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nyheder2019marts14

Trump Couldn’t Be Bothered to Stop the Senate

Even with his signature policy proposal at stake, even with his own party pushing back more than ever before, even with the first veto of his presidency on the table, President Trump just couldn’t be bothered to try to convince Congress to back him. The result was a 59-41 vote to block his declaration of a national emergency to build a wall on the U.S. border with Mexico. It’s the biggest rebelli

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As uniform as cloned soldiers, new spiders were named after the Stormtroopers in Star Wars

Despite being widely distributed across north and central South America, the small family of similarly looking bald-legged spiders had never been confirmed in Colombia. However, a new research paper, published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, describes a total of six previously unknown species inhabiting the country, with four of them belonging to a new genus named Stormtropis — after the clon

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EU godkender farlige kemikalier hver gang virksomheder beder om det

PLUS. EU-Kommissionen har siden 2014 givet grønt lys i 82 sager, hvor virksomheder har ansøgt om at anvende ellers forbudte kemikalier fra EU’s kandidatliste over særligt problematiske stoffer. Det er 82 godkendelser ud af i alt 82 sager.

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Scientists Watch As Heat Moves Through 'Pencil Lead' at the Speed of Sound

Scientists have seen something magical happening inside graphite.

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Thousands of scientists are backing the kids striking for climate change

Thousands of scientists are backing the kids striking for climate change Thousands of scientists are backing the kids striking for climate change, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00861-z Students around the world are walking out of school to urge governments to do more about global warming.

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Lonza Expands Mycoplasma Detection Portfolio with New Luminometer Designed to Accelerate and Simplify Testing

Lonza has further strengthened its extensive mycoplasma detection portfolio with the addition of the Lucetta™ 2 Luminometer, a single-tube system designed to simplify and accelerate mycoplasma detection in cell cultures. Pharmaceutical, biotechnology and academic researchers can now rely on this compact, portable and easy-to-use instrument to run Lonza’s MycoAlert™ Mycoplasma Detection Assays and

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Jens' bondegård er CO2-neutral: 'Min søn skal have gavn af jorden i fremtiden'

Biogasanlæg og personlig handlingsplan har gjort Jens Kroghs landbrug klimavenligt. Professor er dog skeptisk.

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New York City climate-change plan proposes adding land to Manhattan

New York City climate-change plan proposes adding land to Manhattan New York City climate-change plan proposes adding land to Manhattan, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00862-y To protect the city from sea-level rise, mayor Bill de Blasio proposes extending the southern part of the island into the river.

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This is what the future's sustainable cities could look like

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DARPA Is Building a $10 Million, Open Source, Secure Voting System

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See the Most Breathtaking Views of the Martian Surface Yet

Mars in Stereo The European Space Agency’s (ESA) ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, which launched in 2016, just sent back some spectacular images of the Martian surface. The orbiter is equipped to take images of the Martian surface in glorious 3D. The picture below shows the Columbus Crater on Mars’ southern hemisphere — which NASA discovered that sulfate particles contain hydrated minerals . Peekaboo,

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This Autonomous Robot Arm Feeds People Who Can’t Feed Themselves

Mealtime Tech An estimated one million Americans can’t feed themselves. That leaves them little choice but to rely on another person at mealtime, which can be both awkward and time-consuming. But now, researchers from the University of Washington have built Assistive Dexterous Arm (ADA) , an artificially intelligent robot arm capable of using a fork to move food from a person’s plate to their mou

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Why Scientists Should Support the Youth Climate Strike

Their generation will be greatly impacted by the effects of climate change, so it is critical that their voices are heard. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Home' is where success — or failure — rests: Personal context directly affects CPAP use

A new study of the challenges and burdens faced by CPAP users, conducted by research scientists from the Regenstrief Institute, Richard M. Roudebush Veterans Affairs Medical Center and IUPUI, reports that successful patient adherence to CPAP therapy requires new, personalized patterns of behavior incorporating physical, psychological and cognitive adaptations.

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Tracking turtles with telemetry

A new model has been created that can forecast the location of Eastern Pacific leatherback turtles along the coast of Central and South America in an effort to decrease bycatch mortality of this critically endangered and ecologically important species.

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Men who lived in Spain 4500 years ago left almost no male genetic lineages in living people

Study fills in surprising history of Iberian Peninsula over thousands of years

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NYC plans to expand Manhattan to protect against rising seas

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Thursday his $10-billion plan to protect lower Manhattan against sea level rise and storm surges. The plan calls for creating new land that would extend the lower part of the island by about two city blocks. As sea levels rise around the globe, cities are experimenting with various methods to protect themselves. None New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio

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Tracking turtles with telemetry

A new model has been created that can forecast the location of Eastern Pacific leatherback turtles along the coast of Central and South America in an effort to decrease bycatch mortality of this critically endangered and ecologically important species.

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Researchers Discover that Sea Otters Leave Behind Archaeological Records

Researchers Discover that Sea Otters Leave Behind Archaeological Records When the foraging sea mammals crack shells to collect food, they produce distinctive evidence. OttersLeaveTraces.jpg Sea otter pounding open mussels at Bennett Slough Culverts in upright position. Image credits: Jessica Fujii Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Science article. Creature Thu

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Havens upptag av koldioxid ökar i takt med utsläppen

I takt med att våra koldioxidutsläpp ökat har också havens upptag av koldioxid gjort det. Haven dämpar den globala uppvärmningen, men det sker på bekostnad av vattenlevande organismer.

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An Open Letter Endorsing the Global School Strike for Climate

More than 240 scientists have already signed a document supporting students around the world in their demand for bold action to make sure the world they grow up in is livable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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DARPA Is Building an Open Source Voting Machine

Cracking Down Voting booths are notoriously buggy . Whether they’ve been actively hacked or just improperly calibrated, every election season is rife with complaints that machines misrecorded ballots or that an election has been compromised by hackers. To prevent us from having to take a technological step backwards to paper ballots, U.S. Department of Defense’s research division DARPA is working

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When Ignorance Is Bliss

Why we sometimes choose not to know.

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20 Things You Didn't Know About Seasons

Thank our wobbly planet for our seasons, which have led to remarkable adaptations in animals ranging from honeybees to lungfish.

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The World Is Our Niche

Our unique adaptability may explain why we’re the last humans on Earth.

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Mercury Is in Retrograde. Don’t Be Alarmed.

Scientists will tell you it’s all an optical illusion and superstition. And even astrologers say it’s nothing to worry too much about.

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Matter: The Story of the Iberian Peninsula, Told in DNA

With an analysis of nearly 300 skeletons from various periods, scientists are peering into human prehistory in the region.

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We succeed or fail with help from our friends

To understand why people succeed or fail, look at their circle of friends. Like it or not, says economist Matthew Jackson, people’s fates are closely connected to their human networks. While human networks can be beneficial—a friend can be a referral to a lucrative new job, for example—there can be negative effects as well: What happens when someone doesn’t know influential people? A limited huma

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Tracking turtles with telemetry

A new model has been created that can forecast the location of Eastern Pacific leatherback turtles along the coast of Central and South America in an effort to decrease bycatch mortality of this critically endangered and ecologically important species.

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How a mitochondrial enzyme can trigger cell death

Cytochrome c is a small enzyme that plays an important role in the production of energy by mitochondria. It is also involved in signaling dangerous problems that warrant apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Using solid-state NMR, University of Groningen Associate Professor Patrick van der Wel and colleagues from the University of Pittsburgh have discovered that the signal induced by cytochrome c i

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BU: Central American kidney disease epidemic linked to occupational heat exposure

For two decades, Nicaragua and El Salvador have seen increasing mortality from an unusual form of chronic kidney disease (CKD), also called Mesoamerican Nephropathy (MeN). The disease has disproportionately affected sugarcane and other agricultural workers, and appears to be unrelated to traditional kidney disease risk factors such as diabetes.

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Poor pitch singing could be a matter of the tune in your head

Sub-vocalization, the silent, preparatory muscle movements of the face and larynx that result when singers run a song through their heads prior to vocalizing, could be nudging them out of tune, according to University at Buffalo researchers.Their recently published study for the first time presents evidence suggesting a relationship among sub-vocalization, auditory imagery and poor pitch singing.

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The Hottest Chat App for Teens Is … Google Docs

When the kids in Skyler’s school want to tell a friend something in class, they don’t scrawl a note down on a tiny piece of paper and toss it across the room. They use Google Docs. “We don’t really pass physical notes anymore,” said Skyler, 15, who, like all the other students in this story, is identified by a pseudonym. As more and more laptops find their way into middle and high schools, educat

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‘Don’t Ground the Airplanes. Ground the Pilots.’

In the days since the horrific Ethiopian Airlines crash, I have received a lot of email from pilots, aircraft engineers, and others with experience in aviation. These have been in response to three previous posts: first here , then here , then most recently here (with quotes from pilots’ observations about the Boeing 737 Max via NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting System .) While I sift through the

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Softer Diets Allowed Early Humans to Pronounce "F," "V" Sounds

Drastic dietary changes during the agricultural revolution altered the configuration of the human bite, paving the way for new sounds in spoken language, a new study finds.

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Me, my cells and I: a love poem

matte black curtains are taped tightly to the windows the only light allowed here is the gentle yellow glow that illuminates the stage gracefully getting into position I delicately balance between thumb and forefinger a thin disk carried with a careful reverence placed gently on the altar humble sighs aside my hands rise […]

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Transplanted memories

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Mysterious males

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The first fricatives

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Worms go A-WOL

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Gene-edited animals could help humanity, but they're in 'regulatory limbo'

Science They aren’t regulated under international pronouncements in the same way humans are. Non-human animals aren’t regulated under international pronouncements in the same way humans are.

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Two distinct interstitial macrophage populations coexist across tissues in specific subtissular niches

Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population involved in tissue homeostasis, inflammation, and various pathologies. Although the major tissue-resident macrophage populations have been extensively studied, interstitial macrophages (IMs) residing within the tissue parenchyma remain poorly defined. Here we studied IMs from murine lung, fat, heart, and dermis. We identified two independent IM subp

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News at a glance

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Flashes in the scan

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Nowhere to hide

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Mapping the lung

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What lies beneath

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It takes a village

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Beyond survival

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The genomic landscape of pediatric cancers: Implications for diagnosis and treatment

The past decade has witnessed a major increase in our understanding of the genetic underpinnings of childhood cancer. Genomic sequencing studies have highlighted key differences between pediatric and adult cancers. Whereas many adult cancers are characterized by a high number of somatic mutations, pediatric cancers typically have few somatic mutations but a higher prevalence of germline alteratio

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Ushering in the next generation of precision trials for pediatric cancer

Cancer treatment decisions are increasingly based on the genomic profile of the patient’s tumor, a strategy called "precision oncology." Over the past few years, a growing number of clinical trials and case reports have provided evidence that precision oncology is an effective approach for at least some children with cancer. Here, we review key factors influencing pediatric drug development in th

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Science and health for all children with cancer

Each year ~429,000 children and adolescents aged 0 to 19 years are expected to develop cancer. Five-year survival rates exceed 80% for the 45,000 children with cancer in high-income countries (HICs) but are less than 30% for the 384,000 children in lower-middle-income countries (LMICs). Improved survival rates in HICs have been achieved through multidisciplinary care and research, with treatment

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Transplanted memories

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Mysterious males

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The first fricatives

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Worms go A-WOL

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Right in the middle

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The oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2 from 1994 to 2007

We quantify the oceanic sink for anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) over the period 1994 to 2007 by using observations from the global repeat hydrography program and contrasting them to observations from the 1990s. Using a linear regression–based method, we find a global increase in the anthropogenic CO 2 inventory of 34 ± 4 petagrams of carbon (Pg C) between 1994 and 2007. This is equivalent t

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Redefining near-unity luminescence in quantum dots with photothermal threshold quantum yield

A variety of optical applications rely on the absorption and reemission of light. The quantum yield of this process often plays an essential role. When the quantum yield deviates from unity by significantly less than 1%, applications such as luminescent concentrators and optical refrigerators become possible. To evaluate such high performance, we develop a measurement technique for luminescence e

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Terminal coordination of diatomic boron monofluoride to iron

Boron monofluoride (BF) is a diatomic molecule with 10 valence electrons, isoelectronic to carbon monoxide (CO). Unlike CO, which is a stable molecule at room temperature and readily serves as both a bridging and terminal ligand to transition metals, BF is unstable below 1800°C in the gas phase, and its coordination chemistry is substantially limited. Here, we report the isolation of the iron com

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A molecular perovskite solid solution with piezoelectricity stronger than lead zirconate titanate

Piezoelectric materials produce electricity when strained, making them ideal for different types of sensing applications. The most effective piezoelectric materials are ceramic solid solutions in which the piezoelectric effect is optimized at what are termed morphotropic phase boundaries (MPBs). Ceramics are not ideal for a variety of applications owing to some of their mechanical properties. We

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Males as somatic investment in a parthenogenetic nematode

We report the reproductive strategy of the nematode Mesorhabditis belari . This species produces only 9% males, whose sperm is necessary to fertilize and activate the eggs. However, most of the fertilized eggs develop without using the sperm DNA and produce female individuals. Only in 9% of eggs is the male DNA utilized, producing sons. We found that mixing of parental genomes only gives rise to

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Herbivores as drivers of negative density dependence in tropical forest saplings

Ecological theory predicts that the high local diversity observed in tropical forests is maintained by negative density–dependent interactions within and between closely related plant species. By using long-term data on tree growth and survival for coexisting Inga (Fabaceae, Mimosoideae) congeners, we tested two mechanisms thought to underlie negative density dependence (NDD): competition for res

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Histone demethylase KDM6A directly senses oxygen to control chromatin and cell fate

Oxygen sensing is central to metazoan biology and has implications for human disease. Mammalian cells express multiple oxygen-dependent enzymes called 2-oxoglutarate (OG)-dependent dioxygenases (2-OGDDs), but they vary in their oxygen affinities and hence their ability to sense oxygen. The 2-OGDD histone demethylases control histone methylation. Hypoxia increases histone methylation, but whether

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Hypoxia induces rapid changes to histone methylation and reprograms chromatin

Oxygen is essential for the life of most multicellular organisms. Cells possess enzymes called molecular dioxygenases that depend on oxygen for activity. A subclass of molecular dioxygenases is the histone demethylase enzymes, which are characterized by the presence of a Jumanji-C (JmjC) domain. Hypoxia can alter chromatin, but whether this is a direct effect on JmjC-histone demethylases or due t

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RIT1 oncoproteins escape LZTR1-mediated proteolysis

RIT1 oncoproteins have emerged as an etiologic factor in Noonan syndrome and cancer. Despite the resemblance of RIT1 to other members of the Ras small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), mutations affecting RIT1 are not found in the classic hotspots but rather in a region near the switch II domain of the protein. We used an isogenic germline knock-in mouse model to study the effects of RIT1 muta

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The genomic history of the Iberian Peninsula over the past 8000 years

We assembled genome-wide data from 271 ancient Iberians, of whom 176 are from the largely unsampled period after 2000 BCE, thereby providing a high-resolution time transect of the Iberian Peninsula. We document high genetic substructure between northwestern and southeastern hunter-gatherers before the spread of farming. We reveal sporadic contacts between Iberia and North Africa by ~2500 BCE and,

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New Products

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Preparing for Brexit

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Human sound systems are shaped by post-Neolithic changes in bite configuration

Linguistic diversity, now and in the past, is widely regarded to be independent of biological changes that took place after the emergence of Homo sapiens . We show converging evidence from paleoanthropology, speech biomechanics, ethnography, and historical linguistics that labiodental sounds (such as "f" and "v") were innovated after the Neolithic. Changes in diet attributable to food-processing

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Acoel genome reveals the regulatory landscape of whole-body regeneration

Whole-body regeneration is accompanied by complex transcriptomic changes, yet the chromatin regulatory landscapes that mediate this dynamic response remain unexplored. To decipher the regulatory logic that orchestrates regeneration, we sequenced the genome of the acoel worm Hofstenia miamia , a highly regenerative member of the sister lineage of other bilaterians. Epigenomic profiling revealed th

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How ‘F’ Sounds Might Break a Fundamental Rule of Linguistics

Thousands of years ago, small groups of humans across the globe began to transition from hunting and gathering their food to raising and planting it instead. They milked cattle, milled grains to make soft bread, and used new inventions like pottery to preserve meat and vegetables. And once they did that, they could start spicing up their speech by throwing some f and v sounds into the mix. At lea

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Narwhals spend at least half time diving for food, can fast for several days after meal

Narwhals — enigmatic arctic whales known for their sword-like tusk — spend over half their time diving to find food but are also able to last up to three days without a meal, according to a study by Manh Cuong Ngô and colleagues from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, published in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Ancient DNA research shines spotlight on Iberia

The University of Huddersfield's Archaeogenetics Research Group joins an international team to conduct the largest-ever study of ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) which suggests that the Iberian male lineages were almost completely replaced between 4,500 and 4,000 years ago by newcomers originating on the Russian steppe.

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Ocean sink for man-made CO2 measured

An international research project led by scientists from ETH Zurich has determined the amount of man-made CO2 emissions taken up by the ocean between 1994 and 2007.

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In this nematode species males are needed for reproduction but not their genes

In the Mesorhabditis belari roundworm, the sole purpose of males is to help females produce clones of themselves. This unique form of reproduction was recently described by researchers from the CNRS, l'ENS de Lyon, l'Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, and the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle in an article published on March 15, 2019, in the journal Science.

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Guardians of the synapse: Scientists identify a new role for nerve-supporting cells

Salk researchers have found, for the first time, that a blood-clotting protein can, unexpectedly, degrade nerves–and how nerve-supporting glial cells, including Schwann cells, provide protection. The findings, published March 14, 2019, in the journal PLOS Genetics, show that Schwann cells protect nerves by blocking this blood-clotting protein as well as other potentially destructive enzymes relea

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Are we at the limits of measuring water-repellent surfaces

As we develop extremely liquid repellent surfaces, the errors in existing measurement techniques are getting too large

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Exotic 'second sound' phenomenon observed in pencil lead

At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports.

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The genetics of regeneration

Led by Assistant Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Mansi Srivastava, a team of researchers is shedding new light on how animals perform whole-body regeneration, and uncovered a number of DNA switches that appear to control genes used in the process.

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Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth's ice ages, study finds

Over the last 540 million years, the Earth has weathered three major ice ages — periods during which global temperatures plummeted, producing extensive ice sheets and glaciers that have stretched beyond the polar caps. Now scientists at MIT, the University of California at Santa Barbara, and the University of California at Berkeley have identified the likely trigger for these ice ages.

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Ancient DNA research shines spotlight on Iberia

An international team led by researchers at Harvard Medical School and the Institute of Evolutionary Biology in Spain has conducted the largest-ever study of ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula (modern-day Spain and Portugal), spanning 8,000 years.

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Fighting leaf and mandible

Scientists have asked, 'What is the primary driver in tropical forest diversity-competition for resources, or herbivore pests?' For the first time, University of Utah biologists compared the two mechanisms in a single study. The team analyzed how neighboring trees influence the growth and survival of nine coexisting species of the tree genus Inga in the Panama rainforest. They found that pests and

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Unique diversity of the genetic history of the Iberian Peninsula revealed by dual studies

Researchers have analyzed ancient DNA from almost 300 individuals from the Iberian Peninsula, spanning more than 12,000 years, in two studies published today in Current Biology and Science. The first study looked at hunter-gatherers and early farmers living in Iberia between 13,000 and 6,000 years ago. The second looked at individuals from the region over the last 8000 years. Together, the two pap

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Mysterious males: Asexual female nematodes produce males for sperm, not genes

Getting at why nematodes engaged in a unique female-favoring reproduction strategy produce males at all, researchers report that the asexual females produce limited numbers of male offspring to exploit them for their sperm in order to make more males, and in a ratio meaning the resultant sons are more likely to mate with their sisters.

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A new chemogenetic toolset

Inching closer to extending the approach to humans, researchers seeking to improve a promising strategy for noninvasively controlling cellular activity have reported the design of engineered ion-channels that can be activated by low doses of the FDA-approved anti-smoking drug varenicline.

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Charting 8,000 years of Iberian genomic history

Using ancient DNA recovered from over 270 Iberians representing an unprecedented timespan, researchers including David Reich have pieced together an 8,000-year-long genetic history of the Iberian Peninsula.

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Diet-related changes in human bite spread new speech sounds

Contradicting the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throughout human history, a new study reports that sounds such as 'f' and 'v', both common in many modern languages, are a relatively recent development — one brought about by diet-induced changes in the human bite.

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Using an anti-smoking drug to control neurons

A potent chemogenetic system pairs an anti-smoking drug with specially engineered proteins to change neuron activity. The research tool could one day be used to treat conditions like epilepsy or pain.

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Diet-induced changes favor innovation in speech sounds

Diet-induced changes in the human bite resulted in new sounds such as 'f' in languages all over the world, a study by an international team led by researchers at the University of Zurich has shown. The findings contradict the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throughout human history.

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Vaccine study confirms sensitivity of cholera test

Recently, the sensitivity of fecal microbiological cultures for detecting cholera has come under question. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases investigated this claim using a 'vaccine probe' analysis of a completed cholera vaccine cluster randomized trial to support the sensitivity of conventional microbiological culture for cholera.

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Europe's last hunter-gatherers were more diverse than thought, DNA evidence suggests

The genetic legacy of European hunter-gatherers who lived thousands of years ago is more complex than had been thought, according to new genomic evidence reported in Current Biology on March 14. The new findings point to more diversity and mixture amongst hunter-gatherers, especially in the Iberian Peninsula of Southwestern Europe now recognized as Portugal and Spain, who had endured the Last Glac

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Virtual reality prövar trafikmiljö för fotgängare

Det är svårt att studera hur fotgängare fungerar tillsammans med andra trafikanter eller att pröva nya trafiklösningar där fotgängare ska vistas. I många fall är det inte genomförbart med hänsyn till säkerheten. – Vi har utvecklat en fotgängarsimulator genom att använda modern VR-teknik och simulera trafiksituationer. Den ger oss möjligheter att studera fotgängare i olika situationer, säger Björn

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Facebook's Sloppy Data-Sharing Deals Might Be Criminal

Prosecutors in New York reportedly are investigating the company's sharing agreements with other firms, which may have exposed personal information without user consent.

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NASA’s Orion Crew Capsule May Launch on a Commercial Rocket

For years, NASA has been working on their massive Space Launch System (SLS), a next-generation heavy lift rocket that could launch cargo and astronauts beyond low-Earth orbit for the first time since the Apollo Program. They've been developing it in tandem with Orion, a crew capsule that would carry those astronauts into Earth orbit and beyond. Orion’s next big test flight, called EM-1, an uncrewe

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Astronomers Spot a Speeding Star Being Ejected From Our Milky Way Galaxy

The Milky Way Galaxy contains billions of stars. Though the vast majority of these are bound to the galaxy by gravity, astronomers have found a few tens of stars that are not orbiting but instead fleeing our galaxy at extreme speeds. These hypervelocity stars have intrigued researchers for years, and now a new mysterious player has entered the game. LAMOST-HVS, the closest of these fast-moving sta

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Narwhals spend at least half time diving for food, can fast for several days after meal

Narwhals—enigmatic arctic whales known for their sword-like tusk—spend over half their time diving to find food but are also able to last up to three days without a meal, according to a study by Manh Cuong Ngô and colleagues from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, published in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Narwhals spend at least half time diving for food, can fast for several days after meal

Narwhals—enigmatic arctic whales known for their sword-like tusk—spend over half their time diving to find food but are also able to last up to three days without a meal, according to a study by Manh Cuong Ngô and colleagues from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, published in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Humans couldn't pronounce 'f' and 'v' sounds before farming developed

The development of agriculture in the Neolithic transformed world languages thanks to softer food – a finding that resolves a long-standing puzzle of the origin of speech sounds

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Earth may be partly made of rocks from elsewhere in the galaxy

We’ve only seen one interstellar object, a rock called ‘Oumuamua that passed by in 2017, but they may be crucial to speeding up the planet-building process

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Holy fudge: soft foods helped humans form 'f' and 'v' sounds – study

Diet of porridge and gruel shaped human faces, which diversified English language The texts of the 16th century were first to record the F-word for posterity. It appeared in William Dunbar’s poem A Brash of Wowing in 1503 and later, thanks to an angry monk, in a note scrawled in the margin of a 1528 copy of De Officiis , Cicero’s moral manifesto. But according to researchers, the English language

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Mary Rose crew might have included sailors of African heritage

Bone analysis adds to evidence that Tudor England was a melting pot of ethnic diversity Analyses of skeletons from the Mary Rose are fleshing out the crew’s past, offering further evidence that Tudor England was a bustling scene of ethnic diversity. Researchers say studies on the human remains recovered from the warship, which sank in the Solent during a battle with the French in 1545, have revea

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How lab-grown meat is gonna change our moral and philosophical attitudes

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Clarketech: Technologies Indistinguishable from Magic

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Did Cooking Really Give Us The F-Word?

Some linguists are arguing that the advent of softer food, thousands of years ago, led to changes in biting patterns and eventually, to more frequent use of sounds like "f" and "v" in human language. (Image credit: Scott Moisik)

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How Diet Changed Language

How Diet Changed Language Eating softer processed foods changed the position of humans' adult teeth, making it easier to say sounds like "f" and "v," new research suggests. Bread_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Peggy Greb, USDA ARS via Wikipedia Rights information: Public domain Human Thursday, March 14, 2019 – 14:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — What you eat may influence what s

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Tropical Tectonic Collisions May Have Unleashed Ancient Ice Ages

Earth's icy periods may owe their existence to tropical mountains.

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Chemogenetics Method Uses Anti-Smoking Drug to Control Cells

A new set of engineered receptors responds to an FDA-approved drug to provide the most potent chemogenetic toolkit to date.

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Softer Diets Allowed Early Humans to Pronounce "F," "V" Sounds

Drastic dietary changes during the agricultural revolution altered the configuration of the human bite, paving the way for new sounds in spoken language, a new study finds.

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In the Future, Everything Will Be Made of Chickpeas

In 2007, Poorvi Patodia was pregnant and felt like she was eating too many chips. Her cravings for salty, crunchy snacks were intense, but what moms should eat while pregnant is a touchy subject. “I had this thought of, What else could I be eating that’s better for me? ” she says. “I remembered these roasted chickpeas that my mom used to make.” Patodia started roasting chickpeas for herself. She

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Ancient DNA research shines spotlight on Iberia

The largest study to date of ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula (modern-day Portugal and Spain) offers new insights into the populations that lived in this region over the last 8,000 years. The most startling discovery suggests that local Y chromosomes were almost completely replaced during the Bronze Age.

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In this nematode species, males are needed for reproduction—but not their genes

In 1949, the young biologist Victor Nigon described the reproduction of various species of nematodes, small roundworms that live in the soil in its doctoral thesis. These include Mesorhabditis belari, whose rare male specimens are required for reproduction, even though the genetic material found in sperm is rarely used by eggs. The resulting embryo produces a female, who is a clone of its mother.

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Study uncovers genetic switches that control process of whole-body regeneration

When it comes to regeneration, some animals are capable of amazing feats—if you cut the leg off a salamander, it will grow back. When threatened, some geckos drop their tails as a distraction, and regrow them later.

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Are we at the limits of measuring water-repellent surfaces?

How liquids are repelled by a surface, a property called "wettability," is important for engineers to develop aircraft that resist ice formation, for fashion designers developing outdoor gear that repels rain and dirt, and many other fields. Researchers developing whole new surface materials in the lab also need accurate measurement of wetting properties so they can compare how different surfaces

1h

Diet-induced changes favor innovation in speech sounds

Diet-induced changes in the human bite resulted in new sounds such as "f" in languages all over the world, according to a study by an international team led by researchers at the University of Zurich. The findings contradict the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throughout human history.

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Pests and the plant defenses against them drive diversity in tropical rainforests

Researchers have been baffled by tropical rainforest diversity for over a century; 650 different tree species can exist in an area covering two football fields, yet similar species never grow next to each other. It seems like it's good to be different than your neighbors, but why?

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Europe's last hunter-gatherers were more diverse than thought, DNA evidence suggests

The genetic legacy of European hunter-gatherers who lived thousands of years ago is more complex than had been thought, according to new genomic evidence reported in Current Biology on March 14. The new findings point to more diversity and mixture amongst hunter-gatherers, especially in the Iberian Peninsula of Southwestern Europe now recognized as Portugal and Spain, who had endured the Last Glac

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Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth's ice ages, study finds

Over the last 540 million years, the Earth has weathered three major ice ages—periods during which global temperatures plummeted, producing extensive ice sheets and glaciers that have stretched beyond the polar caps.

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Exotic 'second sound' phenomenon observed in pencil lead

The next time you set a kettle to boil, consider this scenario: After turning the burner off, instead of staying hot and slowly warming the surrounding kitchen and stove, the kettle quickly cools to room temperature and its heat hurtles away in the form of a boiling-hot wave.

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In this nematode species, males are needed for reproduction—but not their genes

In 1949, the young biologist Victor Nigon described the reproduction of various species of nematodes, small roundworms that live in the soil in its doctoral thesis. These include Mesorhabditis belari, whose rare male specimens are required for reproduction, even though the genetic material found in sperm is rarely used by eggs. The resulting embryo produces a female, who is a clone of its mother.

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Study uncovers genetic switches that control process of whole-body regeneration

When it comes to regeneration, some animals are capable of amazing feats—if you cut the leg off a salamander, it will grow back. When threatened, some geckos drop their tails as a distraction, and regrow them later.

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Pests and the plant defenses against them drive diversity in tropical rainforests

Researchers have been baffled by tropical rainforest diversity for over a century; 650 different tree species can exist in an area covering two football fields, yet similar species never grow next to each other. It seems like it's good to be different than your neighbors, but why?

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The rise of farming altered our bite and changed how people talk

Soft, processed foods altered our bite, which added “f” and “v” sounds to speech and changed languages worldwide, a study finds.

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New Research: People Who Get Defeated By AI Feel Horrible

Rigged Game Whether it’s chess, Go, or Starcraft II, computer scientists are getting pretty good at building artificial intelligence that excels at games once dominated by people. For the hapless humans who are left eating the pro-gamer AI’s dust, coming second to the bots again and again has a noticeable demoralizing effect, according to a study presented at a recent conference on human-robot in

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Treatments for childhood cancer can devastate lives years later. Scientists are trying to change that

Doctors and researchers are working to better understand the long-term complications of chemotherapy and radiation, and even prevent them

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Keep your distance, bro: tropical plants avoid close relatives

The mathematics of dominance is confounded in the rainforest. Samantha Page reports.

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Renewable energy won't make Bitcoin 'green,' but tweaking its mining mechanism might

The cryptocurrency Bitcoin is known for its energy footprint. Now, a researcher suggests that renewable hydropower production cannot supply the large quantities of energy needed to power machinery used to validate Bitcoin transactions.

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NYC mayor: Extend shoreline to protect city from storms

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is announcing a plan to protect lower Manhattan from rising sea levels by surrounding it with earthen berms and extending its shoreline by as much as 500 feet (152 meters).

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How the Bizarre Economics of Airplanes Raises the Stakes of the Boeing Fallout

On Wednesday, the U.S. government ordered the grounding of Boeing’s 737 Max airplanes , following similar mandates in the preceding days by dozens of countries after a crash of one such plane in Ethiopia. The hundreds of 737 Max planes previously in service worldwide are all currently grounded . In many other industries, when a product has a flaw, companies can rely on a range of workarounds, suc

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Activists report probable dead vaquita porpoise in Mexico

The environmentalist group Sea Shepherd says it found the badly decomposed body of what appeared to be a vaquita porpoise, one of perhaps only 10 that remain in the world.

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Facebook blames server problem for massive outage

Facebook blamed a "server configuration change" Thursday for a massive outage affecting its applications around the world and brought fresh attention to the embattled social networking leader.

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A pleasure to burn: Why do people like spicy foods?

Humans are the only animals known to willingly eat foods that cause irritation, discomfort, and even pain. Theories for why range from thrill-seeking behavior to an evolutionary adaptation for seeking foods that reduce pathogens. Taste results from an interplay of genes, culture, memory, and personality, a complex design that scientists are only now beginning to understand. None If a Martian anth

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The sweet spot: Scientists discover taste center of human brain

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a new method of statistical analysis, researchers have discovered the taste center in the human brain by uncovering which parts of the brain distinguish different types of tastes.

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Cause of cathode degradation identified for nickle-rich materials

A team of scientists including researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have identified the causes of degradation in a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, as well as possible remedies. Their findings, published on Mar. 7, 2019 in Advanced Functional Materials, could lead to the development of more affordable and

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Thanking and apologizing: Talk that isn't cheap

A new paper from Carnegie Mellon University researchers introduces a framework, 'Responsibility Exchange Theory,' for understanding why thanking and apologizing, as well as bragging and blaming, matter so much, and presents novel experimental studies that reveal the psychology underlying these communications.

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New study underscores significant benefit of conversations between clinicians and patients

A new study shows that an innovative communication program developed by Ariadne Labs and tested at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute resulted in more, earlier and better conversations between patients and their oncology clinicians, and led to significant reductions in emotional suffering for patients with advanced cancer.

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Outcomes of intervention to improve communication between clinicians, patient with advanced cancer

These studies report on the outcomes of a clinical trial that evaluated a quality-improvement intervention for communication between oncology clinicians and patients with advanced cancer. The studies are being published to coincide with presentation at a meeting. The clinical trial was conducted at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, and included 91 clinicians and 278 patients with advanced

2h

Activists report probable dead vaquita porpoise in Mexico

The environmentalist group Sea Shepherd says it found the badly decomposed body of what appeared to be a vaquita porpoise, one of perhaps only 10 that remain in the world.

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Facebook blames server problem for massive outage

Facebook blamed a "server configuration change" Thursday for a massive outage affecting its applications around the world and brought fresh attention to the embattled social networking leader.

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Andrew Yang is ready to talk robots on the Democratic debate stage

submitted by /u/TonyThreeTimes [link] [comments]

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The importance of puberty: A call for better research models

Puberty is much more than just a time of biological overdrive, propelled by sexual maturation. Progress in developmental science has greatly broadened the perspective of this critical maturational milestone.

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Why fly the coop? With shortage of mates, some birds choose to help others raise offspring

It's not uncommon for young adults to pitch in and help out with the care of younger siblings. But it turns out that sometimes birds choose to become avian au pairs rather than raise their own brood.

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Why fly the coop? With shortage of mates, some birds choose to help others raise offspring

It's not uncommon for young adults to pitch in and help out with the care of younger siblings. But it turns out that sometimes birds choose to become avian au pairs rather than raise their own brood.

2h

Machine learning sheds light on the biology of toxin exposure

Exposure to potentially harmful chemicals is a reality of life. Our ancestors, faced with naturally occurring toxins, evolved mechanisms to detoxify and expel damaging substances. In the modern world, our bodies regularly process chemicals, from medicines and food additives to agricultural and industrial chemicals, to protect our tissues from harm.

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Machine learning sheds light on the biology of toxin exposure

Exposure to potentially harmful chemicals is a reality of life. Our ancestors, faced with naturally occurring toxins, evolved mechanisms to detoxify and expel damaging substances. In the modern world, our bodies regularly process chemicals, from medicines and food additives to agricultural and industrial chemicals, to protect our tissues from harm.

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Video: Are we running out of helium?

Did you realize that just like certain animals here on Earth, there are endangered elements, too? For example, we're constantly losing helium, a gas that defies gravity and escapes our atmosphere into space. This incredible element is in high demand all over the globe. It's also way too expensive to create in the laboratory, and that's bad news for more than just your birthday party!

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Phones crushed to reveal precious metals

Researchers are blending mobile phones to find out what rare and precious metals are in them.

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Sea otters' tool use leaves behind distinctive archaeological evidence

Researchers have analyzed the use by sea otters of large, shoreline rocks as 'anvils' to break open shells, as well as the resulting shell middens. The researchers used ecological and archaeological approaches to identify patterns that are characteristic of sea otter use of such locations. By looking at evidence of past anvil stone use, scientists could better understand sea otter habitat use.

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The best running headphones

Gadgets They'll stay snug and keep you pumped while you workout. The best running headphones that'll keep you pumped while you workout in 2019.

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WWDC 2019: Apple announces details of its 'biggest event of the year'

New versions of iPhone software and Mac Pros are expected to be the highlights of the event

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Index Funds to Overtake Active in U.S. by 2021, Moody's Says

submitted by /u/climate_throwaway234 [link] [comments]

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The Conversation

Don’t Call Me LGBTQ In the January/February issue, Jonathan Rauch made the case for adopting one overarching designation for sexual minorities. He proposed using a single letter: Q . What a relief to read something about the absurdity of the “alphabet soup” designation for gay people. I totally agree with Jonathan Rauch that it has become a symbol “for the excesses of identity politics,” which ha

2h

Mayor Announces $10 Billion Plan to Save NYC From Rising Seas

Climate Proof New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has a plan to “climate-proof” his city. In an op-ed published in New York Magazine on Wednesday, de Blasio detailed his $10 billion plan to protect Manhattan from the coming rising sea levels and powerful storms that seem almost inevitable in the face of climate change. “It will be one of the most complex environmental and engineering challenges ou

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Tre af fire testede togvogne fra ulykkestog kunne ikke holde fast på anhængere

Alligevel har flere selskaber fået dispensation for at køre med de fejlramte lommevogne igen.

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Bernese Mars camera CaSSIS returns spectacular images

Three years ago, on March 14 2016, the Bernese Mars camera CaSSIS started its journey to Mars with the 'ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter' spacecraft. The camera system has been observing Mars from its primary science orbit since April 2018 and provides high-resolution, color images of the surface. On 2 March 2019, CaSSIS also delivered its first image of InSight, NASA's lander on Mars.

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'Tingle' wearable device improves position tracking accuracy utilizing thermal sensors

In a new study researchers report that a wearable tracking device they developed achieves higher accuracy in position tracking using thermal sensors in addition to inertial measurement and proximity sensors. The wrist-worn device, called Tingle, was also able to distinguish between behaviors directed toward six different locations on the head.

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Bullying evolves with age and proves difficult to escape from

An international team conducted a study on bullying roles among peers. Children who are involved in bullying at age 11, may remain involved throughout their entire adolescence.

2h

IQ a better predictor of adult economic success than math

IQ in childhood is a better indicator of adult wealth than math for very preterm and very low-weight babies, according to a new study.

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Wild African ape reactions to novel camera traps

An international team of researchers analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. Responses varied by species, and even among individuals within the same species, but one thing was consistent throughout: the apes definitely noticed the cameras.

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Daily briefing: It’s 2050 and this is what we did to stop global warming

Daily briefing: It’s 2050 and this is what we did to stop global warming Daily briefing: It’s 2050 and this is what we did to stop global warming, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00863-x Let’s be optimistic. Plus: leading scientists and ethicists call for a moratorium on heritable genome editing and 6 tips for international students targeting US grad schools.

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In California, Rising Seas Pose a Bigger Economic Threat Than Wildfires, Quakes

The combined impact from storms and higher sea levels will be greater than the worst natural disasters in state history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

We’re Due For a Flu Pandemic. How Will It Start?

A flu pandemic could strike without warning in the coming years, global health experts warn.

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An Open Letter Endorsing the Global School Strike for Climate

More than 240 scientists have already signed a document supporting students around the world in their demand for bold action to make sure the world they grow up in is livable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Comic Relief: School shuns red nose plastic because of pollution fears

Sir David Attenborough has written to the children saying he supports what they're doing.

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Is it ethical to genetically engineer people?

Bioethicist Matthew Liao is open to genetic engineering in theory, but he says he was rather horrified to learn that twin girls had been born in China after a researcher genetically modified their embryos to resist HIV infection. “My first reaction was, ‘This is really bad,'” recalls Liao, a professor of bioethics, a moral philosopher, and the director of the College of Global Public Health’s Cen

3h

College drinking intervention strategies need a refresh

Peer approval is the best indicator of the tendency for new college students to drink or smoke according to new research from Michigan State University. This new finding is key to help universities address the problems of underage or binge drinking.

3h

Cell therapy could replace need for kidney transplants

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) scientists are working on a promising approach for treatment of chronic kidney disease – regeneration of damaged tissues using therapeutic cells.

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Oral bacteria in pancreas linked to more aggressive tumours

The presence of oral bacteria in so-called cystic pancreatic tumours is associated with the severity of the tumour, a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal Gut reports. It is hoped that the results can help to improve diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

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A New Discovery Upends What We Know About Viruses

It is a truth universally acknowledged among virologists that a single virus, carrying a full set of genes, must be in want of a cell. A virus is just a collection of genes packaged into a capsule. It infiltrates and hijacks a living cell to make extra copies of itself. Those daughter viruses then bust out of their ailing host, and each finds a new cell to infect. Rinse, and repeat. This is how a

3h

Facebook Had a Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

You Had a Bad Day Facebook just had a very bad day. Facebook, including Messenger, and Instagram users across North America experienced outages for most of Wednesday, starting in the afternoon and ending late the same night . Third party outage sites suggested it affected users across the entire globe . The media reported it was perhaps the longest interruption ever experienced by two of the larg

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European satellite captures Nasa Mars lander from orbit

Europe's newest satellite at Mars has spied the landing site of the American-led InSight probe.

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The Voters Democrats Aren’t Really Fighting Over

Beto O’Rourke’s announcement Thursday that he’s seeking the presidency will compound a demographic mismatch that could powerfully shape the outcome of the 2020 Democratic race. The sprawling Democratic field is already so large, and so diverse in race and gender, that strategists are expecting tough competition in the early stages for almost every group of voters imaginable. But there’s one poten

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Little Short for a Stormtrooper? Newfound Spiders Named for 'Star Wars' Villains

Like the white-armored and -helmeted Stormtroopers from "Star Wars," these spiders are tough to tell apart.

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The Climate Benefits of the Green New Deal

Too many people are focusing on how much it will cost and not on the trillions of dollars it could save — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bernese Mars camera CaSSIS returns spectacular images

Three years ago, on March 14 2016, the Bernese Mars camera CaSSIS started its journey to Mars with the 'ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter' spacecraft. The camera system developed at the University of Bern has been observing Mars from its primary science orbit since April 2018 and provides high-resolution, colour images of the surface. On 2 March 2019, CaSSIS also delivered its first image of InSight, NASA

3h

The importance of puberty: A call for better research models

Puberty is much more than just a time of biological overdrive, propelled by sexual maturation. Progress in developmental science has greatly broadened the perspective of this critical maturational milestone.

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Social risk factors and readmission penalties

New research shows that US safety net hospitals could benefit substantially from a new model that accounts for social risk factors like poverty and living in a disadvantaged neighborhood in determining how the federal government penalizes hospitals financially for their readmission rates.

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Research demonstrates how immunotherapy may be effective for fighting TB

New research from the University of Notre Dame suggests that structures released by the infected cells may be used in tandem with antibiotics to boost the body's immune system, helping fight off the disease.

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'Tingle' wearable device improves position tracking accuracy utilizing thermal sensors

In a new study published in npj Digital Medicine, a team led by Child Mind Institute researchers report that a wearable tracking device they developed achieves higher accuracy in position tracking using thermal sensors in addition to inertial measurement and proximity sensors. The wrist-worn device, called Tingle, was also able to distinguish between behaviors directed toward six different locatio

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Simple directions from parents can guide children's discovery

Whether it's probing a child's understanding of a topic through questions or engaging in hands-on activities alongside them, parents can guide their children to learn in new ways through simple directions, according to a study by psychology researchers at The University of Texas at Austin.

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Lightweight metal foams become bone hard and explosion proof after being nanocoated

Strong enough not only for use in impact protection systems in cars, but able to absorb the shock waves produced by a detonation. Those are just some of the properties shown by the metallic foams developed by materials scientists Stefan Diebels and Anne Jung at Saarland University. Their super lightweight and extremely strong metal foams can be customized for a wide range of applications. The insp

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Doctor video visits increase access to healthcare but could risk fragmentation

In today's fast-paced digital society, virtual doctor visits are on the rise and offer patients a more convenient way to receive medical care from anywhere. Dr. Winston Liaw from the UH College of Medicine led the first study to examine the relationship between telehealth use and access to primary care.

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Antiviral therapy improves survival rates for kidney transplant recipients with hepatitis B or C

Prior to the development of antiviral therapy, kidney transplant recipients infected with either hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV) experienced poor outcomes. In a new study in the Journal of Hepatology, published by Elsevier, researchers report favorable 10-year survival rates for patients with HBV and/or HCV treated with antiviral agents and advise that antiviral therapy should be systematic

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This Guy is Hacking Printers to Warn About Job-Stealing AI

Viral Marketing If you work in finance, your printer may have recently spewed out a bizarre warning about the future of your industry. The warning, which took the form of a glitchy-looking letter conveyed the warning that 94 percent of finance professionals could be replaced by AI by 2024. It’s been sent to over 623,000 printers with publicly-accessible ports, according to its creators — an ambit

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How to hide the Samsung Galaxy S10’s hole-punch camera cutout

By now you may have noticed that the new Samsung Galaxy S10s have a new “hole-punch” design on the front-facing camera that allows for thinner bezels along the top of the screen. …

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How H2 becomes ‘molecule that made the universe’

High-speed lasers are helping to shine a spotlight on the unusual chemistry of the molecule that made the universe, Trihydrogen, or H3+. H3+ is prevalent in the universe, the Milky Way, gas giants, and the Earth’s ionosphere. The lab of Marcos Dantus, a professor in chemistry and physics at Michigan State University, is also creating and studying it. The researchers are using ultrafast lasers—and

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Billions pledged to halt Africa's forest loss

With the world's forests increasingly under threat from climate change and logging, leaders and top bank chiefs pledged billions on Thursday to help reverse the steep decline in Africa's woodland areas.

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Why the College Scandal Touched a Nonpartisan Nerve

In 1884, Leland Stanford, a railroad tycoon, and his wife, Jane, traveled from California to Massachusetts to seek the advice of the president of Harvard University. What, Stanford asked Charles Eliot, would it take to found a world-class university? “Five million dollars,” Eliot replied . “Well, Jane,” Stanford, turning to his wife, said after a little silence, “we could manage that, couldn’t we

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China is about to overtake America in AI research

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

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Noninvasive ultrasound stimulation of spleen could lead to new treatments for inflammatory arthritis

Researchers at the University of Minnesota, in collaboration with researchers at Medtronic, have shown that noninvasive daily ultrasound stimulation of the spleen in mice with inflammatory arthritis resulted in significantly less joint swelling compared to arthritic mice that were not treated. The research is a first step to developing new treatment options for more than a million people in the Un

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Researchers reverse the flow of time on IBM's quantum computer

An international team of scientists led by the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory explored the concept of reversing time in a first-of-its-kind experiment, managing to return a computer briefly to the past. The results, published March 13 in the journal Scientific Reports, suggest new paths for exploring the backward flow of time in quantum systems and present new possibilities

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Solar-powered moisture harvester collects and cleans water from air

A breakthrough by engineers at The University of Texas at Austin offers new solution through solar-powered technology that absorbs moisture from the air and returns it as clean, usable water. This 'super-sponge' could be used in disaster situations, poverty-stricken areas and developing countries.

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Machine learning sheds light on the biology of toxin exposure

Harvard Medical School investigators have developed a machine learning approach using high-quality, large-scale animal model data that sheds new light on the biology of the liver and kidneys after toxin exposure.

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Older adults with multiple chronic illnesses

An expert group of geriatricians, cardiologists, and general physicians have identified a set of action steps, based on a previous set of guiding principles from the American Geriatrics Society, to help healthcare providers work with older adults and caregivers to make the best treatment choices possible when addressing multiple chronic conditions.

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The Climate Benefits of the Green New Deal

Too many people are focusing on how much it will cost and not on the trillions of dollars it could save — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Massive outage adds to growing Facebook woes

Facebook appeared to be back in operation Thursday after a massive outage affecting its applications around the world, creating fresh woes for the social network leader under fire for its handling of sensitive user data.

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English sea walls get wired to measure flood risk in real time

English sea walls get wired to measure flood risk in real time English sea walls get wired to measure flood risk in real time, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00720-x On the shores of Liverpool Bay, ‘WireWall’ device helps engineers mount a battle against the waves.

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IVF birthweights increased over 25 years

A new study has revealed that babies born by in vitro fertilization have increased in birthweight by nearly 200g over the past 25 years.

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A new method to diagnose cancer cells inside lymph nodes

The vast majority of cancer deaths occur due to the spread of cancer from one organ to another, which can happen either through the blood or the lymphatic system. However, it can be tricky to detect this early enough. Researchers have developed a new method that would allow doctors to detect cancers in the lymph nodes while they are still small, before they travel to other parts of the body. This

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New cholesterol-lowering drug could help patients unable to take statins

A new class of oral cholesterol-lowering drug could help patients unable to take statins due to side effects.

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Blood test to diagnose heart attacks is flawed, warn researchers

The blood test used to diagnose a heart attack (acute myocardial infarction) in patients admitted to hospital can be misleading, warn researchers in a new study.

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New way of testing for cocaine discovered

Researchers from the University of Dundee have developed a new chemical sensor for cocaine that may lead to potential new point of seizure tests for police officers, customs officers, prison officers and medical professionals who routinely test for controlled substances.

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Why fly the coop? With shortage of mates, some birds choose to help others raise offspring

After a five-year experiment, researchers from Florida State University and the Tallahassee-based Tall Timbers Research Station found that when fewer mates were available for brown-headed nuthatches, these small pine-forest birds opted to stay home and help their parents or other adults raise their offspring.

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Bacteria may help frogs attract mates

The role played by symbiotic microorganisms isolated from the skin of anurans has been discovered by researchers in Brazil. The study is published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Researchers find epigenetic loss that changes how cells obtain energy from cancer

It has been known for decades that cancer cells have an altered metabolism and it is seen in several biochemical pathways and in particular, in the way they get energy for their survival. Now, a new article describes an epigenetic injury found in human tumours which created this altered path to take energy from the cancer.

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Can an antifreeze protein also promote ice formation?

Antifreeze is life's means of surviving in cold winters: Natural antifreeze proteins help fish, insects, plants and even bacteria live through low temperatures that should turn their liquid parts to deadly shards of ice. Strangely enough, in very cold conditions, the same proteins can also promote the growth of ice crystals.

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Business this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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What Makes Music Special to Us? – Issue 70: Variables

We are all born with a predisposition for music, a predisposition that develops spontaneously and is refined by listening to music. Nearly everyone possesses the musical skills essential to experiencing and appreciating music. Think of “relative pitch,”recognizing a melody separately from the exact pitch or tempo at which it is sung, and “beat perception,”hearing regularity in a varying rhythm. E

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Wikipedia and the Wisdom of Polarized Crowds – Issue 70: Variables

In 2013, James Evans, a University of Chicago sociologist and computational scientist, launched a study to see if science forged a bridge across the political divide. Did conservatives and liberals at least agree on biology and physics and economics? Short answer: No. “We found more polarization than we expected,” Evans told me recently. People were even more polarized over science than sports te

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How Designers Engineer Luck Into Video Games – Issue 70: Variables

On Sept. 16, 2007, a Japanese YouTuber who goes by the handle “Computing Aesthetic” uploaded a forty-eight-second-long video with the deafening title, “ULTRA MEGA SUPER LUCKY SHOT.” The video shows a high-scoring shot in Peggle, a vastly popular video game, loosely based on Japanese pachinko machines, in which a ball bearing clatters down the screen, accruing points as it bounces through a crowd

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Climate striker Greta Thunberg nominated for Nobel peace prize

Greta Thunberg, who has inspired schoolchildren around the world to go on strike in protest against climate change, has been nominated for the Nobel peace prize

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Rise and fall of the landline: 143 years of telephones becoming more accessible – and smart

The global economy has changed dramatically over the past century and a half.

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Study reveals the wolf within your pet dog

Wolves lead and dogs follow – but both can cooperate with us, say experts studying wolves tamed from birth.

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Nuro’s robot delivery cars are coming to Houston, Texas

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

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How Gravity Built the World's Fastest Jet Suit | WIRED

submitted by /u/demonspawn79 [link] [comments]

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Unyttige grønne poser kan være fortid for københavnerne

De grønne poser til bioaffald består af 70 procent plastik og bliver sorteret fra som almindelige plastposer. Det har fået Københavns Kommune til at genoverveje posernes fremtid.

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New call to ban gene-edited babies divides biologists

The debate about whether to declare a “moratorium” on germline editing ratchets up

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Brazil's Embraer posts net loss for 2018

Brazilian airplane manufacturer Embraer, in the process of a partial takeover by US giant Boeing, announced a net loss of 669 million reais ($183 million) for 2018.

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Scientists left camera traps to record wild apes—watch what happens

Researchers analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. Responses varied by species and even among individuals within the same species, but one thing was consistent throughout: the apes definitely noticed the cameras—they poked them, stared at them, and occasionally tried to bite them

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Engineering living 'scaffolds' for building materials

When the inside of a mollusk shell shimmers in sunlight, the iridescence isn't produced by colored pigments but by tiny physical structures self-assembled from living cells and inorganic components. Now, a team of researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has developed a platform to mimic this self-assembly ability by engineering living cells to

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As uniform as cloned soldiers, new spiders were named after the Stormtroopers in Star Wars

Despite being widely distributed across north and central South America, bald-legged spiders had never been confirmed in Colombia until the recent study by the team of Drs Carlos Perafan and Fernando Perez-Miles (Universidad de la Republica, Uruguay) and William Galvis (Universidad Nacional de Colombia). Published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, their research paper describes a total of six pr

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From mirror-image biology to enhanced therapeutic proteins

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have succeeded in reconstructing biomolecules in their mirror-image form. The researchers' goal is to create a mirror-image artificial protein synthesis system. Their aim is to produce mirror-image therapeutic proteins, such as antibodies, which would be protected from biological breakdown in the body and do not provoke any immune response.

4h

Critical materials: Researchers eye huge supply of rare-earth elements from mining waste

Researchers have examined a method to extract rare-earth elements from mining waste that could provide the world with a reliable supply of the valuable materials.

4h

Scientists left camera traps to record wild apes—watch what happens

Researchers analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. Responses varied by species and even among individuals within the same species, but one thing was consistent throughout: the apes definitely noticed the cameras—they poked them, stared at them, and occasionally tried to bite them

4h

Tobacco control policies linked to reduced smoking

Increases in tobacco taxes and smoke-free policies in European countries were significantly related with a reduction in smoking among older adults, according to a new Addiction study.

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Engineering living 'scaffolds' for building materials

Researchers at DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a platform that uses living cells as 'scaffolds' for building self-assembled composite materials. The technology could open the door to self-healing materials and other advanced applications in bioelectronics, biosensing, and smart materials.

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Wild African ape reactions to novel camera traps

An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. Responses varied by species, and even among individuals within the same species, but one thing was consistent throughout: t

4h

Traffic accidents involving moose are 13 times more likely to result in human death

More than 500 traffic crashes involving moose occur in northern New England each year, and the injuries sustained by a vehicle's occupants — because of the height and weight of the animal — can be far more serious and more likely to result in fatalities than collisions with deer, researchers report.

4h

From mirror-image biology to enhanced therapeutic proteins

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have succeeded in reconstructing biomolecules in their mirror-image form. The researchers' goal is to create a mirror-image artificial protein synthesis system. Their aim is to produce mirror-image therapeutic proteins, such as antibodies, which would be protected from biological breakdown in the body and do not provoke any immune response.

4h

What is the association between singing in choir, voice disorders among children?

This study looked at whether singing in a children's choir was associated with developing voice disorders. Nearly 1,500 children from Spain (ages 8 to 14) were included, 752 children who sang in choirs and 743 who didn't. Children were examined for vocal cord problems; their parents, choir directors and teachers of the children who didn't sing were surveyed.

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Brain wave stimulation may improve Alzheimer's symptoms

By exposing mice to a unique combination of light and sound, MIT neuroscientists have shown they can improve cognitive and memory impairments similar to those seen in Alzheimer's patients.

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Renewable energy won't make Bitcoin 'green,' but tweaking its mining mechanism might

The cryptocurrency Bitcoin is known for its energy footprint. Now, researcher Alex de Vries, from PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) in the Netherlands, suggests that renewable hydropower production cannot supply the large quantities of energy needed to power machinery used to validate Bitcoin transactions. In a Commentary publishing March 14 in the journal Joule, he highlights the vast quantities of el

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Scientists left camera traps to record wild apes — watch what happens

Researchers analyzed video from remote camera-trap devices placed in ape-populated forests throughout Africa to see how wild apes would react to these unfamiliar objects. Responses varied by species and even among individuals within the same species, but one thing was consistent throughout: the apes definitely noticed the cameras — they poked them, stared at them, and occasionally tried to bite t

4h

Facebook's 'pivot' is less about privacy and more about profits

Facebook's founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg's latest promise is that his social media conglomerate will become a "privacy-focused" one. By turns lauded and lambasted, this move does not quite address users' primary problems with the company.

4h

Fitbit Versa Lite Review: More for Less

This pared-down smartwatch still has just about everything you need.

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Nytt mobilnät får vässad teknik

5G är namnet på den generation mobilnät som står på tur att ta över efter 4G. Det är på många sätt överlägset sin föregångare, med mellan tio och hundra gånger snabbare dataöverföring och mycket kortare svarstider i kommunikationen. – 5G innebär högre och säkrare datahastigheter och runt hörnet väntar gruvor och skogsmaskiner styrda på distans och självopererande lager och industrier, säger Mahmo

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Converting biomass by applying mechanical force

Nanoscientists have succeeded in demonstrating a new reaction mechanism to cleave cellulose efficiently. This new reaction could lead to an efficient, environmentally friendly and cost-effective process for the conversion of biomass.

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Critical materials: Researchers eye huge supply of rare-earth elements from mining waste

Researchers have examined a method to extract rare-earth elements from mining waste that could provide the world with a reliable supply of the valuable materials.

4h

Buying and selling cattle can link individual farms to thousands of others per purchase

Understanding the complex networks of 'contact chains' between British farms, could help identify potential routes for spread of infections and improve disease control strategies for the cattle industry.

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Free fatty acids appear to rewire cells to promote obesity-related breast cancer

Free fatty acids in the blood are linked with higher rates of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer in obese postmenopausal women, according to a new study.

4h

Democracy linked to global health gains in low-, middle-income countries

A new study suggests that a better way to measure the role of democracy in public health is to examine the causes of adult mortality, such as noncommunicable diseases, HIV, cardiovascular disease and transportation injuries. Little international assistance targets these noncommunicable diseases.

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As uniform as cloned soldiers, new spiders were named after the Stormtroopers in Star Wars

Despite being widely distributed across north and central South America, bald-legged spiders had never been confirmed in Colombia until the recent study by the team of Drs Carlos Perafan and Fernando Perez-Miles (Universidad de la Republica, Uruguay) and William Galvis (Universidad Nacional de Colombia). Published in the open-access journal ZooKeys, their research paper describes a total of six pr

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New screening method developed to confirm if deuteration improves metabolic stability

A collaboration of ANSTO scientists led by the National Deuteration Facility (NDF) has developed a new screening method to rapidly determine if a deuterated molecule has improved metabolic stability. The research was published in Analytica Chimica Acta and is part of a post-doctoral research project of Dr. Rhys Murphy, a lead author on the paper.

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Researchers put machine learning on path to quantum advantage

There are high hopes that quantum computing's tremendous processing power will someday unleash exponential advances in artificial intelligence. AI systems thrive when the machine learning algorithms used to train them are given massive amounts of data to ingest, classify and analyze. The more precisely that data can be classified according to specific characteristics, or features, the better the A

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Gravity influences how we make decisions – new research

Returning to Earth from the International Space Station, Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield remarked how making the right decision is vital in high pressure environments, saying: "Most of the time, you only really get one try to do most of the critical stuff and the consequences are life or death."

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1.8 billion adolescents got a check-up

Adolescent health around the world has worsened over the last 25 years, report researchers. Rapid population growth in low-income countries, which face the world’s worst health challenges, has outpaced positive gains from health efforts, according to the findings. There are now 1.8 billion adolescents in the world, up 20 percent since 1990. But of these, 430 million or 24 percent, now suffer from

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Sea otter archaeology could tell us about their 2-million-year history

Sea otters and other animals leave evidence of their tool use that can be studied using the same archaeological techniques as for ancient humans

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Scientists use a blender to reveal what's in our smartphones

Every year, 1.4 billion mobile phones are produced around the world. Many of us have more than one, but what are they made of, where do those materials come from, and what is the best thing …

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An Hour of Light and Sound a Day Might Keep Alzheimer's at Bay

Playing a flashing white light and a trilling sound reversed signs of Alzheimer’s in mice. Researchers are now trying it in humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

What the world's oldest eggs reveal about dinosaur evolution

A study of the world's earliest known dinosaur eggs reveals new information about the evolution of dinosaur reproduction.

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Touchscreens go 3-D with buttons that pulsate and vibrate under your fingertips

By pulsing or vibrating on demand, smartphone screens can help users navigate through a menu or can guide a user's finger to virtual on-screen buttons that can be created or removed wherever and whenever needed. Professor Stefan Seelecke and his team at Saarland University have developed a film that gives touchscreens a third dimension. The thin and extremely lightweight silicone film can adopt a

4h

Flashing Lights and Sounds Improve Memory and Learning Skills in Mice

Researchers hope the techniques can be applied to help people with Alzheimer’s.

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An Hour of Light and Sound a Day Might Keep Alzheimer's at Bay

Playing a flashing white light and a trilling sound reversed signs of Alzheimer’s in mice. Researchers are now trying it in humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tired of pie? Here are 3.14 other math holidays worth celebrating.

Science Pi Day is so last year. What about those of us with an appetite for math holidays that find celebrations of constants to be a bit too predictable?

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Læger råber politikere op om tolkegebyret: Vi mangler retningslinjer

Otte måneder efter tolkegebyret blev indført, får loven igen hård kritik. Uigennemsigtig, ikke gennemtænkt og kan betyde flere utilsigtede hændelser, lyder det fra læger, der ønsker klare retningslinjer.

4h

Marvel's 'Shang-Chi' Movie Just Got a Director

He's a big talent, not a big name.

4h

Storing energy with eggshells

Biowaste in the form of chicken eggshells has proved to be very effective for energy storage. This finding was made by an international team of researchers, including scientists of the Helmholtz Institute Ulm (HIU) established by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). In the journal Dalton Transactions of the Royal Society of Chemistry, they present the sustainable storage material that might be

4h

Patterns of diet and mobility in the last Neandertals and first modern humans

A new international study indicates that Neandertals and early modern humans probably had very similar diets, contradicting the assumption that Neandertals died out because their diet was insufficiently varied. But modern humans may have had an advantage because they were more mobile and had better connections over longer distances, according to a team headed by Dr. Christoph Wißing at the Univers

4h

Duplicate or mirror? Laser light determines chirality of molecules

"In pharmaceutics, being able to transition a molecule from one chirality to the other using light instead of wet chemistry would be a dream," says Professor Reinhard Dörner from the Institute of Atomic Physics at Goethe University. His doctoral student Kilian Fehre has now brought this dream one step closer to coming true. His observation: the formation of the right- or left-handed version depend

4h

From mirror-image biology to enhanced therapeutic proteins

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have succeeded in reconstructing biomolecules in their mirror-image form. The researchers' goal is to create a mirror-image artificial protein synthesis system. Their aim is to produce mirror-image therapeutic proteins, such as antibodies, which would be protected from biological breakdown in the body and do not provoke any immune response.

4h

From busking pigeons to head banging sea lions – can animals feel the beat?

A pigeon bopping along to a busker playing "Blurred Lines" by Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams set Twitter abuzz in 2013. It's certainly a catchy tune that I can't help but tap my foot along to, but is that really what the pigeon is doing?

4h

Early-warning toolkit to help schools identify students at risk of dropping out

Researchers at the University of Sheffield have launched an early-warning toolkit to help schools and colleges identify young people who are 'quietly disengaging' from education and at risk of dropping out or becoming NEET (not in education, employment or training).

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Our dangerous quest to perfect ourselves | Thomas Curran

Social psychologist Thomas Curran explores how the pressure to be perfect — in our social media feeds, in school, at work — is driving a rise in mental illness, especially among young people. Learn more about the causes of this phenomenon and how we can create a culture that celebrates the joys of imperfection.

4h

The All-American Contradictions of Queer Eye

Before the five divine spirits of the Queer Eye makeover crew whooshed into his life, the 47-year-old Joey Greene didn’t regularly bathe, cut his hair, buy clothes, cook meals, or deal with the fridge stench described as resembling rotten chicken carcasses that had been eaten and then excreted by a skunk. The director of a summer camp for kids, Greene lived out of a deteriorating RV and barely us

4h

The Senate Finds Its Backbone

On Wednesday, the Senate passed a resolution directing the president to end American participation in a foreign war—but not the one in Iraq, Syria, or Afghanistan. The relevant conflict is in Yemen. Despite campaigning on an “America first” foreign policy, President Donald Trump has the U.S. military participating in a civil war there, supporting a Sunni-aligned coalition led by Saudi Arabia. A c

4h

Bullying evolves with age and proves difficult to escape from

An international team from the Universities of Cordoba, Cambridge and Zurich conducted a study on bullying roles among peers. Children who are involved in bullying at age 11, may remain involved throughout their entire adolescence

4h

IQ a better predictor of adult economic success than math

IQ in childhood is a better indicator of adult wealth than math for very preterm and very low-weight babies, according to a new study in PLOS ONE.

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Flickers and buzzes sweep mouse brains of Alzheimer’s plaques

Precisely timed clicking noises can counter signs of Alzheimer’s in the brains of mice and improve memory.

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Hydro power will not make Bitcoin green

Analysis adds to evidence that the cryptocurrency carries enormous energy and environmental costs. Andrew Masterson reports.

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From busking pigeons to head banging sea lions – can animals feel the beat?

A pigeon bopping along to a busker playing "Blurred Lines" by Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams set Twitter abuzz in 2013. It's certainly a catchy tune that I can't help but tap my foot along to, but is that really what the pigeon is doing?

4h

Borgmestre: Ring 5-motorvej vil skabe mere trængsel

PLUS. Regeringen og Dansk Folkepartis planlægger at investere over seks af infrastruktur-milliarderne i en ny ringmotorvej vest for hovedstadsområdet. Men flere kommuner er utilfredse.

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Lasers illuminate a human eyeball’s living cells

Lasers illuminate a human eyeball’s living cells Lasers illuminate a human eyeball’s living cells , Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00822-6 Microscope equipped with mirrors and a laser reveals the back of the retina in real time.

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Blood diseases cured with bone marrow transplant

Doubling the low amount of total body radiation delivered to patients undergoing bone marrow transplants with donor cells that are only 'half-matched' increased the rate of engraftment from only about 50 percent to nearly 100 percent, according to a new study.

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When is best time to get flu shot? Analysis compares scenarios

When flu season peaks after mid-winter, tens of thousands of influenza cases and hundreds of deaths can likely be avoided if older adults wait until October to get their flu immunization.

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Renewable energy reduces the highest electric rates in the nation

Coal is the primary fuel source for Midwest electric utilities. Michigan Technological University researchers found that increasing renewable and distributed generation energy sources can save Michigan electric consumers money.

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An Hour of Light and Sound a Day Might Keep Alzheimer's at Bay

Playing a flashing white light and a trilling sound reversed signs of Alzheimer’s in mice. Researchers are now trying it in humans — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Researchers use algorithm from Netflix challenge to speed up biological imaging

Researchers have repurposed an algorithm originally developed for Netflix's 2009 movie preference prediction competition to create a method for acquiring classical Raman spectroscopy images of biological tissues at unprecedented speeds.

4h

Sentinels monitor converging ice cracks

The Copernicus Sentinel-1 radar mission shows how cracks cutting across Antarctica's Brunt ice shelf are on course to truncate the shelf and release an iceberg about the size of Greater London – it's just a matter of time.

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IQ a better predictor of adult economic success than maths

IQ in childhood is a better indicator of adult wealth than maths for very preterm and very low-weight babies, according to a new study in PLOS One by researchers at the University of Warwick and the University of Tennessee. This could change the education system for those with cognitive impairments.

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Novel methods for analyzing neural circuits for innate behaviors in insects

Insects show a variety of species-specific innate behaviors (instinctive behaviors). For example, a worker honeybee that has found flower nectar exhibits 8-shape waggle-dances upon returning to its beehive. A male moth that has detected a sex pheromone flies around to look for a female counterpart. There remain a number of questions about how a variety of innate behaviors are generated by function

5h

A cosmic bat in flight

Hidden in one of the darkest corners of the Orion constellation, this Cosmic Bat is spreading its hazy wings through interstellar space 2,000 light-years away. It is illuminated by the young stars nestled in its core — despite being shrouded by opaque clouds of dust, their bright rays still illuminate the nebula. Too dim to be discerned by the naked eye, NGC 1788 reveals its soft colors to ESO's

5h

Wolves lead, dogs follow — and both cooperate with humans

The statement is a bold one, especially as wolves have received a lot of negative attention in recent years. A recent study conducted by behavioral researchers, however, shows that dogs and wolves both work equally well with humans, albeit in different ways. The allegedly unequal brothers are thus much more similar than often assumed.

5h

Negative emotions can reduce our capacity to trust

It is no secret that a bad mood can negatively affect how we treat others. But can it also make us more distrustful? Yes, according to a new study, which shows that negative emotions reduce how much we trust others, even if these emotions were triggered by events that have nothing to do with the decision to trust.

5h

New technology accelerates the science of deceleration

While it's not a case of reinventing the wheel, researchers are looking at ways to improve standard braking equipment on trains and cars. By mixing carbon fibers into polymer-based brakes, researchers were able to design brakes that are self-lubricating.

5h

Researchers use algorithm from Netflix challenge to speed up biological imaging

Researchers have repurposed an algorithm originally developed for Netflix's 2009 movie preference prediction competition to create a method for acquiring classical Raman spectroscopy images of biological tissues at unprecedented speeds.

5h

Duplicate or mirror?

Seven of the ten most frequent medications contain chiral agents. These are molecules that occur in right- or left-handed forms. During chemical synthesis both forms usually occur in equal parts and have to be separated afterward, because chirality determines the agent's effect in the body. Physicists at Goethe University have now succeeded in using laser light for the purpose of creating either r

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New 'Avengers: Endgame' Trailer Does 'Whatever It Takes'

Hawkeye's got a mohawk, the team's got shiny new suits, and that's about all you'll get out of the latest 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer.

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Why Amazon Is Going After Netflix | CNBC

submitted by /u/Chispy [link] [comments]

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Adspurgte læger: Tjenestepligt i almen praksis gør intet godt for patienterne

Socialdemokratiets forslag om et halvt års tjenestepligt i almen praksis for nyuddannede læger, vil ikke hjælpe patienterne, mener danske læger.

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Researchers uncover new clues to surviving extinction

Scientists are peeking into ancient oceans to unravel the complexities of mass extinctions, past and future. A new examination of Earth's largest extinction by scientists at the California Academy of Sciences and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee sheds light on how ecosystems are changed by such transformative events. The study, published today in Biology Letters, suggests that the extinction

5h

Researchers uncover new clues to surviving extinction

Scientists are peeking into ancient oceans to unravel the complexities of mass extinctions, past and future. A new examination of Earth's largest extinction by scientists at the California Academy of Sciences and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee sheds light on how ecosystems are changed by such transformative events. The study, published today in Biology Letters, suggests that the extinction

5h

Sea otter archaeology could tell us about their 2-million-year history

Sea otters and other animals leave evidence of their tool use that can be studied using the same archaeological techniques as for ancient humans

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Waterfalls Can Spring from Rivers Spontaneously

The breathtaking sound and sight of waters that cascade off of steep cliffs, may be self-made productions.

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Artificial intelligence learns to predict elementary particle signals

Scientists from the Higher School of Economics and Yandex have developed a method that accelerates the simulation of processes at the Large Hadron Collider. The research findings were published in Nuclear Instruments and Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment.

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Converting biomass by applying mechanical force

German nanoscientists have succeeded in demonstrating a new reaction mechanism to cleave cellulose efficiently. This new reaction could lead to an efficient, environmentally friendly and cost-effective process for the conversion of biomass. The study was published in the journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition.

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IVF birthweights increased over 25 years

A new study led by University of Manchester scientists has revealed that babies born by In Vitro Fertilisation at St Mary's Hospital in Manchester have increased in birthweight by nearly 200g over the past 25 years.

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New method to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from China have proposed a way to reduce uranium concentration in contaminated water. As an essential nuclear fuel, uranium has been greatly used an inevitably released to the environment. Without proper disposal, exposure to uranium can result in serious harms to the ecology and health of humans.

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Accelerating advances for HIV-positive Youth in Eastern Cape, South Africa

Lucie Cluver, Professor of Child and Family Social Work in Oxford's Department of Social Policy and Intervention, is the principal investigator and lead author with Mark Orkin, Visiting Professor in the Developmental Pathways to Health Research Unit (DPHRU) in the Department of Paediatrics & Child Health, School of Clinical Medicine at Wits University.

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Study: Surgery for herniated discs in neck can be safely performed in outpatient setting

Surgery to remove multiple herniated or degenerated discs in the neck, a procedure known as anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), can be safely performed in an outpatient setting in select patients, according to a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City.

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No increased risk of complications for joint replacement in ambulatory surgery setting

Researchers conducted a study to compare patient outcomes and costs for in-patient hip and knee replacement surgeries to those performed in an ambulatory surgery center. They found no increased risk of 90-day complication rates or readmission rates for patients who were discharged the same day compared to patients who had the same procedures and stayed in the hospital.

5h

A cosmic bat in flight

Hidden in one of the darkest corners of the Orion constellation, this Cosmic Bat is spreading its hazy wings through interstellar space 2,000 light-years away. It is illuminated by the young stars nestled in its core — despite being shrouded by opaque clouds of dust, their bright rays still illuminate the nebula. Too dim to be discerned by the naked eye, NGC 1788 reveals its soft colors to ESO's

5h

Sea otters' tool use leaves behind distinctive archaeological evidence

An international team of researchers has analyzed the use by sea otters of large, shoreline rocks as 'anvils' to break open shells, as well as the resulting shell middens. The researchers used ecological and archaeological approaches to identify patterns that are characteristic of sea otter use of such locations. By looking at evidence of past anvil stone use, scientists could better understand se

5h

Researchers use algorithm from Netflix challenge to speed up biological imaging

Researchers have repurposed an algorithm originally developed for Netflix's 2009 movie preference prediction competition to create a method for acquiring classical Raman spectroscopy images of biological tissues at unprecedented speeds.

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Early-life exposure to microbiota restricts colon cancer later in life, study finds

Exposure to microbiota, or microorganisms such as bacteria, in the early stages of life plays a crucial role in establishing optimal conditions in the intestine that inhibit the development of colon cancer in adulthood, according to a new study.

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Researchers look at ways to improve standard braking systems

While it's not a case of reinventing the wheel, researchers are looking at ways to improve standard braking equipment on trains and cars.

5h

Greta Thunberg nominated for Nobel Peace Prize for climate activism

The 16-year-old climate campaigner who has inspired school strikes is in the running to receive the Nobel.

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NASA Could Go to the Moon Next Year

NASA has spent the past decade working on the world’s most powerful rocket. The Space Launch System will stand taller than the Statue of Liberty. It will be capable of lifting more than 200,000 pounds into space. It’s designed to launch American astronauts toward the moon once again. The SLS is supposed to fly for the first time in June 2020. NASA plans to launch an empty crew capsule on a trip a

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Sea otter archaeology reveals the most smashing rocks

New study of “otter signatures” leaves no stone unturned

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Sea otters leave archaeological evidence

Anvils and bite marks leave characteristic traces, potentially providing a historical record. Tanya Loos reports.

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A cosmic bat in flight

Astronomers capture image of distant nebula

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Seth Quits | Naked and Afraid

After getting pushed out of camp by his fellow survivalists, Seth gives up in the rain. Stream Full Episodes of Naked and Afraid: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/naked-and-afraid/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NakedandAfraid https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NakedAndAfraid https:

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Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen får ny klinikchef

Endokrinolog Anne Mette Rosenfalck tiltræder som ny klinikchef på Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen.

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Sea otters' tool use leaves behind distinctive archaeological evidence

An international team of researchers has analyzed the use by sea otters of large, shoreline rocks as "anvils" to break open shells, as well as the resulting shell middens. The researchers used ecological and archaeological approaches to identify patterns that are characteristic of sea otter use of such locations. By looking at evidence of past anvil stone use, scientists could better understand se

5h

Researchers use algorithm from Netflix challenge to speed up biological imaging

Researchers have repurposed an algorithm originally developed for Netflix's 2009 movie preference prediction competition to create a method for acquiring classical Raman spectroscopy images of biological tissues at unprecedented speeds. The advance could make the simple, label-free imaging method practical for clinical applications such as tumor detection or tissue analysis.

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ESO's Cosmic Gems Programme captures the Cosmic Bat's dusty clouds

Hidden in one of the darkest corners of the Orion constellation, this Cosmic Bat is spreading its hazy wings through interstellar space two thousand light-years away. It is illuminated by the young stars nestled in its core — despite being shrouded by opaque clouds of dust, their bright rays still illuminate the nebula. Too dim to be discerned by the naked eye, NGC 1788 reveals its soft colours to

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Research paves the way for next generation of optical tweezers

Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could pave the way for the next generation of optical tweezers.

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Top Takeaways From The Economist Innovation Summit

Over the past few years, the word ‘innovation’ has degenerated into something of a buzzword. In fact, according to Vijay Vaitheeswaran, US business editor at The Economist , it’s one of the most abused words in the English language. The word is over-used precisely because we’re living in a great age of invention. But the pace at which those inventions are changing our lives is fast, new, and scar

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Sea otters' tool use leaves behind distinctive archaeological evidence

An international team of researchers has analyzed the use by sea otters of large, shoreline rocks as "anvils" to break open shells, as well as the resulting shell middens. The researchers used ecological and archaeological approaches to identify patterns that are characteristic of sea otter use of such locations. By looking at evidence of past anvil stone use, scientists could better understand se

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Researchers reverse the flow of time on IBM's quantum computer

Researchers have managed to return a computer briefly to the past. The results suggest new paths for exploring the backward flow of time in quantum systems. They also open new possibilities for quantum computer program testing and error correction.

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Mercury Is Every Planet in the Solar System’s Closest Neighbor

Well, Actually You probably learned in school — or space camp — that Venus is Earth’s closest planetary neighbor. Ready to get your mind blown? A new model of the planets’ orbit shuffles things around, calculating that Earth’s closest neighbor, on average, is actually Mercury. In fact, it says that every other planet in the solar system’s nearest neighbor is Mercury as well. Averaging Out Sure, V

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Review of the recent advances of 2D nanomaterials in Lit-ion batteries

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from the China University of Petroleum (East China) have summarized the recent advances in application of 2D nanomaterials on the electrode materials of lithium-ion batteries, owing to their compelling electrochemical and mechanical properties that make them good candidates as electrodes in lit-ion batteries for high capacity

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Negative emotions can reduce our capacity to trust

It is no secret that a bad mood can negatively affect how we treat others. But can it also make us more distrustful? Yes, according to a new study, which shows that negative emotions reduce how much we trust others, even if these emotions were triggered by events that have nothing to do with the decision to trust. The study was carried out by an international research team from the University of Z

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Fingermark imaging for drug detection

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from Zhejiang have uncovered a novel method of using nanocarrier-based biological fluorescent probes for detecting amphetamine and ketamine in latent fingermark, in a bid to combat drug abuse. This method has the potential to be extended to other drugs and molecules.

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Wolves lead, dogs follow — And both cooperate with humans

The statement is a bold one, especially as wolves have received a lot of negative attention in recent years. A recent study conducted by behavioural researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna, however, shows that dogs and wolves both work equally well with humans, albeit in different ways. The allegedly unequal brothers are thus much more similar than often assumed.

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Rejection of transplanted organs: Long-awaited structure offers new insights

One third of organ transplants are lost to transplant rejection. Although acute transplant rejection responds relatively well to steroids, chronic rejection (which is mainly mediated by antibodies) has no effective treatment. A new structure from NUS Medicine transplant clinicians and immunologists has revealed unexpected insights about the how antibodies in the recipient (alloantibodies) bind to

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China is about to overtake America in AI research

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Here's what a 'very likely' sequel to California's 1862 megastorm would look like

Environment The ARkStorm project reminds residents that preparedness is key. ARkStorm is a realistic scenario of a California-wide meteorological disaster that would cause floods, mudslides, and an estimated $725 billion in damage…

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California experiencing burst of butterflies

They've been spotted on La Cienega, flitting north by the thousands near the Westfield mall.

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New Google App Describes Objects to Blind People

Gift of Sight An estimated 1.3 billion people across the globe live with some sort of vision impairment, and of those, 36 million are blind. Now, Google has released an artificial intelligence-powered app designed to serve as a helpful pair of “eyes” for those people, providing them with a level of independence they may have previously lacked — and showing the world yet another way AI can help pe

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California experiencing burst of butterflies

They've been spotted on La Cienega, flitting north by the thousands near the Westfield mall.

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Renewable energy solution for industrial heat applications

Researchers at the University of South Australia have developed a new technique that may greatly reduce industry's dependence on natural gas, combining renewable energy and low-cost thermal storage to deliver heat for high-temperature industrial processes.

6h

Escalator etiquette: Should I stand or walk for an efficient ride?

Love them or hate them, traffic laws exist to keep people safe and to help vehicles flow smoothly. And while they aren't legally enforceable, pedestrian traffic also tends to follow its own set of unwritten rules.

6h

The impact of extreme weather on biodiversity and pollinating insects

Markus Franzén, doctor in ecology at the department of biology and environmental science at Linnaeus University, has been granted SEK 3 million by Formas for his research project, "Cascading effects of drought on farming/grazing and farmland biodiversity."

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Teens should be able to get vaccines without consent from parents, say NY lawmakers

Teens 14 and older should be able to get vaccinated on their own, says a new bill in New York. Lawmakers were inspired by Ethan Lindenberger, an Ohio teen who fought to take vaccines against his mom's wishes. Anti-vaccination attitudes have been blamed for recent measles outbreaks. None Should kids who are old enough be allowed to make their own vaccination decisions? Such is the proposal being c

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A peek into lymph nodes

The vast majority of cancer deaths occur due to the spread of cancer from one organ to another, which can happen either through the blood or the lymphatic system. However, it can be tricky to detect this early enough. Researchers at Tohoku University have developed a new method that would allow doctors to detect cancers in the lymph nodes while they are still small, before they travel to other par

6h

Novel methods for analyzing neural circuits for innate behaviors in insects

We established a method for activity-dependent visualization of neural circuits in the fruit fly brain. An optogenetic method for reactivation of those visualized neural circuits upon illumination was also established for their manipulation. With these methods, we identified a neural cluster important for behavioral motivation. It is expected that these methods and findings would contribute to elu

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Cholesterol-lowering drugs guard against brain haemorrhages

The drugs statins, which are used to prevent cardiovascular diseases, also guard against brain haemorrhages. This is the conclusion of most extensive study ever carried out, which thus also rebuffs suspicions of the opposite being true.

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Breaking down bedbugs

It might seem like a crazy idea for landlords to tell potential tenants about past bedbug infestations, new research suggests it will pay off in the long run. A new Harvard study that examines a requirement that would mandate notifications found that while landlords would experience a modest drop in rental income in the short term, they would make that money back in just a handful of years.

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Critical materials: Researchers eye huge supply of rare-earth elements from mining waste

Researchers have examined a method to extract rare-earth elements from mining waste that could provide the world with a reliable supply of the valuable materials. The research, led by Idaho National Laboratory and Rutgers University with support from the Critical Materials Institute, is online and in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Chemical Thermodynamics.

6h

New study shows human impact erodes chimpanzee behavioral diversity

A research team led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research investigated whether chimpanzee behavioral diversity is reduced when there is high human impact on their habitats. By comparing sets of chimpanzee behaviors across a large number of social groups exposed to different levels of human disturbance, the scientists f

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Most countries in sub-Saharan Africa not on track for under-5 mortality reduction goal

The relatively slow pace of neonatal and under-5 mortality reduction could prevent most countries in sub-Saharan Africa from achieving targets set in Sustainable Development Goal 3 (SDG-3) by 2030, according to a study published March 12 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Iván Mejía-Guevara of Stanford University, USA and colleagues.

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New technology accelerates the science of deceleration

While it's not a case of reinventing the wheel, researchers are looking at ways to improve standard braking equipment on trains and cars.By mixing carbon fibers into polymer-based brakes, a group of researchers at UBC Okanagan, Sharif University of Technology in Iran and the University of Toronto were able to design brakes that are self-lubricating.

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Researchers uncover new clues to surviving extinction

'Great Dying' extinction survivors appear to have shared many of the same ecological roles as their predecessors, with one catch — there was a surge in the number of individuals with more modern traits. These hardy stand-outs did a better job of driving recovery, making ongoing ecological interactions more intense. Insights into this ancient marine system and its occupants can help guide modern c

6h

The impact of extreme weather on biodiversity and pollinating insects

Markus Franzén, doctor in ecology at the department of biology and environmental science at Linnaeus University, has been granted SEK 3 million by Formas for his research project, "Cascading effects of drought on farming/grazing and farmland biodiversity."

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Germy newborn days may thwart colon cancer later

Exposure to microorganisms in the early stages of life may set the stage for lower colon cancer risk in adulthood, according to new research. The research team explored how exposure to microbiota in utero and in the weeks after birth contributed to the development of colitis-associated cancer in mice later in life. Until now, the effects of prenatal and early postnatal microbial exposure on adult

6h

Astronauts on aborted Soyuz launch to blast off again for ISS

NASA astronaut Nick Hague and his Russian colleague Alexey Ovchinin, who survived a dramatically aborted Soyuz launch last year, were due to blast off again to the International Space Station on Thursday.

6h

Reconstructing a history of palaeoclimate in southeastern Australia

The role of trace elements as palaeo-climate proxies has been explored in ANSTO-led collaborative environmental research.

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Världsrekordet: Nu har talet pi 31,4 biljoner decimaler

Idag firar vi talet pi:s dag och ett nytt världsrekord. Med hjälp av kraftfulla datorer har pi nu fått ytterligare 9 biljoner decimaler. SVT Vetenskap har pratat med en matematiker för att ta reda på vad det här har för betydelse för vetenskapen.

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Solar-powered moisture harvester collects and cleans water from air

Access to clean water remains one of the biggest challenges facing humankind. A breakthrough by engineers at The University of Texas at Austin may offer a new solution through solar-powered technology that absorbs moisture from the air and returns it as clean, usable water.

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Significant milestone in whooping crane recovery

This week marks a significant milestone in the conservation and recovery of the endangered whooping crane. On March 11 and 13, the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center transferred its last two cranes of the approximately 75 that were in its flock to other institutions, closing out more than 50 years of the center's whooping crane research and captive breeding success.

6h

The media shape public opinion about surrogacy and homosexuality

The media play a key role in informing society and in shaping perceptions and judgments about social issues, particularly concerning issues on which there is insufficient knowledge or a lack of experience. For example, one issue that is beginning to arouse public debate is the matter of surrogacy on the part of homosexual couples, a subject most people have not considered.

6h

How (and why) to stay optimistic when it feels like the environment is falling apart

Humans love optimism. It's a no-brainer – optimism makes us feel good and wanting more. This attraction has deep neurological roots that affect both our brain functions and how we process new information.

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A warning for wine-lovers: Climate change is messing with your favourite tipple's timing

While the much-derided "latte set" are stereotyped as the biggest worriers about climate change, it's the chardonnay crowd who are acutely feeling its effects.

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Recovering scattered data from twisted light via 'scattering-matrix-assisted retrieval technique (SMART)'

High-capacity optical communication can be accomplished by multiplexing multiple light-carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) channels. However, in turbulent environments, optical scattering and 'speckle patterns' occur due to ambient, atmospheric microparticles and significantly decrease the orthogonality between OAM channels, demultiplexing (extracting information) and increasing crosstalk duri

6h

Hvad kan sundhedsvæsenet hente hos Ledelseskommissionen?

Her er fire anbefalinger: Fuld fokus på patienten uanset alt andet, topcheferne skal kende driften i detaljer som værn mod politisk styring, fælles ansvar på tværs af søjler sikrer borgernes forløb, og det er afgørende at udvikle lederne.

6h

Komfort slår autoritet i valg af nye ­uniformer

Sygehusene i Region Syddanmark skifter den klassiske, hvide uniform ud med en ny, blå uniform. Det skal klæde personalet på – også psykisk – til dagens udfordringer. Ekspert mener, at komforten har trumfet autoriteten.

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Significant milestone in whooping crane recovery

This week marks a significant milestone in the conservation and recovery of the endangered whooping crane. On March 11 and 13, the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center transferred its last two cranes of the approximately 75 that were in its flock to other institutions, closing out more than 50 years of the center's whooping crane research and captive breeding success.

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Minor genetic change creates unattractive female moths

Sex pheromones are chemical compounds released by an organism to attract potential mates. For moths in particular these sex pheromones are very important for mate recognition, as they rely completely on scent signal rather than visual signals in mate attraction. However, there is still little known about the genes underlying sex pheromone variation. Information that is crucial for understanding ho

6h

NASA Just Released One Final Panorama From the Mars Opportunity Rover

Last June, space exploration enthusiasts from across the world collectively held their breath as a global dust storm enveloped Mars. They did so not because our view of the Red Planet's surface was obscured, but instead because a go-kart-sized rover named Opportunity, which had been roaming the Red Planet for nearly 15 years, fell silent as the storm intensified. After eight months of fruitless at

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Astronauts Set for 3:14 p.m. EDT Launch to the International Space Station

Three new crewmembers will join the International Space Station this week, launching today in a Soyuz vessel from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 3:14 p.m. EDT. The two NASA astronauts, Nick Hague and Christina Koch, will fly with Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin on a Soyuz spacecraft and dock with ISS after a six-hour flight. They will join NASA’s Anne McClain, Roscosmos’ Oleg Kononenko, an

6h

Where Proof, Evidence and Imagination Intersect

Can you find the next number in this sequence? 1, 2, 4, 8 Here’s another number, in case you need a little more data before deciding. 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 The next number has to be 32, right? The pattern is clear: To find the next number, double the current one. We have 1 × 2 = 2; 2 × 2 = 4; 4 × 2 = 8; 8 × 2 = 16. The next number should be 16 × 2 = 32. How much more evidence do we need? While it’s perf

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Minor genetic change creates unattractive female moths

Sex pheromones are chemical compounds released by an organism to attract potential mates. For moths in particular these sex pheromones are very important for mate recognition, as they rely completely on scent signal rather than visual signals in mate attraction. However, there is still little known about the genes underlying sex pheromone variation. Information that is crucial for understanding ho

6h

Scientists use a blender to reveal what's in our smartphones

Scientists blended an entire smartphone to dust before conducting a chemical analysis of the dissolved results to demonstrate why we should all take a keener interest in what is contained within everyday electrical items.

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SPIT lab leading the effort to analyze hair, expand research on puberty

Puberty is something we all go through and yet there is limited science to explain how it affects our physical and mental health. The answers to these questions may be found in our hair. An Iowa State University researcher is using hair samples to study how hormones and environmental factors influence the process of puberty.

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Shorter treatment for Chagas disease could be just as effective, and significantly safer

A two-week treatment course for adult patients with chronic Chagas disease showed, when compared to placebo, similar efficacy and significantly fewer side effects than the standard treatment duration of eight weeks, according to the results of a clinical trial in Bolivia led by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi).

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New approach to stroke treatment could minimize brain damage

A new treatment for a common type of stroke may soon be possible, thanks to a discovery by an international team of researchers led by the University of British Columbia.

6h

Mental health issues increased significantly in young adults over last decade

The percentage of young Americans experiencing certain types of mental health disorders has risen significantly over the past decade, with no corresponding increase in older adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Dowry abuse does exist, but let's focus on the wider issues of economic abuse and coercive control

Rina's marriage problems began two days before her wedding, when her fiance's parents demanded gold and a car. Her parents agreed to part of the demands to ensure the planned marriage went ahead.

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Students striking for climate action are showing the exact skills employers look for

On March 15 2019 thousands of students across Australia will skip school and join the global strike for climate action. This is the second time students have taken to the streets to demand more government action on climate change. Last time they did so, in November 2018, the federal resources minister, Matt Canavan, told them: "The best thing you'll learn about going to a protest is how to join th

6h

Scientists crack genome of superfood seaweed, ito-mozuku

Along the tropical coastline of Okinawa, Japan, farmers raise rows of delectable seaweed and harvest thousands of tons of the crop each year. Unfortunately, scientists predict that pollution and rising ocean temperatures will blunt this impressive yield, forcing farmers to adopt new cultivation techniques. Recently, scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University

6h

‘Defective’ molecular sieve catches more toxic chemicals

Cleaning pollutants from water with a defective filter sounds like a non-starter, but a new study shows that right-sized defects help a molecular sieve soak up more perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) in less time. Researchers showed that a highly porous, Swiss cheese-like nanomaterial called a metal-organic framework (MOF) soaked up PFOS from polluted water faster—and held more PFOS when scienti

6h

Scientists crack genome of superfood seaweed, ito-mozuku

Along the tropical coastline of Okinawa, Japan, farmers raise rows of delectable seaweed and harvest thousands of tons of the crop each year. Unfortunately, scientists predict that pollution and rising ocean temperatures will blunt this impressive yield, forcing farmers to adopt new cultivation techniques. Recently, scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University

6h

Astronomers investigate a recently reactivated radio magnetar

A UK-German team of astronomers has conducted observations of a peculiar radio magnetar known as XTE J1810–197, which turned on in December 2018 after an almost decade-long period of quiescence. Results of these observations provide more information about the magnetar properties, and were presented in a paper published March 6 on arXiv.org.

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Study highlights ways to improve fishing practices

Researchers from The University of Western Australia and Stanford University have confirmed eco-labels on seafood are a trusted way for consumers to ensure they are buying sustainable seafood products and also encourage the seafood industry to be more sustainable.

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Indian Ocean science mission recovers key underwater drone

A British-led marine scientific mission off the Seychelles succeeded on Thursday in retrieving a key underwater drone from the sea bed, where it had fallen after its cable was cut two days ago.

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Study highlights ways to improve fishing practices

Researchers from The University of Western Australia and Stanford University have confirmed eco-labels on seafood are a trusted way for consumers to ensure they are buying sustainable seafood products and also encourage the seafood industry to be more sustainable.

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Interstellar objects like ‘Oumuamua may have helped form Earth

We’ve only seen one interstellar object, a rock called ‘Oumuamua that passed by in 2017, but they may be crucial to speeding up the planet-building process

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Researchers send qubit back in time

Experiment reveals the possibility that an electron in space might ‘spontaneously localise into its recent past’. Samantha Page reports.

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Freitag's Latest Bags Have a Funky New Ingredient: Plastic

The Swiss company Freitag, famous for using upcycled truck tarps, has a new line of bags partially made of yarn spun from plastic bottles.

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Miniaturized neuroprobe for sampling neurotransmitters in the brain

Researchers at the University of Twente have designed a tiny needle in which micro-channels can be used for extracting small liquid samples from a local area of the brain. The needle is about as thick as a human hair. Thanks to this invention, neuroscientists are now able to monitor dynamic processes more quickly (within a few seconds) and accurately (micrometre precision). The research is to be p

6h

Methods for large protein crystal growth for neutron protein crystallography

The ability to grow large protein crystals is the single biggest bottleneck that limits the use of neutron protein crystallography in structural biology. Protein crystals need to have volumes in the region of at least 0.1mm3. Theoretically there is no particular reason why crystals of this size cannot be grown. If they can be, neutron protein crystallography can provide crucial information on the

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Study: Destruction from sea level rise in California could exceed worst wildfires and earthquakes

In the most extensive study to date on sea level rise in California, researchers say damages by the end of the century could be far more devastating than the worst earthquakes and wildfires in state history.

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Non-invasive imaging technique valid for identifying small airway disease in lung

Landmark study confirms ability of non-invasive imaging technique to identify early signs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

6h

Scientists use a blender to reveal what's in our smartphones

Scientists blended an entire smartphone to dust before conducting a chemical analysis of the dissolved results to demonstrate why we should all take a keener interest in what is contained within everyday electrical items.

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A ‘Meritocracy’ Is Not What People Think It Is

When news spread on Tuesday about the bombshell college-bribery scandal —in which dozens of wealthy parents, including the actors Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, are accused of taking part in a scheme to buy slots for their children at exclusive universities such as Georgetown and Stanford—one word kept cropping up in social-media reactions: meritocracy . “Guys, guys, I’m beginning to think A

6h

Using 3D models to reduce side effects of radiotherapy

The debilitating side effects of radiotherapy could soon be a thing of the past thanks to a breakthrough by University of South Australia (UniSA) and Harvard University researchers.

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Acting out: for actors, getting into character means shutting down parts of the brain

First ever study of the neurology of method acting draws surprising conclusions. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Liking death metal doesn’t mean you’re a bad person

Research finds a liking for aggressive music doesn’t desensitise listeners to other violent media. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Chemical π

Using the periodic table to memorize that celebrated number — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Australia's small satellite revolution

A little piece of technology is making a big splash in Australia's space industry. So what on (and off) Earth is a CubeSat?

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Using black holes to conquer space: The halo drive

The idea of traveling to another star system has been the dream of people long before the first rockets and astronauts were sent to space. But despite all the progress we have made since the beginning of the Space Age, interstellar travel remains just that – a dream. While theoretical concepts have been proposed, the issues of cost, travel time and fuel remain highly problematic.

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Scientists Revive 28,000-Year-Old Woolly Mammoth Cells in Mice

Scientists working with Yuka, the best-preserved mammoth ever discovered, have partially revived some of her cells using mouse egg cells. The post Scientists Revive 28,000-Year-Old Woolly Mammoth Cells in Mice appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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When is best time to get flu shot? Analysis compares scenarios

When flu season peaks after mid-winter, tens of thousands of influenza cases and hundreds of deaths can likely be avoided if older adults wait until October to get their flu immunization.

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How pollution and greenhouse gases affect the climate in the Sahel

Over the last decade many countries in the Sahel region—the semi-arid southern edge of the Sahara that stretches from Senegal to Ethiopia—have been embroiled in conflict. Populations in these countries are growing. This means that resources are increasingly scarce, and a highly variable climate is making agriculture-based livelihoods more uncertain.

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Black boxes: Crucial to air crash probes

A top priority for air crash investigators is to locate and analyse a plane's two black boxes which hold vital clues to what caused it to go down, including cockpit conversations.

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Leaders appeal for 'urgent action' on environment

World leaders gathered in Kenya on Thursday to lend political muscle to UN environment talks, calling for "urgent action" to slow the destruction of natural habitats and accelerate funding for green development.

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Long, cold winter won't affect fire season, says expert

Alberta's long, cold winter won't do anything to dampen the 2019 wildfire season, but being extra careful when working and playing in the forests this spring could help, says a University of Alberta expert.

7h

Researchers make important cell division discovery

Researchers at the University of Dundee have provided important new insights into the regulation of cell division, which may ultimately lead to a better understanding of cancer progression.

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Role of sea urchins on California kelp

California sheephead and spiny lobsters may be helping control sea urchin populations in Southern California kelp forests, where sea otters — a top urchin predator — have long been missing, according to a new study. The research provides new insight into the complex predator-prey relationships in kelp forests that can be seen in the absence of sea otters.

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Green tea cuts obesity, health risks in mice

Green tea cut obesity and a number of inflammatory biomarkers linked with poor health in a new study.

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Google Celebrates Pi Day As Employee Calculates New World Record

Emma Haruka Iwao, a Google employee from Japan, calculated pi to new world record. Google announced the milestone on Thursday March 14, also known as Pi Day (3.14). Iwao calculated pi to 31 …

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Researchers develop method to dramatically reduce error rate in next-generation sequencing

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators have developed software to shrink the error rate in next-generation sequencing data by as much as 100-fold, which would likely speed early detection of relapse and other threats. The findings appear March 14 in the journal Genome Biology.

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Evidence of self-forming waterfalls reported

A trio of researchers with the University of Nevada, Reno, the California Institute of Technology and GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences reports evidence that suggests some waterfalls self-form in the absence of external influences. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Joel Scheingross, Michael Lamb and Brian Fuller describe experiments they carried out in their lab with artific

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Researchers make important cell division discovery

Researchers at the University of Dundee have provided important new insights into the regulation of cell division, which may ultimately lead to a better understanding of cancer progression.

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Researchers develop method to dramatically reduce error rate in next-generation sequencing

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators have developed software to shrink the error rate in next-generation sequencing data by as much as 100-fold, which would likely speed early detection of relapse and other threats. The findings appear March 14 in the journal Genome Biology.

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The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence and Data Science

It may be more than coincidence that the NYU Center for Data Science (CDS) chose to hold its Fifth Anniversary Celebration during Brain Awareness Week. The event, held in a well-appointed room at Vanderbilt Hall in New York City, opened with speeches by New York University’s new Vice Provost of Research Staci Grossman Bloom and new CDS Director Julia Kempe that focused on the importance of data s

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Havarikommision: Fejl på yderligere to godsvogne ved storebæltsulykken

En ny rapport fra Havarikommisionen beskriver, hvordan det implicerede godstog led under flere fejl med låsemekanismerne til togvognene.

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Blood diseases cured with bone marrow transplant

Doubling the low amount of total body radiation delivered to patients undergoing bone marrow transplants with donor cells that are only 'half-matched' increased the rate of engraftment from only about 50 percent to nearly 100 percent, according to a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers.

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The most exciting electric motorcycles of 2019

Technology Alluring alternatives or plausible substitutions? This year’s eBikes offer some of the most innovative thinking in the industry. But would you actually buy one?

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On Pi Day, Let's Disrupt Our Narrow Notions of STEM

A festival in Dallas shows how these fields connect to most spheres of human activity, including the arts, humanities and design — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Theorem That Unites Different Kinds of Calculus

Robert Ghrist shares a beautiful link between exponentiation, differentiation and shift — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Emma Haruka Iwao smashes pi world record with Google help

Emma Haruka Iwao calculates the value of pi to 31 trillion digits, after a lifelong fascination.

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The Asteroid Bennu Keeps Spinning Faster. And Scientists Aren't Sure Why

On a distant space rock being explored by a NASA probe, days are slowly shortening — and scientists are still trying to figure out why.

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Professor Stephen Hawking memorial plans 'no further forward'

Cambridge City Council has not decided how to mark the renowned physicist's life a year after his death.

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Origins and nature of 'math anxiety'

A report out today examines the factors that influence 'math anxiety' among primary and secondary school students, showing that teachers and parents may inadvertently play a role in a child's development of the condition, and that girls tend to be more affected than boys.

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Strontium isotope maps are disturbed by agricultural lime

Strontium isotopes are frequently used in archaeological studies to establish the provenance and migration history of prehistoric people and artifacts. Many of these studies may be based on incorrect data. A new study shows that agricultural lime can alter the composition of strontium isotopes dramatically, so that the modern isotopic signature of an area may be very different from the prehistoric

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Stress hormones promote breast cancer metastasis

Scientists have deciphered the molecular mechanisms linking breast cancer metastasis with increased stress hormones. In addition, they found that synthetic derivatives of stress hormones, which are frequently used as anti-inflammatory in cancer therapy, decrease the efficacy of chemotherapy. These results come from patient-derived models of breast cancer in mice and may have implications for the t

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Changes in rat size reveal habitat of 'Hobbit' hominin

A study of rat body sizes shifting over time gives a glimpse into the habitat of the mysterious hominin Homo floresiensis — nicknamed the 'Hobbit' due to its diminutive stature.

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On-the-spot genome analysis

By fine-tuning how algorithms carve up DNA data, researchers have made it possible to do genomic analysis on a smartphone.

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As Massive Outage Plagues Facebook, Telegram Welcomes Millions of New Users

Slowly but surely, it appears that Facebook is getting its “family of apps” back online. The consequences of the longest outage in the company’s history, however, remain to be seen. On Thursday, …

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Climate Change and the Role of Uncertainty

As a physician you have to develop a certain comfort level with uncertainty. The simple fact is – we don’t know everything. The human body is extremely complex, and there are over 7 billion people on the planet representing a great deal of variation. Our data is incomplete and largely statistical, and we have to apply that to specific decisions about an individual patient. This means we have to m

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Students worldwide are striking to demand action on climate change

On March 15, students are set to attend more than 1,000 events to demand that governments do more to rein in greenhouse gas emissions.

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Bus-size robot set to vacuum up valuable metals from the deep sea

Scientists will monitor trial next month to assess collector’s ecosystem damage

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DNA Crime-Solving Is Still New, Yet It May Have Gone Too Far

Genetic databases are helping to solve cold crimes. But the arrest of a woman decades after she killed her baby raises questions of police overreach.

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The Disinformation Problem Starts at Home

Opinion: When it comes to false and divisive online content, more is produced domestically than abroad—and the platforms need to do more to address it.

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Kamala Harris Wants to Give States Millions to Overhaul Tech

The Digital Service Act of 2019 would help state and local governments hire the talent they need to fix the often outdated tools and websites Americans use every day.

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Zafgen: Will There Be a Third Act?

A few years ago on this blog, I wrote several times about a small company called Zafgen and their unusual epoxide-based chemical matter (beloranib) that was in development for the rare Prader-Willi syndrome . That’s a genetic disorder that includes, among many other problems, constant hunger (with the complications that you’d expect from that). Zafgen was pursuing inhibitors of the enzyme methion

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PLO bruger billige tricks

Jeg er fløjtende ligeglad med, om det er en regions- eller en privatpraktiserende læge, bare borgerne har en kvalificeret læge.

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Letter: ‘No Form of Buddhist Practice Is a Replacement for Professional Psychological Help’

Why So Many Americans Are Turning to Buddhism Four in 10 American adults now say they meditate at least weekly. “Buddhism has been popular in various forms among certain celebrities and tech elites,” Olga Khazan wrote last week , “but the religion’s primary draw for many Americans now appears to be mental health.” I am a practicing Buddhist and someone with bipolar disorder, so this article hit v

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The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann Is an Emotional, Exhaustive Project

The day I interviewed Emma Cooper and Chris Smith about their Netflix series, The Disappearance of Madeleine McCann , yet another story about Madeleine happened to be in the U.K. tabloids. “Madeleine McCann abductor walked right past Irish family carrying the missing girl minutes after snatching her,” read the headline in The Sun . The Mirror , the Daily Star , and the Daily Record all ran versio

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The FAA Rigorously Tested the Boeing 737’s Software

Two Boeing 737 Max 8 airplanes have crashed under similar circumstances in the past six months , one in October in Indonesia and the other in Ethiopia last week. These were new planes, and both had a control system installed that has been implicated in the Indonesian crash , and that might have played a role in the most recent disaster. The system, known as the Maneuvering Characteristics Augment

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Image of the Day: Taken to Heart

By zooming in on a developing mouse heart, scientists are studying whether defects in vasculature contribute to a thin muscle wall.

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Cheminova-grunden gemmer på 15 tons pesticider og seks tons kviksølv

Region Midtjylland har undersøgt jordlagene i Cheminovas gamle fabriksgrund for at kortlægge kemikalieforureningen. Et enkelt sted er der målt 4.000 mg kviksølv pr. kg. jord. Grænseværdien er 3 mg.

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Efter første slag: Foreningen mod Ulovlig Logning 0-1 Justitsministeriet

Østre Landsret har efterkommet Justitsministeriets ønske om at udskyde retssagen om ulovlig logning og vente på endnu en EU-dom. Nu går Foreningen mod Ulovlig Logning til Højesteret.

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On Pi Day, Let's Disrupt Our Narrow Notions of STEM

A festival in Dallas shows how these fields connect to most spheres of human activity, including the arts, humanities and design — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China’s race to test ‘mutation-free’ gene-editing tech on patients

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Andrew Yang is ready to talk robots on the Democratic debate stage

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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No, scientists didn’t just “reverse time” with a quantum computer

Amazing headlines about time machines are a long way off the mark, sadly.

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Quasar jets confuse orbital telescope

Astrophysicists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (LPI RAS), and NASA have found an error in the coordinates of active galactic nuclei measured by the Gaia space telescope, and helped correct it. The findings, published in The Astrophysical Journal, also serve as an independent confirmation of the astrophysical mo

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Kan en dos olydnad leda till lycka?

Vi kan inte fortsätta att vara lydiga subjekt som bränner ut oss själva i försöken att uppnå perfektion, menar författaren Carin Franzén som tror sig ha funnit en hjälp för nutidsmänniskan hos en grupp av 1600-talets tänkare – libertinerna. – Hur kan vi kan hitta befriande strategier? I ett sökande efter svar på den frågan fann jag inspiration hos 1600-talets tidigmoderna fritänkare, eller libert

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Here's What NASA's Opportunity Rover Saw Before 'Lights Out'

There's a glorious panorama and a few sad thumbnails of a dark and dusty sky.

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The hippocampus is key for planning ahead

The hippocampus is necessary for our future planning, according to new research. The findings, which appear in the journal Neuron , link the brain region’s long-established role in memory with our ability to use our knowledge to map out the future effects of our actions. The results have implications for the way we think about afflictions that affect the hippocampus, like Alzheimer’s disease, as

8h

Cities rethink parking as ride-hailing grows and parking revenue declines

As Lyft and Uber race toward IPOs this spring, Americans are relying on the ride-hailing services more than ever, and as a result, city parking garages and airport parking lots are a bit emptier. A new study published in the Journal of Transportation and Land Use aims to understand how parking demand is changing as people opt to hitch a ride and leave their cars at home.

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Project recruits help from citizen scientists to classify seismic events

Seismology has a Big Data problem. Northwestern University seismologists think everyday citizens are the solution.

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Research finds some shark deterrents don't work as well

Shark researchers from The University of Western Australia have found that one of the personal shark deterrents commercially available in WA is not effective in deterring sharks.

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Research finds some shark deterrents don't work as well

Shark researchers from The University of Western Australia have found that one of the personal shark deterrents commercially available in WA is not effective in deterring sharks.

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Strong planetary magnetic fields like Earth's may protect oceans from stellar storms

A study by scientists at ANU on the magnetic fields of planets has found that most planets discovered in other solar systems are unlikely to be as hospitable to life as Earth.

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Trade-offs in adaptive anatomy: Vinegar fly species have good vision or olfaction, but not both

A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology has systematically studied and compared the eyes and antennae and the associated brain structures of more than 60 species of the genus Drosophila. They found a large variation, but at the same time a close correlation between the two sensory features. The size of the sensory organs is related to the behavior of the mate and ho

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ALMA observes the formation sites of solar-system-like planets

Researchers have spotted the formation sites of planets around a young star resembling the sun. Two rings of dust around the star, at distances comparable to the asteroid belt and the orbit of Neptune in the solar system, suggest that we are witnessing the formation of a planetary system similar to our own.

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Researchers use SLAC instrument to learn what happens to silicon under intense pressure

Elasticity, the ability of an object to bounce back to its original shape, is a universal property in solid materials. But when pushed too far, materials change in unrecoverable ways: Rubber bands snap in half, metal frames bend or melt and phone screens shatter.

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Kangaroo with a Mean Right Hook Foils Paraglider's Perfect Landing

A paraglider's recent and unexpected close encounter with a belligerent kangaroo left him feeling a little punchy.

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Trade-offs in adaptive anatomy: Vinegar fly species have good vision or olfaction, but not both

A team of scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology has systematically studied and compared the eyes and antennae and the associated brain structures of more than 60 species of the genus Drosophila. They found a large variation, but at the same time a close correlation between the two sensory features. The size of the sensory organs is related to the behavior of the mate and ho

8h

X-ray analysis of carbon nanostructures helps material design

Nanostructures made of carbon are extremely versatile. They can absorb ions in batteries and supercapacitors, store gases and desalinate water. How well they cope with the task at hand depends largely on the structural features of the nanopores. A new study from the HZB has now shown that structural changes that occur due to morphology transition with increasing temperature of the synthesis can al

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Space tech poised to make air travel greener and more efficient

Passengers travelling through busy airports should soon face fewer delays and have a lower environmental impact, thanks to efforts to use airspace more efficiently.

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On the front lines in Kilauea

In the early spring, volcanologists monitoring the ground around Kilauea, the most active volcano on the island of Hawai'i, noticed a significant increase in seismicity, a sign of an impending eruption. Meanwhile, in Palisades, New York, Lamont volcanologist Einat Lev was also watching developments at Kilauea closely, scanning United States Geological Survey (USGS) reports and keeping in regular t

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Vindmøllestøj øger risiko for søvnproblemer og depression hos ældre

PLUS. Sidste delundersøgelse af vindmøllestøj og dens helbredseffekter viser en sammenhæng mellem støj fra vindmøller over 42 dB(A) og udstedelse af sovemedicin og antidepressiver til beboere over 65 år.

8h

Ny bilaftale udskyder afgiftsstigning – men løser ikke problemet

Regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti er blevet enige om at udskyde overgangen til en ny testmetode for bilers brændstofforbrug, der kunne have gjort afgiften på nye biler dyrere.

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Floating ideas for an airlock near the Moon

Assembly of a new habitable structure near the moon, known as the Gateway, is scheduled to begin in 2023. The international project will allow humans to explore farther than ever before and it brings new opportunities for European design in space.

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9 Numbers That Are Cooler Than Pi

Let's give these numbers a slice of fame, too.

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The International Politics of Gut Health

For immigrants to the U.S., we need to focus on political and economic structures that ultimately affect the microbiome — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Book examines connection between gender and cooking energy in Sub-Saharan Africa

Providing energy for home use, especially for cooking food and heating living spaces, without contributing to climate change demands creativity and perseverance.

8h

Bacteria 'trap' could help slow down antibiotic resistance

Scientists have developed a new and faster test for identifying how single bacteria react to antibiotics, which could help in the fight against antimicrobial resistance.

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Video: Our endless fascination with pi

For centuries, pi—the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter—has fascinated mathematicians and scientists. The number, which is infinite but never falls into a repeating pattern, is used in formulae throughout the sciences. For more perspective on the significance and fascination with the number, for Pi Day (3.14) the Gazette spoke with Jacob Barandes, a lecturer and director of graduat

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Top streamer Ninja reportedly paid $1 million by EA for promoting Apex Legends

Reuters reports that Ninja earned that massive sum for just a few hours of livestreaming the battle royale game and tweeting about it to his followers on February 5. An EA spokesperson told …

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Dissecting features of epigenetic variants underlying cardiometabolic risk using full-resolution epigenome profiling in regulatory elements

Dissecting features of epigenetic variants underlying cardiometabolic risk using full-resolution epigenome profiling in regulatory elements Dissecting features of epigenetic variants underlying cardiometabolic risk using full-resolution epigenome profiling in regulatory elements, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09184-z Obesity and related metabolic complications represent

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Memory and relatedness of transcriptional activity in mammalian cell lineages

Memory and relatedness of transcriptional activity in mammalian cell lineages Memory and relatedness of transcriptional activity in mammalian cell lineages, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09189-8 Phenotypically identical mammalian cells often display considerable variability in transcript levels of individual genes. Here the authors document how different genes propagate

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Tuning orbital orientation endows molybdenum disulfide with exceptional alkaline hydrogen evolution capability

Tuning orbital orientation endows molybdenum disulfide with exceptional alkaline hydrogen evolution capability Tuning orbital orientation endows molybdenum disulfide with exceptional alkaline hydrogen evolution capability, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09210-0 Technologies allowing for sustainable hydrogen production will contribute to the decarbonization of the future e

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Phase transitions in few-monolayer spin ice films

Phase transitions in few-monolayer spin ice films Phase transitions in few-monolayer spin ice films, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09187-w Magnetic spin ice compounds are described by vertex models, which have been intensively studied for their exotic properties. Bovo et al. show thin films of Dy2Ti2O7 have structures distinct from bulk crystals and come close to realisi

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In situ reversible underwater superwetting transition by electrochemical atomic alternation

In situ reversible underwater superwetting transition by electrochemical atomic alternation In situ reversible underwater superwetting transition by electrochemical atomic alternation, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09201-1 Materials with in situ reversible wettability have attractive properties for switching applications, but are a challenge to use especially for the inv

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A reference-grade wild soybean genome

A reference-grade wild soybean genome A reference-grade wild soybean genome, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09142-9 Wild relatives of crop plants are invaluable germplasm for genetic improvement. Here, Xie et al. report a reference-grade wild soybean genome and show that it can be used to identify structural variation and refine quantitative trait loci.

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The sharing economy promotes sustainable societies

The sharing economy promotes sustainable societies The sharing economy promotes sustainable societies, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09260-4 Sharing activities are under wide debate regarding the environmental impacts. Here the authors reviewed their benefits and problems and suggested that a simultaneous improvement of both ecological and economic efficiency is necessar

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Intrinsic photoisomerization dynamics of protonated Schiff-base retinal

Intrinsic photoisomerization dynamics of protonated Schiff-base retinal Intrinsic photoisomerization dynamics of protonated Schiff-base retinal, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09225-7 The primary photoresponse of protonated Schiff-base retinal in visual and bacterial rhodopsins is fast sub-ps isomerisation. Here, the authors show that the fast photoisomerization of rhodop

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Facebook Is Not a Monopoly, but It Should Be Broken Up

Elizabeth Warren proposes to force Facebook to divest Instagram and WhatsApp. Her reasoning is flawed, but her prescription is correct.

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NASA's Supersize Space Launch System Might Be Doomed

The space agency's ill-fated SLS was meant to be the biggest rocket in the world. Now the 'rocket to nowhere' may have lost its last reason for being.

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With Tech on the Defensive, SXSW Takes an Introspective Turn

Elizabeth Warren took a shot at Big Tech. And people who are already concerned with the industry’s size, privacy issues, and ethical conundrums want solutions.

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Bacteria 'trap' could help slow down antibiotic resistance

Scientists have developed a new and faster test for identifying how single bacteria react to antibiotics, which could help in the fight against antimicrobial resistance.

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Greener fuels to propel rocket launches into space

Turns out, green fuels are rocket science.

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The International Politics of Gut Health

For immigrants to the U.S., we need to focus on political and economic structures that ultimately affect the microbiome — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Her er forskellene på det groundede Boeing 737 Max og 737'erne, der stadig flyver

PLUS. Den nyeste version af Boeing 737 er løbet ind i problemer efter to af flyene er styrtet i løbet af det seneste år. Men hvad adskiller den egentlig fra de tidligere versioner?

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Hacking your body with tech looks rough

submitted by /u/jvndn101 [link] [comments]

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The Internet Knows You Better Than Your Spouse Does

The traces we leave on the Web and on our digital devices can give advertisers and others surprising, and sometimes disturbing, insights into our psychology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What happens when the Bering Sea’s ice disappears?

Record-low sea ice in 2018 sent ripples through the Bering Sea’s entire ecosystem. Will this be the region’s new normal?

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Brunare och varmare sjöar ger mindre mängd fisk

Klimatförändringar leder till att sjöar blir både varmare och brunare. I en ny studie visar forskare från Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU, hur fiskar påverkas när sjöarna förändras. Sammantaget kan effekterna leda till lägre produktion av fisk i svenska sjöar, vilket är viktig att förstå om vi ska kunna förvalta våra vatten och vårt fiske på ett hållbart sätt i en varmare framtid. – Vår studie

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The Internet Knows You Better Than Your Spouse Does

The traces we leave on the Web and on our digital devices can give advertisers and others surprising, and sometimes disturbing, insights into our psychology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Internet Knows You Better Than Your Spouse Does

The traces we leave on the Web and on our digital devices can give advertisers and others surprising, and sometimes disturbing, insights into our psychology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Why your memories can't be trusted – video

Memory does not work like a video tape – it is not stored like a file just waiting to be retrieved. Instead, memories are formed in networks across the brain and every time they are recalled they can be subtly changed. So if these memories are changeable, how much should we trust them? With experts Dr Julia Shaw and Prof Elizabeth Loftus, the Guardian's Max Sanderson explores the mysterious world

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Bull 'super dads' are being engineered to produce sperm from another father

Bull 'super dads' are being engineered to produce sperm from another father Bull 'super dads' are being engineered to produce sperm from another father, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00718-5 Gene-edited ‘surrogate sires’ could help spread desirable traits rapidly in some livestock.

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Investors could pump $1 bn into Uber self-driving cars: report

A group of investors including SoftBank Group is in talks to invest $1 billion or more into Uber's self-driving car unit, The Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday.

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More vitamin D may improve memory but too much may slow reaction time

How much vitamin D can boost memory, learning and decision-making in older adults, and how much is too much? A unique Rutgers-led study found that overweight and obese older women who took more than three times the recommended daily dose of vitamin D showed improvements in memory and learning — but also had slower reaction times. The researchers hypothesize that slower reaction times may increase

9h

Research paves the way for next generation of optical tweezers

Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could pave the way for the next generation of optical tweezers.

9h

Scientists crack genome of superfood seaweed, ito-mozuku

For the first time, researchers unveil the genome of ito-mozuku (Nemacystus decipiens), the popular Japanese brown seaweed, providing data that could help farmers better grow the health food.

9h

Opel plans Russia comeback as PSA seeks out new markets

German carmaker Opel on Thursday said it would return to Russia after a more than three-year absence as new French owner PSA branches out in a bid to reduce the group's reliance on the European market.

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Happiness is Greater in More Scenic Locations

Happiness is Greater in More Scenic Locations Happiness is Greater in More Scenic Locations, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40854-6 Happiness is Greater in More Scenic Locations

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Brain sugar consumption during neuronal activation detected by CEST functional MRI at ultra-high magnetic fields

Brain sugar consumption during neuronal activation detected by CEST functional MRI at ultra-high magnetic fields Brain sugar consumption during neuronal activation detected by CEST functional MRI at ultra-high magnetic fields, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40986-9 Brain sugar consumption during neuronal activation detected by CEST functional MRI at ultra-high magnetic fi

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Six novel immunoglobulin genes as biomarkers for better prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer by gene co-expression network analysis

Six novel immunoglobulin genes as biomarkers for better prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer by gene co-expression network analysis Six novel immunoglobulin genes as biomarkers for better prognosis in triple-negative breast cancer by gene co-expression network analysis, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40826-w Six novel immunoglobulin genes as biomarkers for better pr

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Linear and circular-polarization conversion in X-band using anisotropic metasurface

Linear and circular-polarization conversion in X-band using anisotropic metasurface Linear and circular-polarization conversion in X-band using anisotropic metasurface, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40793-2 Linear and circular-polarization conversion in X-band using anisotropic metasurface

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Jujuboside A prevents sleep loss-induced disturbance of hippocampal neuronal excitability and memory impairment in young APP/PS1 mice

Jujuboside A prevents sleep loss-induced disturbance of hippocampal neuronal excitability and memory impairment in young APP/PS1 mice Jujuboside A prevents sleep loss-induced disturbance of hippocampal neuronal excitability and memory impairment in young APP/PS1 mice, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41114-3 Jujuboside A prevents sleep loss-induced disturbance of hippocampa

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Intratumor heterogeneity inferred from targeted deep sequencing as a prognostic indicator

Intratumor heterogeneity inferred from targeted deep sequencing as a prognostic indicator Intratumor heterogeneity inferred from targeted deep sequencing as a prognostic indicator, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41098-0 Intratumor heterogeneity inferred from targeted deep sequencing as a prognostic indicator

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Stereotypical patterns of epileptiform calcium signal in hippocampal CA1, CA3, dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex in freely moving mice

Stereotypical patterns of epileptiform calcium signal in hippocampal CA1, CA3, dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex in freely moving mice Stereotypical patterns of epileptiform calcium signal in hippocampal CA1, CA3, dentate gyrus and entorhinal cortex in freely moving mice, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41241-x Stereotypical patterns of epileptiform calcium signal in hip

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Predicting bioavailability change of complex chemical mixtures in contaminated soils using visible and near-infrared spectroscopy and random forest regression

Predicting bioavailability change of complex chemical mixtures in contaminated soils using visible and near-infrared spectroscopy and random forest regression Predicting bioavailability change of complex chemical mixtures in contaminated soils using visible and near-infrared spectroscopy and random forest regression, Published online: 14 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41161-w Predicting bioav

9h

Over 100 Malaysian schools shut after toxic waste dump

Over 100 schools in Malaysia have been closed after the dumping of toxic waste into a river caused hundreds of people to fall ill, including many children, authorities said.

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A real headache: Here’s one from the “What else could go wrong?” files

Researchers in China have retracted a 2016 paper in Oncology Letters on the anti-cancer properties of aspirin because, well, it was a disaster from top to bottom. In the spirit of showing rather than telling, we’ll let the retraction notice do the work: We would like to retract our article entitled “Aspirin inhibits growth of … Continue reading A real headache: Here’s one from the “What else could

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Earth at 2°C hotter will be horrific. Now here’s what 4°C will look like.

The best-case scenario of climate change is that world gets just 2°C hotter, which scientists call the "threshold of catastrophe". Why is that the good news? Because if humans don't change course now, the planet is on a trajectory to reach 4°C at the end of this century, which would bring $600 trillion in global climate damages, double the warfare, and a refugee crisis 100x worse than the Syrian

9h

For Pi Day, Calculate Pi Yourself Using Two Colliding Balls

On this day of numerical glory, get to know pi in an unusual way: using the elastic collision of two different masses and a wall.

9h

The Great Realignment of Britain

Britain spirals faster and faster into the Brexit crisis. On Tuesday, the British Parliament again overwhelmingly rejected the U.K.-EU agreement for an orderly transition. That vote puts Britain on the path to crash out of the European Union on March 29. Party leaders are scrambling to improvise some kind of cushion against the hard landing of a no-deal Brexit. Could Britain ask the EU for an ext

9h

They Bribed College Coaches. I Collected Cans for Cash.

When my husband and I sent our first son to college a decade ago, we collected aluminum cans to help pay for his textbooks. When the actor Felicity Huffman wanted to get her daughter into college, federal prosecutors say , she paid $15,000 to have someone “secretly correct” the teenager’s answers to the SAT. Meanwhile, the actor Lori Loughlin and her husband, the fashion designer Mossimo Giannull

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White Nationalism’s Deep American Roots

Robert Bowers wanted everyone to know why he did it. “ I can’t sit by and watch my people get slaughtered ,” he posted on the social-media network Gab shortly before allegedly entering the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh on October 27 and gunning down 11 worshippers. He “wanted all Jews to die,” he declared while he was being treated for his wounds. Invoking the specter of white Americans fa

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Amatører hjælper klimaforskere med digitalisering af historiske vejrdata

Engelske klimaforskere har bedt private om hjælp til at digitalisere millioner af historiske vejrdata om temperatur og lufttryk. Målet er bedre at kunne forudsige klimaforandringer

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Margaret Hamilton Led the NASA Software Team That Landed Astronauts on the Moon

Apollo’s successful computing software was optimized to deal with unknown problems and to interrupt one task to take on a more important one

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Why Climate Change Pundits Aren’t Convincing Anyone

For more than 50 years, the cognitive sciences have amassed a mountainous body of insight into why we think and choose and act as we do. And what they have found is that facts alone are literally meaningless. To win over climate change skeptics, we must speak to their hearts, not just their heads.

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US ups pressure on Europe over 5G infrastructure from China's Huawei

The US upped pressure on Europe Wednesday to avoid turning to Huawei for 5G telecom infrastructure, with a top commander saying NATO forces would cease communicating with their German colleagues if Berlin teams up with the Chinese firm.

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Drug could alleviate side effects of chemo for breast cancer patients

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have demonstrated a method of forecasting which breast cancer patients will suffer heart problems from a commonly used chemotherapy drug.

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Designer babies: Moratorium on genome editing needed, say experts

Experts from seven countries called Wednesday for a moratorium on the kind of genetic manipulation—known as germline editing—used last year to permanently modify the genome of twin girls in Shenzhen, China.

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Designer babies: Moratorium on genome editing needed, say experts

Experts from seven countries called Wednesday for a moratorium on the kind of genetic manipulation—known as germline editing—used last year to permanently modify the genome of twin girls in Shenzhen, China.

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The Senate Could Embarrass Trump Over His National Emergency

Real power is fear. So said Donald Trump in the thick of the 2016 presidential race. He’s carried the dictum into the White House. Since taking office, President Trump has used fear as a cudgel both to cow top administration officials and intimidate Republican lawmakers loath to see him endorse an opponent in party primaries. To date, he has largely succeeded. Crossing Trump risks alienating a Re

10h

Peru fighting mining pollution with little green algae

Scientists in Peru have removed small green algae from polluted lakes and rivers in a bid to strengthen them with nutrients and oxygen before returning them to purify those water bodies from harmful mining waste.

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Toxic air tears apart families in Mongolia

In the world's coldest capital, many burn coal and plastic just to survive temperatures as low as minus 40 degrees—but warmth comes at a price: deadly pollution makes Ulaanbataar's air too toxic for children to breathe, leaving parents little choice but to evacuate them to the countryside.

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Investors could pump $1 bn into Uber self-driving cars: report

A group of investors including SoftBank Group is in talks to invest $1 billion or more into Uber's self-driving car unit, The Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday.

11h

Oil slick heading to French coast after cargo ship sinks

An oil slick was heading towards the French coastline on Thursday after an Italian cargo ship sank in the Atlantic carrying 45 containers of "dangerous materials", authorities said.

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US grounds Boeing 737 MAX as black boxes flown to France for analysis

The ban on the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft became worldwide after US President Donald Trump joined Canada and other countries in grounding the aircraft, and the black box flight recorders from the doomed plane were flown to France for analysis Thursday.

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A day not to 'like' for Facebook, hit by outage, criminal probe

Facebook grappled with challenges on two fronts Wednesday, an hours-long outage and intensified scrutiny from investigators reportedly probing data deals struck by the world's largest social network.

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Suffer the children: how air pollution hurts the youngest

Air pollution can have devastating health effects for people of all ages, but children are more vulnerable and face specific risks that can last a lifetime, experts say.

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Lufthansa warns airport capacity to squeeze growth

Lufthansa, Europe's largest airline group, said Thursday that capacity bumping up against limits at overcrowded airports would hem in growth this year as it reported that its bottom line fell in 2018.

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NASA chief acknowledges more trouble with SLS rocket

The US space agency NASA on Wednesday cast a shadow on the future of its new heavy-lift rocket, the SLS—acknowledging development delays on a project that is already years behind.

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Buying and selling cattle can link individual farms to thousands of others per purchase

Understanding the complex networks of 'contact chains' between British farms, could help identify potential routes for spread of infections and improve disease control strategies for the cattle industry.

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Buying and selling cattle can link individual farms to thousands of others per purchase

Understanding the complex networks of "contact chains" between British farms, could help identify potential routes for spread of infections and improve disease control strategies for the cattle industry.

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New study examines role of sea urchins on California kelp

California sheephead and spiny lobsters may be helping control sea urchin populations in Southern California kelp forests, where sea otters—a top urchin predator—have long been missing, according to a new San Diego State University (SDSU) study published in the journal Ecology. The research provides new insight into the complex predator-prey relationships in kelp forests that can be seen in the ab

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New study examines role of sea urchins on California kelp

California sheephead and spiny lobsters may be helping control sea urchin populations in Southern California kelp forests, where sea otters—a top urchin predator—have long been missing, according to a new San Diego State University (SDSU) study published in the journal Ecology. The research provides new insight into the complex predator-prey relationships in kelp forests that can be seen in the ab

11h

Stonehenge was 'hub for Britain's earliest mass parties'

The variety of pig bones found suggest people travelled a long way for the feasts, researchers say.

11h

Scientists use a blender to reveal what's in our smartphones

Every year, 1.4 billion mobile phones are produced around the world. Many of us have more than one, but what are they made of, where do those materials come from, and what is the best thing to do with our devices once we have no more use for them?

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Speed limit on DNA-making sets pace for life's first steps

Fruit flies make for stingy mothers, imparting only a portion of the genetic building blocks their offspring need to survive. The rest must be produced by the fertilized egg in its first few steps of growth.

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Speed limit on DNA-making sets pace for life's first steps

Fruit flies make for stingy mothers, imparting only a portion of the genetic building blocks their offspring need to survive. The rest must be produced by the fertilized egg in its first few steps of growth.

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Pi Day: How One Irrational Number Made Us Modern

The famous mathematical ratio, estimated to more than 22 trillion digits (and counting), is the perfect symbol for our species’ long effort to tame infinity.

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Microsoft's updated 'Wireless Display' app lets you stream PC games through the Xbox One

Microsoft's major focus lately has been to blur the line between PCs and the Xbox One, at least in the realm of gaming. For the most part, its attempts to do that so far have been relatively …

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VR Surgeon Simulator for Spinal Pedicle Screw Demo

submitted by /u/S_K_I [link] [comments]

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Skat melder klar: Skattegæld for milliarder er klar til inddrivelse med EFI-afløser

Et af Skats tre store opkrævningssystemer forventes at blive tilsluttet inddrivelsessystemet PSRM inden udgangen af marts. En status varsler dog samtidig forsinkelse i forhold til tilslutningen af et andet af de tre systemer.

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Pi Day quiz: How well do you know the mathematical constant?

14 March is Pi Day, a global celebration of the constant representing the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter. Think you know pi? Try our quiz

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Mathematician cracks centuries-old problem about the number 33

Can you make every number using three cubed numbers? It is a surprisingly difficult question and now we know the answer for 33

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An origami design helps this robot lift delicate and heavy cargo

Fragile items, such as soft fruits, as well as heavier goods are in safe hands with a new robotic gripper.

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Quiz: Hvor i landet spiser vi flest rundstykker, spareribs og pandekager?

Spiser nordjyderne mere fisk, og er københavnerne besat af bacon? Se om dine fordomme om vores madvaner i de forskellige landsdele holder stik.

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Robot museum, built by robots, to open in 2022

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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Robot worker being tested in a Walmart!

submitted by /u/UpwardNinja [link] [comments]

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How the Far Right Weaponized Europe’s Interior Ministries to Block Refugees

VIENNA—Herbert Kickl might be the most important far-right ideologue you’ve never heard of. He’s radically reshaping both refugee policies and the tone of political discourse across Europe. A longtime strategist for Austria’s nativist Freedom Party (FPÖ), Kickl has gone from working behind the scenes to becoming the country’s interior minister. And with a string of controversial statements and po

14h

Experts slam CAM lab tests, call for better regulation

Experts review the evidence and find that common CAM lab tests have "little or no clinical benefit" and are "a potential risk to patient safety." Regulatory reform is urgently needed to protect the public.

14h

How universal basic income could be affordable, Andrew Yang explains

submitted by /u/TonyThreeTimes [link] [comments]

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Speed limit on DNA-making sets pace for life's first steps

Fruit flies make for stingy mothers, imparting only a portion of the genetic building blocks their offspring need to survive. The rest must be produced by the fertilized egg in its first few steps of growth.

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Non-invasive imaging technique valid for identifying small airway disease in lung

Landmark study confirms ability of non-invasive imaging technique to identify early signs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

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Scientists use a blender to reveal what's in our smartphones

Scientists at the University of Plymouth blended an entire smartphone to dust before conducting a chemical analysis of the dissolved results to demonstrate why we should all take a keener interest in what is contained within everyday electrical items.

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Green tea cuts obesity, health risks in mice

Green tea cut obesity and a number of inflammatory biomarkers linked with poor health in a new study.

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New SDSU study examines role of sea urchins on California kelp

California sheephead and spiny lobsters may be helping control sea urchin populations in Southern California kelp forests, where sea otters — a top urchin predator — have long been missing, according to a new San Diego State University (SDSU) study published in the journal Ecology. The research provides new insight into the complex predator-prey relationships in kelp forests that can be seen in

15h

New food guide will save Canadians money but few are following it, study finds

New research surveys Canadians' perception of the new Canada Food Guide and finds it can save households money — if followed.

15h

Expectant mothers can prevent fetal brain problems caused by the flu, study finds

Choline, an essential B vitamin nutrient, can prevent fetal brain developmental problems that often occur after prenatal maternal infections such as colds and influenza (flu).

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15h

An origami design helps this robot lift delicate and heavy cargo

Fragile items, such as soft fruits, as well as heavier goods are in safe hands with a new robotic gripper.

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China is world’s biggest exporter of armed drones, says report

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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