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nyheder2019marts15

Study uncovers genetic switches that control process of whole-body regeneration

Researchers are shedding new light on how animals perform whole-body regeneration, and uncovered a number of DNA switches that appear to control genes used in the process.

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Andrew Yang on why universal basic income won't make people lazy

2020 Democratic president candidate Andrew Yang discussed his views on universal basic income with The Fifth Column . Andrew Yang is the only candidate who's made universal basic income central to his platform. His 'Freedom Dividend' plan aims to give every American – no matter their income – $1,000 a month. None A crowded field of 2020 Democratic presidential election candidates has left many ex

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Receding Chilean glacier a sign of accelerating climate change

In the space of just two weeks, two large icebergs broke off the Grey Glacier in Chilean Patagonia—a sign of accelerating climate change, experts say.

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Jury rules Apple owes Qualcomm $31M for patent infringement

A jury has decided Apple should pay $31 million in damages for infringing on patents for technology owned by mobile chip maker Qualcomm that helps iPhones quickly connect to the internet and extend their battery life.

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NASA sees development of Tropical Depression 03W near Yap

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite revealed 03W that formed near the island of Yap in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Savannah moving away from Indonesia

Tropical Cyclone Savannah continued to move in southerly direction in the Southern Indian Ocean, and move away from Indonesia. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm. Savannah is no threat to land areas.

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Researchers measure near-perfect performance in low-cost semiconductors

Tiny, easy-to-produce particles, called quantum dots, may soon take the place of more expensive single crystal semiconductors in advanced electronics found in solar panels, camera sensors and medical imaging tools. Although quantum dots have begun to break into the consumer market—in the form of quantum dot TVs—they have been hampered by long-standing uncertainties about their quality. Now, a new

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States Are Approving Cannabis to Fight Opioid Addiction

Risky Maneuver So far, two U.S. states, New York and Illinois , have legalized the use of cannabis to help treat chronic pain as an alternative to addictive opioids. Ask anyone on the street, and they would probably tell you that cannabis helps people chill out. The chemical similarities between cannabis and opioids make it seem, anecdotally, like cannabis could help reduce opioid addiction. Both

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Nitrogen pollution's path to streams weaves through more forests (and faster) than suspected

Nitrogen in rain and snow falls to the ground where, in theory, it is used by forest plants and microbes. New research by a scientific collaboration led by the USDA Forest Service shows that more nitrogen from rain and snow is making it to more streams than previously believed and flowing downstream in forests of the United States and Canada. The study, "Unprocessed atmospheric nitrate in waters o

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Dormant viruses activate during spaceflight

Herpes viruses reactivate in more than half of crew aboard Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions, according to NASA research published in Frontiers in Microbiology. While only a small proportion develop symptoms, virus reactivation rates increase with spaceflight duration and could present a significant health risk on missions to Mars and beyond.

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Dormant viruses activate during spaceflight

Herpes viruses reactivate in more than half of crew aboard Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions, according to NASA research published in Frontiers in Microbiology. While only a small proportion develop symptoms, virus reactivation rates increase with spaceflight duration and could present a significant health risk on missions to Mars and beyond.

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Diabetics more likely to experience high blood sugar after joint surgery

People with diabetes who have joint replacement surgery are at sharply higher risk of experiencing elevated blood sugar after the procedure, and this could increase their chances of developing a complication, according to a new study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS).

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Researchers Who Study Mass Shootings Say Perpetrators Often Idolize And Copy Others

The man who claimed responsibility for the mass shooting in New Zealand posted a lengthy statement online before the attack. Researchers who study mass killings say perpetrators often idolize and copy others.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Flickr Cofounder Caterina Fake Weighs In On Big Tech

Caterina Fake says it’s time to ask whether tech should exist, rather than asking if it can exist or if funds are available for it.

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Kids and Teens Strike Against Adults’ Climate Screw-Ups

Across the planet, children skipped school to protest inaction on climate change: "Just 'cause we're kids doesn't mean we have childish opinions."

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How Investigators Pull Data off a Boeing 737’s Black Boxes

Figuring out what happened to Ethiopian Flight 302 may involve baking the black box recorders in an oven, but the information investigators recover can be crucial to preventing future crashes.

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MIT Creates Soft Robotic Gripper That Can Lift 100 Times Its Weight

The origami "magic ball" gripper doesn't try to imitate our hands, but it can still hold 100 times its weight. The post MIT Creates Soft Robotic Gripper That Can Lift 100 Times Its Weight appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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If You Pirated a Copy of Photoshop, You’re as Much a ‘Hacker’ as Beto O’Rourke

Beto O’Rourke, former senate candidate and current dad with a skateboard, has lost much of his shine since losing to Ted Cruz in November. When you’re not running against a brazen ghoul who …

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If an alien ship left its trash near Earth, here’s what it might look like

New study imagines how we might see shiny alien debris

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The sad reason part of the Mars Rover's last image is black and white

Space The rover took the shot, but never had the chance to send it back to earth. The Mars Opportunity rover sent back one last panoramic image.

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The Great Exoplanet Bake-Off: Why NASA Made an Oven-Fresh Alien Atmosphere in Its Lab

NASA scientists cooked up an alien atmosphere in their lab to solve the puzzle of "hot Jupiters."

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Dormant viruses activate during spaceflight — NASA investigates

Herpes viruses reactivate in more than half of crew aboard Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions, according to NASA research published in Frontiers in Microbiology. While only a small proportion develop symptoms, virus reactivation rates increase with spaceflight duration and could present a significant health risk on missions to Mars and beyond.

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This Tech Could Secure Medical Implants Against Hackers

Heart Hack An implanted medical device can dramatically improve a person’s quality of life — or even save their life outright. However, the devices come with serious security vulnerabilities, and it’s not hard to imagine the damage a person could do by hacking someone’s pacemaker, insulin pump, or brain implant . Now, researchers from Purdue University have found a way to prevent hackers from int

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The Mosque Shooter Laid Bare the Post-Shooting Internet Cycle

The gunman who killed at least 49 people at mosques in New Zealand live-streamed the massacres, and left unusually detailed writings.

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A no-deal Brexit isn’t going to be good for Britain’s health

A no-deal Brexit would make it harder for the United Kingdom to recruit health workers into their system and would jeopardize continuing care for British citizens with pre-existing conditions living outside the UK, according to a new study. It could even lead to an increase in cardiovascular disease-related deaths, report researchers. Researchers looked at what effects four different Brexit scena

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Near-perfect performance in low-cost semiconductors

Researchers redefine what it means for low-cost semiconductors, called quantum dots, to be near-perfect and find that quantum dots meet quality standards set by more expensive alternatives.

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Methadone Helped Her Quit Heroin. Now She’s Suing U.S. Prisons to Allow the Treatment.

About to enter a federal prison, a Massachusetts woman is not permitted to continue taking the opioid as a treatment to block cravings and withdrawal from heroin addiction.

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Here’s How Hackers Stole $15 Million From Mexican Banks

Ocean’s O nce In April 2018, hackers stole the equivalent of $15 million from Mexican banks — and now we know how they probably did it. Penetration tester and security advisor Josu Loza was one of the experts called in to respond to the April heist, and on March 8 he presented his findings at the RSA Security conference in San Francisco. Based on his analysis, Mexico’s central bank wasn’t doing n

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NASA sees development of Tropical Depression 03W near Yap

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite revealed 03W that formed near the island of Yap in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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Nitrogen pollution's path to streams weaves through more forests (and faster) than suspected

A USDA Forest Service scientist and 29 co-authors completed one of the largest and longest examinations to trace unprocessed nitrate movement in forests. The team found that some nitrate occasionally moves too fast for biological uptake, resulting in 'unprocessed' nitrate bypassing the otherwise effective filter of forest biology.

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Snapchat may launch a gaming platform as early as next month

Snap may be launching a new gaming platform for Snapchat as early as next month at the company’s Snap Partner Summit in Los Angeles on April 4th, according to a report from Cheddar. …

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Nitrogen pollution's path to streams weaves through more forests (and faster) than suspected

Scientists have completed one of the largest and longest examinations to trace unprocessed nitrate movement in forests. The team found that some nitrate occasionally moves too fast for biological uptake, resulting in 'unprocessed' nitrate bypassing the otherwise effective filter of forest biology.

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Precision medicine for pediatric cancer

Research performed over the last several decades has led to an increased understanding of the genetics of cancer. The clinical application of this knowledge for pediatric cancer has lagged behind studies performed for adults. Medical researchers now survey the landscape of this young field and present opportunities for using genomic information to advance a new era of care for children with cancer

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Sweat holds most promise for noninvasive testing

Medical researchers have been creating new sensors on a wearable patch the size of a Band-Aid that stimulates sweat even when a patient is cool and resting. The sensor measures specific analytes over time that doctors can use to determine how the patient is responding to a drug treatment.

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Near-perfect performance in low-cost semiconductors

Researchers redefine what it means for low-cost semiconductors, called quantum dots, to be near-perfect and find that quantum dots meet quality standards set by more expensive alternatives.

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Seeing through a robot's eyes helps those with profound motor impairments

An interface system that uses augmented reality technology could help individuals with profound motor impairments operate a humanoid robot to feed themselves and perform routine personal care tasks such as scratching an itch and applying skin lotion. The web-based interface displays a 'robot's eye view' of surroundings to help users interact with the world through the machine.

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NASA going commercial could signal a paradigm shift for deep-space travel

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Curing HIV just got more complicated. Can CRISPR help?

Scientists probe cellular hideouts for HIV and show that CRISPR can still cut the AIDS virus from DNA in monkeys

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Ancient Remains Shed Light On The Iberian Peninsula's Complicated History

The Iberian Peninsula of modern day Spain and Portugal has long held one of human history's lingering mysteries. Now, two new studies covering nearly 20,000 years have outlined the region's transformative genetic influence. “It shows how tremendously powerful such transect through time studies are,” said Wolfgang Haak, an anthropologist at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

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Slack Just Removed a Bunch of Hate Groups

Violating Terms Slack, the team collaboration app commonly used to connect people within workplaces, announced Thursday that it had deleted 28 accounts that were clearly affiliated with hate groups, according to the company’s blog . The announcement, sparse on concrete details or specifics, states that hate groups are explicitly unwelcome on the app and that Slack will continue to investigate and

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Hypervelocity Star Flung Out of Milky Way May Have Unusual Origin

Scientists have discovered an unusual origin story for one of the fastest, largest objects we've ever discovered. The post Hypervelocity Star Flung Out of Milky Way May Have Unusual Origin appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Seeing through a robot's eyes helps those with profound motor impairments

An interface system that uses augmented reality technology could help individuals with profound motor impairments operate a humanoid robot to feed themselves and perform routine personal care tasks such as scratching an itch and applying skin lotion. The web-based interface displays a 'robot's eye view' of surroundings to help users interact with the world through the machine.

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Researchers measure near-perfect performance in low-cost semiconductors

Stanford researchers redefine what it means for low-cost semiconductors, called quantum dots, to be near-perfect and find that quantum dots meet quality standards set by more expensive alternatives.

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Survey Highlights "Shocking" Gender Bias Among PI Pay in UK

Young science professors, both men and women, say their institutions don't support them with enough mentoring and resources yet ask them to teach sometimes up to 40 hours a week.

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Watch this INSANE Spider Robot turn into a Wheel before your eyes

submitted by /u/blue_globe [link] [comments]

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KIA Joins With Amazon To Make Home EV Charging Easy

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Barbara Low, Trailblazing Woman in X-Ray Crystallography, Dies

The former Columbia University professor's early work helped illuminate the structure of penicillin, allowing chemists to make variants and broaden the scope of antibiotic treatments.

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Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Savannah moving away from Indonesia

Tropical Cyclone Savannah continued to move in southerly direction in the Southern Indian Ocean, and move away from Indonesia. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm. Savannah is no threat to land areas.

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Sweat holds most promise for noninvasive testing

University of Cincinnati professor Jason Heikenfeld and his students have been creating new sensors on a wearable patch the size of a Band-Aid that stimulates sweat even when a patient is cool and resting. The sensor measures specific analytes over time that doctors can use to determine how the patient is responding to a drug treatment.

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Presidential Hopeful Beto O’Rourke Belonged to Infamous Hacker Group

Political Hack Presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke just admitted to spending his teenage years as part of the Cult of the Dead Cow (CDC), a group of hackers that first coined the term “hacktivism.” O’Rourke, who failed to unseat Senator Ted Cruz in the 2018 midterm election and recently decided to run for president instead of challenging Senator John Cornyn in 2020, told Reuters that he credits

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Report: James Gunn has been un-fired from Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3

After Disney firing in July over tweets, Gunn defected to DC Studios, Suicide Squad.

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The New Old Age: Older Americans Are Awash in Antibiotics

The drugs are not just overprescribed. They often pose special risks to older patients, including tendon problems, nerve damage and mental health issues.

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EPA Imposes Limits on a Deadly Chemical in Paint Strippers

The rule, which scales back a ban proposed under President Barack Obama, would prohibit the consumer use of products containing methylene chloride but allow commercial use.

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Trump Administration Loosens Sage Grouse Protections, Benefiting Oil Companies

The plan would strip away protections for the imperiled bird on nearly nine million acres of energy-rich land in the West.

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Elon Musk: 2019 Will Be “the Year of the Solar Roof”

Looking Up During the unveiling of Tesla’s highly anticipated Model Y Thursday night, CEO Elon Musk shared his vision for his company’s immediate future — and it had little to do with cars. “This is definitely going to be the year of the Solar Roof and Powerwall,” he told the audience, according to Inverse — a sign that Tesla is shifting its focus from the road to the home, with the ultimate goal

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What the New Egg Study Means for the Beloved Breakfast Food

Eggs are back in the news, with a new study concluding that regular consumption of the beloved breakfast food may increase the risk of heart disease after all.

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This Guy Spent a Whole Week In a VR Headset

The Dumbest Thing Jak Wilmot, the co-founder of Atlanta-based VR content studioDisrupt VR, spent 168 consecutive hours in a VR headset — that’s a full week — pent up in his apartment. “This is quite possibly the dumbest thing I’ve ever done, but welcome to a week in the future,” he said in a video about the experiment. To make the experience even more futuristic, Wilmot livestreamed the entire we

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Bird-friendly buildings on the rise

Nearly a billion birds are killed every year after flying into windows. The American Bird Conservancy published an extensive guide to incorporating bird-friendly design into buildings. Over twenty cities have programs to help reduce the number of avian deaths. None Last year, a minor ruckus broke out on social media about feral and indoor-outdoor cats decimating bird populations. According to res

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Researchers say humor is a powerful tool against depression

A new study examined 55 individuals recovering from major depression to see how well humor worked as a coping mechanism against stress. Individuals at risk for depression often fall into depressive episodes because of faulty coping mechanisms. Research indicates that humor works as a powerful defense against depression. None In 1894, Mark Twain had good reason to feel depressed. He owed $100,000

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Brazilian scientists produce mini-brains with eyes

Mini-brains, or "neural organoids," are at the cutting edge of medical research. This is the first one that's started developing eyes. Stem cells are key to the growing of organoids of various body parts. None Organoids are tiny, self-organized tissue cultures. They're comprised of stem cells that can be programmed to replicate naturally occurring tissue. Using them, scientists can grow mini orga

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Netflix Pulls Real-Life Rail Tragedy Clips From ‘Bird Box’

In January, Netflix publicly apologized to the people of Lac-Mégantic, after it discovered that Bird Box used actual footage of the Canadian town’s fatal rail tragedy. At that time, Netflix …

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NASA is using space lasers to measure trees on Earth

Nexus Media News The new system onboard the International Space Station will help scientists gauge how much carbon is stored in forests. Forests store planet-heating carbon dioxide, but measuring how much can be challenging. NASA scientists have developed the technology to use lasers from space to help…

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Trusting your instincts is lazy: Poker pro Liv Boeree on Big Think Edge

Learn to make decisions with the clarity of a World Series Poker Champion. Liv Boeree teaches analytical thinking for Big Think Edge. Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships. None "Trust your instincts!" "Go with your gut!" These popular nuggets of advice appeal to something deep in our nature—a distaste for unresolved complexity. We

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Scientists track damage from controversial deep-sea mining method

Scientists track damage from controversial deep-sea mining method Scientists track damage from controversial deep-sea mining method, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00757-y Researchers will monitor the environmental effects of an industrial test to extract valuable metals from the Pacific sea floor.

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Precision medicine for pediatric cancer

In a perspectives article published in the prestigious journal Science, Dr. Jaclyn Biegel, from Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Dr. Alejandro Sweet-Cordero, of the University of California, San Francisco, survey the landscape on the use of precision medicine in pediatric oncology and present opportunities for using genomic information to advance a new era of care for children with cancer.

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The Guardian view on language: the flesh made word | Editorial

Teeth and tongues make the sounds of our speech, but our humanity makes its meanings Babies have an astonishing talent that adults entirely lose. By the age of one, they can recognise the significant noises in the babble around them and group them into a language. When we have lost this capacity as adults, it becomes enormously difficult to distinguish between sounds that are glaringly different t

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Photos of the Week: Hudson Yards, Birdman Rally, Cat Yoga

A rabbit in war-torn Syria, an underwater-photography exhibit in China, sorrow in Ethiopia after a terrible plane crash, water shortages in Venezuela, cherry blossoms in China, a pagan festival near Moscow, fire-walking in Japan, terror in New Zealand, voting in North Korea, a global youth protest against climate-change inaction, and much more

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A Repulsively Casual Terrorist Manifesto

I have just read the manifesto written by the alleged killer of almost 50 Muslims in Christchurch, New Zealand. I can think of more pleasant ways to spend a Friday morning, such as nursing a throbbing case of pink eye, or seeing how long I can hold my palm on my hot plate without screaming. But the evaluation of nauseating ideological statements is a specialty of mine, and regrettably, today I am

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How to digitize all your VHS and cassette tapes

DIY Preserve your baby videos forever. If your media collection stretches back before the digital age then you might be wondering how you can get all your older VHS and cassette tapes upgraded into formats…

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Japan poised to allow ‘reprogrammed’ stem-cell therapy for damaged corneas

Japan poised to allow ‘reprogrammed’ stem-cell therapy for damaged corneas Japan poised to allow ‘reprogrammed’ stem-cell therapy for damaged corneas, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00860-0 If approved, the treatment could restore vision.

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Nursing work environment shapes relationship between EHR & quality of care

In the decade since the federal government's electronic health record (EHR) initiatives first became law, nearly all US hospitals have adopted some form of EHR technology. Now, focus is on how a comprehensive EHR can enhance outcomes. Yet, little is known about the sociotechnical factors that can shape the relationship between advanced EHR adoption and quality of care.

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Narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease

New evidence shows that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease. For many years, scientists have suspected the sleep disorder of being an autoimmune disease, but couldn’t prove it conclusively. “We have found autoreactive cytotoxic CD8 T cells in the blood of narcolepsy patients. That is, the cells recognize the neurons that produce hypocretin, which regulates a person’s waking state. It does not pro

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Cuddly polar bear cub makes splash in Berlin debut

Berlin's latest zoo celebrity, a fluffy polar bear cub, made her first tentative steps on the public stage Friday, with media hungry to anoint her the rightful successor to late lamented superstar Knut.

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Cuddly polar bear cub makes splash in Berlin debut

Berlin's latest zoo celebrity, a fluffy polar bear cub, made her first tentative steps on the public stage Friday, with media hungry to anoint her the rightful successor to late lamented superstar Knut.

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One Day at a Time Taught Its Fans How to Say Goodbye

One Day at a Time , which was canceled by Netflix on Thursday after three seasons, was always preparing fans for its own ending. It isn’t that the beloved sitcom wanted to end—far from it. Every year, the cast and creatives clawed their way to a renewal, spearheading impassioned Twitter campaigns to save the consistently on-the-bubble show. But on-screen, One Day at a Time understood loss as an i

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Does a new genetic analysis finally reveal the identity of Jack the Ripper?

Scientists claim it’s the best evidence to date, but critics are skeptical

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EU to slap Google with fresh fine: sources

The EU's anti-trust regulator is to slap tech giant Google with a new fine over unfair competition practices, sources told AFP on Friday.

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Photoregulated fluxional fluorophores for live-cell super-resolution microscopy with no apparent photobleaching

Photoregulated fluxional fluorophores for live-cell super-resolution microscopy with no apparent photobleaching Photoregulated fluxional fluorophores for live-cell super-resolution microscopy with no apparent photobleaching, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09217-7 Super-resolution microscopy with spontaneously blinking dyes is dependent on pH and polarity of the medium. He

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Life habits and evolutionary biology of new two-winged long-proboscid scorpionflies from mid-Cretaceous Myanmar amber

Life habits and evolutionary biology of new two-winged long-proboscid scorpionflies from mid-Cretaceous Myanmar amber Life habits and evolutionary biology of new two-winged long-proboscid scorpionflies from mid-Cretaceous Myanmar amber, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09236-4 Long-proboscid scorpionflies were associated with mid-Mesozoic gymnosperm pollination. Here, Lin e

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Automating multimodal microscopy with NanoJ-Fluidics

Automating multimodal microscopy with NanoJ-Fluidics Automating multimodal microscopy with NanoJ-Fluidics, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09231-9 Sample processing for biological imaging experiments involves elaborate protocols with low reproducibility and throughput. Here the authors develop an open-source system called NanoJ-Fluidics, composed of off-the-shelf Lego comp

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Lineage tracing using a Cas9-deaminase barcoding system targeting endogenous L1 elements

Lineage tracing using a Cas9-deaminase barcoding system targeting endogenous L1 elements Lineage tracing using a Cas9-deaminase barcoding system targeting endogenous L1 elements, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09203-z Lineage tracing has provided new insights into cell fate but defining cellular diversity remains a challenge. Here the authors target endogenous repeat regi

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Pervasive function and evidence for selection across standing genetic variation in S. cerevisiae

Pervasive function and evidence for selection across standing genetic variation in S. cerevisiae Pervasive function and evidence for selection across standing genetic variation in S. cerevisiae , Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09166-1 Genetic architecture underlies the complexity of heritable traits. Here, the authors perform high-resolution genetic mapping of metabolic t

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A phosphorylated transcription factor regulates sterol biosynthesis in Fusarium graminearum

A phosphorylated transcription factor regulates sterol biosynthesis in Fusarium graminearum A phosphorylated transcription factor regulates sterol biosynthesis in Fusarium graminearum , Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09145-6 The fungus Fusarium graminearum is a pathogen of cereal crops. Here, Liu et al. identify a transcription factor that regulates sterol biosynthesis an

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The deubiquitylating enzyme USP15 regulates homologous recombination repair and cancer cell response to PARP inhibitors

The deubiquitylating enzyme USP15 regulates homologous recombination repair and cancer cell response to PARP inhibitors The deubiquitylating enzyme USP15 regulates homologous recombination repair and cancer cell response to PARP inhibitors, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09232-8 Deubiquitinases have been shown to be involved in double strand break repair pathways. Here th

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Restoration of high-sensitivity and adapting vision with a cone opsin

Restoration of high-sensitivity and adapting vision with a cone opsin Restoration of high-sensitivity and adapting vision with a cone opsin, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09124-x Activating the spared neurons downstream of rods and cones is a potential therapeutic approach for retinal degeneration, but has been limited by the characteristics of the opsins available. Here

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Facebook loses longtime product chief as it revamps strategy

Facebook is losing its product chief Chris Cox, a top-ranking executive who spent more than a decade at the company, just a week after CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced a major new direction for the social network.

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Make love, not CO2: Students worldwide demand climate action

From the South Pacific to the edge of the Arctic Circle, students mobilized by word of mouth and social media are skipping class to protest what they see as the failures by their governments to take tough action against global warming.

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Wigner solid pinning modes tuned by fractional quantum Hall states of a nearby layer

We studied a bilayer system hosting two-dimensional electron systems (2DESs) in close proximity but isolated from one another by a thin barrier. One 2DES has low electron density and forms a Wigner solid (WS) at high magnetic fields. The other has much higher density and, in the same field, exhibits fractional quantum Hall states (FQHSs). The WS spectrum has resonances which are understood as pin

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Sensitivity of the superconducting state in thin films

For more than two decades, there have been reports on an unexpected metallic state separating the established superconducting and insulating phases of thin-film superconductors. To date, no theoretical explanation has been able to fully capture the existence of such a state for the large variety of superconductors exhibiting it. Here, we show that for two very different thin-film superconductors,

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Composite lithium electrode with mesoscale skeleton via simple mechanical deformation

Lithium metal–based batteries are attractive energy storage devices because of high energy density. However, uncontrolled dendrite growth and virtually infinite volume change, which cause performance fading and safety concerns, have limited their applications. Here, we demonstrate that a composite lithium metal electrode with an ion-conducting mesoscale skeleton can improve electrochemical perfor

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Bioinspired mechanical device generates plasma in water via cavitation

Nature can generate plasma in liquids more efficiently than human-designed devices using electricity, acoustics, or light. In the animal world, snapping shrimp can induce cavitation that collapses to produce high pressures and temperatures, leading to efficient plasma formation with photon and shock wave emission via energy focusing. Here, we report a bioinspired mechanical device that mimics the

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Escaping undesired gas-phase chemistry: Microwave-driven selectivity enhancement in heterogeneous catalytic reactors

Research in solid-gas heterogeneous catalytic processes is typically aimed toward optimization of catalyst composition to achieve a higher conversion and, especially, a higher selectivity. However, even with the most selective catalysts, an upper limit is found: Above a certain temperature, gas-phase reactions become important and their effects cannot be neglected. Here, we apply a microwave fiel

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Gate-controlled VO2 phase transition for high-performance smart windows

Vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ) is a promising material for developing energy-saving "smart windows," owing to its infrared thermochromism induced by metal-insulator transition (MIT). However, its practical application is greatly limited by its relatively high critical temperature (~68°C), low luminous transmittance ( 2 film. With a solid electrolyte layer assisting gating treatment, we modulated the in

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Propane oxidative dehydrogenation over highly selective hexagonal boron nitride catalysts: The role of oxidative coupling of methyl

Hexagonal boron nitride ( h -BN) catalyst has recently been reported to be highly selective in oxidative dehydrogenation of propane (ODHP) for olefin production. In addition to propene, ethylene also forms with much higher overall selectivities to C2-products than to C1-products. In this work, we report that the reaction pathways over the h -BN catalyst are different from the V-based catalysts in

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Vapor-printed polymer electrodes for long-term, on-demand health monitoring

We vapor print conformal conjugated polymer electrodes directly onto living plants and use these electrodes to probe the health of actively growing specimens using bioimpedance spectroscopy. Vapor-printed polymer electrodes, unlike their adhesive thin-film counterparts, do not delaminate from microtextured living surfaces as the organism matures and do not observably attenuate the natural growth

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A Ferocious Shrimp Inspires a Robot Claw That Shoots Plasma

Researchers replicate the snapping shrimp's plasma-firing claw, which is powerful enough to knock prey out cold.

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There’s a Power Struggle Inside Google to Control Superhuman AI

Internal Safeguards DeepMind, the artificial intelligence startup purchased by Google in 2014, is on a mission to build the world’s first artificial general intelligence (AGI) — the sort of all-encompassing, superhuman AI we see in science fiction. To make sure that AGI is used responsibly, DeepMind founder Demis Hassabis protected his company’s independence from Google and parent company Alphabe

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Some shrimp make plasma with their claws. Now a 3-D printed claw can too

Scientists used a replica of a shrimp claw to re-create the extreme pressures and temperatures that the animals produce underwater.

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Heart failure: New drug could halt disease and improve heart function

A molecule that stops two proteins from interacting and impairing heart function halted heart failure and improved heart pumping capacity in rats.

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Why Tech Didn't Stop the New Zealand Attack From Going Viral

Video from mosque shootings in Christchurch popped up on Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, and YouTube, showing the limits of social media moderation.

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How Can We Build Cities to Accommodate 6.5 Billion People?

By 2050, 6.5 billion people will choose to live in cities. These individuals will require employment and access to better healthcare from an infrastructure that is already extremely vulnerable. The Global Maker Challenge asked makers and innovators to help put forward solutions for this issue, and they delivered. The post How Can We Build Cities to Accommodate 6.5 Billion People? appeared first o

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#trashtag challenge has done more the environment in the past week than years of government lobbying.

I posted something similar in another sub, although I thought it would enact more conversation on here as it deals with how if we wish to tackle climate change, it is a matter of how society will do so in the future. And I believe despite all of the testimony on capitol hill over the years, progressive and insightful documentaries, the only true change will happen from the people of their own res

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Rapidly Flashing Lights and Sounds Reduces Alzheimer’s in Mice

Exposing mice to an hour of 40-hertz stimuli every day for a week reduced levels of amyloid-beta plaques and tau protein, and improved cognition.

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Tech companies scramble to remove New Zealand shooting video

Internet companies scrambled Friday to remove graphic video filmed by a gunman in the New Zealand mosque shootings that was widely available on social media for hours after the horrific attack.

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The Media Still Haven’t Figured Out How to Cover Acts of Violence

By the time the news of mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, spread around the world, the effort to remove materials left behind by a suspect in the terror attack online was already well under way. Social-media sites including Facebook , Twitter , and YouTube said they were removing footage of the attack, which was broadcast live to Facebook, from their platforms. Accounts

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90% of heart guidelines aren’t based on best evidence

Less than 10 percent of the treatment recommendations US doctors rely on to manage care for heart patients are based on evidence from multiple large, randomized clinical trials—the gold standard for obtaining scientific data, report researchers. In fact, the proportion of well-supported recommendations for heart care has actually declined compared to 10 years ago, when an earlier analysis found a

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Daily briefing: What to do if your supervisor mistakes you for a chocolatier

Daily briefing: What to do if your supervisor mistakes you for a chocolatier Daily briefing: What to do if your supervisor mistakes you for a chocolatier, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00880-w Don’t let misunderstandings snowball, how scientists are backing the #SchoolStrike4climate and the questionable war on ‘prediabetes’.

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Opinion: Slow Down, SpaceX

Rockets can transport humankind to Mars, but only the scientific and medical community can ensure our survival.

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Tesla Model Y Unveiled: An Affordable (Sort of) Midsize EV Crossover

Affordability starts at $40,200 in spring 2021, but you can't place an order yet. The cheapest one you can order today is $48,200 (plus options): the Model Y Long Wait. Sorry, we meant Model Y Long Range. The post Tesla Model Y Unveiled: An Affordable (Sort of) Midsize EV Crossover appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Ondt i nakken? Væn dig til det

Tre ting står i vejen for mobiltelefonens smarte afløser.

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Oscillation in muscle tissue

When a muscle grows or a muscle injury heals, some of the stem cells develop into new muscle cells. A research team has now described how this process is regulated by two proteins produced in an oscillatory manner.

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Tectonics in the tropics trigger Earth's ice ages

Over the last 540 million years, the Earth has weathered three major ice ages — periods during which global temperatures plummeted, producing extensive ice sheets and glaciers that have stretched beyond the polar caps. Now scientists have identified the likely trigger for these ice ages.

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20% of gamblers attempt suicide — why don't we take the addiction more seriously?

Gambling addiction has been shown to have the same pharmacological effects as opiates. Eighty-five percent of all gambling revenue comes from slot machines. Casinos are designed to disorient and confuse patrons, from the lighting and carpeting to the key of machine sounds. None The smell is the first assault even though the triggers for sensory overload occur concurrently. That is by design. As t

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NASA tracks Tropical Cyclone Idai over Mozambique

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone continued to move in a westerly direction after making landfall in Mozambique.

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The key to combating extremism is to address its social roots

Effective techniques for preventing extremism call for intervening early, making sure disenfranchised groups are included in society and disrupting stereotypes by making people work together. Deradicalisation programmes fail when they ignore this

5h

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields

A new technique uses quantum sensors to enable precise measurements of magnetic fields in different directions.

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Protein precis innan läggdags kan ge dig större muskler

Många som tränar är noggranna med att få i sig mycket protein. Men visste du att din kropp kan ta upp protein även när du sover? Den slutsatsen drar forskare efter en genomgång av det senaste decenniets studier på området.

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Giant Pandas: Facts About the Charismatic Black and White Bears

Giant pandas, known for their distinctive markings and playful personalities, are considered China's national treasure.

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Social Media Was Made for This

Forty-nine people are dead and 20 more injured after terrorist attacks on two New Zealand mosques Friday. One of the alleged shooters was a white man who appears to have announced the attack on the anonymous-troll message board 8chan. There, he posted images of the weapons days before the attack, and an announcement an hour before. On 8chan and Twitter, he also posted links to a 74-page manifesto

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NASA tracks Tropical Cyclone Idai over Mozambique

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone continued to move in a westerly direction after making landfall in Mozambique.

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Cheesy listening: study says tunes change Emmental's taste

It may be grating for some, but hip-hop is music to the ears of Switzerland's most famous cheese.

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Nations agree 'significant' plastic cuts

Nations on Friday committed to "significantly reduce" single-use plastics over the next decade, in a series of voluntary pledges that green groups warned fell short of tackling Earth's pollution crisis.

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Ford to slash over 5,000 German jobs in European overhaul

Ford on Friday said it planned to cut "more than 5,000" jobs in Germany as part of a major restructuring to boost profitability at the US car giant's European operations.

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Aliens Might Shoot Lasers at Black Holes to Travel the Galaxy

We don't know if aliens exist. But if they did, it'd be cool if they got around using lasers and black holes.

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Can blocked anti-endorphins cut the emotional side of pain?

It’s possible to block receptors in the brain responsible for the emotional components of pain and restore motivation, new research with rodents shows. Chronic pain involves more than just hurting. People suffering from pain often experience sadness, depression, and lethargy. That’s one reason opioids can be so addictive—they not only dampen the pain but also make people feel euphoric. What if it

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Jeg tilstår: Det er ikke lige til at se, at sundhedsvæsenet kollapser

Læge Tobias Ramm Eberlein anklager mig for ikke at have data i orden, men hvem har bevisbyrden her? Og hvad vil det egentlig sige – et kollaps af det (offentlige) danske sundhedsvæsen? Men lad os få det undersøgt ordentligt.

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Oscillation in muscle tissue

When a muscle grows or a muscle injury heals, some of the stem cells develop into new muscle cells. A research team at the MDC led by Carmen Birchmeier has now described in the journal Genes & Development how this process is regulated by two proteins produced in an oscillatory manner.

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Periodontitis may raise the risk for developing dementia

Gum disease (gingivitis) that goes untreated can become periodontitis, causing loss in the bone that supports your teeth. Periodontitis is the main cause of tooth loss in adults. Periodontitis is also a risk factor for developing dementia. Recently, researchers in South Korea studied the connection between chronic periodontitis and dementia. They published their findings in the Journal of the Amer

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Chile tests floating solar panels to power mine, save water

A floating island of solar panels is being tested in Chile as a way to generate clean energy and reduce water loss at mine operations, a cornerstone of the Andean country's economy that uses huge amounts of electricity and water.

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Nanocrystal 'factory' could revolutionize quantum dot manufacturing

North Carolina State University researchers have developed a microfluidic system for synthesizing perovskite quantum dots across the entire spectrum of visible light. The system drastically reduces manufacturing costs, can be tuned on demand to any color and allows for real-time process monitoring to ensure quality control.

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Three Implications of the 737 Max Crashes

Previously on this topic: “ Is It Time to Worry About the Boeing 737 Max? ”, “ A Shorter Guide to the Ethiopian Tragedy and the 737 Max ,” “ What Was On the Record About Problems With the 737 Max ,” and “ ‘Don’t Ground the Planes, Ground the Pilots.’ ” Despite the nightmare and tragedy of the situation I am grateful to many informed readers who have written in. The dispatches below contain no “ne

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How Climate Change Has Influenced Travel Writing

“It’s easy to make the mistake when traveling abroad of finding only the good or only the bad in a place, easy to miss how complicated the weave of bad with good is,” Barry Lopez writes in his new book, Horizon . Lopez is forgiving himself here, as he recalls a trip to Galápagos National Park and the island settlement Puerto Villamil. Its residents were then at odds, sometimes violently, with aut

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The Shooter’s Manifesto Was Designed to Troll

In the hours after the horrific mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, people desperately searched the internet for any sign of a motive or meaning behind the attack. Early Friday, a number of unverified social-media posts surfaced, along with a bizarre manifesto posted to 8chan , rich with irony and references to memes. Together, the posts suggest that every aspect of the sh

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The Family Weekly: The College-Admissions Scandal Shows How Broken the System Is

This Week in Family William “Rick” Singer (right) pleaded guilty to charges in a nationwide college-admissions bribery scandal. (Steven Senne / AP) The Department of Justice announced this week that it had charged 50 people with participating in a scheme—involving everything from fraud, to bribery, to cheating on standardized tests—aimed at getting the children of affluent parents into elite scho

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How White-Supremacist Violence Echoes Other Forms of Terrorism

Their enemies are different, but their grievances and methods can look strikingly similar. The suspected gunman charged with killing 49 people at a mosque in New Zealand on Friday was a white nationalist, bent on killing Muslims. But in many respects, he’s not so different from the jihadists who have conducted similar mass shootings on behalf of violent Islamist groups. Terrorists across ideologi

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This Songbird Is Nearly Extinct in the Wild. An International Treaty Could Help Save It — but Won’t.

Over a quarter of the species threatened by commercial trade are not protected by Cites, the global agreement intended to save them.

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Nanocrystal 'factory' could revolutionize quantum dot manufacturing

A new system for synthesizing quantum dots across the entire spectrum of visible light drastically reduces manufacturing costs, can be tuned on demand to any color and allows for real-time process monitoring to ensure quality control.

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Samsung Is Working on Phone With “Invisible” Camera Behind Screen

Punch It Just last month, South Korean tech giant Samsung unveiled the Galaxy S10 , a phone with just a single hole punched in the screen to accommodate its front-facing camera. On Thursday, a Samsung exec shared new details on the company’s intentions to create a “perfect full-screen” phone, with an “invisible” camera behind the screen to eliminate the need for any visible holes or sensors — con

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U.S. Blocks U.N. Resolution on Geoengineering

The measure called for a report on carbon capture and solar radiation management — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Chemical probe can regulate signaling pathway and block cell invasion by arboviruses

Dysregulation of the signaling pathway known as the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt can also cause embryo malformation and contribute for the development of breast and cervical cancer.

5h

A new battle: Veterans more likely to have heart disease

After the war is over, veterans face a new threat. They are more likely to have heart disease at a younger age than nonveterans, and this could herald a new health crisis on the horizon.

5h

Nanocrystal 'factory' could revolutionize quantum dot manufacturing

A new system for synthesizing quantum dots across the entire spectrum of visible light drastically reduces manufacturing costs, can be tuned on demand to any color and allows for real-time process monitoring to ensure quality control.

5h

Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields

A new technique uses quantum sensors to enable precise measurements of magnetic fields in different directions.

5h

Higher egg and cholesterol consumption hikes heart disease and early death risk

Cancel the cheese omelet. A large, new study of nearly 30,000 people reports adults who ate more eggs and dietary cholesterol had a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease and death from any cause. People need to consume lower amounts of cholesterol to have a lower risk of heart disease, the study authors said.

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Loved one’s death brings extra stress to undocumented immigrants

The death of a loved one is never easy to endure, but for undocumented immigrants, the psychological toll is particularly rough, according to new research. For a new study, researchers examined how the loss of a loved one living outside the US affects their relatives living in the United States without documentation. The study of 248 undocumented Mexican immigrants living in a medium-size city ne

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Special Announcement: Futurism Media and Singularity University

So, Readers – As always, we’ve got some news about the future. Except this time, it’s about us. We’re about to enter the next chapter of Futurism, one that will usher in a new era for this site. It’ll come with new ways we’ll be able to deliver on everything you’ve grown to read, watch, subscribe to, and love about what we do here. And also, more in volume of what we do, with larger ambitions, an

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Physicians and Social Media

Platforms like Twitter and Instagram can blur the boundaries between doctors and patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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No Man's Sky Beyond Adds Sprawling Online Multiplayer Component, Coming This Summer

No Man’s Sky is about to receive a major update. Developer Hello Games recently announced that their next update will include No Man’s Sky Online, an online multiplayer experience. This new …

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New proof that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease

Researchers have discovered autoreactive cells in persons suffering from narcolepsy. This is a new, important proof that the sleep disorder is an autoimmune disease. This knowledge may lead to better treatment of the chronic condition, the researchers behind the new discovery believe.

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Trials testing new educational methods in schools 'often fail to produce useful evidence'

The new study found that 40% of large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the UK and the US failed to produce any evidence as to whether an educational intervention helped to boost academic attainment or not.

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A repellent odor inhibits the perception of a pleasant odor in vinegar flies

Scientists have discovered that repellent odors suppress the perception of pleasant smells. This happens because certain brain structures that respond to attractive odors are inhibited by a repellent one. These processes in the brain are also reflected in the behavior of the flies. This helps them to avoid spoiled or infected food sources, which would have fatal consequences for the flies and thei

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Mental health issues increased significantly in young adults over last decade

The percentage of young Americans experiencing certain types of mental health disorders has risen significantly over the past decade, with no corresponding increase in older adults, according to new research.

5h

Research set to shake up space missions

A new study has found a number of 2D materials can not only withstand being sent into space, but potentially thrive in the harsh conditions.

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A new battle: Veterans more likely to have heart disease

After the war is over, veterans face a new threat. They are more likely to have heart disease at a younger age than nonveterans, and this could herald a new health crisis on the horizon.

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Design and validation of world-class multilayered thermal emitter using machine learning

Scientists designed a multilayered metamaterial that realizes ultra-narrowband wavelength-selective thermal emission by combining the machine learning (Bayesian optimization) and thermal emission properties calculations (electromagnetic calculation). The joint team then experimentally fabricated the designed metamaterial and verified the performance. These results may facilitate the development of

6h

Cause of cathode degradation identified for nickel-rich materials

A team of scientists have identified the causes of degradation in a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, as well as possible remedies. Their findings could lead to the development of more affordable and better performing batteries for electric vehicles.

6h

New light shed on link between alcohol marketing and increased consumption in young people

Young people's awareness of alcohol marketing — and their ownership of alcohol-branded merchandise — is associated with increased and higher-risk consumption, a landmark study has found.

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For older adults, sense of control tied to feeling younger

A recent study finds that older adults feel younger when they feel that they have more control over their daily lives, regardless of stress or health concerns. However, stress and health — not a sense of control — play a significant role in how old younger adults feel.

6h

Enzyme USP15 may have potential role in future treatment of various cancers

A team has found that the deubiquitinating enzyme USP15 is a potential biomarker for treatments of pancreatic cancer, as well as ovarian and breast cancers.

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Uncovering uncultivated microbes in the human gut

A human's health is shaped both by environmental factors and the body's interactions with the microbiome, particularly in the gut. Genome sequences are critical for characterizing individual microbes and understanding their functional roles. However, previous studies have estimated that only 50 percent of species in the gut microbiome have a sequenced genome, in part because many species have not

6h

Sea quark surprise reveals deeper complexity in proton spin puzzle

New data from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) add detail — and complexity — to an intriguing puzzle that scientists have been seeking to solve: how the building blocks that make up a proton contribute to its spin. The results reveal that different 'flavors' of antiquarks contribute differently to the proton's overall spin — and in a way that's opposite to those

6h

Physicians and Social Media

Platforms like Twitter and Instagram can blur the boundaries between doctors and patients — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

The Side Effects of Solar Geoengineering Could Be Minimal

Results from a Harvard study don’t “support the common claims that [solar geoengineering] would inevitably lead to significant harms to some regions.”

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Just 19 Percent of Americans Trust Self-Driving Cars With Kids

Poor Turnout While tech companies like Waymo, Uber, and Tesla race to be the first to build a fully-autonomous vehicle, the public is left eating their dust . About 71 percent of Americans say that they don’t trust self-driving cars, according to a new American Automobile Association (AAA) survey. That’s roughly the same percentage as last year’s survey, but it’s eight points higher than in 2017,

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REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast March 1918

REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast March 1918 REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast March 1918, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00858-8 We delve into the archives to tell the stories behind some of Nature’s biggest papers.

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New Zealand Went More Than 20 Years Between Mass Shootings

At least 49 people were killed and 20 injured in an attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, on Friday. Police have said that four suspects have been taken into custody and that a man in his late 20s has been charged with murder. This is the deadliest shooting in the modern history of New Zealand, a country where gun violence is rare and annual gun homicides don’t usually reach the dou

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Chemical probe can regulate signaling pathway and block cell invasion by arboviruses

Dysregulation of the signaling pathway known as the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt can also cause embryo malformation and contribute for the development of breast and cervical cancer.

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NASA May Launch Orion Crew Module on Commercial Rocket

It might seem like we've been talking about the Space Launch System (SLS) for years, and that's because we have been. NASA began this ambitious project in 2011, eventually settling on Boeing as the primary contractor for what will be the most powerful rocket in the world. It's not ready to fly yet, and NASA is getting impatient. The post NASA May Launch Orion Crew Module on Commercial Rocket appe

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Elon Musk: $47,000 Model Y SUV “Will Ride Like a Sports Car”

A Familiar Car First, it was supposed to feature Model-X-style “falcon wing” doors, and then it didn’t . It was supposed to be built in the Shanghai factory, but that didn’t work out either. Tesla finally unveiled its fifth production car, the Model Y, at its design studio outside of Los Angeles Thursday evening. “It has the functionality of an SUV, but it will ride like a sports car,” Tesla CEO

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U.S. heart attack mortality reached a two-decade low in 2014

Deaths within 30 days of a heart attack have declined from 20 percent in 1995 to 12.4 percent in 2014, according to an analysis of Medicare patient data.

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Astronomers Caught a 'Cosmic Bat' Swooping Out of the Darkest Corner of the Orion Nebula

Meet the 'Cosmic Bat' nebula, a dusty band of baby stars swooping around Orion's hips.

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Trump Budget Proposal Outlines Cuts to Science, Again

On Monday, President Trump released his budget request for the 2020 fiscal year, aiming once again to cut funding to major scientific agencies including the National Institutes of Health. While the plan puts $291 million towards the goal of ending HIV, critics say cuts to other programs undermine this vision.

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A brief hissstory of places snakes won't go

Animals A list for the ophidiophobes. Snakes are sneaky. In their 150 million-odd years on this planet, they’ve managed to slither their way into most corners of the world. But Saint Patrick can’t take…

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New wheel units could bring vehicle costs down

Vehicles could be affordably produced for a wide variety of specialized purposes using a sophisticated wheel unit.

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Scientists track patterns of island growth in crystals

Scientists have found that the seemingly random arrangement of islands that form to begin new layers during crystal growth can actually be very similar from layer to layer. The discovery may help scientists better understand of some of the mechanisms behind defect formation, as well as develop techniques to synthesize new types of crystals.

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With single gene insertion, blind mice regain sight

People left blind by retinal degeneration have one option: electronic eye implants. Neuroscientists have now developed an alternative: gene therapy that, in tests, restored vision in blind mice. A gene for green opsin delivered via virus gave blind mice enough sight to discern patterns on an iPad at a resolution sufficient for humans to read. Given existing AAV eye therapies already approved, this

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Sources and Sinks: What drives long-term climatic trends?

For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. But Earth has been ice-free for about 75 percent of the time since complex life first appeared. This variation in background climate, between partly glaciated and ice-free, has puzzled geologists for decades.

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In this nematode species males are needed for reproduction but not their genes

In the Mesorhabditis belari roundworm, the sole purpose of males is to help females produce clones of themselves.

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Are we at the limits of measuring water-repellent surfaces

As we develop extremely liquid repellent surfaces, the errors in existing measurement techniques are getting too large.

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How a mitochondrial enzyme can trigger cell death

Cytochrome c is a small enzyme that plays an important role in the production of energy by mitochondria. It is also involved in signaling dangerous problems that warrant apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have discovered that the signal induced by cytochrome c is more controlled than expected.

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How to keep human bias out of AI | Kriti Sharma

AI algorithms make important decisions about you all the time — like how much you should pay for car insurance or whether or not you get that job interview. But what happens when these machines are built with human bias coded into their systems? Technologist Kriti Sharma explores how the lack of diversity in tech is creeping into our AI, offering three ways we can start making more ethical algori

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What is the real link between bacterial vaginosis and HIV risk in women?

An international team of researchers presents a comprehensive and renewed focus on the common, yet poorly understood condition of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and how the microbial make-up of the vagina can affect a woman's risk of acquiring HIV and AIDS.

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Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields

A new technique developed at MIT uses quantum sensors to enable precise measurements of magnetic fields in different directions.

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Nanocrystal 'factory' could revolutionize quantum dot manufacturing

A new system for synthesizing quantum dots across the entire spectrum of visible light drastically reduces manufacturing costs, can be tuned on demand to any color and allows for real-time process monitoring to ensure quality control.

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Surgery no better than medication at preventing serious complications of atrial fibrillation

Catheter ablation, a common cardiovascular procedure, appears no more effective than drug therapies in preventing strokes, deaths, and other complications in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, patients who get the procedure experience much greater symptom relief and long-term improvements in the quality of life, including fewer recurrences of the condition and fewer hospitalizations, than

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Light physical activity linked to lower risk of heart disease in older women

Light physical activity such as gardening, strolling through a park, and folding clothes might be enough to significantly lower the risk of cardiovascular disease among women 63 and older, a new study has found. This kind of activity, researchers said, appears to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease events such as stroke or heart failure by up to 22 percent, and the risk of heart attack or co

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Disclosure of religious identity, health care practices on Catholic hospital websites

Some patients seek care at Catholic hospitals but others may not because aspects of reproductive and end-of-life care can be limited by ethical and religious directives for Catholic hospitals based on the church's moral teachings. This research letter analyzed the websites of 646 hospitals listed in the Catholic Health Care Directory to see whether the hospitals described their religious identity

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What is association of dietary cholesterol or eating eggs with risk of cardiovascular disease, death?

Eggs are a source of dietary cholesterol. This observational study pooled data from six study groups for more than 29,000 people to determine the associations of consuming dietary cholesterol or eating eggs with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death.

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Study shows most Catholic hospitals don't advertise religious restrictions on health care

In a survey of Catholic hospitals throughout the country, researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus found many did not advertise their religious affiliation and the majority did not explain how that affiliation results in health care restrictions.

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Few treatment guidelines for heart disease are based on rigorous study

Less than 10 percent of the treatment recommendations US doctors rely on to manage care for heart patients are based on evidence gained from multiple large, randomized clinical trials — the gold standard for obtaining scientific data.

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Ablation better than drugs for reducing Afib, improving QOL, but not for reducing death

Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia that affects an estimated 30 million people worldwide. New research shows that catheter ablation, a common cardiovascular procedure, appears no more effective than drug therapy to prevent strokes, deaths and other complications in patients with atrial fibrillation. But patients who receive catheter ablation experience much greater symptom relief and long-

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Heart procedure for AFib better than drug therapy for reducing episodes, improving quality of life and symptoms, but not for reducing death or stroke

The 33 million people with atrial fibrillation worldwide not only suffer from bothersome symptoms, but also face a fivefold increased risk of stroke and a twofold increased risk of death. Research teams led by Mayo Clinic published three connected studies on Friday, March 15, clarifying the benefits of catheter ablation versus rate- or rhythm-control medications to treat atrial fibrillation.

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Bad news for egg lovers

Cancel the cheese omelet. A large, new study of nearly 30,000 people reports adults who ate more eggs and dietary cholesterol had a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease and death from any cause. People need to consume lower amounts of cholesterol to have a lower risk of heart disease, the study authors said.

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Opioid prescribing across United States

National and state trends for opioid prescriptions filled at US retail pharmacies are estimated from 2006 through 2017 in this analysis of data from outpatient prescribing records. Each year an average of nearly 234 million opioid prescriptions were filled. Several key measures of opioid prescribing varied among states.

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Light physical activity associated with reduced risk of heart disease in older women

An observational study of nearly 5,900 older women (ages 50 to 79) that used data from accelerometers to measure light physical activity suggests all movement during the day may have a role in reducing risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). A greater reduced risk was associated with the highest level of light physical activity (more than 5.6 hours per day) compared

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Since 1990s, heart attacks have become less deadly, frequent for Americans

Heart attack prevention and outcomes have dramatically improved for American adults in the past two decades, according to a Yale study in JAMA Network Open. Compared to the mid-1990s, Americans today are less likely to have heart attacks and also less likely to die from them, said the researchers.

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Why Don't We Recycle Our Nuclear Waste Like The French Do? [March, 2014]

submitted by /u/espresso__patronum [link] [comments]

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Partikelpar löser mysterium i kärnan

Atomkärnor är uppbyggda av protoner och neutroner. Protonen och neutronen består i sin tur av kvarkar och kraftpartiklar som kallas gluoner. När kvarkarna upptäcktes trodde fysiker att de skulle vara helt skyddade från påverkan inuti protonen eller neutronen. På 1980-talet upptäcktes dock att kvarkarna och gluonerna kan röra sig annorlunda i protoner och neutroner som är bundna i en atomkärna, jäm

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Space Orbiter Spots 'Hairy Blue Spider' on Mars

Bowie was right; there really is a "spider" from Mars.

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Life in the World’s Fastest-Shrinking Country

Welcome to Altimir, Bulgaria, a village on the verge of extinction in the fastest-shrinking country in the world. Like many rural Bulgarians, Altimir’s residents regard the height of the Soviet Union as the halcyon days, when village life thrived and young people stuck around long enough to start a family. Now, 20 years after the fall of the USSR and a decade after it joined the European Union, B

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DF kræver to mia. ekstra til sundhedsreform

Der skal sikres yderligere to mia. kr. til at gennemføre regeringens sundhedsreform, mener Dansk Folkeparti. Regeringen er ikke afvisende.

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Tracking turtles with telemetry

A new model has been created that can forecast the location of Eastern Pacific leatherback turtles along the coast of Central and South America in an effort to decrease bycatch mortality of this critically endangered and ecologically important species.

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Most countries in sub-Saharan Africa not on track for under-5 mortality reduction goal

The relatively slow pace of neonatal and under-5 mortality reduction could prevent most countries in sub-Saharan Africa from achieving targets set in Sustainable Development Goal 3 (SDG-3) by 2030, according to a new study.

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Narwhals spend at least half time diving for food, can fast for several days after meal

Narwhals — enigmatic arctic whales known for their sword-like tusk — spend over half their time diving to find food but are also able to last up to three days without a meal, according to a new study.

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Diet-induced changes favor innovation in speech sounds

Diet-induced changes in the human bite resulted in new sounds such as 'f' in languages all over the world, a study by an international team led by researchers has shown. The findings contradict the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throughout human history.

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Using an anti-smoking drug to control neurons

A potent chemogenetic system pairs an anti-smoking drug with specially engineered proteins to change neuron activity. The research tool could one day be used to treat conditions like epilepsy or pain.

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Pests and the plant defenses against them drive diversity in tropical rainforests

Researchers have been baffled by tropical rainforest diversity for over a century; 650 different tree species can exist in an area covering two football fields, yet similar species never grow next to each other. It seems like it's good to be different than your neighbors, but why?

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Four ways you can support the YouthStrike4Climate movement | UK Student Climate Network

The school climate strikes show how we are trying to save the world and change it for the better. Everyone can help Since we made headlines in February with the UK’s first school strike, we’ve seen an outpouring of support from our peers, parents, carers, politicians and other people from all walks of life. It seems that most people know we’re in a mess, but they just didn’t know what we can to d

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Woman in first legal challenge against UK's 10-year limit on egg-freezing

Fertility laws compel clinics to destroy frozen eggs after a decade, irrespective of a woman’s age A woman who is fighting for her chance to start a family is bringing the first legal challenge in the UK against fertility legislation that places a 10-year time limit on the storage of frozen eggs. The woman paid to freeze her eggs in 2009 because she was not in a relationship, but hoped to have a

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Det er lige så miljøvenligt at tage bussen som dieseltoget

PLUS. 23 gram per km. Så meget CO2 udleder passagerne i såvel busser som DSB's fjerntog, viser tal gengivet af Transportministeriet.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvor godt isolerer en rumdragt?

En læser vil gerne vide, hvordan det står til med isoleringsevnen i rumdragter i forhold til isolering i bygninger. Det svarer John Leif Jørgensen fra DTU Space på.

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Current training of physicians to care for LGBTQ individuals is falling short

Not enough is being done to prepare physicians to care for the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) patients. Better physician training on their unique clinical needs may eliminate many of the health disparities among this growing segment of the population according to a new study.

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Tony's Missing Buckets Could End His Season | Gold Rush

As the Beets crew assemble dredge #2, Tony and Kevin discover they don't have enough buckets. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Disc

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AI and MRIs at birth can predict cognitive development at age 2

Researchers used MRI brain scans and machine learning techniques at birth to predict cognitive development at age 2 years with 95 percent accuracy.

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Unique diversity of the genetic history of the Iberian Peninsula revealed by dual studies

Researchers have analyzed ancient DNA from almost 300 individuals from the Iberian Peninsula, spanning more than 12,000 years. The first study looked at hunter-gatherers and early farmers living in Iberia between 13,000 and 6,000 years ago. The second looked at individuals from the region over the last 8000 years. Together, the two papers greatly increase our knowledge about the population history

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The Books Briefing: It Ain’t Over Till It’s Over

In his 1967 classic The Sense of an Ending , the scholar Frank Kermode argued that literature helps humans make sense of a chaotic reality—a message that might feel even more urgent in a world threatened by climate change and political division. Happy endings, when they come, can offer a sense of peace and redemption, as exemplified in John Cheever’s short story “The Housebreaker of Shady Hill.”

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Trained neural nets perform much like humans on classic psychological tests

Neural networks were inspired by the human brain. Now AI researchers have shown that they perceive the world in similar ways.

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Robots lined up to help out spectators at 2020 Olympics

The Organising Committee for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo – that last month confirmed that Games winners would receive medals made using recycled electronic waste – has revealed the …

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Trade wars are growing over the digital economy – and developing countries are shaping the agenda

At the heart of the current US trade war with China is tariffs on imports like steel, sorghum and silicon chips. But, with the growing role of data and digital technology in the world economy, a new arena of digital trade conflict is on the cards.

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Lægers opråb om prioriteringsråd bliver hørt på Christiansborg

En række fremtrædende læger vil have en institution, der kan lave benhårde prioriteringer i sundhedsvæsenet, der er ved at knække af pres. S og DF er med på idéen.

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Med-tech trade group launches online cybersecurity tool

Cybersecurity events like 2016's NotPetya ransomware attack tend to arrive in bursts of confusion and concern, but the hard work of mitigating cybersecurity risks in health care technology is embedded in the daily grind of the medical technology industry, insiders say.

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Some sunscreens may kill corals. Should they be banned?

Environmentalists and Democratic lawmakers increasingly are working to bar the sale of sunscreens that may damage coral reefs, but the bans are dividing a surprising group: coral scientists.

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What’s the Closest Planet to Earth? Not Venus, Scientists Say

That acronym you learned to memorize the order of the planets has led you astray.

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Exotic 'second sound' phenomenon observed in pencil 'lead'

At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports.

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How to catch ovarian cancer earlier

Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed too late for effective treatment. Israeli researchers are announcing a liquid biopsy-based diagnostic protocol for ovarian cancer, with higher sensitivity than previous approaches, that may help women in high-risk populations.

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A repellent odor inhibits the perception of a pleasant odor in vinegar flies

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology have discovered that repellent odors suppress the perception of pleasant smells. This happens because certain brain structures that respond to attractive odors are inhibited by a repellent one. These processes in the brain are also reflected in the behavior of the flies. This helps them to avoid spoiled or infected food sources, which wou

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New proof that narcolepsy is an autoimmune disease

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered autoreactive cells in persons suffering from narcolepsy. This is a new, important proof that the sleep disorder is an autoimmune disease. This knowledge may lead to better treatment of the chronic condition, the researchers behind the new discovery believe.

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NASA's Greenland mission still surprises in year four

Only seven months after NASA's Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) mission wrapped its last field campaign on the world's largest island, an OMG crew is back in Greenland to collect more data. With two or three field projects a year since 2016, no wonder OMG has made the most comprehensive measurements yet of how ocean water lapping at the undersides of Greenland's melting glaciers affects them. All th

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Study examines how herbicide adds to phosphorus levels in soil and waterways

New research from McGill University reveals an overlooked impact that the widely used herbicide glyphosate may be having on the environment.

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How a mitochondrial enzyme can trigger cell death

Cytochrome c is a small enzyme that plays an important role in the production of energy by mitochondria. It is also involved in signaling dangerous problems that warrant apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Using solid-state NMR, University of Groningen Associate Professor of Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Patrick van der Wel and colleagues from the University of Pittsburgh have discovered that the

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Metal innovation offers a unique, cost-effective option for plumbing and manufacturing industries

A discovery made by researchers to help ensure water safety may have applications that reach far beyond plumbing. The researchers wanted to find alternative lead-free bronze alloys for use in water valves and the plumbing systems for more than 10 million homes in the United States.

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Adam Spencer: Why Are Monster Prime Numbers Important?

Adam Spencer is fascinated by prime numbers. These seemingly simple numbers can be found in monster sizes—the latest being almost 25 million digits long. (Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/TED)

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Eddie Woo: How Can Math Help Us Understand The Complexity Of The Universe?

The world is full of recurring patterns based on math. Math teacher Eddie Woo explains why human beings are naturally drawn to patterns and how we can use math to engage with our complex world. (Image credit: Vincenzo Amato/TEDxSyd)

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The First Gene-Edited Food Has Reached US Restaurants

Better Beans Gene-editing has just achieved a new milestone. A food service company in the Midwestern region of the United States is now using an oil made from genetically edited soybeans in its sauces, dressings, and fryer. The company that makes the oil claims this is the first commercial use of a gene-edited crop — possibly signaling the start of a new era of healthier, cheaper food courtesy o

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How a mitochondrial enzyme can trigger cell death

Cytochrome c is a small enzyme that plays an important role in the production of energy by mitochondria. It is also involved in signaling dangerous problems that warrant apoptosis, or programmed cell death. Using solid-state NMR, University of Groningen Associate Professor of Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Patrick van der Wel and colleagues from the University of Pittsburgh have discovered that the

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Speeding up artificial intelligence

A group at Politecnico di Milano has developed an electronic circuit able to solve a system of linear equations in a single operation in the timescale of a few tens of nanoseconds. The performance of this new circuit is superior not only to classical digital computers, but also to quantum computers. It will be soon possible to develop a new generation of computing accelerators that will revolution

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Trials testing new educational methods in schools 'often fail to produce useful evidence'

Educational trials aimed at boosting academic achievement in schools are often uninformative, new research suggests.

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Americans Are Going Bankrupt From Getting Sick

In April 2016, Venus Lockett was about to give a speech at an event she volunteered for near her home in Atlanta. She was already stressed. The previous night, she had stayed up late making her presentation, and then deleted it by mistake. As she stepped up to the podium to give her remarks, she noticed that her words were slurring. She tried to speak into the mic, but the words that came out did

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The Iraq War Is a Cautionary Tale for Theresa May’s Brexit Dilemma

Editor’s Note: As Prime Minister Theresa May grapples with parliamentary chaos over her efforts to negotiate Britain’s impending withdrawal from the European Union, the experience of one of her predecessors offers lessons on balancing politics and principle at a crucial juncture in the country’s history. This adapted excerpt of Heroes or Villains? The Blair Years Reconsidered , published in Brita

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When the Jezebel Comments Section Went on Vacation Together

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with a group of friends who met in the comments section (or "the basement," as they called it) of the women's blog Jezebel in the late 2000s. They later moved their discussions onto a private forum si

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Cell therapy could replace need for kidney transplants

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New enzyme boosts 'CRISPR toolbox' for disease detection

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People who get defeated by AI feel horrible about themselves

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Ny formand for klimarådet: Alle skal med i klimakampen

PLUS. Klimarådets nye formand holder kursen og opfordrer til handling for klimaet nu – med adresse både til politikerne, til virksomheder og til alle os private forbrugere

7h

Drag reduction and relaminarization of wall-turbulence by traveling wave control

Energy saving is important to reduce transportation costs of vehicles as well as their impact on the environment. In this context, because skin-friction drag increases significantly in turbulent flow, it is important to study flow control techniques for turbulent flow.

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Adaptive learning system using big data based machine learning

Over the past few decades, many studies conducted in the field of learning science have reported that scaffolding plays an important role in human learning. To scaffold a learner efficiently, a teacher should predict how much support a learner must have to complete tasks and then decide the optimal degree of assistance to support the learner's development. Nevertheless, it is difficult to ascertai

7h

Long-distance quantum information exchange—success at the nanoscale

At the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, researchers have realized the swap of electron spins between distant quantum dots. The discovery brings us a step closer to future applications of quantum information, as the tiny dots have to leave enough room on the microchip for delicate control electrodes. The distance between the dots has now become big enough for integration with traditi

7h

Meet Romania's Very Internet-Savvy Witch Community

Photographer Lucia Sekerková Bláhová's series *Vrăjitoare* documents the digital revolution of Romanian witches, a mystical group that uses social media to advertise services and reach new clients.

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Ninja Made More Streaming 'Apex Legends' Than You Make All Year

Unless you're a basketball player or something.

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The genomic history of the Iberian Peninsula reconstructed

An international study co-led by researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) at the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE) and Harvard University (USA) has developed a genetic map of the Iberian Peninsula covering the last 8,000 years.

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AI and MRIs at birth can predict cognitive development at age 2, UNC study finds

Researchers at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine used MRI brain scans and machine learning techniques at birth to predict cognitive development at age 2 years with 95 percent accuracy.

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Trials testing new educational methods in schools 'often fail to produce useful evidence'

The new study found that 40% of large-scale randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the UK and the US failed to produce any evidence as to whether an educational intervention helped to boost academic attainment or not.

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Cross-regional study of Russian teachers' attitudes towards cultural diversity

Many countries today face the difficulties of teaching kids of religious and ethnic minorities. Schools are especially important in general adaptation processes.

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Imagining the Smart Cities of 2050

Tomorrow’s cities are reshaping almost every industry imaginable, and birthing those we’ve never heard of. Riding an explosion of sensors, megacity AI ‘brains’, high-speed networks, new materials and breakthrough green solutions, cities are quickly becoming versatile organisms, sustaining and responding to the livelihood patterns of millions. Over the next decade, cities will revolutionize everyt

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Origins of hyper-fast star hint at hidden black hole

A hypervelocity, or fast-moving, star may have originated from the Milky Way’s stellar disk, and not from the middle of the galaxy as astronomers previously believed, according to new research. “This discovery dramatically changes our view on the origin of fast-moving stars,” says Monica Valluri, a research professor in the astronomy department at the University of Michigan. “The fact that the tr

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A student’s guide to undergraduate research

A student’s guide to undergraduate research A student’s guide to undergraduate research , Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00871-x Shiwei Wang describes how to find work in a laboratory and make the most of it while studying for your science degree.

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New view of the world could create unlimited sustainable resources

A pioneering predictor tool developed by the University of Sheffield will give scientists an alternative way to visualise the world and help to forecast the impact of climate change, population growth and energy use.

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A new approach to drugging a difficult cancer target

One of the most common cancer-promoting genes, known as Myc, is also one of the most difficult to target with drugs. Scientists have long tried to develop drugs that block the Myc protein, but so far their efforts have not been successful.

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Worms show the danger of lacking vitamin B12

Using roundworms, bioscientists have found a direct link between a diet with too little vitamin B12 and an increased risk of infection by two potentially deadly pathogens. Despite their simplicity, 1-millimeter-long nematodes called Caenorhabditis elegans ( C. elegans ) share an important limitation with humans: They can’t make B12 and must get all they need from their diet. In a paper in PLOS Ge

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Scientists Are Fleeing America’s Rules About Gene-Editing Animals

Jumping Ship S ome scientists are moving their labs out of the U.S. to countries with fewer restrictions on their work, according to the Genetic Literacy Project . The heart of the issue stems from a 2017 proposal by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to regulate animals with “intentionally-altered” DNA as though they were veterinary drugs. That would impose stricter restrictions on scie

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German lawmakers raise hurdle for diesel bans

Lawmakers in Germany moved Friday to make bans on older diesel vehicles in city centres less likely, angering environmentalists by backing off strict EU-wide pollution thresholds.

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Scientists track patterns of island growth in crystals

Argonne scientists reveal connections as crystalline layers form.

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Orange crush of visitors: Will California's wildflowers survive the crowds?

LAKE ELSINORE, Calif. – In the hills of Lake Elsinore, children carried drooping apricot-colored poppies while panting dogs ran alongside them, their paws tainted orange.

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Build social and affordable housing to get us off the boom-and-bust roller coaster

Not long ago Australia's housing boom was in full swing. Investors were betting on rising property values, which rose by 13% in Sydney and 15% in Melbourne in the year to mid-2017. Now the withdrawal of overseas buyers and prudential restrictions on loose lending to local investors have revealed how hollow the boom was.

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As climate continues to warm, study finds several barriers to northward tree migration

Extensive land development, invasive species and too many deer may make it difficult for tree migration to keep pace with climate change in the Northeast, according to newly published research.

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As climate continues to warm, study finds several barriers to northward tree migration

Extensive land development, invasive species and too many deer may make it difficult for tree migration to keep pace with climate change in the Northeast, according to newly published research.

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Students join massive global strike against climate change

Students around the world are striking today in a major global day of action against climate change

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How coyote puppies adjust to life around people

Coyotes can habituate to humans quickly and habituated parents pass this fearlessness on to their offspring, research finds. Across North America, coyotes are moving into urban environments, and their human neighbors are having to adjust. A big question for wildlife researchers is how coyotes habituate to humans, which can potentially lead to conflict. “Even if it’s only 0.001 percent of the time

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No such thing as a plastic-free lunch?

People often ask us about going "plastic free". Have you tried it? I have and it really isn't that easy. I lasted only one week. It can be expensive and time consuming and is particularly difficult if (like me) you live away from a big town or city. "Plastic free" is certainly a great strapline to motivate people, to help you think about your own impacts and to help you feel empowered to deal with

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Artificial intelligence for the study of sites

An experimental study led by researcher Abel Moclán, from the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has just been published in the Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences journal, which proposes a new method to understand how the faunal assemblages were generated in archaeological sites, and how they could have interacted with groups of humans and carnivores in t

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Cause of cathode degradation identified for nickel-rich materials

A team of scientists including researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have identified the causes of degradation in a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries, as well as possible remedies. Their findings, published on Mar. 7 in Advanced Functional Materials, could lead to the development of more affordable and

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Why rich parents are more likely to be unethical

Federal attorneys have arrested 50 people in a college admission scam that allowed wealthy parents to buy their kids' admission to elite universities. Prosecutors found that parents together paid up to US$6.5 million to get their kids into college. The list includes celebrity parents such as actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin.

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A new approach to drugging a difficult cancer target

One of the most common cancer-promoting genes, known as Myc, is also one of the most difficult to target with drugs. Scientists have long tried to develop drugs that block the Myc protein, but so far their efforts have not been successful.

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New book by biochemist David Deamer explores the origins of life

In his new book, Assembling Life, David Deamer challenges the consensus that life began in the ocean and presents an alternative scenario, based on his research, in which life began in freshwater hot springs.

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With single gene insertion, blind mice regain sight

People left blind by retinal degeneration have one option: electronic eye implants. UC Berkeley neuroscientists have developed an alternative: gene therapy that, in tests, restored vision in blind mice. A gene for green opsin delivered via virus gave blind mice enough sight to discern patterns on an iPad at a resolution sufficient for humans to read. Given existing AAV eye therapies already approv

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ANU research set to shake up space missions

A new study from the Australian National University has found a number of 2D materials can not only withstand being sent into space, but potentially thrive in the harsh conditions.

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Uncovering uncultivated microbes in the human gut

A human's health is shaped both by environmental factors and the body's interactions with the microbiome, particularly in the gut. Genome sequences are critical for characterizing individual microbes and understanding their functional roles. However, previous studies have estimated that only 50 percent of species in the gut microbiome have a sequenced genome, in part because many species have not

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Scientists track patterns of island growth in crystals

In a new study from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, scientists have found that the seemingly random arrangement of islands that form to begin new layers during crystal growth can actually be very similar from layer to layer. The discovery may help scientists better understand of some of the mechanisms behind defect formation, as well as develop techniques to synthe

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These odd, scaled mammals are the most poached in the world—and they could go extinct

Pangolins’ keratin scales, prized in traditional Chinese medicine, may doom them

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Hospitalsenhed Midt henter ny ledende overlæge i egne rækker

Hospitalsenhed Midt har ansat Sidsel Rødgaard-Hansen som ny ledende overlæge på Blodprøver og Biokemi.

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InSight lander among latest ExoMars image bounty

Curious surface features, water-formed minerals, 3-D stereo views, and even a sighting of the InSight lander showcase the impressive range of imaging capabilities of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter.

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Image: Bering in dire straits

The Bering Strait is a sea passage that separates Russia and Alaska. It is usually covered with sea ice at this time of year – but as this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission on 7 March 2019 shows, it is virtually ice-free.

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Quantum sensing method measures minuscule magnetic fields

A new way of measuring atomic-scale magnetic fields with great precision, not only up and down but sideways as well, has been developed by researchers at MIT. The new tool could be useful in applications as diverse as mapping the electrical impulses inside a firing neuron, characterizing new magnetic materials, and probing exotic quantum physical phenomena.

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Nations set to agree 'significant' plastic cuts

Nations on Friday were expected to commit to "significantly reduce" single-use plastics over the next decade, in a series of voluntary pledges that green groups warned fell short of tackling Earth's pollution crisis.

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3-D printing shapes building industry, creates rapid construction potential

A residential and commercial tower under development in Brooklyn that is changing the New York City skyline has its roots in research at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The tower's white precast concrete façade rising from the waterfront site of the former Domino Sugar Factory evokes the form of a sugar crystal – a pattern created from 3D printed molds produced at DOE's M

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Elite sport is becoming a platform to target the trans community

Tennis champion Martina Navratilova recently called the participation of transgender women in elite female sporting competitions "insane" and "cheating."

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Cooking up alien atmospheres on Earth

Researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, are cooking up an alien atmosphere right here on Earth. In a new study, JPL scientists used a high-temperature "oven" to heat a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide to more than 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit (1,100 Celsius), about the temperature of molten lava. The aim was to simulate conditions that might be found in the atmo

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New book by biochemist David Deamer explores the origins of life

In his new book, Assembling Life, David Deamer challenges the consensus that life began in the ocean and presents an alternative scenario, based on his research, in which life began in freshwater hot springs.

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Neanderthals didn't need Nintendos: Why we always choose story over technology

Picture the scene – we're in ancient times and a group of cave people are gathered around a fire telling stories about their day (there's evidence of storytelling by way of cave art over 30,000 years ago).

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Tesla's long-awaited Model Y electric SUV arrives next year, but you'll have to wait for the $39,000 version

Cars There are four models to choose from, all of which borrow heavily from the Model 3. Elon Musk showed off his new SUV and it looks like he'll sell a lot of them.

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Huge meteor explosion over Earth last year went unnoticed until now

The second-largest meteor to hit Earth in the past century exploded over the ocean last December, but nobody was around to see it

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Students join second massive strike against climate change

Students around the world are striking today in a major global day of action against climate change.

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Biosensor may provide better cancer diagnosis

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have developed a new biological sensor that could help clinicians better diagnose cancer and epilepsy.

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Current sexual harassment penalties are too low: Study

The current federal cap on monetary damages for workplace sexual harassment is far too low to incentivize firms to take stronger measures to prevent the behavior, writes Vanderbilt economist Joni Hersch in "Valuing the Risk of Workplace Sexual Harassment," published in the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty. Hersch is the Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Law and Economics and co-director of the Ph.D

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When Facebook and Instagram are down, small businesses and big brands can suffer

For Maatie Alcindor, Facebook is less about reaching out to old friends and more about connecting with new clients.

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Softer, processed foods changed the way ancient humans spoke

The human capacity for language divides our species from the rest of the animal kingdom. Language has not only allowed us to conquer all corners of the globe, but to devise writing, mathematics and all things thereafter.

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Nature-inspired antibacterial metals

From aviation to medicine, various sectors are increasingly using materials that mimic the lotus plant, whose leaves have self-cleaning properties. Thanks to the bumpy surface structure covered with tube-shaped wax crystals, water falling on these leaves forms beads that roll off, carrying away dust and dirt. Using this naturally occurring lotus effect concept, a team of scientists has taken a qua

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Counting Other People's Blessings

Envy is one of the most unpleasant of all human emotions. This week, we explore an emotion that can inspire us to become better people — or to commit unspeakable acts. (Image credit: Steve Scott/Getty Images/Ikon Images)

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Glasses-free Displays at CES

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DARPA is trying to build an unhackable open source voting system

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How the U.S. and China can compete and cooperate on artificial intelligence

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Uncovering uncultivated microbes in the human gut

A tree's growth is dependent on nutrients from the soil and water, as well as the microbes in, on, and around the roots. Similarly, a human's health is shaped both by environmental factors and the body's interactions with the microbiome, particularly in the gut. Genome sequences are critical for characterizing individual microbes and understanding their functional roles. However, previous studies

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Study proves importance of bird poo in enhancing coral growth

A University of Otago study has shown the positive impact bird poo, or guano, has on coral growth in tropical seas. Published online in the respected scientific journal Scientific Reports, the study Seabird nutrients are assimilated by corals and enhance coral growth rates demonstrates that seabird nutrients can significantly boost coral growth rates, offering a positive news story in a decade tha

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2-D material has space vehicle applications

A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has found a number of 2-D materials can not only withstand being sent into space, but potentially thrive in the harsh conditions.

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Design and validation of world-class multilayered thermal emitter using machine learning

NIMS, the University of Tokyo, Niigata University and RIKEN have jointly designed a multilayered metamaterial that realizes ultra-narrowband wavelength-selective thermal emission by combining the machine learning (Bayesian optimization) and thermal emission properties calculations (electromagnetic calculation). The joint team then experimentally fabricated the designed metamaterial and verified th

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What Victims Have to Teach Politicians

At least one terrorist murdered 49 people in Christchurch, New Zealand, today as they gathered to worship at two mosques. The gunman is believed to have published a manifesto urging violence to achieve a white ethno-state. Words offer little solace when innocents are murdered. But they can light the way forward, as Martin Luther King Jr. showed in the 1963 eulogy he delivered for the victims of a

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Uncovering uncultivated microbes in the human gut

A tree's growth is dependent on nutrients from the soil and water, as well as the microbes in, on, and around the roots. Similarly, a human's health is shaped both by environmental factors and the body's interactions with the microbiome, particularly in the gut. Genome sequences are critical for characterizing individual microbes and understanding their functional roles. However, previous studies

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Study proves importance of bird poo in enhancing coral growth

A University of Otago study has shown the positive impact bird poo, or guano, has on coral growth in tropical seas. Published online in the respected scientific journal Scientific Reports, the study Seabird nutrients are assimilated by corals and enhance coral growth rates demonstrates that seabird nutrients can significantly boost coral growth rates, offering a positive news story in a decade tha

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Positivity, objectivity are key for online petitions, study reveals

Whether they support a cause or a candidate, online petitions must have a positive tone in their messages and move away from complaining and moralizing in order to succeed, research from FIU Business finds.

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Ocean sink for man-made CO2 measured

An international research project led by scientists from ETH Zurich has determined the amount of man-made CO2 emissions taken up by the ocean between 1994 and 2007. Not all of the CO2 generated during the combustion of fossil fuels remains in the atmosphere and contributes to global warming. The ocean and the ecosystems on land take up considerable quantities of these man-made CO2 emissions from t

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Artificial intelligence speeds up!

A group at Politecnico di Milano has developed an electronic circuit able to solve a system of linear equations in a single operation in the timescale of few tens of ns.

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Russian scientists have determined indicators of stress development in the human body

In today's life, we often encounter situations when the organism's functions are overstrained, and the action of extreme factors causes the development of a stress response. There are three stages in the development of the organism's stress reaction: 1 – the stage of activation, 2 – the stage of resistance, 3 – the stage of exhaustion.

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Tropical Tectonics May Have Triggered Past Ice Ages

What caused the ice ages in Earth's past? Possibly plate tectonic action in the tropics, over millions of years. The post Tropical Tectonics May Have Triggered Past Ice Ages appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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NASA Discovers Mercury Dust Ring, Hints of Hidden Asteroids Near Venus

NASA has released new reports on discoveries in the inner solar system. Dust belts and possible new asteroids ahead. The post NASA Discovers Mercury Dust Ring, Hints of Hidden Asteroids Near Venus appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Soluble epoxide hydrolase in mammals diminishes the body's ability to self-repair

In the 1980s, researchers at the University of California, Riverside, were looking for a way to control insects and found an enzyme—called JHEH—that, when inhibited, prevents caterpillars from becoming butterflies. This work led to the discovery of an equivalent enzyme in mammals, called soluble epoxide hydrolase or sEH.

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Soluble epoxide hydrolase in mammals diminishes the body's ability to self-repair

In the 1980s, researchers at the University of California, Riverside, were looking for a way to control insects and found an enzyme—called JHEH—that, when inhibited, prevents caterpillars from becoming butterflies. This work led to the discovery of an equivalent enzyme in mammals, called soluble epoxide hydrolase or sEH.

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Lessons in confounding epidemiology: Household cleaning products, the microbiome and childhood obesity

Do eco-friendly cleaning products prevent obesity? Probably not, and you shouldn't be eating them anyway.

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Bacteria may help frogs attract mates

Brazilian scientists have discovered that the strong odor released by some amphibian species is produced by bacteria and that attracting a mate is one of its purposes.

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Bacteria may help frogs attract mates

Brazilian scientists have discovered that the strong odor released by some amphibian species is produced by bacteria and that attracting a mate is one of its purposes.

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Isolationism is deadly. Only global collective action can save us | Noga Levy-Rapoport

To tackle the oil and gas giants driving climate change, young people of all nations must act together Brexit is reversible. Article 50 can be juggled, delayed, and bounced around until the government decides to reboot and restart the process. In the meantime, another meaningless “meaningful vote” could happen in the next few days – while we ignore the only threat that truly matters. The effects o

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What Hulu’s Shrill Gets Right—and So Wrong—About Trolling

In her new series, SNL’s Aidy Bryant is an aspiring journalist beset by trolls.

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A NASA spacecraft may have explored the edges of an early Mars sea in 1997

NASA's first rover mission to Mars, the Pathfinder, imaged an extraterrestrial marine spillover landscape 22 years ago, according to a new paper by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Alexis Rodriguez.

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SDSS J1430+1339: Storm rages in cosmic teacup

Fancy a cup of cosmic tea? This one isn't as calming as the ones on Earth. In a galaxy hosting a structure nicknamed the "Teacup," a galactic storm is raging.

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Diving to new depths for Antarctic science

A University of Canterbury scientist is using Kiwi technology in her Antarctic research to capture fascinating footage of life beneath the surface in McMurdo Sound.

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Improved catalytic processes for the synthesis of phenol

Researchers at the University of Electro-communications, Tokyo report a single-site catalytic platform with high selectivity for the single-step synthesis of phenol in a paper appeared in ACS catalysis.

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"Medieval" Diseases Flare as Unsanitary Living Conditions Proliferate

Typhus and other infectious illnesses hit homeless communities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Diving to new depths for Antarctic science

A University of Canterbury scientist is using Kiwi technology in her Antarctic research to capture fascinating footage of life beneath the surface in McMurdo Sound.

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UK's air-breathing rocket engine set for key tests

Important tests lie ahead for the engine concept that could take a plane from London to Sydney in about four hours.

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The terror of climate change is transforming young people's identity

Today, at least 50 rallies planned across Australia are expected to draw thousands of students who are walking out of school to protest climate change inaction.

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World's most endangered marine mammal is now down to 10 animals

The vaquita, a small porpoise that lives in the Gulf of California, is closer to extinction than ever before despite conservation efforts to save the species

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Exploring the behavior of a gas as it transitions between quantum and classical states

A team of researchers from the MIT-Harvard Center for Ultracold Atoms has developed a way to study and measure gases as they transition between quantum and classical states due to changes in temperature. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes experiments they carried out with clouds of lithium-6 atoms and what they found.

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Wafer-scale multilayer fabrication of silk fibroin-based microelectronics

A KAIST research team developed a novel fabrication method for the multilayer processing of silk-based microelectronics. This technology for creating a biodegradable silk fibroin film allows microfabrication with polymer or metal structures manufactured from photolithography. It can be a key technology in the implementation of silk fibroin-based biodegradable electronic devices or localized drug d

9h

Winter was frigid because the polar vortex got 'drunk'

The mere mention of the term "polar vortex" elicits thoughts of bitterly cold temperatures and dangerous wind chills. Most people are aware that the frigid air in the Northern Hemisphere is coming directly from the Arctic region, yet they don't know why polar vortexes happen.

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New 3-D map will help solve long-standing cosmic mysteries

A new study led by ANU has created a 3D map of the magnetic field in a small wedge of the Milky Way galaxy, paving the way for future discoveries that will improve our understanding of the origin and evolution of the Universe.

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Video: Using light to move wireless data faster

"We explore a range of projects that turn light into a powerful medium for data communication and object or behavioral sensing," says Xia Zhou, an associate professor of computer science. "Our recent projects include visible light communication systems and applications, smartphone sensing, and efficient spectrum monitoring to enforce the usage of radio spectrum."

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Handling trillions of supercomputer files just got simpler

A new distributed file system for high-performance computing available today via the software collaboration site GitHub provides unprecedented performance for creating, updating and managing extreme numbers of files.

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KBU i Psykiatrien Region Sjælland

Psykiatrien i Region Sjælland svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Bornholms Hospital

Bornholms Hospital svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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Physicists Reverse Time for Tiny Particles Inside a Quantum Computer

The "arrow of time" went backward inside this tiny quantum computer.

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Nanocoating makes lightweight metal foams bone-hard and explosion-proof

Metallic foams developed by materials scientists Stefan Diebels and Anne Jung at Saarland University Strong are strong enough for use in impact protection systems in cars, and are able to absorb the shock waves produced by a detonation. Their super lightweight, extremely strong metal foams can be customized for a wide range of applications.

9h

Why Don't We Recycle Our Nuclear Waste Like The French Do? [March, 2014]

submitted by /u/espresso__patronum [link] [comments]

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How to actually recycle

Environment Well-intentioned “aspirational recycling” is actually making to harder to recover materials. One of the reasons countries are refusing U.S. recyclables is because they're so contaminated. Much of what we put in our green and blue bins is non-recyclable waste,…

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Students join second global strike against climate change

Students around the world are striking today in the second global day of action against climate change.

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“Vetenskapen är extremt tydlig med vilka åtgärder som behövs”

Idag den 15:e mars hålls världens största klimatmanifestation. Över 1600 städer har registrerat sitt deltagande, där ungdomar runtom i världen samlas under en gemensam strejk. Nu får de stöd av över 360 svenska forskare.

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The Movie Studio Trying to Survive on Risk Taking Alone

At this year’s Academy Awards, only two studios saw multiple feature films take home Oscars: Universal, which made Green Book and First Man , and Megan Ellison’s Annapurna Pictures, which won a trophy apiece for If Beale Street Could Talk and Vice . The two wins weren’t the most dazzling stat of the night, but they were a nice achievement for Annapurna, which had a rocky year punctuated by storie

9h

Letter: Is ‘The Geography of Partisan Prejudice’ Knowable?

The Geography of Partisan Prejudice In early March, The Atlantic published a guide to the most—and least—politically open-minded counties in America. Amanda Ripley, Rekha Tenjarla, and Angela Y. He teamed up with PredictWise, a polling and analytics firm, to create a ranking of counties in the U.S. based on partisan prejudice (or what researchers call “affective polarization”). The results were s

9h

It’s Gonna Be Huge

C ompiling a definitive list of what Donald Trump has not managed to accomplish, despite his self-proclaimed status as a master developer and dealmaker, is a task best left to a future historian. One project has recently made news: the skyscraper Trump sought to build in Moscow, a long-held dream he pursued throughout the 2016 campaign despite his repeated assurances that he had no business ventu

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Why father bees protect other dads’ young

Why father bees protect other dads’ young Why father bees protect other dads’ young, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00820-8 In a solitary species of bee, males gain chances to mate with females when they help guard the little ones.

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Movie Review: The Alien Overlords of Captive State Might Be Coming—for Us

Aliens invade the US in Rupert Wyatt’s Captive State, a movie that has our present-day struggles in mind.

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The Arctic's ‘Carbon Bomb’ Could Screw the Climate Even More

Arctic permafrost, a “sleeping giant” of greenhouse gases, is melting faster than expected and could release 1.5 trillion tons of carbon dioxide.

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Image of the Day: On the Rocks

Otters leave distinct patterns of wear on rocks they use for pounding mussels.

10h

Super-Sensitive Telescope Gets Global Governing Body

CERN-like organization will oversee the construction and operation of the powerful Square Kilometer Array — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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"My Man" / "Bohanna" / "We Dance" | Crush Club

Indie pop duo Crush Club and singer Nicki B bring their blend of funk, house and Latin styles to the TED stage, performing three songs: "My Man," "Bohanna" and "We Dance."

10h

Protection against digital gold diggers—software blocks crypto mining

Cryptojacking describes the creation of cryptocurrencies by a website that executes background mining software on a visitor's computer. Since mining is a very computing-intensive process, this can lead to reduced battery life on mobile devices. The cryptojacked computer runs at full speed, the battery drains quickly, and the profit goes to the attackers. The St. Pölten UAS has now developed the fr

10h

Wolves cooperate with humans

Wolves lead, dogs follow—and both cooperate with humans. The statement is a bold one, especially as wolves have received a lot of negative attention in recent years. A recent study conducted by behavioural researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna, however, shows that dogs and wolves both work equally well with humans, albeit in different ways. The allegedly unequal brothers are thus much more similar than

10h

Converting biomass by applying mechanical force

One of the greatest global challenges is the efficient use of renewable sources in order to meet the increasing demand for energy and feedstock chemicals in the future. In this context, biomass is a promising alternative to existing fossil sources such as coal or oil. Cellulose plays a decisive role here, because it accounts for the largest fraction of the natural carbon storage. These reservoirs

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Artificial intelligence learns to predict elementary particle signals

Scientists from the Higher School of Economics and Yandex have developed a method that accelerates the simulation of processes at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The research findings were published in Nuclear Instruments and Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment.

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Cancerrisk syns i blodet många år i förväg

– Det går att se ett tydligt samband mellan vissa proteinkoncentrationer och framtida sjukdomsförlopp. Detta förbättrar möjligheten att kunna förstå hur dessa tumörer uppstår, säger Florentin Späth, doktorand vid Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper vid Umeå universitet. I sin avhandling visar Florentin Späth att risken att utveckla glioblastom som är den vanligaste och aggressivaste formen av

10h

Wolves cooperate with humans

Wolves lead, dogs follow—and both cooperate with humans. The statement is a bold one, especially as wolves have received a lot of negative attention in recent years. A recent study conducted by behavioural researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna, however, shows that dogs and wolves both work equally well with humans, albeit in different ways. The allegedly unequal brothers are thus much more similar than

10h

Why Don't We Recycle Our Nuclear Waste Like The French Do? [March, 2014]

submitted by /u/espresso__patronum [link] [comments]

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Virtual Reality instead of Opiods [Jan 1st 2018]

submitted by /u/mickeybuilds [link] [comments]

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Nanofabrica commercializes micron resolution additive manufacturing technology

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Liquid marbles self-assemble from a pile of powder

Liquid marbles self-assemble from a pile of powder Liquid marbles self-assemble from a pile of powder, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00821-7 Armoured ‘footballs‘ can be coaxed into cylinder and dumbbell shapes.

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Climate strike: What is a climate emergency?

Bath is the latest council to declare one, as students protest about the planet.

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Spring Statement: Cambridge data team gets £45m boost

The European Bioinformatics Institute will use the money to enhance "storage and building capacity".

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Climate change will make it harder to predict heavy rain and floods

In a warmer world, some aspects of weather forecasting will become easier, but figuring out when torrential rain and flash floods are coming will be harder

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Første vandflaske af genbrugsplast lanceres i Danmark

Aqua d'Or lancerer en fuldstændigt genanvendt flaske, men affaldssortering og etiketter står stadig i vejen for bæredygtighed på flaske.

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Fruktavfall blir ätbara engångsmuggar

Veronika Bátori har studerat avfall från äpple och apelsin. Hon valde dessa avfallssorter för att de är svåra att göra sig av med, och istället skulle kunna användas för att producera nya produkter. – Avfall från äpple och apelsin innehåller båda mycket vatten och mycket organiskt material. Om man lägger detta exempelvis på soptippen så skapas okontrollerad metanproduktion. – Avfallet är också sv

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Can Cannabis Solve the Opioid Crisis?

Probably not—but it might be part of the solution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Can Cannabis Solve the Opioid Crisis?

Probably not—but it might be part of the solution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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FAA's close ties to Boeing questioned after 2 deadly crashes

For more than six decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has relied on employees of airplane manufacturers to do government-required safety inspections as planes are being designed or assembled.

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A Lump Grew Out of a Woman's Belly Button. It Was Cancer.

A strange lump growing out of a woman's belly button turned out to be metastatic cancer, according to a new report of her case.

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No One Wants to Help Bashar al-Assad Rebuild Syria

When the Syrian conflict began, in March 2011, Bashar al-Assad seemed likely to be ousted, like other strongmen swept away by the Arab Spring. Eight years later, Assad is still president, but of a fractured, demolished country. Now one big question is: Who will pay to rebuild Syria? The bill is large. The United Nations estimates the cost of reconstruction at $250 billion (about four times Syria’

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The People Who Hated the Web, Even Before Facebook

Thirty years ago this week, the British scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web at CERN, the European scientific-research center. Suffice it to say, the idea took off. The web made it easy for everyday people to create and link together pages on what was then a small network. The programming language was simple, and publishing was as painless as uploading something to a server with

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A new T. rex exhibit takes a deep dive into the iconic dinosaur

“T. rex: The Ultimate Predator,” a new exhibit in New York City, draws on the latest science to provide a fresh look at Tyrannosaurus rex and its relatives.

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Mediums, magicians and the all-too-fallible mind

The 19th-century race to debunk spiritualism yielded insights that still preoccupy today’s psychologists

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CO2-lagring: Verdens to CCS-pionerer vender teknologien ryggen

PLUS. Vinderne i kapløbet om at gøre CCS til virkelighed går ikke videre med teknologien lige foreløbig. Omkostningerne er for høje.

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Nets skal udvikle og drive afløseren for NemID

Nets DanID vinder den store kontrakt på MitID. Ifølge udbuddet lød budgettet på anskaffelse, implementering, vedligeholdelse herunder løbende opdatering, drift samt videreudvikling af MitID på 900 millioner kroner.

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This Guy Predicted Society's Thirst for Internet Fame—in 1999

Early dot-com millionaire Josh Harris spent his fortune on a series of lurid social experiments to prove his point that people didn't want just 15 minutes of fame in their lives. They wanted it every day.

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How Hackers Pulled Off a $20 Million Mexican Bank Heist

Welcome to the world of fake accounts, phantom funds, and money mules.

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TV Review: 'Love, Death & Robots' and the Rise of NSFW Netflix

The animated anthology isn't for the faint of heart—but it's a wild ride for the curious of spirit.

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For Avalanche Safety, Data Is as Important as Proper Gear

Tech tools and rescue equipment are helping more people survive avalanches. The best defense? Don’t get caught in one.

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BMW blames trade headwinds, emissions tests for weaker 2018

Profits at German high-end carmaker BMW tumbled in 2018, the firm said Friday, with trade headwinds and tough new EU emissions tests' drag on performance set to last into this year.

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“All very painful:” Two retractions to watch for, in eLife and PLOS ONE

We have news of two upcoming retractions, both following critiques on PubPeer. PLOS ONE is retracting a 2012 paper by researchers at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità in Rome and the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France, “Interferon-β Induces Cellular Senescence in Cutaneous Human Papilloma Virus-Transformed Human Keratinocytes by … Continue readin

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Cancerdiagnos med magnetkamera blir säkrare med maskininlärning

Det tar tid att ställa diagnos vid cancer i hjärnan och idag görs det ofta med hjälp av biopsi, det vill säga vävnadsprov från hjärnan. Men provtagning från hjärnan är alltid förenad med en viss risk. En ny experimentell metod med maskininlärning och spektroskopi har visat sig kunna skilja på tumörer som är mindre aggressiva från de mest aggressiva i ett tidigt stadium – utan att behöva ta en biop

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A Strange, Sleeping Magnetar Just Woke Up After a Decade of Silence

A particularly odd, spinning star has woken up, and it'’s spitting bright flashes of radio waves at us again.

11h

Can Cannabis Solve the Opioid Crisis?

Probably not—but it might be part of the solution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Going with the Flow: Waterfalls Can Form Spontaneously

Understanding how these breathtaking features form helps scientist interpret geologic history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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French Painting Stolen by Nazis in 1940 Raid to Be Returned to Owner's Descendants

The painting by Paul Signac was stolen during a Nazi raid in France in 1940.

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Going with the Flow: Waterfalls Can Form Spontaneously

Understanding how these breathtaking features form helps scientist interpret geologic history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Climate strikes spread worldwide as students call for action

Thousands of school pupils protest in cities across Asia and Europe against climate change.

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High intensity endurance training is associated with better quality of life, but not with improved cognitive functions in elderly marathon runners

High intensity endurance training is associated with better quality of life, but not with improved cognitive functions in elderly marathon runners High intensity endurance training is associated with better quality of life, but not with improved cognitive functions in elderly marathon runners, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41010-w High intensity endurance training is ass

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Light quality determines primary production in nutrient-poor small lakes

Light quality determines primary production in nutrient-poor small lakes Light quality determines primary production in nutrient-poor small lakes, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41003-9 Light quality determines primary production in nutrient-poor small lakes

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Absence of the proteoglycan decorin reduces glucose tolerance in overfed male mice

Absence of the proteoglycan decorin reduces glucose tolerance in overfed male mice Absence of the proteoglycan decorin reduces glucose tolerance in overfed male mice, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37501-x Absence of the proteoglycan decorin reduces glucose tolerance in overfed male mice

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Use of FCC-NMRD relaxometry for early detection and characterization of ex-vivo murine breast cancer

Use of FCC-NMRD relaxometry for early detection and characterization of ex-vivo murine breast cancer Use of FCC-NMRD relaxometry for early detection and characterization of ex-vivo murine breast cancer, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41154-9 Use of FCC-NMRD relaxometry for early detection and characterization of ex-vivo murine breast cancer

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A transient window of hypothyroidism alters neural progenitor cells and results in abnormal brain development

A transient window of hypothyroidism alters neural progenitor cells and results in abnormal brain development A transient window of hypothyroidism alters neural progenitor cells and results in abnormal brain development, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40249-7 A transient window of hypothyroidism alters neural progenitor cells and results in abnormal brain development

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Memantine prodrug as a new agent for Alzheimer’s Disease

Memantine prodrug as a new agent for Alzheimer’s Disease Memantine prodrug as a new agent for Alzheimer’s Disease, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40925-8 Memantine prodrug as a new agent for Alzheimer’s Disease

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Havarirapport: Stærk vind på Storebælt kunne vælte fejlramt lastvognstrailer

Ved vindhastigheder på 21,8 meter i sekundet eller derover vil vinden kunne vælte traileren af lommevognen, hvor kongetappen sidder løs, konkluderer en foreløbige havarirapport om togulykken på Storebælt.

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Enzyme USP15 may have potential role in future treatment of various cancers

A team at the George Washington University Cancer Center found that the deubiquitinating enzyme USP15 is a potential biomarker for treatments of pancreatic cancer, as well as ovarian and breast cancers.

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Jes Søgaard fejler fælt

Lidt mere ydmyghed vil klæde sundhedsøkonomen inden han underkender advarslen fra frontpersonalet i det danske sundhedsvæsen – især når han ikke lader til at have styr på sit datagrundlag.

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Data spies: The dark and shady practices of Silicon Valley

In this absorbing talk spanning the last 20 years of tech, Roger McNamee starts at the origins of the PayPal Mafia (which included entrepreneurs like Elon Musk, Peter Thiel, and Reid Hoffman) and traces them to Silicon Valley's global domination. Data is used by online vendors in all industries to make behavioral predictions for profit – often in unethical or cloaked ways. Did we sign up for this

11h

Secular Democrats Are the New Normal

Were a Democrat from the Clinton, Bush, or Obama eras to watch the presidential-announcement video that Beto O’Rourke released on Thursday, they would likely be struck by how it ended. Or, more specifically, by how it didn’t end. O’Rourke did not close with any mention of God. Until recently, farewells that invoke God were standard fare for Democratic and Republican candidates alike. Bill Clinton

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Mueller Might Not Be Done With Manafort Yet

Seventeen months, two trials, and one voided plea deal later, the former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has finally learned his fate: He’ll spend about seven years in federal prison for crimes he committed over more than a decade, marking one of the biggest prosecutorial victories for Special Counsel Robert Mueller since he launched his investigation nearly two years ago. Nevertheless, Mue

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Will the U.S. Finally End the Death Penalty?

The American death penalty is extraordinarily fragile, with death sentences and executions on the decline. Public support for the death penalty has diminished. The practice is increasingly marginalized around the world. California, with its disproportionately large share of American death-row inmates, announces an end to the death penalty. The year? 1972. That’s when the California Supreme Court

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Elite Colleges Don’t Understand Which Business They’re In

Wealthy and famous institutions of higher learning, including the one where I work, are in a crisis of their own making. Universities exist for the production and dissemination of ideas, and make hiring and admission decisions toward that end. At the same time, elite educational institutions have irresponsibly positioned themselves as something entirely different: as the arbiters of applicants’ i

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Netflix’s New Heist Movie Gets Lost in the Jungle

J. C. Chandor can make a strong claim to being the single most intriguing American film director still flying largely beneath the radar. His 2011 debut, Margin Call , was by far the best nondocumentary movie inspired by the 2008 financial crisis. His follow-up, All Is Lost , was an almost wordless exercise in narrative concision . And his third film, A Most Violent Year , was a flat-out masterpie

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A path to the future, paved with ceramics

When you hear the word "ceramics," you may think of the mug you made in pottery class or the vases collecting dust on your grandmother's shelf. While these objects are made up of ceramics, they're only one small part of the bigger picture. Ceramics are being used in armor, lasers, electronics, teeth replacement, and more. They ensure that your computer's motherboard runs smoothly. They protect spa

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Exploring Urban Wildlife: Five Questions for Gavin Van Horn

The author of "The Way of Coyote" explores Chicago's wilder byways by foot and kayak, encountering minks, peregrine falcons, and a wealth of other unexpected urban dwellers. Along the way he reflects on our instinctive hunger for connection with nature and the remarkable adaptive capacity of wildlife.

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Researchers put machine learning on path to quantum advantage

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Apple's new TV ad shows they hope you care as much about privacy on iPhones as they do

Data privacy is an important topic, but will it help sell iPhones?

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Stephen Hawking didn't believe he'd go to heaven, a place for 'people afraid of the dark'

World-renowned physicist Stephen Hawking, who died March 14, 2018,, didn't believe in God and called heaven "a fairy story."

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Did Ford just tease an electric Mustang as Tesla debuts Model Y?

Ford Motor teased a possible electric Mustang-inspired crossover late Thursday at the same time Tesla was about to begin an event to announce its own new electric vehicle.

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Over 2,000 fall ill in Malaysia after toxic waste dumped

More than 2,000 people, including many children, have fallen ill after toxic waste was dumped in a Malaysian river and emitted hazardous fumes over a wide area, an official said Friday.

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New Zealand massacre provides test for live video platforms

A horrific video of the New Zealand mosque massacre was blocked by Facebook during its livestream but circulated on other social media, highlighting the challenges faced by internet platforms …

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Ethiopian Airlines says analysis of flight recorders begins

Analysis of the flight recorders of the crashed Ethiopian Airlines plane has begun, the airline said Friday, and The New York Times reported that the pilot requested permission "in a panicky voice" to return to the airport shortly after takeoff as the plane dipped up and down sharply and appeared to gain startling speed.

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US regulators sue VW over emissions scandal

US stock regulators have sued Volkswagen over the emissions cheating scandal, alleging the German automaker committed fraud by raising billions in corporate bonds while lying to investors about the environmental impact of its cars.

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Guide til unge læger: Sådan finder du den bedste KBU-stilling

Over 600 nyuddannede læger skal snart til at vælge KBU-stilling. Ansøgningsprocessen er i gang, og de nye læger har netop modtaget deres nummer, der afgør, hvor i landet de skal i KBU.

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Australian scientists call for tougher restrictions on land clearing

Australian scientists call for tougher restrictions on land clearing Australian scientists call for tougher restrictions on land clearing, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00856-w Declaration says tighter laws are needed to reduce impact of vegetation loss on climate change.

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Anonyme kilder: FAA vendte på en tallerken, da de opdagede, at ulykkesflyet trimmede næsen nedad

Ligheder med Lion Air-ulykken fik amerikanske myndigheder til, som de sidste i verden, at udstede flyveforbud for Boeing 737 Max.

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Mobilstråling, der giver rotter kræft og CO2-fangst på kulkraftværker

Dyr CCS-teknologi, hvor man fjerner CO2 fra kulkraftværker, bliver måske genoplivet, og en stor undersøgelse viser, at mobilstråler kan give rotter kræft.

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What if AI does away with all the jobs?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Nyt bevis for, at narkolepsi er en autoimmun sygdom

Forskere fra blandt andet Københavns Universitet har fundet autoreaktive celler hos personer med…

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Fem projekter med KU-forskere modtager bevillinger fra Innovationsfonden

Innovationsfonden har bevilliget i alt knap 72 millioner kroner til fem forskellige forskningsprojekter…

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Retraction Note: Vibrio parahaemolyticus RhsP represents a widespread group of pro-effectors for type VI secretion systems

Retraction Note: Vibrio parahaemolyticus RhsP represents a widespread group of pro-effectors for type VI secretion systems Retraction Note: Vibrio parahaemolyticus RhsP represents a widespread group of pro-effectors for type VI secretion systems, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09094-0 Retraction Note: Vibrio parahaemolyticus RhsP represents a widespread group of pro-effec

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Publisher Correction: Neural measures of the role of affective prosody in empathy for pain

Publisher Correction: Neural measures of the role of affective prosody in empathy for pain Publisher Correction: Neural measures of the role of affective prosody in empathy for pain, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40292-4 Publisher Correction: Neural measures of the role of affective prosody in empathy for pain

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How I was almost mistaken for a chocolatier

How I was almost mistaken for a chocolatier How I was almost mistaken for a chocolatier, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00853-z Speak up early when misunderstandings arise, says Jamie Sugrue, or risk their snowballing into something you never prepared for.

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Can a Rust Belt Yogi Save the Democratic Party?

I have never seen a man sweat this much. It’s 6:30 in the morning, and I’m at a small Georgetown yoga studio, stretched out on a mat next to Representative Tim Ryan. The thermostat at the front of the room reads 96 degrees Fahrenheit, and the Ohio Democrat, surrounded by a dozen other middle-aged yogis, has been holding crow pose for the past several seconds. Every time he shifts positions, persp

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Styrk indsatsen mod mæslinger i konfliktzonerne

Mæslinger forårsager de allerfleste dødsfald og varige mén i mellem- og lavindkomstlande, og hvis behov og indsats skal stemme bedre overens, må vi intensivere mæslingekampagnerne i netop de områder.

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Tobacco and E-Cigarette Lobbyists Circle as F.D.A. Chief Exits

Juul and Big Tobacco have lobbied for months to protect themselves from aspects of the F.D.A.’s crackdown. As Scott Gottlieb leaves, they see an opening.

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Discovery of atrial fibrillation subtypes paves way for precision medicine

The discovery of subtypes of atrial fibrillation paves the way for individualized treatment. That's the main message from the joint EHRA/AFNET conference, where new data from the CATCH ME project will be presented, and a consensus reached on personalized medicine approaches to improve patient care.

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Thank you, climate strikers. Your action matters and your power will be felt | Rebecca Solnit

Nothing is possible without action, and almost anything is when we rise up together, as you are today Make a contribution to support the Guardian’s independent journalism and our unique commitment to climate reporting I want to say to all the climate strikers today: thank you so much for being unreasonable. That is, if reasonable means playing by the rules, and the rules are presumed to be guidel

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Capitalism is destroying the Earth. We need a new human right for future generations | George Monbiot

The children on climate strike are right: their lives should not be sacrificed to satisfy our greed The young people taking to the streets for the climate strike are right: their future is being stolen. The economy is an environmental pyramid scheme, dumping its liabilities on the young and the unborn. Its current growth depends on intergenerational theft. At the heart of capitalism is a vast and

14h

In Caracas, water an obsession after days of blackout

Plastic bottles and containers at the ready, Keisy Perez ignores the stench from the brown river as it slips slowly through the grimy San Agustin district of Venezuela's capital.

14h

Airbus trials drone delivery to ships

Airbus on Friday began trials of drones delivering parcels to ships anchored offshore in Singapore, as the high-tech city rolls out the devices for an array of tasks.

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Feds to ease land restrictions across US West

The Trump administration is finalizing plans to ease restrictions on oil and gas drilling and other industries that were meant to protect an imperiled bird species that ranges across the American West, federal officials said Thursday.

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Feds to ease land restrictions across US West

The Trump administration is finalizing plans to ease restrictions on oil and gas drilling and other industries that were meant to protect an imperiled bird species that ranges across the American West, federal officials said Thursday.

14h

California science exhibit explains the dog-human friendship

Did people domesticate dogs or was it the other way around? And why do these two species seem to think so much alike, act so much alike and get along so well?

14h

Malaysia plants hope for palm oil's future in dwarf trees

Test tubes holding plants line shelves in a Malaysian laboratory, the heart of a breeding programme for dwarf palm oil trees which scientists hope will cut costs and limit the environmental damage caused by the controversial industry.

14h

California science exhibit explains the dog-human friendship

Did people domesticate dogs or was it the other way around? And why do these two species seem to think so much alike, act so much alike and get along so well?

14h

Millions hit in Manila's 'worst' water shortage

Manila has been hit by its worst water shortage in years, leaving bucket-bearing families to wait hours to fill up from tanker trucks and some hospitals to turn away less urgent cases.

14h

Short circuit: Tokyo unveils chatty 'robot-eers' for 2020 Olympics

Tokyo Olympic organisers on Friday rolled out a pair of chatty robots they will put to work to assist wheelchair users at the 2020 Games as they continue to plug Japan's cutting-edge technology.

14h

'No Planet B': Global youth demo for climate kicks off

Thousands of young people marched through cities in Asia Friday, kicking off a global day of student protests that aims to spark world leaders into action on climate change.

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In San Francisco, tech boom has left people priced out of housing

In San Francisco, far from the picturesque, winding streets in the hills, a glistening skyscraper represents how the country's tech titans have transformed the city —and made it one of the world's most expensive places to live.

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Young climate activists around the world: why I’m striking today | Brianna Fruean and others

As young people walk out of classrooms for a global climate strike, a panel of campaigners share their reasons for action We strike for the Earth, to protect and save it from what the human race has done. As indigenous youths we have a close connection to the Earth. We know that without it we have nothing, we are nothing. Our community is directly affected by the Cold Lake oil sands , which is a

14h

Three astronauts on Soyuz craft successfully reach ISS

A Russian cosmonaut and two US astronauts arrived Friday at the International Space Station aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, five months after the failed launch of a rocket carrying two of the passengers.

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MtGox 'bitcoin baron' gets suspended sentence for data tampering

A Japanese court on Friday sentenced the former high-flying boss of the MtGox bitcoin exchange to a suspended jail sentence of two and a half years after finding him guilty of data manipulation.

14h

Boeing suspends 737 MAX deliveries as France probes black boxes

US aerospace giant Boeing said Thursday it was suspending deliveries of its top-selling 737 MAX as French investigators took delivery of the black boxes from the Ethiopian Airlines crash that killed all 157 passengers and crew.

14h

Author Correction: Differential Assessment of Factor Xa Activity and Global Blood Coagulability Utilizing Novel Dielectric Coagulometry

Author Correction: Differential Assessment of Factor Xa Activity and Global Blood Coagulability Utilizing Novel Dielectric Coagulometry Author Correction: Differential Assessment of Factor Xa Activity and Global Blood Coagulability Utilizing Novel Dielectric Coagulometry, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37136-y Author Correction: Differential Assessment of Factor Xa Activi

14h

Sea quark surprise reveals deeper complexity in proton spin puzzle

New data from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) add detail—and complexity—to an intriguing puzzle that scientists have been seeking to solve: how the building blocks that make up a proton contribute to its spin. The results, just published as a rapid communication in the journal Physical Review D, reveal definitively for the first time that different "flavors" of an

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A manifesto for tackling the climate change crisis | UK Student Climate Network

As thousands of pupils strike over the catastrophe facing the planet, we demand a state of emergency be called We’re the UK Student Climate Network . We’re young, we’re students and we’re calling for change. Our movement started in February when tens of thousands of young people took to the streets in towns and cities around Britain, in an unprecedented emergence of a youth climate justice moveme

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Cross Section: Matt Parker – Science Weekly podcast

Happy International Pi Day. To celebrate, Hannah Devlin is joined by the mathematician and comedian Matt Parker to discuss maths anxiety , how much today’s world relies on number crunching and what happens when we get it wrong Happy International Pi Day! On 14 March, the world celebrated this mathematical constant because 3/14 matches the first three digits of pi – 3.14. To mark the occasion, Han

15h

Publisher Correction: Metabolic reprogramming of stromal fibroblasts by melanoma exosome microRNA favours a pre-metastatic microenvironment

Publisher Correction: Metabolic reprogramming of stromal fibroblasts by melanoma exosome microRNA favours a pre-metastatic microenvironment Publisher Correction: Metabolic reprogramming of stromal fibroblasts by melanoma exosome microRNA favours a pre-metastatic microenvironment, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37179-1 Publisher Correction: Metabolic reprogramming of strom

15h

Author Correction: Laquinimod treatment in the R6/2 mouse model

Author Correction: Laquinimod treatment in the R6/2 mouse model Author Correction: Laquinimod treatment in the R6/2 mouse model, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-37926-4 Author Correction: Laquinimod treatment in the R6/2 mouse model

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New wheel units could bring vehicle costs down

Vehicles could be affordably produced for a wide variety of specialized purposes using a sophisticated wheel unit developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo.

15h

Using Thoreau, scientists measure the impact of climate change on wildflowers

A new study published in Ecology Letters is using observations made by Henry David Thoreau—19th-century American naturalist, social reformer, and philosopher—to explore the effects of climate change on tree leaf-out and, as a result, the emergence of spring wildflowers.

15h

Bremen Rector Scholz-Reiter: never a plagiarist!

Bremen rector Bernd Scholz-Reiter previously explained his predatory publishing and self-plagiarism as a personal crusade for Open Access. Now a closed access conference paper he coauthored was declared by his university as definitely not plagiarised.

15h

Cross Section: Matt Parker – Science Weekly podcast

Happy International Pi Day. To celebrate, Hannah Devlin is joined by the mathematician and comedian Matt Parker to discuss maths anxiety, how much today’s world relies on number crunching and what happens when we get it wrong. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

15h

»Det lyder usmart«: Kriminalforsorgen dropper at udskifte forældet it-system

Et nyt system til digital sagsbehandling skulle have erstattet Kriminalforsorgens 17 år gamle Klientsystem. Men myndigheden fortsætter nu alligevel med det forældede system, selvom det ikke kan implementere lovændringer hurtigt nok.

15h

New research, March 4-10, 2019

A selection of new climate related research articles is shown below. This post has separate sections for: Climate Change, Climate Change Impacts, Climate Change Mitigation, and Other Papers. Climate change Estimates of Decadal Climate Predictability from an Interactive Ensemble Model Temperature, precipitation, wind Lyapunov exponents and temperature transitions in a warming Australia Recent Surf

16h

Wallace Broecker: Scientists memorialize a titan of climate science

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Bud Ward Wally Broecker, photographed around 2010 (Credit: Bruce Gilbert, via Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory) The climate science community has lost one of the real titans of its field. Geochemist Wallace Broecker – known as “Wally” – passed away February 18 in New York at age 87 of congestive heart failure. A pioneer in identifying Earth’s war

16h

Space port 'could be feasible' in NZ in 10 years

submitted by /u/WarOfNoise [link] [comments]

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Forældre droppede vaccine: Seksårig dreng tæt på at dø af stivkrampe

En dreng i USA tilbragte to måneder på hospitalet som følge af stivkrampe. Vaccinen er meget vigtig, understreger forsker.

16h

Tesla Model Y Unveiled: An Affordable (Sort of) Midsize EV Crossover

Affordability starts at $40,200 in spring 2021, but you can't place an order yet. The cheapest one you can order today is $48,200 (plus options): the Model Y Long Wait. Sorry, we meant Model …

16h

Læger vil have offentligt organ til prioritering

Prioriteringer i sundhedsvæsenet er på manges læber, og politikere og læger står på hver sin side i diskussionen. Men løsningerne skal findes i fællesskab, mener flere læger, og et nyt initiativ kan være på vej.

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Fremtrædende læger: Tryktest af eksisterende behandlinger er vejen til fornuftig prioritering

Mange behandlinger i sundhedsvæsenet er overflødige og i nogle tilfælde skadelige for patienterne, og derfor skal vi kigge behandlingerne efter i krogene, mener en række læger. Godt forslag, men for sent, siger afgående klinikchef på Rigshospitalet.

16h

»Holdningen til en ­diagnose for ­atrieflimren skal være som en ‘obs cancer’«

Forståelsen for, at en diagnose for atrieflimren kræver hurtig handling, er blevet langt bedre, mener neurolog Dorte Damgaard, der gerne ser gode erfaringer fra hospitalerne bredt ud i det danske sundhedsvæsen.

16h

Åbenhed er godt, men ikke nok

Måske skulle Lægemiddelstyrelsen undlade at stille sig tilfreds med åbenhed om industrisamarbejde og interessekonflikter og i stedet bringe kravene vedrørende interessekonflikter op på niveau med det bedste i Europa.

16h

Regioner har svært ved at leve op til ­kvalitetskrav for atrieflimren

Første årsrapport om atrieflimren påviser regionale forskelle i kvaliteten af både udredning og behandling. Bedre patientuddannelse kan forbedre prognosen for de mange danskere med atrieflimren.

16h

Afgående klinikchef: Måske et år mere, og så smelter det sammen

Initiativer til at gennemgå eksisterende behandlinger for at luge ud i det unødvendige er gode, men der er ikke tid til det. Hvis ikke der prioriteres benhårdt nu, brænder sundhedsvæsenet ned om lidt, mener Jakob Trier Møller.

16h

Paradigmeskifte i sundhedsvæsenet?

Ikke at cannabis er et dårligt stof til festbrug, men som medicinsk behandling er dokumentationen tvivlsom.

16h

Tæt samarbejde løfter atrieflimrenpatienter

Den relativt nystartede klinik for atrieflimren på Regionshospitalet i Horsens er god til at sikre, at patienterne får lavet en ekkokardiografi, hurtigt sættes i antikoagulationsbehandling og får et struktureret undervisningsprogram. Forklaringen på de gode resultater er bl.a. en flad struktur, korte kommandoveje og effektiv brug af erfarne sygeplejerskers kompetencer.

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Statin nedsætter risikoen for hjerneblødning

Stort dansk forsøg afliver en udbredt mistanke om koblingen mellem statiner og risikoen for hjerneblødning og kan ændre danske lægers praksis på området.

16h

Autoritet tur/retur

Troen på lægestanden og på evidens kan kun genskabes af lægerne selv, og kunsten er at komme forud for udviklingen. Tilfredse kunder holder politikerne væk.

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KBU på Odense Universitetshospital

Odense Universitetshospital svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Sygehus Lillebælt, Kolding

Sygehus Lillebælt, Kolding svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU

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KBU på Sygehus Sønderjylland

Sygehus Sønderjylland svarer på 19 spørgssmål om KBU.

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KBU på Svendborg Sygehus

Svendborg Sygehus svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Slagelse Sygehus

Slagelse Sygehus svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Sygehus Lillebælt, Vejle

Sygehus Lillebælt, Vejle svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital

Herlev og Gentofte Hospital svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital

Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU:

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KBU i Region Hovedstadens Psykiatri

Region Hovedstadens Psykiatri svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Regionshospital Nordjylland

Regionshospital Nordjylland svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU

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KBU på Hospitalsenheden Vest

Hospitalsenheden Vest svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Regionshospitalet Randers

Regionshospitalet Randers svarer på 18 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Nykøbing F. Sygehus

Nykøbing F. Sygehus svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU i Region Nordjyllands Psykiatri

Region Nordjyllands Psykiatri svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Nordsjællands Hospital

Nordsjællands Hospital svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Aalborg Universitetshospital

Aalborg Universitetshospital svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU

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KBU i Psykiatrien Region Midtjylland

Psykiatrien i Region Midtjylland svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU

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KBU på Hvidovre og Amager Hospital

Hvidovre og Amager Hospital svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU-guiden forår 2019

Er du klar til at søge KBU 1. april? Vi har samlet en guide over hospitalernes tilbud til dig.

16h

KBU på Hospitalsenheden Midt

Hospitalsenheden Midt svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU

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KBU på Aarhus Universitetshospital

Aarhus Universitetshospital svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

16h

KBU i Grønland

Det Grønlandske Sundhedsvæsen svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Holbæk Sygehus

Holbæk Sygehus svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Sjællands Universitetshospital

Sjællands Universitetshospital svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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KBU på Regionshospitalet Horsens

Regionshospitalet Horsens svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU

16h

It's Official: There's Nothing We Can Do Now to Stop Arctic Temperature Rise

It's too late to stop temperature rise. But not too late to limit it.

17h

Tesla's Model Y SUV Brings More to the Masses

It starts at $39,000, has up to 300 miles of range, and is due out in fall 2020. Oh, and it has a panoramic glass roof.

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Klima-alarm skaber fornyet interesse for dyr CO2-lagring

PLUS. Forsøg efter forsøg med CO-fangst og -lagring på kulkraftværker er blevet lukket. Men FN’s klimapanel giver ny medvind til den kostbare og energi­krævende teknologi.

17h

New wheel units could bring vehicle costs down

Vehicles could be affordably produced for a wide variety of specialized purposes using a sophisticated wheel unit developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo.

17h

Design and validation of world-class multilayered thermal emitter using machine learning

NIMS, the University of Tokyo, Niigata University and RIKEN jointly designed a multilayered metamaterial that realizes ultra-narrowband wavelength-selective thermal emission by combining the machine learning (Bayesian optimization) and thermal emission properties calculations (electromagnetic calculation). The joint team then experimentally fabricated the designed metamaterial and verified the per

17h

Cardiovascular screenings uncover diabetes, high cholesterol in middle schoolers

A pilot study of 45 middle school kids shows that more than a third of those screened had abnormal levels of blood sugar or high cholesterol. Two had blood sugar levels (HbA1c) in the diabetes range.

17h

For older adults, sense of control tied to feeling younger

A recent study finds that older adults feel younger when they feel that they have more control over their daily lives, regardless of stress or health concerns. However, stress and health — not a sense of control — play a significant role in how old younger adults feel.

17h

Facebook Adds ‘Gaming’ To Its Main Navigation Menu

We know that Facebook is interested in gaming to a certain degree, although on that front other platforms such as Twitch and YouTube do have a better audience. However it seems that Facebook …

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Internet of Things Legislation Introduced in Senate, House

submitted by /u/lovejazz17 [link] [comments]

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Insects Are Disappearing, But California Just Got a Beautiful Explosion of Butterflies

Here's why California is flooded with butterflies right now.

19h

Liveblog: Tesla Debuts the Model Y, Its Baby SUV

Follow along with us as Elon Musk takes the stage to show off Tesla's latest creation.

19h

THE ORIGIN OF ART, my fourth book.

submitted by /u/markchangizi [link] [comments]

19h

Edible Insect Breeding Led to Larger but Not Necessarily Better Larvae

Researchers aiming to lower the cost of mealworms were able to double the worms' size, but the larger larvae had fewer eggs and weaker offspring. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Guy spends a week in VR

submitted by /u/Greg-2012 [link] [comments]

20h

Climate change: What are your questions?

We want to hear which questions you want answered on climate change.

20h

Edible Insect Breeding Led to Larger but Not Necessarily Better Larvae

Researchers aiming to lower the cost of mealworms were able to double the worms' size, but the larger larvae had fewer eggs and weaker offspring. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Jury still out on what confers survival advantage in female trauma patients

Female hormones, particularly estrogen, do not seem to explain why women tend to have higher survival rates than men following severe trauma, an 11-year study using data from 815,843 Swedish patients suggests. The findings are published in the open access Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine.

20h

Author Correction: Post-stroke insomnia in community-dwelling patients with chronic motor stroke: Physiological evidence and implications for stroke care

Author Correction: Post-stroke insomnia in community-dwelling patients with chronic motor stroke: Physiological evidence and implications for stroke care Author Correction: Post-stroke insomnia in community-dwelling patients with chronic motor stroke: Physiological evidence and implications for stroke care, Published online: 15 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36813-2 Author Correction: Post-st

20h

Ergodicity is sufficient but not necessary for group-to-individual generalizability [Letters (Online Only)]

Researchers commonly draw inferences from the group level to the individual and vice versa—that is, across levels. One of the empirical cornerstones of medicine is the clinical trial that tests the efficacy of a drug compared with placebo. If the intervention group outperforms the placebo group, the conclusion is that…

20h

Reply to Adolf and Fried: Conditional equivalence and imperatives for person-level science [Letters (Online Only)]

We thank Adolf and Fried (1) for their insightful commentary on our paper (2). We agree, in principle, that group-to-individual generalizability lies along a continuum. Some intraindividual and interindividual statistical estimates may be ergodic, sharing equivalent values across all statistical moments. Under these conditions, inferences from cross-sectional data could be…

20h

Universal and robust assessment of circadian time? [Letters (Online Only)]

In PNAS, Braun et al. (1) describe the algorithm TimeSignature. We make the following observations. First, circadian time refers to the phase of internal biological clocks. Any algorithm assessing this should be validated against gold-standard markers of internal circadian phase. For example, the phase of the melatonin rhythm is considered…

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Reply to Laing et al.: Accurate prediction of circadian time across platforms [Letters (Online Only)]

TimeSignature’s power is that it is highly accurate across transcriptomic platforms and experimental protocols. TimeSignature can be trained using data from a single platform/study and be applied to independent data without additional processing. Demonstrating this robustness and generalizability required applying TimeSignature to as diverse a set of studies as possible…

20h

Principles of plastid reductive evolution illuminated by nonphotosynthetic chrysophytes [Evolution]

The division of life into producers and consumers is blurred by evolution. For example, eukaryotic phototrophs can lose the capacity to photosynthesize, although they may retain vestigial plastids that perform other essential cellular functions. Chrysophyte algae have undergone a particularly large number of photosynthesis losses. Here, we present a plastid…

20h

Increasing population size can inhibit cumulative cultural evolution [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

The extent to which larger populations enhance cumulative cultural evolution (CCE) is contentious. We report a large-scale experiment (n = 543) that investigates the CCE of technology (paper planes and their flight distances) using a transmission-chain design. Population size was manipulated such that participants could learn from the paper planes…

20h

Transcriptome-wide profiling of multiple RNA modifications simultaneously at single-base resolution [Chemistry]

The breadth and importance of RNA modifications are growing rapidly as modified ribonucleotides can impact the sequence, structure, function, stability, and fate of RNAs and their interactions with other molecules. Therefore, knowing cellular RNA modifications at single-base resolution could provide important information regarding cell status and fate. A current major…

20h

Social networks and the archaeology of the Native American South [Commentaries]

At the point of early European colonization of the Americas, there were many Native American chiefdoms and chiefly provinces in what is now the southeastern United States associated with what is known to archaeologists as the Mississippian cultural tradition, dating from roughly AD 1000 through the 16th century (1). Archaeology…

20h

Reciprocal modulation of 5-HT and octopamine regulates pumping via feedforward and feedback circuits in C. elegans [Neuroscience]

Feeding is vital for animal survival and is tightly regulated by the endocrine and nervous systems. To study the mechanisms of humoral regulation of feeding behavior, we investigated serotonin (5-HT) and octopamine (OA) signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans, which uses pharyngeal pumping to ingest bacteria into the gut. We reveal that…

20h

Molecular dynamics-guided discovery of an ago-allosteric modulator for GPR40/FFAR1 [Pharmacology]

The long-chain fatty acid receptor FFAR1/GPR40 binds agonists in both an interhelical site between the extracellular segments of transmembrane helix (TM)-III and TM-IV and a lipid-exposed groove between the intracellular segments of these helices. Molecular dynamics simulations of FFAR1 with agonist removed demonstrated a major rearrangement of the polar and…

20h

Bipotent stem cells support the cyclical regeneration of endometrial epithelium of the murine uterus [Cell Biology]

The endometrial epithelium of the uterus regenerates periodically. The cellular source of newly regenerated endometrial epithelia during a mouse estrous cycle or a human menstrual cycle is presently unknown. Here, I have used single-cell lineage tracing in the whole mouse uterus to demonstrate that epithelial stem cells exist in the…

20h

Substrate binding mode and catalytic mechanism of human heparan sulfate d-glucuronyl C5 epimerase [Biochemistry]

Heparan sulfate (HS) is a linear, complex polysaccharide that modulates the biological activities of proteins through binding sites made by a series of Golgi-localized enzymes. Of these, glucuronyl C5-epimerase (Glce) catalyzes C5-epimerization of the HS component, d-glucuronic acid (GlcA), into l-iduronic acid (IdoA), which provides internal flexibility to the polymer…

20h

Gold-implanted plasmonic quartz plate as a launch pad for laser-driven photoacoustic microfluidic pumps [Applied Physical Sciences]

Enabled initially by the development of microelectromechanical systems, current microfluidic pumps still require advanced microfabrication techniques to create a variety of fluid-driving mechanisms. Here we report a generation of micropumps that involve no moving parts and microstructures. This micropump is based on a principle of photoacoustic laser streaming and is…

20h

Tree clusters in savannas result from islands of soil moisture [Environmental Sciences]

Tree clusters in savannas are commonly found in sizes that follow power laws with well-established exponents. We show that their size distributions could result from the space–time probabilistic structure of soil moisture, estimated over the range of rainfall observed in semiarid savannas; patterns of soil moisture display islands whose size,…

20h

Volumetric chemical imaging by clearing-enhanced stimulated Raman scattering microscopy [Chemistry]

Three-dimensional visualization of tissue structures using optical microscopy facilitates the understanding of biological functions. However, optical microscopy is limited in tissue penetration due to severe light scattering. Recently, a series of tissue-clearing techniques have emerged to allow significant depth-extension for fluorescence imaging. Inspired by these advances, we develop a volumetr

20h

Structural and dynamical rationale for fatty acid unsaturation in Escherichia coli [Biochemistry]

Fatty acid biosynthesis in α- and γ-proteobacteria requires two functionally distinct dehydratases, FabA and FabZ. Here, mechanistic cross-linking facilitates the structural characterization of a stable hexameric complex of six Escherichia coli FabZ dehydratase subunits with six AcpP acyl carrier proteins. The crystal structure sheds light on the divergent substrate selectivity…

20h

Entanglement distribution over a 96-km-long submarine optical fiber [Physics]

Quantum entanglement is one of the most extraordinary effects in quantum physics, with many applications in the emerging field of quantum information science. In particular, it provides the foundation for quantum key distribution (QKD), which promises a conceptual leap in information security. Entanglement-based QKD holds great promise for future applications…

20h

Transcriptome profiling of Plasmodium vivax in Saimiri monkeys identifies potential ligands for invasion [Microbiology]

Unlike the case in Asia and Latin America, Plasmodium vivax infections are rare in sub-Saharan Africa due to the absence of the Duffy blood group antigen (Duffy antigen), the only known erythrocyte receptor for the P. vivax merozoite invasion ligand, Duffy binding protein 1 (DBP1). However, P. vivax infections have…

20h

Retinoic acid receptor plays both sides of homeostatic plasticity [Commentaries]

Retinoic acid (RA) was originally identified as a morphogen, a signaling molecule that is produced by a specific region but diffuses away, thereby producing a concentration gradient. The morphogen’s nonuniform distribution governs embryo patterning during development. In its role as a morphogen, RA was shown to bind to the RA…

20h

Glycoconjugate vaccine using a genetically modified O antigen induces protective antibodies to Francisella tularensis [Microbiology]

Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia, a category A bioterrorism agent. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O antigen (OAg) of F. tularensis has been considered for use in a glycoconjugate vaccine, but conjugate vaccines tested so far have failed to confer protection necessary against aerosolized pulmonary bacterial challenge. When F….

20h

Tracking the rotation of single CdS nanorods during photocatalysis with surface plasmon resonance microscopy [Chemistry]

While rotational dynamics of anisotropic nanoobjects has often been limited in plasmonic and fluorescent nanomaterials, here we demonstrate the capability of a surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) to determine the orientation of all kinds of anisotropic nanomaterials. By taking CdS nanorods as an example, it was found that two-dimensional Fourier…

20h

Interfacial engineering of cobalt sulfide/graphene hybrids for highly efficient ammonia electrosynthesis [Chemistry]

Electrocatalytic N2 reduction reaction (NRR) into ammonia (NH3), especially if driven by renewable energy, represents a potentially clean and sustainable strategy for replacing traditional Haber–Bosch process and dealing with climate change effect. However, electrocatalytic NRR process under ambient conditions often suffers from low Faradaic efficiency and high overpotential. Developing newly…

20h

Singlet oxygen mediated iron-based Fenton-like catalysis under nanoconfinement [Engineering]

For several decades, the iron-based Fenton-like catalysis has been believed to be mediated by hydroxyl radicals or high-valent iron-oxo species, while only sporadic evidence supported the generation of singlet oxygen (1O2) in the Haber–Weiss cycle. Herein, we report an unprecedented singlet oxygen mediated Fenton-like process catalyzed by ∼2-nm Fe2O3 nanoparticles…

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Edible Insect Breeding Led to Larger but Not Necessarily Better Larvae

Researchers aiming to lower the cost of mealworms were able to double the worms' size, but the larger larvae had fewer eggs and weaker offspring. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Did Dietary Changes Bring Us ‘F’ Words? Study Tackles Complexities of Language’s Origins

Softer foods from agricultural lifestyles may have changed the human bite, making it easier to form certain sounds.

20h

Bagsiden: Da Royal mail sagde pænt undskyld

Prisen steg 9 øre syv dage før tilladt

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Tænkeboks – løsning: Tromlen vil trække mod højre

Her kommer svaret på sidste uges tænkeboks:

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Central American kidney disease epidemic linked to occupational heat exposure

For two decades, Nicaragua and El Salvador have seen increasing mortality from an unusual form of chronic kidney disease (CKD), also called Mesoamerican Nephropathy (MeN). The disease has disproportionately affected sugarcane and other agricultural workers, and appears to be unrelated to traditional kidney disease risk factors such as diabetes.

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Ancient migration transformed Spain's DNA

A migration from Central Europe transformed the genetic make-up of Iberia, a new DNA study reveals.

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Nuclear industry pushing for fewer inspections at plants

submitted by /u/isleepinahammock [link] [comments]

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'Super worried' about the planet – in Spain, Kenya, Bangladesh

Young people around the world on their fears about the effects of pollution and climate change.

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Extremist sympathies more likely in white British and UK-born people

White British people are almost twice as likely to hold extremist views as people of Pakistani heritage in England, according to a study by Queen Mary University of London.

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Singing in your head could mess up your pitch

Singing a song in your head before actually singing it could be nudging you out of tune, according to new research. The study is the first to present evidence suggesting a relationship among sub-vocalization, auditory imagery, and poor pitch singing. Sub-vocalization is the silent, preparatory muscle movements of the face and larynx that result when singers run a song through their heads prior to

21h

Peer pressure gets college students to avoid drinking

Peer approval is the best indicator of the tendency for new college students to drink or smoke, even if they don’t want to admit it, according to a new study. This new finding is key to help universities address the problems of underage or binge drinking, says lead author Nancy Rhodes, an associate professor in the advertising and public relations department at Michigan State University. “…the me

21h

Using Thoreau, scientists measure the impact of climate change on wildflowers

A new study is using observations made by Henry David Thoreau — 19th-century American naturalist, social reformer, and philosopher — to explore the effects of climate change on tree leaf-out and, as a result, the emergence of spring wildflowers.

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Guardians of the synapse: Scientists identify a new role for nerve-supporting cells

Researchers have found, for the first time, that a blood-clotting protein can, unexpectedly, degrade nerves–and how nerve-supporting glial cells, including Schwann cells, provide protection. The findings show that Schwann cells protect nerves by blocking this blood-clotting protein as well as other potentially destructive enzymes released by muscle cells. The work could have implications for dise

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Researchers find epigenetic loss that changes how cells obtain energy from cancer

It has been known for decades that cancer cells have an altered metabolism and it is seen in several biochemical pathways and in particular, in the way they get energy for their survival. Now, a new article describes an epigenetic injury found in human tumours which created this altered path to take energy from the cancer.

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The importance of puberty: A call for better research models

Puberty is much more than just a time of biological overdrive, propelled by sexual maturation. Progress in developmental science has greatly broadened the perspective of this critical maturational milestone.

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Italy's First Known Coral Reef Has Been Discovered

Now let's try and look after it.

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Next generation of optical tweezers

Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could pave the way for the next generation of optical tweezers.

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Team solves mystery of brain’s taste ‘sweet spot’

Researchers have discovered the taste center in the human brain by uncovering which parts of the brain distinguish different types of tastes. “We have known that tastes activate the human brain for some time, but not where primary taste types such as sweet, sour, salty, and bitter are distinguished,” says Adam Anderson, professor of human development in the College of Human Ecology at Cornell Uni

22h

The Atlantic Daily: One Virus That Seems to Break All the Rules

What We’re Following The GOP-led Senate voted to block President Donald Trump’s national-emergency declaration —a mostly symbolic move, since Trump is all but certain to nullify it with a veto , the first of his presidency. For his part, Trump seemed to have put surprisingly little effort into the politicking of getting Republicans in the chamber to go along with his norm-breaking move. That wasn

22h

Bacteria 'trap' could help slow down antibiotic resistance

Scientists have developed a new and faster test for identifying how single bacteria react to antibiotics, which could help in the fight against antimicrobial resistance.

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Speed limit on DNA-making sets pace for life's first steps

Fruit flies make for stingy mothers, imparting only a portion of the genetic building blocks their offspring need to survive. The rest must be produced by the fertilized egg in its first few steps of growth.

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Next generation of optical tweezers

Scientists have developed a pioneering new technique that could pave the way for the next generation of optical tweezers.

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Scientists crack genome of superfood seaweed, ito-mozuku

For the first time, researchers unveil the genome of ito-mozuku (Nemacystus decipiens), the popular Japanese brown seaweed, providing data that could help farmers better grow the health food.

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Bristol provides first long-term look at predictors of suicide attempts

Academics at the University of Bristol have taken the first long-term look at potential factors that could lead to suicide attempts in high-risk young people.

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New light shed on link between alcohol marketing and increased consumption in young people

Young people's awareness of alcohol marketing — and their ownership of alcohol-branded merchandise — is associated with increased and higher-risk consumption, a landmark study has found.

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Soft drink companies copy tobacco playbook to lure young users

Tobacco conglomerates that used colors, flavors and marketing techniques to entice children as future smokers transferred these same strategies to sweetened beverages when they bought food and drink companies starting in 1963, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

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The Lancet Global Health: Maternal deaths following C-section 50 times higher in Africa compared to high-income countries

The maternal mortality rate following a caesarean section (C-section) in Africa may be 50 times higher than that of high-income countries, according to an observational study of more than 3,500 mothers from 22 African countries, published in The Lancet Global Health journal.

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Early menopause in smokers linked to bladder cancer

Research shows that experiencing menopause before the age of 45 is associated with a higher risk of bladder cancer. This higher risk was notable if the woman is a smoker. The study, which looked at health outcomes of more than 220,000 US Nurses, is presented at the European Association of Urology congress in Barcelona.

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Bold business ideas: Where is tech taking us?

Smart companies will use innovation to augment rather than replace human intelligence

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Researchers uncover new clues to surviving extinction

'Great Dying' extinction survivors appear to have shared many of the same ecological roles as their predecessors, with one catch — there was a surge in the number of individuals with more modern traits. These hardy stand-outs did a better job of driving recovery, making ongoing ecological interactions more intense. Insights into this ancient marine system and its occupants can help guide modern c

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The sweet spot: Scientists discover taste center of human brain

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a new method of statistical analysis, researchers have discovered the taste center in the human brain by uncovering which parts of the brain distinguish different types of tastes.

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Poor pitch singing could be a matter of the tune in your head

Sub-vocalization, the silent, preparatory muscle movements of the face and larynx that result when singers run a song through their heads prior to vocalizing, could be nudging them out of tune, according to researchers. Their recently published study for the first time presents evidence suggesting a relationship among sub-vocalization, auditory imagery and poor pitch singing.

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Your genes might influence how well your birth control works

Health Birth control pills affect all women differently—including how well they work. A study found people with particular gene variants, normal alterations to the human genome, metabolize one birth control hormone more quickly—reducing its concentrations…

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UK failing to provide universal health coverage by charging undocumented migrant kids

By charging undocumented child migrants for healthcare, the UK is failing to provide universal health coverage — in contravention of the Sustainable Development Goals and its obligations under the UN convention on children's rights — argue infectious disease and global health experts in an editorial published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Alcohol marketing awareness linked to 'higher risk' drinking among UK teens

Medium to high awareness of alcohol marketing among UK teens is linked to increased consumption and a greater probability of 'higher risk' drinking among current drinkers, finds a large observational study published in the online journal BMJ Open.

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How to Watch Tesla’s Model Y Reveal Tonight

Elon Musk takes the stage tonight to show off his automaker’s new baby SUV—here’s what we know and how to stay up to speed.

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Jordan Peterson on gun control

Shortly after the Las Vegas shooting, Jordan Peterson replied to a question about gun control in America. Peterson believes only the police and army being armed is dangerous, and that the citizenry should be equally dangerous. He also feels that legislation would do "zero" to stop school shootings in America. None In 2016, 64 percent of homicides in the United States resulted from gun violence ;

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Opportunity Sent Back One Final Stunning Mars Panorama Before Going Offline Forever

Before the plucky little rover passed on, it beamed back one final gift to the people of Earth: an awe-inspiring panorama of Perseverance Valley. The post Opportunity Sent Back One Final Stunning Mars Panorama Before Going Offline Forever appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Anyone can be a Nobel Prize nominee. Here’s why a 16-year-old climate activist deserves to win.

Environment She's been a fearless advocate for young people and the planet. If Greta Thunberg wins, beating out 304 other individuals and organizations currently under consideration, she’ll be the youngest winner in the award’s history.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: You Beto Believe It

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, March 14. ‣The House voted 420–0 to demand that Attorney General William Barr release Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s findings and full report to the public once they are completed. During his Senate confirmation hearing, Barr had not committed to making Mueller’s findings public. Here’s what else we’re watching: Veto: Twelve Republican senators broke wi

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Mobilsikkerhed: Kun hver tiende antivirus holder stand

Ny undersøgelse dumper halvdelen af programmerne mod virus til Android.

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College drinking intervention strategies need a refresh

Peer approval is the best indicator of the tendency for new college students to drink or smoke according to new research from Michigan State University. This new finding is key to help universities address the problems of underage or binge drinking.

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Why fly the coop? With shortage of mates, some birds choose to help others raise offspring

After a five-year experiment, researchers in Florida found that when fewer mates were available for brown-headed nuthatches, these small pine-forest birds opted to stay home and help their parents or other adults raise their offspring.

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From mirror-image biology to enhanced therapeutic proteins

Scientists have succeeded in reconstructing biomolecules in their mirror-image form. The researchers' goal is to create a mirror-image artificial protein synthesis system. Their aim is to produce mirror-image therapeutic proteins, such as antibodies, which would be protected from biological breakdown in the body and do not provoke any immune response.

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