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nyheder2019marts19

Abel Prize for maths awarded to woman for first time

The Abel Prize in mathematics was on Tuesday awarded to Karen Uhlenbeck of the United States for her work on partial differential equations, the first woman to win the award, the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters said.

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Human Brainwaves' "Hum" Responds to Changes in the Magnetic Field

A study of people’s brainwaves hints at their unconscious ability to perceive the Earth’s magnetic field.

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Bane over Vestfyn til 4,8 mia. kr. skal spare rejsende for fire kilometer

PLUS. En ny jernbanestrækning langs motorvejen mellem Odense og Middelfart skal skære 6 minutter af rejsetiden og sikre større kapacitet på den fynske jernbane i fremtiden.

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Verdens største bølgeanlæg skal sænke CO2-udledningen fra containerskibe

Dansk teknologi skal knække koden til kæmpe testbølgebassin i Sydkorea.

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Are there Zika reservoirs in the Americas?

A researcher at Washington University in St. Louis travels the Americas, collecting feces from nonhuman primates to determine the risk of Zika reservoirs.

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New Futurist Fear: “Economic Singularity” Could Kill Jobs Forever

Economic Robot Revolution If robots automate all of our jobs, what use will the goods and services they produce be without people who can afford them? That’s the big question posed by Electronic Engineering Journal ‘s editor-in-chief, Kevin Morris, who defines the moment robots and artificial intelligence surpass humanity’s abilities in the workforce as an “economic singularity” — and suggested t

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Chicago's Large Lot Program sowing change in inner-city communities

Chicago's Large Lot Program is promoting positive change in inner-city neighborhoods by enabling residents to buy and repurpose vacant lots that currently attracted crime and other problems.

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Prescribing healthy food in Medicare/Medicaid is cost effective, could improve health

A team of researchers modeled the health and economic effects of healthy food prescriptions in Medicare and Medicaid. The study finds that health insurance coverage to offset the cost of healthy food for Medicare and/or Medicaid participants would be highly cost effective after five years and improve health outcomes.

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The rise and fall of Ziggy star formation and the rich dust from ancient stars

Researchers have detected a radio signal from abundant interstellar dust in MACS0416_Y1, a galaxy 13.2 billion light-years away in the constellation Eridanus. Standard models can't explain this much dust in a galaxy this young, forcing us to rethink the history of star formation. Researchers now think MACS0416_Y1 experienced staggered star formation with two intense starburst periods 300 million a

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Fountain of youth for heart health may lie in the gut

As our collection of resident gut bacteria changes with age, it increasingly produces harmful metabolites that damage veins and blood vessels, driving disease, a new study suggests.

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New model IDs primate species with potential to spread Zika in the Americas

In the Americas, primate species likely to harbor Zika — and potentially transmit the virus — are common, abundant, and often live near people. So reports a new study.

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Solar Jets Cause Standing Waves in Earth's Magnetic Field

When jets of charged particles from the sun hit our magnetosphere, some of the ensuing ripples travel towards the north and southern poles and get reflected back. The resulting interference allows standing waves to form, like on a drumhead.

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This Guy Is Trying to Grow Organs in Pig-Human Hybrids

Growing Chimeras At any given time, tens of thousands of people are waiting on an organ donation in America alone. One promising yet icky solution could be growing human organs inside other animals. A new Wired profile looks at Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, who runs two labs where he’s using CRISPR to make pigs grow harvestable human organs instead of their own — and sliding into dicey ethical te

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Do you have a self-actualized personality? Maslow revisited

Abraham Maslow was the 20th-century American psychologist best-known for explaining motivation through his hierarchy of needs, which he represented in a pyramid. At the base, our physiological needs include food, water, warmth and rest. Moving up the ladder, Maslow mentions safety, love, and self-esteem and accomplishment. But after all those have been satisfied, the motivating factor at the top

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WHO panel proposes new global registry for all CRISPR human experiments

The World Health Organization should also step up governance of human genome-editing research, group says

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Britain’s biggest electric car rapid-charge hub is now open

submitted by /u/DumbPeople76 [link] [comments]

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Andrew Yang 2020!

submitted by /u/drd525 [link] [comments]

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Chicago's Large Lot Program sowing change in inner-city communities

Chicago's Large Lot Program is promoting positive change in inner-city neighborhoods by enabling residents to buy and repurpose vacant lots that attracted crime and other problems, a new study by University of Illinois researchers and the USDA Forest Service.

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Fountain of youth for heart health may lie in the gut

As our collection of resident gut bacteria changes with age, it increasingly produces harmful metabolites that damage veins and blood vessels, driving disease, a new study suggests

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Experiments with roundworms suggest alternatives for the treatment of schizophrenia

Researchers used C. elegans as an animal model to investigate the importance of certain human genes for the treatment of schizophrenia.

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Revealing the rules behind virus scaffold construction

New insights into virus shell self-assembly could impact future drug delivery and therapeutic strategies.

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Food safety: Dung beetles and soil bacteria reduce risk of human pathogens

Food safety regulations increasingly pressure growers to remove hedgerows, ponds and other natural habitats from farms to keep out pathogen-carrying wildlife and livestock. Yet, this could come at the cost of biodiversity. New research encourages the presence of dung beetles and soil bacteria at farms as they naturally suppress E. coli and other harmful pathogens before spreading to humans.

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NSF hopes Congress will dig it out of a $1 billion budget hole

President’s 2020 request would shrink $8-billion agency to where it was in 2012

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Shipping growth will mean more invasive stowaways

Rising global maritime traffic could lead to sharp increases in invasive species around the world over the next 30 years, according to a new study. The findings, which appear in Nature Sustainability , suggest that shipping growth will far outweigh climate change in the spread of non-indigenous pests to new environments in coming decades. “Biological invasions are believed to be a major driver of

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Invasive species to surge as ship traffic soars on the high seas

Invasive species to surge as ship traffic soars on the high seas Invasive species to surge as ship traffic soars on the high seas , Published online: 18 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00870-y Global shipping will have a bigger effect than climate change on the spread of non-native life forms.

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Rohingya refugees need mental health treatment and justice

Doctors are working with an organization in Bangladesh to help deliver mental health care to Rohingya refugees from Myanmar. Since 2017, more than 740,000 refugees—more than half of them children—have fled violence in Myanmar and settled in overcrowded camps in Bangladesh. In one camp, a 12-year-old Rohingya boy flatly, stoically tells of how, within three hours one day in August 2017, the Myanma

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Nintendo Switch savings and other good deals happening today

Gadgets A snapshot of the day's best bargains. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Revealing the rules behind virus scaffold construction

Professor Danielle Tullman-Ercek's insights into virus shell self-assembly could impact future drug delivery and therapeutic strategies.

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A p et monkey was buried some 4,000 years ago with same rites as humans

A p et monkey was buried some 4,000 years ago with same rites as humans A p et monkey was buried some 4,000 years ago with same rites as humans, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00889-1 Rhesus macaque, perhaps an elite gift, was interred with a type of pottery also found in human graves.

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2,500 Years Ago, Herodotus Described a Weird Ship. Now, Archaeologists Have Found it.

One of the most elusive boats from the ancient world — a mysterious river barge that famed Greek historian Herodotus described nearly 2,500 years ago — has finally been discovered.

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Experiments with roundworms suggest alternatives for the treatment of schizophrenia

Researchers used C. elegans as an animal model to investigate the importance of certain human genes for the treatment of schizophrenia.

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Sweetened Drinks Linked to Higher Mortality Risk

While sugary beverages seem to be the worst offenders, artificially sweetened drinks might also associated with health problems, an observational study suggests.

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Was Thomas Kuhn Evil?

Filmmaker Errol Morris, once Kuhn’s grad student, accuses him of being a bad philosopher and bad person. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bernie Sanders Just Hired His Twitter Attack Dog

Shortly before he gave speeches launching his 2020 campaign earlier this month, Bernie Sanders emailed his supporters, urging them to “do our very best to engage respectfully with our Democratic opponents—talking about the issues we are fighting for, not about personalities or past grievances. I want to be clear that I condemn bullying and harassment of any kind and in any space.” What he didn’t

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You don't need to drink alcohol for it to harm you

Health Quantifying how alcohol hurts non-drinkers is difficult, but a new paper shows the way. No amount of alcohol is good for you. But often people forget that when they drink, they don’t just hurt ourselves. Unfortunately, even scientists forget that. As a new…

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How to Place you Badge (According to the Government in 1947)

Digging into NASA’s Apollo-era history of nuclear propulsion for manned deep space missions, I found another gem in the history of the government not really knowing how to address women’s clothing. This time, we’re talking beauty and badges. For the back story on this image, we need to the Plum Brook Station before it was a NASA centre, all the way back to the Second World War when it was the Plum

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New tracking software and manual scoring platform

submitted by /u/coco18c [link] [comments]

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A Wild and Brainy Night at the Museum

Last Thursday, the American Museum of Natural History in New York City hosted “Neuroscience Night: Wild, Wild Brains” during Brain Awareness Week in the Spitzer Hall of Human Origins. The night was filled with interactive games and flash lectures (i.e., a series of talks no more than 30 minutes long) that showcased how our human brains compare to those of our animal counterparts, both present day

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South Korean App Warns Smartphone Addicts Not to Step Into Traffic

Heads Up A city near Seoul, in South Korea, is worried about “smartphone zombies” who wander into traffic while looking at their phones. Its solution, according to Reuters : a high-tech crosswalk that uses lights, lasers and an app to alert phone-addicted pedestrians that they’re about to be hit by a car. “Increasing number of smombie [smartphone zombie] accidents have occurred in pedestrian cros

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Untangling the Physics Behind Drifting Embers, 'Firenadoes' and Other Wildfire Phenomena

Fires can leap rapidly from building to building and even cause extreme weather events such as pyrocumulonimbus storm clouds

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Solar Jets Cause Standing Waves in Earth's Magnetic Field

When jets of charged particles from the sun hit our magnetosphere, some of the ensuing ripples travel towards the north and southern poles and get reflected back. The resulting interference allows… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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U.S. Mathematician Becomes First Woman To Win Abel Prize, 'Math's Nobel'

"I find that I am bored with anything I understand," Karen Uhlenbeck once said. That sentiment is part of why she won what many call the Nobel of mathematics Tuesday.

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Diattenuation imaging: Promising imaging technique for brain research

A new imaging method provides structural information about brain tissue that was previously difficult to access. Diattenuation imaging allows researchers to differentiate, e.g., regions with many thin nerve fibers from regions with few thick nerve fibers. With current imaging methods, these tissue types cannot easily be distinguished.

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Why believing in soulmates makes people more likely to "ghost" romantic partners

Ghosting, or the practice of cutting off all contact suddenly with a romantic partner, is a controversial method of dumping someone. People generally agree that it's bad form, but new research shows that people have surprisingly different opinions on the practice. Overall, people who are more destiny-oriented (more likely to believe that they have a soulmate) tend to approve of ghosting more, whi

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Inflammation inhibitor blocks neurodevelopmental disorders in mouse model

Work published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that an enzyme inhibitor developed by Professor Bruce Hammock and colleagues at UC Davis reduced inflammation in the brains of mice born to mothers with maternal immune activation. Inflammation triggered by the enzyme, soluble epoxide hydrolase, is linked to neurodevelopmental disorders in these mice.

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NASA mission reveals asteroid has big surprises

A NASA spacecraft that will return a sample of a near-Earth asteroid named Bennu to Earth in 2023 made the first-ever close-up observations of particle plumes erupting from an asteroid's surface. Bennu also revealed itself to be more rugged than expected, challenging the mission team to alter its flight and sample collection plans, due to the rough terrain.

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How attention helps the brain perceive an object

The ability of the brain to ignore extraneous visual information is critical to how we work and function, but the processes governing perception and attention are not fully understood. Scientists have long theorized that attention to a particular object can alter perception by amplifying certain neuronal activity and suppressing the activity of other neurons (brain "noise"). Now, scientists have

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Underwater surveys in Emerald Bay reveal the nature and activity of Lake Tahoe faults

Emerald Bay, California, a beautiful location on the southwestern shore of Lake Tahoe, is surrounded by rugged landscape, including rocky cliffs and remnants of mountain glaciers. Scenic as it may be, the area is also a complex structural puzzle. Understanding the history of fault movement in the Lake Tahoe basin is important to assessing earthquake hazards for regional policy planners.

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Speeding the development of fusion power to create unlimited energy on Earth

A detailed examination of the challenges and tradeoffs in the development of a compact fusion facility with high-temperature superconducting magnets.

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Smarter drug release thanks to control over encapsulation

Researchers have discovered the parameters that govern the encapsulation of drugs. This gives more control over the slow and steady release of drugs in patients. Moreover, designing encapsulations for new drugs will now require far less experimentation which makes for faster and cheaper drug development. The researchers believe this work will have a significant impact on the biomedical field and d

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What makes evolution go backwards?

The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature. Instead, new research by behavioral scientists shows that in certain cases evolution works in the opposite direction, reversing individual improvements to benefit related members of the same group.

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Ejecting flagella could help microbes save energy during nutrient depletion

In favorable conditions, many bacteria propel themselves to food sources and other sites of interest using whip-like molecular propellers known as flagella. However, according to new research, members of the bacterial class Gammaproteobacteria eject their flagella when nutrients are scarce.

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NASA's Fermi Satellite clocks 'cannonball' pulsar speeding through space

Astronomers have found a runaway pulsar hurtling through space at nearly 2.5 million miles an hour — so fast it could travel the distance between Earth and the Moon in just 6 minutes.

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Diattenuation imaging: Promising imaging technique for brain research

A new imaging method provides structural information about brain tissue that was previously difficult to access. Diattenuation imaging allows researchers to differentiate, e.g., regions with many thin nerve fibers from regions with few thick nerve fibers. With current imaging methods, these tissue types cannot easily be distinguished.

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Tiny song bird makes record migration

The bird's trek between its breeding grounds in the central and western boreal forest of North America and its winter home in the Amazon Basin is one of the longest songbird migrations recorded. Describing a route arcing across North America and including a transoceanic flight to South America, the study confirms an epic migration journey that scientists had long suspected but not yet proved. Trac

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Emotionally attuned managers are better at judging workgroup effectiveness

Experts show for first time that — even on the fly — a manager who can read emotions in others well can better evaluate a working group's performance.

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Many pet owners keen to have vegan pets

A growing number of pet owners is interested in feeding their pets plant-based diets.

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Google’s new Stadia service will let you play video games without downloading them

The platform, which runs on Chrome and Google data centers, envisions a new way to play video games.

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Facebook settles suits over ad-targeting discrimination

Facebook settled five lawsuits alleging that its advertising systems enabled discrimination in housing , credit and employment ads. For the social network, that's one major legal problem down, …

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Pilot program lowers blood pressure of migrant workers

A hypertension care pilot program is effective and sustainable in underserved communities of Haitian immigrants in the Dominican Republic, report researchers. High blood pressure affects an estimated 31 percent of the world’s population, disproportionately in low- and middle-income countries like the Dominican Republic. “Communities of migrant workers in the Dominican Republic have limited access

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I Gave Up and Let Instagram Shop for Me

The first product I ever bought directly from an internet ad was a pair of Nike VaporMax sneakers, which cost $200 and were a rosy shade often referred to as “Millennial pink.” The shoes appeared while I was tapping through my friends’ Instagram Stories, and it was a sales pitch so perfect for me, a Millennial sneaker fanatic, that I felt concerned about how well Nike and Instagram apparently kne

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How attention helps the brain perceive an object

The ability of the brain to ignore extraneous visual information is critical to how we work and function, but the processes governing perception and attention are not fully understood. Scientists have long theorized that attention to a particular object can alter perception by amplifying certain neuronal activity and suppressing the activity of other neurons (brain 'noise'). Now, Salk scientists h

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The Light Triad vs. Dark Triad of Personality

New research contrasts two very different profiles of human nature. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fireball Earth

Heads up! Our planet is under constant bombardment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Surprising astronomers, Bennu spits plumes of dust into space

Bennu spews dust from its rocky surface, which may be a new kind of asteroid activity.

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Wyatt Technology Launches All New Multi-Angle Light Scattering Instruments

Wyatt Technology, the world leader in instrumentation for absolute macromolecular and nanoparticle characterization, announces the launch of its next-generation multi-angle light scattering (MALS), refractive index and intrinsic viscosity instruments.

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Unscrambling the health effects of eggs

Health Are eggs good or bad for you? Here's what the latest research means. There is good reason to caution younger people about the risks of following the fad of high-protein diets that may include eating several eggs a day.

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The Guardian view on weather forecasts: we need the bigger picture | Editorial

Climate must not be confused with local conditions, but remodelled broadcasts could help people understand the dangers we face Still, and in defiance of decades worth of scientific evidence, vast numbers of people around the world refuse to accept that we are in the process of drastically altering the climate. Vast numbers more lack the information they need to interpret what is going on. This is

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Better Living Through Crispr: Growing Human Organs in Pigs

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Sleep problems during pregnancy affect glucose, may increase risk of childhood obesity

The study found that mild sleep apnea changed sugar levels during pregnancy and was connected to infant growth patterns related to increased risk of obesity.

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Eat mushrooms to keep your brain sharp?

Seniors who consume more than two standard portions of mushrooms weekly may have 50 percent reduced odds of having mild cognitive impairment (MCI), according to a new study. Researchers defined a portion as three quarters of a cup of cooked mushrooms with an average weight of around 150 grams. Two portions would be equivalent to approximately half a plate. While the portion sizes act as a guideli

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NASA Shocked by “Plumes Erupting From an Asteroid’s Surface”

Asteroid Plumes You probably think of asteroids as inert space rocks. But NASA just announced that one of its spacecrafts has made a surprise discovery: “particle plumes erupting” from the surface of a large asteroid called Bennu — and while details of the discovery are still hazy, it could suggest that some asteroids are far more dynamic and poorly understood than previously believed. Biggest Su

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Weird, wild gravity of asteroid Bennu

New research is revealing the Alice in Wonderland-like physics that govern gravity near the surface of the asteroid Bennu.

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Trigger warnings do little to reduce people's distress, research shows

Trigger warnings that alert people to potentially sensitive content are increasingly popular, especially on college campuses, but research suggests that they have minimal impact on how people actually respond to content.

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Think of the closest planet to Earth… Wrong! Think again!

Earth is the third planet from the Sun, so our closest neighbor must be planet two or four, right? Wrong! Neither Venus nor Mars is the right answer. Three scientists ran the numbers. In this YouTube video, one of them explains why our nearest neighbor is… Mercury! Did Musk pick the wrong planet to die on? By 2024, Elon Musk wants to land humans on Mars – the billionaire entrepreneur has said t

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Scientists laser-poke ‘bizarre’ brain cell droplets

Physicists are using innovative tools to study the properties of a bizarre class of molecules that may play a role in disease: proteins that cluster together to form spherical droplets inside human cells. Their latest research sheds light on the conditions that drive such droplets to switch from a fluid, liquidy state to a harder, gel-like state. Published in the journal Biomolecules , the study

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Norwegian aluminum producer hit by cyberattack

Norwegian aluminum producer Norsk Hydro says it has been a targeted by "an extensive cyberattack" through a ransomware virus impacting its key operations and disrupting its IT systems.

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Facebook to overhaul ad targeting to prevent discrimination

Facebook will overhaul its ad-targeting systems to prevent discrimination in housing , credit and employment ads as part of a legal settlement.

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Canada to assess Boeing 737 MAX airworthiness without US

Canada said Tuesday it will make its own assessment of Boeing's modifications to its 737 MAX airliners before allowing them to fly again in its airspace, after two crashes in less than five months.

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Google announces video game streaming service to let you play anywhere

Google announces a streaming service that will allow people to play video games in 4K in their browser — provided they have a good internet connection

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HP’s New Reverb VR Headset Bumps Up the Resolution

The price has swelled too. The Reverb bundle will cost between $599 and $649 when it ships in late April.

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Google aims to disrupt video games with streaming

Google on Tuesday set out to disrupt the world of video games with a Stadia platform aimed at putting its massive data center power in game maker's hands and letting people play blockbuster titles from any device they wish.

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Precision oncology insights revealed for colorectal cancer

Findings published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology could help define strategies to more effectively treat colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States.

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Former inmates need social supports to maintain mental health, Rutgers study says

Men released from prison who receive social, community and spiritual support have better mental health, according to a study by researchers at Rutgers School of Public Health.

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Ejecting flagella could help microbes save energy during nutrient depletion

In favorable conditions, many bacteria propel themselves to food sources and other sites of interest using whip-like molecular propellers known as flagella. However, according to new research published on March 19 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, by Josie Ferreira and colleagues of Imperial College London, members of the bacterial class Gammaproteobacteria eject their flagella when nutrien

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Fishing for fun, not food: Study takes stock of recreational fishing impacts

A new paper by an international team of researchers argues that decision-makers and fishing organizations must recognize the growing role of recreational fishing and the potential pressures it places on fish stocks.

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Starving bacteria can eject their tails to save energy and stay alive

When nutrients are dangerously low, a group of bacteria have been found to take the drastic measure of getting rid of their tails.

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Prescribing healthy food in Medicare/Medicaid is cost effective, could improve health

A team of researchers modeled the health and economic effects of healthy food prescriptions in Medicare and Medicaid. The study, published today in PLOS Medicine, finds that health insurance coverage to offset the cost of healthy food for Medicare and/or Medicaid participants would be highly cost effective after five years and improve health outcomes.

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Healthy food prescriptions could save lives and money

Healthy food prescriptions through Medicare and Medicaid could generate substantial health gains and be highly cost-effective, according to a study published March 19 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Yujin Lee and Dariush Mozaffarian of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, Massachusetts, United States and colleagues. As noted by the authors, the findi

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Control of hearing sensitivity by tectorial membrane calcium [Neuroscience]

When sound stimulates the stereocilia on the sensory cells in the hearing organ, Ca2+ ions flow through mechanically gated ion channels. This Ca2+ influx is thought to be important for ensuring that the mechanically gated channels operate within their most sensitive response region, setting the fraction of channels open at…

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Parkinson’s disease-linked D620N VPS35 knockin mice manifest tau neuropathology and dopaminergic neurodegeneration [Neuroscience]

Mutations in the vacuolar protein sorting 35 ortholog (VPS35) gene represent a cause of late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson’s disease (PD). A single missense mutation, D620N, is considered pathogenic based upon its segregation with disease in multiple families with PD. At present, the mechanism(s) by which familial VPS35 mutations precipitate…

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Lipid transporter TMEM24/C2CD2L is a Ca2+-regulated component of ER-plasma membrane contacts in mammalian neurons [Neuroscience]

Close appositions between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plasma membrane (PM) are a general feature of all cells and are abundant in neurons. A function of these appositions is lipid transport between the two adjacent bilayers via tethering proteins that also contain lipid transport modules. However, little is known…

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AAV cis-regulatory sequences are correlated with ocular toxicity [Neuroscience]

Adeno-associated viral vectors (AAVs) have become popular for gene therapy, given their many advantages, including their reduced inflammatory profile compared with that of other viruses. However, even in areas of immune privilege such as the eye, AAV vectors are capable of eliciting host-cell responses. To investigate the effects of such…

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Constitutive signaling activity of a receptor-associated protein links fertilization with embryonic patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana [Plant Biology]

In flowering plants, the asymmetrical division of the zygote is the first hallmark of apical-basal polarity of the embryo and is controlled by a MAP kinase pathway that includes the MAPKKK YODA (YDA). In Arabidopsis, YDA is activated by the membrane-associated pseudokinase SHORT SUSPENSOR (SSP) through an unusual parent-of-origin effect:…

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Task-driven visual exploration at the foveal scale [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Humans use saccades to inspect objects of interest with the foveola, the small region of the retina with highest acuity. This process of visual exploration is normally studied over large scenes. However, in everyday tasks, the stimulus within the foveola is complex, and the need for visual exploration may extend…

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Genomic and molecular characterization of preterm birth [Systems Biology]

Preterm birth (PTB) complications are the leading cause of long-term morbidity and mortality in children. By using whole blood samples, we integrated whole-genome sequencing (WGS), RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and DNA methylation data for 270 PTB and 521 control families. We analyzed this combined dataset to identify genomic variants associated with…

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Symbolic labeling in 5-month-old human infants [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Humans’ ability to create and manipulate symbolic structures far exceeds that of other animals. We hypothesized that this ability rests on an early capacity to use arbitrary signs to represent any mental representation, even as abstract as an algebraic rule. In three experiments, we collected high-density EEG recordings while 150…

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Correction for Shneiderman, Creativity and collaboration: Revisiting cybernetic serendipity [Correction]

COLLOQUIUM Correction for “Creativity and collaboration: Revisiting cybernetic serendipity,” by Ben Shneiderman, which was first published February 5, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1807200116 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 116:1837–1843). The author notes that, on page 1840, left column, second full paragraph, lines 4–5, Jeffrey Heer should have been included in the list of…

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Correction for Li et al., Mutational landscape of primary, metastatic, and recurrent ovarian cancer reveals c-MYC gains as potential target for BET inhibitors [Correction]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Mutational landscape of primary, metastatic, and recurrent ovarian cancer reveals c-MYC gains as potential target for BET inhibitors,” by Charles Li, Elena Bonazzoli, Stefania Bellone, Jungmin Choi, Weilai Dong, Gulden Menderes, Gary Altwerger, Chanhee Han, Aranzazu Manzano, Anna Bianchi, Francesca Pettinella, Paola Manara, Salvatore Lopez, Ghanshyam…

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Correction for Moore et al., Robust predictions of specialized metabolism genes through machine learning [Correction]

PLANT BIOLOGY Correction for “Robust predictions of specialized metabolism genes through machine learning,” by Bethany M. Moore, Peipei Wang, Pengxiang Fan, Bryan Leong, Craig A. Schenck, John P. Lloyd, Melissa D. Lehti-Shiu, Robert L. Last, Eran Pichersky, and Shin-Han Shiu, which was first published February 5, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1817074116 (Proc Natl…

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Correction to Supporting Information for Townsend et al., Dietary sugar silences a colonization factor in a mammalian gut symbiont [SI Correction]

MICROBIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for “Dietary sugar silences a colonization factor in a mammalian gut symbiont,” by Guy E. Townsend II, Weiwei Han, Nathan D. Schwalm III, Varsha Raghavan, Natasha A. Barry, Andrew L. Goodman, and Eduardo A. Groisman, which was first published December 17, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1813780115 (Proc Natl…

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Blue whale memory and migration Blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) migrates in the California current. Image courtesy of Jeremy A. Goldbogen (Stanford University, Stanford, CA) and the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab. Many migrant species track waves of high-quality food resources across landscapes. Although there is extensive research on…

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Discussion of forest definitions and tree cover estimates for Haiti [Biological Sciences]

In PNAS, Hedges et al. (1) estimate that only 0.32% of “primary forest” cover of Haiti remains. They argue the situation is dire and predict that Haiti will have no remaining primary forest by 2035 (1). We highlight several assumptions in their forest definition parameters and subsequent national extrapolation that…

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Reply to Wampler et al.: Deforestation and biodiversity loss should not be sugarcoated [Biological Sciences]

We determined that Haiti has less than 1% of its original primary (virgin) forest and will likely lose it all in the next two decades at the current rate (1). We focused on primary forest because of its close connection with species survival (2). The letter by Wampler et al….

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Universal and robust assessment of circadian time? [Biological Sciences]

In PNAS, Braun et al. (1) describe the algorithm TimeSignature. We make the following observations. First, circadian time refers to the phase of internal biological clocks. Any algorithm assessing this should be validated against gold-standard markers of internal circadian phase. For example, the phase of the melatonin rhythm is considered…

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Reply to Laing et al.: Accurate prediction of circadian time across platforms [Biological Sciences]

TimeSignature’s power is that it is highly accurate across transcriptomic platforms and experimental protocols. TimeSignature can be trained using data from a single platform/study and be applied to independent data without additional processing. Demonstrating this robustness and generalizability required applying TimeSignature to as diverse a set of studies as possible…

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Polariton chemistry: Thinking inside the (photon) box [Physics]

The study of single quantum objects embedded in confined electromagnetic environments is the main focus of the field of cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED). According to a recent historical account by the 2012 Nobel laureate Sergei Haroche (1), the origins of this field can be traced back to the early days…

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Migrating whales depend on memory to exploit reliable resources [Ecology]

Animal migrations, which can span hundreds to thousands of kilometers and require journeys lasting weeks to months, are fascinating biological phenomena. Across systems and species, key questions focus on the behavioral mechanisms that facilitate successful migrations. Perception, information sharing among individuals, and various forms of memory separate migration from other…

2h

In a globally warming world, insects act locally to manipulate their own microclimate [Ecology]

A key challenge, as CO2 accumulates and Earth warms, is to predict the responses of ecological systems—the suite of interacting populations embedded in the abiotic arena of temperature, moisture, and biogeochemistry. Thermal performance theory (1–3) has come to the fore as a powerful approach toward understanding such biotic change. Thermal…

2h

Temperature- and rigidity-mediated rapid transport of lipid nanovesicles in hydrogels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Lipid nanovesicles are widely present as transport vehicles in living organisms and can serve as efficient drug delivery vectors. It is known that the size and surface charge of nanovesicles can affect their diffusion behaviors in biological hydrogels such as mucus. However, how temperature effects, including those of both ambient…

2h

Encoding biological recognition in a bicomponent cell-membrane mimic [Chemistry]

Self-assembling dendrimers have facilitated the discovery of periodic and quasiperiodic arrays of supramolecular architectures and the diverse functions derived from them. Examples are liquid quasicrystals and their approximants plus helical columns and spheres, including some that disregard chirality. The same periodic and quasiperiodic arrays were subsequently found in block copolymers,…

2h

Interactive programming paradigm for real-time experimentation with remote living matter [Engineering]

Recent advancements in life-science instrumentation and automation enable entirely new modes of human interaction with microbiological processes and corresponding applications for science and education through biology cloud laboratories. A critical barrier for remote and on-site life-science experimentation (for both experts and nonexperts alike) is the absence of suitable abstractions and…

2h

Assessment of extreme heat and hospitalizations to inform early warning systems [Environmental Sciences]

Heat early warning systems and action plans use temperature thresholds to trigger warnings and risk communication. In this study, we conduct multistate analyses, exploring associations between heat and all-cause and cause-specific hospitalizations, to inform the design and development of heat–health early warning systems. We used a two-stage analysis to estimate…

2h

Almost partition identities [Mathematics]

An almost partition identity is an identity for partition numbers that is true asymptotically 100% of the time and fails infinitely often. We prove a kind of almost partition identity, namely that the number of parts in all self-conjugate partitions of n is almost always equal to the number of…

2h

Assembling responsive microgels at responsive lipid membranes [Physics]

Directed colloidal self-assembly at fluid interfaces can have a large impact in the fields of nanotechnology, materials, and biomedical sciences. The ability to control interfacial self-assembly relies on the fine interplay between bulk and surface interactions. Here, we investigate the interfacial assembly of thermoresponsive microgels and lipogels at the surface…

2h

Optimal errors and phase transitions in high-dimensional generalized linear models [Statistics]

Generalized linear models (GLMs) are used in high-dimensional machine learning, statistics, communications, and signal processing. In this paper we analyze GLMs when the data matrix is random, as relevant in problems such as compressed sensing, error-correcting codes, or benchmark models in neural networks. We evaluate the mutual information (or “free…

2h

Advantaged socioeconomic conditions in childhood are associated with higher cognitive functioning but stronger cognitive decline in older age [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Cognitive aging is characterized by large heterogeneity, which may be due to variations in childhood socioeconomic conditions (CSC). Although there is substantial evidence for an effect of CSC on levels of cognitive functioning at older age, results on associations with cognitive decline are mixed. We examined by means of an…

2h

Stepwise 5' DNA end-specific resection of DNA breaks by the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2 nuclease ensemble [Biochemistry]

To repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination, the 5′-terminated DNA strands must first be resected to produce 3′ overhangs. Mre11 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a 3′ → 5′ exonuclease that is responsible for 5′ end degradation in vivo. Using plasmid-length DNA substrates and purified recombinant proteins, we show that…

2h

Interleukin-37 monomer is the active form for reducing innate immunity [Biochemistry]

Interleukin-37 (IL-37), a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines, is a fundamental suppressor of innate and acquired immunities. Here, we used an integrative approach that combines biophysical, biochemical, and biological studies to elucidate the unique characteristics of IL-37. Our studies reveal that single amino acid mutations at the IL-37…

2h

Domain topology, stability, and translation speed determine mechanical force generation on the ribosome [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The concomitant folding of a nascent protein domain with its synthesis can generate mechanical forces that act on the ribosome and alter translation speed. Such changes in speed can affect the structure and function of the newly synthesized protein as well as cellular phenotype. The domain properties that govern force…

2h

Spastin is a dual-function enzyme that severs microtubules and promotes their regrowth to increase the number and mass of microtubules [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The remodeling of the microtubule cytoskeleton underlies dynamic cellular processes, such as mitosis, ciliogenesis, and neuronal morphogenesis. An important class of microtubule remodelers comprises the severases—spastin, katanin, and fidgetin—which cut microtubules into shorter fragments. While severing activity might be expected to break down the microtubule cytoskeleton, inhibiting these enzyme

2h

Evolutionarily informed deep learning methods for predicting relative transcript abundance from DNA sequence [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Deep learning methodologies have revolutionized prediction in many fields and show potential to do the same in molecular biology and genetics. However, applying these methods in their current forms ignores evolutionary dependencies within biological systems and can result in false positives and spurious conclusions. We developed two approaches that account…

2h

Motional dynamics of single Patched1 molecules in cilia are controlled by Hedgehog and cholesterol [Cell Biology]

The Hedgehog-signaling pathway is an important target in cancer research and regenerative medicine; yet, on the cellular level, many steps are still poorly understood. Extensive studies of the bulk behavior of the key proteins in the pathway established that during signal transduction they dynamically localize in primary cilia, antenna-like solitary…

2h

Narrow safety margin in the phyllosphere during thermal extremes [Ecology]

The thermal limit of ectotherms provides an estimate of vulnerability to climate change. It differs between contrasting microhabitats, consistent with thermal ecology predictions that a species’ temperature sensitivity matches the microclimate it experiences. However, observed thermal limits may differ between ectotherms from the same environment, challenging this theory. We resolved…

2h

Oxytocin/vasopressin-like peptide inotocin regulates cuticular hydrocarbon synthesis and water balancing in ants [Ecology]

Oxytocin/vasopressin-like peptides are important regulators of physiology and social behavior in vertebrates. However, the function of inotocin, the homologous peptide in arthropods, remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the level of expression of inotocin and inotocin receptor are correlated with task allocation in the ant Camponotus fellah. Both genes…

2h

Environment-dependent fitness gains can be driven by horizontal gene transfer of transporter-encoding genes [Evolution]

Many microbes acquire metabolites in a “feeding” process where complex polymers are broken down in the environment to their subunits. The subsequent uptake of soluble metabolites by a cell, sometimes called osmotrophy, is facilitated by transporter proteins. As such, the diversification of osmotrophic microorganisms is closely tied to the diversification…

2h

Weevil pgrp-lb prevents endosymbiont TCT dissemination and chronic host systemic immune activation [Evolution]

Long-term intracellular symbiosis (or endosymbiosis) is widely distributed across invertebrates and is recognized as a major driving force in evolution. However, the maintenance of immune homeostasis in organisms chronically infected with mutualistic bacteria is a challenging task, and little is known about the molecular processes that limit endosymbiont immunogenicity and…

2h

Regulatory changes in pterin and carotenoid genes underlie balanced color polymorphisms in the wall lizard [Evolution]

Reptiles use pterin and carotenoid pigments to produce yellow, orange, and red colors. These conspicuous colors serve a diversity of signaling functions, but their molecular basis remains unresolved. Here, we show that the genomes of sympatric color morphs of the European common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis), which differ in orange…

2h

The genetic architecture of teosinte catalyzed and constrained maize domestication [Evolution]

The process of evolution under domestication has been studied using phylogenetics, population genetics–genomics, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, gene expression assays, and archaeology. Here, we apply an evolutionary quantitative genetic approach to understand the constraints imposed by the genetic architecture of trait variation in teosinte, the wild ancestor of maize,…

2h

Chloroplast competition is controlled by lipid biosynthesis in evening primroses [Genetics]

In most eukaryotes, organellar genomes are transmitted preferentially by the mother, but molecular mechanisms and evolutionary forces underlying this fundamental biological principle are far from understood. It is believed that biparental inheritance promotes competition between the cytoplasmic organelles and allows the spread of so-called selfish cytoplasmic elements. Those can be,…

2h

TIM-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 release is antagonized by Nef but potentiated by SERINC proteins [Microbiology]

The T cell Ig and mucin domain (TIM) proteins inhibit release of HIV-1 and other enveloped viruses by interacting with cell- and virion-associated phosphatidylserine (PS). Here, we show that the Nef proteins of HIV-1 and other lentiviruses antagonize TIM-mediated restriction. TIM-1 more potently inhibits the release of Nef-deficient relative to…

2h

MicroRNA-186-5p controls GluA2 surface expression and synaptic scaling in hippocampal neurons [Neuroscience]

Homeostatic synaptic scaling is a negative feedback response to fluctuations in synaptic strength induced by developmental or learning-related processes, which maintains neuronal activity stable. Although several components of the synaptic scaling apparatus have been characterized, the intrinsic regulatory mechanisms promoting scaling remain largely unknown. MicroRNAs may contribute to posttranscr

2h

Long-term population spike-timing-dependent plasticity promotes synaptic tagging but not cross-tagging in rat hippocampal area CA1 [Neuroscience]

In spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), the direction and degree of synaptic modification are determined by the coherence of pre- and postsynaptic activities within a neuron. However, in the adult rat hippocampus, it remains unclear whether STDP-like mechanisms in a neuronal population induce synaptic potentiation of a long duration. Thus, we asked…

2h

Transcranial alternating current stimulation entrains single-neuron activity in the primate brain [Neuroscience]

Spike timing is thought to play a critical role in neural computation and communication. Methods for adjusting spike timing are therefore of great interest to researchers and clinicians alike. Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) is a noninvasive technique that uses weak electric fields to manipulate brain activity. Early results have suggested…

2h

Role of economics in analyzing the environment and sustainable development [Introductions]

The environmental sciences have documented large and worrisome changes in earth systems, from climate change and loss of biodiversity, to changes in hydrological and nutrient cycles and depletion of natural resources (1–12). These global environmental changes have potentially large negative consequences for future human well-being, and raise questions about whether…

2h

Fecal stanols show simultaneous flooding and seasonal precipitation change correlate with Cahokia’s population decline [Anthropology]

A number of competing hypotheses, including hydroclimatic variations, environmental degradation and disturbance, and sociopolitical disintegration, have emerged to explain the dissolution of Cahokia, the largest prehistoric population center in the United States. Because it is likely that Cahokia’s decline was precipitated by multiple factors, some environmental and some societal, a…

2h

Formylglycine-generating enzyme binds substrate directly at a mononuclear Cu(I) center to initiate O2 activation [Biochemistry]

The formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) is required for the posttranslational activation of type I sulfatases by oxidation of an active-site cysteine to Cα-formylglycine. FGE has emerged as an enabling biotechnology tool due to the robust utility of the aldehyde product as a bioconjugation handle in recombinant proteins. Here, we show that…

2h

HDAC11 regulates type I interferon signaling through defatty-acylation of SHMT2 [Biochemistry]

The smallest histone deacetylase (HDAC) and the only class IV HDAC member, HDAC11, is reported to regulate immune activation and tumorigenesis, yet its biochemical function is largely unknown. Here we identify HDAC11 as an efficient lysine defatty-acylase that is >10,000-fold more efficient than its deacetylase activity. Through proteomics studies, we…

2h

Cryo-electron microscopy structure of the filamentous bacteriophage IKe [Biochemistry]

The filamentous bacteriophage IKe infects Escherichia coli cells bearing IncN pili. We report the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the micrometer-long IKe viral particle at a resolution of 3.4 Å. The major coat protein [protein 8 (p8)] consists of 47 residues that fold into a ∼68-Å-long helix. An atomic model of…

2h

Genome mining and biosynthesis of a polyketide from a biofertilizer fungus that can facilitate reductive iron assimilation in plant [Biochemistry]

Fungi have the potential to produce a large repertoire of bioactive molecules, many of which can affect the growth and development of plants. Genomic survey of sequenced biofertilizer fungi showed many secondary metabolite gene clusters are anchored by iterative polyketide synthases (IPKSs), which are multidomain enzymes noted for generating diverse…

2h

Fast pressure-jump all-atom simulations and experiments reveal site-specific protein dehydration-folding dynamics [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

As theory and experiment have shown, protein dehydration is a major contributor to protein folding. Dehydration upon folding can be characterized directly by all-atom simulations of fast pressure drops, which create desolvated pockets inside the nascent hydrophobic core. Here, we study pressure-drop refolding of three λ-repressor fragment (λ6–85) mutants computationally…

2h

COX-2 mediates tumor-stromal prolactin signaling to initiate tumorigenesis [Cell Biology]

Tumor-stromal communication within the microenvironment contributes to initiation of metastasis and may present a therapeutic opportunity. Using serial single-cell RNA sequencing in an orthotopic mouse prostate cancer model, we find up-regulation of prolactin receptor as cancer cells that have disseminated to the lungs expand into micrometastases. Secretion of the ligand…

2h

Double-negative T cells remarkably promote neuroinflammation after ischemic stroke [Cell Biology]

CD3+CD4−CD8− T cells (double-negative T cells; DNTs) have diverse functions in peripheral immune-related diseases by regulating immunological and inflammatory homeostasis. However, the functions of DNTs in the central nervous system remain unknown. Here, we found that the levels of DNTs were dramatically increased in both the brain and peripheral blood…

2h

Infection by the parasitic helminth Trichinella spiralis activates a Tas2r-mediated signaling pathway in intestinal tuft cells [Cell Biology]

The parasitic helminth Trichinella spiralis, which poses a serious health risk to animals and humans, can be found worldwide. Recent findings indicate that a rare type of gut epithelial cell, tuft cells, can detect the helminth, triggering type 2 immune responses. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be fully…

2h

Femtosecond covariance spectroscopy [Chemistry]

The success of nonlinear optics relies largely on pulse-to-pulse consistency. In contrast, covariance-based techniques used in photoionization electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry have shown that a wealth of information can be extracted from noise that is lost when averaging multiple measurements. Here, we apply covariance-based detection to nonlinear optical spectroscopy,…

2h

Environmental control programs the emergence of distinct functional ensembles from unconstrained chemical reactions [Chemistry]

Many approaches to the origin of life focus on how the molecules found in biology might be made in the absence of biological processes, from the simplest plausible starting materials. Another approach could be to view the emergence of the chemistry of biology as process whereby the environment effectively directs…

2h

Theory of mechanochemical patterning in biphasic biological tissues [Developmental Biology]

The formation of self-organized patterns is key to the morphogenesis of multicellular organisms, although a comprehensive theory of biological pattern formation is still lacking. Here, we propose a minimal model combining tissue mechanics with morphogen turnover and transport to explore routes to patterning. Our active description couples morphogen reaction and…

2h

Statistics of noisy growth with mechanical feedback in elastic tissues [Developmental Biology]

Tissue growth is a fundamental aspect of development and is intrinsically noisy. Stochasticity has important implications for morphogenesis, precise control of organ size, and regulation of tissue composition and heterogeneity. However, the basic statistical properties of growing tissues, particularly when growth induces mechanical stresses that can in turn affect growth…

2h

Neural crest-derived neurons invade the ovary but not the testis during mouse gonad development [Developmental Biology]

Testes and ovaries undergo sex-specific morphogenetic changes and adopt strikingly different morphologies, despite the fact that both arise from a common precursor, the bipotential gonad. Previous studies showed that recruitment of vasculature is critical for testis patterning. However, vasculature is not recruited into the early ovary. Peripheral innervation is involved…

2h

Seedling traits predict drought-induced mortality linked to diversity loss [Ecology]

Trait-based approaches are increasingly used to predict ecological consequences of climate change, yet seldom have solid links been established between plant traits and observed climate-driven community changes. Most analyses have focused on aboveground adult plant traits, but in warming and drying climates, root traits may be critical, and seedlings may…

2h

Memory and resource tracking drive blue whale migrations [Ecology]

In terrestrial systems, the green wave hypothesis posits that migrating animals can enhance foraging opportunities by tracking phenological variation in high-quality forage across space (i.e., “resource waves”). To track resource waves, animals may rely on proximate cues and/or memory of long-term average phenologies. Although there is growing evidence of resource…

2h

Short-term impact of PM2.5 on contemporaneous asthma medication use: Behavior and the value of pollution reductions [Colloquium Paper]

Asthma ranks among the most costly of chronic diseases, accounting for over $50 billion annually in direct medical expenditures in the United States. At the same time, evidence has accumulated that fine particulate matter pollution can exacerbate asthma symptoms and generate substantial economic costs. To measure these costs, we use…

2h

The low but uncertain measured benefits of US water quality policy [Colloquium Paper]

US investment to decrease pollution in rivers, lakes, and other surface waters has exceeded $1.9 trillion since 1960, and has also exceeded the cost of most other US environmental initiatives. These investments come both from the 1972 Clean Water Act and the largely voluntary efforts to control pollution from agriculture…

2h

On the use of group performance and rights for environmental protection and resource management [Colloquium Paper]

Environmental and natural resource (ENR) policies that focus on group outcomes are common but have received relatively less attention from economists than policies based on individual behavior. Existing research tends to focus on particular contexts, such as water or air quality, fisheries, or land use. This paper discusses unifying themes…

2h

Testing for crowd out in social nudges: Evidence from a natural field experiment in the market for electricity [Colloquium Paper]

This study considers the response of household electricity consumption to social nudges during peak load events. Our investigation considers two social nudges. The first targets conservation during peak load events, while the second promotes aggregate conservation. Using data from a natural field experiment with 42,100 households, we find that both…

2h

Sustaining cooperation through self-sorting: The good, the bad, and the conditional [Colloquium Paper]

In four public-good game experiments, we study self-sorting as a means to facilitate cooperation in groups. When individuals can choose to join groups precommitted to charity, such groups sustain cooperation toward the group’s local public good. By eliciting subjects’ conditional contribution profiles, we find that subjects who prefer the charity…

2h

Self-selection into payments for ecosystem services programs [Colloquium Paper]

Designers and funders of payments for ecosystem services (PES) programs have long worried that payments flow to landholders who would have conserved forests even without the program, undermining the environmental benefits (“additionality”) and cost-effectiveness of PES. If landholders self-select into PES programs based on how much conservation they were going…

2h

Private provision of public goods by environmental groups [Colloquium Paper]

Many environmental nonprofit groups are assumed to provide public goods. While an extensive literature examines why donors join and give to nonprofits, none directly tests whether donations actually provide public goods. We seek such a test by using a common form of environmental organization: watershed groups. We find their increased…

2h

Time-dependent manufacturing processes lead to a new class of inverse problems [Engineering]

The control of time-dependent, energy beam manufacturing processes has been achieved in the past through trial-and-error approaches. We identify key research gaps and generic challenges related to inverse problems for these processes that require a multidisciplinary problem-solving approach to tackle them. The generic problems that we identify have a wide…

2h

Renal reabsorption in 3D vascularized proximal tubule models [Engineering]

Three-dimensional renal tissues that emulate the cellular composition, geometry, and function of native kidney tissue would enable fundamental studies of filtration and reabsorption. Here, we have created 3D vascularized proximal tubule models composed of adjacent conduits that are lined with confluent epithelium and endothelium, embedded in a permeable ECM, and…

2h

Physical immobilization of particles inspired by pollination [Engineering]

Biomimetic systems often exhibit striking designs well adapted to specific functions that have been inspiring the development of new technologies. Herein, we explored the remarkable ability of honey bees to catch and release large quantities of pollen grains. Hair spacing and height on bees are crucial for their ability to…

2h

Jet stream dynamics, hydroclimate, and fire in California from 1600 CE to present [Environmental Sciences]

Moisture delivery in California is largely regulated by the strength and position of the North Pacific jet stream (NPJ), winter high-altitude winds that influence regional hydroclimate and forest fire during the following warm season. We use climate model simulations and paleoclimate data to reconstruct winter NPJ characteristics back to 1571…

2h

Environmental catastrophes and mitigation policies in a multiregion world [Colloquium Paper]

In this paper we present a simple model for assessing the willingness to pay for reductions in the risk associated with catastrophic climate change. The model is extremely tractable and applies to a multiregion world but with global externalities and has five key features: (i) Neither the occurrence nor the…

2h

Localized prosocial preferences, public goods, and common-pool resources [Colloquium Paper]

The presence of prosocial preferences is thought to reduce significantly the difficulty of solving societal collective action problems such as providing public goods (or reducing public bads). However, prosociality is often limited to members of an in-group. We present a general theoretical model where society is split into subgroups and…

2h

The blue paradox: Preemptive overfishing in marine reserves [Colloquium Paper]

Most large-scale conservation policies are anticipated or announced in advance. This risks the possibility of preemptive resource extraction before the conservation intervention goes into force. We use a high-resolution dataset of satellite-based fishing activity to show that anticipation of an impending no-take marine reserve undermines the policy by triggering an…

2h

Evolution of nitric oxide regulation of gut function [Evolution]

Although morphologies are diverse, the common pattern in bilaterians is for passage of food in the gut to be controlled by nerves and endodermally derived neuron-like cells. In vertebrates, nitric oxide (NO) derived from enteric nerves controls relaxation of the pyloric sphincter. Here, we show that in the larvae of…

2h

Patterns of genome-wide allele-specific expression in hybrid rice and the implications on the genetic basis of heterosis [Genetics]

Utilization of heterosis has greatly increased the productivity of many crops worldwide. Although tremendous progress has been made in characterizing the genetic basis of heterosis using genomic technologies, molecular mechanisms underlying the genetic components are much less understood. Allele-specific expression (ASE), or imbalance between the expression levels of two parental…

2h

A SIR-independent role for cohesin in subtelomeric silencing and organization [Genetics]

Cohesin is a key determinant of chromosome architecture due to its DNA binding and tethering ability. Cohesin binds near centromeres and chromosome arms and also close to telomeres, but its role near telomeres remains elusive. In budding yeast, transcription within 20 kb of telomeres is repressed, in part by the…

2h

RIP1 kinase inhibitor halts the progression of an immune-induced demyelination disease at the stage of monocyte elevation [Immunology and Inflammation]

Demyelination in the central nervous system (CNS) underlies many human diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). We report here the findings of our study of the CNS demyelination process using immune-induced [experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)] and chemical-induced [cuprizone (CPZ)] mouse models of demyelination. We found that necroptosis, a receptor-interacting protein 3…

2h

Renal control of disease tolerance to malaria [Immunology and Inflammation]

Malaria, the disease caused by Plasmodium spp. infection, remains a major global cause of morbidity and mortality. Host protection from malaria relies on immune-driven resistance mechanisms that kill Plasmodium. However, these mechanisms are not sufficient per se to avoid the development of severe forms of disease. This is accomplished instead…

2h

MDA-7/IL-24 regulates the miRNA processing enzyme DICER through downregulation of MITF [Medical Sciences]

Melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24) is a multifunctional cytokine displaying broad-spectrum anticancer activity in vitro or in vivo in preclinical animal cancer models and in a phase 1/2 clinical trial in patients with advanced cancers. mda-7/IL-24 targets specific miRNAs, including miR-221 and miR-320, for down-regulation in a cancer-selective manner. We demons

2h

Human cytomegalovirus haplotype reconstruction reveals high diversity due to superinfection and evidence of within-host recombination [Microbiology]

Recent sequencing efforts have led to estimates of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome-wide intrahost diversity that rival those of persistent RNA viruses [Renzette N, Bhattacharjee B, Jensen JD, Gibson L, Kowalik TF (2011) PLoS Pathog 7:e1001344]. Here, we deep sequence HCMV genomes recovered from single and longitudinally collected blood samples from…

2h

NF-{kappa}B activation is a turn on for vaccinia virus phosphoprotein A49 to turn off NF-{kappa}B activation [Microbiology]

Vaccinia virus protein A49 inhibits NF-κB activation by molecular mimicry and has a motif near the N terminus that is conserved in IκBα, β-catenin, HIV Vpu, and some other proteins. This motif contains two serines, and for IκBα and β-catenin, phosphorylation of these serines enables recognition by the E3 ubiquitin…

2h

Activity-dependent visualization and control of neural circuits for courtship behavior in the fly Drosophila melanogaster [Neuroscience]

Males of Drosophila melanogaster exhibit stereotypic courtship behavior through which they assess potential mates by processing multimodal sensory information. Although previous studies revealed important neural circuits involved in this process, the full picture of circuits that participate in male courtship remains elusive. Here, we established a genetic tool to visualize…

2h

PERIOD-controlled deadenylation of the timeless transcript in the Drosophila circadian clock [Neuroscience]

The Drosophila circadian oscillator relies on a negative transcriptional feedback loop, in which the PERIOD (PER) and TIMELESS (TIM) proteins repress the expression of their own gene by inhibiting the activity of the CLOCK (CLK) and CYCLE (CYC) transcription factors. A series of posttranslational modifications contribute to the oscillations of…

2h

Identifying spinon excitations from dynamic structure factor of spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the Kagome lattice [Physics]

A spin-1/2 lattice Heisenberg Kagome antiferromagnet (KAFM) is a prototypical frustrated quantum magnet, which exhibits exotic quantum spin liquids that evade long-range magnetic order due to the interplay between quantum fluctuation and geometric frustration. So far, the main focus has remained on the ground-state properties; however, the theoretical consensus regarding…

2h

Large-scale analysis of test-retest reliabilities of self-regulation measures [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

The ability to regulate behavior in service of long-term goals is a widely studied psychological construct known as self-regulation. This wide interest is in part due to the putative relations between self-regulation and a range of real-world behaviors. Self-regulation is generally viewed as a trait, and individual differences are quantified…

2h

Opinion: Governing the recreational dimension of global fisheries [Sustainability Science]

Fisheries provide food. In industrialized nations, the overwhelming portion of seafood comes from a small number of commercial fishers and increasingly aquaculture (1). Fisheries also contribute to leisure and recreation. In developed nations, 1 in 10 people fishes for pleasure, amounting to at least 220 million recreational fishers worldwide (2,…

2h

Seeking natural capital projects: Forest fires, haze, and early-life exposure in Indonesia [Colloquium Paper]

Natural capital will be depleted rapidly and excessively if the long-term, offsite impacts of depletion are ignored. By examining the case of tropical forest burning, we illustrate such myopia: Pursuit of short-term economic gains results in air pollution that causes long-term, irreversible health impacts. We integrate longitudinal data on prenatal…

2h

Assessing ecological infrastructure investments [Colloquium Paper]

Conventional markets can underprovide ecosystem services. Deliberate creation of a market for ecosystem services [e.g., a payments for ecosystem services (PES) scheme] can close the gap. The new ecosystem service market alters behaviors and quantities of ecosystem service provided and reveals prices for the ecosystems service: a market-clearing equilibrium. Assessing…

2h

Knowledge infrastructure and safe operating spaces in social-ecological systems [Colloquium Paper]

Maintaining safe operating spaces for exploited natural systems in the face of uncertainty is a key sustainability challenge. This challenge can be viewed as a problem in which human society must navigate in a limited space of acceptable futures in which humans enjoy sufficient well-being and avoid crossing planetary boundaries….

2h

Effect of oil spills on infant mortality in Nigeria [Sustainability Science]

Oil spills can lead to irreversible environmental degradation and are a potential hazard to human health. We study how onshore oil spills affect neonatal and infant mortality by combining spatial data from the Nigerian Oil Spill Monitor with Demographic and Health Surveys. To identify a causal effect, we compare siblings…

2h

Causal inference in coupled human and natural systems [Colloquium Paper]

Coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) are complex, dynamic, interconnected systems with feedback across social and environmental dimensions. This feedback leads to formidable challenges for causal inference. Two significant challenges involve assumptions about excludability and the absence of interference. These two assumptions have been largely unexplored in the CHANS literature,…

2h

Woolly star plants need catastrophes to live

The endangered Santa Ana Woolly Star depends on catastrophic floods. Thanks to a huge dam, natural floods are now nonexistent in its home turf. Researchers use different soil treatments mimicking flood effects in its preferred habitat, exploring the effectiveness of each towards plant survival.

2h

Natural selection favors cheaters

Natural selection predicts that mutualisms — interactions between members of different species that benefit both parties — should fall apart. Individuals that gain from the cooperation of others but do not reciprocate (so-called cheaters) should arise and destabilize mutualisms. Yet to date, surprisingly little evidence of such cheating or destabilization exists. A team of biologists has now fou

2h

Water-bearing minerals on asteroid Bennu

Astronomers have discovered evidence of abundant water-bearing minerals on the surface of the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu. Using early spectral data from NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft orbiting the asteroid, the team identified infrared properties similar to those in a type of meteorite called carbonaceous chondrites.

2h

10 novels that brilliantly capture the American experience

Literature expands our ability to feel empathy and inspires compassion. These 10 novels tackle some facet of the American experience. The list includes a fictional retelling of the first Native American to graduate from Harvard, and hiding out in inner-city Newark. We call it "getting lost" in a novel, but what we find there is often more impactful than any nonfiction work can offer. Literature m

2h

Aspiring Doctors Seek Advanced Training In Addiction Medicine

Once a tiny specialty that drew mostly psychiatrists, addiction medicine is expanding its accredited training to include primary care residents and "social justice warriors" who see it as a calling. (Image credit: Jackie Hai/KJZZ)

2h

Nvidia Enables Ray Tracing on GPUs It Claims Can’t Ray Trace Effectively

Nvidia is bringing ray tracing support to GPUs it claims aren't powerful enough to run it properly, seemingly to get you to upgrade to a GPU that can. The post Nvidia Enables Ray Tracing on GPUs It Claims Can’t Ray Trace Effectively appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

Incredible Photos Capture Last Glimpse of Long-Tusked 'Elephant Queen'

An elephant matriarch in Kenya was an impressive sight to the very end.

2h

OSIRIS-REx spies on the weird, wild gravity of an asteroid

Research led by the University of Colorado Boulder is revealing the Alice in Wonderland-like physics that govern gravity near the surface of the asteroid Bennu.

2h

How hot spots of genetic variation evolved in human DNA

What makes one person different from one another, and how did these differences evolve?

2h

Nature hits rewind: Research predicts what makes evolution go backwards

The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature.

2h

Underwater surveys in Emerald Bay reveal the nature and activity of Lake Tahoe faults

Emerald Bay, California, a beautiful location on the southwestern shore of Lake Tahoe, is surrounded by rugged landscape, including rocky cliffs and remnants of mountain glaciers. Scenic as it may be, the area is also a complex structural puzzle. Understanding the history of fault movement in the Lake Tahoe basin is important to assessing earthquake hazards for regional policy planners.

2h

How hot spots of genetic variation evolved in human DNA

What makes one person different from one another, and how did these differences evolve?

2h

Nature hits rewind: Research predicts what makes evolution go backwards

The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature.

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Fishing for fun, not food: Study takes stock of recreational fishing impacts

The vast majority of people who fish in the world do so for pleasure, not food. Yet despite the substantial impacts these fishers have on fish populations and aquatic ecosystems worldwide, fishery management approaches still focus on the production of protein rather than quality leisure.

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Toyota is Selling a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Car for $50,000

Clean Cars In Japan, Toyota is taking an unconventional approach to reducing vehicle emissions. Rather than focusing on plug-in electric vehicles, the automaker is manufacturing a hydrogen fuel cell-powered car that the company is calling the Mirai, according to NPR — and with $20,000 worth of government subsidies, it costs just $50,000. That’s a little more expensive than a conventional car, but

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With Google Stadia, Gaming Dreams Head For the Cloud

The company this morning introduced Stadia, its new vision for anywhere, any-device gaming.

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Fishing for fun, not food: Study takes stock of recreational fishing impacts

The vast majority of people who fish in the world do so for pleasure, not food. Yet despite the substantial impacts these fishers have on fish populations and aquatic ecosystems worldwide, fishery management approaches still focus on the production of protein rather than quality leisure.

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Team identifies water-bearing minerals on asteroid Bennu

A Southwest Research Institute-led team discovered evidence of abundant water-bearing minerals on the surface of the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu. Using early spectral data from NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft orbiting the asteroid, the team identified infrared properties similar to those in a type of meteorite called carbonaceous chondrites.

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How destroying a tumor promoter could lead to new cancer treatments

Mutated p53 tumor suppressor protein is a key driver of most cancers. Now, scientists have identified its mechanism of stability and how to disrupt it.

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Asteroid Bennu is spewing out dust and rocks to create its own moons

NASA’s OSIRIS-REx has found that Bennu is an active asteroid and is also covered in large rocks that will make grabbing a sample more difficult

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Nature hits rewind

The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature.Instead, new research by McMaster behavioural scientists shows that in certain cases evolution works in the opposite direction, reversing individual improvements to benefit related members of the same group.

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OSIRIS-REx spies on the weird, wild gravity of an asteroid

Research led by the University of Colorado Boulder is revealing the Alice in Wonderland-like physics that govern gravity near the surface of the asteroid Bennu.

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How hot spots of genetic variation evolved in human DNA

New research investigates hot spots of genetic variation within the human genome, examining the sections of our DNA that are most likely to differ significantly from one person to another.

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Trigger warnings do little to reduce people's distress, research shows

Trigger warnings that alert people to potentially sensitive content are increasingly popular, especially on college campuses, but research suggests that they have minimal impact on how people actually respond to content. The findings are published in Clinical Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

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Underwater surveys in Emerald Bay reveal the nature and activity of Lake Tahoe faults

Emerald Bay, Calif., a beautiful location on the southwestern shore of Lake Tahoe, is surrounded by rugged landscape, including rocky cliffs and remnants of mountain glaciers. Scenic as it may be, the area is also a complex structural puzzle. Understanding the history of fault movement in the Lake Tahoe basin is important to assessing earthquake hazards for regional policy planners.

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SwRI-led team identifies water-bearing minerals on asteroid Bennu

A Southwest Research Institute-led team discovered evidence of abundant water-bearing minerals on the surface of the near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu. Using early spectral data from NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft orbiting the asteroid, the team identified infrared properties similar to those in a type of meteorite called carbonaceous chondrites.

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Starving bacteria can eject their tails to save energy and stay alive

When nutrients are dangerously low, a group of bacteria have been found to take the drastic measure of getting rid of their tails.

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OSIRIS-REx reveals asteroid Bennu has big surprises

A NASA spacecraft that will return a sample of a near-Earth asteroid named Bennu to Earth in 2023 made the first-ever close-up observations of particle plumes erupting from an asteroid's surface. Bennu also revealed itself to be more rugged than expected, challenging the mission team to alter its flight and sample collection plans, due to the rough terrain.

3h

The Deeper Education Issue Under the College Bribery Scandal

There’s a vast pool of talent out there. But they need access to courses that suit their learning style and schedules, according to Sebastian Thrun.

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Google Stadia can use AI to change a game's art in real-time

Google's Stadia game streaming service isn't just using the cloud to make games playable anywhere — it's also using the technology for some clever artistic tricks. …

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Starving bacteria can eject their tails to save energy and stay alive

When nutrients are dangerously low, a group of bacteria have been found to take the drastic measure of getting rid of their tails.

3h

The Science of Innovation

Lessons from the physics of complexity can help organizations achieve breakthroughs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Science of Innovation

Lessons from the physics of complexity can help organizations achieve breakthroughs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study finds natural selection favors cheaters

Mutualisms, which are interactions between members of different species that benefit both parties, are found everywhere—from exchanges between pollinators and the plants they pollinate, to symbiotic interactions between us and our beneficial microbes.

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Woolly stars need catastrophes to live

A small, crunchy, spiny plant redefines toughness as it thrives on catastrophic flooding. The endangered Santa Ana Woolly Star does not just prosper with floods, though; it depends on them. Thanks to a huge dam, natural floods are now nonexistent in its home turf.

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Study finds natural selection favors cheaters

Mutualisms, which are interactions between members of different species that benefit both parties, are found everywhere—from exchanges between pollinators and the plants they pollinate, to symbiotic interactions between us and our beneficial microbes.

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Woolly stars need catastrophes to live

A small, crunchy, spiny plant redefines toughness as it thrives on catastrophic flooding. The endangered Santa Ana Woolly Star does not just prosper with floods, though; it depends on them. Thanks to a huge dam, natural floods are now nonexistent in its home turf.

3h

Sex, Empathy, Jealousy: How Emotions And Behavior Of Other Primates Mirror Our Own

Primatologist Frans de Waal believes that the way humans experience emotion is not unique: "That's a spectrum of behavior that we have, and the same thing is true for many other species." (Image credit: AFP/Getty Images)

3h

Manganese exposure can trigger Parkinson’s symptoms

A new study sheds light on the biological processes through which exposure to some metals can contribute to the onset of Parkinson’s-like symptoms. The study focuses on the metal manganese, which has a range of industrial uses as an alloy. Anumantha Kanthasamy, a professor in veterinary medicine and chair of neurotoxicology at Iowa State University, says the research details how manganese exposur

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Asteroid’s bumpiness threatens US plan to return a sample to Earth

Asteroid’s bumpiness threatens US plan to return a sample to Earth Asteroid’s bumpiness threatens US plan to return a sample to Earth, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00859-7 NASA mission finds asteroid Bennu littered with big boulders and spraying out particles.

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Fresh data deepen mystery of dark-matter signal

Fresh data deepen mystery of dark-matter signal Fresh data deepen mystery of dark-matter signal, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00865-9 Physicists at a detector in Italy have long claimed to see the Universe’s missing mass — but copycat experiments don’t yet see the same.

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Study finds natural selection favors cheaters

Natural selection predicts that mutualisms — interactions between members of different species that benefit both parties — should fall apart. Individuals that gain from the cooperation of others but do not reciprocate (so-called cheaters) should arise and destabilize mutualisms. Yet to date, surprisingly little evidence of such cheating or destabilization exists. A team of biologists at the Univ

3h

Woolly stars need catastrophes to live

The endangered Santa Ana woolly star depends on catastrophic floods. Thanks to a huge dam, natural floods are now nonexistent in its home turf. Researchers use different soil treatments mimicking flood effects in its preferred habitat, exploring the effectiveness of each towards plant survival.

3h

Hen harriers 'vanishing due to illegal killing' – study

Bird of prey 10 times more likely to die on English grouse moors than other habitats, data shows.

3h

Climate change making storms like Idai more severe, say experts

Destructive power of storms likely to increase in future as world warms up The climate crisis that is driving sea level rises and more extreme rainfall is making deadly storms like the one that hit southern Africa more severe, according to experts. Cyclone Idai, the tropical storm that ravaged Mozambique , Malawi and Zimbabwe, has been described as the worst weather-related disaster to hit the so

3h

Sensor created to detect dopamine, brain disorders, in seconds

Using nanotechnology, researchers have developed the first rapid detector for dopamine, a chemical that is believed to play a role in various diseases such as Parkinson's, depression and some cancers.

3h

The Rise of Killer Robots? AI in the American Military

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Astronomers find 'cannonball pulsar' speeding through space

VLA image shows the trail of a speeding pulsar pointing directly back at the center of the debris shell from the supernova that created it.

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Every hour 30 people are diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) in the European Region

New ECDC/WHO Tuberculosis surveillance data for Europe show that despite an overall decline in numbers of people suffering from TB, the disease remains a major public health challenge in the Region. Of the 275,000 new diagnoses and relapses, an estimated 77,000 people suffer from difficult-to-treat multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). The European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA) countries fa

3h

The rise and fall of Ziggy star formation and the rich dust from ancient stars

Researchers have detected a radio signal from abundant interstellar dust in MACS0416_Y1, a galaxy 13.2 billion light-years away in the constellation Eridanus. Standard models can't explain this much dust in a galaxy this young, forcing us to rethink the history of star formation. Researchers now think MACS0416_Y1 experienced staggered star formation with two intense starburst periods 300 million a

3h

Hayabusa2 probes asteroid Ryugu for secrets

The first data received from the Hayabusa2 spacecraft in orbit of asteroid Ryugu helps space scientists explore conditions in the early solar system. The space probe gathered vast amounts of images and other data which gives researchers clues about Ryugu's history, such as how it may have formed from a larger parent body. These details in turn allow researchers to better estimate quantities and ty

3h

Different bacteria use same cell surface molecule to invade tissue and promote infection

A new study identifies a single molecule as a key entry point used by two types of dangerous bacteria to break through cellular barriers and cause disease. The findings suggest that blocking the interaction between the molecule, known as CD40, and bacteria may represent a universal strategy for preventing life-threatening illnesses, including toxic shock syndrome.

3h

First Anatolian farmers were local hunter-gatherers that adopted agriculture

An international team has analyzed eight prehistoric individuals, including the first genome-wide data from a 15,000-year-old Anatolian hunter-gatherer, and found that the first Anatolian farmers were direct descendants of local hunter-gatherers. These findings provide support for archaeological evidence that farming was adopted and developed by local hunter-gatherers, rather than being introduced

3h

Sensor created to detect dopamine, brain disorders, in seconds

Using nanotechnology, researchers have developed the first rapid detector for dopamine, a chemical that is believed to play a role in various diseases such as Parkinson's, depression and some cancers.

3h

Gene-edited foods are safe, Japanese panel concludes

Recommendation opens door to plants and animals produced using CRISPR and similar techniques

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Asteroid Ryugu is so dry we may have to rethink how Earth got water

The first results from Japan’s Hayabusa-2 mission show that the asteroid Ryugu is surprisingly dry, which may have implications for how life began on Earth

3h

In Praise of Selfish NFL Players

The idea that NFL players might put themselves before their team is a scary proposition for the league. Because if the players really start understanding their own value, they just might get what they’re actually worth. The wide receiver Antonio Brown did. After months of friction with the Pittsburgh Steelers, where he was a key piece of the offense, and with the quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, B

3h

First Confirmed Piece of a Denisovan Skull Discovered

A chunk of a Denisovan skull has been identified for the first time — a dramatic contribution to the handful of known samples from one of the most obscure branches of the hominin family tree. Paleoanthropologist Bence Viola from the University of Toronto will discuss the as-yet-unpublished discovery at the upcoming meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists in Cleveland, Ohio,

3h

Two Russian Volcanoes Erupting in Tandem

The Kamchatka Peninsula in far eastern Russia is one of the most active volcanic areas on Earth. It isn't surprising to find multiple volcanoes erupting each week and this week is no exception. Two side-by-side volcanoes — Bezymianny and Sheveluch — were simultaneously erupting over the weekend (above). The eruption at Bezymianny was big enough to cause some air travel over the peninsula to chan

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Have microscope, will travel: New tech project links Madison, Boston scientists

An invention designed to transform how and where high-powered research microscopes are deployed—and who gets to use them—will make its way from Madison this spring to the fertile biology labs of greater Boston.

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Have microscope, will travel: New tech project links Madison, Boston scientists

An invention designed to transform how and where high-powered research microscopes are deployed—and who gets to use them—will make its way from Madison this spring to the fertile biology labs of greater Boston.

3h

Google Stadia is the company's new cloud-based video game platform. Here's what you need to know.

Gadgets Google is about to go hard in gaming. Google is making a big announcement at GDC in San Francisco.

3h

Daily briefing: Desperate plan to save Florida oranges with antibiotics

Daily briefing: Desperate plan to save Florida oranges with antibiotics Daily briefing: Desperate plan to save Florida oranges with antibiotics, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00946-9 Thin evidence for the safety or efficacy of spraying hundreds of thousands of kilograms of antibiotics. Plus: a soap-bubble pioneer wins the Abel Prize and proposed budget cuts at the NSF.

3h

The unexpected surface of asteroid (101955) Bennu

The unexpected surface of asteroid (101955) Bennu The unexpected surface of asteroid (101955) Bennu, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1033-6 Observations of asteroid (101955) Bennu with NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft reveal an unexpected surficial diversity that poses a challenge to the success of the sample-return mission.

3h

Discovery of a crucial immune reaction when solid food is introduced that prevents inflammatory disorders

In newborn infants, gut microbiota is first conditioned by breast milk components. When solid food is introduced, gut microbiota develops and bacteria proliferate. Scientists have discovered that a key immune response is generated in mice when solid food is introduced and microbiota expands. But, above all, they have shown that this immune reaction is essential as it is involved in educating the i

3h

Initial results from Hayabusa2's visit to the Ryugu asteroid, shaped like a 'spinning top'

A trio of papers in this issue presents the initial results from the Japanese Hayabusa2 mission to the near-Earth carbonaceous asteroid Ryugu.

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Hayabusa2 probes asteroid for secrets

The first data received from the Hayabusa2 spacecraft in orbit of asteroid Ryugu helps space scientists explore conditions in the early solar system. The space probe gathered vast amounts of images and other data which gives researchers clues about Ryugu's history, such as how it may have formed from a larger parent body. These details in turn allow researchers to better estimate quantities and ty

3h

2.6 Billion People Lack Access to Electricity. The World Needs Sustainable Energy Now.

Communities lacking electricity are forced to rely on dangerous fuels that can result in pollution and even cause premature death. The Global Maker Challenge received over a thousand submissions from innovators with potential solutions to help these communities. The post 2.6 Billion People Lack Access to Electricity. The World Needs Sustainable Energy Now. appeared first on Futurism .

3h

Cost-effective method for hydrogen fuel production process

Researchers have identified an inexpensive way to boost the efficiency of a process used to create hydrogen, a clean, renewable fuel.

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Deep brain stimulation provides sustained relief for severe depression

Patients suffering from severe, treatment-resistant depression can benefit not only acutely but also the long-term from deep brain stimulation.

3h

People choose healthy and sustainable lunches if given the green light

People are likely to choose healthier and more sustainable canteen meals if they are labelled with a traffic light system, according to new research.

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The rise and fall of Ziggy star formation and the rich dust from ancient stars

Researchers have detected a radio signal from abundant interstellar dust in MACS0416_Y1, a galaxy 13.2 billion light-years away in the constellation Eridanus. Standard models can't explain this much dust in a galaxy this young, forcing us to rethink the history of star formation. Researchers now think MACS0416_Y1 experienced staggered star formation with two intense starburst periods 300 million a

4h

Death-Cap Mushrooms Are Terrifying and Unstoppable

Most poisonous mushrooms won’t kill you—they’ll simply cause a severe headache or vomiting. Death-cap mushrooms are not like the others. As little as half an Amanita phalloides contains enough toxin to kill an adult human. Ingestion of the poison in death-cap mushrooms, known as amatoxin, is responsible for 90 percent of deaths related to mushroom poisoning worldwide. Worse still, death caps can

4h

These Cutting Edge CBD Sleep Aids Use Melatonin to Fight Nighttime Stress

Most of us have heard anecdotal evidence suggesting it’s getting harder and harder to get a good night’s sleep. But the actual statistics are almost alarming. According to one recent survey , over a quarter of U.S. adults (roughly 27 percent) say they have trouble falling or staying asleep most nights. Meanwhile, 68 percent say they have trouble sleeping at least once a week. And for the record,

4h

Emergency ascent in Indian Ocean as sub fills with smoke

A British scientist and her American pilot made an emergency ascent from 100 meters (328 feet) beneath the surface of the Indian Ocean on Tuesday after smoke filled the cockpit of their submersible.

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Hayabusa2 helps researchers understand ingredients for life in early solar system

The first data received from the Hayabusa2 spacecraft orbiting the asteroid Ryugu is helping space scientists explore conditions in the early solar system. The space probe gathered vast amounts of images and other data providing researchers clues about Ryugu's history, such as how it may have formed from a larger parent body. These details in turn allow scientists to better estimate quantities and

4h

Fermi Satellite clocks 'cannonball' pulsar speeding through space

Astronomers found a pulsar hurtling through space at nearly 2.5 million miles an hour—so fast it could travel the distance between Earth and the Moon in just 6 minutes. The discovery was made using NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the National Science Foundation's Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA).

4h

Trump’s Casinos Couldn’t Make Atlantic City Great Again

Photographer Brian Rose turns his lens on the city where Donald Trump built (and nearly destroyed) his reputation.

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Ryugu is a heap of space rubble that might unlock the mysteries of water on Earth

Early results from the Japanese Hayabusa2 mission are not just giving us insights into space rocks—they can tell us about our own planet’s history, too.

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Ryugu latest: asteroid is a partially dehydrated ‘pile of rubble’

Japanese researchers publish three studies on the object of Hayabusa2’s attention. Richard A Lovett reports.

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New Horizons: Ultima Thule 'a time machine' to early Solar System

Ultima Thule has been described as a Frankenstein object, composed of "poorly formed snowmen".

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Losses from US Midwest flooding seen above $1 bn

Waters began to recede Tuesday in the US Midwest after historic flooding that claimed at least three lives and caused losses estimated at more than $1 billion.

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NASA's Fermi Satellite clocks 'cannonball' pulsar speeding through space

Astronomers have found a runaway pulsar hurtling through space at nearly 2.5 million miles an hour — so fast it could travel the distance between Earth and the Moon in just 6 minutes.

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What's Behind the Massive Midwestern Floods: 2 Giant Waves of Water

Here's why vast swaths of Nebraska, Missouri, and other Midwestern states are drowning.

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Across North America and the Atlantic, an enormous migration journey for a tiny songbird

Blackpoll warblers that breed in western North America may migrate up to 12,400 miles roundtrip each year, some crossing the entire North American continent before making a nonstop trans-ocean flight of up to four days to South America. Now a new study led by first author Bill DeLuca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and project lead Ryan Norris at the University of Guelph, Ontario offers

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Emotionally attuned managers are better at judging workgroup effectiveness: study

People who are naturally more attuned to others' emotions are better able to judge how well small groups are performing, even when observation times are brief, according to a new study led by New York University professor Patricia Satterstrom.

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Speeding the development of fusion power to create unlimited energy on Earth

Can tokamak fusion facilities, the most widely used devices for harvesting on Earth the fusion reactions that power the sun and stars, be developed more quickly to produce safe, clean, and virtually limitless energy for generating electricity? Physicist Jon Menard of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has examined that question in a detailed look at th

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Across North America and the Atlantic, an enormous migration journey for a tiny songbird

Blackpoll warblers that breed in western North America may migrate up to 12,400 miles roundtrip each year, some crossing the entire North American continent before making a nonstop trans-ocean flight of up to four days to South America. Now a new study led by first author Bill DeLuca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and project lead Ryan Norris at the University of Guelph, Ontario offers

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Androgen receptor, treatment target for prostate cancer, imports into mitochondria

Androgens stimulate prostate cancer cells to grow. Many drugs to target that cancer focus on stopping androgen biosynthesis or blocking the androgen receptor, or AR. Researchers have discovered a new function of the AR in prostate cells — the AR is imported into and localizes to mitochondria of the cell, where it plays a novel role in regulating multiple mitochondrial processes.

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Go for a run or eat chocolate: A choice dictated by the cannabinoid receptors

A study reveals that the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors play an essential role in the choice between running and eating chocolatey food.

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When development and conservation clash in the Serengeti

New or upgraded roads in the Greater Serengeti Ecosystem around Serengeti National Park will not reduce growing pressure on the ecosystem, a study shows.

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Where does chronic pain begin? Scientists close in on its origins

A new study has produced evidence of the source of chronic pain in humans, revealing several new targets for pain treatment. The paper examined human dorsal root ganglia, specialized nerve cells clustered near the base of the spine removed from cancer patients undergoing surgery.

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Many pet owners keen to have vegan pets, study finds

A surprising number of pet owners, particularly those who are vegan, are interested in feeding their pets a plant-based diet, according to new University of Guelph research.

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Study identifies molecule that allows bacteria to breach cellular barriers

A new study identifies a single molecule as a key entry point used by two types of dangerous bacteria to break through cellular barriers and cause disease. The findings, published March 19 in the journal mBio, suggest that blocking the interaction between the molecule, known as CD40, and bacteria may represent a universal strategy for preventing life-threatening illnesses, including toxic shock sy

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Many pet owners keen to have vegan pets, study finds

A surprising number of pet owners, particularly those who are vegan, are interested in feeding their pets a plant-based diet, according to new University of Guelph research.

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Study identifies molecule that allows bacteria to breach cellular barriers

A new study identifies a single molecule as a key entry point used by two types of dangerous bacteria to break through cellular barriers and cause disease. The findings, published March 19 in the journal mBio, suggest that blocking the interaction between the molecule, known as CD40, and bacteria may represent a universal strategy for preventing life-threatening illnesses, including toxic shock sy

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World's largest study to monitor air quality exposure of 250 children

A new study by King's scientists will monitor air quality exposure of 250 children on their way to school and in the classroom. The announcement was made today at Haimo Primary School in Greenwich by the Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, who is funding the study.

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Researchers develop sensor to detect brain disorders in seconds

Using nanotechnology, UCF researchers have developed the first rapid detector for dopamine, a chemical that is believed to play a role in various diseases such as Parkinson's, depression and some cancers.

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Patreon: We're changing our fees and services. Please don't freak out. – CNET

Patreon is going from one-size-fits-all to a model offering creators more perks for higher fees.

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A Reason to be Skeptical of the Workplace Wellness Industry

New study finds no changes in health care costs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Reason to be Skeptical of the Workplace Wellness Industry

New study finds no changes in health care costs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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To gauge a neighborhood, combine tons of reviews

The vast trove of digital data on neighborhoods—friendly neighbors, late buses, good restaurants, etc.—can help improve cities and quality of life, say researchers. The research, published in the Annals of the American Association of Geographers , analyzes neighborhood reviews from more than 7,600 unique users who posted about New York City on the website Niche.com. The goal was to efficiently so

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Speeding the development of fusion power to create unlimited energy on Earth

A detailed examination of the challenges and tradeoffs in the development of a compact fusion facility with high-temperature superconducting magnets.

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Emotionally attuned managers are better at judging workgroup effectiveness: study

Experts from NYU, Exeter, Harvard and other institutions show for first time that — even on the fly — a manager who can read emotions in others well can better evaluate a working group's performance.

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Tiny song bird makes record migration, U of G study proves

The bird's trek between its breeding grounds in the central and western boreal forest of North America and its winter home in the Amazon Basin is one of the longest songbird migrations recorded.Describing a route arcing across North America and including a transoceanic flight to South America, the study confirms an epic migration journey that scientists had long suspected but not yet proved. Track

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Go for a run or eat chocolate: A choice dictated by the cannabinoid receptors

A study by Inserm and CNRS researchers published on March 7, 2019 in JCI Insight reveals that the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors play an essential role in the choice between running and eating chocolatey food.

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First Anatolian farmers were local hunter-gatherers that adopted agriculture

An international team has analyzed eight prehistoric individuals, including the first genome-wide data from a 15,000-year-old Anatolian hunter-gatherer, and found that the first Anatolian farmers were direct descendants of local hunter-gatherers. These findings provide support for archaeological evidence that farming was adopted and developed by local hunter-gatherers, rather than being introduced

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Extreme far right: 'pick'n'mix' ideologies and direct messaging online make for deadly new combination

While it is difficult to look beyond the atrocities committed in New Zealand, that they were perpetrated by someone inspired by the extreme right reminds us of the very real threat such ideologies and those committed to them pose to our ongoing safety and security. Described by the Australian prime minister, Scott Morrison, as an "extremist, right-wing, violent terrorist", the Australian national

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Protected hen harriers are vanishing under suspicious circumstances

A study that tracked 58 hen harriers over a decade found that most of the birds disappeared without a trace – and this was more likely to happen on grouse moors

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How bats harbor viruses but don’t get sick

A new study identifies the molecular and genetic mechanisms that allow bats to stay healthy even when hosting viruses that kill other animals, including humans. Bats live long and host numerous viruses, including Ebola virus, Nipah virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronaviruses, which are all extremely harmful when they infect humans and oth

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The U.S. Military is Buying a Brutal-Looking Powered Exoskeleton

The Guardian XO It looks a bit like a cross between Iron Man’s suit and Ripley’s Power Loader from “Aliens” — and while it won’t kill the alien queen quite yet, it does give its wearer super strength. American robot developer Sarcos Robotics announced today that it’s been awarded a contract by United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) to deliver a pre-production, full-body robotic exoske

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Facebook says no one flagged NZ mosque shooting livestream

Facebook says none of the 200 or so people who watched live video of the New Zealand mosque shooting flagged it to moderators, underlining the challenge tech companies face in policing violent or disturbing content in real time.

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Bill Gates Compares Artificial Intelligence to Nuclear Weapons

Nuclear Option Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist Bill Gates issued a grave warning Monday, comparing advanced artificial intelligence to nuclear weapons — and arguing that the United States is losing its edge in the global AI research race. “The world hasn’t had that many technologies that are both promising and dangerous,” Gates said during an event at Stanford, according to CNET . He adde

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30-Love? Dude Tests Tesla Auto-Braking, Uses Wife as Test Prop

A YouTube video, now vanished, shows a Tesla Model S driver testing if the car will auto-brake in time. Once it did, but only after the driver had to brake on his own. The post 30-Love? Dude Tests Tesla Auto-Braking, Uses Wife as Test Prop appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Does Sharing the Womb with a Brother Affect Girls?

A study links having a male twin with women’s educational, financial, and childbearing decisions. Researchers suspect prenatal exposure to testosterone may play a role.

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'Insectageddon' is 'alarmist by bad design': Scientists point out the study's major flaws

Amidst worldwide publicity and talks about 'Insectageddon': the extinction of 40% of the world's insects, as estimated in a recent scientific review, a critical response was published in the open-access journal Rethinking Ecology.

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Abel Prize: American professor is first woman to win prestigious math award

Karen Keskulla Uhlenbeck of the University of Texas at Austin wins one of the world’s most prestigious mathematics awards An American professor has become the first woman to be awarded the Abel Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious international mathematics awards. The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters announced in Oslo on Tuesday that Karen Keskulla Uhlenbeck of the University of Tex

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'Insectageddon' is 'alarmist by bad design': Scientists point out the study's major flaws

Amidst worldwide publicity and talks about 'Insectageddon': the extinction of 40% of the world's insects, as estimated in a recent scientific review, a critical response was published in the open-access journal Rethinking Ecology.

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Held i sprøjten: Efter 50 år på frost virker fåret Sir Freddies sæd

Forskere har befrugtet 34 får med sæd, der blev frosset ned helt tilbage i 1968.

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Insekten som vibrerar för kärleken

Att hitta en partner kan vara knepigt om man varken har tillgång till krogen eller Tinder. En ny studie visar att insektstypen stritar löser problemet genom att skaka på magen, vilket skickar vibrationer längs med växter och blad.

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Drug used to control cholesterol found effective against cancer-associated cachexia

Experiments with mice suggest that treatment with atorvastatin can attenuate adipose tissue remodeling, leading to rapid weight loss and muscle atrophy.

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Researchers find cost-effective method for hydrogen fuel production process

U of A researchers have identified an inexpensive way to boost the efficiency of a process used to create hydrogen, a clean, renewable fuel.

5h

People choose healthy and sustainable lunches if given the green light

People are likely to choose healthier and more sustainable canteen meals if they are labelled with a traffic light system, according to research from Queen Mary University of London.

5h

Video and film portals that incorporate real-time comments from their audiences

This technology allows watching videos of various kinds and posting comments that are superimposed on the video, collaboratively. It's called 'danmaku' in Japanese and 'danmu' in Mandarin Chinese and was launched in 2007 and 2008, respectively. It immediately became very popular among otakus (fans of anime and manga).

5h

Roots of European agriculture revealed

A theory about migration and the birth of farming is disproved. Andrew Masterson reports.

5h

Are We Measuring Research Success Wrong?

Universities tout how much they spend, but it’s no virtue if that spending is inefficient — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Are We Measuring Research Success Wrong?

Universities tout how much they spend, but it’s no virtue if that spending is inefficient — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Image: Saturn at equinox

Saturn is famous for its bright, glorious rings but in this picture, taken during Saturn's 2009 equinox, the rings are cast in a different light as sunlight hits the rings edge-on.

5h

First Anatolian farmers were local hunter-gatherers that adopted agriculture

An international team led by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and in collaboration with scientists from the United Kingdom, Turkey and Israel, has analyzed eight prehistoric individuals, including the first genome-wide data from a 15,000-year-old Anatolian hunter-gatherer, and found that the first Anatolian farmers were direct descendants of local hunter-ga

5h

Indkøbssposer, husholdningsfilm og kødbakker gør britiske veje stærkere

PLUS. Britisk firma genanvender plastaffald fra husholdninger og industri som erstatning for bitumen i asfalt. Dansk entreprenør er interesseret.

5h

Researchers discover new material to help power electronics

Scientists have discovered a way to simplify how electronic devices use those electrons — using a material that can serve dual roles in electronics, where historically multiple materials have been necessary.

5h

Molecular motors run in unison in a metal-organic framework

For molecular motors to be exploited effectively, they need to be able to operate in unison. However, integrating billions of these nanometre-sized motors into a single system, and getting them to operate in unison has proved to be quite a challenge. Organic chemists have now succeeded in integrating numerous unidirectional light-driven rotary motors into a metal-organic framework (a solid materia

5h

Advances point the way to smaller, safer batteries

New research advances the design of solid-state batteries, a technology that is inherently safer and more energy-dense than today's lithium-ion batteries, which rely on flammable liquid electrolytes for fast transfer of chemical energy stored in molecular bonds to electricity. By starting with liquid electrolytes and then transforming them into solid polymers inside the electrochemical cell, the r

5h

Facial motion capture helps bring VR documentary to life

CAMERA, the University of Bath's motion capture research centre, has collaborated with the Interactive arm of Aardman on a BBC virtual reality documentary about the story of twin sisters whose lives were torn apart by a terrible accident.

5h

Triangle Bird Count to shed light on urban wildlife

Wildlife researchers are launching a bird population survey in the Triangle region, focused on getting a better understanding of the birds that live in Raleigh, Durham and other urban centers. The researchers are recruiting participants for the citizen science study, and are particularly interested in bringing in people who may not view themselves as birdwatchers.

5h

Triangle Bird Count to shed light on urban wildlife

Wildlife researchers are launching a bird population survey in the Triangle region, focused on getting a better understanding of the birds that live in Raleigh, Durham and other urban centers. The researchers are recruiting participants for the citizen science study, and are particularly interested in bringing in people who may not view themselves as birdwatchers.

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Germany renewables share jumped to to 72.4% last week

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

5h

HSE researchers teach neural networks to determine crowd emotions

Scholars from the Higher School of Economics have developed an algorithm that detects emotions in a group of people on a low-quality video. The solution provides a final decision in just one hundredth of a second, which is faster than any other existing algorithms with similar accuracy. The results have been described in the paper 'Emotion Recognition of a Group of People in Video Analytics Using

5h

Deep brain stimulation provides sustained relief for severe depression

Patients suffering from severe, treatment-resistant depression can benefit not only acutely but also the long-term from deep brain stimulation, as researchers from the Medical Center — University of Freiburg and their colleagues from the University Hospital Bonn demonstrate in a current study.

5h

Across North America and the Atlantic, an enormous migration journey for a tiny songbird

Blackpoll warblers that breed in western North America may migrate up to 12,400 miles roundtrip each year, some crossing the entire North American continent before making a nonstop trans-ocean flight of up to four days to South America. Now a new study led by first author Bill DeLuca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and project lead Ryan Norris at the University of Guelph, Ontario offers

5h

SwRI-led team discovers surprisingly old surface on near-Earth asteroid

A Southwest Research Institute-led team has discovered that the surface geology on asteroid Bennu is older than expected. Early observations of the near-Earth asteroid by NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission indicate a surface that is between 100 million and 1 billion years old.

5h

Androgen receptor, treatment target for prostate cancer, imports into mitochondria

Androgens stimulate prostate cancer cells to grow. Many drugs to target that cancer focus on stopping androgen biosynthesis or blocking the androgen receptor, or AR. Researchers have discovered a new function of the AR in prostate cells — the AR is imported into and localizes to mitochondria of the cell, where it plays a novel role in regulating multiple mitochondrial processes.

5h

Many pet owners keen to have vegan pets, University of Guelph study finds

A growing number of pet owners is interested in feeding their pets plant-based diets.

5h

Different bacteria use same cell surface molecule to invade tissue and promote infection

A new study identifies a single molecule as a key entry point used by two types of dangerous bacteria to break through cellular barriers and cause disease. The findings, published March 19 in the journal mBio, suggest that blocking the interaction between the molecule, known as CD40, and bacteria may represent a universal strategy for preventing life-threatening illnesses, including toxic shock sy

5h

Medical marijuana laws linked to health and labor supply benefits in older adults

A study that examined older Americans' well-being before and after medical marijuana laws were passed in their state found reductions in reported pain and increased hours worked. The study, co-written by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Temple University, suggests medical marijuana laws could be improving older Americans' health.

5h

Smarter drug release thanks to control over encapsulation

Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology and Utrecht University have discovered the parameters that govern the encapsulation of drugs. This gives more control over the slow and steady release of drugs in patients. Moreover, designing encapsulations for new drugs will now require far less experimentation which makes for faster and cheaper drug development. The researchers believe this work

5h

For older adults, sense of control tied to feeling younger

A recent study finds that older adults feel younger when they feel that they have more control over their daily lives, regardless of stress or health concerns. However, stress and health — not a sense of control — play a significant role in how old younger adults feel.

5h

Researchers develop sensor to detect brain disorders in seconds

Using nanotechnology, UCF researchers have developed the first rapid detector for dopamine, a chemical that is believed to play a role in various diseases such as Parkinson's, depression and some cancers.

5h

New model IDs primate species with potential to spread Zika in the Americas

In the Americas, primate species likely to harbor Zika—and potentially transmit the virus—are common, abundant, and often live near people. So reports a new study published today in Epidemics. Findings are based on an innovative model developed by a collaborative team of researchers from Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and IBM Research through its Science for Social Good initiative.

5h

3D mammography significantly reduces breast biopsy rates

The use of digital breast tomosynthesis, also known as 3D mammography, may significantly reduce the number of women who undergo breast biopsy for a non-cancerous lesion following an abnormal mammogram, according to a new study.

5h

New model IDs primate species with potential to spread Zika in the Americas

In the Americas, primate species likely to harbor Zika—and potentially transmit the virus—are common, abundant, and often live near people. So reports a new study published today in Epidemics. Findings are based on an innovative model developed by a collaborative team of researchers from Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and IBM Research through its Science for Social Good initiative.

5h

Why we need a modern origin story today

If history can help us understand the world we live in, why not teach about the whole of history and the whole of time? That is what big history tries to do. I have been teaching big history courses for almost 30 years.

5h

Eggs are again linked to heart problems — though the study has problems

A new study at Northwestern University found a link between egg consumption and cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The research relied on self-reporting at the beginning of observation, with no follow-up reporting. Correlation is likely, not causation, as larger studies have found the opposite to be true. None Here we go again. Few foods have taken a beating like eggs. From the world

5h

Why Teen Boys Have More Leisure Time Than Teen Girls

On average, American men have more leisure time each day than American women—the difference works out to about half an hour . This inequity, according to a recent analysis of government data by the Pew Research Center, starts early. Among teens ages 15 to 17, the analysis found, boys had roughly an hour more of free time each day than girls. The time-use patterns of teen boys and girls map closel

5h

Western droughts caused permanent loss to major California groundwater source

California's Central Valley aquifer, the major source of groundwater in the region, suffered permanent loss of capacity during the drought experienced in the area from 2012 to 2015.

5h

Prisaftale risikerer at skade udbudsrabatter på sygehusmedicin

Amgros’ muligheder for at opnå rabatter på medicin kan blive påvirket af ny prisaftale med medicinalindustrien, mener Adam Wolf, direktør i Danske Regioner.

5h

'Angry Birds AR' on iOS lets you fling fowl in the real world

Angry Birds has already made the leap from smartphones to augmented reality and VR. But now, Rovio is bringing some of those lessons back to the iPhone. With Angry Birds AR: Isle of …

5h

Call of Duty: Mobile is coming to Android, iOS – CNET

The free app is open for preregistration online and in the Google Play Store.

5h

Scientists discover common blueprint for protein antibiotics

A discovery by researchers at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) has uncovered a common blueprint for proteins that have antimicrobial properties. This finding opens the door to design and development of a new generation of anti-infectives active against pathogens that have become resistant to conventional antibiotics.

5h

Scientists study fish to learn how to adapt to the impacts of climate change

Freshwater biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and nature-based solutions that increase the resilience of ecological communities are becoming increasingly important in helping communities prepare for the unavoidable effects of climate change.

5h

Dolphin smarts

Imagine you are blindfolded and placed into a pool of water with a dolphin. The dolphin performs a movement, such as spinning in a circle, or swimming in a zig-zag pattern, and your task is to imitate this movement, without having seen it. Ready, go.

5h

US lawmaker sues Twitter, alleging anti-conservative bias

A Republican congressman is suing Twitter claiming the online platform discriminates against conservatives by hiding their messages, and for allowing "abusive, hateful and defamatory" content about the lawmaker.

5h

Uncovering the superconducting phosphine: P2H4 and P4H6

High-Tc superconductors have become a hot topic in physics since superconducting mercury was first reported more than a century ago. Dense hydrogen was predicted to metalize and become a superconductor at high pressure and room temperature. However, no widely accepted experimental work has been reported yet. In 2004, Ashcroft predicted hydrogen-dominant hydrides could become a high-Tc superconduct

5h

Scientists study fish to learn how to adapt to the impacts of climate change

Freshwater biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and nature-based solutions that increase the resilience of ecological communities are becoming increasingly important in helping communities prepare for the unavoidable effects of climate change.

5h

Dolphin smarts

Imagine you are blindfolded and placed into a pool of water with a dolphin. The dolphin performs a movement, such as spinning in a circle, or swimming in a zig-zag pattern, and your task is to imitate this movement, without having seen it. Ready, go.

5h

Eating fish may help prevent asthma

An innovative study has revealed new evidence that eating fish can help prevent asthma.

5h

Electron accelerators reveal the radical secrets of antioxidants

A professor has demonstrated for the first time the value of linear particle accelerators for the generation of free radicals inside biological samples. This work will have important applications throughout biochemistry, especially for researchers studying antioxidants and photosynthesis.

5h

Scientists study fish to learn how to adapt to the impacts of climate change

Freshwater biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and nature-based solutions which increase the resilience of ecological communities are becoming increasingly important in helping communities prepare for the unavoidable effects of climate change.

5h

Computer program developed to find 'leakage' in quantum computers

A new computer program that spots when information in a quantum computer is escaping to unwanted states will give users of this promising technology the ability to check its reliability without any technical knowledge for the first time.

5h

Carbon monoxide detectors could warn of extraterrestrial life

Scientists have used computer models of chemistry in the biosphere and atmosphere to identify two intriguing scenarios in which carbon monoxide readily accumulates in the atmospheres of living planets. The models show that relatively high amounts of carbon monoxide are compatible with life and should not automatically rule out the possibility of life on some planets.

5h

Discovery of parasitic arsenic cycle may offer glimpse of life in future, warmer oceans

A newly discovered parasitic cycle, in which ocean bacteria keep phytoplankton on an energy-sapping treadmill of nutrient detoxification, may offer a preview of what further ocean warming will bring.

5h

Epigenetic protein could be new therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia

Researchers have discovered that an epigenetic protein called EZH2 delays the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but then switches sides once the disease is established to help maintain tumor growth. The study suggests that targeting EZH2 could therefore be an effective treatment for AML, an aggressive blood cancer expected to kill over 10,000 people in the US alone this year.

5h

Where does chronic pain begin? Scientists close in on its origins

A new study published March 19, 2019 in Brain has produced evidence of the source of chronic pain in humans, revealing several new targets for pain treatment. The paper examined human dorsal root ganglia, specialized nerve cells clustered near the base of the spine removed from cancer patients undergoing surgery.

5h

When development and conservation clash in the Serengeti

New or upgraded roads in the Greater Serengeti Ecosystem around Serengeti National Park will not reduce growing pressure on the ecosystem, a study shows.

5h

'Insectageddon' is 'alarmist by bad design': Scientists point out the study's major flaws

Amidst worldwide talks about 'Insectageddon': the extinction of 40 percent of the world's insects, according to a recent scientific review, a response was published in the open-access journal Rethinking Ecology. Its authors point out major flaws in the earlier study: query- and geographically biased summaries; mismatch between objectives and cited literature; and misuse of existing conservation da

5h

Scientists revealed how probiotics influence human gut bacteria

A group of researchers from ITMO University and Knomics company studied how gut microbiota of 150 volunteers changed after a month of regular consumption of yogurt fortified with probiotics. The study showed that such diet increases the proportion of beneficial gut bacteria, which, in turn, can positively affect state of the whole organism. The work was supported by the company PepsiCo R&D Inc, th

5h

Undernutrition during pregnancy changes lung-specific gene expression

Higher rates of lung disease in children born to moms who were undernourished during pregnancy could be explained by epigenetic changes in a number of lung-specific genes.

5h

Even low doses of synthetic cannabinoids can impair cognitive performance

A new study shows that inhaled doses of as little as 2 mg of the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 can significantly impair critical thinking and memory, slow reaction times, and increase confusion and dissociation.

5h

Diattenuation imaging — a promising imaging technique for brain research

A new imaging method provides structural information about brain tissue that was previously difficult to access. Diattenuation imaging, developed by scientists at Forschungszentrum Jülich and the University of Groningen, allows to differentiate, e.g., regions with many thin nerve fibers from regions with few thick nerve fibers. With current imaging methods, these tissue types cannot easily be dist

5h

It's no Fortnite, but it's helping stroke survivors move again

Severely impaired stroke survivors are regaining function in their arms after sometimes decades of immobility, thanks to a new video game-led training device invented by Northwestern Medicine scientists.

5h

Making xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from paper paste

The ecological bio-production of xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from material produced by the paper industry has been achieved. This discovery could contribute to the development of a greener and more sustainable society.

5h

The Radical Sincerity of The OA

During the two hours I spent talking with Brit Marling and Zal Batmanglij in February, the conversation eddied its way around the following topics. The movies of Krzysztof Kieślowski. The neuroscience of trauma. The painter and novelist Leonora Carrington. Noise shows in San Francisco. Hilma af Klint and the origins of abstract expressionism. Hannah Gadsby’s Nanette . Malcolm Gladwell’s podcast.

5h

Does most of your paycheck go to rent? That may be hurting your health

New data on health across the U.S. shows that high housing costs are harming Americans' health – and that some communities are affected more than others.

5h

Want to increase staff loyalty? You'll need to be seen as important, new research suggests

Offering praise and having a good working relationship isn't always enough to engender loyalty from staff—employees also need to feel that the relationship with their boss is important, according to new research.

5h

Are really tiny tools what make humans special?

It wasn’t tool making that set our human ancestors apart from other primates, a new paper argues, but rather miniaturizing them. Just as tiny transistors transformed electronics a few decades ago, our Stone Age ancestors felt the urge to make tiny tools. “It’s a need that we’ve been perennially faced with and driven by,” says Justin Pargeter, an anthropologist at Emory University and lead author

5h

Which habitable zones are the best to actually search for life?

Looking to the future, NASA and other space agencies have high hopes for the field of extra-solar planet research. In the past decade, the number of known exoplanets has reached just shy of 4000, and many more are expected to be found once next-generation telescopes are put into service. And with so many exoplanets to study, research goals have slowly shifted away from the process of discovery and

5h

Thumbs up for marine blueprint in the Mediterranean

Thanks to a trailblazing marine protection initiative in Turkey, the tide may finally be turning for the Mediterranean monk seal – one of the world's most threatened marine mammals.

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Scientists discover common blueprint for protein antibiotics

A discovery by researchers at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) has uncovered a common blueprint for proteins that have antimicrobial properties. This finding opens the door to design and development of a new generation of anti-infectives active against pathogens that have become resistant to conventional antibiotics.

5h

Anxieties over livestreams can help us design better Facebook and YouTube content moderation

As families in Christchurch bury their loved ones following Friday's terrorist attack, global attention now turns to preventing such a thing ever happening again.

5h

Thumbs up for marine blueprint in the Mediterranean

Thanks to a trailblazing marine protection initiative in Turkey, the tide may finally be turning for the Mediterranean monk seal – one of the world's most threatened marine mammals.

5h

Student-led CatSat mission selected by NASA

An inflatable space antenna designed by University of Arizona students is one of 16 small research satellites from 10 states NASA has selected to fly as auxiliary payloads aboard space missions planned to launch in 2020, 2021 and 2022.

5h

More robots, more work

Robots will take over all jobs, so it is often thought. On the contrary, say Charissa Freese and Ton Wilthagen: robots will create jobs. It's just that these new jobs will be different, and the challenge is to anticipate which jobs will disappear, which ones will change, and what the new ones will be like – and when. Tilburg University aims to prepare employers and employees to the labor market of

5h

Low-quality work influences what young people want out of a job

Young people in precarious or unsecure work, including temporary or zero-hour contracts, value 'extrinsic' work values such as pay and security less than those who have a permanent job.

5h

Therapy on the couch, plus the London book fair – books podcast

On this week’s show, Claire and Sian meet up at London book fair to discuss the trends and biggest books announced for 2019 and 2020. Then they sit down with neuropsychologist AK Benjamin and novelist Anthony Good, who have written two very different books turning the tables on therapy. Benjamin’s genre-busting take on mental health, Let Me Not Be Mad, puts the author centre stage, while Good’s K

5h

There's a reason England was able to harness geniuses like Isaac Newton

Science Excerpt: Loonshots The Royal Society helped Newton and England win a race against time, a competition to discover truths of nature.

5h

Measuring differences in brain chemicals in people with mild memory problems

Using strong and targeted but noninvasive magnets at specific sites in the brains of people with and without mild learning and memory problems, researchers report they were able to detect differences in the concentrations of brain chemicals that transmit messages between neurons. The strength of these magnetic fields allows the researchers to measure tiny amounts and compare multiple brain metabol

6h

New technique for in-cell distance determination

Researchers demonstrate for the first time that the pulsed EPR technique RIDME (relaxation-induced dipolar modulation enhancement) can be used for in-cell distance determination in biomacromolecules. Applied within the cell, RIDME improves significantly on conventional double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements.

6h

Floodplain forests under threat

Researchers warn of the effects of summer drought and competition for ground water.

6h

Milk or no milk? Study fills long-time knowledge gap on babies with genetic disorder

A new study finally brings clarity to parents of children with Duarte galactosemia, a milder variant of a genetic disorder that impairs the body's ability to process a milk sugar known as galactose. The study found that children with Duarte galactosemia are at no greater risk of long-term developmental abnormalities than their unaffected siblings, regardless of their exposure to milk as infants.

6h

Making xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from paper paste

The ecological bio-production of xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from material produced by the paper industry has been achieved. This discovery could contribute to the development of a greener and more sustainable society.

6h

CRISPR gene editing: Why we need Slow Science

In a newly published article in Nature, a group of prominent scientists and ethicists have called for a moratorium on clinical research using CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing.

6h

Smarter drug release thanks to control over encapsulation

Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology and Utrecht University have discovered the parameters that govern the encapsulation of drugs. This gives more control over the slow and steady release of drugs in patients. Moreover, designing encapsulations for new drugs will now require far less experimentation which makes for faster and cheaper drug development. The researchers believe this work

6h

How suspicious parties can work together safely

Cryptographer Max Fillinger developed new methods to analyse a group of algorithms called commitments schemes. These schemes are building blocks for cryptographic protocols, which enable multiple parties that do not trust each other to work together safely. His Ph.D. Defence is on 19 March.

6h

Scholar probes secrets of sacred North Korean mountains

The conclusion of a second Trump-Kim summit with no North Korean opening to the West puts an even greater premium on the research that Maya Stiller, University of Kansas assistant professor of the history of art, has been able to do inside the hermit kingdom, and about which she continues to publish.

6h

Wastewater contains nutrients, energy and precious metals—scientists are learning how to recover them

Most people think as little as possible about the wastewater that is produced daily from their showers, bathtubs, sinks, dishwashers and toilets. But with the right techniques, it can become a valuable resource.

6h

Simple blood test could determine preterm birth rate in low-resource countries

A study funded by Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation shows blood test and mathematical model can accurately identify preterm babies without ultrasound.

6h

HP Reverb gives Microsoft VR a high-res boost – CNET

The new $600 VR headset doubles up on the Samsung Odyssey and Vive Pro, arriving late April. We gave it a test drive.

6h

CRISPR gene editing: Why we need Slow Science

In a newly published article in Nature, a group of prominent scientists and ethicists have called for a moratorium on clinical research using CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing.

6h

The Unexpected Side Effects of Trump’s Trade War

Several weeks ago, John Boyd’s combine broke down. The machine is an absolute necessity for Boyd—he, like most commodity farmers, uses it to harvest the soybeans, corn, and wheat he grows every year in Baskerville, Virginia. What he really needs is a whole new combine, which would allow him to harvest his crops more efficiently, and which would last him much longer than fixing his current machine

6h

Spring vs. Autumn: An Equinox Throwdown

It’s just about the equinox, but there are two sides to any seasonal story: for those of us north of the Equator, it’s about to become spring, and for those of us south of the Equator, it’s about to become autumn. With the advent of either one, there are pros and cons. Which season would you rather it be? Starting at 11 AM EDT on 3/21 and going for 24 hours, now is your chance to declare the supe

6h

Record Floods Could "Test the Limits" of Midwest Defenses

Rains and melting snow have caused rivers to breach levees from Minnesota to Missouri — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Även för tidigt födda har skyddande antikroppar

Under tiden i mammans mage överförs antikroppar från mammans blod till fostret. Dessa antikroppar ger det nyfödda barnet ett passivt skydd mot infektioner. Eftersom huvuddelen av antikroppstransporten sker under graviditetens sista tredjedel har man hittills betraktat mycket för tidigt födda barn som oskyddade av sådana så kallade maternella antikroppar. Men en annan bild framträdde, när den tota

6h

Millennial-scale effects of human disturbance on tropical forests

How do human disturbances and climate change affected tropical forests? An international research team, including ecologists from the University of Amsterdam, has looked into the 7000 year history of a tropical Amazonian forest. They reveal that human disturbance, more than climate change, affects the species composition of tropical forests over the last millennia. The results, including important

6h

Jupiter's Great Red Spot: A 300-year-old cyclone persists but is shrinking

The Great Red Spot, a storm larger than the Earth and powerful enough to tear apart smaller storms that get drawn into it, is one of the most recognizable features in Jupiter's atmosphere and the entire solar system. The counterclockwise-moving storm, an anticyclone, boasts wind speeds as high as 300 miles per hour. This prominent feature, observed since 1830, and possibly as far back as the 1660s

6h

Butterfly numbers down by two-thirds—scientists call for a change in agricultural approaches

Together with a German/Polish team, Senckenberg scientist Thomas Schmitt studied the effects of various land use models on the butterfly fauna. The researchers show that meadows adjacent to high-intensity agricultural areas are home to less than half the number of butterfly species than areas in nature preserves. The number of individuals is even down to one-third of that number. In their study, w

6h

Halskæder af slik inspirerer til ny måde at indtage medicin

En spiral med medicintabletter der indføres i maven kan erstatte almindelige piller, og forbedre behandlingen af blandt andet tuberkulose i U-lande.

6h

Here's how airplane crash investigations work, according to an aviation safety expert

The fatal crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 has resulted in the worldwide grounding of Boeing 737 Max aircraft. Investigators are probing the crash and another like it that occurred less than five months earlier in Indonesia.

6h

Aerial imaging of plant heights could help farmers manage field crops more effectively

Monitoring the growth patterns of crop plants provides farmers with a strong indication of potential yield, allowing them to tweak crop management to boost production. Now, KAUST researchers have demonstrated that using fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) to collect data on vegetation height throughout the crop growth cycle provides a low-cost, simple way of monitoring plant health on a far

6h

Floodplain forests under threat

A team from the Institute of Forest Sciences at the University of Freiburg shows that the extraction of ground water for industry and households is increasingly damaging floodplain forests in Europe given the increasing intensity and length of drought periods in the summer. The scientists have published their results in the journal Frontiers in Forests and Global Change.

6h

New technique for in-cell distance determination

In a joint paper, researchers from the University of Konstanz, Bielefeld University and ETH Zurich demonstrate for the first time that the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique RIDME (relaxation-induced dipolar modulation enhancement) can be applied to determine distances between gadolinium(III)-based spin labels in cells. In-cell distance determination by electron paramagnetic resonance

6h

Energy-efficient superconducting cable for future technologies

For connecting wind parks, for DC supply on ships, or for lightweight and compact high-current cabling in future electric airplanes: scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a versatile superconducting cable that can be manufactured easily. In case of moderate cooling, it transports electric energy with hardly any losses.

6h

Butterfly numbers down by two-thirds—scientists call for a change in agricultural approaches

Together with a German/Polish team, Senckenberg scientist Thomas Schmitt studied the effects of various land use models on the butterfly fauna. The researchers show that meadows adjacent to high-intensity agricultural areas are home to less than half the number of butterfly species than areas in nature preserves. The number of individuals is even down to one-third of that number. In their study, w

6h

Why I turned Chicago's abandoned homes into art | Amanda Williams

Amanda Williams shares her lifelong fascination with the complexity of color: from her experiences with race and redlining to her discovery of color theory to her work as a visual artist. Journey with Williams to Chicago's South Side and explore "Color(ed) Theory," a two-year art project in which she painted soon-to-be-demolished houses bold, monochromatic colors infused with local meaning — cata

6h

Urban landscapes associated with reported life satisfaction and inequalities in life satisfaction at the city level

Cities which have a balance between facilities, housing and natural green spaces have lower levels of socio-economic inequality in the life satisfaction of its residents, according to new research.

6h

IMF policy reforms weaken state capacity in developing nations, study finds

A new study shows that lending conditions imposed by the International Monetary Fund undermine "state capacity" in developing nations – preventing state bureaucrats from implementing essential policies in health, education, and national security.

6h

New class of drugs could treat ovarian cancer

A team of researchers across the University of Manchester have shown that a new class of drugs are able to stop ovarian cancer cells growing. The Cancer Research UK and Wellcome Trust funded study, published in the journal Cancer Cell, showed that the drugs, called PARG inhibitors, can kill ovarian cancer cells by targeting weaknesses within their ability to copy their DNA.

6h

A study analyzes pre-installed software on Android devices and its privacy risks for users

A study that encompasses 82,000 pre-installed apps in more than 1,700 devices manufactured by 214 brands, reveals the existence of a complex ecosystem of manufacturers, mobile operators, app developers and providers, with a wide network of relationships between them. This includes specialized organizations in user monitoring and tracking and in providing Internet advertising.

6h

Floodplain forests under threat

Researchers at the University of Freiburg warn of the effects of summer drought and competition for ground water.

6h

New technique for in-cell distance determination

Researchers from the University of Konstanz, Bielefeld University and ETH Zurich demonstrate for the first time that the pulsed EPR technique RIDME (relaxation-induced dipolar modulation enhancement) can be used for in-cell distance determination in biomacromolecules. Applied within the cell, RIDME improves significantly on conventional double electron-electron resonance (DEER) measurements.

6h

Measuring differences in brain chemicals in people with mild memory problems

Using strong and targeted but noninvasive magnets at specific sites in the brains of people with and without mild learning and memory problems, Johns Hopkins researchers report they were able to detect differences in the concentrations of brain chemicals that transmit messages between neurons. The strength of these magnetic fields allows the researchers to measure tiny amounts and compare multiple

6h

25 Governments Are Meeting Right Now to Prevent a Space Arms Race

Counterfeit Treaty Representatives from 25 countries around the world are currently meeting in Geneva, Switzerland to formulate international laws to prevent space-based conflict. But the meetings, which will continue through March 28, hit a roadblock when the U.S. representative accused China and Russia of undermining the entire process by developing anti-satellite weaponry, according to France

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We need a new definition of pornography—with consent at the centre

We all think we know what pornography is, whether we oppose it, use it, or tolerate it. But are we all conjuring up the same images?

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To Be Ethical, AI Must Become Explainable. How Do We Get There?

As over-hyped as artificial intelligence is—everyone’s talking about it, few fully understand it, it might leave us all unemployed but also solve all the world’s problems—its list of accomplishments is growing. AI can now write realistic-sounding text , give a debating champ a run for his money, diagnose illnesses, and generate fake human faces —among much more . After training these systems on m

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Sygehusdokumentar sender sundhedsminister i samråd

Patientsikkerheden er sat på prøve i en presset hverdag, viser ny DR-dokumentar. Det har afledt flere reaktioner, bl.a har Enhedslisten kaldt sundhedsministeren i samråd.

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KL får ny direktør for sundhed

For at imødekomme flere kronikere og ældre, satser KL på velfærdsteknologi og ansætter Christian Harsløf til at stå i spidsen for området.

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‘Toy Story 4’ Trailer Takes Woody’s Gang on a Crazy Adventure

Woody and company are back: The playroom objects go on the ultimate adventure to rescue their friend, Forky, in Toy Story 4. Disney-Pixar released the movie’s first full-length trailer …

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Rays of light shape objects in new 3D-printing tech

A new 3D printer uses light to transform gooey liquids into complex solid objects in just minutes. The inventors nicknamed the printer the “replicator” after the Star Trek device that can materialize any object on demand. The 3D printer can create objects that are smoother, more flexible, and more complex than what is possible with traditional 3D printers. It can also encase an already existing o

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Fraktur i örat vanligare än tidigare känt

Att få en fraktur i örat kan vara vanligare än man tidigare trott. – Våra resultat från Norrbotten talar för att hammarfraktur är något som inte uppmärksammas, kanske för att många inte söker vård eller för att det saknas kunskaper inom sjukvården eftersom det anses så ovanligt, säger Anders Niklasson, doktorand vid Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap vid Umeå universitet. Under en tioårsperiod u

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Mary Anning biopic director defends film's lesbian romance storyline

Kate Winslet picture about renowned fossil hunter had been criticised by relatives for ‘unconfirmed’ portrait of her sexuality The director of a new biopic about the celebrated fossil hunter Mary Anning has defended his film after criticism of its lesbian romance storyline. Ammonite, which stars Kate Winslet and Saoirse Ronan , recently began filming in Lyme Regis, the coastal town in Dorset wher

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Researchers Found a Way to Levitate Objects Using Only Light

Light Levitation Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) say they’ve found a way to levitate and propel objects using only light — though, for the time being, the work remains theoretical. They hope the technique could be used for “trajectory control of ultra-light spacecraft and even laser-propelled light sails for space exploration,” according to a paper published in the

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A nutty solution for improving brain health

Long-term, high nut consumption could be the key to better cognitive health in older people according to new research.

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Odds of perfect bracket are 1 in 9.2 quintillion, so why do we play?

The odds are, quite frankly, astronomical. If you are sitting down today to fill out your NCAA bracket, know this: the odds of getting it 100 percent correct are 1 in 9.2 quintillion (a number string 19 digits long). But yet many of us still play, and there's good reason for that.

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Rise of drones necessitates revision of laws of war

Today, it is almost impossible to imagine warfare without unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones. For instance, they have been deployed in the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Are the current laws of war adequate to address the use of drones? Ph.D. candidate James Welch will defend his thesis on 21 March.

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Study shows pressure induces unusually high electrical conductivity in polyiodide

A study into the effects of high mechanical pressure on the polyiodide TEAI showed that it brings unusually high electrical conductivity starting from insulating state, suggesting that the material may be useful as a switchable semiconductor. This system could represent an alternative to gel electrolytes and ionic liquids in dye-synthesized solar cells. The paper, 'Pressure-induced Polymerization

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Computer program developed to find 'leakage' in quantum computers

A new computer program that spots when information in a quantum computer is escaping to unwanted states will give users of this promising technology the ability to check its reliability without any technical knowledge for the first time.

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New model IDs primate species with potential to spread Zika in the Americas

In the Americas, primate species likely to harbor Zika — and potentially transmit the virus — are common, abundant, and often live near people. So reports a new study published today in Epidemics. Findings are based on an innovative model developed by a collaborative team of researchers from Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and IBM Research through its Science for Social Good initiative.

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Breast density assessment varies greatly by screening method and race

Fewer women are assigned to a dense breast category when evaluated with advanced mammographic screening technologies compared to standard digital mammography, according to a new study.

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3D mammography significantly reduces breast biopsy rates

The use of digital breast tomosynthesis, also known as 3D mammography, may significantly reduce the number of women who undergo breast biopsy for a non-cancerous lesion following an abnormal mammogram, according to a new study.

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Jordan Peele’s Us Is Worth Seeing Again and Again

In the opening sequence of Us , Jordan Peele gives the audience what it might be expecting after months of hype for his follow-up to Get Out : a perfectly taut piece of virtuoso horror filmmaking. A little girl (played by Madison Curry) frolics with her family at a seaside funfair, then wanders off as her dad plays a carnival game, eventually winding up alone in a haunted house. It’s a place for

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The U.S. National Women’s Soccer Team Makes a Really Good Case for Equal Pay

Since 1963, “ equal pay for equal work ” has been the law of the land when it comes to compensating men and women in the U.S. If only it were so simple. According to a lawsuit filed on March 8 by the U.S. women’s national soccer team, these female athletes are being paid less than the men’s team, in some cases earning just 38 percent of pay per game. This, despite the fact that in recent years th

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The Cost of Not Knowing a Huntington’s Diagnosis

When Jennifer Leyton was going through IVF, her doctors would tell her very little. They turned off the ultrasound screen facing her so she could not count the number of eggs retrieved. They kept secret the number of fertilized embryos. They did not even say how many they transferred to her womb. This secrecy might have been maddening for many IVF patients, but for Leyton, it was her choice. She

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Who Still Buys Wite-Out, and Why?

Christmastime is when the pens in my house get their biggest workout of the year. Like many Americans above grammar-school age , I seldom write by hand anymore, outside of barely legible grocery lists. But the end of the year brings out a slew of opportunities for penmanship: adding notes to holiday cards to old friends, addressing them, and then doing the same with thank-you notes after Christma

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Water-splitting system pulls green fuel from seawater

Researchers have devised a way to generate hydrogen fuel using solar power, electrodes, and saltwater from San Francisco Bay. The findings demonstrate a new way of separating hydrogen and oxygen gas from seawater via electricity. Existing water-splitting methods rely on highly purified water, which is a precious resource and costly to produce. Theoretically, to power cities and cars, “you need so

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Artificial intelligence to measure citizen perception towards events of noise pollution

Researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid have developed an artificial intelligence system to detect and assess noisy activities from social network data.

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The learning gap between rich and poor students hasn’t changed in decades

The educational achievement gap between the poorest and richest U.S. students remains as wide as it was almost 50 years ago.

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Flashing Light and Sound Reduced Alzheimer’s Symptoms in Mice

The last thing Dr. Li-Huei Tsai expected to help her Alzheimer’s mice was a disco cage. Three years back, in a strobe of insight, her team decided to stick mice engineered with a genetic predisposition to Alzheimer’s disease under flashing lights. For just an hour a day, these mice—their brains chock full of amyloid-beta, a toxic protein that likely contributes to the mind-eating disease—crawled

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UAE announces pan-Arab body for space programme

Eleven Arab states including Saudi Arabia, Algeria and Morocco on Tuesday signed on to the first regional team to cooperate on a space programme, the UAE said.

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Fish in river that famously caught fire now OK'd for dinner

Fish in an Ohio river that became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say.

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A new first: Scientists mimic nature's self-affinity using computer simulations

For the first time, researchers have simulated the process of surface roughness creation. This is a step forward in understanding the emergence of fractal characteristic of rough surfaces on many scales ranging from atomic to geological scales. The perspectives of their findings are far reaching. Controlling surface roughness is essential to the performance and durability of virtually all engineer

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Ultrasound provides precise, minimally invasive way to measure heart function in children

Currently, a practical, precise, minimally invasive way to measure cardiac output or heart function in children undergoing surgery does not exist. New research illustrates how a novel minimally invasive method using catheter-based ultrasound to measure heart function performed with similar precision to a traditional highly invasive device.

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Study finds test of protein levels in the eye a potential predictor of (future) Alzheimer's disease

Low levels of amyloid-beta and tau proteins, biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease, in eye fluid were significantly associated with low cognitive scores, according to a new study. These findings indicate that proteins in the eye may be a potential source for an accessible, cost-effective test to predict future Alzheimer's disease.

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Researchers discover new material to help power electronics

Scientists have discovered a way to simplify how electronic devices use those electrons — using a material that can serve dual roles in electronics, where historically multiple materials have been necessary.

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From the archive

From the archive From the archive, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00882-8 How Nature reported Australian flooding in 1919, and the conservation of patches of grass in 1969.

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UK pledges to fully fund EU nuclear-fusion facility

UK pledges to fully fund EU nuclear-fusion facility UK pledges to fully fund EU nuclear-fusion facility, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00930-3 Britain will pay £60 million to keep the Joint European Torus near Oxford running if negotiations to continue EU funding stall.

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Välkommen till riksårsmöte 2019 i Göteborg!

Då var det snart dags för riksårsmöte i Göteborg! Inbjudan har nu skickats ut via e-post och snigelpost och har du inte fått din inbjudan än så hör av dig till oss så löser vi det. I kalendariet ligger nu också en post med inbjudan bifogad. Kom ihåg att du måste föranmäla dig till vissa […] The post Välkommen till riksårsmöte 2019 i Göteborg! appeared first on Vetenskap och Folkbildning .

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Scientists study fish to learn how to adapt to the impacts of climate change

Freshwater biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and nature-based solutions which increase the resilience of ecological communities are becoming increasingly important in helping communities prepare for the unavoidable effects of climate change.

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Making xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from paper paste

The ecological bio-production of xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from material produced by the paper industry has been achieved by a Japanese research team. This discovery could contribute to the development of a greener and more sustainable society. The findings were published on March 4, in Green Chemistry.

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Uncovering the superconducting phosphine: P2H4 and P4H6

Phosphine (PH3), a typical hydrogen-rich hydride, has attracted a great deal of research interest because of its superconducting transition at high pressure. However,PH3 phase under compression has remained unknown and no relevant experimental studies have been reported. In a recent paper published in National Science Review, it reports the stoichiometric evolutions of PH3 under high pressure. The

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New material will allow abandoning bone marrow transplantation

Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' developed nanomaterial, which will be able to restore the internal structure of bones damaged due to osteoporosis and osteomyelitis. A special bioactive coating of the material helped to increase the rate of division of bone cells by three times. In the future, it can allow to abandon bone marrow transplantation and patients

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Human diet changes influenced consonant prevalence distribution in languages

Labiodental sounds, such as F and V, have been known to be rarely met in hunter-gatherer languages. To understand how this has occurred, the authors undertook a massive statistical inquiry. 2,400 languages were analyzed, and a biomechanical model of mouth and lip movements was created.

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Electron accelerators reveal the radical secrets of antioxidants

An Osaka University professor has demonstrated for the first time the value of linear particle accelerators for the generation of free radicals inside biological samples. This work will have important applications throughout biochemistry, especially for researchers studying antioxidants and photosynthesis.

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Eating fish may help prevent asthma

A scientist from James Cook University in Australia says an innovative study has revealed new evidence that eating fish can help prevent asthma.

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Australian study links breastfeeding with lower risk of heart disease

Mothers who breastfeed their babies have a lower risk of developing or dying from heart disease than those who don't breastfeed, finds new research from the University of Sydney, Australia.

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Computer program developed to find 'leakage' in quantum computers

A new computer program that spots when information in a quantum computer is escaping to unwanted states will give users of this promising technology the ability to check its reliability without any technical knowledge for the first time.

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Electron accelerators reveal the radical secrets of antioxidants

In a groundbreaking series of experiments, an Osaka University researcher has demonstrated an exciting new method for understanding the power of antioxidants to protect us from harmful free radicals. Professor Kazuo Kobayashi has used linear electron accelerators, sometimes called "linacs," to fling electrons at speeds not previously seen in biological research. When the electrons slammed into wat

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Discovery of parasitic arsenic cycle may offer glimpse of life in future, warmer oceans

A newly discovered parasitic cycle, in which ocean bacteria keep phytoplankton on an energy-sapping treadmill of nutrient detoxification, may offer a preview of what further ocean warming will bring.

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Danske Henrik Fisker er klar med Tesla-konkurrent i 2021

Ny elektrisk SUV fra Fisker Inc. skal kunne køre næsten 500 km på en opladning.

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Your heartburn meds may threaten your kidneys

Common medications for heartburn, acid reflux, and ulcers are linked to increased risks of kidney failure and chronic kidney disease, according to a new study. Use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), a group of drugs that reduce the production of stomach acid, may increase risk as much as 20 percent—and also come with a four times greater risk of kidney failure, researchers say. People at least 65 y

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Think of the closest planet to Earth… Wrong! Think again!

Earth is the third planet from the Sun, so our closest neighbour must be planet two of four, right? Wrong! Neither Venus nor Mars is the right answer. Three scientists ran the numbers. In this YouTube video, one of them explains why our nearest neighbour is… Mercury! Did Musk pick the wrong planet to die on? By 2024, Elon Musk wants to land humans on Mars – the billionaire entrepreneur has said

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Using Pepsi to see magnetic fields

Astronomers capture forces at work on the surface of a distant star.

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2.1 Billion-Year-Old Tracks May Be Giant Ancient "Slime Molds"

Whatever made these structures lived 1.4 billion years before the first animals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Carbon monoxide detectors could warn of extraterrestrial life

Carbon monoxide detectors in our homes warn of a dangerous buildup of that colorless, odorless gas we normally associate with death. Astronomers, too, have generally assumed that a build-up of carbon monoxide in a planet's atmosphere would be a sure sign of lifelessness. Now, a UC Riverside-led research team is arguing the opposite: celestial carbon monoxide detectors may actually alert us to a di

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$500M USA exascale supercomputer to arrive in 2021

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Heading towards a tsunami of light

Researchers have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. The strong wave can be used to study interactions between matter and light in a unique way.

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Bright skies for plant-based jet fuels

With an estimated daily fuel demand of more than 5 million barrels per day, the global aviation sector is incredibly energy-intensive and almost entirely reliant on petroleum-based fuels. However, a new analysis shows that sustainable plant-based bio-jet fuels could provide a competitive alternative to conventional fuels if current development and scale-up initiatives continue to push ahead succes

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From foam to bone: Plant cellulose can pave the way for healthy bone implants

Researchers have developed what could be the bone implant material of the future: an airy, foamlike substance from plant cellulose that can be injected into the body and provide scaffolding for the growth of new bone.

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Position paper on potential impacts of climate change on winter sports

For the first time, experts of European weather and climate research institutions have issued a joint paper on the impacts of climate change on winter sports. The initiators are the Stiftung Sicherheit im Skisport (SIS, Foundation for Safety of Ski Sports), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), and the German Sport University Cologne (DSHS).

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New Chemistry, Making New Things

In a perverse way, I’m enjoying how modern organic synthesis is upsetting the classic undergraduate sort of test-question syntheses. You know – Grignards, ester condensations, oxidation and reduction of carbonyls, Wittigs, Sandmeyer reactions, Friedel-Crafts, good ol’ hammer-and-tongs bond formation. I had sophomore organic back in the early 1980s, so we didn’t even have palladium couplings in th

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10 novels that brilliantly capture the American experience

Literature expands our ability to feel empathy and inspires compassion. These ten novels tackle some facet of the American experience. The list includes a fictional retelling of the first Native American to graduate from Harvard and hiding out in inner city Newark. We call it "getting lost" in a novel, but what we find there is often more impactful than any nonfiction work can offer. Literature m

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New approach to stem soil erosion

Topsoil and nutrient runoff are two serious challenges of sustainable agriculture. Perennial crops can help solve these problems by preserving cropland productivity without requiring substantial dietary and manufacture shifts. Although the development of perennial corn has long been an idea, a major roadblock has been the lack of knowledge about the genetics of perennialism. SDSU researchers Drs.

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Giving marsupials scents from suitors helps breeding programs

Smell is a vital part of sexual attraction for all kinds of animals (including humans). We may be able to use smell to improve breeding programs by giving the female animal a sample sniff of potential mates and letting her choose the best one before introducing them.

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Energy loss gives unexpected insights in evolution of quasar

An international team of astrophysicists observed for the first time that the jet of a quasar is less powerful on long radio wavelengths than earlier predicted. This discovery gives new insights in the evolution of quasar jets. They made this observation using the international Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) telescope, which produced high-resolution radio images of quasar 4C+19.44, located over 5 bil

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Lake 'dead zones' could kill fish and poison drinking water

'Dead zones' could become increasingly common in lakes in future due to climate change, reducing fish numbers and releasing toxic substances into drinking water.

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Researchers show best methods to help endangered woodpecker

The best methods to help an endangered woodpecker in Alabama thrive are installation of artificial homes and controlled burning in forests, according to research from The University of Alabama.

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We did a breakthrough 'speed test' in quantum tunnelling, and here's why that's exciting

When you deal with things at the quantum scale, where things are very small, the world is quite fuzzy and bizarre in comparison to our everyday experiences.

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Indian summer monsoon amplified global warming 130,000 years ago, helping end ice age

The past may be a surprisingly useful guide for predicting responses to future climate change. This is especially important for places where extreme weather has been the norm for a long time, such as the Indian subcontinent. Being able to reliably predict summer monsoon rainfall is critical to plan for the devastating impact it can have on the 1.7 billion people who live in the region.

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A nutty solution for improving brain health

Long-term, high nut consumption could be the key to better cognitive health in older people according to new research from the University of South Australia.

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Milk or no milk? Study fills long-time knowledge gap on babies with genetic disorder

A new study co-authored by a Washington State University researcher finally brings clarity to parents of children with Duarte galactosemia, a milder variant of a genetic disorder that impairs the body's ability to process a milk sugar known as galactose. Published in the journal Pediatrics, the study found that children with Duarte galactosemia are at no greater risk of long-term developmental abn

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Discovery of parasitic arsenic cycle may offer glimpse of life in future, warmer oceans

A newly discovered parasitic cycle, in which ocean bacteria keep phytoplankton on an energy-sapping treadmill of nutrient detoxification, may offer a preview of what further ocean warming will bring.

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Registry helps move aortic dissection care forward

Diagnosis, treatments and outcomes for acute aortic dissection have evolved. An international registry (IRAD) reveals trends and the power of data, presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Session.

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New approach to stem soil erosion

Topsoil and nutrient runoff are two serious challenges of sustainable agriculture. Perennial crops can help solve these problems by preserving cropland productivity without requiring substantial dietary and manufacture shifts. Although the development of perennial corn has long been an idea, a major roadblock has been the lack of knowledge about the genetics of perennialism. SDSU researchers Drs.

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Giving marsupials scents from suitors helps breeding programs

Smell is a vital part of sexual attraction for all kinds of animals (including humans). We may be able to use smell to improve breeding programs by giving the female animal a sample sniff of potential mates and letting her choose the best one before introducing them.

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Researchers show best methods to help endangered woodpecker

The best methods to help an endangered woodpecker in Alabama thrive are installation of artificial homes and controlled burning in forests, according to research from The University of Alabama.

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The electric car, technological disruption, and climate change

The key ingredients for decarbonization of the American economy are renewable energy and the electric car. Most of America's use of fossil fuels is in transportation.

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Smarter automatic defibrillator

Automatic implantable cardiac defibrillators (AICDs) deliver shocks to the heart to correct arrythmias. They do so based on electrocardiogram data. Researchers have now shown that an AICD can be programmed to also measure stroke volume — the amount of blood pumped out of the heart. The hope is that this will enable the AICDs to deliver shocks only when needed.

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Levitating objects with light

Specially designed materials enable objects of different sizes to be levitated and manipulated with light, thanks to new research.

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Study explaining side effects of statins finds drug can have unexpected benefits

By suppressing the activity of key cellular receptors called G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their interacting partners called G proteins, statins have the potential to alter various bodily functions controlled by this important pathway, according to researchers.

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Superbugs have colonized the International Space Station — but there's a silver lining

Researchers have taken another small step towards deep space exploration, by testing a new silver- and ruthenium-based antimicrobial coating aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Their study shows that the AGXX® dramatically reduced the number of bacteria on contamination-prone surfaces — and could help protect future astronauts beyond the moon and Mars.

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Bright skies for plant-based jet fuels

With an estimated daily fuel demand of more than 5 million barrels per day, the global aviation sector is incredibly energy-intensive and almost entirely reliant on petroleum-based fuels. However, a new analysis shows that sustainable plant-based bio-jet fuels could provide a competitive alternative to conventional fuels if current development and scale-up initiatives continue to push ahead succes

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From foam to bone: Plant cellulose can pave the way for healthy bone implants

Researchers have developed what could be the bone implant material of the future: an airy, foamlike substance from plant cellulose that can be injected into the body and provide scaffolding for the growth of new bone.

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Bromethalin is poisoning the parrots of Telegraph Hill, study finds

Bromethalin, a common rat poison, is the agent responsible for a neurological disease that has sickened or killed birds from a popular flock of naturalized parrots that reside primarily in the Telegraph Hill area in north San Francisco, according to a new study.

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Trek's new bike helmet mimics your brain's protective fluid

Technology A better understanding of how concussions happen has led to more innovative helmet designs. Over the last few decades researchers have begun to better understand how head injuries—particularly concussions—happen. In tandem, helmet companies have used that new…

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The Myth of Fingerprints

Police today increasingly embrace DNA tests as the ultimate crime-fighting tool. They once felt the same way about fingerprinting

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Making xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from paper paste – towards a green and sustainable society

The ecological bio-production of xylitol and cellulose nanofibers using modified yeast cells, from material produced by the paper industry has been achieved by a Japanese research team. This discovery could contribute to the development of a greener and more sustainable society. The findings were published on March 4, in Green Chemistry.

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Nanoscale Lamb wave-driven motors in nonliquid environments

Light driven movement is challenging in nonliquid environments as micro-sized objects can experience strong dry adhesion to contact surfaces and resist movement. In a recent study, Jinsheng Lu and co-workers at the College of Optical Science and Engineering, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, School of Engineering and the Institute of Advanced Technology in China and Singapore, dev

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We need a legally binding treaty to make plastic pollution history

A powerful marriage between the fossil fuel and plastic industries threatens to exacerbate the global plastic pollution crisis. The Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL) estimates the next five years will see a 33-36% surge in global plastics production.

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Ny aftale: Sygehuse kan spare 15 pct. på medicinpriser

Sundhedsministeriet, Danske Regioner og Lægemiddelindustriforeningen indgår aftale om at sænke prisen på sygehusmedicin frem til og med 2023. Dog er der tvivl om betydning i regionerne.

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Making xylitol and cellulose nanofibers from paper paste – towards a green and sustainable society

The ecological bio-production of xylitol and cellulose nanofibers using modified yeast cells, from material produced by the paper industry has been achieved by a Japanese research team. This discovery could contribute to the development of a greener and more sustainable society. The findings were published on March 4, in Green Chemistry.

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Researchers find cost-effective method for hydrogen fuel production process

Nanoparticles composed of nickel and iron have been found to be more effective and efficient than other, more costly materials when used as catalysts in the production of hydrogen fuel through water electrolysis.

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How to make water issues matter to world leaders

In December 1992, the UN General Assembly declared 22 March World Water Day, to be celebrated each year. With increasing populations and economic activities, many countries face water scarcity – which in turn limits their economic development.

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Researchers suggest tight oil prices might be based on futures contracts instead of day-to-day price fluctuations

A pair of researchers, one with the Institute of Management and Economics at Clausthal University of Technology, the other the Department of Earth and Environment at Boston University, has found evidence that suggests oil prices might now be based on futures contracts instead of day-to-day price fluctuations. In their paper published in the journal Nature Energy, Esmail Ansari and Robert Kaufmann

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Lab-Grown Brain Uses “Tendrils” to Grab, Control Spinal Cords

Mini-Brain Cambridge scientists say they’ve grown a miniature brain in a petri dish that seizes control of biological material around it. Unlike previous lab-grown brains , this one actively will send out “tendrils” to connect to a spinal cord removed from a mouse, according to The Guardian — and can then use its new spine to control a mouse muscle attached to it. It’s…Alive? The brain, which The

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Heading towards a tsunami of light

Researchers have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. The strong wave can be used to study interactions between matter and light in a unique way.

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Carbon monoxide detectors could warn of extraterrestrial life

A UC Riverside-led team used computer models of chemistry in the biosphere and atmosphere to identify two intriguing scenarios in which carbon monoxide readily accumulates in the atmospheres of living planets. The models show that relatively high amounts of carbon monoxide are compatible with life and should not automatically rule out the possibility of life on some planets.

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Levitating objects with light

Specially designed materials enable objects of different sizes to be levitated and manipulated with light, thanks to new research from Caltech scientists.

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Epigenetic protein could be new therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia

British researchers have discovered that an epigenetic protein called EZH2 delays the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but then switches sides once the disease is established to help maintain tumor growth. The study, which will be published March 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting EZH2 could therefore be an effective treatment for AML, an aggressive bloo

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Human Spaceflight Could Be a $23 Billion Industry by 2030

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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The world is utterly unprepared for artificial intelligence in the near-term: "Media Synthesis", the phenomenon which includes deepfakes, is further along than almost anyone realizes and is prepared for, and this will result in a lot of fun and angst come the 2020s

I run the /r/MediaSynthesis subreddit, collecting links and discussions surrounding this technology. The other day, I asked /r/MachineLearning about a topic that I've been tossing about my head for almost a full decade now: when will we be able to use style transfer on audio reliably? In the simplest possible terms, "style transfer" is when you make one thing like another using machine learning.

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2019 Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence Symposium

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Hong Kong to build $79 bn artificial island

Hong Kong plans to build one of the world's largest artificial islands with an eye-watering $79 billion price tag, city officials announced Tuesday.

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Four ways social media platforms could stop the spread of hateful content in aftermath of terror attacks

The deadly attack on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, in which 50 people were killed and many others critically injured, was streamed live on Facebook by the man accused of carrying it out. It was then quickly shared across social media platforms.

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Tree swallows expose state of our climate

For many of us, birds are an interesting distraction or a sign of spring. For Fran Bonier and her former master's student Amelia Cox, bird populations provide vital data about the health of the world. Their new research adds to growing evidence that the climate is changing – and not for the better.

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IGR J17503-2636 may be a supergiant fast X-ray transient, study finds

European astronomers have investigated a recently discovered hard X-ray transient known as IGR J17503-2636 using space observatories. Results of this study, presented in a paper published March 7 on the arXiv pre-print server, suggest that this source may be a relatively faint supergiant fast X-ray transient.

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Sustainable pellet production saving lives

The world needs more efficient energy systems based on renewable raw material, an equation not easily solved. At Karlstad University, research and education are in progress to find sustainable energy systems, for instance, through a project in which pellets replace charcoal in cooking solutions in Zambia, because cooking with charcoal as fuel leads to extensive deforestation as well as health haza

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Ooni Koda Pizza Oven Review: A Backyard Pie Party

Can a home pizza oven be easy and convenient? With this backyard Ooni oven, it can.

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Sikorsky's Self-Flying Helicopter Hints at the Flying Future

The Lockheed Martin subsidiary has made giving flight a whirl a matter of tapping on a tablet.

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Evolving society: why humanity coheres

Evolving society: why humanity coheres Evolving society: why humanity coheres, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00873-9 Agustín Fuentes compares three books on the origins, trajectory and implications of our group behaviour.

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Novel coating kyboshes ISS bacteria

Researchers report microbe numbers drop, but survivors are multi-drug-resistant. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Earth is a less volatile version of the sun

Elemental comparison of the planet and its host star suggests a ‘universal process’ governing rocky planets across the universe. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Apple iMacs Finally Refreshed With 8th Gen Intel Core CPUs And Add Radeon Vega GPU Options

Yesterday, Apple refreshed its iPad mini family and introduced an all-new 10.5-inch iPad Air model. Today, it’s time for Apple turn to its attention to its oft-neglected iMac family, which …

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A new first: Scientists mimic nature's self-affinity using computer simulations

For the first time, researchers have simulated the process of surface roughness creation. This is a step forward in understanding the emergence of fractal characteristic of rough surfaces on many scales ranging from atomic to geological scales. The perspectives of their findings are far reaching. Controlling surface roughness is essential to the performance and durability of virtually all engineer

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Team studies smarter automatic defibrillator

Automatic implantable cardiac defibrillators (AICDs) deliver shocks to the heart to correct arrythmias. They do so based on electrocardiogram data. A team of researchers from UT Health San Antonio and UT Austin have now shown that an AICD can be programmed to also measure stroke volume — the amount of blood pumped out of the heart. The hope is that this will enable the AICDs to deliver shocks onl

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Tree swallows expose state of our climate

For many of us, birds are an interesting distraction or a sign of spring. For Fran Bonier and her former master's student Amelia Cox, bird populations provide vital data about the health of the world. Their new research adds to growing evidence that the climate is changing – and not for the better.

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Cheer the first women-only spacewalk, but equality is still far away

The first women-only spacewalk is a cause for celebration, but we are still a long way from achieving equality in our space programmes

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YouTube's Recommendation Algorithm Has a Dark Side

It leads users down rabbit holes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Biologists develop new method of cloning

DNA, which contains the genetic information of an organism, consists of long chains of nucleotides. In order to study the functions based on the sequence of these building blocks, DNA molecules must be inserted in carrier molecules (plasmid-vectors) to be multiplied. For this cloning process, a research team from the University of Bayreuth has developed a highly efficient, fast and inexpensive met

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Dead whale found with 40 kilograms of plastic in its stomach

A dead whale found in the Philippines with 40 kilograms of plastic inside its body is the latest example of the problem of plastic pollution

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Cutting-edge fingerprint technology could help in the fight against knife crime

A new fingerprint technique capable of producing high-resolution images from the most challenging of metal surfaces, including knives and firearms—is already attracting interest from detectives working on cold cases.

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Biologists develop new method of cloning

DNA, which contains the genetic information of an organism, consists of long chains of nucleotides. In order to study the functions based on the sequence of these building blocks, DNA molecules must be inserted in carrier molecules (plasmid-vectors) to be multiplied. For this cloning process, a research team from the University of Bayreuth has developed a highly efficient, fast and inexpensive met

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Levitating objects with light

Researchers at Caltech have designed a way to levitate and propel objects using only light, by creating specific nanoscale patterning on the objects' surfaces.

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Researchers explore the effects of climate change on hunger

As the climate changes, where plants grow best is predicted to shift. Crops that once thrived as a staple in one region may no longer be plentiful enough to feed a community that formerly depended on it. Beyond where plants grow, there's also the issue of how they grow. Evidence suggests that plants grown in the presence of high carbon dioxide levels aren't as nutritious.

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Strength in numbers for 3-D printing

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Meal kits and recipe tastings increase healthy food selections among food pantry clients

Food pantry clients are more likely to select nutrient dense products when they are arranged with all ingredients needed to make a meal. These findings can help food pantries maximize the nutritional quality of food available and improve the diets of their clients.

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The Power to Overcome Challenges

We all experience different forms of adversity in our lives, some more severe than others. But why do some people seem to crumble when faced with those challenges, while others remain optimistic and persevere? Do genetics play a role? Scientists are looking at the biological underpinnings of resilience for answers. Heather Berlin, Ph.D. Diving into this subject, the Rubin Museum of Art welcomed t

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Apple iMac 2019: Specs, Price, Release Date

Apple just refreshed its desktop computers. One of them now runs on Intel’s 9th-generation processor.

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Foreign retaliation to U.S. tariffs disproportionately affects Republican-leaning counties, report finds

The impact of trade policies the Trump administration began implementing in 2018 is starting to come into sharp relief. A new study suggests that Republican-leaning counties are among the areas that have been hit hardest by trading partners' retaliation to the U.S. tariffs.

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Don't fall for it: A parent's guide to protecting your kids from online hoaxes

It's a parent's responsibility to protect their children from harm, no matter where that threat of harm comes from. But what if the threat is a hoax?

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Researchers use muon detector to measure electric potential in a thunderstorm

A team of researchers from several institutions in India and Japan has found that it is possible to use a muon detector to measure electric potential in thunderstorms. The paper is published in the journal Physical Review Letters. The researchers explain that they noticed muon detection levels drop during thunderstorms, and used that information to calculate electric potential in thunderstorms.

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Instagram adds 'checkout' feature to let you purchase items directly through the app

'Checkout' lets users store their payment information and purchase items directly through Instagram. Starting Tuesday, it's rolling out to 20 brands, including H&M, Zara, Uniqlo and Adidas.

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Intel, DOE Announce First-Ever Exascale Supercomputer ‘Aurora’

Intel and the DOE have announced the first exascale computer expected to be deployed. Codenamed Aurora, the system should be ready by 2021. The post Intel, DOE Announce First-Ever Exascale Supercomputer ‘Aurora’ appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Muslimer födda i väst stödjer oftare extremism

Det är en vanlig uppfattning att hotet från jihadister kommer från platser utanför västvärlden. Utifrån det antagandet har vissa länder velat bygga murar och stängsel vid sina gränser och andra utfärda inreseförbud för medborgare från en del muslimska länder. Samtidigt visar sammanställningar att majoriteten av de islamistiska terrordåden i Europa och USA är planerade och genomförda av personer s

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The Mathematical Phrase that Melts My Brain

What the heck does “three times less than” mean? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Huawei om bagdørs-beskyldninger: »Hvis dit mål er at nedlægge et netværk, så er der lettere og mere effektive måder«

Den kinesiske teleleverandør Huawei svarer på bekymringer om 'Kill Switche' og bagdøre i hardware og software.

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Ny prognose: Femerntunnel kaprer op til 1.644 biler om dagen fra Storebælt

Trafikprognosen for den kommende sænketunnel under Femern Bælt er blevet opdateret, efter at konsulenter for fire år siden påpegede huller i beregningerne. Den nye prognose giver det enorme projekt bedre økonomiske udsigter end de hidtidige estimater.

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Study explaining side effects of statins finds drug can have unexpected benefits

By suppressing the activity of key cellular receptors called G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their interacting partners called G proteins, statins have the potential to alter various bodily functions controlled by this important pathway, according to researchers at The University of Toledo.

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The Gambler’s Fallacy

One of the core concepts in my book, The Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe , is that humans are inherently good at certain cognitive tasks, and inherently bad at others. Further, our cognitive processes are biased in many ways and we tend to commit common errors in logic and mental short-cuts that are not strictly valid. The human brain appears to be optimized by evolution to quickly and efficientl

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How heavy elements come about in the universe

Heavy elements are produced during stellar explosion or on the surfaces of neutron stars through the capture of hydrogen nuclei (protons). This occurs at extremely high temperatures, but at relatively low energies. An international research team headed by Goethe University has now succeeded in investigating the capture of protons at the storage ring of the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforsc

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Expansion of transposable elements offers clue to genetic paradox

Species often experience a genetic bottleneck that diminishes genetic variation after speciation or introduction into a new area. Though bottlenecks in population size always reduce fitness and evolutionary potential, introduced species often become invasive. This is known as the genetic paradox of invasion.

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Study shows IPCC is underselling climate change

A new study has revealed that the language used by the global climate change watchdog, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), is overly conservative – and therefore the threats are much greater than the Panel's reports suggest.

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Organoids reveal inflammatory processes in chlamydia infections

For a long time, researchers were only able to examine human cells infected with bacteria by using cancer cell lines. However, these transformed cells often give a false impression of the infection process. Fallopian tube organoids from normal human fallopian tube cells, on the other hand, reflect the natural structure of the tissue. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology i

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Get ready for a menu of lab-grown steaks, "bleeding" plant burgers, and cricket smoothies

It takes about 90 seconds of flipping and stirring for Josh Hyman to whip up a skillet of fluffy, pale yellow scrambled eggs. He's in an industrial kitchen in San Francisco, and I'm 3,000 miles away on my farm in rural Tennessee, watching Hyman cook via Skype. He tips the craggy yellow mounds out of the pan and onto the plate, the eggs jiggling as they slide.

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Researchers pinpoint cause of deadly Lake Michigan rip current

The storm on Lake Michigan lasted only 15 minutes, but the conditions it put into motion took seven lives.

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Expansion of transposable elements offers clue to genetic paradox

Species often experience a genetic bottleneck that diminishes genetic variation after speciation or introduction into a new area. Though bottlenecks in population size always reduce fitness and evolutionary potential, introduced species often become invasive. This is known as the genetic paradox of invasion.

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Organoids reveal inflammatory processes in chlamydia infections

For a long time, researchers were only able to examine human cells infected with bacteria by using cancer cell lines. However, these transformed cells often give a false impression of the infection process. Fallopian tube organoids from normal human fallopian tube cells, on the other hand, reflect the natural structure of the tissue. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology i

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What are the dangers and downsides of A.I.?

The development of artificial intelligence has begun to feel inevitable and holds lots of promise, but there are hidden dangers, according to Ben Zhao. Zhao, a computer scientist at the University of Chicago, has spent much of his career testing how the security of these systems can break down. “Really, this space is so hyped—there’s so much excitement—that I thought that it was just a little too

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America Cares About Climate Change Again

Suddenly, climate change is a high-profile national issue again. It’s not just the Green New Deal. Around the country, the loose alliance of politicians, activists, and organizations concerned about climate change is mobilizing. They are deploying a new set of strategies aimed at changing the minds—or at least the behaviors—of a large swath of Americans, including utility managers, school princip

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New Argonne supercomputer, built for next-gen AI, will be most powerful in U.S.

The most powerful computer ever built in the United States will make its home at Argonne National Laboratory in 2021, the U.S. Department of Energy and Intel announced today. Aurora, the United States' first exascale computer, will combine unprecedented processing power with the growing potential of artificial intelligence to help solve the world's most important and complex scientific challenges.

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Adapting to melting ice trails isn't easy, even for Arctic locals

Environment Climate scientists wanted to understand how their lives are changing. Of the world’s regions, the Arctic is confronting the most dramatic immediate impacts of climate change.

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The World Bank must clean up its act

The World Bank must clean up its act The World Bank must clean up its act, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00876-6 A court ruling on environmental damages is a wake-up call: agencies are slipping in their mission to help the global poor, says Vijaya Ramachandran.

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Instagram's New Shopping Feature Works Like a Digital Mall

Because #capitalism.

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Taiwan's new carrier StarLux signs deal with Airbus for 17 planes

Taiwan's new StarLux Airlines signed a deal on Tuesday worth up to $6 billion for 17 Airbus A350 XWB aircraft in one of the island's biggest single commercial plane purchases.

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Danish telecom group shuns China's Huawei for 5G rollout

Denmark's biggest telecom group TDC has chosen Swedish firm Ericsson over existing provider Huawei to roll out its ultra-fast 5G mobile network across the country, as a debate rages over security concerns surrounding the Chinese giant.

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Material for new-generation atomic reactors developed

Materials scientists from the National University of Science and Technology "MISIS" (NUST MISIS) developed a unique sandwich steel-vanadium-steel material that is able to withstand temperatures of up to 700°C, hard radiation exposure, mechanical stress and chemical exposure for a long period of time. The material can be used in the shells of nuclear reactor cores.

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A laser technique proves effective to recover material designed to protect industrial products

Fluoropolymers are macromolecules made up of carbon and fluoride which, due to their properties, tend to be used as non-stick and anticorrosive coatings on a wide range of material. Products in the clothing, graphic, chemical and car industries as well as different metal molds and kitchen utensils need fluoropolymers for their coatings and to improve their features regarding sticking and resisting

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Method grows a new jawbone from a rib

A new technique grows live bone to repair craniofacial injuries by attaching a 3D-printed bioreactor—basically, a mold—to a rib. Stem cells and blood vessels from the rib infiltrate scaffold material in the mold and replace it with natural bone custom-fit to the patient. Bioengineer Antonios Mikos, a pioneer in the field of tissue engineering, and his colleagues combined technologies they have de

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Abel Prize for maths awarded to woman for first time

The Abel Prize in mathematics was on Tuesday awarded to Karen Uhlenbeck of the United States for her work on partial differential equations, the first woman to win the award, the Norwegian Academy …

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Spread of cancers halted by smart bacteria that trigger immune attack

In tests in animals, injecting genetically modified bacteria shrank tumours and triggered a strong immune response that prevented cancers spreading

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Appeals court dismisses charges of institutional racism at U.K.-Kenyan research partnership

Six plaintiffs failed to prove their careers suffered because of their skin color, court says

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Image of the Day: Organ Crosstalk

Zooming in on the ovarioles of Drosophila could reveal links between muscles, nutrition, and the development of eggs.

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På väg mot en tsunami av ljus

– Med hjälp av den här strålningskällan kan vi se verkligheten ur ett helt nytt perspektiv. Det är som att vrida en spegel och upptäcka något helt annat, säger Illia Thiele, teoretisk fysiker vid Chalmers tekniska högskola. Tillsammans med forskaren Evangelos Siminos vid Göteborgs universitet och professor Tünde Fülöp på Chalmers presenterar han en teoretisk metod för att skapa världens starkaste

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ESA's Hera asteroid mission borrows eyes of NASA's Dawn

The mission to the smallest asteroid ever explored will employ the same main camera as the mission to the largest asteroids of all. ESA's proposed Hera spacecraft to the Didymos asteroid pair has inherited its main imager from NASA's Dawn mission to the Vesta and Ceres asteroids.

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Molecular motors run in unison in a metal-organic framework

For molecular motors to be exploited effectively, they need to be able to operate in unison. However, integrating billions of these nanometre-sized motors into a single system and getting them to operate in unison has proved to be quite a challenge. Organic chemists at the University of Groningen have now succeeded in integrating numerous unidirectional light-driven rotary motors into a metal-orga

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Novel form of graphene-based optical material developed

Researchers at the University of Sydney, Swinburne University of Technology and the Australian National University have collaborated to develop a solar absorbing, ultrathin film with unique properties that has great potential for use in solar thermal energy harvesting.

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Researchers make a key discovery on how alpine streams work

An EPFL study has prompted scientists to rethink a standard approach used to calculate the velocity of gas exchange between mountain streams and the atmosphere. Research conducted in streams in Vaud and Valais indicate that equations used to predict gas exchange based on data from lowland streams undershoots the actual gas exchange velocity in mountain streams on average by a factor of 100.

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Robot arms with the flexibility of an elephant's trunk

Unlike conventional robot arms with hinged and swivel joints, new flexible arms being developed by Professor Stefan Seelecke and his research group at Saarland University are constructed using muscles made from shape-memory wires that have the ability to bend in almost any direction and to wind themselves around corners.

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Heading toward a tsunami of light

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. The strong wave can be used to study interactions between matter and light in a unique way.

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Dalian Coherent Light Source reveals hydroxyl super rotors from water photochemistry

Scientists at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently revealed hydroxyl super rotors from water photochemistry by using the Dalian Coherent Light Source (DCLS). The researchers, under the direction of Prof. Yuan Kaijun and Prof. Yang Xueming, published their findings in Nature Communications.

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Author Correction: Strong indirect coupling between graphene-based mechanical resonators via a phonon cavity

Author Correction: Strong indirect coupling between graphene-based mechanical resonators via a phonon cavity Author Correction: Strong indirect coupling between graphene-based mechanical resonators via a phonon cavity, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09240-8 Author Correction: Strong indirect coupling between graphene-based mechanical resonators via a phonon cavity

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Ett nätverk av gener bestämmer bladets form

Det är Barbara Terebieniec, doktorand vid Umeå Plant Science Centre som har identifierat de gener som kontrollerar bladform i europeisk asp. – Jag är intresserad av grundforskning kring populationer och hur vissa synliga egenskaper ärvs. Och bladform är en av de mest uppenbara egenskaperna hos växter, säger hon. – Vi använde metoder från bioinformatik för att ta in alla genetiska faktorer så väl

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Whose Job Is It to Help Build Public Trust in Science?

Scientists, research institutions and science writers all have roles to play — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Abelprisen går for første gang til en kvinde: Står bag gennembrud i gaugeteori

Hendes anerkendelse burde have været meget større, siger britisk teoretisk fysiker om Karen Uhlenbeck, der i år løber med Abelprisen, der er opkaldt efter Nordens største matematiker.

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Karen Uhlenbeck Is First Woman to Win Abel Prize for Mathematics

Dr. Uhlenbeck helped pioneer geometric analysis, developing techniques now commonly used by many mathematicians.

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James Bond is making the switch to an electric car, so when will you?

You don’t need to be green to embrace an electric car – their design and performance now rivals their gas-guzzling equivalents, says Jason Barlow

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Karen Uhlenbeck is first woman to win prestigious maths Abel prize

Karen Uhlenbeck has won the Abel prize, often called the Nobel prize of mathematics, for work that laid the foundations for major breakthroughs in theoretical physics

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Bubble maths researcher wins top award

One of the highest prizes for mathematics is awarded to Prof Karen Uhlenbeck for her ground-breaking work.

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Computer science college seniors in U.S. outperform peers in China, India and Russia, new research says

Undergraduate computer science programs at universities and colleges in the United States appear to produce more skilled students on average than equivalent programs in China, India and Russia, according to new Stanford-led research.

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How a Measles Quarantine Can Lead to Eviction

In June 2014, Rex Archer, the director of health in Kansas City, Missouri, quarantined five families during a measles outbreak because several of the families’ members had contracted measles. The residents were told to stay in their home and avoid returning to work for several days. Quarantine is a necessary, though difficult , measure that public-health officials sometimes take for people who ar

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Soap-bubble pioneer is first woman to win prestigious maths prize

Soap-bubble pioneer is first woman to win prestigious maths prize Soap-bubble pioneer is first woman to win prestigious maths prize, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00932-1 Abel-prize winner Karen Keskulla Uhlenbeck built bridges between analysis, geometry and physics.

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Founder of geometric analysis honored with Abel Prize

Karen Uhlenbeck is first woman to receive the honor

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The Read/Write Metaphor Is a Flawed Way to Talk About DNA

Among both scientists and laypeople, DNA is a language, one which we “read,” “write,” and “edit.” The metaphor may distort our understanding of genetics.

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How a tiger transforms into a man-eater

‘No Beast So Fierce’ examines the historical and environmental factors that turned a tiger in Nepal and India into a human-killer.

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Karen Uhlenbeck, Uniter of Geometry and Analysis, Wins Abel Prize

Karen Uhlenbeck , whose seminal work helped launch an entire field of mathematics, was awarded the Abel Prize in a ceremony today in Oslo. The prize, created by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters in 2003, is widely viewed as the mathematics equivalent of a Nobel Prize. Uhlenbeck’s work has “led to some of the most dramatic advances in mathematics in the last 40 years,” the prize citatio

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Spraying diseased citrus orchards with antibiotics could backfire

Spraying diseased citrus orchards with antibiotics could backfire Spraying diseased citrus orchards with antibiotics could backfire, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00875-7 Florida’s efforts to combat citrus greening with widespread drugs could harm the environment and public health.

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Antibiotics set to flood Florida’s troubled orange orchards

Antibiotics set to flood Florida’s troubled orange orchards Antibiotics set to flood Florida’s troubled orange orchards, Published online: 19 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00878-4 A desperate plan to fight a citrus scourge has public-health advocates and scientists concerned.

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