, President Donald Trump has already moved to divert another several billion toward building

1h

When Your Land Is Stolen From Beneath Your Feet

From 1975 to 1999, millions of Cambodian families were murdered, starved, or displaced by the Khmer Rouge regime. The filmmaker Kalyanee Mam’s family was among those uprooted from their homeland. Recently, Mam traveled back to the country from which her family fled. “What I found there shocked me completely,” she told me. Nearly two decades following the dissolution of the regime, thousands of Ca

1h

Web inventor urges users to seek 'complete control' of data

World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee on Monday slammed the increasing commodification of personal information and appealed for internet users to strive to maintain "complete control" of their data.

1h

NASA Wants to Send a Sample Return Mission to Mars

Mars Sample Return Mission Since 1996, NASA has successfully sent four robotically controlled rovers to Mars. And now, the agency wants to launch its first sample return mission— as soon as 2026 . “We will continue planning and developing the first round-trip mission to the Red Planet with Mars Sample Return,” NASA chief Jim Bridenstine said in an official statement . U.S. President Donald Trump

1h

Investigating commercial airline crashes goes beyond the 'black box'

Technology In crashes like Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, the black boxes are a crucial puzzle piece, but experts are trained to look at multiple factors. Here’s how experts try to determine what happened after a plane goes down.

2h

Apple sets March 25 event, hints at streaming

Apple announced plans Monday for a March 25 media event, hinting at a widely expected plan to unveil its own Netflix-style streaming service with original video.

2h

In competition, people get discouraged by competent robots

It's not whether you win or lose; it's how hard the robot is working.

2h

Grounding the Boeing 737 a touchy subject for US authorities

Following Sunday's crash in Ethiopia of another Boeing 737 MAX 8, the second accident in five months, the flagship US manufacturer faces fresh questions about the planes' airworthiness.

2h

Faster robots demoralize co-workers

A Cornell University-led team has found that when robots are beating humans in contests for cash prizes, people consider themselves less competent and expend slightly less effort — and they tend to dislike the robots.

2h

When coyote parents get used to humans, their offspring become bolder, too

When coyote parents are habituated to humans, their offspring are more habituated, too — potentially leading to negative interactions between coyotes and humans.

2h

When coyote parents get used to humans, their offspring become bolder, too

Across North America, coyotes are moving into urban environments, and regardless of how they feel about it, urban residents are having to get used to some new animal neighbors. A big question for wildlife researchers is how coyotes habituate to humans, which can potentially lead to conflict.

2h

Research connects dots among ocean dynamics, drought and forests

In a time of drastic change, humans look for predictability. A recent study led by a University of Wyoming researcher found that even in dramatically changing climates, mechanisms can be found that predict how those changes will play out. The last ice age was 11,000 years ago and, since then, climates have continuously changed, triggering constant shifts in the landscape.

2h

When coyote parents get used to humans, their offspring become bolder, too

Across North America, coyotes are moving into urban environments, and regardless of how they feel about it, urban residents are having to get used to some new animal neighbors. A big question for wildlife researchers is how coyotes habituate to humans, which can potentially lead to conflict.

2h

The Trump Administration Really Wants to Cut Education Funding. Congress Doesn’t.

On Monday, Donald Trump’s administration released its budget proposal for the 2020 fiscal year, and the plan isn’t pretty for the Education Department. The proposal requests a roughly $7.1 billion cut in funding for the department compared with 2019, which represents a 10 percent decrease in its budget. The proposed cut is unlikely to go anywhere; like years past, Congress is expected to disregar

2h

For hyenas, there's no 'I' in clan

When it comes to advancing social status, it's not what you know, it's who you know—for humans and spotted hyenas alike.

2h

Teenage T. rex was already chomping on prey, new research shows

New research from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh indicates that even as a teenager the Tyrannosaurus rex showed signs that it would grow up to be a ferocious predator.

2h

For hyenas, there's no 'I' in clan

When it comes to advancing social status, it's not what you know, it's who you know—for humans and spotted hyenas alike.

2h

NASA Goddard teams to study unopened Apollo samples

Two proposals submitted by teams, led by scientists from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, have been selected to analyze unopened Apollo samples.

2h

Aqua Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Idai in Mozambique Channel

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the center of Tropical Cyclone Idai in the Mozambique Channel.

2h

When green 'fixes' actually increase the carbon footprint

When a big technology company moves to town, it often promises eco-friendly infrastructure and encourages a sustainability ethos to go along with it.

2h

Study: Information literacy can combat 'fake news'

It's not difficult to verify whether a new piece of information is accurate; however, most people don't take that step before sharing it on social media, regardless of age, social class or gender, a new Ohio University study has found.

2h

The World Wide Web Turns 30. Where Does It Go From Here?

Thirty years ago, Tim Berners-Lee published a proposal that led to the World Wide Web. Today, he reflects on its history—and its future.

2h

Creepy Database Lists Whether 1.8M Chinese Women Are “Breedready”

Breedready or Not We already knew China kept a close eye on its population, monitoring everything from their spending habits to their social interactions. Now we know someone in the nation is also tracking which female citizens are “breedready,” a term apparently used to signal that a woman is likely able to have children — and the disturbing data is not being protected the way it should be. One

2h

This Photoshop and Illustrator alternative is half off today

Get it now for just $29.99. This Photoshop and Illustrator alternative is half off today and you can get it now for just $29.99.

2h

Vanderbilt panel weighs in against tenure for #MeToo scientist

But chancellor may still reverse decision on BethAnn McLaughlin

2h

New Toyota Patent Would Let Cars Spray Thieves With Tear Gas

Unauthorized User In the future, Toyota vehicles may pack a nasty surprise to deter any would-be carjackers. Over the summer, Toyota filed a patent for a personalized fragrance dispenser system. Published online last week , the patent is fairly straightforward: when the car recognizes someone as an authorized user, it can spray their favorite scent. And if the car gets broken into, it can give th

2h

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Few Remaining Paths Lead to a Tolerable Amount of Climate Change

Climate change is riddled with questions that have uncertain answers. How fast will Earth’s population grow? When will renewables become affordable enough to take over? How much carbon dioxide can the oceans suck up? But even with these uncertainties, researchers in a new study say it's clearer than ever that the actions society chooses to take today will dictate the climate for future generations

2h

New Study Says Our Galaxy Weighs 1.5 Trillion Solar Masses

Researchers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) have managed to accurately measure the galaxy's mass including all the dark matter. They say the Milky Way weighs in at a hefty 1.5 trillion solar masses. The post New Study Says Our Galaxy Weighs 1.5 Trillion Solar Masses appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

Research connects dots among ocean dynamics, drought and forests

The study found predictable, traceable connections between changes in how the Atlantic Ocean flowed and operated with centuries-long droughts and changes in forest makeup.

3h

For hyenas, there's no 'I' in clan

When it comes to advancing social status, it's not what you know, it's who you know — for humans and spotted hyenas alike.

3h

College campuses are thinking about lactation spaces — but could be doing more

Breastfeeding mothers in higher-education environments can typically find a place to pump, but only recently have institutions begun to prioritize access to this resource.

3h

Trump seeks big cuts to science funding — again

Trump seeks big cuts to science funding — again Trump seeks big cuts to science funding — again, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00719-4 The president wants to cut spending at the National Institutes of Health and Environmental Protection Agency, but it's not clear whether Congress will go along.

3h

Jaguar Attacks Woman at Arizona Zoo, and the Woman Apologizes

The woman had crossed a barrier while trying to take a photo, and the animal left her with lacerations on an arm.

3h

Nuclear fusion: is halfway good enough?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

3h

3h

Are eyes the window to our mistakes?

When humans make certain types of mistakes, the size of their pupils change. This may offer clues as to what's going on in the brain when people make suboptimal decisions, University of Arizona researchers found.

3h

When green 'fixes' actually increase the carbon footprint

When tech companies move into a city, they often encourage a sustainability mindset. However, new research from the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Georgia, Southwestern University, and Portland State, shows that they can also lead to gentrification and emissions that stay the same or increase.

3h

Largest ever HIV prevention study delivers sobering message

Mixed results of aggressive treatment to curb new infections suggest “ending AIDS” will be harder than expected

3h

3h

Rabid animals don't always foam at the mouth—here's what to look out for instead

Health Rabies is rare in the United States, but the threat isn't totally gone. Knowing what to look for—and what to do—is key.

3h

Famous Hacker Thinks We’re Living in Simulation, Wants to Escape

Jailbreak George Hotz, a self-driving car developer and famous hacker, is the latest tech celebrity to suggest that our universe may be a simulation built by some society more advanced than our own. “There’s no evidence this is not true,” Hotz announced during his talk at the Austin tech conference SXSW, according to The Verge . “It’s easy to imagine things that are so much smarter than you and t

3h

Messages of stewardship affect Christians' attitudes about climate change

Christians' attitudes toward the environment and climate change are shaped by whether they hold a view of humans as having stewardship of the Earth or dominion over the planet, and reading material from religious sources advocating a stewardship interpretation can increase their concern for environmental issues, a new study found.

3h

Anti-malarial shows promise in human clinical study

An experimental drug, called DSM265, cured seven volunteers of a Plasmodium falciparum infection, a malaria parasite that is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The goal of this research is to find a cure for malaria with a single dose, and ultimately, eradicate the parasite.

3h

Novel technology aims to improve lithium metal battery life, safety

Rechargeable lithium metal batteries with increased energy density, performance, and safety may be possible with a newly-developed, solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI), according to researchers.

3h

No silver bullet for helping the Great Barrier Reef

Using a combination of advanced satellite imaging and over 20 years of coral monitoring across the Reef, a team of researchers has found that chronic exposure to poor water quality is limiting the recovery rates of corals across wide swaths of the Great Barrier Reef.

3h

FDA Lifts Import Restrictions on Genetically Engineered Salmon

The fast-growing fish can now be raised and sold in the US, although it's likely to be some time before the product hits the market.

3h

New alternative to Trump's wall would create jobs, renewable energy, and increase border security

The proposal was recently presented to several U.S. members of Congress. The plan still calls for border security, considering all of the facilities along the border would be guarded and connected by physical barriers. It's undoubtedly an expensive and complicated proposal, but the team argues that border regions are ideal spots for wind and solar energy, and that they could use the jobs and fres

3h

3h

How universal basic income could be affordable, Andrew Yang explains

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

3h

A Drone You Control With Your Mind Is About to Hit Kickstarter

Ready for Launch A Kickstarter campaign is launching on Tuesday for a drone you control with your mind. The mind-controlled drone is the work EEGSmart, a Chinese company focused on the development of brain-machine interface (BMI) technology — and according to New Atlas writer Loz Blain, who got a chance to test the device , “It’s not perfect, but it does give a glimpse of a mind-controlled future

3h

Pakistan Says It’s Cracking Down on Terrorists, Again

ISLAMABAD —The al-Quba mosque and seminary was, until recently, a hive of activity. The sprawling complex, which sits in a quiet neighborhood of the Pakistani capital, is a center of religious and ideological indoctrination for those wanting to take up arms against Indian forces in Kashmir. Now, however, the entrance to the seminary is locked. Two uniformed police officers, seated in a black pick

3h

One of the strongest known solar storms blasted Earth in 660 B.C.

Ice cores and tree rings reveal that Earth was blasted with a powerful solar storm 2,610 years ago.

3h

3h

50 percent off an electric toothbrush and other deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

4h

For infection-fighting cells, a guideline for expanding the troops

A new study from Princeton researchers uses mathematical modeling to explain how T cells, part of the body's key defenses against pathogens, expand to fight a new infection. The team found that the amount of T-cell expansion is related to the quantity of infectious material, or antigen, as well as the stickiness with which the T cell binds the antigen.

4h

Forgetting uses more brain power than remembering

Choosing to forget something might take more mental effort than trying to remember it, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin discovered through neuroimaging.

4h

Cash programs that help the poor can harm natural resources

Poverty programs throughout the world that give poor families cash for food, education and health needs can have unintended consequences for communities that depend on natural resources, such as fish and trees.

4h

An international study co-led by CNIO identifies a 'sensor' that activates cell migration

Forces generated by the cytoskeleton activate a protein responsible for cell migration.These findings broaden knowledge of tumor cell migration during metastasis.The study was conducted by CNIO, the Ludwig Maximilians University Munich and the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, both in Germany.

4h

Researchers uncover additional evidence for massive solar storms

Solar storms can be far more powerful than previously thought. A new study has found evidence for the third known case of a massive solar storm in historical times. The researchers believe that society might not be sufficiently prepared if a similar event were to happen now.

4h

Researchers report new light-activated micro pump

Even the smallest mechanical pumps have limitations, from the complex microfabrication techniques required to make them to the fact that there are limits on how small they can be. Researchers have announced a potential solution — a laser-driven photoacoustic microfluidic pump, capable of moving fluids in any direction without moving parts or electrical contacts.

4h

A school that values diversity could result in health benefits for students of color

Students of color who attend schools with a culture that emphasizes the value of diversity — specifically schools whose mission statements mention goals such as serving a diverse student body and appreciating diversity and cultural differences — show better cardiovascular health than peers whose schools do not express such values, according to a new collaborative study done by researchers at Nor

4h

Rainfall changes for key crops predicted even with reduced greenhouse gas emissions

Even if humans radically reduce greenhouse gas emissions soon, important crop-growing regions of the world can expect changes to rainfall patterns by 2040. In fact, some regions are already experiencing new climatic regimes compared with just a generation ago. The study, published March 11 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, warns that up to 14 percent of land dedicated to wheat, m

4h

Short birth intervals associated with higher offspring mortality in primates

Shorter intervals between primate births are associated with higher mortality rates in offspring, finds a new study of macaque monkeys. The results are consistent with previous research on human birth intervals, suggesting that this is a pattern of evolutionary origin.

4h

US black and Hispanic minorities bear disproportionate burden from air pollution

Black and Hispanic Americans bear a disproportionate burden from air pollution caused mainly by non-Hispanic white Americans, according to a study to be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The research, led by researchers from the University of Minnesota and the University of Washington, quantifies for the first time the racial gap between who causes air pollution and

4h

Fossil teeth from Kenya solve ancient monkey mystery

The teeth of a new fossil monkey, unearthed in the badlands of northwest Kenya, help fill a 6-million-year void in Old World monkey evolution, according to a study by US and Kenyan scientists published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

4h

Radical proposal to artificially cool Earth's climate could be safe, new study claims

Experts worry that injecting sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere could put some regions at risk A new study contradicts fears that using solar geoengineering to fight climate change could dangerously alter rainfall and storm patterns in some parts of the world. Related: Geoengineering may be used to combat global warming, experts say Continue reading…

4h

Radioactive particles from huge solar storm found in Greenland

Discovery raises questions about emergency plans in place for severe space weather Traces of an enormous solar storm that battered the atmosphere and showered Earth in radioactive particles more than 2,500 years ago have been discovered under the Greenland ice sheet. Scientists studying ice nearly half a kilometre beneath the surface found a band of radioactive elements unleashed by a storm that

4h

Historiska solstormar pekar på framtida risker

Solens yta skiftar och sjuder av fenomen som solfläckar och solfacklor. Ibland kan den också få större utbrott, som i värsta fall kan bli ett hot mot viktig infrastruktur på jorden. Kraftiga solstormar kan orsakat strömavbrott, och de kan också hota satelliter och astronauter i omloppsbana. En grupp forskare från flera olika länder har nu upptäckt tecken på att vissa sådana utbrott genom historien

4h

Forests are becoming less able to bounce back from wildfires

Climate change is causing forests around the world to lose their ability to recover from devastating wildfires

4h

Ethnic minorities produce less pollution but are exposed to more

Black and Hispanic people in the US are, on average, exposed to more dirty air than white people, despite generally producing less pollution

4h

Ultrathin and ultrafast: Scientists pioneer new technique for two-dimensional material analysis

Using a never-before-seen technique, scientists have found a new way to use some of the world's most powerful X-rays to uncover how atoms move in a single atomic sheet in real time, opening up new possibilities for probing two-dimensional materials.

4h

Researchers turn liquid metal into a plasma

Researchers have found a way to turn a liquid metal into a plasma and to observe the temperature where a liquid under high-density conditions crosses over to a plasma state. Their observations have implications for better understanding stars and planets and could aid in the realization of controlled nuclear fusion — a promising alternative energy source whose realization has eluded scientists for

4h

Ice Samples Reveal a Massive Sun Storm Hit Earth in Ancient Times…And It Could Happen Again

A gigantic solar storm hit Earth about 2,600 years ago, one about 10 times stronger than any solar storm recorded in the modern day, a new study finds.

4h

4h

The first male bees spotted babysitting are mostly stepdads

Some male bees guard young that are likely not their own while mom looks for pollen, a study finds.

4h

Short birth intervals associated with higher offspring mortality in primates

Shorter intervals between primate births are associated with higher mortality rates in offspring, finds a new study of macaque monkeys. The results are consistent with previous research on human birth intervals, suggesting that this is a pattern of evolutionary origin.

4h

How to take a census of Earth's biodiversity? One team of researchers has a plan

How do you monitor the number and location of Earth's plants and animals at any given time? It's a daunting, planet-sized problem, but an international team of researchers has published a proposal for how to do just that.

4h

Sepsis a leading cause of death in US hospitals but many deaths may not be preventable

A research team has comprehensively reviewed the characteristics and clinical management of patients who died with sepsis.

4h

Mobile devices don't reduce shared family time

The first study of the impact of digital mobile devices on different aspects of family time in the UK has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents rather than less — but not in shared activities such as watching TV and eating. The increase is in what is called 'alone-together' time, when children are at home with their parents but say they are alone.

4h

A tale of two cities: Is air pollution improving in Paris and London?

For the first time, a joint air pollution study across two mega-cities — London and Paris — measures the impact of policies designed to reduce air pollution from urban traffic over the last 12 years.

4h

People are essential to conserving pollinators

A global study has concluded that people are essential to conserving the pollinators that maintain and protect biodiversity, agriculture and habitat.

4h

Smoking during pregnancy doubles the risk of sudden unexpected infant death, study warns

Scientists are providing expecting mothers new information about how smoking before and during pregnancy contributes to the risk of an infant dying suddenly and unexpectedly before their first birthday.

4h

Moderate muscle strength may lower risk for type 2 diabetes

Of the 30 million Americans with diabetes, 90 to 95 percent have type 2, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. New research shows building muscle strength may lower risk for the disease by 32 percent.

4h

Cash programs that help the poor can harm natural resources

Poverty programs throughout the world that give poor families cash for food, education and health needs can have unintended consequences for communities that depend on natural resources, such as fish and trees. That is because the cash infusion that makes the families wealthier can cause a ripple effect in the form of higher demand for, and impact on, the natural resources on which the local econo

4h

Short birth intervals associated with higher offspring mortality in primates

Shorter intervals between primate births are associated with higher mortality rates in offspring, finds a new study of macaque monkeys. The results are consistent with previous research on human birth intervals, suggesting that this is a pattern of evolutionary origin.

4h

Rainfall changes for key crops predicted even with reduced greenhouse gas emissions

Even if humans radically reduce greenhouse gas emissions soon, important crop-growing regions of the world can expect changes to rainfall patterns by 2040. In fact, some regions are already experiencing new climatic regimes compared with just a generation ago. The study, published March 11 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, warns that up to 14 percent of land dedicated to wheat, m

4h

A school that values diversity could result in health benefits for students of color

Students of color who attend schools with a culture that emphasizes the value of diversity—specifically schools whose mission statements mention goals such as serving a diverse student body and appreciating diversity and cultural differences—show better cardiovascular health than peers whose schools do not express such values, according to a new collaborative study done by researchers at Northwest

4h

Researchers uncover additional evidence for massive solar storms

Solar storms can be far more powerful than previously thought. A new study has found evidence for the third known case of a massive solar storm in historical times. The researchers believe that society might not be sufficiently prepared if a similar event were to happen now.

4h

Fossil teeth from Kenya solve ancient monkey mystery

The teeth of a new fossil monkey, unearthed in the badlands of northwest Kenya, help fill a 6-million-year void in Old World monkey evolution, according to a study by U.S. and Kenyan scientists published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

4h

US black and Hispanic minorities bear disproportionate burden from air pollution

Black and Hispanic Americans bear a disproportionate burden from air pollution caused mainly by non-Hispanic white Americans, according to a study set to be published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

4h

Researchers report new light-activated micro pump

Even the smallest mechanical pumps have limitations, from the complex microfabrication techniques required to make them to the fact that there are limits on how small they can be. Researchers have announced a potential solution—a laser-driven photoacoustic microfluidic pump, capable of moving fluids in any direction without moving parts or electrical contacts.

4h

Study: Messages of stewardship affect Christians' attitudes about climate change

Christians' attitudes toward the environment and climate change are shaped by whether they hold a view of humans as having stewardship of the Earth or dominion over the planet, and reading material from religious sources advocating a stewardship interpretation can increase their concern for environmental issues, a new study found.

4h

Build Strength and Muscle Fast with Occlusion Training

It has been shown to result in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, increased strength, and increased endurance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

AT&T is increasing DirecTV Now prices by $10 per month

If you subscribe to AT&T's DirecTV Now, keep an eye on your bill — prices are going up again. Last July, AT&T increased the cost of its live TV streaming bundles …

4h

Can Netflix binges lead to ‘mean world syndrome’?

Binging violent television shows online may lead you to view the world as a mean and scary place, new research suggests. Online platforms like Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime have transformed the way we watch television shows—instead of waiting for a new episode to come out once a week, viewers can now watch their favorite series whenever and wherever it’s convenient. It’s not uncommon for people

4h

Tesla Reverses Course on Store Closures, Raises Prices to Compensate

Tesla has reversed course on its plan to close stores and now claims it will only close underperforming locations. Prices are going up to compensate. The post Tesla Reverses Course on Store Closures, Raises Prices to Compensate appeared first on ExtremeTech .

4h

Teenage T. rex was already chomping on prey

New research indicates that even as a teenager the Tyrannosaurus rex showed signs that it would grow up to be a ferocious predator. Scientists reported evidence that a juvenile T. rex fed on a large plant-eating dinosaur, even though it lacked the bone-crushing abilities it would develop as an adult.

4h

Imaging technique finds differences between radiation-sensitive and resistant tumors

Researchers have begun pilot clinical trials using an imaging technique called Raman spectroscopy, which offers promise for guided cancer treatment and could spare some patients of the toxic side effects of ineffective radiation therapy.

4h

Sinister blastocystis: A clandestine killer of good bacteria revealed

A study has revealed an insidious aspect of the gut protozoan Blastocystis, which is largely thought to be a harmless commensal organism. A Singaporean subtype of Blastocystis, ST7, caused the destruction of 'good' bacteria in the gut through activating reactive oxidative species. ST7 also caused damage to the gut epithelial lining. This discovery has implications for inflammatory bowel disease, i

4h

When a cell's 'fingerprint' can be a weapon against cancer

A research team has computationally analyzed the expression of marker genes that are associated with a 'fingerprint' of cancer cells in thousands of tumors and revealed its therapeutic potential in the fight against cancer. The study shows the types of tumors in which these genes are most active and identifies drugs with the potential to selectively eliminate cells that carry that label.

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A robotic leg, born without prior knowledge, learns to walk

Researchers believe they have become the first to create an AI-controlled robotic limb driven by animal-like tendons that can even be tripped up and then recover within the time of the next footfall, a task for which the robot was never explicitly programmed to do.

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From Russia, With Thrusters

As another Soyuz space rocket prepares to send a new batch of astronauts to the International Space Station, a photographer takes us inside the world’s oldest and largest spaceport.

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10 tips for making the group chat less terrible

DIY How to stay in contact with your college friends, kickball team, and siblings without sometimes wanting to throw your phone away. Liven up your chats, quieten down notifications, learn some secret shortcuts, and more with our guide to improving your group conversations.

4h

Please Don't Hop the Zoo Wall to Take Jaguar Selfies

Jaguar attacks careless selfie taker at Arizona zoo. Selfie taker apologizes.

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Quantum physicists succeed in controlling energy losses and shifts

In a new study, scientists demonstrate that they can increase the dissipation rate, on demand, by a factor of thousand in a high-quality superconducting resonator — just like the ones used in prototype quantum computers.

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Researcher Warns: Algorithms Are “Using and Even Controlling Us”

Algorithmic Reality We’re surrounded by algorithms in almost everything we do, from browsing the web to making financial decisions. But do we, as humans, still have a say in the way those algorithms shape our reality? Maybe not, according to new research. “Our exploration led us to the conclusion that, over time, the roles of information technology and humans have been reversed,” professor at the

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Weekday–Weekend Sleep Unbalance Bad for Blood Sugar Regulation

Weekday sleep deprivation with weekend make-up sleeping seems to be worse for blood sugar control than even chronic sleep deprivation alone.

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Maslenitsa 2019 Celebrations

Maslenitsa is an ancient ceremony—a farewell to winter celebrated since pagan times in the Slavic regions of Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, and other countries. Maslenitsa, or Pancake Week, is both a folk and religious holiday tied to Shrovetide, the carnival before Lent. Some traditional festivities include the burning of effigies of “Lady Maslenitsa,” family visits, snowball fights, and the cooking

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Boost muscle strength to lower diabetes risk

Building muscle strength may offer a way to lower your risk of type 2 diabetes, researchers report. In a new study of more than 4,500 adults, researchers found that moderate muscle mass reduced the risk for type 2 diabetes by 32 percent. The benefits were independent of cardiorespiratory fitness. Higher levels of muscle strength did not provide additional protection. Of the 30 million Americans w

4h

Who Was the Real King Herod?

The Bible falsely maligns Herod has a monster who tried to kill baby Jesus.

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Renowned Sudanese geneticist behind bars for opposing regime

Muntaser Ibrahim was arrested after he and other academics drew up a plan for national reform

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When a cell's 'fingerprint' can be a weapon against cancer

A research team led by Nuno Barbosa Morais, group leader at iMM in Lisbon, computationally analyzed the expression of marker genes that are associated with a 'fingerprint' of cancer cells in thousands of tumors and revealed its therapeutic potential in the fight against cancer. The study published today in the scientific journal PLOS Computational Biology shows the types of tumors in which these g

5h

Sinister blastocystis: a clandestine killer of good bacteria revealed

A study from NUS Medicine has revealed an insidious aspect of the gut protozoan Blastocystis, which is largely thought to be a harmless commensal organism. A Singaporean subtype of Blastocystis, ST7, caused the destruction of 'good' bacteria in the gut through activating reactive oxidative species. ST7 also caused damage to the gut epithelial lining. This discovery has implications for inflammator

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Adobe Pulling Plug On Unloved Shockwave Player On April 9

Adobe doesn't have the best of histories when it comes to software like Flash and Shockwave. Both have been leveraged by nefarious types to take advantage of computer users over the years. …

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Why beer lovers owe a debt to the yeasts that ferment wine

Why beer lovers owe a debt to the yeasts that ferment wine Why beer lovers owe a debt to the yeasts that ferment wine, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00817-3 Beer-brewing yeasts might have arisen from a Silk Road rendezvous between strains related to wine-making yeasts.

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Starwatch: the waxing gibbous moon moves into Cancer

As the moon moves into its second phase, it can help star watchers locate the faint constellation of the crab This week the moon passes through its first quarter phase, when half of the visible surface is illuminated. It occurs on 14 March and marks the moment when the moon stops being a waxing crescent and becomes a waxing gibbous moon. In another week’s time, it will be full. The chart shows th

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Is It Time to Worry About the Boeing 737 Max 8?

The first thing to say after an aviation disaster, like the Ethiopian Airlines crash that killed all 157 people aboard over the weekend, is that it is of course an unspeakable tragedy for those who perished and for the families, communities, and organizations that will forever feel the effects of this loss. Sympathies to all of them. The second thing to say is that initial guesswork and speculati

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Fatal horizon, driven by acidification, closes in on marine organisms in Southern Ocean

Marine microorganisms in the Southern Ocean may find themselves in a deadly vise grip by century's end as ocean acidification creates a shallower horizon for life.

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One step closer to a clock that could replace GPS and Galileo

Scientists have made a breakthrough to a crucial element of an atomic clock — devices which could reduce our reliance on satellite mapping in the future — using cutting-edge laser beam technology.

5h

Genes that evolve from scratch expand protein diversity

A new study challenges one of the classic assumptions about how new proteins evolve. The research shows that random, noncoding sections of DNA can quickly evolve to produce new proteins.

5h

Few pathways to an acceptable climate future without immediate action

A new comprehensive study of climate change has painted over 5 million pictures of humanity's potential future, and few foretell an Earth that has not severely warmed. But with immediate action and some luck, there are pathways to a tolerable climate future, according to a research team.

5h

Quantum physicists succeed in controlling energy losses and shifts

In a new study, scientists demonstrate that they can increase the dissipation rate, on demand, by a factor of thousand in a high-quality superconducting resonator — just like the ones used in prototype quantum computers.

5h

Protection from Zika virus may lie in a protein derived from mosquitoes

By targeting a protein found in the saliva of mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, investigators reduced Zika infection in mice. The finding demonstrates how researchers might develop a vaccine against Zika and similar mosquito-borne viruses, the study authors said.

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Daylight savings sees 'sleepy consumers' with a wider variety in their shopping carts

A recent study found that sleepier consumers reach for more variety at their local stores to help them stay awake, including those impacted by loss of sleep due to daylight saving time.

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Hot or cold, rural residents more vulnerable to extreme temperatures

A study in China's Zheijiang Province shows that people in China's rural communities are more vulnerable to both hot and cold temperature extremes than people living in urban areas.

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Palaeolithic art featuring birds and humans discovered

A new article tells how researchers found — in the site of Hort de la Bequera (Margalef de Montsant, Priorat) — an artistic piece from 12,500 years ago in which humans and birds try to interact in a pictorial scene with exceptional traits: figures seem to star a narration on hunting and motherhood.

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Mindfulness found to improve mental health of students

Mental health among university students could be improved by introducing mindfulness training. These are the findings from the first UK study to measure the efficacy of mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on students.

5h

Note taking jurors influence verdicts, study finds

New research highlights the positive impact jurors' note taking has on evidence recall and, crucially, trial verdicts.

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Mystery solved — biologists explain the genetic origins of the saffron crocus

For almost 100 years, there has been controversy as to the possible parent species of the saffron crocus are. If the parent species were known, changes could be inserted into the crocus genome by new breeding. It is precisely this mystery that biologists have now solved.

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Cutting the standard dose of medication for acute mountain sickness in half does not reduce its effectiveness

A new study demonstrated that trekkers and climbers taking a lower dose of acetazolamide (62.5 mg twice daily) were no more likely to develop acute mountain sickness (AMS) symptoms than those who took twice that amount, which is the standard prophylactic dose.

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Binge drinking in adolescence may increase risk for anxiety later in life

Researchers have found that adolescent binge drinking, even if discontinued, increases the risk for anxiety later in life due to abnormal epigenetic programming.

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Controlling thermal conductivity of polymers with light

In a new study, researchers have designed and demonstrated a novel type of polymer demonstrating a switchable thermal conductivity controlled by light. The material has the potential to route the conduction of heat on-demand and enable new, smarter, ways to manage heat.

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911 Calls Reveal Mental Anguish of Amazon Employees

Note: This article includes discussion of mental health and suicide. Prison-Like Amazon’s warehouses are notorious for their poor working conditions . “The atmosphere is what I imagine a prison feels like,” investigative journalist James Bloodworth told Business Insider after working undercover in an Amazon warehouse last year. “You felt like you were walking on eggshells.” Now, an investigation

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Controlling thermal conductivity of polymers with light

In a new study, researchers have designed and demonstrated a novel type of polymer demonstrating a switchable thermal conductivity controlled by light. The material has the potential to route the conduction of heat on-demand and enable new, smarter, ways to manage heat.

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Breathing in before doing something may actually make you better at it

Without realising people seem to synchronise their inhales with starting a task, and they sometimes perform better when they do so

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A robotic leg, born without prior knowledge, learns to walk

submitted by /u/QuietCakeBionics [link] [comments]

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Imaging technique finds differences between radiation-sensitive and resistant tumors

Researchers have begun pilot clinical trials using an imaging technique called Raman spectroscopy, which offers promise for guided cancer treatment and could spare some patients of the toxic side effects of ineffective radiation therapy.

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NASA's Aqua Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Idai in Mozambique Channel

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the center of Tropical Cyclone Idai in the Mozambique Channel.

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Teenage T. rex was already chomping on prey, new UW Oshkosh research shows

New research from the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh indicates that even as a teenager the Tyrannosaurus rex showed signs that it would grow up to be a ferocious predator. In a study published last week in the peer-reviewed journal Peerj–the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences, UWO scientists reported evidence that a juvenile T. rex fed on a large plant-eating dinosaur, even though it lac

5h

Southern Ocean acidification puts marine organisms at risk

New research co-authored by University of Alaska indicates that acidification of the Southern Ocean will cause a layer of water to form below the surface that corrodes the shells of some sea snails.

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OHIO study: Information literacy can combat 'fake news'

It's not difficult to verify whether a new piece of information is accurate; however, most people don't take that step before sharing it on social media, regardless of age, social class or gender, a new Ohio University study has found.

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The Risks, Rewards and Possible Ramifications of Geoengineering Earth’s Climate

Injecting aerosols into the stratosphere could help cool the planet, but scientists have yet to study exactly how such solar geoengineering would work

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Sound May Be Carried by Tiny Particles With Negative Gravity

Important Update Conventional wisdom in physics dictates that sound waves are massless fluctuations in pressure that travel through materials like air, water, and eardrums — and can’t travel through empty space. That’s why the recent discovery that sound waves actually do carry a trace amount of mass is so shocking — it’s been right under scientists’ noses for centuries. Even more surprising, acc

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The SciStarter team is hitting the road.

The best part of our work is meeting the people who power citizen science either by visiting and joining SciStarter, engaging in projects, or sharing, saving, or facilitating projects and events. If you're receiving this message, that includes YOU! We'd love to meet you in person at any of the following events. Fingers crossed that one of them takes place near you. If so, please come say "hi!" Che

5h

When a cell's 'fingerprint' can be a weapon against cancer

A research team led by Nuno Barbosa Morais, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM) in Lisbon, computationally analysed the expression of marker genes that are associated with a "fingerprint" of cancer cells in thousands of tumors and revealed its therapeutic potential in the fight against cancer. The study published today in PLoS Computational Biology shows the typ

5h

When a cell's 'fingerprint' can be a weapon against cancer

A research team led by Nuno Barbosa Morais, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM) in Lisbon, computationally analysed the expression of marker genes that are associated with a "fingerprint" of cancer cells in thousands of tumors and revealed its therapeutic potential in the fight against cancer. The study published today in PLoS Computational Biology shows the typ

5h

Silicon Valley Wants to Be Destroyed by Aliens

In the 1996 Roland Emmerich film Independence Day , a powerful alien civilization attacks Earth. Huge saucers 15 miles across lurk over major cities, literally foreshadowing their destruction. When the attack finally arrives, the vessels focus their power, signaled for cinema as an aquamarine glow, onto major monuments in each urban location. All are synecdoches for the cities and their cultures:

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New 'tracers' improve diagnosis of cancer and may be useful for treatment

Researchers have identified two new nuclear medicine tracers that make it easier to diagnose and potentially treat multiple types of cancer, providing high-quality images with less patient preparation and shorter acquisition times.

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Common beetle's gut microbiome benefits forests, holds promise for bioenergy

New research shows how an insect common to the Eastern U.S., the long-horned passalid beetle, has a hardy digestive tract with microbes to thank for turning its woody diet into energy, food for its young, and nutrients for forest growth. These insights into how the beetle and its distinct microbiome have co-evolved provide a roadmap for the production of affordable, nature-derived fuels and biopro

5h

Ancient records prompt rethink of animal evolution timeline

Scientists are rethinking a major milestone in animal evolution, after gaining fresh insights into how life on Earth diversified millions of years ago.

5h

Finding the right 'dose' for solar geoengineering

New research finds that if solar geoengineering is used to cut global temperature increases in half, there could be worldwide benefits without exacerbating change in any large geographic area.

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Honey bees can help monitor pollution in cities

Honey from urban bees can tell us how clean a city is and help pinpoint the sources of environmental pollutants such as lead, new research has found.

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Box Users Are Unwittingly Exposing Hundreds Of Thousands Of Documents From Over 90 Companies

As has been warned in the past, if your company uses Box to share files and is employing a custom domain, you might be exposing confidential data. That is not because of a bug or vulnerability …

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US may punish Germany if it uses Huawei tech

The US hasn't been shy about pressuring its allies to ditch Huawei, but now it's turning to threats of serious consequences. The Wall Street Journal has learned that the …

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Circulation Research Fires Editor over Homophobic Email

Roberto Bolli was editor of the American Heart Association's journal until last week, after anti-gay comments he sent to the Louisville Ballet became public.

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Labs Pick Up the Pieces After St. Andrews Fire

Since a February blaze displaced 10 research groups, “phenomenally generous” support has emerged from across campus and the world as scientists wait to return to the bench.

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See the incredible supercars from the 2019 Geneva International Motor Show

Cars Every car on the list is worthy of a poster. The world has a new king for expensive supercars.

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Bee diversity critical to world's food supply

Ecosystems that contain only a few bee species underperform in terms of plant production whereas those with many different species thrive, according to research which highlights the importance of bee diversity to securing the world's food supply.

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Bee diversity critical to world's food supply

Ecosystems that contain only a few bee species underperform in terms of plant production whereas those with many different species thrive, according to research which highlights the importance of bee diversity to securing the world's food supply.

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Urban African Americans are 'startlingly' more likely to live in trauma deserts, researchers say

Chicago's South Side didn't have a trauma care unit until last year; the last closed in 1991. Whether immediate trauma care or long-term mental health care, access to facilities is limited in minority neighborhoods. Since the University of Chicago's Level 1 Trauma Center opened, there's been a seven-fold reduction in the disparity in the city's access to care. None Imagination is one of our most

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The Singularity and CyberTerrorism

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Anti-malarial shows promise in human clinical study

An experimental drug, called DSM265, cured seven volunteers of a Plasmodium falciparum infection, a malaria parasite that is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The goal of this research is to find a cure for malaria with a single dose, and ultimately, eradicate the parasite.

6h

Remembering to forget

Discarding information from the brain is associated with more mental effort than keeping it, finds a human neuroimaging study published in JNeurosci. These results suggest that focusing attention on the memory of an unwanted experience may be required to forget it.

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Multitasking amygdala neurons respond to sights, sounds, and touch

Individual neurons in the monkey amygdala that respond to touch also respond to imagery and sounds, according to new research published in JNeurosci. These cells may provide the building blocks needed to process multisensory social and emotional information.

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Anti-malarial shows promise in human clinical study

An experimental drug, called DSM265, cured seven volunteers of a Plasmodium falciparum infection, a malaria parasite that is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The goal of this research is to find a cure for malaria with a single dose, and ultimately, eradicate the parasite. The research is published March 11 in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Soci

6h

Genes that evolve from scratch expand protein diversity

One of the most important questions in biology is how rapidly new proteins evolve in organisms. Proteins are the building blocks that carry out the basic functions of life. As the genes that produce them change, the proteins change as well, introducing new functionality or traits that can eventually lead to the evolution of new species.

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Anti-malarial shows promise in human clinical study

An experimental drug, called DSM265, cured seven volunteers of a Plasmodium falciparum infection, a malaria parasite that is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The goal of this research is to find a cure for malaria with a single dose, and ultimately, eradicate the parasite. The research is published March 11 in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Soci

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Genes that evolve from scratch expand protein diversity

One of the most important questions in biology is how rapidly new proteins evolve in organisms. Proteins are the building blocks that carry out the basic functions of life. As the genes that produce them change, the proteins change as well, introducing new functionality or traits that can eventually lead to the evolution of new species.

6h

Weekday–Weekend Sleep Unbalance Bad for Blood Sugar Regulation

Weekday sleep deprivation with weekend make-up sleeping seems to be worse for blood sugar control than even chronic sleep deprivation alone. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Weekday–Weekend Sleep Unbalance Bad for Blood Sugar Regulation

Weekday sleep deprivation with weekend make-up sleeping seems to be worse for blood sugar control than even chronic sleep deprivation alone. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Scientists one step closer to a clock that could replace GPS and Galileo

Scientists in the Emergent Photonics Lab (EPic Lab) at the University of Sussex have made a breakthrough to a crucial element of an atomic clock—devices which could reduce our reliance on satellite mapping in the future—using cutting-edge laser beam technology. Their development greatly improves the efficiency of the lancet (which in a traditional clock is responsible for counting), by 80% – somet

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Michael Wilks obituary

My friend Michael Wilks, who has died of prostate cancer aged 69, was a forensic physician. His professional achievements were underpinned by his courage and honesty in confronting his problems with alcohol and he made an outstanding contribution to changing attitudes towards addiction. Michael was born in Paddington, west London, to Dennis, a GP, and Bridget (nee Chetwynd-Stapylton), a nurse. Af

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Solve it did you? Speak Yoda how to

The answers to today’s Jedi language puzzle Earlier today I set you the following puzzle about the peculiar grammar of Yoda, Star Wars’ pointy-eared Jedi master. Yoda inverts pairs of phrases before speaking. If Yoda says “Believe you I don’t”, we know what he means is “I don’t believe you.” Continue reading…

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Five tips for nailing your US-based graduate-school applications

Five tips for nailing your US-based graduate-school applications Five tips for nailing your US-based graduate-school applications, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00845-z Cristian Román-Palacios discusses how to deal with the bureaucracy and make a great case for yourself.

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Genes that evolve from scratch expand protein diversity

A new study published in Nature Ecology and Evolution led by scientists from the University of Chicago challenges one of the classic assumptions about how new proteins evolve.

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Sussex scientists one step closer to a clock that could replace GPS and Galileo

Scientists in the Emergent Photonics Lab (EPic Lab) at the University of Sussex have made a breakthrough to a crucial element of an atomic clock — devices which could reduce our reliance on satellite mapping in the future — using cutting-edge laser beam technology.

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Ultrathin and ultrafast: Scientists pioneer new technique for two-dimensional material analysis

Discovery allows scientists to look at how 2-D materials move with ultrafast precision.

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Democrats Want Any Infrastructure Bill to Address Climate Change

Proponents have floated proposals ranging from energy efficiency to electric grid modernization — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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No silver bullet for helping the Great Barrier Reef

Recent flooding and the mass outflows of dirty water onto the Great Barrier Reef are raising concerns about their impact on reef health. Across much of coastal Queensland, coastal rivers dump millions of litres of brown, polluted water out onto the Great Barrier Reef, but until now the relative effects of these annual inputs on reef corals and associated organisms have been difficult to understand

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Quantum Cryptography Demystified: How It Works in Plain Language

Once quantum computers become a commercial reality, they will change the ground rules for cryptography. Able to break many current systems, they threaten to allow the pilfering of massive amounts of encrypted data. However, they also hold promise for enabling us to better secure our data using quantum computing technology. The post Quantum Cryptography Demystified: How It Works in Plain Language

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Sprint warns customers: Don’t be fooled by AT&T’s “fake 5G”

AT&T's "5G E" is still just 4G LTE, Sprint reminds customers in open letter.

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This Site Detects Whether Text Was Written by a Bot

Digital Turncoat Last month, developers from OpenAI announced that they had built a text generating algorithm called GPT-2 that they said was too dangerous to release into the world, since it could be used to pollute the web with endless bot-written material. But now, a team of scientists from the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab and Harvard University built an algorithm called GLTR that determines how like

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Is there such a thing as an anarchist capitalist?

Even though anarchy and capitalism seem like they're diametrically opposed, there are some out there who call themselves anarcho-capitalists. A more extreme version of libertarianism, anarcho-capitalism argues that there ought to be no state whatsoever; the free market can sort everything out, and if left alone, will ensure everybody's liberty. The philosophy attracts considerable criticism, both

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Daily briefing: Cuba acknowledges climate change threats in its constitution

Daily briefing: Cuba acknowledges climate change threats in its constitution Daily briefing: Cuba acknowledges climate change threats in its constitution, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00843-1 Growing worldwide impetus — or lip service? Plus: how AI might give doctors more freedom to focus on patients and the month’s best science images.

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ITU åbner nyt Center for it-sikkerhed

Et tværfagligt center på it-universitetet skal styrke uddannelse indenfor it-sikkerhed.

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Ultrathin and ultrafast: Scientists pioneer new technique for two-dimensional material analysis

Using a never-before-seen technique, scientists have found a new way to use some of the world's most powerful X-rays to uncover how atoms move in a single atomic sheet in real time, opening up new possibilities for probing two-dimensional materials.

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No silver bullet for helping the Great Barrier Reef

Using a combination of advanced satellite imaging and over 20 years of coral monitoring across the Reef, a team of researchers from Dalhousie University, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University (Coral CoE), the University of Adelaide and Lancaster University in the UK has found that chronic exposure to poor water quality is limiting the recovery rates of corals acr

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How to take a census of Earth's biodiversity? One team of researchers has a plan

How do you monitor the number and location of Earth's plants and animals at any given time? It's a daunting, planet-sized problem, but an international team of researchers has published a proposal for how to do just that.

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Novel technology aims to improve lithium metal battery life, safety

Rechargeable lithium metal batteries with increased energy density, performance, and safety may be possible with a newly-developed, solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI), according to Penn State researchers.

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Honey bees can help monitor pollution in cities

Honey from urban bees can tell us how clean a city is and help pinpoint the sources of environmental pollutants such as lead, new University of British Columbia research has found.

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Pollinators need people

A global study has concluded that people are essential to conserving the pollinators that maintain and protect biodiversity, agriculture and habitat.

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A robotic leg, born without prior knowledge, learns to walk

A team of researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering believe they have become the first to create an AI-controlled robotic limb driven by animal-like tendons that can even be tripped up and then recover within the time of the next footfall, a task for which the robot was never explicitly programmed to do.

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Finding the right 'dose' for solar geoengineering

New research finds that if solar geoengineering is used to cut global temperature increases in half, there could be worldwide benefits without exacerbating change in any large geographic area.

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Ancient records prompt rethink of animal evolution timeline

Scientists are rethinking a major milestone in animal evolution, after gaining fresh insights into how life on Earth diversified millions of years ago.

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Sydney united to build a quantum harbor city

Working together, researchers at the University of Sydney and UNSW have overcome a fundamental hurdle to building quantum computers in silicon.

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Nature's own biorefinery

New research from Berkeley Lab shows how an insect common to the Eastern U.S., the long-horned passalid beetle, has a hardy digestive tract with microbes to thank for turning its woody diet into energy, food for its young, and nutrients for forest growth. These insights into how the beetle and its distinct microbiome have co-evolved provide a roadmap for the production of affordable, nature-derive

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Experts present a new framework for global species monitoring

A group of international experts has developed a much-needed framework to significantly improve the monitoring of status and trends of species worldwide. This finding comes after a multi-year collaboration under the auspices of the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON).

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Fatal horizon, driven by acidification, closes in on marine organisms in Southern Ocean

Marine microorganisms in the Southern Ocean may find themselves in a deadly vise grip by century's end as ocean acidification creates a shallower horizon for life.

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Spontaneous spin polarization demonstrated in a two-dimensional material

Physicists from the University of Basel have demonstrated spin alignment of free electrons within a two-dimensional material. Writing in the latest edition of Nature Nanotechnology, they described their observation of spontaneous spin polarization, which cannot occur in ideal two-dimensional materials according to a well-known theorem from the 1960s.

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ORNL-led collaboration solves a beta-decay puzzle with advanced nuclear models

An international collaboration including scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory solved a 50-year-old puzzle that explains why beta decays of atomic nuclei are slower than what is expected based on the beta decays of free neutrons. The findings, published in Nature Physics, fill a longstanding gap in physicists' understanding of beta decay, an important process stars

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Quantum physicists succeed in controlling energy losses and shifts

In their paper to be published on March 11, 2019 in Nature Physics, scientists from Aalto University and the University of Oulu demonstrate that they can increase the dissipation rate, on demand, by a factor of thousand in a high-quality superconducting resonator–just like the ones used in prototype quantum computers.

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Few pathways to an acceptable climate future without immediate action, according to study

A new comprehensive study of climate change has painted over 5 million pictures of humanity's potential future, and few foretell an Earth that has not severely warmed. But with immediate action and some luck, there are pathways to a tolerable climate future, according to a research team led by Tufts University.

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Physicists use supercomputers to solve 50-year-old beta decay puzzle

Beta decay plays an indispensable role in the universe. And for 50 years it has held onto a secret that puzzled nuclear physicists. With ever-advancing computing power at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a team of researchers has solved that mystery, with the results appearing in Nature Physics.

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Protection from Zika virus may lie in a protein derived from mosquitoes

By targeting a protein found in the saliva of mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, Yale investigators reduced Zika infection in mice. The finding demonstrates how researchers might develop a vaccine against Zika and similar mosquito-borne viruses, the study authors said.

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Broadband electro-optic frequency comb generation in a lithium niobate microring resonator

Broadband electro-optic frequency comb generation in a lithium niobate microring resonator Broadband electro-optic frequency comb generation in a lithium niobate microring resonator, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1008-7 Using a thin-film lithium niobate photonic platform, an electro-optic frequency comb generator is realized that is capable of producing wide and stable s

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Jupiter could be cracking its moon Europa with powerful magnetic force

Jupiter’s colossal magnetic field may create a jet stream in Europa’s subsurface ocean, which could explain cracks in its surface and help nourish life there

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Amerikansk skiferolie buldrer frem

Verdens olieproduktion vokser. Det gælder særligt USA’s skifferolieproduktion. Især plastindustrien og flytrafikken kommer til at drive den forøgede efterspørgsel mod 2024.

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Steven Spielberg vs. Netflix

At 72 years old, Steven Spielberg has made movies for several decades and has an estimated net worth of $3.7 billion. He might be one of Hollywood’s most beloved directors, but it’s not too difficult for the industry’s newer generation to view him as someone who might be a little out of touch with the ordinary movie consumer’s experience. So when the Oscar-winning filmmaker first publicly aired c

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A Bank Is Testing a Debit Card With Built-in Fingerprint Scanner

Fingerprint Card In 2019, there are many ways to make a purchase: you can tap your phone, enter a PIN, or sign a receipt. Soon there might be a new one: Netherlands-based digital security company Gemalto is working on a debit card that can make secure purchases through a built-in fingerprint biometric scanner. Hold your thumb over the scanner on the card, tap it at any tap-to-pay-enabled terminal

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How Artificial Intelligence Is Changing Science

No human, or team of humans, could possibly keep up with the avalanche of information produced by many of today’s physics and astronomy experiments. Some of them record terabytes of data every day — and the torrent is only increasing. The Square Kilometer Array, a radio telescope slated to switch on in the mid-2020s, will generate about as much data traffic each year as the entire internet. The d

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Ancient records prompt rethink of animal evolution timeline

Scientists are rethinking a major milestone in animal evolution, after gaining fresh insights into how life on Earth diversified millions of years ago.

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Common beetle's gut microbiome benefits forests, holds promise for bioenergy

Insects are critical contributors to ecosystem functioning, and like most living organisms their co-evolution with microbes has been essential to support these functions. While many insects are infamous for wreaking havoc wherever they roam, many thousands of species go quietly about their business, providing important services essential to healthy ecosystems using the innovative biochemistry of t

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Experts present a new framework for global species monitoring

A group of international experts has developed a much-needed framework to significantly improve the monitoring of status and trends of species worldwide. This finding comes after a multi-year collaboration under the auspices of the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON).

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Protection from Zika virus may lie in a protein derived from mosquitoes

By targeting a protein found in the saliva of mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, Yale investigators reduced Zika infection in mice. The finding demonstrates how researchers might develop a vaccine against Zika and similar mosquito-borne viruses, the study authors said.

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People are essential to conserving pollinators

A global study has concluded that people are essential to conserving the pollinators that maintain and protect biodiversity, agriculture and habitat.

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Honey bees can help monitor pollution in cities

Honey from urban bees can tell us how clean a city is and help pinpoint the sources of environmental pollutants such as lead, new University of British Columbia research has found.

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Controlling thermal conductivity of polymers with light

Polymers are regularly used as thermal insulators for everything from keeping beverages hot to keeping sensitive electronics cool. In some cases, polymers can even be used as thermal conductors to enable efficient heating or cooling.

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Quantum physicists succeed in controlling energy losses and shifts

Quantum computers need to preserve quantum information for a long time to be able to crack important problems faster than a normal computer. Energy losses take the state of the qubit from one to zero, destroying stored quantum information at the same time. Consequently, scientists all over the globe have traditionally worked to remove all sources of energy loss—or dissipation—from these machines.

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Novel technology aims to improve lithium metal battery life, safety

Rechargeable lithium metal batteries with increased energy density, performance, and safety may be possible with a newly-developed, solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI), according to Penn State researchers.

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Ancient records prompt rethink of animal evolution timeline

Scientists are rethinking a major milestone in animal evolution, after gaining fresh insights into how life on Earth diversified millions of years ago.

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Few pathways to an acceptable climate future without immediate action, according to study

A new comprehensive study of climate change has painted over 5 million pictures of humanity's potential future, and few foretell an Earth that has not severely warmed. But with immediate action and some luck, there are pathways to a tolerable climate future, according to a research team led by Tufts University.

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Common beetle's gut microbiome benefits forests, holds promise for bioenergy

Insects are critical contributors to ecosystem functioning, and like most living organisms their co-evolution with microbes has been essential to support these functions. While many insects are infamous for wreaking havoc wherever they roam, many thousands of species go quietly about their business, providing important services essential to healthy ecosystems using the innovative biochemistry of t

7h

Experts present a new framework for global species monitoring

A group of international experts has developed a much-needed framework to significantly improve the monitoring of status and trends of species worldwide. This finding comes after a multi-year collaboration under the auspices of the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON).

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Finding the right 'dose' for solar geoengineering

One of the key misconceptions about solar geoengineering—putting aerosols into the atmosphere to reflect sunlight and reduce global warming—is that it could be used as a fix-all to reverse global warming trends and bring temperature back to pre-industrial levels.

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Protection from Zika virus may lie in a protein derived from mosquitoes

By targeting a protein found in the saliva of mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, Yale investigators reduced Zika infection in mice. The finding demonstrates how researchers might develop a vaccine against Zika and similar mosquito-borne viruses, the study authors said.

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Opening the path to scaling silicon quantum computers

Research collaboration between UNSW and the University of Sydney has overcome a fundamental hurdle to building quantum computers in silicon, opening the way to further develop the machines at scale.

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Fatal horizon, driven by acidification, closes in on marine organisms in Southern Ocean

Marine microorganisms in the Southern Ocean may find themselves in a deadly vise grip by century's end as ocean acidification creates a shallower horizon for life, new University of Colorado Boulder research finds.

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People are essential to conserving pollinators

A global study has concluded that people are essential to conserving the pollinators that maintain and protect biodiversity, agriculture and habitat.

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Physicists solve a beta-decay puzzle with advanced nuclear models

An international collaboration including scientists at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) solved a 50-year-old puzzle that explains why beta decays of atomic nuclei are slower than what is expected based on the beta decays of free neutrons.

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Spontaneous spin polarization demonstrated in a two-dimensional material

Physicists from the University of Basel have demonstrated spin alignment of free electrons within a two-dimensional material. Writing in the latest edition of Nature Nanotechnology, they described their observation of spontaneous spin polarization, which cannot occur in ideal two-dimensional materials according to a well-known theorem from the 1960s.

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Honey bees can help monitor pollution in cities

Honey from urban bees can tell us how clean a city is and help pinpoint the sources of environmental pollutants such as lead, new University of British Columbia research has found.

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Half the World Doesn’t Have Internet Access. How do we Bridge the Gap?

Bridging this gap can improve economic growth, business, and educational opportunities in struggling communities. The Global Maker Challenge has received over a thousand submissions from innovators from around the world to put forward solutions to help solve this problem. The post Half the World Doesn’t Have Internet Access. How do we Bridge the Gap? appeared first on Futurism .

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Deep Time

Dead things, bubbles in ice cores, layers of sediment: together, they testify to the power of the atmosphere to change the Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New 'tracers' improve diagnosis of cancer and may be useful for treatment

Researchers have identified two new nuclear medicine tracers that make it easier to diagnose and potentially treat multiple types of cancer, providing high-quality images with less patient preparation and shorter acquisition times. The research is featured in the March issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (http://jnm.snmjournals.org).

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Controlling thermal conductivity of polymers with light

In a new study, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have designed and demonstrated a novel type of polymer demonstrating a switchable thermal conductivity controlled by light. The material has the potential to route the conduction of heat on-demand and enable new, smarter, ways to manage heat.

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Binge drinking in adolescence may increase risk for anxiety later in life

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that adolescent binge drinking, even if discontinued, increases the risk for anxiety later in life due to abnormal epigenetic programming.

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Deep Time

Dead things, bubbles in ice cores, layers of sediment: together, they testify to the power of the atmosphere to change the Earth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers identify role sex-biased protein may play in autism

Researchers are one step closer to helping answer the question of why autism is four times more common in boys than in girls after identifying and characterizing the connection of certain proteins in the brain to autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

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Tesla Reverses Course, Raising Car Prices and Keeping Stores Open

Big Changes In late February, Tesla announced its intentions to shift to online-only sales via a blog post , which outlined a plan to close all but a small number of Tesla stores that would serve as “galleries, showcases and Tesla information centers.” Closing those stores would allow Tesla to cut the cost of its vehicles by an average 6 percent, it claimed, meaning it could finally sell the $35,

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Some countries ground Boeings, most keep them flying

Boeing's 737 MAX 8 medium-haul workhorse jet was grounded in China, Ethiopia and Indonesia on Monday after an Ethiopian Airlines crash killed all 157 people on board.

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The Genderless Digital Voice the World Needs Right Now

The idea behind Q is to pressure the tech industry into acknowledging that gender isn’t necessarily binary, a matter of man or woman, masculine or feminine.

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Note taking jurors influence verdicts, study finds

New University of Liverpool research, published in PLOS ONE, highlights the positive impact jurors' note taking has on evidence recall and, crucially, trial verdicts.

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The largest ever catalog of bacteria in the human body contain over 150 thousands genomes

The largest ever catalog of bacterial and archaeal microbes commonly populating the human body across worldwide populations has been assembled. This is the main result of a new study coordinated by Nicola Segata and Edoardo Pasolli of the Laboratory of Computational Metagenomics at the University of Trento, Italy. The work appeared online in the scientific journal "Cell".

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Note-taking jurors influence verdicts, study finds

New University of Liverpool research, published in PLOS ONE, highlights the positive impact jurors' note taking has on evidence recall and, crucially, trial verdicts.

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To slow malaria, cure mosquitoes with drug-treated bed nets

Researchers found that they could use the same drug — atovaquone — used to treat the malaria parasite when a person gets sick, coat mosquito bed nets with it, and let mosquitoes ingest the anti-malarial drug.

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Cutting the standard dose of medication for acute mountain sickness in half does not reduce its effectiveness

A new study published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine demonstrated that trekkers and climbers taking a lower dose of acetazolamide (62.5 mg twice daily) were no more likely to develop acute mountain sickness (AMS) symptoms than those who took twice that amount, which is the standard prophylactic dose.

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Mindfulness found to improve mental health of students

Mental health among university students could be improved by introducing mindfulness training. These are the findings from the first UK study, published in Education Research International, to measure the efficacy of mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on students.

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Hot or cold, rural residents more vulnerable to extreme temperatures

A study in China's Zheijiang Province shows that people in China's rural communities are more vulnerable to both hot and cold temperature extremes than people living in urban areas.

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Kids' concussion recovery like snakes and ladders game

During the first 24 hours, home and leisure activities may be undertaken as long as they are only for five minutes at a time, and stopped if symptoms increase. The guidelines give pathways for three categories of concussions: for those who are symptom free within 48 hours of the injury, those who are symptom free or much decreased within one to four weeks, and those who have the symptoms for more

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To slow malaria, cure mosquitoes with drug-treated bed nets

For decades, one of the strongest weapons against malaria has been a one-two punch: low-tech mosquito bed nets to physically block biting, treated with deadly insecticides to kill the mosquitoes.

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'Captain Marvel' Beat Its Own Box Office Projections

Carol Danvers made bank last weekend.

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Brain zap prison experiment suspended by Spanish government

Tests to see if zapping the brains of prisoners can make them less aggressive have been suspended, following New Scientist’s exclusive report on the experiment

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To slow malaria, cure mosquitoes with drug-treated bed nets

For decades, one of the strongest weapons against malaria has been a one-two punch: low-tech mosquito bed nets to physically block biting, treated with deadly insecticides to kill the mosquitoes.

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Some countries ground Boeings, most keep them flying

Boeing's 737 MAX 8 medium-haul workhorse jet was grounded in China, Ethiopia and Indonesia on Monday after an Ethiopian Airlines crash killed all 157 people on board.

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How online neighborhood reviews could aid urban planning

Every day, people share a dizzying amount of information about local communities online. They talk about whether their neighbors are friendly, how well the buses run, what kinds of restaurants are in an area, and much, much more.

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Vaccines and autism: A thorough review of the evidence (2019 update)

One of the most common concerns that people have about vaccines is that they might cause (or exacerbate) autism. This idea is perpetuated by celebrities and innumerable websites, and it has become one of the cornerstone arguments of the anti-vaccine … Continue reading →

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Quantum computing could change the way the world uses energy

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[Feature] Age of AI anxiety: Will human translators survive automation?

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AOC: Automation Means “More Time Enjoying the World We Live In”

Techno-Optimism Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said that job automation doesn’t have to be the job-displacing scourge that many think it is during an appearance at the Austin tech conference SXSW. If people can pursue their passions and interests while robots handle the work, Ocasio-Cortez believes that we can all spend “more time enjoying the world we live in,” according to Fast Company . “Not all cre

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Daylight savings sees 'sleepy consumers' with a wider variety in their shopping carts

A recent study from the UBC Sauder School of Business found that sleepier consumers reach for more variety at their local stores to help them stay awake, including those impacted by loss of sleep due to Daylight Savings Time.

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Tiny particles in air pollution may damage fetal hearts

Microscopic particles in air pollution that pregnant women inhale may damage fetal cardiovascular development, according to a new study with mice. Researchers found that early in the first trimester and late in the third trimester were critical windows during which pollutants most affect the mother’s and fetus’ cardiovascular systems. “These findings suggest that pregnant women, women of child-be

8h

Some exoplanets tilt too much, and it's pushing everyone apart

Space Orbits are getting a bit less mysterious. The proclivity for pairs of exoplanets to seemingly push themselves into orbits that are more irregular from one-another than they ought to be has confounded astronomers…

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A tale of two cities: Is air pollution improving in Paris and London?

For the first time, a joint air pollution study across two mega-cities—London and Paris—measures the impact of policies designed to reduce air pollution from urban traffic over the last 12 years.

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Researchers say education a major barrier to following heart healthy diet

With cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death in the United States, researchers said it is concerning that less than one-third of the study participants were familiar with heart healthy diets. Physician practices with interdisciplinary teams that include nutritionists can be very effective in educating patients about nutrition, researchers noted.

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Researchers find a piece of Palaeolithic art featuring birds and humans

An article published in the journal L'Anthropologie tells how UB researchers found — in the site of Hort de la Bequera (Margalef de Montsant, Priorat) — an artistic piece from 12,500 years ago in which humans and birds try to interact in a pictorial scene with exceptional traits: figures seem to star a narration on hunting and motherhood.

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How online neighborhood reviews could aid urban planning

Every day, people share a dizzying amount of information about local communities online. They talk about whether their neighbors are friendly, how well the buses run, what kinds of restaurants are in an area, and much, much more.A new study shows how we can sort through this vast trove of digital data to improve cities and people's quality of life.

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Mobile devices don't reduce shared family time, study finds

The first study of the impact of digital mobile devices on different aspects of family time in the UK has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents rather than less — but not in shared activities such as watching TV and eating. The increase is in what is called 'alone-together' time, when children are at home with their parents but say they are alone.

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Daylight savings sees 'sleepy consumers' with a wider variety in their shopping carts

A recent study from the UBC Sauder School of Business found that sleepier consumers reach for more variety at their local stores to help them stay awake, including those impacted by loss of sleep due to daylight saving time.

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Mystery solved — biologists in Dresden explain the genetic origins of the saffron crocus

For almost 100 years, there has been controversy as to the possible parent species of the saffron crocus are. If the parent species were known, changes could be inserted into the crocus genome by new breeding. It is precisely this mystery that Dresden biologists have now solved.

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Multi-country study: Many Airbnb listings that allow smoking lack smoke detectors

In a study that analyzed Airbnb listings across 17 countries, researchers from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that less than half of the Airbnb venues that allow smoking are equipped with smoke detectors, while nearly two-thirds of Airbnb venues that do not allow smoking are equipped with smoke detectors.

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A tale of two cities: Is air pollution improving in Paris and London?

For the first time, a joint air pollution study across two mega-cities — London and Paris — measures the impact of policies designed to reduce air pollution from urban traffic over the last 12 years.

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How susceptible are hospital employees to phishing attacks?

A multicenter study finds high click rate for simulated phishing emails, potential benefit in phishing awareness training.

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Is infant temperament associated with future risk of childhood obesity?

This observational study looked at whether the temperament of infants born to mothers with gestational diabetes was associated with future risk of childhood obesity at ages 2 to 5 years. Children whose mothers develop diabetes during pregnancy are more likely to become obese but how infant temperament might influence the development of obesity in this population isn't clear. In healthy populations

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Extraordinary president, ordinary presidency

President Trump's refusal to play the Washington game pleases his base but limits his ability to fulfill his campaign promises. It's just one of the many reasons this extraordinary president is delivering a very ordinary presidency, according to a new book from US politics experts Dr. Jon Herbert, Dr. Trevor McCrisken, and Dr. Andrew Wroe.

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Politikere valgte den billigste placering til Danmarks største havmøllepark

Med placeringen af Danmarks største havmøllepark i Nordsøen ud for Thorsminde har politikerne valgt den placering, der gav den billigste havmølle-strøm.

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Friends or strangers? Laughter lets babies know

Infants as young as five months can differentiate laughter between friends and laughs strangers share, according to a new study. The results suggest that the ability to detect the nature of social relationships shows up early in human infancy, possibly the result of a detection system that uses vocal cues. “Infants’ sensitivity to different kinds of laughter might be one of the early emerging too

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Sowing the seeds – The past, present and future of plant conservation at FFI

You have to fast-forward almost 80 years from the origins of Fauna & Flora International (FFI) before you find any formal acknowledgement of our interest in things botanical, but plant conservation was on our agenda long before 'Flora' featured in our actual name.

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Fair Isle Bird Observatory—Watching the birdwatchers

Note: This post was scheduled just as news came in that the Fair Isle Bird Observatory had been destroyed by fire on Sunday, 10th March 2019). Thankfully, nobody was injured in the fire. Plans are already afoot to rebuild, but that will take time and money.

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The temperature evolution after 2016 suggests hotter future

Heat has been accumulating to the Earth's climate system quite steadily for decades . This has not prevented the apparent slowdown of warming seen in global mean surface temperature (GMST) since 1998 to become one of the pet claims for climate misinformers . Recently, we discussed this issue in our two papers ( paper 1 , paper 2 ). There are many factors that affect the GMST at any time, which ca

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How sea-produced energy could just change the world

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Humans and machines can improve accuracy when they work together

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Our Misplaced Fear of Job-Stealing Robots

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Gender-based salary gap persists among academic emergency medicine physicians

Although overall salaries for emergency physicians have increased over the past four years, and despite a call to end gender disparities in salary, men still make 18 percent more than women, and a $12,000 gender salary gap remains essentially unchanged.

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Sepsis a leading cause of death in US hospitals but many deaths may not be preventable

A research team at Brigham and Women's Hospital has comprehensively reviewed the characteristics and clinical management of patients who died with sepsis.

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New regulatory factor identified in bone formation

Researchers report the identification of a novel transcription factor that helps regulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into bone in mice.

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New study highlights 'alarmingly high' rate of visual problems in stroke survivors

A new University of Liverpool study, published in PLOS ONE, highlights the high incidence and prevalence of visual problems in acute stroke survivors.

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Sowing the seeds – The past, present and future of plant conservation at FFI

You have to fast-forward almost 80 years from the origins of Fauna & Flora International (FFI) before you find any formal acknowledgement of our interest in things botanical, but plant conservation was on our agenda long before 'Flora' featured in our actual name.

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Fair Isle Bird Observatory—Watching the birdwatchers

Note: This post was scheduled just as news came in that the Fair Isle Bird Observatory had been destroyed by fire on Sunday, 10th March 2019). Thankfully, nobody was injured in the fire. Plans are already afoot to rebuild, but that will take time and money.

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Unveiling the role of selenocysteine, the mysterious 21st amino acid

Selenocysteine is an essential amino acid for certain species, such as humans and the other vertebrates, although it has disappeared from others, such as insects. Researchers have discovered that it is also preserved in fungi, contrary to existing belief. Understanding the role it plays in these organisms may help us to understand why it is essential to human health.

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Across diseases, women are diagnosed later than men

When considering all diseases, there are big differences between the course of men's and women's patient care within the Danish healthcare system. This is shown in a new, extensive study, in which researchers have analyzed health data from the entire Danish population.

8h

Mechanized cane measures patients' rehabilitation process without noticing it

Engineers specializing in the design of physical devices to aid users, such as a smart wheelchair, have developed a mechanized cane that can measure patients' rehabilitation process without any impact on them.

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How to train your robot (to feed you dinner)

Researchers have developed a robotic system that can feed people who need someone to help them eat.

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Hospital cleaning trial cuts infections

Researchers have led a major trial of boosted hospital cleaning practices across 11 Australian hospitals that focused on 'touch points' in wards, and found significant reductions in healthcare-associated infections, with associated cost benefits.

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Winning the arms race: Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection

Researchers have applied molecular evolutionary analysis to quantify the severity of negative selection pressures on genes encoding the pneumococcal choline-binding proteins (CBPs). They found particularly strong selective constraints on the gene cbpJ, suggesting its importance for bacterial infection. Further analyses revealed its role in bacterial evasion of host neutrophils, suggesting CbpJ's v

8h

Kepler Space Telescope's first exoplanet candidate confirmed

An international team of astronomers announced the confirmation of the first exoplanet candidate identified by NASA's Kepler Mission.

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NASA’s Lunar Orbiter Spots “Moving Water Molecules” on the Moon

Moving Water NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) just spotted “moving water molecules” on the near side of the Moon — which could be a big deal for future human missions to the Moon. Scientists observed water molecules moving around as the lunar surface heated up during the Moon’s day cycle. Researchers had previously assumed that the main source of water — hydrogen ions from solar wind — w

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The Western Erasure of African Tragedy

On Sunday morning, an Ethiopian Airlines jetliner crashed shortly after leaving Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital, en route to Nairobi, the capital city of neighboring Kenya. Minutes after takeoff, the Boeing 737 Max 8—the same model of aircraft that went down in Indonesia several months ago —lost contact with air-traffic controllers. Soon after, the aircraft crashed;

8h

Is Beto the Front-Runner or Already a Flop?

In between the road trips and the Facebook Live posts, Beto O’Rourke seems to have made up his mind. Barack Obama told him back in December to get in touch with David Plouffe, who ran his 2008 campaign, and Paul Tewes, who directed the Iowa operation that scored a surging victory and propelled him to the White House. Both have now become O’Rourke advisers, along with other top Democratic operativ

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How to train your robot (to feed you dinner)

About 1 million adults in the United States need someone to help them eat, according to census data from 2010. It's a time-consuming and often awkward task, one largely done out of necessity …

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The "dementia village" that's redefining elder care | Yvonne van Amerongen

How would you prefer to spend the last years of your life: in a sterile, hospital-like institution or in a village with a supermarket, pub, theater and park within easy walking distance? The answer seems obvious now, but when Yvonne van Amerongen helped develop the groundbreaking Hogeweyk dementia care center in Amsterdam 25 years ago, it was seen as a risky break from tradition. Journey with van

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Donald Trump's use of humiliation could have catastrophic consequences – a psychologist explains why

World War II opened the gates to hell. In 1948, the nations of the world tried to bolt them shut again. They did so with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which recognised the inherent dignity of all people and provided the basis on which international human rights law was built. When this bolt was subsequently loosened in countries such as Cambodia, Rwanda and Bosnia, catastrophe ensued.

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Sound Waves May Fall Up in Gravity Instead of Down

Sound Waves May Fall Up in Gravity Instead of Down New findings suggest that ordinary sound has negative gravitational mass. Drums_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Uximetc pavel via Shutterstock Physics Monday, March 11, 2019 – 10:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — The sound of a sonic boom may produce about the same magnitude of gravitational pull as a 10-milligram weight, a new st

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Trauma of partition haunts India and Pakistan today

A recent escalation in tensions between India and Pakistan has put a spotlight on the violent history of the two countries’ independence. Historian Priya Satia says that history continues to haunt the Indian subcontinent. The two nations have co-existed uneasily since the 1947 partition of India, which ended almost two centuries of British rule in the region and led to the largest mass migration

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Do cosmic rays come from galactic bubbles?

New research provides evidence that galactic bubbles may be a source of cosmic rays. In space, a galactic bubble is composed of a lighter gas trapped inside a heavier one, and these bubbles can be huge. Galaxy NGC 3079, which is located approximately 67 million light years from Earth, contains two galactic bubbles—one that is 4,900 light years across, and another that is 3,600 light years across.

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Genom-direktør stopper efter hårdt arbejdspres

Gert Sørensen forlader sin direktørstilling i Nationalt Genom Center på grund af arbejdsopgaverne og arbejdspresset. Centret søger nu en lægefaglig direktør.

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Lantbruket en garant för fred

– Det krävs en omvärdering av lantbrukets roll i samhällsdebatten. Det behövs en storsatsning på innovationer, såväl för att mätta världens ökande befolkning som att undvika ännu fler krig och kriser, menar Per Frankelius, som gjort en litteraturstudie av de teorier som finns kring varför krig startar. Han kan konstatera att orsakerna till varför krig bryter ut i grunden varken handlar om faktore

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Ancient DNA is a powerful tool for studying the past – when archaeologists and geneticists work together

DNA has moved beyond esoteric science and into the center of everyday conversations about identity, culture and politics. It's also reshaping stories about the past as advances allow scientists to extract ancient DNA (aDNA) from skeletons found at archaeological sites.

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Selfish genetic elements amplify inflammation and age-related diseases

Researchers from the University of Rochester show that LINE1 retrotransposons, a class of selfish genetic elements, become more active with age and may cause age-related diseases by triggering inflammation. By understanding the impacts of retrotransposons, researchers can better recognize the processes by which cells age and how to combat the deleterious effects of aging.

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Researchers turn liquid metal into a plasma

For the first time, researchers at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) have found a way to turn a liquid metal into a plasma and to observe the temperature where a liquid under high-density conditions crosses over to a plasma state. Their observations, published in Physical Review Letters, have implications for better understanding stars and planets and could aid in

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Sex differences in personality traits in Asian elephants

Scientists from the University of Turku, Finland, have found that male and female Asian elephants differ in their personality. Previous work on a timber elephant population from Myanmar has shown that Asian elephants have three personality factors: attentiveness, sociability and aggressiveness. The new study demonstrates that male elephants score higher on the aggressiveness trait than females, wh

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Criteria for the reduction of environmental impact applied in the Roman Theatre of Itálica

The authors of the study have developed tools that link Life-Cycle Analysis (LCA) and Building Information Modeling (BIM) software so that environmental-impact reduction criteria can be integrated into projects from the moment of their first design.

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UNH researchers identify role gender-biased protein may play in autism

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire are one step closer to helping answer the question of why autism is four times more common in boys than in girls after identifying and characterizing the connection of certain proteins in the brain to autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

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Of mice, men and… computers: Common foundations of biological and artificial vision

The new study provides new insights on the mechanisms used by neurons in rat visual cortex to encode the shape of visual objects confirming the importance that rodents can have in the study of vision.The results suggest that the brain of these animals, in addition to that of the most evolved species, can inspire improvements to the so-called Artificial Deep Neural Networks, possibly helping them t

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Mechanized cane measures patients' rehabilitation process without noticing it

The Embedded Systems Engineering Group of the University of Malaga, specializing in the design of physical devices to aid users, such as a smart wheelchair, has developed a mechanized cane that can measure patients' rehabilitation process without any impact on them.

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Across diseases, women are diagnosed later than men

When considering all diseases, there are big differences between the course of men's and women's patient care within the Danish healthcare system. This is shown in a new, extensive study, in which researchers from the University of Copenhagen (UCPH) have analysed health data from the entire Danish population.

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Novel insect vectors and host trees harbor Dutch elm disease

Researchers from the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) and the University of Krakow have revealed novel and unexpected insect vectors and host trees for the Dutch elm disease, a deadly and devastating fungal disease of elm trees. Global trade and climate change enhance the risk of new exotic insect and fungi introductions.

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Novel insect vectors and host trees harbor Dutch elm disease

Researchers from the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) and the University of Krakow have revealed novel and unexpected insect vectors and host trees for the Dutch elm disease, a deadly and devastating fungal disease of elm trees. Global trade and climate change enhance the risk of new exotic insect and fungi introductions.

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Tesla changes course, will keep more showrooms open

Electric carmaker Tesla is reversing course on its decision to move most of its sales online, saying it will keep many of its showrooms open—but will need to hike prices to do so.

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Plastic in crosshairs at UN environment forum

Countries from around the world set their sights Monday on a pivotal deal to curb plastic waste, a source of long-term pollution and worsening contamination of the ocean's food chain.

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A smarter, safer way to beat corrosion: Research shows new corrosion inhibitor is 10 times more effective

Independent research has shown that a safer, smarter corrosion inhibitor can protect products for up to ten times longer, plugging the performance gap for an effective, chrome-free inhibitor.

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Adoption assessment tool lags behind societal changes

A researcher says a tool to assess potential adoptive parents does not meet the needs of lesbian, gay or gender minority adults.

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What's for dinner? Sushi, with a side of crickets

While insects have been consumed for centuries worldwide, many people still haven't warmed to the idea of a creepy-crawly on the tongue.

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The evolution of grain yield

A high grain yield is undoubtedly a desirable trait in cereal crops. Floret fertility is a key factor which determines the number of grains per inflorescence of cereals such as bread wheat or barley. Nonetheless, until recently little was known about its genetic basis. Whilst investigating floret fertility, a group of researchers have now discovered the locus Grain Number Increase 1 (GNI1), an imp

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Female academic EM doctors less likely than male doctors to hold rank of full professor

As few as one-third of academic emergency medicine physicians are female and these physicians face significant disparities in representation and academic rank by gender. Researchers have found that female academic emergency medicine physicians are less likely to hold the rank of full professor, compared to male counterparts.

9h

Massive twin star discovered snuggling close to its stellar sibling

Astronomers have discovered a binary star system with the closest high-mass young stellar objects ever measured, providing a valuable 'laboratory' to test theories on high mass binary star formation.

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Harry Potter: Wizards Unite mixes Pokemon Go with a mobile mystery, but release date remains hidden – CNET

CNET spent a morning at Niantic's headquarters playing a prerelease version of the upcoming game and we weren't disappointed with the game play.

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Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection

To successfully infect their hosts, bacteria need to evade the host immune system in order to reproduce and spread. Over the course of evolution, hosts—such as humans—develop increasingly sophisticated …

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New diagnostic clues found for life limiting lung condition

A new biomarker that could be used to provide earlier diagnosis for a life limiting lung condition has been identified by researchers at the University of Bradford.

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Unveiling the role of selenocysteine, the mysterious 21st amino acid

Selenocysteine is an essential amino acid for certain species, such as humans and the other vertebrates, although it has disappeared from others, such as insects. CRG researchers have discovered that it is also preserved in fungi, contrary to existing belief. Understanding the role it plays in these organisms may help us to understand why it is essential to human health. The study has been publish

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New data uncovers missing numbers to the only body clock that matters — your immune age

New data, published in Nature Medicine, from scientists at the Technion, Stanford and CytoReason describes for the first time ever a way to reliably quantify a person's 'immune age.' This game changing capability provides a much more reliable predictor for the status of your immune system than any other method and could lead to fundamental changes in drug and vaccine development and medical practi

9h

Blood pressure control is beneficial, is it not?

Until recently, physicians had generally assumed that older adults benefit from keeping their blood pressure below 140/90 mmHg. However, researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have now found that this assumption does not apply to all patients with high blood pressure. The reality is, in fact, quite the opposite: lower blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of death in a

9h

Improved hybrid models for multi-step wind speed forecasting

To ensure the safety and stability of the power grid, reliable predictions of wind speed and power generation at the local scale for wind farms are essential. Scientists found the CS-WD-WNN model performs well in wind speed prediction, and the accuracy is higher than that of earlier proposed models.

9h

How to train your robot (to feed you dinner)

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a robotic system that can feed people who need someone to help them eat.

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Massive twin star discovered snuggling close to its stellar sibling

Astronomers have discovered a binary star system with the closest high-mass young stellar objects ever measured, providing a valuable 'laboratory' to test theories on high mass binary star formation.

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Our misplaced fear of job-stealing robots

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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AI Advancements Are Making It Easier to Hack Biometric Systems

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Turning buildings into energy producers

Photovoltaics can be used directly in building and renovation projects and serve as a construction material in their own right. Integrating solar panels into facades and roofs can transform buildings into electricity producers and reduce CO2 emissions. To develop and promote this technology, Be-Smart project partners will design multifunctional solar panels that not only produce energy but also do

9h

Dorthe Crüger er udnævnt til ny ledelsesambassadør

For at styrke ledelse og kompetencer i den offentlige sektor, udpeger regeringen, KL og Danske Regioner en ny ledelsesambassadør. Valget er faldet på Dorthe Crüger.

9h

Nye antidoter til NOAK-midler på vej

Første modgift til NOAK-midlerne Eliquis og Xarelto har fået en positiv anbefaling af det europæiske lægemiddelagentur EMA. Kardiolog ser det som godt nyt for patienterne.

9h

Research suggests adoption assessment tool lags behind societal changes

A UBC researcher says a tool to assess potential adoptive parents does not meet the needs of lesbian, gay or gender minority adults.

9h

Scientists discover a potential strategy to treat influenza A

A team of researchers from Scripps Research and Janssen Research & Development LLC has discovered an orally active small molecule that neutralizes influenza A group 1 viruses, the most common flu strains. Scientists uncovered the potential therapy in a large chemical library and optimized lead compounds to produce JNJ-4796. Now they have proven its effectiveness against influenza in mice.

9h

Mobile devices don't reduce shared family time, study finds

The first study of the impact of digital mobile devices on different aspects of family time in the UK has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents rather than less—but not in shared activities such as watching tv and eating. The increase is in what is called 'alone-together' time, when children are at home with their parents but say they are alone.

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Scientists discover a potential strategy to treat influenza A

A team of researchers from Scripps Research and Janssen Research & Development LLC has discovered an orally active small molecule that neutralizes influenza A group 1 viruses, the most common flu strains. Scientists uncovered the potential therapy in a large chemical library and optimized lead compounds to produce JNJ-4796. Now they have proven its effectiveness against influenza in mice.

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Nu kan du folde og bøje din skærm

PLUS. To producenter er snart klar til at sælge smart­phones, hvor skærmen kan foldes ud til dobbelt størrelse.

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Techathlon podcast: Net Neutrality, publicity stunts, and streaming stats

Technology Play along with the most competitive tech podcast around. Let's see if you're as smart as your Twitter bio tries to make you seem.

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This Austrian village has world's shortest metro

The world's shortest (0.8 mi) and highest (4,680 ft) metro runs beneath an Austrian ski resort Constructed in 1985, the Dorfbahn keeps Serfaus traffic-free Capacity will increase from 1,600 to 3,000 passengers per hour this spring Postcard-perfect The weather's good for skiing today in Serfaus, Austria. Snow conditions are listed as 'powdery', with depths of 170 cm at the summit and 30 cm at the

9h

Researchers discover new nitrogen source in Arctic

Scientists have revealed that the partnership between an alga and bacteria is making the essential element nitrogen newly available in the Arctic Ocean. The microbial process of "nitrogen fixation" converts the element into a form that organisms can use, and was discovered recently in the frigid polar waters. This shift may be a result of climate change and could affect global chemical cycles, acc

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Underwater mudslides are the biggest threat to offshore drilling, and energy companies aren't ready for them

Like generals planning for the last war, oil company managers and government inspectors tend to believe that because they survived the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, they are ready for all contingencies. Today they are expanding drilling into deeper and deeper waters, and the Trump administration is opening more offshore areas to production.

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Energy efficiency: A clue to politically feasible climate policy

Our federal government and many state and local governments have been promoting energy efficiency for decades. It is hard to argue against efficiency. Why would anyone want to waste something that costs money, like energy? If I can drive a car forty miles on a gallon of gas, why would I want to spend twice the money if the same car got twenty miles to the gallon? If I can heat my home for 2/3 the

9h

Humans and machines can improve accuracy when they work together

Whether artificial intelligence systems steal humans' jobs or create new work opportunities, people will need to work together with them.

9h

Making Beautiful Darkroom Images—Without Using a Camera

Natalja Kent uses only chromogenic paper, a flashlight, and some improvisational footwork for 'Movement Artifacts'.

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No Bones About It: The Human Skeleton

We all have bones. But how much do we know about them? (Image credit: RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

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Is A Cure For HIV/AIDS On The Horizon?

A second person has apparently been cured of the disease. (Image credit: CLAUDIO REYES/AFP/Getty Images)

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Sex differences in personality traits in Asian elephants

Scientists from the University of Turku, Finland, have found that male and female Asian elephants differ in their personality. Previous work on a timber elephant population from Myanmar has shown that Asian elephants have three personality factors: Attentiveness, Sociability and Aggressiveness. The new study demonstrates that male elephants score higher on the Aggressiveness trait than females, wh

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Sex differences in personality traits in Asian elephants

Scientists from the University of Turku, Finland, have found that male and female Asian elephants differ in their personality. Previous work on a timber elephant population from Myanmar has shown that Asian elephants have three personality factors: Attentiveness, Sociability and Aggressiveness. The new study demonstrates that male elephants score higher on the Aggressiveness trait than females, wh

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China says air pollution dropped in 2018

China's air quality improved substantially last year, the environment ministry said Monday, following a government crackdown on pollution and a weakening economy.

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Driving water down nanohighways

Removing water vapor from air and other gas mixtures, which is crucial for many industrial processes and air conditioning, could become cheaper and more effective through polymer membrane technology now developed at KAUST.

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The fiddlers influencing mangrove ecosystems

The types of bacteria living in and around fiddler crab burrows vary widely between mangroves, but their functional activities are remarkably similar.

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3 Practical Solutions to Offset Automation’s Impact on Work

In recent years, the media has sounded the alarm about mass job loss to automation and robotics —some studies predict that up to 50 percent of current jobs or tasks could be automated in coming decades. While this topic has received significant attention, much of the press focuses on potential problems without proposing realistic solutions or considering new opportunities . The economic impacts o

9h

Let's Talk about Miscarriage, Baby

Here’s my story; may it provide some comfort even though it has no happy ending — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Let's Talk about Miscarriage, Baby

Here’s my story; may it provide some comfort even though it has no happy ending — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What's for dinner? Sushi, with a side of crickets

While insects have been consumed for centuries worldwide, many people still haven't warmed to the idea of a creepy-crawly on the tongue.

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The fiddlers influencing mangrove ecosystems

The types of bacteria living in and around fiddler crab burrows vary widely between mangroves, but their functional activities are remarkably similar.

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Inhibiting post-translational modifications may lower oxidative stress in the aging eye

Advanced age is the largest risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Sumoylation is a reversible post-translational modification that conjugates small peptide, small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO), to a target protein. Our data indicate sumoylation critically regulates retina and RPE aging and that targeting sumoylation process may provide potential therapeutic strategy for AMD trea

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Winning the arms race: Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection

Researchers at Osaka University applied molecular evolutionary analysis to quantify the severity of negative selection pressures on genes encoding the pneumococcal choline-binding proteins (CBPs). They found particularly strong selective constraints on the gene cbpJ, suggesting its importance for bacterial infection. Further analyses revealed its role in bacterial evasion of host neutrophils, sugg

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Female academic EM doctors less likely than male doctors to hold rank of full professor

As few as one-third of academic emergency medicine physicians are female and these physicians face significant disparities in representation and academic rank by gender. Researchers have found that female academic emergency medicine physicians are less likely to hold the rank of full professor, compared to male counterparts.

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One Way Captain Marvel Could Have Been a Much Better Movie

For the first half of Marvel Studios’ newest release, Captain Marvel , the titular protagonist—although she never uses that super-moniker in the film—believes herself to be “Veers,” a member of the Kree, an interstellar race of “noble warrior heroes” doing battle with another alien race, called the Skrulls. Yet she has momentary flashes of a previous life as a human test-fighter pilot named Carol

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The Truth About People Who Have No Personality

What does it mean if someone says you have no personality? “We typically understand that we have not been paid a compliment,” write four researchers from Ouachita Baptist University in a recently published study . But the term is otherwise a little vague. Does it mean you’re quiet and reserved, or that you’re just not very unique? Are you, God forbid, basic ? The study’s conclusions point to some

9h

The fiddlers influencing mangrove ecosystems

The types of bacteria living in and around fiddler crab burrows vary widely between mangroves, but their functional activities are remarkably similar.

9h

Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection

To successfully infect their hosts, bacteria need to evade the host immune system in order to reproduce and spread. Over the course of evolution, hosts—such as humans—develop increasingly sophisticated defenses against bacterial infection, while bacteria in turn develop new strategies to overcome these defenses in a biological arms race.

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Study warns of disinfectant use in hospitals

The use of disinfectants to clean and control infections in hospitals should be regulated in the same way that prescribing antibiotics is, according to researchers from the University of Aberdeen.

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Soaking up clues from freshwater sponges

University of Minnesota Crookston researchers, aided by students, are shedding light on freshwater sponges in Minnesota, which may be indicators of water quality.

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Analysis reveals key gene for bacterial infection

To successfully infect their hosts, bacteria need to evade the host immune system in order to reproduce and spread. Over the course of evolution, hosts—such as humans—develop increasingly sophisticated defenses against bacterial infection, while bacteria in turn develop new strategies to overcome these defenses in a biological arms race.

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Cleaning up with cellulose

Selectively permeable membranes made from renewable plant-based materials could significantly improve the environmental credentials of the chemical industry. A KAUST team has tested the viability of cellulose membranes to show they can effectively clean wastewater.

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Study warns of disinfectant use in hospitals

The use of disinfectants to clean and control infections in hospitals should be regulated in the same way that prescribing antibiotics is, according to researchers from the University of Aberdeen.

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Soaking up clues from freshwater sponges

University of Minnesota Crookston researchers, aided by students, are shedding light on freshwater sponges in Minnesota, which may be indicators of water quality.

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Rehearsing for the Mars landings in Hawaii and Idaho

Imagine astronauts on Mars, tasked with picking rock samples that will be used by scientists to search for signs of life. But they can only transport a limited number back to Earth. What should they look for? Are some types of rocks better than others? They could try to ask for advice from the team of geologists and biologists back on Earth, but due to the distance between Earth and Mars it could

9h

Graphene and cobalt for creating new electromagnetic devices

Researchers from IMDEA Nanociencia and other European centres have discovered that the combination of graphene with cobalt offers relevant properties in the field of magnetism. This breakthrough sets the stage for the development of new logic devices that can store large data amounts quickly and with reduced energy consumption.

9h

Why gas prices vary in the same part of town

Why do some gas stations charge more for fuel than others in the same general geographic location? After all, many of the factors that influence the price per gallon—the cost of crude oil, regional taxes, and processing and transportation charges—affect all pumps in a given area. Geographers Alan Murray and Jing Xu of the University of California, Santa Barbara conducted a survey of gas prices in

9h

Preparing for Invasive Pests Before They Arrive

Even though non-native species cost global economies $1.4 trillion annually, pest management tends to be reactive: An insect or disease arrives, farmers take notice, and then scientists and advocacy groups scramble. But with increased globalization and climate change, that's starting to change.

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How secret conversations inside cells are transforming biology

How secret conversations inside cells are transforming biology How secret conversations inside cells are transforming biology, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00792-9 Organelles — the cell’s workhorses — mingle far more than scientists ever appreciated.

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Here's how we can combine robots with the Internet of Things

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How collaboration is driving advances in additive manufacturing (AM)

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Persons with Alzheimer's disease have a higher risk of head injuries

Persons with Alzheimer's disease have approximately 30 percent higher risk of head injuries, and 50 percent higher risk of traumatic brain injuries than persons without Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from University of Eastern Finland shows. The results were published in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Hospital cleaning trial cuts infections

Queensland University of Technology researchers have led a major trial of boosted hospital cleaning practices across 11 Australian hospitals that focused on 'touch points' in wards, and found significant reductions in healthcare-associated infections, with associated cost benefits.

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Research suggests adoption assessment tool lags behind societal changes

A UBC researcher says a tool to assess potential adoptive parents does not meet the needs of lesbian, gay or gender minority adults.Sarah Dow-Fleisner, a professor in the UBC Okanagan's School of Social Work, worked with Boston Children's Hospital postdoctoral fellow Adeline Wyman Battalen and David Brodzinsky, professor emeritus at Rutgers University, to test the validity of the commonly-used Tra

9h

Scientists discover a potential strategy to treat influenza A

A team of researchers from Scripps Research and Janssen Research & Development LLC has discovered an orally active small molecule that neutralizes influenza A group 1 viruses, the most common flu strains. Scientists uncovered the potential therapy in a large chemical library and optimized lead compounds to produce JNJ-4796. Now they have proven its effectiveness against influenza in mice.

9h

Fear of hospitalization keeps men from talking about suicide

Fear of psychiatric hospitalization is one of the primary reasons that older men — an age and gender group at high risk for suicide — don't talk about suicide with their physicians. Researchers discovered this finding as part of a pre-launch, stakeholder assessment of a multimedia program designed to encourage men to open up to their primary care providers about suicidal thoughts.

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How birds become male or female, and occasionally both

The highly unusual "semi-identical" Australian twins reported last week are the result of a rare event. It's thought the brother and sister (who have identical genes from their mother but not their father) developed from an egg fertilised by two different sperm at the same moment.

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Dog therapy: What I've learned overseeing 60 canine campus teams

The interaction always played out the same way. I'd leave my office and make my way across campus in search of coffee, my dog Frances by my side, and I would be besieged by students who, for the most part, would ignore me and lose themselves in Frances. They would eventually look up with tear-filled eyes and say: "As much as I miss my parents, I miss my dog more."

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Chipmaker Nvidia to acquire Mellanox for $6.9 billion

Chipmaker Nvidia will acquire network and data transmission company Mellanox for $6.9 billion in an all-cash deal.

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How birds become male or female, and occasionally both

The highly unusual "semi-identical" Australian twins reported last week are the result of a rare event. It's thought the brother and sister (who have identical genes from their mother but not their father) developed from an egg fertilised by two different sperm at the same moment.

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Echoes of 2008: Could climate change spark a global financial crisis?

The dire climate change situation continues to make headlines and inspire actions like the Sunrise Movement.

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Dog therapy: What I've learned overseeing 60 canine campus teams

The interaction always played out the same way. I'd leave my office and make my way across campus in search of coffee, my dog Frances by my side, and I would be besieged by students who, for the most part, would ignore me and lose themselves in Frances. They would eventually look up with tear-filled eyes and say: "As much as I miss my parents, I miss my dog more."

9h

Could an eye doctor diagnose Alzheimer's before you have symptoms?

A study of more than 200 people suggests the loss of blood vessels in the retina could signal Alzheimer's disease.

9h

New nitrogen source in Arctic

Scientists have revealed that the partnership between an alga and bacteria is making the essential element nitrogen newly available in the Arctic Ocean. The microbial process of 'nitrogen fixation' converts the element into a form that organisms can use, and was discovered recently in the frigid polar waters. This shift may be a result of climate change and could affect global chemical cycles.

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Potential way to improve cancer surgery outcomes by managing nontraditional risk factors

In a study of 142 patients preparing for cancer surgery, researchers say they have evidence that psychological or social risk factors such as depression, limited resilience and lack of emergency resources along with standard medical risk factors such as high blood pressure or diabetes are linked with higher risks of surgical complications.

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Monastery of 7th-Century Scottish Princess (and Saint) Possibly Discovered

Archaeologists and citizen scientists have unearthed what may be the monastery of Princess Aebbe, who was born a pagan but later spread Christianity along the northeast British coast in the seventh century.

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The Consequences of Teen Motherhood Can Last for Generations

A child whose mother had her as a teenager is set up to have a tough life. Compared with peers whose parents gave birth later, this child is at a greater risk of being born prematurely , of struggling to acquire basic skills such as literacy and self-control, and of underperforming in school. This child is also more likely to become a teen mother herself. Adolescent pregnancy isn’t genetic, but i

9h

'Failure of trust': Why regulators need to get tough on Facebook and Google

Two leading Australian digital media experts have backed proposed tougher regulations for digital platforms, saying the public has lost faith in tech giants like Facebook and Google.

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In-plane coherent control of plasmon resonances for plasmonic switching and encoding

Light incident on metallic nanoparticles can initiate the collective motion of electrons, causing a strong amplification of the local electromagnetic field. Such plasmonic resonances have significant roles in biosensing with ability to improve the resolution and sensitivity required to detect particles at the scale of the single molecule. The control of plasmon resonances in metadevices have poten

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Using quantum measurements to fuel a cooling engine

Researchers at the University of Florence and Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, in Italy, have recently proved that the invasiveness of quantum measurements might not always be detrimental. In a study published in Physical Review Letters, they showed that this invasive quality can actually be exploited, using quantum measurements to fuel a cooling engine.

9h

The irreplaceable role of mom-and-pop spaces for aging adults

Ethnographer Stacy Torres, assistant professor at the UC San Francisco School of Nursing, is shedding a unique light on how we think about social ties and social relationships among older people – how places affect social interactions, particularly in areas where gentrification is changing the character of neighborhoods. In addition to publishing in academic journals and mainstream periodicals, in

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'American Gods" Biggest Battle Is Its Own Reincarnation

After two years teetering on the brink of oblivion, American Gods has managed to find just enough spark to give its second season life—even if that spark is at times feeble and sputtering.

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Researchers discover new nitrogen source in Arctic

Scientists have revealed that the partnership between an alga and bacteria is making the essential element nitrogen newly available in the Arctic Ocean. The microbial process of 'nitrogen fixation' converts the element into a form that organisms can use, and was discovered recently in the frigid polar waters. This shift may be a result of climate change and could affect global chemical cycles, acc

10h

New study shows an eye scan can detect signs of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers from the Duke Eye Center have shown that a new, noninvasive imaging device can see signs of Alzheimer's disease in a matter of seconds.

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Could an eye doctor diagnose Alzheimer's before you have symptoms?

A study of more than 200 people at the Duke Eye Center in the journal Ophthalmology Retina suggests the loss of blood vessels in the retina could signal Alzheimer's disease.

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Kepler Space Telescope's first exoplanet candidate confirmed

An international team of astronomers announced the confirmation of the first exoplanet candidate identified by NASA's Kepler Mission.

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Wallaby-Size Dinosaur Discovered in Australia (Crikey!)

This newly discovered dinosaur has an oddly shaped jaw.

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Biologists study enzymes that help wheat to fight fungi

Scientists from I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University together with their Russian colleagues studied the reaction of wheat plants to damage caused by pathogenic fungi. They examined the activation of enzymes involved in cell death induced in response to infection. The research results and enzyme classification were published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences.

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Why are so few girls choosing careers in construction?

A new report looks at how construction is portrayed and perceived by high-school girls as a potential career option. Dr Phillippa Carnemolla, Senior Research Fellow at UTS School of Built Environment also examined the pathways that young women are taking when they do choose to pursue a construction career.

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Carbon dioxide mineralization in geologically common rocks for carbon storage

Humanity needs to improve when it comes to reducing carbon emissions to prevent the worst effects of climate change. If the world is to meet the IPCC's minimum target of keeping global temperature increases below 1.5 °C, every possible avenue for CO2 remediation must be explored.

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Biologists study enzymes that help wheat to fight fungi

Scientists from I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University together with their Russian colleagues studied the reaction of wheat plants to damage caused by pathogenic fungi. They examined the activation of enzymes involved in cell death induced in response to infection. The research results and enzyme classification were published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences.

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Mobile team forebygger indlæggelser og mindsker brugen af tvang

Den mobile skadestue binder psykiatri og botilbud sammen og startede som satspulje-projekt, men er nu en fast del i syddanmark og udvides til at dække hele ugen på børne- og ungeområdet.

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Super clones to conquer coconut crisis

Ageing coconut palm trees could be replaced quickly and cheaply by superior cloned coconuts being developed by University of Queensland researchers.

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Sugar set for 'energycane' reinvention

Gene-editing sugarcane for use in renewable energy and bio-plastics could help secure the industry's future.

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She Invented a Board Game With Scientific Integrity. It’s Taking Off.

How Elizabeth Hargrave turned a passion for ornithology and spreadsheets into a popular game about birds.

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Wet winters no longer ease California’s wildfire risk

Wet winters no longer predict possible relief from severe wildfires for California, according to a new study. From 1600 to 1903, the position of the North Pacific jet stream over California linked to the amount of winter precipitation and the severity of the subsequent wildfire season, researchers say. The jet stream brought wet winters and low wildfire activity followed. In contrast, higher wild

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Smoking, high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity each linked to unhealthy brains

Factors that influence the health of our blood vessels, such as smoking, high blood and pulse pressures, obesity and diabetes, are linked to less healthy brains. The strongest links are with areas of the brain known to be responsible for our more complex thinking skills, and which deteriorate during the development of Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

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Study of young athletes suggests snoring and sleep apnea are linked to sudden cardiac death

A study of university rugby players has shown that they are more likely to suffer sleep disordered breathing than an average middle-aged man. The study also showed that the athletes who experience this problem are also more likely to have low levels of oxygen in their blood and higher pulse rates during the night, suggesting that athletes with sleep disordered breathing may be at risk of heart abn

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New device could help minimize scarring in cosmetic surgery

Researchers have developed a new device that could help minimize scarring during surgery. The device can ascertain the orientation of skin tension lines, which is important for wound-healing post-surgery.

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Air pollution may impact fetal cardiovascular system

Microscopic particles in air pollution inhaled by pregnant women may damage fetal cardiovascular development, according to a new study. The study found that early in the first trimester and late in the third trimester were critical windows during which pollutants most affect the mother's and fetus' cardiovascular systems.

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New way to sense earthquakes could help improve early warning systems

Every year earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. Forewarning allows people to head for safety and a matter of seconds could spell the difference between life and death. Researchers demonstrate a new earthquake detection method — their technique exploits subtle telltale gravitational signals traveling ahead of the tremors. Future research could boost early warning system

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New species of stiletto snake capable of sideways strikes discovered in West Africa

During surveys in the Upper Guinea forest zone of Liberia and Guinea, scientists discovered snakes later identified as a new to science species. It belongs to the stiletto snakes, spectacular for their unusual skulls, allowing them to stab sideways with a fang sticking out of the corner of their mouths. The discovery is further evidence supporting the status of the region as unique in its biodiver

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Super clones to conquer coconut crisis

Ageing coconut palm trees could be replaced quickly and cheaply by superior cloned coconuts being developed by University of Queensland researchers.

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Sugar set for 'energycane' reinvention

Gene-editing sugarcane for use in renewable energy and bio-plastics could help secure the industry's future.

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How Africa can quell the next disease outbreaks

How Africa can quell the next disease outbreaks How Africa can quell the next disease outbreaks, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00789-4 As mobility increases, so must investments in national public-health institutions and local leadership, says John N. Nkengasong.

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Stem cells divide faster in space

Chinese researchers discover cell performance accelerates in microgravity.

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Ultima Thule in 3D

Victorian-era photographic gimmickry produces fantastic new view of Kuiper Belt Object.

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Searching for ET? Look to binary stars, researchers say

Some twin-systems might be prime targets for alien life. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Science history: the man whose balls didn’t explode

Leo Baekeland invented Bakelite, the salvation of America’s billiard players. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Role-playing game for international personnel deployed in conflict zones provides soft skills training

Effective cooperation may be crucial for peacekeepers working in EU missions, but it isn't always easy. The diverse cultures and genders of police, military and civilian personnel and the different organisations they come from often make effective communication and coordination a challenge. However, current training doesn't devote enough resources to teaching critical soft skills.

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The parallels of female power in ancient Egypt and modern times

Over the course of 3,000 years of Egypt's history, six women ascended to become female kings of the fertile land and sit atop its authoritarian power structure. Several ruled only briefly, and only as the last option in their respective failing family line. Nearly all of them achieved power under the auspices of attempting to protect the throne for the next male in line. Their tenures prevented ci

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New study uncovers insights about the nature of the ultraviolet-bright star Barnard 29

Analyzing data from spectroscopic instruments, astronomers have reported fundamental properties of Barnard 29, an ultraviolet-bright star in globular cluster Messier 13. Results of the analysis, presented in a paper published March 1 on arXiv.org, provide important insights into the nature of this star.

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Croatia's top oyster farmers in alarm after norovirus found

Oyster farming is the pride of this small town in the south of Croatia's Adriatic Sea coast. But tasting the famed local delicacy may not be a good idea at the moment.

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Sound by the Pound: Surprising Discovery Hints Sonic Waves Carry Mass

Some sounds might possess a tiny but measurable amount of negative gravitational mass — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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You Can Power a Calculator With Some LEDs

LEDs generate light, which is why they're in our screens. But if you instead shine a light on an LED, you can generate current to run a small device.

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Australian climate tool identifies end of winter by 2050

Academics from the School of Art & Design have teamed up with colleagues from the ANU Climate Change Institute on a design project, which takes existing data and communicates the impacts of climate change in a way that people can engage with and better understand.

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New decadal survey for the social and behavioral sciences presents guidance to the intelligence community

The social and behavioral sciences (SBS) offer an essential contribution to the mission of the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC), a mission that requires an understanding of what human beings do, how, and why, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report—A Decadal Survey of the Social and Behavioral Sciences: A Research Agenda for Advancing Intellig

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How did reading and writing evolve? Neuroscience gives a clue

The beginnings of writing may lie in humanity's far distant past, before Homo sapiens even emerged, says Derek Hodgson of the UK's University of York.

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The mysterious origins of beer

Genetic analysis reveals ale is truly the product of a meeting between east and west. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Sound by the Pound: Surprising Discovery Hints Sonic Waves Carry Mass

Some sounds might possess a tiny but measurable amount of negative gravitational mass — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Academic performance of urban children with asthma worse than peers without asthma

A new study shows urban children with poorly controlled asthma, particularly those who are ethnic minorities, also suffer academically. Kids who were kept home due to asthma symptoms weren't able to do as well in the classroom.

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New wallaby-sized dinosaur from the ancient Australian-Antarctic rift valley

A new, wallaby-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been identified from five fossilized upper jaws in 125-million-year-old rocks from the Cretaceous period of Victoria, southeastern Australia.

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For infants, distinguishing between friends and strangers is a laughing matter

Infants as young as five months can differentiate laughter between friends and that between strangers, finds a new study. The results suggest that the ability to detect the nature of social relationships is instilled early in human infancy, possibly the result of a detection system that uses vocal cues.

10h

Viruses interact socially with each other to evade the immune system

Pilar Domingo, Ernesto Segredo, María Durán and Rafael Sanjuán from the Institute of Integrated Systems Biology (I²SysBio) have shown that viruses behave altruistically to avoid the immune system. This research, published on Monday in Nature Microbiology and carried out in the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), has potential applications in the development of antiviral and vaccine treatments.

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A world full of copper helped animals colonise the Earth

An abundance of copper played an equally crucial role to oxygen in helping the rise and spread of the earliest animals 700 million years ago.

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Our misplaced fear of job-stealing robots

Some good news: The robots aren't coming for your job. Experts say fears that rapid advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and automation will leave all of us unemployed are vastly overstated.

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Viruses interact socially with each other to evade the immune system

Pilar Domingo, Ernesto Segredo, María Durán and Rafael Sanjuán from the Institute of Integrated Systems Biology (I²SysBio) have shown that viruses behave altruistically to avoid the immune system. This research, published on Monday in Nature Microbiology and carried out in the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), has potential applications in the development of antiviral and vaccine treatments.

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Another Boeing 737 has crashed killing all on board — what went wrong?

More than 150 people died after an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed. Flying is still very safe overall, but questions remain about what went wrong

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Researchers Turn Hard Drives Into Covert Listening Devices

Turning a hard drive into a listening device doesn't have anything to do with its data storage capabilities. Instead, the team leveraged the sensors that help control the position of the read head above the platters. The post Researchers Turn Hard Drives Into Covert Listening Devices appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Researchers report two pathways that cells use to mend cancer-causing DNA damage

DNA damage occurs in all cellular organisms. In human cells, it can be caused by the body's normal metabolic activities, by environmental factors or by chemotherapy. During the crucial phase when cells replicate their genetic content, they are susceptible to lesions – damaged sections of a DNA molecule. Common lesions known as DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) can prevent the cell from replicating it

10h

Virus deletes gene to regain replication

One virus' genetic loss can become its evolutionary gain, says a pioneering study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Massive twin star discovered snuggling close to its stellar sibling in its cradle

Astronomers have discovered a binary star system with the closest high-mass young stellar objects ever measured, providing a valuable "laboratory" to test theories on high mass binary star formation.

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Hubble's dazzling display of 2 colliding galaxies

Located in the constellation of Hercules, about 230 million light-years away, NGC 6052 is a pair of colliding galaxies first discovered in 1784. A long time ago gravity drew the two galaxies together into the chaotic state we now observe.

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Researchers report two pathways that cells use to mend cancer-causing DNA damage

DNA damage occurs in all cellular organisms. In human cells, it can be caused by the body's normal metabolic activities, by environmental factors or by chemotherapy. During the crucial phase when cells replicate their genetic content, they are susceptible to lesions – damaged sections of a DNA molecule. Common lesions known as DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) can prevent the cell from replicating it

10h

Virus deletes gene to regain replication

One virus' genetic loss can become its evolutionary gain, says a pioneering study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

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Moderate muscle strength may lower risk for type 2 diabetes

Of the 30 million Americans with diabetes, 90 to 95 percent have type 2, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. New research shows building muscle strength may lower risk for the disease by 32 percent.

11h

Potential way to improve cancer surgery outcomes by managing nontraditional risk factors

In a study of 142 patients preparing for cancer surgery, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have evidence that psychological or social risk factors such as depression, limited resilience and lack of emergency resources along with standard medical risk factors such as high blood pressure or diabetes are linked with higher risks of surgical complications.

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Rat hair, beaver anal secretions, and other surprising things in your food

Health The ingredients in some popular foods might startle you. Other than narcotics, there are a host of surprises lurking in everyday foodstuffs that you might not be aware of. Here are some of the less palatable ones. Bon…

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The Next Industrial Revolution: Computational Biology & Bioplatforms

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Transportministeriet går i rette med Københavns Kommune om løbehjul

I et brev til Københavns Kommune kritiserer ministeriet den tolkning af vejloven, som kommunen har brugt til at sætte en stopper for Voi, Tier og Donkey Republics udlejning af el-løbehjul og delecykler.

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Kæmpe datalæk: 809 millioner opgørelser totalt ubeskyttede og frit tilgængelige

Virksomheden Verifications.io med speciale i mailing-lister til marketing, har ladet millioner af informationer ligge frit tilgængelige på en åben 150 Gigabyte MongoDB database.

11h

Another Theory of Everything – Oh My!

These are always amusing, but I do admit to a little bit of guilt. My concern is that the individuals involved may be diagnosable, and is it really fair to publicly criticize their “work.” But then I realize I cannot diagnose people from afar, and they placed their work in the public arena, so it’s fair game. What I am talking about are extreme cranks, and a particular flavor of cranks that belie

11h

The Huawei Case Signals the New US–China Cold War Over Tech

US allegations against China's Huawei are less about keeping Huawei out of American networks and more about the rest of the world.

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Acer Swift 5 Review: Big Screen, Impossibly Light

The Acer Swift 5 is a 2.2-pound laptop with a big 15.6-inch screen, a spacious keyboard, and great battery life. It's excellent, if a bit flimsy.

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Image of the Day: Mind Altering

A study in rats finds that tiny doses of the psychedelic drug DMT may yield positive effects for anxiety and depression, but there could be downsides too.

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Starstruck—60 Years of NASA's Dazzling Archives

Get lost in space with this thrilling collection of images from the revered agency — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Starstruck—60 Years of NASA's Dazzling Archives

Get lost in space with this thrilling collection of images from the revered agency — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Illuminating the genome

The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been causing ripples in the scientific community ever since its mechanisms were reported in 2012. Commonly referred to as a genome editing tool, many scientists have found different applications for the scissor-like properties of the Cas9-protein. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK Gatersleben) have now found a way to ut

11h

Space radiation detector can help to spot fake masterpieces

Technology originally developed for CERN's Large Hadron Collider and then flown in space by ESA is now being used to analyse historic artworks, helping to detect forgeries.

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Alleged Photo Of Entry-Level Nikon Z1 Camera Leaked

Image credit – Nikon RumorsAs some of you might be aware, Nikon is trying their hand at mirrorless cameras once again. In 2018 the company launched the Nikon Z6 and Z7 cameras that …

11h

Facebook Testing A Blindingly White UI For Its Android App

One of Facebook’s more readily identifiable features is the use of blue where the color is featured prominently in its logo and its website. This is also applicable for its mobile …

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Starling Bank to open second UK office, creating up to 150 tech and support jobs in Southampton

Starling Bank, the U.K. challenger bank founded by banking veteran Anne Boden, is to open a second U.K. office this summer, where it plans recruit up to 50 software engineers and up to 100 customer …

11h

Illuminating the genome

The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been causing ripples in the scientific community ever since its mechanisms were reported in 2012. Commonly referred to as a genome editing tool, many scientists have found different applications for the scissor-like properties of the Cas9-protein. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK Gatersleben) have now found a way to ut

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Renaissance for artisanal mortar

To adapt mortar to new building materials and industrial methods, the content in walls and plaster changed during the 20th century. The change meant that knowledge of historical materials and methods for producing mortar were lost. New research at the University of Gothenburg reveals that historical binding agents and mortar can be produced and used in present-day plaster restorations.

11h

A new way to sense earthquakes could help improve early warning systems

Every year, earthquakes worldwide claim hundreds or even thousands of lives. Forewarning allows people to head for safety and a matter of seconds could spell the difference between life and death. UTokyo researchers have demonstrated a new earthquake detection method—their technique exploits subtle telltale gravitational signals traveling ahead of the tremors. Future research could boost early war

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Pheromones and social status: Macho mice smell better

Male house mice produce several pheromones, which are volatile and non-volatile chemical signals that have potent effects on the reproductive physiology and behavior of female mice. A recent study conducted by researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna now shows that female house mice are attracted to the scent of dominant males, and that these males produce higher levels of certain pheromones compared to

11h

Gasbus eksploderet i Stockholm: Gastank i taget punkteret af skilt

Søndag eksploderede en bybus i den svenske hovedstad, da den kolliderede med et skilt i en tunnel. Ifølge trafikselskabet fulgte chaufføren ikke den planlagte rute, da ulykken skete.

11h

Citrix er hacket

Et af verdens mest anvendte it-sikkerhedsfirmaer er blevet hacket. Det vides endnu ikke hvor langt ind i Citrix-systemerne, angriberne kom.

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Pheromones and social status: Macho mice smell better

Male house mice produce several pheromones, which are volatile and non-volatile chemical signals that have potent effects on the reproductive physiology and behavior of female mice. A recent study conducted by researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna now shows that female house mice are attracted to the scent of dominant males, and that these males produce higher levels of certain pheromones compared to

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Happy Brain Awareness Week!

It’s officially Brain Awareness Week starting today until Sunday, March 17, and people all over the world will be participating in activities about the brain! Every year, Brain Awareness Week partners organize events to educate people about the organ responsible for all that we are and all that we do. Events are taking place in schools, concert halls, public plazas, cafes, museums, even on boats.

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Hydrogen fuels rockets, but what about power for daily life? We're getting closer

Hydrogen is the first element on the periodic table. In its pure form hydrogen is a light, colourless gas, but forms a liquid at very low temperatures.

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Researchers develop tool to probe plastics' behavior down to the molecular scale

Consider the humble tire. Sitting outside on a frigid winter day, it's hard as a stone, yet when spinning under a drag racer, a tire becomes warmly pliable. For everyday materials, from glass to rubber to plastic, these fundamental changes in behavior are determined by the glass transition temperature.

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Living Near a Supermassive Black Hole

It would pose some dangers, of course—but it could also be fun! — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Machine Learning is your Secret BFF

submitted by /u/ylesiw7 [link] [comments]

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Debit card with built-in fingerprint reader begins trial in the UK

submitted by /u/redkemper [link] [comments]

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Anyone with passion/knowledge of AI and Future Technologies interested in expanding a new niche: Future Technology Services?

Hey All, Future tech like AI is already massively impacting many industries and allowing us to solve complex problem that were unthinkable prior to 2012. But the focus has consistently been on high-level and complex problems however such as autonomous vehicles, and there is going to be a wave of new ways that SMEs and individuals use AI to solve their problems also. I think this is akin to someth

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Apple Offers Users 10 Percent Incentive Bonus To Add Funds To Your Apple ID

If you ever pay full price for App Store/iTunes credit, you are doing it wrong. The time to pounce is when gift cards and credit purchases go on sale, as typically occurs around various holidays …

12h

Dear Therapist: My Family Hates My Mother

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, No one likes my mother. She is loud, obnoxious, negative, and self-involved. She doesn’t listen to people when they talk, or look them in the eye. She doesn’t have any common ground with most folks, since she’

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Techtopia #95: Internettets glemte kvinder

Historien om den geniale computernørd er næsten altid historien om en mand, men det gør en ny bog op med. Der er nemlig masser af fascinerende historie om kvindelig computernørder.

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Legal Scholar Tim Wu Says the US Must Enforce Antitrust Laws

Tim Wu, who coined the phrase "net neutrality," supports Senator Elizabeth Warren's call to review big tech mergers.

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Did *Captain Marvel* Save Stan Lee's Best Cameo for Last?

The comic creator's cameo in Marvel's latest film winks at his joyful history of movie appearances.

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Living Near a Supermassive Black Hole

It would pose some dangers, of course—but it could also be fun! — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Radioactive Glass Beads May Tell the Terrible Tale of How the Fukushima Meltdown Unfolded

The microscopic particles unleashed by the plant’s explosions are also a potential environmental and health concern — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Debit card with built-in fingerprint reader begins trial in the UK

British bank Natwest is trialling the use of a new NFC payment card with a built-in fingerprint scanner. The trial, which will include 200 customers when it begins in mid-April, …

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Amazon Fire TV no longer needs you to type your WiFi password

There are a number of reasons why it can be laborious to set up a living room media player, not the least of which is WiFi — you try entering a password with a remote. Those days might …

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Radioactive Glass Beads May Tell the Terrible Tale of How the Fukushima Meltdown Unfolded

The microscopic particles unleashed by the plant’s explosions are also a potential environmental and health concern — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Interaction between CYP1A1/CYP17A1 polymorphisms and parental risk factors in the risk of hypospadias in a Chinese population

Interaction between CYP1A1/CYP17A1 polymorphisms and parental risk factors in the risk of hypospadias in a Chinese population Interaction between CYP1A1/CYP17A1 polymorphisms and parental risk factors in the risk of hypospadias in a Chinese population, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40755-8 Interaction between CYP1A1/CYP17A1 polymorphisms and parental risk factors in the

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Preparation of kenaf stem hemicellulosic hydrolysate and its fermentability in microbial production of xylitol by Escherichia coli BL21

Preparation of kenaf stem hemicellulosic hydrolysate and its fermentability in microbial production of xylitol by Escherichia coli BL21 Preparation of kenaf stem hemicellulosic hydrolysate and its fermentability in microbial production of xylitol by Escherichia coli BL21 , Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40807-z Preparation of kenaf stem hemicellulosic hydrolysate and its

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Energy expenditure and body temperature variations in llamas living in the High Andes of Peru

Energy expenditure and body temperature variations in llamas living in the High Andes of Peru Energy expenditure and body temperature variations in llamas living in the High Andes of Peru, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40576-9 Energy expenditure and body temperature variations in llamas living in the High Andes of Peru

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RNAi-based bioinsecticide for Aedes mosquito control

RNAi-based bioinsecticide for Aedes mosquito control RNAi-based bioinsecticide for Aedes mosquito control, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39666-5 RNAi-based bioinsecticide for Aedes mosquito control

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Intraseasonal oscillation of deep currents influenced by mesoscale eddies in the Kuroshio Extension Region

Intraseasonal oscillation of deep currents influenced by mesoscale eddies in the Kuroshio Extension Region Intraseasonal oscillation of deep currents influenced by mesoscale eddies in the Kuroshio Extension Region, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39567-7 Intraseasonal oscillation of deep currents influenced by mesoscale eddies in the Kuroshio Extension Region

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The NLRP3 inflammasome modulates glycolysis by increasing PFKFB3 in an IL-1β-dependent manner in macrophages

The NLRP3 inflammasome modulates glycolysis by increasing PFKFB3 in an IL-1β-dependent manner in macrophages The NLRP3 inflammasome modulates glycolysis by increasing PFKFB3 in an IL-1β-dependent manner in macrophages, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40619-1 The NLRP3 inflammasome modulates glycolysis by increasing PFKFB3 in an IL-1β-dependent manner in macrophages

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The dynamics of the antibiotic resistome in the feces of freshly weaned pigs following therapeutic administration of oxytetracycline

The dynamics of the antibiotic resistome in the feces of freshly weaned pigs following therapeutic administration of oxytetracycline The dynamics of the antibiotic resistome in the feces of freshly weaned pigs following therapeutic administration of oxytetracycline, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40496-8 The dynamics of the antibiotic resistome in the feces of freshly wea

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Cortical-like mini-columns of neuronal cells on zinc oxide nanowire surfaces

Cortical-like mini-columns of neuronal cells on zinc oxide nanowire surfaces Cortical-like mini-columns of neuronal cells on zinc oxide nanowire surfaces, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40548-z Cortical-like mini-columns of neuronal cells on zinc oxide nanowire surfaces

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For infants, distinguishing between friends and strangers is a laughing matter

Infants as young as five months can differentiate laughter between friends and that between strangers, finds a new study. The results suggest that the ability to detect the nature of social relationships is instilled early in human infancy, possibly the result of a detection system that uses vocal cues.

13h

Overcoming the thermal regime for the electric-field driven Mott transition in vanadium sesquioxide

Overcoming the thermal regime for the electric-field driven Mott transition in vanadium sesquioxide Overcoming the thermal regime for the electric-field driven Mott transition in vanadium sesquioxide, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09137-6 Thermal effects limit the speed of the electrically driven insulator-metal transition in V2O3 to tens of picoseconds. Here the authors

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A KLF6-driven transcriptional network links lipid homeostasis and tumour growth in renal carcinoma

A KLF6-driven transcriptional network links lipid homeostasis and tumour growth in renal carcinoma A KLF6-driven transcriptional network links lipid homeostasis and tumour growth in renal carcinoma, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09116-x Super enhancers are frequently involved in the dysregulation of gene expression in cancer. Here, in kidney cancer, a super enhancer is s

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Aqueous proton-selective conduction across two-dimensional graphyne

Aqueous proton-selective conduction across two-dimensional graphyne Aqueous proton-selective conduction across two-dimensional graphyne, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09151-8 Aqueous proton-selective membranes are vital for methanol fuel cells and flow batteries, but suffer from crossover issues. Here the authors use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to show that

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Thermodynamically stable whilst kinetically labile coordination bonds lead to strong and tough self-healing polymers

Thermodynamically stable whilst kinetically labile coordination bonds lead to strong and tough self-healing polymers Thermodynamically stable whilst kinetically labile coordination bonds lead to strong and tough self-healing polymers, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09130-z There is often a trade-off between mechanical properties (modulus and toughness) and dynamic self-he

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Molecular architecture of a cylindrical self-assembly at human centrosomes

Molecular architecture of a cylindrical self-assembly at human centrosomes Molecular architecture of a cylindrical self-assembly at human centrosomes, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08838-2 The centrosome is a membraneless organelle composed of two centrioles and an amorphous pericentriolar material but the overall centrosome organizations remains unknown. Here authors sh

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Proteome-wide solubility and thermal stability profiling reveals distinct regulatory roles for ATP

Proteome-wide solubility and thermal stability profiling reveals distinct regulatory roles for ATP Proteome-wide solubility and thermal stability profiling reveals distinct regulatory roles for ATP, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09107-y ATP can function as a biological hydrotrope, but its global effects on protein solubility have not yet been characterized. Here, the aut

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Intrinsic measurements of exciton transport in photovoltaic cells

Intrinsic measurements of exciton transport in photovoltaic cells Intrinsic measurements of exciton transport in photovoltaic cells, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09062-8 Zhang et al. develop a device-based method to probe intrinsic exciton transport in photovoltaic cells. The broad utility of this method is demonstrated by measuring exciton transport for both luminescen

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Ultrafast photonic micro-systems to manipulate hard X-rays at 300 picoseconds

Ultrafast photonic micro-systems to manipulate hard X-rays at 300 picoseconds Ultrafast photonic micro-systems to manipulate hard X-rays at 300 picoseconds, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09077-1 It is desirable to improve spatiotemporal control of light generated by synchrotron user facilities or table-top X-ray sources. Here the authors demonstrate manipulation of hard

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If Liberals Won’t Enforce Borders, Fascists Will

I. The Wave That’s Still Building T hrough much of the 20th century , the United States received comparatively few immigrants. In the 60 years from 1915 until 1975, nearly a human lifetime, the United States admitted fewer immigrants than arrived, legally and illegally, in the single decade of the 1990s. If you grew up in the 1950s, the 1960s, or even the 1970s, heavy immigration seemed mostly a

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Journal temporarily withdraws eight papers after publisher mistake

Publishers love their embargoes, whether they’re of papers that aren’t open access yet, or are available to the media before they’re published. Apparently, however, they also break embargoes, just like the journalists they sometimes sanction for the same sin. Take Oxford University Press, which publishes the journal Physical Therapy for the American Physical Therapy Association … Continue reading

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Kina grounder Boeing 737 Max: Ulykkesfly havde ustabil vertikal hastighed

Weekendens flyulykke i Etiopien ligner Lion Air-ulykken fra 2018 med samme flytype.

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Is time real or is it an illusion?

Time can change depending on how fast you're moving through space. Also, time can "flow" at different rates for different observers. Light doesn't experience time — it exists outside of time. We perceive space and time differently, but they may be woven together. For instance, they both balance each other out: If you are still, time goes by at a natural rate. However, if you move through space ve

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How algorithms could bring empathy back to medicine

How algorithms could bring empathy back to medicine How algorithms could bring empathy back to medicine, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00708-7 Thomas R. Insel lauds a call for artificial intelligence to give doctors back the freedom to focus on their patients.

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The ‘roof of the world’ was raised more recently than once thought

New studies suggest that the Tibetan Plateau may have risen to its dizzying heights after 25 million years ago.

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A little-known AI method can train on your health data without threatening your privacy

Machine learning has great potential to transform disease diagnosis and detection, but it’s been held back by patients’ reluctance to give up access to sensitive information.

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The New Health Care: A Diabetes Home Test Can Be a Waste of Time and Money

Routine glucose monitoring may be unnecessary for people with Type 2 diabetes who are not on insulin.

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Cancer Patients Are Getting Robotic Surgery. There’s No Evidence It’s Better.

High-tech surgical robots aren’t an improvement over traditional operations, the F.D.A. warns. For some patients, the robots may be worse.

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Out There: Cut the Science Budget? Not So Fast

Contrary to first impressions, Congress has done a decent job standing up for scientific research.

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There’s a new way to break quantum cryptography

Quantum communication promises a perfectly secure way to transmit private messages—in theory. The reality is turning out to be somewhat different.

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Sick marine mammals turning up on California beaches in droves

As record rains have poured down on California's coasts, sending thousands of gallons of runoff into the ocean and dumping debris and trash onto the beaches, dozens of sickened marine mammals have been turning up along the state's shores this winter.

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T-Mobile's latest pitch for Sprint merger: Taking on cable internet and TV

As T-Mobile's bid to merge with Sprint continues to face challenges on Capitol Hill, the company is continuing to make its case to regulators.

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Valve laid off 13 employees working on virtual reality

submitted by /u/real_genesix [link] [comments]

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Human Mind Control of Rat Cyborg’s Continuous Locomotion with Wireless Brain-to-Brain Interface

Human Mind Control of Rat Cyborg’s Continuous Locomotion with Wireless Brain-to-Brain Interface Scientific Reports volume 9 , Article number: 1321 (2019) "Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) provide a promising information channel between the biological brain and external devices and are applied in building brain-to-device control. Prior studies have explored the feasibility of establishing a brain-b

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It's 2050 And This Is How We Stopped Climate Change

Let's imagine that we've ended global warming. Humans no longer are releasing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Here's what life is like in a zero-carbon world. (Image credit: Panoramic Images/Getty Images)

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Japan marks tsunami, nuclear tragedy eight years on

With flowers, silent prayers and tearful tributes, Japan Monday marked the eighth anniversary of a crippling earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster that devastated its northeastern coast and left some 18,500 people dead or missing.

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Tesla performs U-turn over store closures

Car prices to rise by ‘about 3%’ after decision to move to online-only sales reversedTesla has reversed a decision to close all its stores and move to an online-only sales model, the company …

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Climate change: Pledge to cut emissions from dairy farms

A dairy firm is promising to make its farms carbon-neutral by 2050 in a move described as "ambitious".

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Att ta sig uppför livets bergstoppar på äldre dar

Livets utmaningar kan liknas vid en bergskedja, ibland går det uppför och ibland nedför. Tänk dig att du ska ta dig uppför berget, vilka resurser har du att tillgå? Forskare vid Högskolan i Kristianstad och Lunds universitet kartlägger nu vilka resurser som finns hos äldre personer, för att bibehålla och stärka sin egen hälsa. I den här artikeln berättar Anna Martinsson, doktorand, om sin forsknin

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Naturopaths try (and fail yet again) to argue that they are science-based

That booster of all things "integrative," John Weeks has devoted the entire most recent issue of The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine , which he edits, to trying to demonstrate that naturopathy is science-based. It does not go well. Same as it ever was.

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Solve it can you? Speak Yoda how to

A Jedi language puzzle UPDATE: The solutions can be read here Today the British linguistics community is launching a campaign to make language analysis – the study of patterns in language – part of mainstream school education. To celebrate this campaign, about which more below, here’s a puzzle about Yoda, the cuddly Star Wars Jedi Master. Ready are you? Continue reading…

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New species of stiletto snake capable of sideways strikes discovered in West Africa

Following a series of recent surveys in north-western Liberia and south-eastern Guinea, an international team of researchers found three stiletto snakes which were later identified as a species …

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Another Boeing 737 has crashed killing all on board — what went wrong?

Over 150 people died after an Ethiopian Airlines flight crashed. Flying is overall still very safe, but questions remain about what went wrong

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Hurtig hajs hemmelighed er en helt særlig hud

Små tænder på huden gør den kortfinnede makohaj til en meget hurtig haj. Viden, den amerikanske hær kan bruge.

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KI Rector Ottersen and the magic gel of Institut Pasteur

Karolinska rector Ottersen was criticised for suspicious figure in an old paper. Now his collaborators at Institut Pasteur provide outlandish explanations for a manipulated gel Ottersen's former lab provided. The original data, allegedly recovered, is not available to anyone, even KI.

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Boeing 737 MAX safety record questioned after two tragedies

For the second time in less than six months, a Boeing 737 MAX 8 has crashed minutes after takeoff and killed everyone on board, raising fresh questions about the safety of a model that is crucial to the US giant's future plans.

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Eksperter: Frederiksbergs sundheds-samtykke overtræder persondatalov

Kommune: Vi har ikke været helt tydelige – samtykke ændres.

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New wallaby-sized dinosaur from the ancient Australian-Antarctic rift valley

A new, wallaby-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been identified from five fossilized upper jaws in 125 million year old rocks from the Cretaceous period of Victoria, southeastern Australia.

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New species of stiletto snake capable of sideways strikes discovered in West Africa

Following a series of recent surveys in north-western Liberia and south-eastern Guinea, an international team of researchers found three stiletto snakes which were later identified as a species previously unknown to science.

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Schools should have 'no idling zones', Public Health England chief says

A review by public health chiefs also calls for charges for cities across the UK to cut air pollution.

17h

New species of stiletto snake capable of sideways strikes discovered in West Africa

Following a series of recent surveys in north-western Liberia and south-eastern Guinea, an international team of researchers found three stiletto snakes which were later identified as a species previously unknown to science.

17h

New device could help minimize scarring in cosmetic surgery

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a new device that could help minimize scarring during surgery. The device can ascertain the orientation of skin tension lines, which is important for wound-healing post-surgery.

17h

11 Simple Things You Should Do to Beat The Daylight Saving 'Jet Lag'

Seems almost obvious, but we all need a good reminder.

17h

17h

Internationella forskare: Fler helikoptrar hjälper inte mot svenska skogsbränder

Svenska barrskogar är för brandfarliga för att vattenbombning ska hjälpa mot våldsamma skogsbränder, menar internationella forskare. De anser istället att Sverige borde plantera skogarna med lövskog som naturliga brandhinder.

18h

Naturvårdsverket: “Våtmarker är ett effektivt hinder för skogsbränder”

Återskapade våtmarker är viktiga för att hindra skogsbränder, enligt Naturvårdsverket. Men skogsbolaget Sveaskog tycker att det är viktigare att köpa fler helikoptrar istället.

18h

New wallaby-sized dinosaur from the ancient Australian-Antarctic rift valley

A new, wallaby-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been identified from five fossilized upper jaws in 125 million year old rocks from the Cretaceous period of Victoria, southeastern Australia.

18h

What kinda guy is society?

As a whole, as a being, what are the characteristics. I must know. I do not know where to look. I do not want what google thinks I think I want. If someone could point me in the direction of some good reading material on society or sociology that you personally believe to be true. Or maybe even a decent search engine. Trying to determine a few things for the next 15 years atm, maybe even 40 if I

18h

Pluginhybrider har overhalet elbiler

Elbiler og pluginhybrider er langsomt på vej frem, efter at salget styrtdykkede med registreringsafgiften i 2016. De udgør stadig kun to procent af bilsalget i Danmark.

18h

Galleonosaurus dorisae: New dinosaur discovered in Australia

Based on its teeth, Galleonsaurus would have been a herbivore and belonged to the ornithopod family.

18h

18h

Chile’s sugary food fight echoes around the world

Governments tough action on unhealthy foods begins to bite — and inspire campaigners abroad

18h

Why the future of gene-edited foods is in the balance

Regulators will decide the impact of the biggest advance in bioscience since genetic modification

18h

Apps step up to the plate with diet and DNA-tailored advice

New online services nudge users towards smarter shopping and eating choices

18h

Podcast: Can DNA diet apps help keep you healthy?

Experts explore into the science behind new smartphone services

18h

Computer kidney could provide safer tests for new medications

A University of Waterloo researcher has spearheaded the development of the first computational model of the human kidney.

19h

Air pollution may impact fetal cardiovascular system, Rutgers study says

Microscopic particles in air pollution inhaled by pregnant women may damage fetal cardiovascular development, according to a study by Rutgers researchers.The study, published in the journal Cardiovascular Toxicology, found that early in the first trimester and late in the third trimester were critical windows during which pollutants most affect the mother's and fetus' cardiovascular systems.

19h

New species of stiletto snake capable of sideways strikes discovered in West Africa

During surveys in the Upper Guinea forest zone of Liberia and Guinea, scientists discovered snakes later identified as a new to science species. It belongs to the stiletto snakes, spectacular for their unusual skulls, allowing them to stab sideways with a fang sticking out of the corner of their mouths. The discovery, published in the open-access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution, is further ev

19h

New device could help minimize scarring in cosmetic surgery

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a new device that could help minimize scarring during surgery. The device can ascertain the orientation of skin tension lines, which is important for wound-healing post-surgery.

19h

NIH study shows many preteens screen positive for suicide risk during ER visits

A new study found nearly one-third of youth ages 10 to 12 years screened positive for suicide risk in emergency departments. As part of a larger study on youth suicide risk screening in emergency departments, researchers at NIMH and collaborators explored how frequently preteen youth ages 10 to 12 screened positive for suicide risk. Notably, 7 percent of the preteens who screened positive for suic

19h

Smoking during pregnancy doubles the risk of sudden unexpected infant death, study warns

The first findings to result from a collaboration between Seattle Children's Research Institute and Microsoft data scientists provides expecting mothers new information about how smoking before and during pregnancy contributes to the risk of an infant dying suddenly and unexpectedly before their first birthday.

19h

New plastic surgery statistics reveal trends toward body enhancement

New data released by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) shows there were nearly a quarter million more cosmetic procedures performed in 2018 than the previous year. According to the ASPS annual plastic surgery statistics report, there were more than 17.7 million surgical and minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures performed in the United States in 2018, a number that has risen steadily

19h

Academic performance of urban children with asthma worse than peers without asthma

A new study published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows urban children with poorly controlled asthma, particularly those who are ethnic minorities, also suffer academically. Kids who were kept home due to asthma symptoms weren't able to do as well in the classroom.

19h

Colorectal cancer in patients with early onset is distinct from that in older patients

New research indicates that colorectal cancer diagnosed at an early age has clinical and genetic features that are different from those seen in traditional colorectal cancer diagnosed later in life. Published early online in CANCER, the study also revealed certain unique features in especially young patients and those with predisposing conditions.

19h

New wallaby-sized dinosaur from the ancient Australian-Antarctic rift valley

A new, wallaby-sized herbivorous dinosaur has been identified from five fossilized upper jaws in 125-million-year-old rocks from the Cretaceous period of Victoria, southeastern Australia.

19h

Study finds that parents often permit e-cigarette use in homes and cars with children

A study led by MassGeneral Hospital for Children researchers, the first to examine parents' rules about prohibiting both electronic cigarette and regular cigarette use in homes and cars, shows that parents who use e-cigarettes — whether or not they also smoke traditional cigarettes — were much more likely to permit e-cigarette use inside both homes and cars than parents who smoke only traditiona

19h

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says "we should be excited about automation"

submitted by /u/sirawesome63 [link] [comments]

19h

Newly found Aussie dinosaur confirms diversity in ancient rift valley

The space between Australia and Antarctica was once rich with herbivorous life. Andrew Masterson reports.

19h

20h

Facebook sues Ukrainians over quizzes packed with adware stealing data – CNET

What kind of breach are you a part of? Find out by giving us all your data!

20h

20h

Noam Chomsky on Democracy | Forces of Renewal Southeast Asia

submitted by /u/Chispy [link] [comments]

20h

'A big jump': People might have lived in Australia twice as long as we thought | Paul Daley

The result of 11 years of research suggests that human habitation could stretch to 120,000 years Extensive archaeological research in southern Victoria has again raised the prospect that people have lived in Australia for 120,000 years – twice as long as the broadly accepted period of human continental habitation. The research, with its contentious potential implications for Indigenous habitation

21h

Chipmaker Nvidia to acquire Mellanox for $6.9 billion

Chipmaker Nvidia will acquire network and data transmission company Mellanox for $6.9 billion in an all-cash deal.

21h

Algorithms have already taken over human decision making

submitted by /u/Blognoggl5 [link] [comments]

21h

21h

A blood-based signature of cerebrospinal fluid Aβ1–42 status

A blood-based signature of cerebrospinal fluid A β 1–42 status A blood-based signature of cerebrospinal fluid A β 1–42 status, Published online: 11 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37149-7 A blood-based signature of cerebrospinal fl