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nyheder2019marts13

Physicists reverse time using quantum computer

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology teamed up with colleagues from the U.S. and Switzerland and returned the state of a quantum computer a fraction of a second into the past. They also calculated the probability that an electron in empty interstellar space will spontaneously travel back into its recent past. The study is published in Scientific Reports.

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Physicists reverse time using quantum computer

Researchers from the Russia teamed up with colleagues from the US and Switzerland and returned the state of a quantum computer a fraction of a second into the past. They also calculated the probability that an electron in empty interstellar space will spontaneously travel back into its recent past.

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Death metal music inspires joy not violence

Despite gruesome lyrics, death metal does not desensitise fans to images of violence, a study shows.

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Norway Joins List of Countries Canceling Elsevier Contracts

The publisher failed to meet requests for better access to research, a consortium of Norwegian institutions says.

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Barbara Low, Whose Research Boosted Antibiotics, Dies at 98

Her work with Dorothy Hodgkin identified the structure of penicillin, enabling scientists to replicate it and develop drugs to treat other infections.

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We’re Losing the War on Corruption

It’s too bad that Felicity Huffman has been indicted. That probably so poisons her acting career that she can’t be cast as Paul Manafort’s wife, Kathleen, in the inevitable biopic of the lobbyist’s life. But Huffman and Manafort are spiritually connected, and the fact they are packed together above the fold today is more than an accident of timing. They are twin avatars of an elite that acts with

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'Neuroflight' drone controller gets a boost from A.I.

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Trump Grounds All 737 Max Flights After Ethiopian Airlines Disaster

President Trump has grounded all 737 Max 8s after the crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302. The post Trump Grounds All 737 Max Flights After Ethiopian Airlines Disaster appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Democracy linked to global health gains in low-, middle-income countries

A new study led by Stanford Medicine and the Council on Foreign Relations suggests that a better way to measure the role of democracy in public health is to examine the causes of adult mortality, such as noncommunicable diseases, HIV, cardiovascular disease and transportation injuries. Little international assistance targets these noncommunicable diseases.

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The Lancet: Global study highlights role of democracy in improving adult health

Democratic rule, enforced by regular free and fair elections, appears to make an important contribution to adult health by increasing government spending on health and potentially reducing deaths from several non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and transport injuries. Conversely, autocracies that escape this general scrutiny, and do not have the same external pressures or support from global health d

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Blood test to diagnose heart attacks is flawed, warn researchers

The blood test used to diagnose a heart attack (acute myocardial infarction) in patients admitted to hospital can be misleading, warn researchers in a study published by The BMJ today.

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Apple Music is now available on Amazon Fire TV – CNET

The streaming-music service will become available on Fire TV and Echo devices in the UK in the coming weeks, Amazon says.

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Inactive Ingredients in Drugs May Be Less Inactive Than You Think

Inactive ingredients may not be as, well, inactive as we think

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Colleges Need Influencers, but Do Influencers Need College?

About a third of Gen Z wants to grow up to be YouTubers. Which doesn't really require a college education.

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We may finally have a way to weigh the Milky Way

Space But more importantly, we know a bit more about why the galaxy is the way it is. It’s not entirely surprising we’ve previously failed to peg the mass of the Milky Way.

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Despite Similarities, Are the 2 Recent 737 Max 8 Crashes a Coincidence?

Former Boeing engineer Peter Lemme weighs in on the second 737 Max 8 accident in five months — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists plead for moratorium after designer babies outcry

Developers of Crispr among those demanding halt to experiments on hereditary genes

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Despite Similarities, Are the 2 Recent 737 Max 8 Crashes a Coincidence?

Former Boeing engineer Peter Lemme weighs in on the second 737 Max 8 accident in five months — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Verizon 5G Is Coming for Real, but It Will Cost You

Verizon said it will introduce 5G wireless service in selected areas in Chicago and Minneapolis on April 11, for an additional $10 a month.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Grounded

What We’re Following Today It’s Wednesday, March 13. ‣ The Senate is expected to vote tomorrow on a resolution to block President Donald Trump’s national-emergency declaration. Ahead of the vote, a group of senators, led by the Utah Republican Mike Lee, is attempting to reach a last-minute agreement with the White House to limit the president’s power to declare future national emergencies in exch

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Jack Dorsey’s endorsement of anti-vax podcaster highlights Twitter’s misinformation problem

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey is facing criticism for promoting a fitness writer and podcaster who has spread fears about vaccines. Dorsey tweeted his endorsement of the podcaster, author …

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Research shines light on preventing infection after miscarriage

New international guidelines on how to provide treatment for women having miscarriage surgery are needed after a large-scale international trial led by the University of Birmingham.

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Dramatic shifts in first-time opioid prescriptions bring hope, concern

Analysis shows the monthly rate of first-time opioid prescriptions dropped by more than half between 2012 and 2017.Though some physicians wrote no new prescriptions at all, others continued to prescribe dosages and durations that put patients at risk for misuse, overdose and death.Findings underscore importance of nuanced, individualized prescribing over all-or-nothing approach.

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New cholesterol-lowering drug could help patients unable to take statins

A new class of oral cholesterol-lowering drug could help patients unable to take statins due to side effects.

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U.K. Royal Mint honors Stephen Hawking on new 50p coin

Stephen Hawking, cosmologist, theoretical physicist and popular science educator, died on March 14, 2018. The Royal Mint is celebrating his work and life with a collector's coin that's selling for 10 pounds. Hawking's younger son said he imagined his dad reacting to the news with "one of his huge, wide smiles." None The U.K. Royal Mint has issued a 50-pence coin commemorating the late physicist S

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Alaska DGAF

On July 4, 2017, North Korea launched an intercontinental ballistic missile that had serious ramifications for the United States. The ICBM traveled more than 1,700 vertical miles before ultimately landing in the Sea of Japan. Some experts warned that if the missile had been sent on a flatter trajectory, it could have made contact with Alaska. The Communist regime was finally capable of nuclear de

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Potential cystic fibrosis treatment uses 'molecular prosthetic' for missing lung protein

An approved drug normally used to treat fungal infections could also do the job of a protein channel that is missing or dysfunctional in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis, operating as a prosthesis on the molecular scale, says new research.

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Ancient People Came From All Across England to Party at Stonehenge

Some things, it appears, never change. Death and taxes are certainties, the poor we will always have with us, and of course war… war never changes. But, according to a study today in the open-access …

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How Google Influences the Conversation in Washington

Google has spent more money on lobbying in each of the last two years than any other company. But that's only the tip of the firm's efforts to influence federal policy.

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Why IBM Thinks Quantum Computers Will Boost Machine Learning

Quantum Leap When full-scale quantum computers finally arrive, they could give machine learning algorithms a major boost, letting the AI systems find hidden patterns in data that today’s best technology has no hope of spotting. At least, that’s the gist of research by IBM scientists, first shared online last year that was published in the journal Nature on Wednesday — findings that could help mak

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Here’s What Was on the Record About Problems With the 737 Max

As mentioned in these two previous reports—a long one , and a short one —some things are known, and many things are not, about the horrific crash this past weekend outside Addis Ababa, in which all 157 people aboard a new-model Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max were killed. One thing that’s known: This is the second crash of this kind of plane within the past five months, following the Lion Air crash in

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Study: Free fatty acids appear to rewire cells to promote obesity-related breast cancer

Free fatty acids in the blood are linked with higher rates of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer in obese postmenopausal women, according to a new study led by food science and human nutrition professor Zeynep Madak-Erdogan at the University of Illinois.

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Steal from your heroes: John Cleese on Big Think Edge

John Cleese teaches a video lesson for Big Think Edge called "Make Your Mark with Humor". The Monty Python alumni and comedy legend has some unexpected advice to get your creativity out of your mind and onto the page. Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships. None Who better to show you the ropes of comedy than Monty Python alumni John

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Seychelles science mission chases a wayward drone, in vain

A British-led marine scientific mission off the Seychelles failed on Wednesday to retrieve a key underwater drone from the sea bed, where it had fallen after its cable was cut the day before.

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Vulnerable to attack: Businesses should boost cyber defenses

When cyberthieves attacked Empire Industries' computer network, technology manager Rich Shemanskis could see files in the process of being infected by malicious software.

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AT&T raises prices for DirecTV Now streaming service

AT&T is raising prices for its DirecTV Now streaming TV service, while removing some networks from the cable-like television package.

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Self-Driving Cars Would Shut Down New York if 10 Percent Got Hacked

Researchers developed a model to predict what would happen as self-driving cars were attacked. They found you'd only have to take out a fraction of vehicles in a city to bring traffic to a complete halt. The post Self-Driving Cars Would Shut Down New York if 10 Percent Got Hacked appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Outage hits Facebook, Instagram users worldwide

Facebook and Instagram users lost access to the social network's applications in parts of the world Wednesday as a result of an outage of undetermined origin.

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Early-life exposure to microbiota restricts colon cancer later in life, study finds

Exposure to microbiota, or microorganisms such as bacteria, in the early stages of life plays a crucial role in establishing optimal conditions in the intestine that inhibit the development of colon cancer in adulthood, according to a study led by Georgia State University.

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Ancient People Came From All Across England to Party at Stonehenge

Some things, it appears, never change. Death and taxes are certainties, the poor we will always have with us, and of course war… war never changes. But, according to a study today in the open-access journal Science Advances, similarly untouchable is the status of Stonehenge and its ilk as tourist destinations — and our love for partying it up with pork. The study, by a team of British archaeologis

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Drugs' Inactive Ingredients Aren't Often Listed, Can Cause Harm, Study Says

When your doctor prescribes a medication, they take care not to give you something that might cause harm. But, many drugs have a hidden danger for people with allergies or other sensitivities. The inactive ingredients, non-drug components of a medication, can contain compounds that cause harm. And, says a new study, many doctors don't even know what those ingredients are. It's not really a doctor'

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A Hox-TALE regulatory circuit for neural crest patterning is conserved across vertebrates

A Hox-TALE regulatory circuit for neural crest patterning is conserved across vertebrates A Hox-TALE regulatory circuit for neural crest patterning is conserved across vertebrates, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09197-8 Mechanisms coupling Hox genes to neural crest are largely unknown. Here, the authors use cross species regulatory comparisons between the Hox2 genes of ja

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Conformal hexagonal-boron nitride dielectric interface for tungsten diselenide devices with improved mobility and thermal dissipation

Conformal hexagonal-boron nitride dielectric interface for tungsten diselenide devices with improved mobility and thermal dissipation Conformal hexagonal-boron nitride dielectric interface for tungsten diselenide devices with improved mobility and thermal dissipation, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09016-0 Plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) is an industria

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The High Plains bomb cyclone has exploded — a report from ground zero

As I'm writing this at 11:30 a.m. on March 13, 2019, winds are gusting above 45 miles per hour, snow is blowing horizontally outside my patio window, and the lights in my home are flickering. I hope manage to get this story posted before the electricity goes out… Winter Storm Ulmer is intensifying over the High Plains and going through a process known as "bombogenesis." You can see its evolution

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First Graphene-Based Device Is A “Few Months” Away, Says Startup

The Waiting Game Scientists first isolated graphene — a transparent layer of carbon just one atom thick — in 2004. Almost immediately, we began hearing about all the wondrous ways the material could transform our world , ushering in everything from quantum computers to unlimited drinking water . Fifteen years later, that transformation has yet to take place, as graphene’s complex, expensive manuf

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Top Scientists Call for Moratorium Blocking Gene-Edited Babies; Critics Want Action

More than a dozen top scientists from seven countries are calling for world governments to adopt a moratorium on what scientists call heritable genome editing. They’re on a mission to make sure the world doesn’t see any more gene-edited babies — not till we’re good and ready — and they’ve got a plan to stop it. The group penned a commentary published Wednesday in the journal Nature. The effort w

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The Android Q beta is here with a focus on privacy

It's that time of year when Google offers an early peek at the next version of Android, and sure enough, the first Android Q preview beta is here. Like previous Android betas, …

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A belief in meritocracy is not only false: it’s bad for you

'We are true to our creed when a little girl born into the bleakest poverty knows that she has the same chance to succeed as anybody else …' Barack Obama, inaugural address, 2013 'We must create a level playing field for American companies and workers.' Donald Trump, inaugural address, 2017 Meritocracy has become a leading social ideal. Politicians across the ideological spectrum continually retu

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Pesticides influence ground-nesting bee development and longevity

Results from a new study suggest that bees might be exposed to pesticides in more ways than we thought, and it could impact their development significantly. The study looks at the non-target effects of pesticides on ground-nesting bees, a group that actually makes up the majority of bee species.

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Hungry moose more tolerant of wolves' presence

Research in western Wyoming shows that close proximity of wolves does cause moose to move, but not enough to drive them from their preferred habitats — especially late in the winter.

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Looking back and forward: A decade-long quest for a transformative transistor

Transistors have been miniaturized for the past 50 years, but we've reached the point where they can't continue to be scaled any further. Researchers review negative capacitance field-effect transistors, a new device concept that suggests traditional transistors can be made much more efficient by simply adding a thin layer of ferroelectric material. If it works, the same chip could compute far mor

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Found: The missing ingredient to grow blood vessels

Researchers have discovered an ingredient vital for proper blood vessel formation that explains why numerous promising treatments have failed. The discovery offers important direction for efforts to better treat conditions ranging from diabetes to heart attacks and strokes.

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Hungry moose more tolerant of wolves' presence: study

Driven by the need for food, moose in western Wyoming are less likely to change their behavior to avoid wolves as winter progresses, according to new research by University of Wyoming scientists.

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NASA infrared imagery reveals powerful Tropical Cyclone Idai at Mozambique's coast

NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Idai approaching the coast of Mozambique. The infrared data provided cloud top temperatures that indicated powerful thunderstorms circled Idai's center.

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Hungry moose more tolerant of wolves' presence: study

Driven by the need for food, moose in western Wyoming are less likely to change their behavior to avoid wolves as winter progresses, according to new research by University of Wyoming scientists.

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ZEB1 throttles therapeutic target, protecting KRAS-mutant lung cancer

A cellular identity switch protects a cancer-promoting genetic pathway from targeted therapy, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today reported in Science Translational Medicine.

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Having great-grandparents, cousins with Alzheimer's linked to higher risk

Having a parent with Alzheimer's disease has been known to raise a person's risk of developing the disease, but new research suggests that having second- and third-degree relatives who have had Alzheimer's may also increase risk. The study is published in the March 13, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Scientists Push for a Moratorium on Human Germline Editing

After the reported birth of CRISPRed babies in China, experts want to take time to consider the scientific, social, ethical, and philosophical consequences of editing heritable human DNA.

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Mechanism of DNA translocation underlying chromatin remodelling by Snf2

Mechanism of DNA translocation underlying chromatin remodelling by Snf2 Mechanism of DNA translocation underlying chromatin remodelling by Snf2, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1029-2 Cryo-EM structures of yeast Snf2 bound to the nucleosome in the presence of ADP or an ATP analogue reveal that Snf2 binding leads to distortion of the DNA, and a two-step mechanism underlying

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Discovery of a pathway for terminal-alkyne amino acid biosynthesis

Discovery of a pathway for terminal-alkyne amino acid biosynthesis Discovery of a pathway for terminal-alkyne amino acid biosynthesis, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1020-y Microbial generation of a terminal-alkyne-containing amino acid can be encoded into E. coli and provides the potential for in vivo generation of proteins and natural products for click chemistry.

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Feature-selective encoding of substrate vibrations in the forelimb somatosensory cortex

Feature-selective encoding of substrate vibrations in the forelimb somatosensory cortex Feature-selective encoding of substrate vibrations in the forelimb somatosensory cortex, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1015-8 Responses to passive vibration of the forelimb in the mouse somatosensory cortex rely on a rate code that is selectively tuned to a combination of stimulus fre

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Enzyme-catalysed [6+4] cycloadditions in the biosynthesis of natural products

Enzyme-catalysed [6+4] cycloadditions in the biosynthesis of natural products Enzyme-catalysed [6+4] cycloadditions in the biosynthesis of natural products, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1021-x Enzymatic catalysis of pericyclic [6+4] cycloaddition reactions to form ten-membered rings is observed during biosynthesis of the macrocyclic antibiotic streptoseomycin, and the m

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Small-molecule ion channels increase host defences in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

Small-molecule ion channels increase host defences in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia Small-molecule ion channels increase host defences in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1018-5 Amphotericin B forms nonselective transmembrane ion channels, and restores host defences of cystic fibrosis airway epithelia independently of the regulatory func

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Glucocorticoids promote breast cancer metastasis

Glucocorticoids promote breast cancer metastasis Glucocorticoids promote breast cancer metastasis, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1019-4 In patient-derived xenograft models of breast cancer in mice, an increase in stress hormones during progression or treatment with their synthetic derivatives activates the glucocorticoid receptor, and results in increased metastatic colo

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Four Lessons From the Manafort Sentencing

Earlier today, Paul Manafort, the former campaign manager for Donald Trump, was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison by Judge Amy Berman Jackson in Washington, D.C. This sentence will run concurrently with the 47-month sentence that Manafort received from Judge T. S. Ellis III in Alexandria, Virginia, last week. Moments after Manafort was sentenced, Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. V

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Pesticides influence ground-nesting bee development and longevity

Results from a new study suggest that bees might be exposed to pesticides in more ways than we thought, and it could impact their development significantly.

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Infants' advances in speech processing play role in language-cognition link

A new study provides the first evidence that infants' increasingly precise perceptual tuning to the sounds of their native language sets constraints on the range of human languages they will link to cognition.

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Molecular patterns could better predict breast cancer recurrence

The genetic and molecular make-up of individual breast tumors holds clues to how a woman's disease could progress, including the likelihood of it coming back after treatment, and in what time frame, according to a new study.

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Coastal ecosystems suffer from upriver hydroelectric dams

Researchers found that inland river dams can have highly destructive effects on the stability and productivity of coastline and estuarine habitats, which provide protection from storms, commercial fishery habitats, and belowground carbon storage.

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Combination immunotherapy could stop liver cancer growth

New preclinical data offers proof-of-principle for a combination immunotherapy that suppresses tumor growth in the liver. Current therapies for liver cancer are largely ineffective, resulting in poor outcomes.

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Measuring the success of East African protected areas

East Africa (Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda) contains 1,776 protected areas (including 186 'strict' protected areas) covering more than 27 percent of its terrestrial area. Researchers have now documented the extent to which this East African protected area network really protects wildlife and habitats.

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Bat flight model can inspire smarter, nimbler drones

Engineers have captured the full complexity of bat flight in a three-dimensional computer model for the first time, potentially inspiring the future design of better drones and other aerial vehicles.

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Pesticides influence ground-nesting bee development and longevity

Results from a new study suggest that bees might be exposed to pesticides in more ways than we thought, and it could impact their development significantly.

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Looking back and forward: A decadelong quest for a transformative transistor

Smartphones contain billions of tiny switches called transistors that allow us to take care of myriad tasks beyond making calls—sending texts, navigating neighborhoods, snapping selfies and Googling names. These switches involve an electrically conducting channel whose conductivity can be changed by a gate terminal, which is separated from the channel by a dielectric film that's a mere 5 to 6 atom

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A NASA Journey to the Moon May Need to Find Another Rocket or Two

Mounting delays to the Space Launch System, primarily built by Boeing, are leading the agency to consider alternative forms of transport.

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Amazon Pulls 2 Books That Promote Unscientific Autism ‘Cures’

The online retailer’s move follows recent efforts by Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest to limit the availability of anti-vaccination and other pseudoscientific material.

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Experts Call for Temporary World Ban on Gene-Hacked Children

Global Moratorium Late last year, Chinese scientist He Jiankui carried out a highly controversial gene-editing experiment by altering the genome of a human embryo. In a response to growing concern over future changes or edits to hereditary genes, some of the biggest names in gene editing signed an open letter published in the journal Nature this week, calling for a global moratorium on editing DN

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Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Special effects: How a movie could reduce corruption

They don't give an Academy Award for this, but a Nigerian feature film, "Water of Gold," made viewers significantly more likely to report corruption, according to a new article.

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Danger of vitamin B12 deficiency

Using roundworms, one of Earth's simplest animals, bioscientists have found the first direct link between a diet containing too little vitamin B12 and an increased risk of infection by two potentially deadly pathogens.

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Tunas, sharks and ships at sea

Researchers combine maps of marine predator habitats with satellite tracks of fishing fleets to identify regions where they overlap — a step toward more effective wildlife management on the high seas.

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Reducing the burden of tuberculosis treatment

A research team has developed a device that can lodge in the stomach and deliver antibiotics to treat tuberculosis, which they hope will make it easier to cure more patients and reduce health care costs.

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Like rats, you brain may contain 'time cells' that help form long-term memories

A new study represents an important step in understanding the mystery behind how the brain encodes time when long-term memories are formed.

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Major cosmic impact 12,800 years ago

When geologists set out years ago to examine signs of a major cosmic impact that occurred toward the end of the Pleistocene epoch, little did they know just how far-reaching the projected climatic effect would be.

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Righty Male Cuttlefish Are Better at Sex and Fighting

Righty cuttlefish males have more sex and win more fights. And this could help explain why lefty humans exist at all.

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Ancient Stonehenge Pigs Had Long Journey Before Their Slaughter

Countless piggies likely trotted hundreds of miles to Stonehenge and other ancient monuments during the Neolithic, where they were promptly devoured during giant feasts, a new study finds.

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Scientists Call for a Moratorium on Editing Inherited Genes

Amid a controversy over gene-edited babies, leading researchers want to call a halt and install a global governance process — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Found: the missing ingredient to grow blood vessels

Researchers have discovered an ingredient vital for proper blood vessel formation that explains why numerous promising treatments have failed. The discovery offers important direction for efforts to better treat conditions ranging from diabetes to heart attacks and strokes.

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Later abortion increased in Texas after House Bill 2

A new study by the Texas Policy Evaluation Project (TxPEP) finds that the number of second-trimester abortions in Texas increased 13 percent after the implementation of the restrictive abortion law known as House Bill 2 (HB 2), even as the total number of abortions declined by 18 percent.

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Scientists Call for a Moratorium on Editing Inherited Genes

Amid a controversy over gene-edited babies, leading researchers want to call a halt and install a global governance process — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists Call for a Moratorium on Editing Inherited Genes

Amid a controversy over gene-edited babies, leading researchers want to call a halt and install a global governance process — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Raising the Steaks: How One City in the Netherlands Wants to Feed the World

There are 7.5 billion of us and counting. Dutch researchers are working to feed us all sustainably — without any meat

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Human encroachment is obliterating chimpanzee culture

A study finds that human impact is decimating the cultures of chimpanzee communities in the wild. Unique localized behaviors are being reduced by 88 percent. Socialized learning in chimps has finally been established, just in time to be destroyed. None People who enjoy travel have seen this trend becoming more and more pronounced even in human populations: There's an increasing homogeneity among

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How humanity learned to go farther (and get there faster)

Technology Humanity's biggest milemarkers. For most of our history we were limited to foot- and horsepower, but that didn't stop us from venturing.

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Looking back and forward: A decade-long quest for a transformative transistor

Transistors have been miniaturized for the past 50 years, but we've reached the point where they can't continue to be scaled any further. In Applied Physics Letters, researchers review negative capacitance field-effect transistors, a new device concept that suggests traditional transistors can be made much more efficient by simply adding a thin layer of ferroelectric material. If it works, the sam

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Hungry moose more tolerant of wolves' presence

Research in western Wyoming shows that close proximity of wolves does cause moose to move, but not enough to drive them from their preferred habitats — especially late in the winter.

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Researchers: Pesticides influence ground-nesting bee development and longevity

Results from a new study suggest that bees might be exposed to pesticides in more ways than we thought, and it could impact their development significantly. The study, published in Nature's Scientific Reports, looks at the non-target effects of pesticides on ground-nesting bees, a group that actually makes up the majority of bee species.

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Infants' advances in speech processing play role in language-cognition link

A new Northwestern University study provides the first evidence that infants' increasingly precise perceptual tuning to the sounds of their native language sets constraints on the range of human languages they will link to cognition.

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Facebook, Instagram outages affecting social media users around the world

Facebook says it is aware of outages on its platforms including Facebook, Messenger and Instagram and is working to resolve the issue. …

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Metal exposure and Parkinson's symptoms: Link explored

A new study describes the biological process that causes Parkinson's-like symptoms to develop following exposure to the metal manganese. The new research could lead to earlier detection of Parkinson's disease and better outcomes for patients.

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Decapitated Worms Regrow Their Brains

Ribbon worms that lose their heads can grow a new one.

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U.S. Military Eyes Mini Nuclear Reactors To Reduce Convoy Casualties

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Testing the DNA in Museum Artifacts Can Unlock New Natural History, but Is it Worth the Potential Damage?

Museums house a wealth of rare animal specimens, such as arctic clothing, medieval parchment and Viking drinking horns, but DNA testing can be destructive

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‘Neuroflight’ drone controller gets a boost from A.I.

Machine learning powers a new kind of drone flight controller software, researchers report. After Wil Koch flew a friend’s drone for the first time, operating it through “first-person view” where a person wears a headset connected to a video feed streaming live from a camera on the drone, he thought it was amazing. So amazing that he went out that same day and purchased his own system—a video hea

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Therapy could improve and prolong sight in those suffering vision loss

Ganglion cells in the eye generate noise as the light-sensitive photoreceptors die in diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. Now, neurobiologists have found a drug and gene therapy that can tamp down the noise, improving sight in mice with RP. These therapies could potentially extend the period of useful vision in those with degenerative eye diseases, including, perhaps, age-related macular degene

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Serotonin can regulate gene expression inside neurons

Findings could fundamentally change how scientists interpret the biological activities of serotonin.

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Testing the symmetry of space-time by means of atomic clocks

According to Einstein the speed of light is always the same. But according to theoretical models of quantum gravitation, this uniformity of space-time does not apply to particles. Physicists have now tried to detect a change in the uniformity of space-time using two optical Ytterbium clocks.

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How Taoist philosophy deals with the concept of anxiety

Anxiety doesn't exist for someone who has a life lived in the present. Our concerns for a spectral future fuel anxiety. Taoist philosophy teaches us a new way of living. Varying degrees of anxiety awash over millions. Whether it's stress from the workplace, fretting for a future that never comes or getting tangled in the ceaseless political drama of the day. At the root of this issue is the const

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FUJIFILM Irvine Scientific Introduces Low Hydrolysate Medium For Insect Cell Expression Systems

FUJIFILM Irvine Scientific, Inc., a world leader in the optimization and manufacture of cell culture media, today announced the introduction of IS Sf Insect medium. The serum-free, animal component-free, low hydrolysate medium is formulated for scalability for the consistent growth and yields of proteins, viral vectors and viral-like particles using baculovirus expression systems (BEVS), in Sf9 an

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Review of noise impacts on marine mammals yields new policy recommendations

Marine mammals are particularly sensitive to noise pollution because they rely on sound for so many essential functions, including communication, navigation, finding food, and avoiding predators. An expert panel has now published a comprehensive assessment of the available science on how noise exposure affects hearing in marine mammals, providing scientific recommendations for noise exposure crite

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Inactive ingredients in pills and capsules may cause allergic, adverse reactions

The majority of oral medications available to consumers contain ingredients that can affect sensitive individuals.

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Neural networks predict planet mass

To find out how planets form astrophysicists run complicated and time consuming computer calculations. Scientists have now developed a totally novel approach to speed up this process dramatically. They use deep learning based on artificial neural networks, a method that is well known in image recognition.

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Big stats, human stories change attitudes about global issues

New research sheds light on the types of statistical and narrative evidence that are most effective at persuading people to pay attention to global issues.

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Rice U. study highlights danger of vitamin B12 deficiency

Using roundworms, one of Earth's simplest animals, Rice University bioscientists have found the first direct link between a diet containing too little vitamin B12 and an increased risk of infection by two potentially deadly pathogens.

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Special effects: How a movie could reduce corruption

A film and texting campaign can increase anticorruption reports from citizens, study shows.

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NASA infrared imagery reveals powerful Tropical Cyclone Idai at Mozambique's coast

NASA's Terra satellite captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Idai approaching the coast of Mozambique. The infrared data provided cloud top temperatures that indicated powerful thunderstorms circled Idai's center.

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Skal historien skrives om igen, igen? Egtvedpigen og Skrydstruppigen er måske fra Danmark alligevel

Nyt studie modsiger Nationalmuseet, der dog står fast på, at bronzealderpigerne indvandrede fra Tyskland.

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The Atlantic Elevates Adrienne LaFrance to Executive Editor

Adrienne LaFrance, who has been the top editor of TheAtlantic.com since the summer of 2017, is now executive editor of The Atlantic , editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today. Swati Sharma and Sarah Yager are promoted to managing editors. Sharma will run the day-to-day coverage at TheAtlantic.com, and Yager will become operations chief for The Atlantic . “Adrienne has proven herself to be

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9 Revealing Moments From the College-Admissions Indictment

On Tuesday morning, the Department of Justice accused more than 50 people—parents and college-athletics coaches—of a nationwide scheme to get the children of the wealthy into selective colleges such as the University of Southern California, Georgetown, Yale, Wake Forest, and the University of Texas. William Singer pleaded guilty on Tuesday to charges of racketeering conspiracy, money-laundering c

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Civil Courts Step In to Solve What the Catholic Church Won’t

PARIS—This week marked a major turning point in the Catholic Church’s sexual-abuse crisis. An Australian court sentenced Cardinal George Pell to six years in prison for sexually abusing minors, a decision that not only makes him the highest-ranking Church official to face civil justice, but also underscores a central animating tension in the issue: the one between civil and Church authorities. Af

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7 Strategies to Maximize a Break without Losing Focus

We reward a productive stretch with a “quick break” that morphs into a two-hour social media sinkhole. Dr. Ellen Hendriksen helps us maximize our breaks and recharge without losing… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The evolution of monkeys remains a mystery

One theory seems to be wrong

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7 Strategies to Maximize a Break without Losing Focus

We reward a productive stretch with a “quick break” that morphs into a two-hour social media sinkhole. Dr. Ellen Hendriksen helps us maximize our breaks and recharge without losing… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Will the world be a different place when the 20 year old's right now grow old?

What do you guys think? I'm honestly kinda pessimistic and feel like no big changes will happen. submitted by /u/ACasualGuy [link] [comments]

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Nano-bot can probe inside human cells

Researchers have built a set of magnetic 'tweezers' that can position a nano-scale bead inside a human cell with unprecedented precision. The nano-bot has already been used to study the properties of cancer cells, and could lead to enhanced diagnosis and treatment.

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Placenta ‘crosstalk’ benefits brains of mom and fetus

There’s a functional link between the placenta and the brains of both mother and fetus, a new study with mice genes shows. The link allows each to adapt to changing conditions in the other and improve the chance of a successful pregnancy, researchers report. In addition to providing a better understanding of pregnancy in women, researchers also say the results of the study could help in fighting

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Surprising research funded by the National Science Foundation, which may lose $1 billion

Science Cuts to the government agency's budget would impact a lot of science. The National Science Foundation provides money for much more than the typical health and biological research you hear about in the news. Here’s just a small taste.

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Trilobites: What Makes a Waterfall? Maybe It Forms Itself

An experiment with a river built in a lab suggests that geological histories around the world may need to be rewritten.

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Alan Watts quotes that will change your perspective on life

Quotes on the immediacy of experience and life. Learn a Zen Koan or two and scramble rationalist thought. Ponder on the meaning of life with Alan Watts. To this day, Alan Watts's words impactful and wise words circulate through the culture. We find them in the many books he left behind , countless lectures and pop-culture references galore. Renowned scholar and teacher, Joseph Campbell once said

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UK vows to invest £200m in ‘cutting edge’ science

Proposal in Spring Statement to end visa cap for PhD-level roles

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Scientists call for global moratorium on gene editing of embryos

Crispr ‘tops list’ of recent scientific discoveries with massive consequences for humanity, says lead proponent Leading scientists have called for a global moratorium on the use of powerful DNA editing tools to make genetically modified children. The move is intended to send a clear signal to maverick researchers, and the scientific community more broadly, that any attempt to rewrite the DNA of s

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Nano-bot can probe inside human cells

Researchers have built a set of magnetic 'tweezers' that can position a nano-scale bead inside a human cell with unprecedented precision. The nano-bot has already been used to study the properties of cancer cells, and could lead to enhanced diagnosis and treatment.

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Protected areas could help large herbivores bounce back after war

Large herbivore populations can substantially recover after war-induced declines, given that protected area management is provided, according to a new study.

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Tracking urban gentrification, one building at a time

A new deep-mapping computer model can detect visual changes to individual properties, allowing researchers to more rapidly track gentrification within neighborhoods and cities, according to a new study.

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Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge

Archaeologists have unearthed evidence of the earliest large-scale celebrations in Britain – with people and animals traveling hundreds of miles for prehistoric feasting rituals. The study is the most comprehensive to date and examined the bones of 131 pigs, the prime feasting animals, from four Late Neolithic complexes. Serving the world-famous monuments of Stonehenge and Avebury, the four sites

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New cell subtypes classified in mouse brain

An international team has created a new way to classify neurons in the mouse brain. The approach is revealing new brain cell subtypes even while bringing the BRAIN Initiative closer to its goal of comprehensively mapping a whole brain.

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Mathematical Cognition and Learning Society

submitted by /u/Selfalopod [link] [comments]

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Brain Fairs for Brain Awareness Week

Prior to Brain Awareness Week, we encouraged you to watch our video on how to organize a successful brain fair , and now that Brain Awareness Week is here, we encourage you to see one in action ! Across the globe, brain fairs—stations with activities and information about the brain set up at hospitals, universities, community centers, and more—are a popular activity for organizers and attendees a

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Scientists Used IBM's Quantum Computer to Reverse Time, Possibly Breaking a Law of Physics

The universe is getting messy. Like a glass shattering to pieces or a single wave crashing onto the shore, the universe’s messiness can only move in one direction – toward more chaos and disorder. But scientists think that, at least for a single electron or the simplest quantum computer, they may be able to turn back time, and restore order to chaos. This doesn't mean we'll be visiting with dinosa

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Get Ready For More Interactive Netflix Programming

Under Control In December, Netflix released Bandersnatch , a choose-your-own-adventure style episode of its hit dystopian sci-fi series “Black Mirror.” Based on the positive response to that episode, Netflix’s VP of product Todd Yellin has now announced the company’s intentions to make interactive storytelling a more regular part of its programming — a sign that the future of entertainment could

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7 Biohacks to Master Before Worrying About Other Biohacks

For 45 minutes each morning, the veteran hockey player Duncan Keith ritually goes upstairs to what he calls his “lab,” where he has “a bunch of little things that I do to stay healthy.” This, according to an interview this week in The New York Times , includes dousing himself with infrared light, lying for eight minutes on a mat that “has electromagnetic currents,” and taking supplement pills suc

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Like rats, you brain may contain 'time cells' that help form long-term memories

A new U of T study represents an important step in understanding the mystery behind how the brain encodes time when long-term memories are formed.

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Therapy could improve and prolong sight in those suffering vision loss

Ganglion cells in the eye generate noise as the light-sensitive photoreceptors die in diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. Now, UC Berkeley neurobiologists have found a drug and gene therapy that can tamp down the noise, improving sight in mice with RP. These therapies could potentially extend the period of useful vision in those with degenerative eye diseases, including, perhaps, age-related ma

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Antibody-drug conjugate shows efficacy against cell surface protein in neuroblastoma

Physician-scientists in the Cancer Center at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have developed a preclinical, potent therapy attached to an antibody that targets a surface protein expressed in most childhood neuroblastomas, effectively killing cancer cells.

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Stress hormones promote breast cancer metastasis

Scientists from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel have deciphered the molecular mechanisms linking breast cancer metastasis with increased stress hormones. In addition, they found that synthetic derivatives of stress hormones, which are frequently used as anti-inflammatory in cancer therapy, decrease the efficacy of chemotherapy. These results come from patient-derived m

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Scientists find new approach that shows promise for treating cystic fibrosis

Researchers say a widely-used antifungal drug may hold promise for treating people with cystic fibrosis, a life-threatening genetic disorder that causes serious damage to the lungs. In studies using human cells and animals models, the researchers found that the medication, called amphotericin, helps lung cells function in a way that could make it easier for patients to fight chronic bacterial lung

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Tunas, sharks and ships at sea

Researchers combine maps of marine predator habitats with satellite tracks of fishing fleets to identify regions where they overlap — a step toward more effective wildlife management on the high seas.

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Molecular patterns could better predict breast cancer recurrence

The genetic and molecular make-up of individual breast tumours holds clues to how a woman's disease could progress, including the likelihood of it coming back after treatment, and in what time frame, according to a Cancer Research UK-funded study published in Nature.

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Mount Sinai researchers discover serotonin can regulate gene expression inside neurons

Findings could fundamentally change how scientists interpret the biological activities of serotonin.

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Reports of corruption increase in Nigeria after film and text campaign

A star-studded Nigerian movie about corruption — and a subsequent text-messaging campaign to combat government graft — led a record number of citizens in Nigeria to report acts of corruption, according to a study in the journal Science Advances.

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Potential cystic fibrosis treatment uses 'molecular prosthetic' for missing lung protein

An approved drug normally used to treat fungal infections could also do the job of a protein channel that is missing or dysfunctional in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis, operating as a prosthesis on the molecular scale, says new research from the University of Illinois and the University of Iowa.

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Testing the symmetry of space-time by means of atomic clocks

According to Einstein the speed of light is always the same. But according to theoretical models of quantum gravitation, this uniformity of space-time does not apply to particles. Physicists at the German Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, together with colleagues at the University of Delaware, tried to detect a change in the uniformity of space-time using two optical Ytterbium clocks. Their r

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NIH supports international moratorium on clinical application of germline editing

Today, leading scientists and ethicists from seven countries have called for an international moratorium on the use of genetic editing to modify the human germline for clinical purposes.

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Coastal ecosystems suffer from upriver hydroelectric dams

Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and UC Riverside found that inland river dams can have highly destructive effects on the stability and productivity of coastline and estuarine habitats, which provide protection from storms, commercial fishery habitats, and belowground carbon storage.

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Researchers create nano-bot to probe inside human cells

U of T Engineering researchers have built a set of magnetic 'tweezers' that can position a nano-scale bead inside a human cell with unprecedented precision. The nano-bot has already been used to study the properties of cancer cells, and could lead to enhanced diagnosis and treatment.

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Thanks to pig remains, scientists uncover extensive human mobility to sites near Stonehenge

A mutli-isotope analysis of pigs remains found around henge complexes near Stonehenge has revealed the large extent and scale of movements of human communities in Britain during the Late Neolithic. The findings 'demonstrate a level of interaction and social complexity not previously appreciated,' the authors say, and provide insight into more than a century

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Drug-delivering device streamlines tuberculosis treatment in pigs

Scientists have created a retrievable, wire-like device that safely resides in the stomach and releases large dosages of drugs over several weeks.

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Strontium isotope maps are disturbed by agricultural lime

Strontium isotopes are frequently used in archaeological studies to establish the provenance and migration history of prehistoric people and artifacts. Many of these studies may be based on incorrect data. A Danish study shows that agricultural lime can alter the composition of strontium isotopes dramatically, so that the modern isotopic signature of an area may be very different from the prehisto

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Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge

Archaeologists have unearthed evidence of the earliest large-scale celebrations in Britain – with people and animals traveling hundreds of miles for prehistoric feasting rituals. The study, led by Dr. Richard Madgwick of Cardiff University, is the most comprehensive to date and examined the bones of 131 pigs, the prime feasting animals, from four Late Neolithic complexes. Serving the world-famous

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Reducing the burden of tuberculosis treatment

A research team led by MIT has developed a device that can lodge in the stomach and deliver antibiotics to treat tuberculosis, which they hope will make it easier to cure more patients and reduce health care costs.

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'Inactive' ingredients may not be, study finds

MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital researchers have found that nearly all pills and capsules contain some inactive ingredients that can cause allergic reactions or food intolerances in certain patients.

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Inactive ingredients in pills and capsules may cause allergic, adverse reactions

The majority of oral medications available to consumers contain ingredients that can affect sensitive individuals.

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Protected areas could help large herbivores bounce back after war

Large herbivore populations can substantially recover after war-induced declines, given that protected area management is provided, according to a study published March 13 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marc Stalmans of Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, and colleagues.

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Tracking urban gentrification, one building at a time

A new deep-mapping computer model can detect visual changes to individual properties, allowing researchers to more rapidly track gentrification within neighborhoods and cities, according to a study published March 13, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Lazar Ilic, Michael Sawada, and Amaury Zarzelli of the University of Ottawa, Canada.

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Put a Black Hole in Your Pocket with This New Stephen Hawking 50-Pence Coin

It features one of the late physicist's most iconic equations.

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It's not your fault — Your brain is self-centered

You're in the middle of a conversation and suddenly turn away because you heard your name. While this 'cocktail party effect' of turning our attention toward self-related stimulation is well-known, scientist don't know if something similar happens inside our heads. By testing for 'self-referential bias' in working memory, researchers are starting to understand how our brains make us naturally self

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No super-Drosophila: Vinegar fly species have a good vision or olfaction, but not both

A team of scientists has systematically studied and compared the eyes and antennae and the associated brain structures of more than 60 species of the genus Drosophila. They found a large variation, but at the same time a close correlation between the two sensory features. The size of the sensory organs is related to the behavior of the mate and host selection.

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Differences in brain activity in children with anhedonia

Researchers have identified changes in brain connectivity and brain activity during rest and reward anticipation in children with anhedonia, a condition where people lose interest and pleasure in activities they used to enjoy. The study sheds light on brain function associated with anhedonia and helps differentiate anhedonia from other related aspects of psychopathology.

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Machine learning tracks moving cells

Scientists can now study the migration of label-free cells at unprecedented resolution, a feat with applications across biology, disease research, and drug development.

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Hematopoietic stem cells: Making blood thicker than water

A team revealed that Ragnase-1 is a key regulator of the self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockout of this gene in mice resulted in aberrant blood cell composition and hematopoiesis, and caused health-related outcomes such as low hemoglobin, enlarged spleen, and early death. This insight into blood cell homeostasis and differentiation could lead to treat

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Secrets of early life revealed from less than half a teaspoon of blood

A global team of scientists have mapped the developmental pathway of a newborn's life for the first time. The research, could transform our understanding of health and disease in babies.

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Avocado seed extract shows promise as anti-inflammatory compound

An extract from the seeds of avocados exhibited anti-inflammatory properties in a laboratory study, according to researchers, and it represents a potential source for novel anti-inflammatory compounds that could be developed as a functional food ingredient or pharmaceuticals.

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CRISPR experts are calling for a global moratorium on heritable gene editing

Some of the biggest names in gene editing want to stop anyone from playing around with cells that pass on changes to the next generation.

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Quantum computing should supercharge this machine-learning technique

Certain machine-learning tasks could be revolutionized by more powerful quantum computers.

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Drones that perch like birds could go on much longer flights

A simple gripping mechanism allows unmanned aerial vehicles to save energy by resting on ledges and poles.

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'Dangerious materials' in sunken cargo ship off France: authorities

French authorities said Wednesday that an Italian cargo ship which sank in the Atlantic was carrying 45 containers of "dangerous materials."

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A distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud that is precise to one per cent

A distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud that is precise to one per cent A distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud that is precise to one per cent, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0999-4 A new calibration of the surface brightness–colour relation of eclipsing binary stars gives a distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud that is precise to one per cent.

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Germline gene-editing research needs rules

Germline gene-editing research needs rules Germline gene-editing research needs rules, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00788-5 In the wake of CRISPR babies, there is an urgent need to better regulate and debate whether, when and how related should be done.

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Histone serotonylation is a permissive modification that enhances TFIID binding to H3K4me3

Histone serotonylation is a permissive modification that enhances TFIID binding to H3K4me3 Histone serotonylation is a permissive modification that enhances TFIID binding to H3K4me3, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1024-7 In serotonin-rich tissues, tissue transglutaminase 2 is able to attach serotonin to a glutamine residue in histone H3; this modification mediates permiss

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Molecular-decoration technique offers boost to medicinal chemists

Molecular-decoration technique offers boost to medicinal chemists Molecular-decoration technique offers boost to medicinal chemists, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00767-w The ability to attach a variety of chemical groups to one position in a molecule facilitates the search for compounds that have useful properties. Reactions have been reported that could transform how c

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Structure of the human LAT1–4F2hc heteromeric amino acid transporter complex

Structure of the human LAT1–4F2hc heteromeric amino acid transporter complex Structure of the human LAT1–4F2hc heteromeric amino acid transporter complex, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1011-z The cryo-EM structure of the LAT1–4F2hc complex, a heteromeric amino acid transporter, is characterized, providing insights into its function and the mechanisms through which mutati

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Optical clock comparison for Lorentz symmetry testing

Optical clock comparison for Lorentz symmetry testing Optical clock comparison for Lorentz symmetry testing, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0972-2 Agreement between two single-ion clocks is demonstrated experimentally at the 10−18 level over a six-month period, confirming a key postulate of Einstein’s theory of relativity with hundredfold-improved precision.

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NIH supports call for moratorium on clinical uses of germline gene editing

NIH supports call for moratorium on clinical uses of germline gene editing NIH supports call for moratorium on clinical uses of germline gene editing, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00814-6 NIH supports call for moratorium on clinical uses of germline gene editing

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Pore-forming small molecules offer a promising way to tackle cystic fibrosis

Pore-forming small molecules offer a promising way to tackle cystic fibrosis Pore-forming small molecules offer a promising way to tackle cystic fibrosis, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00781-y In cystic fibrosis, ion-transport abnormalities cause problems in many organs. A small molecule that forms cell-membrane pores allowing ion transport shows therapeutic promise in h

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Novel insights from uncultivated genomes of the global human gut microbiome

Novel insights from uncultivated genomes of the global human gut microbiome Novel insights from uncultivated genomes of the global human gut microbiome, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1058-x Novel insights from uncultivated genomes of the global human gut microbiome

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Self-formed bedrock waterfalls

Self-formed bedrock waterfalls Self-formed bedrock waterfalls, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0991-z Even in the absence of external perturbations, waterfalls can gradually form from planar bedrock riverbeds as a result of unstable interactions between flow hydraulics, sediment transport and bedrock erosion.

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Site-selective and versatile aromatic C−H functionalization by thianthrenation

Site-selective and versatile aromatic C−H functionalization by thianthrenation Site-selective and versatile aromatic C−H functionalization by thianthrenation, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0982-0 A highly site-selective aromatic C–H functionalization reaction that does not require a particular directing group or arene substitution pattern provides functionalized arenes t

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Podcast: Ebola in DRC, a new HIV treatment, and the proposed US budget

Podcast: Ebola in DRC, a new HIV treatment, and the proposed US budget Podcast: Ebola in DRC, a new HIV treatment, and the proposed US budget, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00850-2 Benjamin Thompson talks to Amy Maxmen about the lastest science news.

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Efficacy of MEK inhibition in patients with histiocytic neoplasms

Efficacy of MEK inhibition in patients with histiocytic neoplasms Efficacy of MEK inhibition in patients with histiocytic neoplasms, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1012-y A proof-of-concept clinical trial of patients with histiocytoses with MAPK-pathway mutations showed durable responses to treatment with the MEK1 and MEK2 inhibitor cobimetinib, which indicates that histi

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Modification of histone proteins by serotonin in the nucleus

Modification of histone proteins by serotonin in the nucleus Modification of histone proteins by serotonin in the nucleus, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00532-z The function of histone proteins can be modified through addition or removal of certain chemical groups. The addition of a serotonin molecule is a newly found histone modification that could influence gene expres

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Supervised learning with quantum-enhanced feature spaces

Supervised learning with quantum-enhanced feature spaces Supervised learning with quantum-enhanced feature spaces, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0980-2 Two classification algorithms that use the quantum state space to produce feature maps are demonstrated on a superconducting processor, enabling the solution of problems when the feature space is large and the kernel func

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Histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 36 guides m6A RNA modification co-transcriptionally

Histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 36 guides m 6 A RNA modification co-transcriptionally Histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 36 guides m 6 A RNA modification co-transcriptionally, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1016-7 METTL14 recognizes the trimethyl mark on lysine 36 of histone H3 that directs m6A modifications co-transcriptionally.

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Adopt a moratorium on heritable genome editing

Adopt a moratorium on heritable genome editing Adopt a moratorium on heritable genome editing, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00726-5 Eric Lander, Françoise Baylis, Feng Zhang, Emmanuelle Charpentier, Paul Berg and specialists from seven countries call for an international governance framework.

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Dynamics of breast-cancer relapse reveal late-recurring ER-positive genomic subgroups

Dynamics of breast-cancer relapse reveal late-recurring ER-positive genomic subgroups Dynamics of breast-cancer relapse reveal late-recurring ER-positive genomic subgroups, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1007-8 A statistical framework for breast-cancer recurrence uses long-term follow-up data and a knowledge of molecular subcategories to model distinct disease stages and

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Academies’ action plan for germline editing

Academies’ action plan for germline editing Academies’ action plan for germline editing, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00813-7 Academies’ action plan for germline editing

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Machine learning in quantum spaces

Machine learning in quantum spaces Machine learning in quantum spaces, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00771-0 Ordinary computers can perform machine learning by comparing mathematical representations of data. An experiment demonstrates how quantum computing could use quantum-mechanical representations instead.

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Big stats, human stories change attitudes about global issues

New research from Cornell University sheds light on the types of statistical and narrative evidence that are most effective at persuading people to pay attention to global issues.

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Geologic evidence supports theory that major cosmic impact event occurred approximately 12,800 years ago

When UC Santa Barbara geology professor emeritus James Kennett and colleagues set out years ago to examine signs of a major cosmic impact that occurred toward the end of the Pleistocene epoch, little did they know just how far-reaching the projected climatic effect would be.

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Measuring the success of East African protected areas

East Africa (Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda) contains 1,776 protected areas (including 186 "strict" protected areas) covering more than 27 percent of its terrestrial area. Researchers at UC Davis have now documented the extent to which this East African protected area network really protects wildlife and habitats.

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NASA's new rocket won't be ready for moon shot next year

NASA's massive new rocket won't be ready for a moon shot next year, the space agency's top official told Congress on Wednesday.

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Scientists chasing waterfalls discovered something they aren't used to

We often think waterfalls indicate ancient tectonic or glacial activity – but it turns out they can form all by themselves without these external influences

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IBM made a quantum algorithm that could make AI more powerful

Artificial intelligence can automatically sort out data, but it struggles for some particularly complex datasets – a quantum algorithm could do better

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Drug-releasing coil in stomach could provide better treatment for TB

Some people have to take several tablets each day to treat tuberculosis – a coil threaded with pills and inserted in the stomach offers an alternative

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AI-powered smartphone cameras are changing the way we see reality

Smartphone cameras now use artificial intelligence to completely transform the pictures we take, and it could change the way we see reality

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Spotify's Apple Complaint Cuts to a Core Antitrust Issue

Rather than arguing Apple shouldn't own the App store, as Elizabeth Warren has proposed, Spotify just wants the company to change its conduct there.

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Rapid and inefficient kinetics of sickle hemoglobin fiber growth

In sickle cell disease, the aberrant assembly of hemoglobin fibers induces changes in red blood cell morphology and stiffness, which leads to downstream symptoms of the disease. Therefore, understanding of this assembly process will be important for the treatment of sickle cell disease. By performing the highest spatiotemporal resolution measurements (55 nm at 1 Hz) of single sickle hemoglobin fi

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The neural circuitry of affect-induced distortions of trust

Aversive affect is likely a key source of irrational human decision-making, but still, little is known about the neural circuitry underlying emotion-cognition interactions during social behavior. We induced incidental aversive affect via prolonged periods of threat of shock, while 41 healthy participants made investment decisions concerning another person or a lottery. Negative affect reduced tru

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Predicted hotspots of overlap between highly migratory fishes and industrial fishing fleets in the northeast Pacific

Many species of sharks and some tunas are threatened by overexploitation, yet the degree of overlap between industrial fisheries and pelagic fishes remains poorly understood. Using satellite tracks from 933 industrial fishing vessels and predictive habitat models from 876 electronic tags deployed on seven shark and tuna species, we developed fishing effort maps across the northeast Pacific Ocean

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Stabilization of fault slip by fluid injection in the laboratory and in situ

Faults can slip seismically or aseismically depending on their hydromechanical properties, which can be measured in the laboratory. Here, we demonstrate that fault slip induced by fluid injection in a natural fault at the decametric scale is quantitatively consistent with fault slip and frictional properties measured in the laboratory. The increase in fluid pressure first induces accelerating ase

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Motivating the adoption of new community-minded behaviors: An empirical test in Nigeria

Social scientists have long sought to explain why people donate resources for the good of a community. Less attention has been paid to the difficult task of motivating the first adopters of these important behaviors. In a field experiment in Nigeria, we tested two campaigns that encouraged people to try reporting corruption by text message. Psychological theories about how to shift perceived norm

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Multi-isotope analysis reveals that feasts in the Stonehenge environs and across Wessex drew people and animals from throughout Britain

The great henge complexes of southern Britain are iconic monuments of the third millennium BCE, representing great feats of engineering and labor mobilization that hosted feasting events on a previously unparalleled scale. The scale of movement and the catchments that the complexes served, however, have thus far eluded understanding. Presenting the largest five-isotope system archeological datase

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Human pluripotent stem cell-derived brain pericyte-like cells induce blood-brain barrier properties

Brain pericytes play important roles in the formation and maintenance of the neurovascular unit (NVU), and their dysfunction has been implicated in central nervous system disorders. While human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have been used to model other NVU cell types, including brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs), astrocytes, and neurons, hPSC-derived brain pericyte–like cells have no

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Bach1 regulates self-renewal and impedes mesendodermal differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

The transcription factor BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) is expressed in the embryos of mice, but whether Bach1 regulates the self-renewal and early differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is unknown. We report that the deubiquitinase ubiquitin-specific processing protease 7 (Usp7) is a direct target of Bach1, that Bach1 interacts with Nanog, Sox2, and Oct4, and that Bach1 facilitate

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Atmospheric forcing of rapid marine-terminating glacier retreat in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

The Canadian Arctic Archipelago contains >300 glaciers that terminate in the ocean, but little is known about changes in their frontal positions in response to recent changes in the ocean-climate system. Here, we examine changes in glacier frontal positions since the 1950s and investigate the relative influence of oceanic temperature versus atmospheric temperature. Over 94% of glaciers retreated

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Cellular microRNA detection with miRacles: microRNA- activated conditional looping of engineered switches

MicroRNAs are short noncoding regulatory RNAs that are increasingly used as disease biomarkers. Detection of microRNAs can be arduous and expensive and often requires amplification, labeling, or radioactive probes. Here, we report a single-step, nonenzymatic microRNA detection assay using conformationally responsive DNA nanoswitches. Termed miRacles (microRNA-activated conditional looping of engi

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A natural experiment reveals the impact of hydroelectric dams on the estuaries of tropical rivers

We tested how sediment trapping by hydroelectric dams affects tropical estuaries by comparing two dammed and two undammed rivers on Mexico’s Pacific coast. We found that dams demonstrably affected the stability and productivity of the estuaries. The two rivers dammed for hydroelectricity had a rapid coastal recession (between 7.9 and 21.5 ha year –1 ) in what should otherwise be an accretional co

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Agricultural lime disturbs natural strontium isotope variations: Implications for provenance and migration studies

The application of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr in prehistoric mobility studies requires accurate strontium reference maps. These are often based from present-day surface waters. However, the use of agricultural lime in low to noncalcareous soils can substantially change the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr compositions of surface waters. Water unaffected by agriculture in western Denmark has an average 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of 0.7124

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Conformational landscape alternations promote oncogenic activities of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 as revealed by NMR

Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell morphology by cycling between inactive guanosine diphosphate (GDP)–bound and active guanosine triphosphate (GTP)–bound states. Rac1 P29S mutant is known to strongly promote oncogenesis by facilitating its intrinsic GDP dissociation and thereby increasing the level of the GTP-bound state. Here, we use

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A controversial new call to ban editing and implanting human embryos

The debate about whether to declare a “moratorium” on germline editing ratchets up

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Antifungal drug could help cystic fibrosis patients for whom common treatments don’t work

Compound shows promise in human cells and in pigs with the disease

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Stonehenge-like monuments were home to giant pig feasts. Now, we know who was on the guest list

People likely came to southern England’s henges from all over the British Isles

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Waterfall-chasing scientists uncover rare, self-forming cascades

New study could explain origins of mysterious waterfalls on Earth—and Mars

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Measuring the success of East African protected areas

East Africa (Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda) contains 1,776 protected areas (including 186 "strict" protected areas) covering more than 27 percent of its terrestrial area. Researchers at UC Davis have now documented the extent to which this East African protected area network really protects wildlife and habitats.

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Watch-like device protects pacemakers from hackers

New technology keeps your body’s electrical signals contained, which can protect medical devices like pacemakers from hacking, researchers report. It’s possible for someone to hack into your pacemaker or insulin pump and potentially kill you, just by intercepting and analyzing wireless signals. This hasn’t happened in real life yet, but researchers have demonstrated for at least a decade that it’

5h

The day the world burned

When UC Santa Barbara geology professor emeritus James Kennett and colleagues set out years ago to examine signs of a major cosmic impact that occurred toward the end of the Pleistocene epoch, little did they know just how far-reaching the projected climatic effect would be.

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Big stats, human stories change attitudes about global issues

New research from Cornell University sheds light on the types of statistical and narrative evidence that are most effective at persuading people to pay attention to global issues.

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Measuring the success of East African protected areas

East Africa (Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda) contains 1,776 protected areas (including 186 'strict' protected areas) covering more than 27 percent of its terrestrial area. Researchers at UC Davis have now documented the extent to which this East African protected area network really protects wildlife and habitats.

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Preclinical data shows combination immunotherapy could stop liver cancer growth

New preclinical data from University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center offers proof-of-principle for a combination immunotherapy that suppresses tumor growth in the liver. Current therapies for liver cancer are largely ineffective, resulting in poor outcomes.

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Google is reportedly pulling ‘dozens’ of engineers off its laptop and tablet teams

Google is reportedly shifting employees from its laptop and tablet hardware teams to other divisions within Google and Alphabet, according to Business Insider. The move is attributed …

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Astronauts who survived Soyuz scare ready for new launch despite glitches

Astronauts who survived an abortive Soyuz launch said Wednesday they were confident about their upcoming flight to the International Space Station despite some last-minute malfunctions.

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Protected areas could help large herbivores bounce back after war

Large herbivore populations can substantially recover after war-induced declines, given that protected area management is provided, according to a study published March 13 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marc Stalmans of Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, and colleagues. But the community structure may take longer to restore, as the rate of recovery varies for different populations.

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Strontium isotope maps are disturbed by agricultural lime

Strontium isotopes are frequently used in archaeological studies to establish the provenance and migration history of prehistoric people and artifacts. Many of these studies may be based on incorrect data. A Danish study shows that agricultural lime can alter the composition of strontium isotopes dramatically, so that the modern isotopic signature of an area may be very different from the prehisto

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Testing the symmetry of space-time by means of atomic clocks

In his Special Theory of Relativity, Einstein formulated the hypothesis according to which the speed of light is always the same, no matter what the conditions are. It may, however, be possible that—according to theoretical models of quantum gravitation—this uniformity of space-time does not apply to particles. Physicists have now tested this hypothesis with a first long-term comparison of two opt

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Prehistoric Britons rack up food miles for feasts near Stonehenge

Archaeologists have unearthed evidence of the earliest large-scale celebrations in Britain—with people and animals travelling hundreds of miles for prehistoric feasting rituals.

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Reports of corruption increase in Nigeria after film and text campaign

A star-studded Nigerian movie about corruption—and a subsequent text-messaging campaign to combat government graft—led a record number of citizens in Nigeria to report acts of corruption, according to a study in the journal Science Advances.

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US, Canada ground Boeing 737 Max 8s after Ethiopia crash (Update)

President Donald Trump issued an emergency order Wednesday grounding all Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft in the wake of a crash of an Ethiopian airliner that killed 157 people, a reversal for the U.S. after federal aviation regulators had maintained it had no data to show the jets are unsafe.

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Coastal ecosystems suffer from upriver hydroelectric dams

Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego and UC Riverside found that inland river dams can have highly destructive effects on the stability and productivity of coastline and estuarine habitats. The study was published March 13 in Science Advances.

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Research predicts overlap of tunas, sharks and ships at sea

Maps that show where sharks and tunas roam in the eastern Pacific Ocean, and where fishing vessels travel in this vast expanse, could help ocean managers to identify regions of the high seas where vulnerable species may be at risk.

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Toyota joins space race with plan for self-driving lunar rover

Japanese firm’s vehicle would allow astronauts to travel on moon without space suits Toyota is to build a self-driving lunar rover that will enable astronauts to travel on the surface of the moon without space suits, as Japan raises the stakes amid renewed international interest in lunar exploration. The Japanese carmaker and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa) hope the vehicle will be

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Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies

An international group of 18 prominent scientists and bioethicists is calling for countries around the world to impose a moratorium on the creation of babies whose genes have been altered in the lab. (Image credit: Mark Schiefelbein/AP)

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An Abandoned Baby’s DNA Condemns His Mother

Thirty-eight years ago, an infant boy—hours old, tears frozen on his face—was found dead in a ditch in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Last week, police arrested his mother and charged her with murder, after investigators uploaded the baby’s DNA to a genealogy website and matched her relatives. The same strategy led police to the Golden State Killer suspect in April 2018, and since then law enforcemen

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Why Manafort Is Still Talking About Collusion

Karma has a sense of irony. In 2012 and 2013, Paul Manafort undertook a covert campaign to support the imprisonment of Yulia Tymoshenko, a former prime minister of Ukraine and the political rival of Manafort’s patron, Viktor Yanukovych. Manafort used government contacts and the media to smear Tymoshenko and besmirch her character. On Wednesday, Manafort was in a courtroom in Washington, D.C., def

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Sound Bites: Dogs on the Microphone

Once in a while, reporters in the field find themselves presented with the opportunity—or challenge—to interview a famous pup, or a four-legged friend that has just made the news, or simply a dog that’s finally had its day. I’ve gathered a few of these very important moments, captured in news photos below, from the past 90 years.

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Mayor Bill de Blasio to Headline The Atlantic’s Fourth Annual Renewal Summit in New York on Wednesday, April 3

Washington, D.C. (March 13, 2019)—How do cities like New York keep growing and evolving, while remaining true to the people, communities, and businesses that embody their heritage? The Atlantic will probe this topic with Mayor Bill de Blasio and city entrepreneurs, nonprofit leaders, and artists at The Renewal Summit next month, made possible by Allstate. The event will take place Wednesday, Apri

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Researchers investigate the impact of the statewide opioid crisis on teachers

Researchers have evaluated the impact of the opioid crisis in classrooms across the Mountain State through a survey of 2,205 teachers in 49 counties.

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Blunting pain's emotional component

Pain researchers have shown in rodents that they can block receptors on brain cells that appear to be responsible for the negative emotions associated with pain, such as sadness, depression and lethargy. The findings could lead to new, less addictive approaches to pain treatment.

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Inside a tumor: Purple bacteria visualize 'big eaters'

Scientists have shown that harmless purple bacteria (Rhodobacter) are capable of visualizing heterogeneity in tumors. With the aid of optoacoustic imaging, the researchers used these microorganisms to visualize macrophages (Greek for 'big eaters'), that also play a role in tumor development.

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Simple urine test allows for rapid diagnosis of preeclampsia

About one in 20 women develop preeclampsia during pregnancy, which can be life-threatening to both moms and babies. However, it is difficult to diagnose because symptoms often mimic those of a normal pregnancy, such as swelling and headaches. Now a new innovation may help start treatment sooner by quickly identifying preeclampsia with a simple urine test. In a new study, researchers developed a fa

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How the heart sends an SOS signal to bone marrow cells after a heart attack

Exosomes are key to the SOS signal that the heart muscle sends out after a heart attack. Exosomes in the bloodstream carry greatly increased amounts of heart-specific microRNAs — as seen in both mice and humans. These exosomes preferentially go to progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Inside those cells, the microRNAs turn off a specific gene that allows the progenitor cells to leave the bone marr

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Ultraprecise atomic clocks put Einstein’s special relativity to the test

Physics obeys the same rules no matter what direction you’re facing, a new experiment confirms.

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Geneticists push for a 5-year global ban on gene-edited babies

Prominent scientists are using the word “moratorium” to make it clear that experiments to create babies with altered genes are wrong, for now.

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Hidden compounds in many medications can trigger allergies

Analysis of 42,000 pill recipes shows nearly 93 percent have ingredients that may cause allergic reactions.

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Hydro power can generate more carbon dioxide than it saves

Whole system analysis finds hydro dams damage downstream ecosystems. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Concerns raised over ‘inactive’ pill ingredients

Bulking compounds in common meds can trigger allergies and coeliac reactions, researchers find. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Bronze Age skeleton evidence contaminated by agricultural run-off

Isotope data showing ancient humans travelled long distances may be the result of farmers using lime. Andrew Masterson reports.

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The 7 best Google Docs anonymous animals, ranked

Technology From the slimy blobfish to the mighty auroch, these are the most iconic digital creatures. When you view a doc anonymously, you’re assigned one of more than 70 animals. We ranked the best.

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Protected areas could help large herbivores bounce back after war

Large herbivore populations can substantially recover after war-induced declines, given that protected area management is provided, according to a study published March 13 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marc Stalmans of Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, and colleagues. But the community structure may take longer to restore, as the rate of recovery varies for different populations.

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Research predicts overlap of tunas, sharks and ships at sea

Maps that show where sharks and tunas roam in the eastern Pacific Ocean, and where fishing vessels travel in this vast expanse, could help ocean managers to identify regions of the high seas where vulnerable species may be at risk.

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Pärlband i magen bekämpar tuberkulos

Tuberkulos är en infektionssjukdom som främst påverkar lungorna. Den vanligaste behandlingen pågår i ett halvår och innefattar flera gram per dag av sammanlagt fyra olika slags antibiotika. Uppåt hälften av världens tuberkulospatienter har svårt att fullfölja en sådan behandling, vilket ökar risken för att bakterierna blir resistenta. Problemet är störst i fattiga länder med bristande sjukvård. Me

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Race, gender and age affect who writes majority opinions for state supreme courts

A new study provides evidence that the gender, age and race of state supreme court justices may influence whether they are asked to write the majority opinion in a case.

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Researchers investigate the impact of the statewide opioid crisis on teachers

When their family members struggle with substance use disorders, children bring experiences of neglect, trauma and often, mental health issues into the classroom, creating challenging environments for their teachers. Researchers at West Virginia University have evaluated the impact of the opioid crisis in classrooms across the Mountain State through a survey of 2,205 teachers in 49 counties.

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NASA Might Send Astronauts Around the Moon on Commercial Rocket

Private Ride NASA’s several-billion-dollar Space Launch System (SLS) is on thin ice. The culprit: the enticingly low-cost and high-performance rockets of its private industry competitors. At a Senate hearing today , NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine suggested that NASA might use a commercial rocket to boost its Orion crew capsule around the Moon in 2020. “We need to consider, as an agency, all o

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Defects help nanomaterial soak up more pollutant in less time

Cleaning pollutants from water with a defective filter sounds like a non-starter, but a recent study by chemical engineers at Rice University found that the right-sized defects helped a molecular sieve soak up more perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) in less time.

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'Virtual focus groups' uncover clues to rural and urban HPV vaccination disparities

Researchers have harnessed the power of social media to understand differences in attitudes and behaviors about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among hundreds of thousands of parents living in rural and urban areas.

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Parkinson's treatment delivers a power-up to brain cell 'batteries'

Scientists have gained clues into how a Parkinson's disease treatment, called deep brain stimulation, helps tackle symptoms.

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Most deaths in children aged 5 to 14 in India, China, Brazil, Mexico are preventable

Most deaths of children aged five to 14 in India, China, Brazil and Mexico arise from preventable or treatable conditions, suggests a new study.

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Artificial intelligence cuts lung cancer screening false positives

Right now, 96 percent of people who screen positive for lung cancer don't actually have a malignant growth. Machine learning can rule out cancer in a third of them, saving time, money and anxiety.

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Taking arts classes leads to better academic performance

A new study found a link between arts elective courses in music, dance, visual art and drama, and better grades in middle school. The study followed a large and diverse sample of preschool children up until they completed sixth, seventh and eighth grade.

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At 3,836 mph, which way does the air flow?

Aerospace engineers extend classical kinetic theory into high-speed aerodynamics, including hypersonic speed, which begins at 3,836 mph or roughly five times the speed of sound. The new study attempt to solve long-standing problems associated with high-speed aerodynamics.

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Pet Dog with Plague Exposed More Than 100 Veterinary Workers to the Disease

A sick dog in Colorado caused alarm at a veterinary hospital when doctors realized the animal was infected with a rare and deadly illness: the plague.

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Gene-Edited Soybean Oil Makes Restaurant Debut

A Minnesota-based company reports the sale of a soybean oil engineered to have greater stability and no trans-fat.

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Quasar jets confuse orbital telescope

Astrophysicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (LPI RAS), and NASA have found an error in the coordinates of active galactic nuclei measured by the Gaia space telescope, and helped correct it.

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Drug that prevents lung problems in older preemies also lowers costs

A drug given to nearly 10 percent of all pregnant women to prevent severe respiratory ailments in preterm babies also reduces healthcare costs, according to a new study by Columbia researchers.

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Parkinson's: Study reveals how cancer drug reduces toxic protein in brain

An analysis of trial results reveals the mechanism through which the cancer drug nilotinib increases brain dopamine in people with Parkinson's disease.

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Sealed Cache of Moon Rocks to Be Opened by NASA

A half-century ago, three containers of lunar samples were set aside, to await study by more advanced technology. Their time has come.

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A beginner’s guide to buying a motorcycle

Cars Picking the right ride can make all the difference. Know before you hit the showroom what kind of bike you're looking for.

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Google Play apps with 150 million installs contain aggressive adware

Google removes 210 apps after outside researchers report them as abusive.

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Spring statement policies look to Brexit and a hi-tech future

Chancellor promises a global Britain and announces funds for science and digital projects The chancellor outlined a package of measures at the spring statement designed to prepare Britain for life outside the EU, as well as for the hi-tech digital jobs of the future. Alongside the central update on the economy, other announcements made by Philip Hammond included: Continue reading…

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Bat flight model can inspire smarter, nimbler drones

Engineers at the University of British Columbia have captured the full complexity of bat flight in a three-dimensional computer model for the first time, potentially inspiring the future design of better drones and other aerial vehicles.

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WVU researchers investigate the impact of the statewide opioid crisis on teachers

Researchers at West Virginia University have evaluated the impact of the opioid crisis in classrooms across the Mountain State through a survey of 2,205 teachers in 49 counties.

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Amazon Removes Books About Dangerous “Autism Cures”

Willful Ignorance Amazon is cracking down on books purporting to teach parents how to “cure” autism. On Monday, a Wired story revealed that the e-retailer sells dozens of books boasting pseudoscientific — and often dangerous — “autism cures.” The next day, Amazon removed at least two of those books from its marketplace — an encouraging example of a tech powerhouse taking a stand against the sprea

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Understanding and controlling the molecule that made the universe

Trihydrogen, or H3+, is acknowledged by many scientists as the molecule that made the universe. Researchers employed high-speed lasers to shine a spotlight on the mechanisms that are key in H3+ creation and its unusual chemistry.

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Climate change could devastate painted turtles

Climate change could contribute to the demographic collapse of the painted turtle, a species that has temperature-dependent sex determination. A scientist is sounding the alarm about the painted turtle's future in a new study.

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ALMA observes the formation sites of solar-system-like planets

Researchers have spotted the formation sites of planets around a young star resembling our sun. Two rings of dust around the star, at distances comparable to the asteroid belt and the orbit of Neptune in our solar system, suggest that we are witnessing the formation of a planetary system similar to our own.

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Study offers clues for why birth control may fail

Women who get pregnant while using birth control may carry a gene that breaks down the hormones common in contraceptives, according to researchers in a new study.

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Science Couple Phages Out Superbug

Medical researcher Stephanie Strathdee needed to save the life of her husband, researcher Tom Patterson, when he contracted one of the world's worst infections. She turned to phage therapy: using a… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Science Couple Phages Out Superbug

Medical researcher Stephanie Strathdee needed to save the life of her husband, researcher Tom Patterson, when he contracted one of the world's worst infections. She turned to phage therapy: using a… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ethicist Warns: Future AI Could Take Revenge for How We Treat It Now

BattleBots Right now, the bulk of artificial intelligence systems are computer programs that are particularly good at spotting patterns within data. Sure, there are impressive robots out there, but they still have serious limitations . If machines become truly intelligent or sentient, an ethicist at Victoria University Wellington named Nicholas Agar is sharing a dire warning: future machines may

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Determining what binds to mucus

The human body is full of mucus. This viscous goo isn't just a nuisance that gets coughed up or sneezed out — it can bind to drugs, toxins or microbes, potentially impacting human health. However, relatively little is known about such interactions. Now, researchers say they have developed a new way of analyzing mucus binding that could lead to better drug development.

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Families and schools may play key roles in promoting adolescent self-confidence

Self-confidence is critical for teens as they prepare for the challenges of adulthood, and both families and schools may together play a vital role in boosting adolescents' confidence even in the face of difficulties with family, according to researchers.

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X-ray analysis of carbon nanostructures helps material design

Nanostructures made of carbon are extremely versatile: they can absorb ions in batteries and supercapacitors, store gases, and desalinate water. How well they cope with the task at hand depends largely on the structural features of the nanopores. A new study has now shown that structural changes that occur due to morphology transition with increasing temperature of the synthesis can also be measur

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Powering devices — with a desk lamp?

Batteries power most of our devices, and even some cars. But researchers now report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a step toward running electronic devices in homes and offices on the light coming from lamps scattered around the room. The team developed special light harvesters, like those used for solar power, optimized to produce energy from ambient indoor lighting.

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Trust more important than ecology to gain local support for conservation

Trust, transparency, communication, and fairness in the planning and management of conservation projects may be more important for gaining long-term local support than emphasizing ecological effectiveness, research has discovered.

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Tiny 'blinkers' enable simultaneous imaging of multiple biomolecules

In everyday life, blinking lights can send signals — for example, that a car is going to turn. Now, researchers have engineered tiny 'blinkers' that reveal single molecules of RNA or protein inside cells based on the duration and frequency of each flash. The research could allow scientists to see the locations of many different biomolecules in a cell simultaneously, possibly leading to better dia

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The power of gratitude in the workplace

The study shows that being thanked more often at work predicted better sleep, fewer headaches and healthier eating, because it improved nurses' work satisfaction.

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Could internet activity provide accurate in plant and animal conservation?

More than a quarter of the species in their dataset showed seasonal interest. For these seasonal species, the researchers found that the timing and amount of internet activity is a highly accurate measure of when and how the species is present. The team thinks it might be possible to measure changes in the presence and abundance of species simply by measuring internet activity.

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Verizon's 5G mobile service launches next month in Chicago and Minneapolis

Verizon on Wednesday announced plans to launch its 5G Ultra Wideband Network in Chicago and Minneapolis on April 11.

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The Aftermath Is a Superficial, War-Torn Love Story

The first shot of The Aftermath is a dispassionate view of an aerial attack, a bombing run that blows the city below into smithereens. The city is Hamburg, which was set ablaze in 1943 and lay in ruins after the end of World War II. But, disfigured by rubble, it could be mistaken for almost anywhere—just one way the director, James Kent, tries to convey the terrible might of the bombardment. When

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It's not your fault — Your brain is self-centered

You're in the middle of a conversation and suddenly turn away because you heard your name. While this 'cocktail party effect' of turning our attention toward self-related stimulation is well-known, scientist don't know if something similar happens inside our heads. By testing for 'self-referential bias' in working memory, Duke researchers are starting to understand how our brains make us naturally

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No super-Drosophila: Vinegar fly species have a good vision or olfaction, but not both

A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology has systematically studied and compared the eyes and antennae and the associated brain structures of more than 60 species of the genus Drosophila. They found a large variation, but at the same time a close correlation between the two sensory features. The size of the sensory organs is related to the behavior of the mate and ho

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Daily briefing: Black and Hispanic Americans breathe more than their fair share of deadly air pollution

Daily briefing: Black and Hispanic Americans breathe more than their fair share of deadly air pollution Daily briefing: Black and Hispanic Americans breathe more than their fair share of deadly air pollution, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00854-y White people make pollution, others breathe it in. Plus: nearly half of childhood cancer goes undiagnosed and 2D semiconductor

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New Acting FDA Commissioner Named

Ned Sharpless, director of the National Cancer Institute, will take over the job when Scott Gottlieb leaves next month — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Determining what binds to mucus

The human body is full of mucus. This viscous goo isn't just a nuisance that gets coughed up or sneezed out — it can bind to drugs, toxins or microbes, potentially impacting human health. However, relatively little is known about such interactions. Now, researchers say they have developed a new way of analyzing mucus binding that could lead to better drug development.

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Italy bans unvaccinated children from schools after measles outbreaks

As countries around the world grapple with rise of “anti-vax” sentiment, non-vaccinating parents in Italy face fines or their children being turned away from school

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Southwest States Make Large Strides on Renewable Energy Targets

New Mexico and Nevada are poised to enact far-reaching changes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A 'Bomb Cyclone' Is Thwacking The Central U.S.

The storm is bringing high winds, snow, rain and dangerous road conditions. Meteorologists and local officials are warning people across the West and Midwest to cancel travel plans. (Image credit: GOES-East/NOAA)

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Russian Scientists Used a Quantum Computer to Turn Back Time

Fall Back Russian scientists have apparently reversed the flow of time in an experiment they conducted on a quantum computer. The finding is unlikely to lead to a time machine that would work on people. But the team of physicists managed to restore IBM’s public quantum computer to the state it had been in just a moment earlier, according to research published Wednesday in the journal Nature Scien

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The Math That Tells Cells What They Are

In 1891, when the German biologist Hans Driesch split two-cell sea urchin embryos in half, he found that each of the separated cells then gave rise to its own complete, albeit smaller, larva. Somehow, the halves “knew” to change their entire developmental program: At that stage, the blueprint for what they would become had apparently not yet been drawn out, at least not in ink. Since then, scient

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Race, gender and age affect who writes majority opinions for state supreme courts

FINDINGS: Female justices are more likely to be assigned to write an opinion in general, but they are less likely to be selected to write the opinion if a case is considered complex.Both female and black justices are less likely to be selected to write the majority opinion as they get older while their non-minority male peers are selected for this task at higher rates with advancing age

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Verdens mindste robotter: En million robotter kravler rundt på en 10 centimeters wafer-plade

PLUS. Ved at bruge teknologi fra halvlederindustrien har Marc Miskin og hans kolleger fremstillet mikroskopiske robotter, der bevæger sig med platin og titan-ben og får energi fra solceller.

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Celebrate Pi Day and Brain Awareness Week with 3.14x Bonus in Eyewire on 3/14!

Thursday is March 14 AKA Pi Day! This week is also Brain Awareness Week , so we figured we’d go all out in honor of that organ that led us to pi in the first place. Celebrate ya boi Archimedes with 3.14x bonus starting as soon as the clock strikes midnight on 3/14/2019 and continuing until the Ides of March. There will be special surprise bonus for the top scoring player. Bonus will be awarded on

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Defects help nanomaterial soak up more pollutant in less time

Cleaning pollutants from water with a defective filter sounds like a non-starter, but a recent study by chemical engineers found that the right-sized defects helped a molecular sieve soak up more perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) in less time.

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Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe

Astronomers have discovered 83 quasars powered by supermassive black holes that were formed when the universe was only 5 percent of its current age.

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Artificial Intelligence Could Reduce False Positives In Lung Cancer Screenings

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Something to Crow About: The Rise of Conservation Genomics

Understanding the genomes of endangered species could help stop their slide toward extinction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Would You Move Back Into a Town Destroyed by a Volcano?

It has been nearly 11 years since the surprise eruption of Chaitén in Chile, one of the largest explosive eruptions in the 21st century. The volcano remained active for a full 3 years and the volcanic ash and debris would be washed down the river valleys during heavy rains. In the end, parts of the town of Chaitén would need to be abandoned due to the influx of debris from the eruption. Yet, only

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Google releases Lookout app for visually impaired and blind on Pixel 3 – CNET

The app uses AI to help low-vision users better interact with their environment.

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SPIE journal reports advances in use of 3D models in assessing coronary artery disease

In an article published in SPIE's Journal of Medical Imaging (JMI), researchers announce critical advances in the use of 3D-printed coronary phantoms with diagnostic software, further developing a non-invasive diagnostic method for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) risk assessment.

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How the heart sends an SOS signal to bone marrow cells after a heart attack

Exosomes are key to the SOS signal that the heart muscle sends out after a heart attack. Exosomes in the bloodstream carry greatly increased amounts of heart-specific microRNAs — as seen in both mice and humans. These exosomes preferentially go to progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Inside those cells, the microRNAs turn off a specific gene that allows the progenitor cells to leave the bone marr

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The Moral Center of Meritocracy Collapses

You are shocked— shocked— I know. According to the FBI, a network of 33 wealthy parents engaged in a massive fraud to buy places for their children at elite colleges. Didn’t they realize that there are many perfectly legal ways to do that? You can hire a legitimate college counselor for $10,000 and up. You can get test prep for anything from $120 to $375 an hour. You can buy personal coaches, fen

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Ointresse för e-böcker i handeln – tur nog finns biblioteken

E-böcker har idag ungefär fem procent av bokmarknaden. Ljudböcker är mer populära och ökar snabbare, men det finns långt fler e-böcker än ljudböcker på marknaden. Birgitta Wallin, universitetslektor i biblioteks- och informationsvetenskap, har undersökt distributörernas syn på e-böcker. Genom enkäter och intervjuer med bibliotek och bokhandlare, såväl fysiska som nätbaserade, framträder i huvudsa

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Defects help nanomaterial soak up more pollutant in less time

Cleaning pollutants from water with a defective filter sounds like a non-starter, but a recent study by chemical engineers found that the right-sized defects helped a molecular sieve soak up more perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) in less time.

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How marine snow cools the planet

Researchers have mapped out how carbonate formations formed from 'marine snow' have helped regulate Earth's temperature over 120 million years. Researchers also warn that global warming could result in the release of some of that carbon into the atmosphere.

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Gas heating ban for new homes from 2025

Climate change: fossil fuel burning will become a thing of the past for new homes

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Something to Crow About: The Rise of Conservation Genomics

Understanding the genomes of endangered species could help stop their slide toward extinction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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See the Robot Head That Might Interview You for Your Next Job

You’re Hired The next time you interview for a job, the recruiter you need to impress might not be human. Since October, Swedish recruitment agency TNG has been using an artificially intelligent robot head called Tengai to conduct test interviews in place of a human recruiter. Starting in May, the device will begin interviewing candidates for actual jobs with the goal of eliminating the biases hu

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Changes in rat size reveal habitat of 'Hobbit' hominin

A study of rat body sizes shifting over time gives a glimpse into the habitat of the mysterious hominin Homo floresiensis—nicknamed the "Hobbit" due to its diminutive stature.

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Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe

Astronomers from Japan, Taiwan and Princeton University have discovered 83 quasars powered by supermassive black holes in the distant universe, from a time when the universe was less than 10 percent of its present age.

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Top Universities Join to Push ‘Public Interest Technology’

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Physicists reverse time using quantum computer

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China may overtake the US with the best AI research in just two years

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China Is Catching Up to the US in AI Research–Fast

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Can artificial intelligence solve the mysteries of quantum physics?

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Artificial intelligence is going to control on-demand bus services in Japan

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The media shape public opinion about surrogacy and homosexuality

The media play a key role in informing society and at the same time an important role in shaping perceptions and judgements about social issues, particularly concerning issues on which there is insufficient knowledge and/or a lack of experience. For example, one issue that is beginning to arouse public debate about which most audiences do not have any direct experience is the matter of surrogacy o

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Defects help nanomaterial soak up more pollutant in less time

Cleaning pollutants from water with a defective filter sounds like a non-starter, but a recent study by chemical engineers at Rice University found that the right-sized defects helped a molecular sieve soak up more perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) in less time.

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Changes in rat size reveal habitat of 'Hobbit' hominin

A study of rat body sizes shifting over time gives a glimpse into the habitat of the mysterious hominin Homo floresiensis — nicknamed the 'Hobbit' due to its diminutive stature.

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The College-Admissions Scandal and the Warped Fantasy of the American Scam

One of the heavily populated tags on New York magazine’s website, its pieces collected on a page featuring a large and varied group of stories, is “Summer of Scam.” The tag—it derives from the nickname given to the scam-addled summer of 2018—includes stories about Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos, about the “ unrivaled grifter Anna Delvey ,” about the “ Portofino pirate ,” about a scheme thieves dre

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Pilots Were Worried About Boeing 737 Max Before Deadly Crash

Grounded Boeing has a lot of questions to answer. Its 737 Max passenger jetliner was supposed to provide more comfort for passengers and better fuel efficiency. But the plane’s reputation has been tarnished by two recent crashes that have captured international attention: October’s Flight 61, operated by Indonesian airline Lion Air and which killed 189 , and a second crash only four months later

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Martian meteorites land at Army lab

NASA officials say that some rare and distinct meteorites found on Earth were actually blasted off Mars by a large impact event. One such rock from the red planet made its way to an Army laboratory recently for a special X-ray look inside.

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Fingerprints, revisited

For more than a century, forensic scientists have linked criminals to crime scenes through the distinctive loops and whorls on their fingertips. But now, researchers are moving beyond simple pattern comparisons to glean more information from fingerprints. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, chemical analysis and D

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ICE is tapping into a huge license-plate database, ACLU says, raising new privacy concerns about surveillance

Federal immigration agents have relied on a nationwide license-plate database to help find and investigate immigrants, according to new documents released Wednesday by the American Civil Liberties …

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Träden är hem för många hotade arter

Att träden är så betydelsefulla som värdväxter beror bland annat på att de är långlivade, storvuxna och att de kan erbjuda en mängd olika livsmiljöer på – och inuti – sina olika delar. Under senare år har två trädarter drabbats av sjukdomar. Almar hotas av en svampinfektion som ger upphov till almsjuka. Det är en dödlig sjukdom som sprids från träd till träd av en barkborrande skalbagge. Ask drabb

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Internal Docs Show How ICE Gets Surveillance Help From Local Cops

Documents obtained by the ACLU show how ICE uses unofficial channels to access billions of license plate location data points—including some sanctuary cities.

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'Captain Marvel' Shows How Trolls Lost Their Edge

They've been trying to sabotage the movie's success from the beginning. Their failure proves they're played out.

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These New Technologies Could Make Interstellar Travel Real

Long considered science fiction, leaving the solar system and speeding amid the stars may soon be within reach.

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Kinesisk database over 1,8 millioner kvinder og deres frugtbarhed lå frit tilgængelig

En kinesisk database med informationer om 1,8 millioner kvinder, inklusive deres adresser, telefonnumre, alder, og hvorvidt de er klar til at få børn, lå frit tilgængelig på internettet

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Ny plan giver asfalt 53 milliarder – skinner får 15

Nye projekter udgør 68 milliarder kroner i regeringen og Dansk Folkepartis investeringsplan for dansk transport, der ellers tæller over 112 milliarder kroner.

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Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe

Astronomers from Japan, Taiwan and Princeton University have discovered 83 quasars powered by supermassive black holes that were formed when the universe was only 5 percent of its current age.

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ALMA observes the formation sites of solar-system-like planets

Researchers have spotted the formation sites of planets around a young star resembling our sun. Two rings of dust around the star, at distances comparable to the asteroid belt and the orbit of Neptune in our solar system, suggest that we are witnessing the formation of a planetary system similar to our own.

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Astronomers discover 83 supermassive black holes in the early universe

A team of astronomers has discovered 83 quasars powered by supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the early universe. This increases the number of black holes known at that epoch considerably, and reveals, for the first time, how common SMBHs were early in the universe's history.

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Blunting pain's emotional component

Pain researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown in rodents that they can block receptors on brain cells that appear to be responsible for the negative emotions associated with pain, such as sadness, depression and lethargy. The findings could lead to new, less addictive approaches to pain treatment.

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Cardiovascular disease in China

This study analyzed data from the Global Burden of Disease Study to look at the rate of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in China along with death and disability from CVD from 1990 to 2016. The proportion of people in the population with CVD increased 14.7 percent during that time from 5,265 per 100,000 to 6,037 per 100,000 with nearly 94 million cases in 2016.

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Study examines use of video-assisted surgery for known, suspected lung cancer in VA

A video-assisted thoracoscopic lung resection is a minimally invasive surgical procedure to remove part of a lung in patients with known or suspected lung cancer. This study used Veterans Affairs data for about 11,000 veterans who had lung resections from 2002 to 2015 to examine adoption of the procedure. There were 7,095 open lung resections and 3,909 video-assisted thorascopic resections.

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NIH study reveals differences in brain activity in children with anhedonia

Researchers have identified changes in brain connectivity and brain activity during rest and reward anticipation in children with anhedonia, a condition where people lose interest and pleasure in activities they used to enjoy. The study, by scientists at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), part of the National Institutes of Health, sheds light on brain function associated with anhedoni

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Interdisciplinary education helps hospital patients better understand their medications

Patients understanding their medications and taking them as instructed are important parts of improving the care and outcomes of heart attack patients, as well as potentially reducing avoidable readmissions, according to research presented at the ACC Quality Summit in New Orleans.

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National survey of emergency department management of self-harm highlights successes, room for improvement

In a study published March 13 in JAMA Psychiatry, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital describe the results of a national survey to evaluate how frequently evidence-based management practices are used in EDs when treating patients who present for self-harm.

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One Way to Stop College-Admissions Insanity: Admit More Students

On Tuesday, dozens of parents—actresses, hedge-fund managers, doctors—were charged by federal prosecutors for their alleged role in a bribery scheme that cleared the way for students to get into selective colleges. Some parents are accused of cheating on the ACT or SAT, bribing test proctors to let someone else take the test for students to make sure they got the right score to get in. Other pare

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Scientists on making the Large Hadron Collider safer

An international research team headed by Evgeniy Talantsev, a senior research fellow at the Research and Educational Center of Ural Federal University, has approached the task of increasing the reliability of such complex and expensive facilities as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The results of the experiment were published in the journal Scientific Reports in an article titled "The onset of dis

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New sensor system safeguards fuel quality at hydrogen filling stations

Fuel cell vehicles need hydrogen to operate, but that hydrogen has to be free of any contaminants that could damage the fuel cell. Professor Andreas Schütze and his research team at Saarland University are collaborating with research partners to develop a sensor system that can provide continuous in situ monitoring of hydrogen quality at hydrogen fuelling stations. The infrared measuring cell will

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New cell subtypes classified in mouse brain

It's been estimated that the human brain contains roughly 100 billion neurons, together completing countless tasks through countless connections. So how do we make sense of the roles each of these neurons play? As part of the United States BRAIN Initiative, scientists from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have outlined a way to classify neurons based not only on how they look, but on with whic

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New cell subtypes classified in mouse brain

It's been estimated that the human brain contains roughly 100 billion neurons, together completing countless tasks through countless connections. So how do we make sense of the roles each of these neurons play? As part of the United States BRAIN Initiative, scientists from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have outlined a way to classify neurons based not only on how they look, but on with whic

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US Navy Struggling to Deal With an Onslaught of Hackers

Submarine Screen Door According to a new internal review, the U.S. Navy is being overwhelmed by a wave of hacks and cyberattacks. The problem is so bad — and the Navy’s cybersecurity so inadequate— that the Navy doesn’t even know how much sensitive information has been stolen, according to The Wall Street Journal , which reviewed the 57-page internal report. “We are under siege,” a senior Navy to

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On board the canoe that proved ancient Polynesians could cross the Pacific

Technology Excerpt: Sea People: The Puzzle of Polynesia In the 1970s the Polynesian Voyaging Society built and launched a Polynesian voyaging canoe with the intention of sailing it from Hawai‘i to Tahiti using only…

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There May Be 50 Billion Rogue Planets in Our Galaxy

People used to argue about whether planets like the eight (or more) in our solar system were rare. Starting in the 1990s with the discovery of the first exoplanets, it became clear planets are common around other stars. Now, a new simulation suggests there could be as many as 50 billion rogue planets. The post There May Be 50 Billion Rogue Planets in Our Galaxy appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Determining what binds to mucus

The human body is full of mucus. This viscous goo isn't just a nuisance that gets coughed up or sneezed out—it can bind to drugs, toxins or microbes, potentially impacting human health. However, relatively little is known about such interactions. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Biomacromolecules say they have developed a new way of analyzing mucus binding that could lead to better drug developm

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Where did the Moon come from? A new theory | Sarah T. Stewart

The Earth and Moon are like identical twins, made up of the exact same materials — which is really strange, since no other celestial bodies we know of share this kind of chemical relationship. What's responsible for this special connection? Looking for an answer, planetary scientist and MacArthur "Genius" Sarah T. Stewart discovered a new kind of astronomical object — a synestia — and a new way

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Research finds simple urine test allows for rapid diagnosis of preeclampsia

About one in 20 women develop preeclampsia during pregnancy, which can be life-threatening to both moms and babies. However, it is difficult to diagnose because symptoms often mimic those of a normal pregnancy, such as swelling and headaches. Now a new innovation may help start treatment sooner by quickly identifying preeclampsia with a simple urine test. In a new study, researchers at The Ohio St

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Discovery of how organs form helps researchers to develop future diabetes treatments

In a new study, researchers at the University of Copenhagen show that the development of a certain type of immature stem cells — also known as progenitor cells — depends on the quantity of a special protein and interaction with other cells in the body. The new study has just been published in the scientific journal Developmental Cell.

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Mobilizing the lymphatic system may help combat obesity-induced metabolic syndrome

Recently, investigators have been exploring whether they can engage the lymphatic system to help regulate obesity-induced inflammation of fat (adipose) tissue and restore systemic metabolic fitness. In a study appearing in The American Journal of Pathology researchers report that augmenting lymphatic vessel formation in obese adipose tissue via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-D) signaling

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Climate change could devastate painted turtles, according to new study

Climate change could contribute to the demographic collapse of the painted turtle, a species that has temperature-dependent sex determination. An Iowa State University scientist is sounding the alarm about the painted turtle's future in a new study.

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Researchers explore link between metal exposure and Parkinson's symptoms

A new study from an Iowa State University biomedical researcher describes the biological process that causes Parkinson's-like symptoms to develop following exposure to the metal manganese. The new research, published in the journal Science Signaling, could lead to earlier detection of Parkinson's disease and better outcomes for patients.

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Largest carbon dioxide sink in renewable forests

Forests are the filters of our Earth: they clean the air, remove dust particles, and produce oxygen. So far, the rain forest in particular has been considered the 'green lung' of our planet. Yet, an international team, including researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, recently found that the world's largest carbon sinks are located in young, regrowing forests. The results are published i

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Understanding and controlling the molecule that made the universe

Trihydrogen, or H3+, is acknowledged by scientists as the molecule that made the universe. In recent issues of Nature Communications and the Journal of Chemical Physics, Michigan State University researchers employed high-speed lasers to shine a spotlight on the mechanisms that are key in H3+ creation and its unusual chemistry.

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We should cautiously welcome use of a form of ketamine for depression

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved a form of ketamine for use in treatment-resistant depression. While there are unknowns, it is a welcome move, says Celia Morgan

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Pangolins set new world record… but no one is celebrating

What is the fastest thing on four legs? Which is the world's smallest mammal? How much did an elephant bird's egg weigh? When I was a child, I was fascinated by this kind of animal fact. And still am, if I'm honest. Inevitably, there was a mild obsession with record-breakers. Who doesn't love a bat the size of a bumblebee? Or a whale with a tongue the size of a small car? Or a falcon that can plum

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FILMAD FÖRELÄSNING: När de inre ljuden stör

När de inre ljuden stör – en föreläsning av Jonas Brännström om tinnitus, hörselnedsättning och kognitiv prestation

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Efter svensk eksplosion kører danske gasbusser ufortrødent videre

Flere danske trafikselskaber ser gasbusser som både grønne og sikre alternativer til dieselbusserne, og mener ikke, at der er grund til at frygte ulykker som i Stockholm.

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Some human cells can ‘slingshot’ themselves

Some human cells use a slingshot motion to move forward and travel five times faster than previously documented, according to a new study. Researchers observed this for the first time in bioengineered 3D scaffolds that model stromal tissue—the connective tissue that surrounds organs—and say the spread of cancer could involve this type of cell movement. Further, the researchers say they could pote

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Caterpillars take in haze and sustain damage

Haze affects the survival and development of butterflies, report biologists. The burning of regional peat forests to clear land for agriculture causes a large-scale air pollution issue called the Southeast Asia (SEA) transboundary haze. Apart from causing economic losses for countries in this region, the haze is also hazardous to human health. The smoke causing the haze contains harmful gases (e.

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Neural networks predict planet mass

To find out how planets form, astrophysicists run complicated and time-consuming computer calculations. Members of the NCCR PlanetS at the University of Bern have now developed a totally novel approach to speed up this process dramatically. They use deep learning based on artificial neural networks, a method that is well known in image recognition.

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Pangolins set new world record… but no one is celebrating

What is the fastest thing on four legs? Which is the world's smallest mammal? How much did an elephant bird's egg weigh? When I was a child, I was fascinated by this kind of animal fact. And still am, if I'm honest. Inevitably, there was a mild obsession with record-breakers. Who doesn't love a bat the size of a bumblebee? Or a whale with a tongue the size of a small car? Or a falcon that can plum

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Researchers unravel mysteries of Earth's inner core

Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) are unlocking some of the secrets of the Earth's inner core by adapting and further developing a technique used in hospitals around the world.

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Uncoupling the link between snake venom and prey

What was fast-becoming received wisdom among herpetologists, namely that snake venom composition normally reflects the variety of their prey, has been disproved in one common species of North American rattlesnake.

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Remarkable letter reveals earthquake drama for nuns in exile

Traveling around Europe in search of a new home after the dissolution of the monasteries must have been dramatic enough for England's oldest community of Bridgettine nuns. But a remarkable newly-catalogued letter shows they also experienced another harrowing event – the Great Lisbon Earthquake of 1755.

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Russia Blocks Access to ProtonMail

Access Denied The Russian Federal Security Service just ordered internet providers to block several internet addresses, including servers for the encrypted email service ProtonMail and some of the connections necessary to run the censorship-dodging browser Tor. The internet service providers complied, and while Russian ProtonMail users can currently access their inbox, they can neither send nor r

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Uncoupling the link between snake venom and prey

What was fast-becoming received wisdom among herpetologists, namely that snake venom composition normally reflects the variety of their prey, has been disproved in one common species of North American rattlesnake.

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Breaking down plastic degradation

Imagine these three items on the table in front of you: a torn rain jacket, a leaky ballpoint pen and an empty sandwich bag.

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Understanding global trauma systems — OTA International looks at current status, future needs

National trauma systems play a critical role in improving survival and reducing disability from musculoskeletal and other injuries. An update on trauma systems around the world — and priorities for developing and standardizing care in lower- and higher-income countries — is presented in a supplement to OTA International, open-access journal of the Orthopaedic Trauma Association. The journal is p

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Understanding and controlling the molecule that made the universe

Trihydrogen, or H3+, is acknowledged by scientists as the molecule that made the universe. In recent issues of Nature Communications and the Journal of Chemical Physics, Michigan State University researchers employed high-speed lasers to shine a spotlight on the mechanisms that are key in H3+ creation and its unusual chemistry.

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Inside a tumor: Purple bacteria visualize 'big eaters'

A team of scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, the Juelich Research Center, the Technical University of Munich and the Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf has shown that harmless purple bacteria (Rhodobacter) are capable of visualizing heterogeneity in tumors. With the aid of optoacoustic imaging, the researchers used these microorganisms to visualize macrophages (Greek for 'big eater

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New cell subtypes classified in mouse brain

An international team has created a new way to classify neurons in the mouse brain. The approach is revealing new brain cell subtypes even while bringing the BRAIN Initiative closer to its goal of comprehensively mapping a whole brain.

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Families and schools may play key roles in promoting adolescent self-confidence

Self-confidence is critical for teens as they prepare for the challenges of adulthood, and both families and schools may together play a vital role in boosting adolescents' confidence even in the face of difficulties with family, according to researchers.

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Determining what binds to mucus

The human body is full of mucus. This viscous goo isn't just a nuisance that gets coughed up or sneezed out — it can bind to drugs, toxins or microbes, potentially impacting human health. However, relatively little is known about such interactions. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Biomacromolecules say they have developed a new way of analyzing mucus binding that could lead to better drug devel

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Neural networks predict planet mass

To find out how planets form astrophysicists run complicated and time consuming computer calculations. Members of the NCCR PlanetS at the University of Bern have now developed a totally novel approach to speed up this process dramatically. They use deep learning based on artificial neural networks, a method that is well known in image recognition.

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Powering devices — with a desk lamp?

Batteries power most of our devices, and even some cars. But researchers now report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a step toward running electronic devices in homes and offices on the light coming from lamps scattered around the room. The team developed special light harvesters, like those used for solar power, optimized to produce energy from ambient indoor lighting.

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X-ray analysis of carbon nanostructures helps material design

Nanostructures made of carbon are extremely versatile: they can absorb ions in batteries and supercapacitors, store gases, and desalinate water. How well they cope with the task at hand depends largely on the structural features of the nanopores. A new study from the HZB has now shown that structural changes that occur due to morphology transition with increasing temperature of the synthesis can a

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'Virtual focus groups' uncover clues to rural and urban HPV vaccination disparities

Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and Dartmouth College have harnessed the power of social media to understand differences in attitudes and behaviors about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among hundreds of thousands of parents living in rural and urban areas. Their findings were presented at the Society for Behavioral Medicine's 40th annual meeting in Wash

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F.D.A. Moves to Restrict Flavored E-Cigarette Sales to Teenagers

The agency spells out its proposal to require retailers to wall off sections of stores to limit access, a move opposed by many convenience stores.

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Meet Some Robots with a Softer Touch

Meet Some Robots with a Softer Touch Researchers embrace the wobbliness of soft materials to make squishy robots. soft-walker.gif Image credits: Katia Bertoldi, Harvard University Technology Wednesday, March 13, 2019 – 10:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — When you think of robots you probably picture something made of cold hard metal, or maybe smooth plastic armor. But what about a so

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Kritisk ph.d. ændrer ikke myndighedernes syn på HPV-vacciner

Ny ph.d.-afhandling konkluderer, at HPV-vaccinen virker, men også øger risikoen for alvorlige nervesystemskadevirkninger. Der er dog tale om »tilfældige fund«, der ikke rokker ved myndighedernes tillid til vaccinerne, siger Lægemiddelstyrelsen.

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Sneaking Proteins Into Cells

Now here’s a weird and rather startling paper . One of the things that people in this line of work spend a lot of time on is getting things into living cells. Small molecules often slide in, one way or another (although, to be honest, our detailed understanding of how they do that could use some work). But full-sized proteins? Not so much. There are active transport pathways that can bring such t

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Does PTSD put 9/11 responders at risk of dementia?

There may be a link between chronic PTSD in 9/11 responders and neurodegeneration, a pilot study finds. The physical and cognitive health of 9/11 World Trade Center responders remains a concern for healthcare professionals who care for the thousands of responders, many of whom continue to experience conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. The study tested neuronal biomarkers in the pla

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Hepatitis B vaccination in preadolescents lowered the disease incidence rate in Catalonia

Introducing hepatitis B vaccine in preadolescents meant a decline in the disease incidence rate by 52 percent according to a study in which the University of Barcelona took part. The study analyzed the efficiency and impact of the vaccination program set in Catalonia, Spain, 21 years ago. The results show that after introducing the program, the incidence rate in general population went from 2.5 pe

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On-the-spot genome analysis

By fine-tuning how algorithms carve up DNA data, Garvan researchers have made it possible to do genomic analysis on a smartphone.

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Easier nicotine vaping product access likely to improve health and reduce health costs

Easier access to e-cigarettes containing nicotine is highly likely to lead to health gains and cost savings in the health sector, Australian and New Zealand researchers have found. The research modeled what would happen if the number of people in New Zealand who vape increased due to greater access to nicotine-containing e-cigarettes compared to current patterns of use. Researchers say the results

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Chickens Peck Intruder Fox to Death, Because They're Dinosaurs

One fox learned the hard way that it's unwise to mess with a herd of dinosaurs.

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On-the-spot genome analysis

The ability to read the genome—all the DNA of an organism—has vast potential to understand human health and disease.

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On-the-spot genome analysis

The ability to read the genome—all the DNA of an organism—has vast potential to understand human health and disease.

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Gorgeous Hubble Photo Gives Glimpse of Milky Way's Fate

A new image from the venerable Hubble Space Telescope shows what happens when two galaxies collide — an experience our own Milky Way will have in a few billion years.

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Resistive plate chambers as neutron detectors

Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are being developed as detectors for neutrons as part of SINE2020. Luís Margato, Andrey Morozov and Alberto Blanco from LIP Coimbra in Portugal have been working on the project. Here is what they have done.

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Trust more important than ecology to gain local support for conservation

Trust, transparency, communication, and fairness in the planning and management of conservation projects may be more important for gaining long-term local support than emphasizing ecological effectiveness, UBC-led research has discovered.

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How marine snow cools the planet

University of Sydney scientists have modelled how carbonate accumulation from 'marine snow' in oceans has absorbed carbon dioxide over millennia and been a key driver in keeping the planet cool for millions of years.

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Perceptions about social demographic motivates parents to choose Free Schools

Perceptions about the social mix and environment of local mainstream schools motivate parents to choose Free Schools for their children, a new study published in the Cambridge Journal of Education finds. A 'traditional' approach to education and smaller class sizes also make such schools more appealing to parents.

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Boeing 737 MAX 8 pilots voiced safety concerns before Ethiopia crash

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Trust more important than ecology to gain local support for conservation

Trust, transparency, communication, and fairness in the planning and management of conservation projects may be more important for gaining long-term local support than emphasizing ecological effectiveness, UBC-led research has discovered.

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Team Rick Isn't Giving Up Yet | Gold Rush

After coming up just short on their season goal, Team Rick is determined to find more gold before winter. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twit

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Watching for 'bright lines' during the Trump presidency

For the past year and a half, Bright Line Watch, a non-partisan group of political scientists, has been surveying the American public and their colleagues in academia in an effort to gauge the health of the nation's democracy. Over that time period, the watchdog group, which includes University of Rochester political science professor Gretchen Helmke, has published regular updates based on their q

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LS2 report: rejuvenation for the antiproton decelerator

The Antiproton Decelerator (AD), sometimes known as the Antimatter Factory, is the world's largest source of antimatter and has been operational since 2000. Here, antiprotons are slowed down and sent into the experiments, where they are combined with antielectrons to produce the most basic antiatom: that of antihydrogen. Over the course of the second long shutdown of CERN's accelerator complex (LS

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The better batteries that will power your phone—and a green future

It's a difficult choice: Go hungry or go it alone.

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China Is Catching Up to the US in AI Research–Fast

Chinese researchers publish more papers about artificial intelligence than their US counterparts. A new study finds the quality of Chinese research is improving too.

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Photos of Ordinary Objects Sliced in Half With a Water Jet

Inventor Mike Warren uses a 60,000-psi water Jet to reveal the cross-sections of ordinary objects.

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Trust more important than ecology to gain local support for conservation

Trust, transparency, communication, and fairness in the planning and management of conservation projects may be more important for gaining long-term local support than emphasizing ecological effectiveness, UBC-led research has discovered.

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Avocado seed extract shows promise as anti-inflammatory compound

An extract from the seeds of avocados exhibited anti-inflammatory properties in a laboratory study, according to Penn State researchers, and it represents a potential source for novel anti-inflammatory compounds that could be developed as a functional food ingredient or pharmaceuticals.

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How marine snow cools the planet

Researchers at the University of Sydney have mapped out how carbonate formations formed from 'marine snow' have helped regulate Earth's temperature over 120 million years. Dr Andria Dutkiewicz warns that global warming could release some of that carbon into the atmosphere.

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Hematopoietic stem cells: Making blood thicker than water

An Osaka University-led team revealed that Ragnase-1 is a key regulator of the self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Knockout of this gene in mice resulted in aberrant blood cell composition and hematopoiesis, and caused health-related outcomes such as low hemoglobin, enlarged spleen, and early death. This insight into blood cell homeostasis and differentiati

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Machine learning tracks moving cells

Scientists can now study the migration of label-free cells at unprecedented resolution, a feat with applications across biology, disease research, and drug development.

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The End of the Cult of Sympathy for Theresa May

LONDON —When Theresa May took to the dispatch box to stage yet another—ultimately futile—defense of her Brexit deal before the House of Commons, she was barely audible. The British prime minister had lost her voice. Observers described the scene as “ painful ” and “ awful to watch .” Even those who stood to contest her deal couldn’t help but express some sympathy. “Most of us when we’re unwell ca

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China may overtake the US with the best AI research in just two years

The number of influential AI research papers coming from China is increasing rapidly, a data analysis shows.

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IBM Introduces ‘Quantum Volume’ to Track Progress Towards the Quantum Age

Quantum computing companies are racing to squeeze ever more qubits into their devices, but is this really a solid sign of progress? IBM is proposing a more holistic measure it calls “quantum volume” (QV) that it says gives a better indication of how close we are to practical devices. Creating quantum computers that can solve real-world problems will require devices many times larger than those we

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Vad utrotade jättehajen?

För några miljoner år sedan fanns det en haj med artnamnet megalodon som var 18 meter lång och vägde 60 ton.

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Scientists take a deep dive into the imperfect world of 2-D materials

Nothing is perfect, or so the saying goes, and that's not always a bad thing. In a study at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), scientists learned how nanoscale defects can enhance the properties of an ultrathin, so-called 2-D material.

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Machine learning tracks moving cells

Both developing babies and elderly adults share a common characteristic: the many cells making up their bodies are always on the move. As we humans commute to work, cells migrate through the body to get their jobs done. Biologists have long struggled to quantify the movement and changing morphology of cells through time, but now, scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Gradua

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Scientists Just Came Closer Than Ever to Cloning a Woolly Mammoth

Cool Discovery In 2011, researchers discovered the frozen body of a woolly mammoth in Siberian permafrost. Now, a team of Japanese scientists has coaxed biological reactions from the mammoth’s 28,000-year-old cells — making it more likely than ever that we could one day bring the extinct species back from the dead. Active Cells In a paper published Monday in the journal Scientific Reports , the t

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What every rider needs to know about their motorcycle carburetor

DIY Understanding how each part works is the key to tuning. The first part of tuning a carburetor is understanding what each part does. In this episode of MC Garage we talk about carburetors.

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Can smarter forest buffer strips along streams help to mitigate climate change?

Forests are important components of the global climate system, taking up large amounts of carbon. Yet, part of this carbon is lost to inland waters and emitted back to the atmosphere as greenhouse gases. Recent research indicates the importance of forest management along streams for such emissions. Supported by new research funding, Marcus Klaus is now seeking to understand how forestry related gr

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Facebook's cryptocurrency: a financial expert breaks it down

Facebook is reportedly preparing to launch its own version of Bitcoin, for use in its messaging applications, WhatsApp, Messenger and Instagram. Could this "Facecoin" be the long-awaited breakthrough by a global technology giant into the lucrative market for retail financial services? Or will it be yet another exaggerated "crypto" project, buying into the continuing excitement about decentralised

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Chemical storage of renewable energies

In 2050, 80 percent of the electric power in Germany has to be based on renewable resources. To reach this goal, it is required to store electric power in the form of chemical energy carriers. Within the priority program "Catalysts and Reactors under Dynamic Conditions for Energy Storage and Conversion" (SPP 2080, DynaKat) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), twelve big research consort

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Protection for high seas is crucial to safeguarding vulnerable coastal communities—new research

Key areas of the Indian Ocean, Bay of Bengal and the Pacific should be designated protected areas in order to safeguard vulnerable coastal communities' livelihoods, new research published this week reveals.

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Becoming more like WhatsApp won't solve Facebook's woes – here's why

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg declared last week that the company would shift away from open networks that embody "the town square" towards private, encrypted services that are more like "the digital equivalent of the living room".

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Robot learns to feed folks dinner

A new robotic system can help make eating easier for people who need assistance, according to new research. After identifying different foods on a plate, the robot can strategize how to use a fork to pick up and deliver the desired bite to a person’s mouth. About 1 million adults in the United States need someone to help them eat, a time-consuming and often awkward task, one largely done out of n

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Ny viden om organers udvikling fører stamcelleforskere på sporet af fremtidige diabetes- og kræftbehandlinger

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet beskriver i et nyt studie, at en bestemt type stamcellers…

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New method to assess platelet health could help ER doctors

Researchers have created a novel system that can measure platelet function within two minutes and can help doctors determine which trauma patients might need a blood transfusion upon being admitted to a hospital.

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Investigation of the origin of heavy elements

Atomic physicists working on nuclear fusion research succeeded in computing the world's highest accuracy atomic data of neodymium ions which is used in analysis of the light from a binary neutron star merger. This research accelerates studies of a long-standing mystery about the cosmic origins of heavy elements.

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This Is a Truly Lousy Experiment About Evolution

“Believing that it is always best to study some special group, I have, after deliberation, taken up domestic pigeons,” wrote one Charles Darwin in On the Origin of Species . Four years earlier, Darwin had taken to raising pigeons in his own dovecote , hobnobbing with other pigeon fanciers, and carefully measuring the birds. In the diverse breeds , with their fantails, feather-duster feet, and fri

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ATLAS Experiment releases first result with full LHC Run 2 dataset

Could a Grand Unified Theory resolve the remaining mysteries of the Standard Model? If verified, it would provide an elegant description of the unification of Standard Model forces at very high energies, and might even explain the existence of dark matter and neutrino masses. Physicists at the ATLAS Experiment at CERN are searching for evidence of new heavy particles predicted by such theories, in

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Report: Despite being skilled producers, Danish farmers face poorer conditions than their European counterparts

AGRICULTURE Danish farmers are good at exploiting their productive potential, but higher production costs make it difficult for them to compete with other EU nations. This, according to a number of conclusions in a University of Copenhagen report that analyzes financial data from 80,000 farms across Europe.

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Perceptions about social demographic motivates parents to choose Free Schools

Perceptions about the social mix and environment of local mainstream schools motivate parents to choose Free Schools for their children, a new study published in the Cambridge Journal of Education finds. A 'traditional' approach to education and smaller class sizes also make such schools more appealing to parents.

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Physicists proposed fast method for printing nanolasers from rerovskites

International research team developed a new method of synthesizing miniature light sources. It is based on a special laser producing millions of nanolasers from a perovskite film in a few minutes. Such lasers look like small disks, work at room temperature and have an tunable emission wavelength from 550 to 800 nm. The high speed and good reproducibility of this method make it promising for the in

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Spine evaluation is critical to reduce dislocations in revision total hip arthroplasty

A new assessment tool before revision hip replacement surgery has significantly reduced the rate of recurrent dislocations compared to a standard evaluation, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery.

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Review of noise impacts on marine mammals yields new policy recommendations

Marine mammals are particularly sensitive to noise pollution because they rely on sound for so many essential functions, including communication, navigation, finding food, and avoiding predators. An expert panel has now published a comprehensive assessment of the available science on how noise exposure affects hearing in marine mammals, providing scientific recommendations for noise exposure crite

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The weirdest things we learned this week: 40,000 vanishing pigeons and the science of poodle haircuts

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s hit podcast.

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Twitter's revamped camera is its answer to Stories

There were rumors flying around recently of Twitter working on a "News Camera," which would bring a Stories-style feature to the social network. And, well, it turns out that's …

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It will be 'snowing' nitrogen on Pluto for the next century

A 30-year study of Pluto’s nitrogen atmosphere suggests it has reached maximum pressure and will now start to form 'snow'

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The best image-recognition AIs are fooled by slightly rotated images

Driverless cars have a problem – rotations of an object fool the best image recognition AIs, which may mean confusing a tin for a truck on the road

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Flight of the jellyfish, eel and barnacle along the California coast

Marine biologist Jacqueline Sones was strolling along a beach near this Northern California fishing village one foggy summer morning when she spotted an unfamiliar jellyfish bobbing in the surf.

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Flight of the jellyfish, eel and barnacle along the California coast

Marine biologist Jacqueline Sones was strolling along a beach near this Northern California fishing village one foggy summer morning when she spotted an unfamiliar jellyfish bobbing in the surf.

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Quantum-critical conductivity of the Dirac fluid in graphene

Graphene is expected to behave like a quantum-critical, relativistic plasma known as "Dirac fluid" near charge neutrality in which massless electrons and holes rapidly collide. In a recent study now published in Science, Patrick Gallagher and co-workers at the departments of physics and materials science in the U.S., Taiwan, China and Japan used on-chip terahertz spectroscopy and measured the freq

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Publisher Correction: β-Synuclein-reactive T cells induce autoimmune CNS grey matter degeneration

Publisher Correction: β-Synuclein-reactive T cells induce autoimmune CNS grey matter degeneration Publisher Correction: β-Synuclein-reactive T cells induce autoimmune CNS grey matter degeneration, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1047-0 Publisher Correction: β-Synuclein-reactive T cells induce autoimmune CNS grey matter degeneration

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The power of gratitude in the workplace

The study shows that being thanked more often at work predicted better sleep, fewer headaches and healthier eating, because it improved nurses' work satisfaction.

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Watching for 'bright lines' during the Trump presidency

For the past year and a half, Bright Line Watch, a non-partisan group of political scientists, has been surveying the American public and exports to gauge the state of the nation's democracy. Possibly most worrisome, they find that the president's supporters and detractors are increasingly drawing conclusions about the health of the US democracy that are 'not merely disconnected, but reflect an in

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Designing next-generation optical antennas

Antennas catch radio waves, a form of electromagnetic radiation, from the air and convert the energy into electrical signals that feed modern telecommunications. They can also convert electrical signals into radio waves. Without antennas, the world would be a much different place than it is today. Optical engineers and scientists like Anthony J. Hoffman, associate professor in the Department of El

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NASA requests $21 billion budget to lead the agency's return with astronauts to the moon

NASA is putting its money on the moon, preparing for what the space agency says will be the nation's long-awaited, sustainable return to missions outside of Earth's orbit.

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Scientists delineate pathway that helps us make antibodies

Our bodies are continuously concocting specific antibodies to thwart invaders like a virus or even pollen, and scientists have new information about how the essential production gets fired up and keeps up.

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Hybrid embryos, ketamine drug and dark photons

Hybrid embryos, ketamine drug and dark photons Hybrid embryos, ketamine drug and dark photons, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00790-x The week in science: 8–14 March 2019.

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Please [redacted] my last e-mail

Please [redacted] my last e-mail Please [redacted] my last e-mail, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00797-4 Error message.

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Ethiopia to send black boxes to Europe as questions mount over crash

Ethiopia said Wednesday it would send the black boxes from last weekend's deadly Ethiopian Airlines crash to Europe for analysis as urgency mounted for answers amid safety concerns for the Boeing 737 MAX 8.

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Inside a guppy, heading for the moon

NASA locks in behind a permanent lunar presence.

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Revealed: How sushi determines attitudes to eating insects

Attitudes for and against using insects as protein sources are complex, surprising, and culturally distinct. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Starry starry frog

New species, and ancient lineage, of frog discovered in India. Andrew Masterson reports.

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When It Comes to Disease, Why Wait for a Pandemic to Respond?

Simulated real-world outbreaks are key to understanding how humans respond to outbreaks—and they provide valuable STEM education to boot.

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How to Use Twitter's New In-App Camera Feature

Starting today, users will be able to take photos straight from the native Twitter app.

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Large area solar flares are the likely source of puzzling millimeter emission

Solar flares are sudden explosive processes that convert the energy of the magnetic field into the kinetic energy of electrons and ions. Since the beginning of the century, millimeter observations of solar flares became routinely possible at a few frequencies with limited spatial resolution (see Kaufmann 2012, as a review). One of the most puzzling aspects of the observations at millimeter wavelen

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Cardiorespiratory fitness of farmed Atlantic salmon unaffected by virus

The respiratory systems of Atlantic salmon function normally even when carrying large loads of piscine orthoreovirus (PRV), new research has found. The results are a positive step in reducing the uncertainty about the potential of infected farmed Atlantic salmon in marine pens to negatively impact migrating wild Pacific salmon.

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Light provides control for 3D printing with multiple materials

Scientists have developed a novel 3D printer that uses patterns of visible and ultraviolet light to dictate which of two monomers are polymerized to form a solid material. Different patterns of light provide the spatial control necessary to yield multi-material parts.

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How to grow a better blueberry

Using grasses instead of fertiliser solves a nutrient problem linked to berry evolution. Natalie Parletta reports.

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In a first, U.S. private sector employs nearly as many Ph.D.s as schools do—from Science Careers

With academic jobs no longer the norm, universities look to adapt

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Magnetstimulering kan bli alternativ vid schizofreni och depression

– Vår förhoppning är att magnetstimulering ska ha effekt på motivationsbrist och apati, vanliga symtom vid schizofreni som det idag inte finns någon behandling för, säger Robert Bodén, överläkare på mottagningen för hjärnstimulering vid Akademiska sjukhuset. Transkraniell magnetstimulering (rTMS) innebär att en elektromagnet sätts mot huvudet. Magneten producerar ett snabbt varierande magnetfält

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The man behind that Apollo boot print

Lunar soil expert David Carrier is to thank for the iconic photo of some of the first steps on the moon.

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Nearly half of global childhood cancer cases go undiagnosed

Nearly half of global childhood cancer cases go undiagnosed Nearly half of global childhood cancer cases go undiagnosed, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00828-0 Tens of thousands of cancers are missed each year, particularly in countries where children have poor access to health care.

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World-class Go-playing AI has learned to do really hard colouring-in

An AI based on DeepMind's AlphaGo Zero AI has learned to solve graph colouring problems, which could ave many applications including allocating aeroplanes to flight routes

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Virtual time-lapse photos can capture ultrafast phenomena

Scientists have developed a new image-processing method that can capture extremely rapid phenomena using any type of camera. Their method, called Virtual Frame Technique, delivers better performance than any commercial high-speed camera and is affordable and accessible to anyone.

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The world's adolescents — large unmet needs and growing inequalities

The first detailed global study of adolescent health reveals: growing inequality with a large disease burden in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and the Pacific, obesity rates have doubled, with countries in the Pacific region having among the highest prevalence, anemia remains unchecked, India bearing heavy burden, investments in health, education, legal systems have not kept pace with needs, and gender

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Neurofeedback gets you back in the zone

Researchers have shown — for the first time — that they can use online neurofeedback to modify an individual's arousal state to improve performance in a demanding sensory motor task, such as flying a plane or driving in suboptimal conditions.

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Mowing for monarchs

You might think that mowing fields wouldn't benefit monarch butterfly populations. New research, however, shows that disturbances like mowing — at key times — might help boost the iconic butterfly's numbers.

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Iron measurements with MRI reveal stroke's impact on brain

A simple MRI method that measures iron content can provide a more comprehensive picture of the consequences of stroke-related damage to the brain, according to a new study. Researchers said the findings point to a role for MRI brain iron measurements in monitoring recovery from stroke.

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Younger kids with autism struggle with distractions

Before age 10, children with autism struggle with ability to block out visual distractions and focus on a specific task, research finds, and would benefit from intervention to address this. Researchers saw in previous studies that younger children with autism had more difficulty with visual distractions when compared to their same-aged peers without autism. They didn’t see the impairment in older

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Microlasers for photonic computing of future can be produced today quickly and cheaply

Scientists of the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) together with Russian colleagues from ITMO University, researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas, and Australian National University have developed an efficient, fast and cheap way to produce perovskite microdisk lasers—sources of intense coherent radiation for optical microchips to be used in new-generation optical computers. The rela

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Researchers find fighting and mating success in giant Australian cuttlefish influenced by sidedness

A team of researchers from the University of Rennes in France, Southern Cross University in Australia and the Marine Biological Laboratory in the U.S., has found that both fighting and mating success with giant Australian cuttlefish are influenced by behavioral lateralization. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describe their study of the largest species of c

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Researchers find fighting and mating success in giant Australian cuttlefish influenced by sidedness

A team of researchers from the University of Rennes in France, Southern Cross University in Australia and the Marine Biological Laboratory in the U.S., has found that both fighting and mating success with giant Australian cuttlefish are influenced by behavioral lateralization. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describe their study of the largest species of c

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Researchers confirm massive hyper-runaway star ejected from the Milky Way Disk

A fast-moving star may have been ejected from the Milky Way's stellar disk by a cluster of young stars, according to researchers from the University of Michigan who say the star did not originate from the middle of the galaxy, as previously believed by astronomers.

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Study identifies essential oil compounds most toxic to bed bugs

The synthetic pesticides used to control bed bug infestations face two problems: the insects are gaining a tolerance to them, and many consumers are looking for "green" alternatives they consider safer to spray in their living spaces.

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Study identifies essential oil compounds most toxic to bed bugs

The synthetic pesticides used to control bed bug infestations face two problems: the insects are gaining a tolerance to them, and many consumers are looking for "green" alternatives they consider safer to spray in their living spaces.

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Asfalt og skinner: Her vil regeringen sende infrastruktur-milliarderne hen

Får regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti gennemført deres vision for fremtidens infrastruktur, så står de kommende ti år på etablering ny togstrækning og mange kilometer motorvej.

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Danske virksomheder ansøger om patenter som aldrig før: Novozymes er i toppen

Danske virksomheder har i 2018 søgt 2.089 patenter ved Det Europæiske Patentkontor. Novozymes er den mest flittige ansøger og har i 2018 søgt om 192 patenter.

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White people create more air pollution, but breathe in less

Black and Hispanic Americans are exposed to higher amounts of air pollution that non-Hispanic white Americans generate, according to new research. Poor air quality is the largest environmental health risk in the United States. Fine particulate matter pollution is responsible for more than 100,000 deaths each year from heart attacks, strokes, lung cancer, and other diseases. But not everyone is eq

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Image of the Day: Squid Skin

The cephalopods use several strategies to manipulate light and produce their colorful patterns.

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Scientists Sign Petition Warning about EMF

A petition signed by 250 scientists warns about wireless technology, but the science is not on their side.

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Russian military is building a flying vehicle with rotating paddles

Defence researchers in Russia are building a cyclocopter, which is a flying vehicle that looks more like a paddle steamer than a conventional aircraft

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Handheld device could detect CRISPR bioweapons before they spread

Bits of DNA known as gene drives that force themselves through a population could be use maliciously, but thankfully there is a way to detect them before they spread

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Greta Thunberg: Why I began the climate protests that are going global

Swedish 16-year-old Greta Thunberg will lead a global school strike this week. Thousands of children are expected to walk-out to protest climate change inaction

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Careful how you treat today's AI: It might take revenge in the future

Artificial intelligence (AI) systems are becoming more like us. You can ask Google Home to switch off your bedroom lights, much as you might ask your human partner.

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Drexel Report: Low-income and minority youth with autism face worse outcomes than peers

Autism occurs in children from all backgrounds. But the impacts of autism are not felt equally across all groups.

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Tiny 'blinkers' enable simultaneous imaging of multiple biomolecules

In everyday life, blinking lights can send signals — for example, that a car is going to turn. Now, researchers have engineered tiny 'blinkers' that reveal single molecules of RNA or protein inside cells based on the duration and frequency of each flash. The research, published in the ACS journal Nano Letters, could allow scientists to see the locations of many different biomolecules in a cell si

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Blockchain could democratise banking, music – but at what cost?

Few technologies have the potential to disrupt old institutions as much as blockchain – a system that maintains records on huge networks of individual computers. As with any new technology, it could be used for social good – such as supporting people who are priced-out of the current bank accounts – but the big challenge is how to limit its unintended consequences.

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Why the binding arbitration game is rigged against customers

You may have noticed it in the boilerplate of your customer contract with a bank, a brokerage firm, or just a cellular phone carrier.

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Researchers improve description of defective oxides with first principles calculation

Understanding how defects can affect ground-state properties, promote phase transitions, or enable entirely new functionalities in some strongly correlated oxides has become a subject of major interest in the field of design and discovery of novel functional materials. SrMnO3 (SMO) is a particularly interesting example, but better characterization is needed. MARVEL researchers have now a developed

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What do gardens bring to urban ecosystems?

Twin Cities research moves urban agriculture forward.

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These odd, scaled mammals are the most poached in the world—and they’re going extinct

Pangolins’ keratin scales, prized in traditional Chinese medicine, may doom them

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Vibrating ‘mohawk’ may cause concussion side effects

Additional evidence supports the idea that damage to the corpus callosum, a thick bundle of nerves that connects the brain’s two halves, could result in some common side effects of concussion. The assumption—that damage to the corpus callosum could affect coordination between the two halves— is straightforward but difficult to prove. Although still not definitive proof, the new research adds evid

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As Scientists Probe the Mystery of How Newborns Develop Immunity, Order Rises from the Chaos

New studies take the most comprehensive look yet into immune system activity immediately after birth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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UK panel calls for new antitrust regulator targeting giant tech platforms

The U.K. plan arrives on the same day that a dispute between Spotify and Apple has blown up into a battle over the app store.

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The dollars and sense of big batteries on the grid

As the mix of energy sources feeding power-hungry homes, businesses and industry comes to incorporate more renewables like wind and solar, society faces a reckoning with where to turn when wind and sunshine die down. What will it take for greener sources not only to join fossil fuels on the American power grid, but eventually to displace them?

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Tiny 'blinkers' enable simultaneous imaging of multiple biomolecules

In everyday life, blinking lights can send signals—for example, that a car is going to turn. Now, researchers have engineered tiny "blinkers" that reveal single molecules of RNA or protein inside cells based on the duration and frequency of each flash. The research, published in the ACS journal Nano Letters, could allow scientists to see the locations of many different biomolecules in a cell simul

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The Departure of HBO's Boss Reveals AT&T's Plan for Empire

With Time Warner in the fold, AT&T is now a three-headed conglomerate of media and communications.

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The World's Recycling Is in Chaos. Here's What Has to Happen

China’s decision to no longer accept the world’s recycled waste has left countries scrambling to adapt. They have a long way to go.

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Somewear Global Hotspot Review: A Good Hiking Companion

We review a simple, easy-to-use safety beacon that pairs to your phone via Bluetooth, so you can text or call anywhere on the planet using the Iridium satellite network.

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Two Superstars Gamble on Record-Breaking Deals

After months of waiting, Major League Baseball’s premier free agents have finally found new homes. First, Manny Machado, one of the game’s top young infielders, signed a 10-year, $300 million contract with the San Diego Padres. Nine days later, the superstar outfielder Bryce Harper inked a massive contract of his own, signing with the Philadelphia Phillies for 13 years and $330 million. With Mach

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Why Urban Millennials Love Uniqlo

Nadav Machete Uniqlo was founded in 1984 in Hiroshima, Japan, as the Unique Clothing Warehouse—an ironic name for a manufacturer known for clothing that is in no way unique. A person can dress sock-to-cardigan in the company’s wares without announcing herself as a devotee of the brand. In an industry as label-oriented as fashion, such anonymity would seem to be a detriment to success. Today, howe

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As Scientists Probe the Mystery of How Newborns Develop Immunity, Order Rises from the Chaos

New studies take the most comprehensive look yet into immune system activity immediately after birth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Novel potent antimicrobial from thermophilic bacterium

University of Groningen microbiologists and their colleagues from Lithuania have discovered a new glycocin, a small antimicrobial peptide with a sugar group attached, which is produced by a thermophilic bacterium and is stable at relatively high temperatures. They also succeeded in transferring the genes required to produce this glycocin to an E. coli bacterium. This makes it easier to produce and

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Microgravity research after the International Space Station

For nearly 20 years, the International Space Station (ISS) has served as a singular laboratory for thousands of scientists, students, and startups around the world, who have accessed the station's microgravity environment to test how being in space impacts everything from cancer cells and human tissues to zucchini and barley seeds—not to mention a host of living organisms including flatworms, ants

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Review of noise impacts on marine mammals yields new policy recommendations

Marine mammals are particularly sensitive to noise pollution because they rely on sound for so many essential functions, including communication, navigation, finding food, and avoiding predators. An expert panel has now published a comprehensive assessment of the available science on how noise exposure affects hearing in marine mammals, providing scientific recommendations for noise exposure crite

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Review of noise impacts on marine mammals yields new policy recommendations

Marine mammals are particularly sensitive to noise pollution because they rely on sound for so many essential functions, including communication, navigation, finding food, and avoiding predators. An expert panel has now published a comprehensive assessment of the available science on how noise exposure affects hearing in marine mammals, providing scientific recommendations for noise exposure crite

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Home DNA-testing firm will let users block FBI access to their data

A big home DNA-testing company, FamilyTreeDNA, is to allow customers to block law-enforcement agencies from accessing their data, after a recent backlash

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Little owls on the move

The little owl, Athene noctua, is a small nocturnal owl and is classified as an endangered species on the German Red List. In recent years the existing population of little owls has successfully been stabilized in the south-west of Germany, and in some places numbers are even rising. In neighboring northern Switzerland on the other hand there is still no established population of little owls, even

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Novel potent antimicrobial from thermophilic bacterium

University of Groningen microbiologists and their colleagues from Lithuania have discovered a new glycocin, a small antimicrobial peptide with a sugar group attached, which is produced by a thermophilic bacterium and is stable at relatively high temperatures. They also succeeded in transferring the genes required to produce this glycocin to an E. coli bacterium. This makes it easier to produce and

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Excessive hygiene promotes resistance to antibiotics

In Nature Communications, researchers from Graz in Austria have presented initial approaches to preventing the spread of antibiotic resistance in hospitals.

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Research team uses artificial muscles to develop an air conditioner for the future

It can be used to cool or heat the air in a room or to cool or heat liquids. And it looks like something that Q—the tech specialist and gadgeteer in the James Bond films—might have come up with. The prototype device, which has been developed by a research team led by Professors Stefan Seelecke and Andreas Schütze at Saarland University, is able to transfer heat using 'muscles' made from nickel-tit

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Opportunity's parting shot was a beautiful panorama

Over 29 days last spring, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity documented this 360-degree panorama from multiple images taken at what would become its final resting spot in Perseverance Valley. Located on the inner slope of the western rim of Endurance Crater, Perseverance Valley is a system of shallow troughs descending eastward about the length of two football fields from the crest of Endea

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UK reviews urges new rules to deal with power of tech giants

A review into competition in the U.K.'s digital market says the country needs tough new rules to help counter the dominance of big tech giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon.

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Air pollution raises diabetes risk in China: study

Long-term exposure to harmful smog particles increases the risk of diabetes, a new study in China has shown, providing evidence for a link between the country's air pollution and the disease.

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At Major Engineering Conferences, Women Are Still Hard to Find

Since 2006, the OFC has included only one woman among the 42 plenary speakers, and women made up only about 10 percent of the roughly 100 invited speakers this year. Previous OFC meetings have been similar — and the problem arises at other engineering conferences, too. What can be done to remedy things?

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Little owls on the move

The little owl, Athene noctua, is a small nocturnal owl and is classified as an endangered species on the German Red List. In recent years the existing population of little owls has successfully been stabilized in the south-west of Germany, and in some places numbers are even rising. In neighboring northern Switzerland on the other hand there is still no established population of little owls, even

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Excessive hygiene promotes resistance to antibiotics

In Nature Communications, researchers from Graz in Austria have presented initial approaches to preventing the spread of antibiotic resistance in hospitals.

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Environment damage behind 1 in 4 global deaths, disease: UN

A quarter of all premature deaths and diseases worldwide are due to manmade pollution and environmental damage, the United Nations said Wednesday in a landmark report on the planet's parlous state.

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Norwegian Air Shuttle demands Boeing pay for grounding of 737 MAX planes

Low-cost airline Norwegian Air Shuttle, which has grounded its 18 Boeing 737 MAX 8 aircraft pending an investigation into the cause of a crash in Ethiopia, said Wednesday it will demand financial compensation from Boeing.

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Spotify lodges EU complaint against Apple over unfair music competition

Swedish music streaming giant Spotify said Wednesday it had filed a complaint with the EU Commission against Apple, accusing its US rival of stifling competition in the online music market.

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Life's a ball in Vienna as city tops world rankings for 10th year

Vienna has been named the city with the best quality of life for a 10th consecutive year in a survey published Wednesday.

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The man who helped invent virtual assistants thinks they’re doomed without a new AI approach

Boris Katz has spent his career trying to help machines master language. He believes that current AI techniques aren’t enough to make Siri or Alexa truly smart.

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Facebook Can Make VR Avatars Look—and Move—Exactly Like You

"Codec avatars," as Facebook researchers call them, are all but indistinguishable from the humans they represent—and may be a staple of our virtual lives sooner than we think.

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Mixed-cation perovskite solar cells in space

With the continuous improvement of efficiency and stability, perovskite solar cells are gradually approaching practical applications. PSCs may show the special application in space where oxygen and moisture (two major stressors for stability) barely exist. Publishing in Sci. China-Phys. Mech. Astron., a group of researchers at Peking University in China, led by Dr. Rui Zhu and Prof. Qihuang Gong i

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Virtual time-lapse photos can capture ultrafast phenomena with any camera

EPFL scientists have developed a new image-processing method that can capture extremely rapid phenomena using any type of camera. Their method, called the Virtual Frame Technique, delivers better performance than any commercial high-speed camera and is affordable and accessible to anyone.

11h

Nitrogen dioxide pollution mapped

New maps that use information from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite reveal nitrogen dioxide emission being released into the atmosphere in cities and towns across the globe.

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Scientists warn about the dangerous interaction of plant protection products

Pest control is one of the vital services provided by insects in agroecosystems. Natural methods relying on biological control agents, such as parasitoid wasps, represent a highly effective way to supress crop pest populations. Conventional practices in agriculture typically involve applying various synthetic pesticides (e.g. insecticides, fungicides, herbicides) simultaneously, in the form of a t

11h

Smartare bäckkantzoner kan minska kolutsläpp från kalhyggen

En viktig åtgärd för att skydda vattendrags kemiska status från skogsavverkning är att lämna en skogskant, så kallad buffertzon, längs vattendragen. Nu visar färsk forskning alltså att utformningen av dessa buffertzoner också är viktiga för att hindra växthusgasutsläpp från skogsbruket. Nu ska Marcus Klaus, miljöforskare vid Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap vid Umeå universitet t

11h

Scientists warn about the dangerous interaction of plant protection products

Pest control is one of the vital services provided by insects in agroecosystems. Natural methods relying on biological control agents, such as parasitoid wasps, represent a highly effective way to supress crop pest populations. Conventional practices in agriculture typically involve applying various synthetic pesticides (e.g. insecticides, fungicides, herbicides) simultaneously, in the form of a t

11h

Can artificial intelligence solve the mysteries of quantum physics?

Under the direction of Mobileye founder Amnon Shashua, a research group at Hebrew University of Jerusalem's School of Engineering and Computer Science has proven that artificial intelligence (AI) can help us understand the world on an infinitesimally small scale called quantum physics phenomena.

11h

Focusing the heat: Extreme weather risk perception in the United States

Heat waves are more dangerous than tornadoes, statistically. They kill more people than sharks, and put more human lives at risk than blizzards, floods or lightning storms. But they lack a certain dramatic flair, making it surprisingly difficult for many people to grasp and evaluate the real danger lurking behind their devastating effects. Recognizing those risks could be a matter of life or death

11h

Image: Heat sterilisation of Exomars parachute

A technician places a nearly 70 kg parachute designed for ESA and Roscosmos's ExoMars 2020 mission inside the dry heater steriliser of the Agency's Life, Physical Sciences and Life Support Laboratory, based in its Netherlands technical centre.

11h

»Disse opgaver må gerne forsvinde fra vores praksis«

Profylaktiske undersøgelser af børn og gravide skal i høj grad blive, mens forsikringsattester, kostvejledning og rygestop gerne må glide ud. Sådan lyder dommen fra over 200 læger om fremtidens almen praksis i ny PLO-analyse. Men hvad mener de enkelte læger? Her er fire bud.

11h

A Scandal Fit for a Win-at-All-Costs Society

On Tuesday, court documents alleging a major college-bribery scheme described some outlandish behavior on the part of wealthy parents looking to give their children an edge in the admissions process. Allegedly , the parents were open to falsifying learning disabilities, athletic accomplishments, and grades on their children’s behalf, as well as paying millions of dollars in bribes. These strategi

11h

Undervisningsministeren: Vi ruster ikke de unge til fremtiden ved bare at give dem en iPad

49 procent af lærerne peger i en undersøgelse fra Undervisningsministeriet på, at der benyttes teknologi i undervisningen for teknologiens skyld – altså uden et klart formål.

11h

Could Alzheimer's Be a Reaction to Infection?

A relatively new and still controversial theory suggests the disease could be triggered by pathogens — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Would New Physics Colliders Make Big Discoveries or Wander a Particle Desert?

Around the globe, imminent decisions on proposed next-generation experiments are set to shape particle physics for decades to come — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Spotify files antitrust complaint over ‘Apple tax’

Spotify announced this morning that it’s filed an antitrust complaint against Apple with the European Union, alleging that the iPhone maker is harming consumer choice and stifling …

12h

The Beto Odyssey

It is not yet clear whether Beto O’Rourke is running for president. What is clear, however, is that in the course of making his decision, he has been going for a lot of runs. Head-clearing runs. Meaningful runs. In November—just after O’Rourke lost, by a slim margin, the U.S. Senate campaign he had waged against Ted Cruz in Texas—Beto shared the details of a jog he took during a morning snowfall

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Not That Kind of Girl

Every few years, new concerns bloom about the changing ways young people are approaching relationships, from the stigmatized early years of online dating in the 1990s and 2000s to the panic over campus hookup culture in the early 2010s to the dawning concern that rather than having too much sex, Millennials aren’t having enough . Many young people are now experiencing a sex recession, my colleagu

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Will Machines Be Able to Tell When Patients Are About to Die?

What one experience with palliative care says about the capacity of artificial intelligence to make medical decisions.

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Pharmaceutical abuse sent more than 350,000 people to the ER in 2016

The misuse of pharmaceuticals sent an estimated 350,000 people to U.S. emergency departments in 2016.

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Kulturskatter ryker i skogsbruket

För att öka kunskapen om skogens kulturlämningar har Riksantikvarieämbetet låtit ta fram en rapport om kolbottnen, våra skogars vanligaste kulturlämning. − Rapporten syftar till att föra diskussionen framåt och underlätta att finna vägar till lösningar på skadeproblemet och en ändamålsenlig antikvarisk hantering av lämningarna, säger riksantikvarie Lars Amréus. Skogens vanligaste kulturlämning Av

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Grågåsens bajs viktigt för växtligheten

Spridning av växtarter sker i huvudsak på tre olika sätt, med hjälp av vinden, med hjälp av vatten och med hjälp av djur. Biologer vid Karlstads universitet har besökt över 100 skärgårdsöar i Östersjön, och dokumenterat de arter som fanns. Därefter samlade de in spillning från grågåsen på 45 av öarna. Grågässen ersätter betesdjuren – Resultatet vi fann var att spillningen från grågås innehöll liv

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Svenska mikroalger producerar biobränsle medan de renar vatten

Gröna mikroalger är fotosyntetiska vattenorganismer som med hjälp av solljus och några andra näringsämnen omvandlar koldioxid (CO2) till energi och biomassa. Algbiomassa anses vara ett bra utgångsmaterial för produktion av olika biobränslen eftersom dessa mikroorganismer naturligt kan bilda och lagra stora mängder lipider som kan omvandlas till biodiesel. Dessutom kan kväve och fosfor som finns i

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Matlagning med hållbara pellets räddar både liv och skog

Världen behöver effektivare energisystem som bygger på förnybara råvaror, en ekvation som inte är så lätt att lösa. – I den här studien har vi tittat på tolv olika tillgängliga restprodukter för pelletsproduktion i Zambia och studerat hur dessa produkter fungerar tillsammans i olika blandningar, säger Stefan Frodeson, universitetsadjunkt i miljö- och energisystem. Studien har lett till att flera

12h

Could Alzheimer's Be a Reaction to Infection?

A relatively new and still controversial theory suggests the disease could be triggered by pathogens — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Læger: Fri os for forsikringsattester, kostvejledning og rygestopforløb

I en ny undersøgelse fra PLO har over 200 praktiserende læger svaret på, om ni udvalgte opgaver fortsat skal løses i almen praksis. Formålet er at blive klogere på, hvordan lægerne bliver sikret mest mulig tid til kerneopgaven.

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USA står fast: »Der er ikke grundlag for at grounde 737 Max«

PLUS. Mens langt de fleste eksemplarer af den ulykkesramte flytype Boeing 737 Max 8 er groundet, vil de amerikanske luftfartsmyndigheder fortsat ikke holde landets fly på jorden. Dermed er amerikanske FAA direkte uenig med sit europæiske modstykke.

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Early Animal Life Exploded on Earth Even Earlier Than Once Thought

The rise of new species during the Cambrian may have been more like a wave than an explosion.

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Would New Physics Colliders Make Big Discoveries or Wander a Particle Desert?

Around the globe, imminent decisions on proposed next-generation experiments are set to shape particle physics for decades to come — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Newly Discovered 'Starry Dwarf Frog' Wears a Galaxy on Its Back, Hides in Dead Leaves

This frog looks like a pile of dead leaves and carries the sky on its back.

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Kræftens Bekæmpelse vil have HPV-vaccine gratis til alle drenge

Over 200.000 drenge mellem 12 og 17 år bliver forskelsbehandlet ved ikke at få tilbudt gratis HPV-vaccine, selv om piger i samme aldersgruppe gør. Der vil altid være drenge, der falder uden for tilbuddet, siger ministeriet.

12h

Billund-bane, Limfjords-forbindelse og motorveje: Regeringen og DF vil skyde 110 mia. i infrastruktur

Regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti har indgået aftale om fremtidens infrastruktur, der bl.a. omfatter en ny Limfjordsforbindelse, en togstrækning fra Billund til Vejle og mange kilometer motorvej.

12h

New method to assess platelet health could help ER doctors

UW researchers have created a novel system that can measure platelet function within two minutes and can help doctors determine which trauma patients might need a blood transfusion upon being admitted to a hospital.

12h

Crystal structures of multidrug efflux pump MexB bound with high-molecular-mass compounds

Crystal structures of multidrug efflux pump MexB bound with high-molecular-mass compounds Crystal structures of multidrug efflux pump MexB bound with high-molecular-mass compounds, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40232-2 Crystal structures of multidrug efflux pump MexB bound with high-molecular-mass compounds

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Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is intrinsically required for post-transcriptional regulation of Drosophila Germline Stem Cell (GSC) maintenance

Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is intrinsically required for post-transcriptional regulation of Drosophila Germline Stem Cell (GSC) maintenance Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is intrinsically required for post-transcriptional regulation of Drosophila Germline Stem Cell (GSC) maintenance, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40152-1 Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) is intrinsic

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Performance comparison of III–V//Si and III–V//InGaAs multi-junction solar cells fabricated by the combination of mechanical stacking and wire bonding

Performance comparison of III–V//Si and III–V//InGaAs multi-junction solar cells fabricated by the combination of mechanical stacking and wire bonding Performance comparison of III–V//Si and III–V//InGaAs multi-junction solar cells fabricated by the combination of mechanical stacking and wire bonding, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40727-y Performance comparison of III–V/

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Steered molecular dynamic simulations of conformational lock of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase

Steered molecular dynamic simulations of conformational lock of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase Steered molecular dynamic simulations of conformational lock of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40892-0 Steered molecular dynamic simulations of conformational lock of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase

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Metabolic syndrome alters relationships between cardiometabolic variables, cognition and white matter hyperintensity load

Metabolic syndrome alters relationships between cardiometabolic variables, cognition and white matter hyperintensity load Metabolic syndrome alters relationships between cardiometabolic variables, cognition and white matter hyperintensity load, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40630-6 Metabolic syndrome alters relationships between cardiometabolic variables, cognition and w

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Defects, dopants and Mg diffusion in MgTiO3

Defects, dopants and Mg diffusion in MgTiO 3 Defects, dopants and Mg diffusion in MgTiO 3 , Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40878-y Defects, dopants and Mg diffusion in MgTiO 3

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Meta-analysis suggests evidence of novel stress-related pathway components in Orsay virus – Caenorhabditis elegans viral model

Meta-analysis suggests evidence of novel stress-related pathway components in Orsay virus – Caenorhabditis elegans viral model Meta-analysis suggests evidence of novel stress-related pathway components in Orsay virus – Caenorhabditis elegans viral model, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40762-9 Meta-analysis suggests evidence of novel stress-related pathway components in Or

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A core-scale reconstructing method for shale

A core-scale reconstructing method for shale A core-scale reconstructing method for shale, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39442-5 A core-scale reconstructing method for shale

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Two papers yanked for lack of formal ethics approval

Get it in writing. That’s the moral in a pair of retractions in different journals after authors claimed to have received oral — but not written — ethics approval for their research. One paper, in the International Journal of Pediatrics, a Hindawi title, came from a group in Kuwait and Greece. Titled “Prevalence and associated … Continue reading Two papers yanked for lack of formal ethics approval

13h

The wild side of discovery, a history of information warfare, and the immune system uncovered: Books in brief

The wild side of discovery, a history of information warfare, and the immune system uncovered: Books in brief The wild side of discovery, a history of information warfare, and the immune system uncovered: Books in brief, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00794-7 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

13h

The unexpected cost of living for a very long time

Medical advances have increased our longevity by decades, says Michael Dowling, president and CEO of Northwell Health . That benefit comes with an unintended disadvantage – high costs. Bringing the overall cost of health care down is near impossible, as an increased life expectancy brings new diseases and procedures with it. Reducing the out-of-pocket cost is a separate issue, however. It is poss

13h

The development of synaptic transmission is time-locked to early social behaviors in rats

The development of synaptic transmission is time-locked to early social behaviors in rats The development of synaptic transmission is time-locked to early social behaviors in rats, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09156-3 The development of functional synapses is a key milestone in neurodevelopment. Here, the authors show how serotonin signalling coordinates development of

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Fast spin exchange across a multielectron mediator

Fast spin exchange across a multielectron mediator Fast spin exchange across a multielectron mediator, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09194-x Controllable two-qubit interactions are necessary to build a functional quantum computer. Here the authors demonstrate fast, coherent swapping of two spin states mediated by a long, multi-electron quantum dot that could act as a tun

13h

Whole-genome resequencing of 472 Vitis accessions for grapevine diversity and demographic history analyses

Whole-genome resequencing of 472 Vitis accessions for grapevine diversity and demographic history analyses Whole-genome resequencing of 472 Vitis accessions for grapevine diversity and demographic history analyses, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09135-8 Despite the importance of grapevine cultivation in human history and the economic values of cultivar improvement, large-

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Dietary fatty acids fine-tune Piezo1 mechanical response

Dietary fatty acids fine-tune Piezo1 mechanical response Dietary fatty acids fine-tune Piezo1 mechanical response, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09055-7 Piezo channels are mechanosensitive and rely on membrane composition to transduce physical stimuli into electrical signals. Here authors analyse the membrane components that modulate Piezo1 function using lipid profiling

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Amyloid β oligomers suppress excitatory transmitter release via presynaptic depletion of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate

Amyloid β oligomers suppress excitatory transmitter release via presynaptic depletion of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate Amyloid β oligomers suppress excitatory transmitter release via presynaptic depletion of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09114-z The underlying mechanism of amyloid β (Aβ) oligomer-induced aberrant neurotransm

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Phototrophic purple bacteria as optoacoustic in vivo reporters of macrophage activity

Phototrophic purple bacteria as optoacoustic in vivo reporters of macrophage activity Phototrophic purple bacteria as optoacoustic in vivo reporters of macrophage activity, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09081-5 Current optoacoustic probes for cancer imaging have limitations including background noise, long-term toxicity and scarce imaging depth in living tissue. Here the

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Radiation tolerance of two-dimensional material-based devices for space applications

Radiation tolerance of two-dimensional material-based devices for space applications Radiation tolerance of two-dimensional material-based devices for space applications, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09219-5 The potential of 2D materials for space applications has been surfaced recently, however a comprehensive assessment of their suitability is currently missing. Here,

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Contractile forces in platelet aggregates under microfluidic shear gradients reflect platelet inhibition and bleeding risk

Contractile forces in platelet aggregates under microfluidic shear gradients reflect platelet inhibition and bleeding risk Contractile forces in platelet aggregates under microfluidic shear gradients reflect platelet inhibition and bleeding risk, Published online: 13 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09150-9 Platelet aggregates generate contractile forces that contribute to their cohesion and ad

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Microsoft Offers Suspicious Demo of xCloud Game Streaming Service

At Microsoft’s Inside Xbox event, the company brought an Android phone up on stage and streamed Forza Horizon 4 from its Azure data centers. Or did it? The post Microsoft Offers Suspicious Demo …

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How Bigotry Made a Dove Out of Tucker Carlson

In the Trump era, some on the anti-interventionist left have developed a tolerance for, even a grudging appreciation of, Tucker Carlson. The reason: He’s a caustic critic of hawkish foreign policy. The Intercept ’s Glenn Greenwald , the historian Stephen F. Cohen , and the author Max Blumenthal —all of whom agree with Carlson that the Trump-Russia scandal is fueling a new cold war—regularly appea

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The Myth of Joe Biden’s Working-Class Support

People always talk about Joe Biden’s special connection to the white working class, those vaunted lost voters throughout the industrial Midwest whom Democrats are desperate to get back if they want the White House again. No one has any proof that this connection gets anyone to vote for Biden, or vote at all. The idea that he can win white working-class votes is part of every calculation about Bid

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What Immigration Restrictionists Can’t Foresee

Periodically, a journalist or policy maker informs us that Americans are panicked about immigration, and suggests that the United States should engineer the demographics of its population through immigration policy. Writing in The Atlantic , for example, David Frum argues that the U.S. should slash legal-immigration levels and restrict family reunification in favor of selecting immigrants based o

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Trump’s Budget Harms National Security

The Trump administration has delivered its behemoth $4.5 trillion budget. Even if one accepts the 3 percent GDP growth the administration anticipates (which neither the Federal Reserve nor the Congressional Budget Office does), the plan would not produce an end to the deficit profligacy that is a yawning vulnerability for America’s national security. Even its calculations see deficit spending con

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It’s Time for U.S. Troops to Leave Afghanistan

This year, the United States marks 18 years of combat in Afghanistan. We remember and honor the more than 2,300 brave U.S. service members who made the ultimate sacrifice and the over 20,000 who have been wounded in action. We thank the courageous men and women in uniform who are still abroad, a world away from their homes and families, fighting this war. Soon, we will reach a watershed moment in

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Robyn Knows When to Give and When to Withhold

Last week, footage went viral of a joyful scene on a New York City subway platform: a throng of travelers jumping up and down, pumping fists, recording themselves on their phones, and singing Robyn songs. They’d just gotten out of the Swedish singer’s Madison Square Garden show, and they clearly hadn’t gotten enough of her sweet-sad dance-pop choruses. As videos of the spontaneous sing-along circ

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