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nyheder2019marts20

Balance of two enzymes linked to pancreatic cancer survival

UC San Diego School of Medicine research sets the stage for clinicians to potentially one day use levels of a pancreatic cancer patient's PHLPP1 and PKC enzymes as a prognostic, and for researchers to develop new therapeutic drugs that inhibit PHLPP1 and boost PKC as a means to treat the disease.

5h

Scientists rise up against statistical significance

Scientists rise up against statistical significance Scientists rise up against statistical significance, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00857-9 Valentin Amrhein, Sander Greenland, Blake McShane and more than 800 signatories call for an end to hyped claims and the dismissal of possibly crucial effects.

2h

Spørg Fagfolket: Er 5G farligt for helbredet?

Flere læsere er bekymrede over artikler på de sociale medier, der advarer mod stråler fra 5G. Skal vi være bekymrede? Antennespecialist Gert Frølund Pedersen og kræftforsker Christoffer Johansen forklarer her, hvorfor de ikke er så bekymrede.

9h

Mobile DNA element found in mosquito parasite has potential for infectious disease control

Controlling mosquito-borne illnesses, such as Dengue or West Nile virus, has historically been difficult due to a lack of effective vaccines and concerns about the environmental impact of insecticides. Thus, scientists have turned to manipulating Wolbachia, a parasitic bacterium within mosquitoes, as a way to control the reproductive fitness of mosquito populations that transmit human disease.

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Research paves way for new source for leukemia drug

Chemistry researchers at Oregon State University have patented a method for making anti-leukemia compounds that until now have only been available via an Asian tree that produces them.

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Measuring impact of drought on groundwater resources from space

A team of scientists has been using the latest space technology, combined with ground measurements, to assess the health of one of the nation's most important sources of underground water, a large aquifer system located in California's San Joaquin Valley.

2min

Honey bee colonies more successful by foraging on non-crop fields

Honey bee colonies foraging on land with a strong cover of clover species and alfalfa do more than three times as well than if they are put next to crop fields of sunflowers or canola, according to a new study.

2min

New measurement method for radioactive methane

Researchers have made a first step towards creating a precise measuring device for radioactive methane.

2min

New measurement method for radioactive methane

Researchers have made a first step towards creating a precise measuring device for radioactive methane.

2min

Research paves way for new source for leukemia drug

Chemistry researchers at Oregon State University have patented a method for making anti-leukemia compounds that until now have only been available via an Asian tree that produces them.

2min

Mobile DNA element found in mosquito parasite has potential for infectious disease control

Controlling mosquito-borne illnesses, such as Dengue or West Nile virus, has historically been difficult due to a lack of effective vaccines and concerns about the environmental impact of insecticides. Thus, scientists have turned to manipulating Wolbachia, a parasitic bacterium within mosquitoes, as a way to control the reproductive fitness of mosquito populations that transmit human disease.

2min

Chop Up a Worm. It Will Regenerate. Scientists Figured Out Why.

Researchers identified the master control gene that enables worms to grow a new body, capturing the imagination of some humans looking for a fresh start.

3min

An Android Vulnerability Went Unfixed For Over Five Years

Older Android devices—of which there are over 100 million still in use—will remain exposed.

6min

Toilet seat that detects congestive heart failure getting ready to begin commercialization

With 1 million new cases of congestive heart failure diagnosed each year, a revolutionary product is making it easier for hospitals to monitor patients with the condition in the comfort of their own homes.

6min

Giant X-ray 'chimneys' are exhaust vents for vast energies produced at Milky Way's center

The center of our galaxy is a frenzy of activity. A behemoth black hole—4 million times as massive as the sun—blasts out energy as it chows down on interstellar detritus while neighboring stars burst to life and subsequently explode.

12min

Turn off a light, save a life, says new study

We all know that turning off lights and buying energy-efficient appliances affects our financial bottom line. Now, according to a new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers, we know that saving energy also saves lives and even more money for consumers by alleviating the costs of adverse health effects attributed to air pollution.

12min

NASA tracks Tropical Cyclone Trevor approaching Australia's Cape York Peninsula

Tropical Cyclone Trevor appeared to have a cloud-filled eye in visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite.

12min

UCI engineers aim to pioneer tissue-engineering approach to TMJ disorders

Here's something to chew on: One in four people are impacted by defects of the temporomandibular – or jaw – joint. Despite the pervasiveness of this affliction, treatments are lacking, and many sufferers resort to palliative measures to cope with the pain and debilitation it causes.

13min

BMI, but not age at puberty, tied to risk of multiple sclerosis

Some studies have suggested that people who are younger when they enter puberty are more likely to later develop multiple sclerosis (MS). But a new study attributes that link to body mass index (BMI). The study is published in the March 20, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

13min

‘Hot spots’ show how adaptable our DNA is

New research sheds light on the malleability of human DNA and points to just how adaptable—yet delicate—we are as a species. The study illuminates one aspect of the complicated question of what makes one person different from another, and how these differences evolve. The research examines hot spots of genetic variation within the human genome, looking at the sections of our DNA that are most lik

25min

Scientists’ New Goal: Make the ISS Bathroom Less Disgusting

Space Poop Space may be devoid of life, but us Earthlings are working hard to change that, especially when it comes to the bacteria growing in the International Space Station’s bathroom. The ISS’s bathroom isn’t the cleanest place in the universe, which is a problem given that space travel can weaken a person’s immune system — and that antibiotic-resistant bacteria have already been found on boar

27min

This High-Tech Toilet Seat Can Detect Heart Failure

Toilet Seat-Based Monitoring A team of researchers at the Rochester Institute of Technology invented a “toilet seat-based cardiovascular monitoring system” that could help hospitals monitor patients for risk of congestive heart failure — a toilet, in other words, that detects whether your heart is about to give out. “This system will be uniquely positioned to capture trend data in the home that h

27min

A Smuggler Just Got Caught With a Live Human Embryo in His Luggage

Pre-Emptive Kidnapping A Malaysian man was arrested on Saturday as he tried to smuggle a live human embryo into India through Mumbai’s airport. The smuggler, Partiban Durai, told police that this was the tenth trip smuggling embryos on behalf of a fertility clinic called Indo Nippon over an 18-month period, according to The Times of India — though the clinic is pushing back against his story. Sho

27min

What came first: all-seeing gods or large societies?

A search for the origin of religions

28min

Want in on nanotechnology? Capitalize on collaborative environments

Patent law experts demonstrate that private-public partnerships lead to promising innovation output measured in patents. Collaborations between private entities and public institutions have the potential to improve technology transfer in nanotechnology. Nations entering the nano-space can capitalize on collaborative environments, developing frameworks and close institutional networks between entit

30min

Radiomics predicts who will benefit from chemotherapy

Using data from computed tomography (CT) images, researchers may be able to predict which lung cancer patients will respond to chemotherapy, according to a new study.

30min

Look out for the super worm moon on Wednesday night – video

A rare super worm moon will loom large as it coincides with the spring equinox. It will be the third time this year a full moon has occurred near to the moon’s closest approach to Earth – making it a supermoon – and will be the last such event in 2019 Rare super worm moon will loom large as it coincides with equinox Continue reading…

32min

UIC researchers find hidden proteins in bacteria

Scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago have developed a way to identify the beginning of every gene — known as a translation start site or a start codon — in bacterial cell DNA with a single experiment and, through this method, they have shown that an individual gene is capable of coding for more than one protein.

35min

The EU Hits Google With a Third Billion-Dollar Fine. So What?

The latest penalty—stemming from how Google previously displayed search results on other websites—probably won't act as a deterrent, and critics want more.

36min

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Robots built by Toyota are going to help visitors at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

38min

TIMELAPSE OF THE FUTURE: A Journey to the End of Time (4K)

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38min

Why is 18 the age of adulthood if the brain can take 30 years to mature?

Research suggests that most human brains take about 25 years to develop, though these rates can vary among men and women, and among individuals. Although the human brain matures in size during adolescence, important developments within the prefrontal cortex and other regions still take pace well into one's 20s. The findings raise complex ethical questions about the way our criminal justice system

42min

Obama-Era Oil Leases Broke the Law by Not Assessing Climate Impact, Judge Rules

The decision could present a threat to President Trump’s agenda to quickly expand oil and gas drilling by offering opponents a roadmap to legal challenges.

45min

Tree rings contain secrets from the forest

Nexus Media News These wooden cores could help us better understand climate change. A team of scientists are studying tree rings to learn how climate change and carbon storage has impacted forests over time.

49min

Giant X-ray 'chimneys' are exhaust vents for vast energies produced at Milky Way's center

At the center of our galaxy, where an enormous black hole blasts out energy as it chows down on interstellar detritus while neighboring stars burst to life and explode. astronomers have discovered two exhaust channels — dubbed the 'galactic center chimneys' — that appear to funnel matter and energy away from the cosmic fireworks.

49min

New study reshapes understanding of how the brain recovers from injury

Each year, approximately 265,000 Americans have a stroke that causes visual impairment. New research, which appears in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, sheds light on how the damage in the brain caused by a stroke can lead to permanent vision impairment. The findings could provide researchers with a blueprint to better identify which areas of vision are recoverable, facilitating the

49min

Volvo will use cameras to fight drunk and distracted driving

Volvo plans to use cameras and sensors inside cars to combat drunk and distracted driving. The vehicles may intervene if a driver doesn't respond to warning signals — cars may …

58min

The best topological conductor yet: Spiraling crystal is the key to exotic discovery

A team of researchers has discovered the strongest topological conductor yet, in the form of thin crystal samples that have a spiral-staircase structure.

1h

Computer scientists create reprogrammable molecular computing system

Researchers have designed self-assembling DNA molecules with unprecedented reprogrammability.

1h

New mobile element found in mosquito parasite has potential for disease control

An interdisciplinary team of scientists has identified a new mobile DNA element in the Wolbachia parasite, which may contribute to improved control strategies for mosquito vectors of diseases such as Dengue and West Nile virus.

1h

Older immigrants living in US more satisfied with life than native-born counterparts

Most people who immigrated to the United States for a chance to live the 'American Dream' are more satisfied with their lives in the 'land of the free' than those who were born here, according to new research from Florida State University.

1h

NASA tracks Tropical Cyclone Trevor approaching Australia's Cape York Peninsula

Tropical Cyclone Trevor appeared to have a cloud-filled eye in visible imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite.

1h

NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Veronica develop off western Australia's coast

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a view of Tropical Cyclone Veronica after it developed off the northern coast of Western Australia.

1h

As if by magic: TGen develops program that lights up cancer-causing mutations

By conjuring the spell 'Lumos!' wizards in the mythical world of Harry Potter could light up the tip of their magic wands and illuminate their surroundings. So, too, does LumosVar, a computer program developed by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), 'light up' cancer-causing genetic Var-ients, or mutations, illuminating how physicians might best treat their patients.

1h

There Is No Way to Prevent the Next Cheating Scandal

The college-admissions scandal that led to federal bribery charges against dozens of parents last week unfolded at selective universities that pride themselves on “holistic” evaluations of their applicants. This process typically means that several admissions officers review a file and consider factors beyond grades and test scores , often intangible qualities that aren’t quantifiable and are usu

1h

Ryugu is probably a chip off one of these two other asteroids

Japan’s Hayabusa2 team has narrowed down the asteroid Ryugu’s origins based on its color.

1h

Cybrexa Therapeutics to Present First Data and Unveil Details for its alphalex™-PARP Inhibitor Lead Candidate CBX-11 at AACR Annual Meeting 2019

Cybrexa Therapeutics, a biotechnology company developing a new class of cancer therapeutics through its alphalex™ tumor targeting platform, today announced that Vishwas Paralkar, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer of Cybrexa, will present the first set of preclinical data supporting its alphalex™-PARP inhibitor lead candidate, CBX-11, at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meetin

1h

There are two kinds of failure – but only one is honorable

Learn to recognize failure and know the big difference between panicking and choking . At Big Think Edge, Malcolm Gladwell teaches how to check your inner critic and get clear on what failure is . Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships. None As Malcolm Gladwell – author of numerous New York Times bestselling books – points out, maste

1h

An Important Group of European Hunter-Gatherers Taught Themselves To Farm

Some 12,000 years ago, the land was exceptionally fertile curving up from the Nile River basin across Jordan, Syria, and Iraq, down into the Tigris River Valley. The area’s earliest settlers grew wheat, barely and lentils. Some kept pigs and sheep. Farming soon replaced hunting and foraging as a way of life there. The region became known as the Fertile Crescent, the birthplace of agriculture. This

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$70 off a robot vacuum and mop, plus other tech deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

1h

When Ancient Societies Hit a Million People, Vengeful Gods Appeared

From a societal standpoint, you need a divine power watching you only if your neighbor isn't doing so.

1h

WHO Panel Calls For a Registry of Gene-Editing Research in Humans

The advisors' recommendations follow news of ethically dubious gene-editing work carried out by He Jiankui late last year.

1h

Potent Weed Linked to Psychosis

Frequent use of high-strength cannabis may increase the risk of mental health problems, according to a large-scale epidemiological study.

1h

Research paves way for new source for leukemia drug

Chemistry researchers have patented a method for making anti-leukemia compounds that until now have only been available via an Asian tree that produces them.

1h

Generic advice doesn't help patients drop pounds

When it comes to losing weight, doctors' messages to their patients can make a powerful difference, according to new research from Duke University.

1h

Robotic 'gray goo'

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time a way to make a robot composed of many loosely coupled components, or 'particles.' Unlike swarm or modular robots, each component is simple, and has no individual address or identity. In their system, which the researchers call a 'particle robot,' each particle can perform only uniform volumetric oscillations (slightly expanding and contracting), bu

1h

Reality TV ‘must do more to protect mental health of participants’

Psychologists call for greater regulation of reality shows to address mental health risks Psychologists and producers who have worked in reality television have warned that the industry must do more to protect participants who are being “exploited and spat out” by the experience. After the death of the former Love Island contestant Mike Thalassitis , current and former members of production teams

1h

Fei-Fei Li Wants AI to Care More About Humans

Stanford professor and former Google employee Fei-Fei Li is the force behind the new Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence.

1h

What came first: all-seeing gods or large societies?

A search for the origin of religions

1h

Hate the gym? Grow a garden instead.

Health Even small amounts of light physical activity help reduce your mortality risk. Health experts spend a lot of time trying to get folks to the gym. But here’s the thing: many people hate gyms. I know, this is a total shock to you. And yet it’s true!

1h

Brain-inspired AI inspires insights about the brain (and vice versa)

Researchers have described the results of experiments that used artificial neural networks to predict with greater accuracy than ever before how different areas in the brain respond to specific words. The work employed a type of recurrent neural network called long short-term memory (LSTM) that includes in its calculations the relationships of each word to what came before to better preserve conte

1h

The best topological conductor yet: Spiraling crystal is the key to exotic discovery

A team of researchers has discovered the strongest topological conductor yet, in the form of thin crystal samples that have a spiral-staircase structure.

1h

Computer scientists create reprogrammable molecular computing system

Researchers have designed self-assembling DNA molecules with unprecedented reprogrammability.

1h

New short-tailed whip scorpion species discovered in Amazon

A new species of Surazomus, which belongs to the class Arachnida and the order Schizomida, has been discovered in the eastern Amazon, according to a new study.

1h

Earth-changing asteroid impact theory gets new evidence

Researchers have discovered new evidence to support the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis, which postulates that a fragmented comet slammed into the Earth close to 12,800 years ago. When James Kennett and his colleagues set out years ago to examine signs of a major cosmic impact toward the end of the Pleistocene epoch, little did they know just how far-reaching the projected climatic effect would b

1h

Hong Kong Is Planning a $79 Billion Artificial Island

Artificial Island Faced with a critical land shortage, the city of Hong Kong is planning to build one of the most ambitious artificial islands in the history of the world, an extraordinary development project that would change the face of modern development. The Lantau Tomorrow Vision project, which would cost $79 billion, would give the city an additional 1,000 hectares of land to build 260,000

1h

Why Did the USDA Perform 'Cat Cannibalism' Experiments?

These gruesome experiments were conducted to research a common parasite.

1h

OSIRIS-REx Spots Unexplained Particle Ejections from Asteroid Bennu

Not only is the surface remarkably rugged, but the asteroid is also regularly ejecting puffs of dust and rock into space. This is a phenomenon never before observed on an asteroid. The post OSIRIS-REx Spots Unexplained Particle Ejections from Asteroid Bennu appeared first on ExtremeTech .

1h

Stroke risk drops in both black and white older adults

Recent reductions in hospitalization and death due to stroke extend to both black and white Medicare beneficiaries, reports a study in the April issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

1h

Premature babies could benefit from combined glucocorticoid and antioxidant therapy

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have suggested that subtle changes to the drugs administered to mothers threatened with preterm birth or to premature babies could further improve clinical treatment and help increase their safety.

1h

Sustainable fisheries and conservation policy

There are roughly five times as many recreational fishers as commercial fishers throughout the world. And yet, the needs and peculiarities of these recreational fishers have largely been ignored in international fisheries and conservation policy. An international team of scientists led by Robert Arlinghaus from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries has now presented a fi

1h

Princeton scientists discover chiral crystals exhibiting exotic quantum effects

Princeton physicist Zahid Hasan led an international team of physicists who have discovered a form of chiral crystals — crystals with an asymmetry like biological "handedness" — that host slow light-like massless electrons. The movement of some groups of electrons in these crystals mimics the behavior of magnetic monopoles. These strange properties may be utilized for next-generation quantum, ma

1h

Tropical storms likely to become more deadly as climate changes

Tropical storms are likely to become more deadly under climate change, leaving people in developing countries, where there may be a lack of resources or poor infrastructure, at increased risk, new research shows.

1h

Toilet seat that detects congestive heart failure getting ready to begin commercialization

A toilet-seat based cardiovascular monitoring system aims to lower the hospital readmission rates of patients with congestive heart failure.

1h

North Africans were among the first to colonize the Canary Islands

People from North Africa are likely the main group that founded the indigenous population on the Canary Islands, arriving by 1000 CE, reports a new study.

1h

Robotic 'gray goo'

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time a way to make a robot composed of many loosely coupled components, or 'particles.' Unlike swarm or modular robots, each component is simple, and has no individual address or identity. In their system, which the researchers call a 'particle robot,' each particle can perform only uniform volumetric oscillations (slightly expanding and contracting), bu

1h

Visualizing better cancer treatment

Researchers have engineered nanoscale protein micelles capable of both delivering chemotherapeutic drugs and of being tracked by MRI. The innovation allows researchers to administer therapy while noninvasively monitoring the therapeutic progress and drastically reducing the need for surgical intervention. They biosynthesized a protein block copolymer containing amino acid building blocks with fluo

2h

Atheism Is Inconsistent with the Scientific Method, Prize-Winning Physicist Says

In conversation, the 2019 Templeton Prize winner does not pull punches on the limits of science, the value of humility and the irrationality of nonbelief — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

What Is Your Metabolism?

You've probably heard the word "metabolism," especially as it relates to weight loss or gain. But what is your metabolism, what does it do, and do you have any control over it? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Advanced Chromatography Preparation and Separation Solutions Deliver Robust and Reliable Sample Analysis

New sample preparation workflow and chromatography column enable rapid and reproducible characterization of steroid hormones and sensitive separation of drugs of abuse

2h

New High-Purity Acids Add Breadth to Chemicals Portfolio for Trace Elemental Analysis

Thermo Scientific ICP-OES acids tested for elemental impurities in the low parts-per-billion range

2h

China Is Building a 33,000 Ton Nuclear Icebreaker

Polar Bear Club China is working to develop a 33,069-ton nuclear icebreaker, designed to smash and grind its way through ice-covered waters, that would be even bigger than the epic nuclear-powered vessels built by Russia . The state-owned China General Nuclear Power Group just passed its Wednesday deadline for accepting bids from Chinese companies interested in actually building the 152-meter shi

2h

To abort or not to abort — making difficult choices alone

Some pregnant women are so conflicted about abortion that they don't even talk about it with their own mother. But they would like someone to listen to them talk to about their decision nonetheless. A new study shows that more training for health care providers could help fill that gap.

2h

Turn off a light, save a life, says new UW-Madison study

We all know that turning off lights and buying energy-efficient appliances affects our financial bottom line. Now, according to a new study by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers, we know that saving energy also saves lives and even more money for consumers by alleviating the costs of adverse health effects attributed to air pollution.

2h

Toilet seat that detects congestive heart failure getting ready to begin commercialization

A toilet-seat based cardiovascular monitoring system created by a team of Rochester Institute of Technology researchers aims to lower the hospital readmission rates of patients with congestive heart failure.

2h

Tropical storms likely to become more deadly as climate changes

Tropical storms are likely to become more deadly under climate change, leaving people in developing countries, where there may be a lack of resources or poor infrastructure, at increased risk, new research from Oregon State University shows.

2h

Mobile DNA element found in mosquito parasite has potential for infectious disease control

An interdisciplinary team of scientists has identified a new mobile DNA element in the Wolbachia parasite, which may contribute to improved control strategies for mosquito vectors of diseases such as Dengue and West Nile virus.

2h

Computer scientists create reprogrammable molecular computing system

Caltech researchers have designed self-assembling DNA molecules with unprecedented reprogrammability.

2h

Complex societies gave birth to big gods, not the other way around

Big data analyses by an international research team, including a member of the Complexity Science Hub Vienna, suggest that moralizing gods are rather the product than the drivers of social complexity. The results are published in the current issue of the journal Nature.

2h

Neutrons paint atomic portrait of prototypical cell signaling enzyme

Direct observations of the structure and catalytic mechanism of a prototypical kinase enzyme — protein kinase A or PKA — will provide researchers and drug developers with significantly enhanced abilities to understand and treat fatal diseases and neurological disorders such as cancer, diabetes, and cystic fibrosis. The discovery was made by an international team of researchers using macromolecul

2h

Precision-targeted liposomes curb triple-negative breast cancer, metastases in mice

A novel precision medicine strategy described in Science Advances offers an intriguing ray of hope for triple-negative breast cancer. The proof-of-concept study shows that dually-targeted, antibody-guided nanoparticles, loaded with an existing chemotherapy drug, markedly improved tumor targeting, decreased tumor and metastatic growth and dramatically improved survival in a mouse model — with no o

2h

Protein BRCA1 as a stress coach

Two proteins work hand in hand to ensure that the tumor cells of neuroblastoma can grow at full speed. In Nature, a Würzburg research team shows how the proteins can do this.

2h

Pushing MYC inhibition closer to the clinic

VHIO-born spin-off Peptomyc S.L. has developed and preclinically validated mini-protein MYC inhibitor as effective and tolerable against notoriously difficult-to-treat lung cancer subtype.

2h

The best topological conductor yet: Spiraling crystal is the key to exotic discovery

A team of researchers working at Berkeley Lab has discovered the strongest topological conductor yet, in the form of thin crystal samples that have a spiral-staircase structure. The team's result is reported in the March 20 edition of the journal Nature.

2h

Computer scientists create programmable self-assembling DNA

Computer scientists at UC Davis, Maynooth University in Ireland and the California Institute of Technology have created DNA molecules that can self-assemble into patterns essentially by running their own program. The work is published March 21 in the journal Nature.

2h

Adhesive gel bonds to eye surface, could repair injuries without surgery

An adhesive gel packed with light-activated chemicals can seal cuts or ulcers on the cornea — the clear surface of the eye — and then encourage the regeneration of corneal tissue, according to a preclinical study published online today in Science Advances. The new technology, named GelCORE (gel for corneal regeneration), could one day reduce the need for surgery to repair injuries to the cornea,

2h

In humans, an anesthetic rightly timed can weaken the strength of a traumatic memory

As part of continued efforts to develop treatments for anxiety and stress-related disorders, researchers have shown that reactivating a negative memory in a human patient and then administering an anesthetic to that person made it harder for them to retrieve the memory 24 hours later. This result has implications for developing therapies for disorders including post-

2h

'Particle robot' works as a cluster of simple units

Taking a cue from biological cells, researchers from MIT, Columbia University, and elsewhere have developed computationally simple robots that connect in large groups to move around, transport objects, and complete other tasks.

2h

Robotic 'gray goo'

Researchers at Columbia Engineering and MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL), demonstrate for the first time a way to make a robot composed of many loosely coupled components, or 'particles.' Unlike swarm or modular robots, each component is simple, and has no individual address or identity. In their system, which the researchers call a 'particle robot,' each particle can per

2h

Tracing the genetic origins of insecticide resistance in malaria-transmitting mosquitoes

Researchers have identified a single genetic alteration in a malaria-transmitting mosquito species that confers resistance to a widely used insecticide, according to a new study.

2h

Researchers find broad impacts from lake trout invasion in Yellowstone

The scientists analyzed data spanning more than four decades and concluded that the impact of lake trout in Yellowstone Lake — in particular, the decline of native cutthroat trout — has cascaded across the lake, its tributaries and the surrounding ecosystem.

2h

Anaesthesia drug may make it easier to forget upsetting memories

A drug used for anaesthesia can make upsetting memories less vivid and may one day be used to help some people with post-traumatic stress disorder

2h

Visualizing better cancer treatment

Researchers have engineered nanoscale protein micelles capable of both delivering chemotherapeutic drugs and of being tracked by MRI. The innovation allows researchers to administer therapy while noninvasively monitoring the therapeutic progress and drastically reducing the need for surgical intervention. They biosynthesized a protein block copolymer containing amino acid building blocks with fluo

2h

Gene variant associated with cellular aging

It is well known that psychiatric stress is associated with accelerated aging. Now, a new study shows that a gene mutation interacts with multiple types of psychiatric stress including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), pain and sleep disturbances in association with cellular aging.

2h

Does pregnancy history affect cognitive function?

Healthy cognitive aging is a public health priority, especially as the US population grows older. Until now, not much has been known about the link between pregnancy history and cognitive function in older women. A new study finds that there does not appear to be a link.

2h

A mating war in diving beetles has stopped the evolution of species

In nature, males eager attempts to mate with females can be so extreme that they will harm females. Such negative impact of mating interactions has been suggested to promote the emergence of new species under some circumstances. Surprisingly, one type of diving beetle species now show that this conflict between the sexes can instead lead to an evolutionary standstill in which mating enhancing trai

2h

Chromatin changes rapidly in response to low oxygen

A study reveals new insights into how cells respond to oxygen deprivation. The researchers found that chromatin, the complex of DNA and proteins where all genes reside, quickly changes in response to low oxygen.

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Assessment tool predicts chronic fatigue syndrome 6 months after mono

To assess risk factors for chronic fatigue syndrome after mononucleosis, researchers developed and validated a scale for rating the severity of mononucleosis. In a study with 126 college students, they found that participants with a higher mononucleosis severity score had over three times the risk of meeting two or more sets of diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome after six months.

2h

Biodiversity patterns in Antarctic Dry Valleys

'Surprisingly, we found that biotic, or living, interactions are crucial in shaping biodiversity patterns even in the extreme ecosystems of the Antarctic Dry Valleys.'

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X-ray chimneys in the Galactic Centre

X-ray chimneys in the Galactic Centre X-ray chimneys in the Galactic Centre, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00811-9 X-ray observations of the Galactic Centre have uncovered chimney-like structures filled with hot plasma. The discovery might reveal how energy is transported from this central region to far-off locations.

2h

Complex societies precede moralizing gods throughout world history

Complex societies precede moralizing gods throughout world history Complex societies precede moralizing gods throughout world history, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1043-4 Belief in moralizing gods followed the expansion of human societies and may have been preceded by doctrinal rituals that contributed to the initial rise of social complexity.

2h

Ratcheting up lipopolysaccharide transport

Ratcheting up lipopolysaccharide transport Ratcheting up lipopolysaccharide transport, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00802-w A protein complex that moves molecules called lipopolysaccharides between the two cell-wall membranes of certain bacteria is a target for antibiotics. Structures now reveal how this complex delivers its load irreversibly.

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Podcast: Antibiotics in orchards, and rethinking statistical significance

Podcast: Antibiotics in orchards, and rethinking statistical significance Podcast: Antibiotics in orchards, and rethinking statistical significance, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00953-w Listen the latest science news, brought to you by Benjamin Thompson and Nick Howe.

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Observation of unconventional chiral fermions with long Fermi arcs in CoSi

Observation of unconventional chiral fermions with long Fermi arcs in CoSi Observation of unconventional chiral fermions with long Fermi arcs in CoSi, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1031-8 Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements in CoSi reveal the presence of unconventional chiral fermions near the Fermi level, with giant surface Fermi arcs and one pair of

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Structural basis of unidirectional export of lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface

Structural basis of unidirectional export of lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface Structural basis of unidirectional export of lipopolysaccharide to the cell surface, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1039-0 Crystal structures of a five-protein complex comprising the inner-membrane components of the bacterial lipopolysaccharide transporter provide insight into the mechanis

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A potassium channel β-subunit couples mitochondrial electron transport to sleep

A potassium channel β-subunit couples mitochondrial electron transport to sleep A potassium channel β-subunit couples mitochondrial electron transport to sleep, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1034-5 Sleep deprivation in Drosophila elevates reactive oxygen species in sleep-promoting neurons, leading to changes in potassium currents and spiking activity and thereby connecti

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Particle robotics based on statistical mechanics of loosely coupled components

Particle robotics based on statistical mechanics of loosely coupled components Particle robotics based on statistical mechanics of loosely coupled components, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1022-9 A stochastic robotic system shows deterministic behaviour—such as locomotion, object transport and phototaxis—from the collective motion of many loosely coupled disk-shaped ‘par

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A NIK–SIX signalling axis controls inflammation by targeted silencing of non-canonical NF-κB

A NIK–SIX signalling axis controls inflammation by targeted silencing of non-canonical NF-κB A NIK–SIX signalling axis controls inflammation by targeted silencing of non-canonical NF-κB, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1041-6 Non-canonical NF-κB is regulated by a negative feedback loop involving NIK-mediated activation of SIX1 and SIX2.

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Topological chiral crystals with helicoid-arc quantum states

Topological chiral crystals with helicoid-arc quantum states Topological chiral crystals with helicoid-arc quantum states, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1037-2 Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements reveal that CoSi and RhSi are nearly ideal topological conductors, with structural chirality and surface helicoid arcs of topological charge ±2 arising from b

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Structural basis of lipopolysaccharide extraction by the LptB2FGC complex

Structural basis of lipopolysaccharide extraction by the LptB 2 FGC complex Structural basis of lipopolysaccharide extraction by the LptB 2 FGC complex, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1025-6 Cryo-electron microscopy structures of LptB2FGC, in nucleotide-free and vanadate-trapped states, reveal the mechanism of lipopolysaccharide extraction from the inner membrane of Gram-

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Neoantigen-directed immune escape in lung cancer evolution

Neoantigen-directed immune escape in lung cancer evolution Neoantigen-directed immune escape in lung cancer evolution, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1032-7 RNA sequencing data and tumour pathology observations of non-small-cell lung cancers indicate that the immune cell microenvironment exerts strong evolutionary selection pressures that shape the immune-evasion capacity

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An X-ray chimney extending hundreds of parsecs above and below the Galactic Centre

An X-ray chimney extending hundreds of parsecs above and below the Galactic Centre An X-ray chimney extending hundreds of parsecs above and below the Galactic Centre, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1009-6 Huge X-ray structures, termed Galactic Centre ‘chimneys’, extending hundreds of parsecs above and below the Galactic plane, appear to be exhaust channels connecting the

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Deep electrical imaging of the ultraslow-spreading Mohns Ridge

Deep electrical imaging of the ultraslow-spreading Mohns Ridge Deep electrical imaging of the ultraslow-spreading Mohns Ridge, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1010-0 An inversion model for the ultraslow-spreading Mohns Ridge, combining controlled source electromagnetic and magnetotelluric data, reveals passive mantle upwelling controlled by slow and asymmetric plate moveme

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Robotic collectives inspired by biological cells

Robotic collectives inspired by biological cells Robotic collectives inspired by biological cells, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00839-x A robotic system has been demonstrated in which the random motion of individual components leads to deterministic behaviour, much as occurs in living systems. Environmental and medical applications could follow.

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‘Particle’ robot swarm moves without computer control

‘Particle’ robot swarm moves without computer control ‘Particle’ robot swarm moves without computer control, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00954-9 A machine inspired by biology, self-coordinates movement based on statistical principles.

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It’s time to talk about ditching statistical significance

It’s time to talk about ditching statistical significance It’s time to talk about ditching statistical significance, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00874-8 Looking beyond a much used and abused measure would make science harder, but better.

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Recruitment of BRCA1 limits MYCN-driven accumulation of stalled RNA polymerase

Recruitment of BRCA1 limits MYCN-driven accumulation of stalled RNA polymerase Recruitment of BRCA1 limits MYCN-driven accumulation of stalled RNA polymerase, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1030-9 In human neuroblastoma tumours, MYCN is engaged in a USP11–BRCA1-dependent manner to suppress the accumulation of stalled RNAPII and induces both the activation and repression o

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The expanding landscape of ‘oncohistone’ mutations in human cancers

The expanding landscape of ‘oncohistone’ mutations in human cancers The expanding landscape of ‘oncohistone’ mutations in human cancers, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1038-1 The characterization of missense histone mutations that occur across several cancer types provides insight into the potential role of these mutations in altering chromatin structure and potentially c

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EU’s biggest research programme yet takes shape

EU’s biggest research programme yet takes shape EU’s biggest research programme yet takes shape, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00957-6 European Union officials have struck an agreement on the basic structure of the bloc’s next major science-funding scheme, Horizon Europe.

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Novel tau filament fold in chronic traumatic encephalopathy encloses hydrophobic molecules

Novel tau filament fold in chronic traumatic encephalopathy encloses hydrophobic molecules Novel tau filament fold in chronic traumatic encephalopathy encloses hydrophobic molecules, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1026-5 Cryo-electron microscopy structures of tau filaments from the brains of three individuals with chronic traumatic encephalopathy reveal distinct assembled

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Diverse and robust molecular algorithms using reprogrammable DNA self-assembly

Diverse and robust molecular algorithms using reprogrammable DNA self-assembly Diverse and robust molecular algorithms using reprogrammable DNA self-assembly, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1014-9 A set of 355 self-assembling DNA ‘tiles’ can be reprogrammed to implement many different computer algorithms—including sorting, palindrome testing and divisibility by three—sugg

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Van der Waals integration before and beyond two-dimensional materials

Van der Waals integration before and beyond two-dimensional materials Van der Waals integration before and beyond two-dimensional materials, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1013-x Recent advances and future directions in the use of van der Waals integration beyond two-dimensional materials are reviewed.

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Fish and Bees "Talk" with Help from Robot Translators

Robots integrated into groups of zebrafish and of one-day-old honey bees allow the two species to influence each other's behavior.

2h

A Dose of Anesthesia Could Blunt Traumatic Memories

A new study raises hopes for a minimally-invasive PTSD treatment.

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Atheism Is Inconsistent with the Scientific Method, Prize-Winning Physicist Says

In conversation, the 2019 Templeton Prize winner does not pull punches on the limits of science, the value of humility and the irrationality of nonbelief — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Robot swarm inspired by cells can keep moving even if its parts fail

A swarm of bots inspired by the way living cells move can slither through gaps and keep moving if many of its parts fail

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Anaesthesia drug makes upsetting memories harder to remember

A drug used for anaesthesia can make upsetting memories less vivid and may one day be used to help some people with post-traumatic stress disorder

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Electric cars won't shrink emissions enough – we must cut travel too

Until now, the focus has been on moving to greener means of transport, but some people are proposing that we need to cut back on travelling and stay in one place

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We have to find a way to stop drones disrupting airports

Drones near airports are grounding flights and leaving people miserable, but can we actually find a way to stop them?

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Deforestation in the Amazon could raise local temperatures by 1.5C

Deforestation in the Amazon could have a similar local warming effect to decades of climate change-driven temperature rises

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Quantum theory might be flawed. That's a cause for celebration

It might be our most successful theory, but that doesn't mean it can't be bettered – and questioning basic assumptions is how we make scientific progress

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NASA Isn’t Sure What’s Wrong With Its InSight Mars Lander

“Encountered Something” NASA collaborators recently admitted that they’re not sure what’s wrong with the InSight lander’s instrument that was supposed to dig into the surface of Mars and measure the heat flow of the planet’s interior. “At about 30 centimeters depth we encountered something,” said Germany space agency researcher Tilman Spohn at a recent conference, according to Space News . “We do

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Confused Pilots Were Reading Boeing 737 Handbook as Plane Crashed

Crash Details Reuters broke a horrifying story today, revealing that the pilots on board the doomed Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX airplane “scoured a handbook as they struggled to understand why the jet was lurching downwards.” It’s an apparently damning revelation about the highly sophisticated features of Boeing’s popular line of commercial jets — and perhaps a warning overly-complex automated flying

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The genius behind your hand geometry.

submitted by /u/markchangizi [link] [comments]

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Big Religion May Have Gotten Too Much Credit for the Evolution of Modern Society

Contrary to a popular hypothesis, pro-social religions didn’t kick-start complex social systems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Arctic sea ice 2019 wintertime extent is seventh lowest

Sea ice in the Arctic appears to have hit its annual maximum extent after growing through the fall and winter. The 2019 wintertime extent reached on March 13 ties with 2007's as the 7th smallest extent of winter sea ice in the satellite record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center and NASA.

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National parks in Senegal may save chimps

A new study of animal populations inside and outside Senegal, Niokolo-Koba National Park, shows that protecting these areas from human interaction and development could save chimps and many other endangered species. The West African chimpanzee population has declined nearly 80 percent in recent decades. Habitat loss is threatening their livelihoods across the continent, especially in Senegal, whe

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Codweb: Whole-genome sequencing uncovers extensive reticulations fueling adaptation among Atlantic, Arctic, and Pacific gadids

Introgressive hybridization creates networks of genetic relationships across species. Among marine fish of the Gadidae family, Pacific cod and walleye pollock are separate invasions of an Atlantic cod ancestor into the Pacific. Cods are ecological success stories, and their ecologies allow them to support the largest fisheries of the world. The enigmatic walleye pollock differs morphologically, b

2h

A hidden state in the turnover of a functioning membrane protein complex

Most membrane proteins exist in complexes that carry out critical cellular functions and exhibit rich dynamics. The bacterial flagellar motor, a large membrane-spanning ion-driven rotary motor that propels the bacteria to swim, provides a canonical example. Rotation of the motor is driven by multiple torque-generating units (stators). Turnover of the stators has been shown previously, demonstrati

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Hypoxia and matrix viscoelasticity sequentially regulate endothelial progenitor cluster-based vasculogenesis

Vascular morphogenesis is the formation of endothelial lumenized networks. Cluster-based vasculogenesis of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) has been observed in animal models, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, using O 2 -controllabe hydrogels, we unveil the mechanism by which hypoxia, co-jointly with matrix viscoelasticity, induces EPC vasculogenesis. When EPCs are subjected to a

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A previously unrecognized source of the O2 Atmospheric band emission in Earths nightglow

Earth’s night sky continuously produces a faint chemiluminescence known as nightglow. Two prominent nighttime emissions around 90 km are the O 2 Atmospheric and the OH Meinel band systems. Despite a plethora of studies since their identification seven decades ago, substantial gaps persist in our understanding of the mechanisms that control them. This report shows that oxygen atoms connect these t

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Newly developed reversible MAO-B inhibitor circumvents the shortcomings of irreversible inhibitors in Alzheimers disease

Monoamine oxidase–B (MAO-B) has recently emerged as a potential therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because of its association with aberrant -aminobutyric acid (GABA) production in reactive astrocytes. Although short-term treatment with irreversible MAO-B inhibitors, such as selegiline, improves cognitive deficits in AD patients, long-term treatments have shown disappointing results.

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Zooming in on protons: Neutron structure of protein kinase A trapped in a product complex

The question vis-à-vis the chemistry of phosphoryl group transfer catalyzed by protein kinases remains a major challenge. The neutron diffraction structure of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA-C) provides a more complete chemical portrait of key proton interactions at the active site. By using a high-affinity protein kinase substrate (PKS) peptide, we captured the reacti

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Predatory fish invasion induces within and across ecosystem effects in Yellowstone National Park

Predatory fish introduction can cause cascading changes within recipient freshwater ecosystems. Linkages to avian and terrestrial food webs may occur, but effects are thought to attenuate across ecosystem boundaries. Using data spanning more than four decades (1972–2017), we demonstrate that lake trout invasion of Yellowstone Lake added a novel, piscivorous trophic level resulting in a precipitou

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Sutureless repair of corneal injuries using naturally derived bioadhesive hydrogels

Corneal injuries are common causes of visual impairment worldwide. Accordingly, there is an unmet need for transparent biomaterials that have high adhesion, cohesion, and regenerative properties. Herein, we engineer a highly biocompatible and transparent bioadhesive for corneal reconstruction using a visible light cross-linkable, naturally derived polymer, GelCORE (gel for corneal regeneration).

2h

How cardiolipin modulates the dynamics of respiratory complex I

Cardiolipin modulates the activity of membrane-bound respiratory enzymes that catalyze biological energy transduction. The respiratory complex I functions as the primary redox-driven proton pump in mitochondrial and bacterial respiratory chains, and its activity is strongly enhanced by cardiolipin. However, despite recent advances in the structural biology of complex I, cardiolipin-specific inter

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Inhibiting the stringent response blocks Mycobacterium tuberculosis entry into quiescence and reduces persistence

The stringent response enables Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ) to shut down its replication and metabolism under various stresses. Here we show that Mtb lacking the stringent response enzyme Rel Mtb was unable to slow its replication rate during nutrient starvation. Metabolomics analysis revealed that the nutrient-starved rel Mtb -deficient strain had increased metabolism similar to that of ex

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Propofol-induced deep sedation reduces emotional episodic memory reconsolidation in humans

The adjustment of maladaptive thoughts and behaviors associated with emotional memories is central to treating psychiatric disorders. Recent research, predominantly with laboratory animals, indicates that memories can become temporarily sensitive to modification following reactivation, before undergoing reconsolidation. A method to selectively impair reconsolidation of specific emotional or traum

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Dual complementary liposomes inhibit triple-negative breast tumor progression and metastasis

Distinguishing malignant cells from non-neoplastic ones is a major challenge in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) treatment. Here, we developed a complementary targeting strategy that uses precisely matched, multivalent ligand-receptor interactions to recognize and target TNBC tumors at the primary site and metastatic lesions. We screened a panel of cancer cell surface markers and identified i

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Lamin A buffers CK2 kinase activity to modulate aging in a progeria mouse model.

Defective nuclear lamina protein lamin A is associated with premature aging. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) binds the nuclear lamina, and inhibiting CK2 activity induces cellular senescence in cancer cells. Thus, it is feasible that lamin A and CK2 may cooperate in the aging process. Nuclear CK2 localization relies on lamin A and the lamin A carboxyl terminus physically interacts with the CK2α catalytic c

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pH-dependent gating mechanism of the Helicobacter pylori urea channel revealed by cryo-EM

The urea channel of Helicobacter pylori ( Hp UreI) is an ideal drug target for preventing gastric cancer but incomplete understanding of its gating mechanism has hampered development of inhibitors for the eradication of H. pylori . Here, we present the cryo-EM structures of Hp UreI in closed and open conformations, both at a resolution of 2.7 Å. Our hexameric structures of this small membrane pro

2h

These Two Cosmic 'Chimneys' Could Be Fueling the Galaxy-Sized Bubbles Looming Over the Milky Way

Scientists made an X-ray map of the center of the galaxy — and they found two chimneys of plasma.

2h

Sartorius Introduces Cubis® II Modular Laboratory Balances for Improved Operational Efficiency and Unmatched Flexibility

– Fully customizable enabling thousands of configurations optimized for the user’s workflow- Supports 21 CFR part 11 and EU Annex 11 compliance with complete traceability- Easy, seamless integration with existing lab software and LIMS

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Cuphead is coming to Nintendo Switch in April – CNET

The acclaimed platformer will arrive on April 18 and be compatible with Xbox Live.

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X-ray ‘chimneys’ connect the Milky Way to mysterious gamma-ray bubbles

Two columns of X-rays that are hundreds of light-years long could explain the existence of giant bubbles of energetic light that sandwich the galaxy.

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Statisticians' Call To Arms: Reject Significance And Embrace Uncertainty!

Scientists and statisticians are putting forth a bold idea: ban the very concept of "statistical significance." A bit more humility would be in order to account for the ambiguity in the world. (Image credit: intraprese/Getty Images)

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Neutrons paint atomic portrait of prototypical cell signaling enzyme

Direct observations of the structure and catalytic mechanism of a prototypical kinase enzyme—protein kinase A or PKA—will provide researchers and drug developers with significantly enhanced abilities to understand and treat fatal diseases and neurological disorders such as cancer, diabetes, and cystic fibrosis.

2h

Predicted deforestation in Brazil could lead to local temperature increase up to 1.45 C

A new model quantifies how forest change affects local surface temperatures by altering sunlight-reflection and evapotranspiration properties, and predicts that Brazilian deforestation could result in a 1.45°C increase by 2050, in a study published March 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jayme A. Prevedello from the Rio de Janeiro State University, Brazil, and colleagues.

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New short-tailed whip scorpion species discovered in Amazon

A new species of Surazomus, which belongs to the class Arachnida and the order Schizomida, has been discovered in the eastern Amazon, according to a study published March 20 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Gustavo Ruiz and Roberta Valente of the Universidade Federal do Pará in Brazil.

2h

Researchers find broad impacts from lake trout invasion in Yellowstone

Introduction of nonnative lake trout in Yellowstone Lake has affected organisms from the microscopic level in the lake to large animals in the region, according to newly published research.

2h

The best topological conductor yet: Spiraling crystal is the key to exotic discovery

The realization of so-called topological materials—which exhibit exotic, defect-resistant properties and are expected to have applications in electronics, optics, quantum computing, and other fields—has opened up a new realm in materials discovery.

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North Africans were among the first to colonize the Canary Islands

People from North Africa are likely the main group that founded the indigenous population on the Canary Islands, arriving by 1000 CE, reports a new study by Rosa Fregel of Stanford University and Universidad de La Laguna, Spain, and colleagues, published March 20, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

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'First large-scale study' illuminates artist diversity in US museums

Eighty-five percent of artists whose work is found in collections of major U.S. museums are white, and 87 percent are male, according to new research by Chad Topaz of Williams College, MA, and colleagues. The study, published in PLOS ONE, also suggests that artist diversity is not strongly linked to a museum's collection mission.

2h

The INBIS channel: the most complete submarine cartography

A scientific study describes for the first time the submarine cartography of a high-latitude system in the IBIS channel, which covers tens of kilometres in the northern western area of the Barents Sea, in the Arctic Ocean. This channel is one of the few submarine valleys in polar latitudes that kept its geological architecture during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM).

2h

Brain-inspired AI inspires insights about the brain (and vice versa)

In a paper presented at the 2018 Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS), researchers from The University of Texas at Austin described the results of experiments that used artificial neural networks to predict with greater accuracy than ever before how different areas in the brain respond to specific words. The work employed a type of recurrent neural network called long shor

2h

Arctic sea ice 2019 wintertime extent is seventh lowest

Sea ice in the Arctic appears to have hit its annual maximum extent after growing through the fall and winter. The 2019 wintertime extent reached on March 13 ties with 2007's as the 7th smallest extent of winter sea ice in the satellite record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center and NASA.

2h

Microbots swarm and shape-shift

Chinese research shows tiny mass-produced bots can organise collectively depending on the environment. Nick carne reports.

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White male artists dominate US gallery collections

Major art museum works do not reflect ethnic or gender diversity, researchers find. Andrew Masterson reports.

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One invasive species spells disaster for Yellowstone’s lake

An interloping trout has wreaked havoc for plankton, fish, bird, otter and bear species, research finds – but there are signs of recovery. Tanya Loos reports.

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Neutrons paint atomic portrait of prototypical cell signaling enzyme

Direct observations of the structure and catalytic mechanism of a prototypical kinase enzyme—protein kinase A or PKA—will provide researchers and drug developers with significantly enhanced abilities to understand and treat fatal diseases and neurological disorders such as cancer, diabetes, and cystic fibrosis.

2h

New short-tailed whip scorpion species discovered in Amazon

A new species of Surazomus, which belongs to the class Arachnida and the order Schizomida, has been discovered in the eastern Amazon, according to a study published March 20 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Gustavo Ruiz and Roberta Valente of the Universidade Federal do Pará in Brazil.

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Researchers find broad impacts from lake trout invasion in Yellowstone

Introduction of nonnative lake trout in Yellowstone Lake has affected organisms from the microscopic level in the lake to large animals in the region, according to newly published research.

2h

Big Religion May Have Gotten Too Much Credit for the Evolution of Modern Society

Contrary to a popular hypothesis, pro-social religions didn’t kick-start complex social systems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Did judgmental gods help societies grow?

Researchers investigate the role of “big gods” in the foundation of large-scale human communities

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Big Religion May Have Gotten Too Much Credit for the Evolution of Modern Society

Contrary to a popular hypothesis, pro-social religions didn’t kick-start complex social systems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ocean mission's emergency ascent caused by motor burning out

A drama in which a submersible made an emergency ascent from 250 meters (820 feet) below the Indian Ocean was caused by condensation burning out a small motor in the cockpit, the director of the British-led Nekton Mission said on Wednesday.

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Antibodies from earlier exposures affect response to new flu strains

Research highlights role of immunological imprinting — or how the immune system fights the flu after previous exposure to the virus via infections or vaccinations — in the elicitation of new antibodies.

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UMass Amherst student-led permaculture gardens serve as model for sustainable agriculture

To educate and inspire people about how to farm and garden sustainably in the Northeast, three student-led permaculture gardens at the University of Massachusetts Amherst are now featured in vivid and interactive, 360-degree splendor on the USDA's Climate Hubs website.

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Researchers engineer a protein micelle that can be visualized by MRI as it delivers hemotherapeutics

A team of researchers from New York University has engineered nanoscale protein micelles capable of both delivering chemotherapeutic drugs and of being tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

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Chromatin changes rapidly in response to low oxygen, study finds

A study by the University of Liverpool reveals new insights into how cells respond to oxygen deprivation.

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Chromatin changes rapidly in response to low oxygen, study finds

A study by the University of Liverpool reveals new insights into how cells respond to oxygen deprivation.

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I got caught in the middle of a bitter row over humans' violent past

A simmering feud between geneticists and archaeologists has finally exploded. This turf war is unwise and unscientific, says Michael Marshall

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Lithuanian man pleads guilty in $100M internet fraud case

A Lithuanian man who duped Google and Facebook into transferring over $100 million into accounts he controlled has pleaded guilty to wire fraud.

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US indoor climate most similar to northeast African outdoors

Americans are most comfortable when their indoor climate is like the northeast African outdoors — warm and relatively dry.

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Balance of two enzymes linked to pancreatic cancer survival

New research sets the stage for clinicians to potentially one day use levels of a pancreatic cancer patient's PHLPP1 and PKC enzymes as a prognostic, and for researchers to develop new therapeutic drugs that inhibit PHLPP1 and boost PKC as a means to treat the disease.

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Innovative lab test to develop easy-to-swallow medicine for children

Scientists have revealed an innovative in vitro method that can help to develop easy to swallow medicine for children and older people.

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Improper removal of personal protective equipment contaminates health care workers

More than one-third of healthcare workers were contaminated with multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO) after caring for patients colonized or infected with the bacteria, according to a new study. The study found that 39 percent of workers made errors in removing personal protective equipment (PPE), including gowns and gloves, increasing the incidence of contamination.

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Daily briefing: How a ‘super-smeller’ can sniff out Parkinson’s disease

Daily briefing: How a ‘super-smeller’ can sniff out Parkinson’s disease Daily briefing: How a ‘super-smeller’ can sniff out Parkinson’s disease, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00956-7 Years before motor symptoms, the smell might diagnose Parkinson’s. Plus: WHO panel calls for a human genome-editing registry and an online tool for building better biology figures.

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Americans Built Tech for China’s Sinister “Re-Education Camps”

International Collaboration When Google announced Project Dragonfly, a version of its search engine that would cater to China’s censored internet, pockets of the internet and the company’s own workforce erupted in protest . But many other American scientists and companies have quietly helped China build its surveillance state, according to Foreign Policy , where citizens are now subjected to near

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Rare super worm moon will loom large as it coincides with equinox

Phenomenon last occurred in spring 1905 and won’t happen again until the year 2144 Those gazing up into the sky on Wednesday night are set to witness an unusual event: a super worm moon that coincides with the equinox. It will be the third time this year a full moon has occurred near to the moon’s closest approach to the Earth – making it a supermoon – and will be the last such event in 2019. Tho

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W. S. Merwin’s Poems of Ethical Care

W. S. Merwin, who died last week at age 91, wrote in a lyric register to capture the epic brutality and organized violence of the 20th century. His poems are promontories from which readers can see, in one panoramic view, the catastrophic storm that sweeps together the Nixon era with the Trump era. Merwin’s poetry found its visionary calling in the late 1960s and 1970s as an indictment of U.S. mi

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The Transcendent Final Season of Catastrophe

This story contains spoilers for the entire fourth season of Catastrophe . When viewers first met Sharon Morris and Rob Norris, the protagonists of Amazon Prime’s Catastrophe , the two had just embarked on a dizzying, if also unorthodox, romance. After a six-night stand with Sharon during a business trip to London, the Boston-based advertising executive learns a month later that “Sharon London Se

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The Lack of Diversity in NYC’s Elite High Schools Is Perpetually Shocking

The first sentence of the New York Times story was like a blow to the gut. “Seven black students have been offered a chance to start classes at Stuyvesant High School in September,” out of 952 total offers. It was two fewer black students than the nine the school had accepted the year prior in a freshman class of 963 students. In response, a state lawmaker declared that he would redraft a bill he

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Beware the Medusavirus

The very first giant virus was discovered in a water-cooling tower in 2003. As the name suggests, giant viruses are unusually large and their genomes unusually complex, all of which flew against the prevailing idea of viruses as small, simple, and primitive. Then one baffling giant virus became many, as scientists kept discovering different types: in water off the Chilean coast , in Siberian perm

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Magnetic stir bars carry 'memory' from previous flasks and tubes

Magnetic stir bars are regarded as reusable consumables, and in many labs they last for months. This study shows that in a regular catalysis lab almost all magnetic stir bars become permanently contaminated with metal nanoparticles. Regular cleaning procedures do not remove such contamination completely. Indeed, subsequent release of metal traces in the next reactions is unacceptable even in small

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Analysts: Rocket Jumps Between Earth Cities Could Smash Airlines

High Speed Space Travel A new report by Swiss investment bank UBS predicts that soon high speed travel through the near reaches of space will come to compete with long-haul airline flights. UBS analysts estimate that space tourism alone will become a $3 billion market by 2030, while the space industry as a whole will double in worth from $400 billion today to $805 billion over the same period. An

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Jordens tyngdefelt afslører jordskælv: Skal skaffe japanerne dyrebare sekunder

Japanske forskere vil gøre alt for at advare befolkningen mod jordskælv, og selv sociale medier kan være hurtigere end seismiske målinger.

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[AMA] I am Andrew from Harvard, the lead author on a study where we sequenced the genome of a worm that can regenerate its entire body, and found "genomic switches" that control this process. Ask Me Anything!

summary of the work: https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2019/03/harvard-study-unlocks-a-key-to-regeneration/ Our lab: http://www.srivastavalab.org/ Me: https://andrewgehrke.weebly.com/ @Andrew_Gehrke on twitter submitted by /u/Andrew_R_Gehrke [link] [comments]

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Meet the veteran astronaut who’ll be on the first launch of Boeing’s Starliner

The newest addition to the commercial crew explains how he is preparing for space again, eight years after his last trip.

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For these intrepid crickets, Hawaii’s lava is home sweet home

Scientists probe how an insect colonizes Hawaii’s fresh flows

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Facebook Does Have to Respect Civil-Rights Legislation, After All

For most of Facebook’s existence, a prospective advertiser listing a job or a home or a loan could have kept the ad from reaching women or people over 55 or those with an “ethnic affinity” for African Americans. When ProPublica documented this in late 2016 , housing-rights advocates were shocked. After all, it was exactly this kind of exclusionary practice that activists in the 1960s and 1970s ha

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How Did Dinosaurs Hear The World? Alligators Give Us Clues

How did dinosaurs hear? Researchers now have an idea thanks to alligators. In a new study, researchers have discovered that American alligators process sounds the same way that barn owls and chickens do. And because birds and reptiles last shared a common ancestor nearly 250 million years ago, the finding means the shared hearing strategy originated before dinosaurs existed. "We know so little abo

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Israeli Moon Lander to Touch Down Near Apollo Landing Sites Next Month

Beresheet, the first privately launched moon lander, has a site selected — and it’s in a fairly familiar locale. Scientists at Israeli spaceflight company SpaceIL, working with Jim Head of Brown University — who also worked on the Apollo missions — chose Mare Serenitatis as the landing spot for their historic moon landing. It's free of large rocks and craters, obstacles that can prove hazardous

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Fighting Alzheimer’s Disease During the Megathon: Spotlight on Three Citizen Scientists

Stall Catchers, a gamified way of contributing to Alzheimer’s research, is going big! Working with SciStarter, the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University, the Citizen Science Association, the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Pacific Southwest Region, and other partners, Stall Catchers is activating the Megathon (register at Megathon.us) during Citizen S

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Nature’s Notebook: Investigating the Science of Seasons

Nature’s Notebook is a citizen science project focused on the signs of the seasons. Participants can track the changes in plants and animals in their own backyards. How do you know when spring arrives? Is it when the first flower buds appear on your favorite tree, when the daylight hours lengthen, or when the first day that you don’t need your winter jacket arrives? Though it’s difficult to put a

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Independent Discussion Sections?

Scientific papers should have two Discussion sections – one written by the authors, and the other by an independent researcher. According to a new paper from Michael S. Avidan, John P. A. Ioannidis and George A. Mashour, this "second discussant" system could help ensure more balanced and objective inference in science. The authors begin by noting that while the reproducibility crisis has focussed

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Giant, Weird-Looking Fish With 'Startled' Eyes Washes Up on Aussie Beach

When a group of Aussies spotted the behemoth on the beach, they initially thought it was a rugged piece of driftwood. Upon closer inspection, however, they realized it was the body of an enormous, bony fish.

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Miscarriage from a man's perspective

'In describing the miscarriage itself, the men are speaking to a societal expectation that pregnancy is easy and smooth,' Horstman said. 'When describing their role in the experience, the men speak to the traditional expectation that they should be heterosexual and tough. But without intention, we see that men's emotions are being pushed aside to help their partner, when in reality these men are a

3h

Surface trembling detected on Mars for the first time

Faint “microseisms” may help scientists understand the Red Planet’s subsurface

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USA vil bruge 3,2 mia. på verdens kraftigste supercomputer

PLUS. Intel vil sammen med det amerikanske energiministerium bygge verdens første supercomputer i exaskala i Chicago. Den skal stå klar til drift i 2021. Kina fører dog fortsat i det globale supercomputer-kapløb

4h

A Major Migratory Bird Habitat Is in Danger

North America’s Great Basin is getting warmer, drier and saltier — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pal-V Liberty Flying Car Offers the Best of Both Helicopters and Cars

One part helicopter, one part car, the Pal-V Liberty allows you to drive to an airport and take to the sky without ever having to leave your vehicle. The post Pal-V Liberty Flying Car Offers the Best of Both Helicopters and Cars appeared first on Futurism .

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Science Should Be More Helpful to New Parents

We need paid leave so young researchers can start families without abandoning STEM careers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How fear affects your body

Science Fright in the flesh. Alarm strikes your body within seconds of recognizing a threat. Here's what's going down.

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Why I believe humans were in Australia much earlier than we thought

Newly discovered shells and blackened stones are compelling evidence that humans lived in Australia 60,000 years earlier than we thought, says James Bowler

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NASA develops new copper alloy for 3D printing rocket components

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The Heretic: Unity GDC 2019 reveal

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Improved control of big power in little motors

Little motors power everything from small comforts, such as desk fans, to larger safety systems, like oven exhaust systems – but they could be more precise, according to a research team from Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories. An international collaboration from Japan and Massachusetts unveiled an improved algorithm to track motor performance and speed estimation. Experiments demonstrate th

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Laser-targeted removal of prostate tumors works as well complete removal of prostate

Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, led by prostate cancer treatment pioneer Dr. Eric Walser, have shown that selectively destroying cancerous prostate tissue is as effective as complete prostate removal or radiation therapy while preserving more sexual and urinary function than the other treatments.

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Butterfly numbers down by two thirds

Meadows adjacent to high-intensity agricultural areas are home to less than half the number of butterfly species than areas in nature preserves. The number of individuals is even down to one-third of that number.

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It's spring already? Physics explains why time flies as we age

Researchers have a new explanation for why those endless days of childhood seemed to last so much longer than they do now — physics. According to the theory, the apparent temporal discrepancy can be blamed on the ever-slowing speed at which images are obtained and processed by the human brain as the body ages.

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How did government ‘transparency’ get so important?

Though we talk a lot about government transparency today, Americans didn’t always expect it of their leaders, according to Stefanos Geroulanos. “Transparency as we understand it today really is a very novel invention,” says Geroulanos, associate professor of European intellectual history at New York University, who explains the origins of the political buzzword in this video: Source: New York Uni

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The Questionable Science Behind the New Jack the Ripper Claim

Did the analysis of a silk shawl just provide a major clue in one of London's coldest cases, the identity of Jack the Ripper?

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The Art of a Monster

The camera flies high above the palm trees of Hollywood, soaring north and west, all the way to the suburb of Simi Valley, where it slows down to seek out a certain street, and then slows some more until it finds a particular house. It hovers above it, and then swoops down, pushing in all the way to the doorstep, where it rests, impatient. It is the house where James Safechuck, one of the two men

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Q&A: Why fishery managers need to overhaul recreational fishing rules

Angling is too diverse for one-size-fits-all management, researchers say

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Yale: White liberals dumb down speech when talking to minorities

The study examined how Democratic and Republican presidential candidates used language when speaking to black and white audiences. A second study focused on how white people use language in emails to strangers with stereotypically white or black names. The lead researcher called the findings "kind of an unpleasant surprise." None White liberals are more likely to use dumbed-down language in conve

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A Quarter of Europeans Trust AI More Than Politicians

Political Bots About a quarter of Europeans are so fed up with their leaders that they’d rather automate the political process and put robots in charge. In the U.K. and Germany, that rises to one in three people. But they don’t want to give robots and artificial intelligence total control — 70 percent of Europeans believe that emerging tech like AI and robotics, including their new robot overlord

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Oculus Rift S ups the resolution, adds built-in sensors for improved VR

Oculus has released other virtual reality headsets since the original Oculus Rift launched to consumers in January 2016, but now we have its true successor. The Oculus Rift S increases …

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New Cretaceous fossil sheds light on avian reproduction

A team of scientists led by Alida Bailleul and Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first …

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Restriktiv migrationspolitik är skadlig

– Våra resultat visar också att höga dokumentationskrav – exempelvis som den amerikanska policyn “Arizona SB 1070” där det krävs att migranter alltid ska kunna identifiera sig när det efterfrågas – samt begränsade möjligheter att få stöd från socialförsäkringssystemen har negativa konsekvenser för migranters psykiska hälsa och minskar deras utnyttjande av sjukvården säger Sol Juarez, docent vid i

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Supreme Court: Google class-action case should be revisited

The Supreme Court on Wednesday directed a lower court to take another look at a lawsuit that involved Google and privacy concerns and ended in a class-action settlement.

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Tracee Ellis Ross Teams Up For Time's Up With Her Aunt, Dr. Barbara Ross-Lee

The Hollywood movement is now expanding into healthcare equity. (Image credit: Rich Fury/Getty Images for The Hollywood Reporter)

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Visualizing better cancer treatment

Researchers have engineered nanoscale protein micelles capable of both delivering chemotherapeutic drugs and of being tracked by MRI. The innovation allows researchers to administer therapy while noninvasively monitoring the therapeutic progress and drastically reducing the need for surgical intervention. They biosynthesized a protein block copolymer containing amino acid building blocks with fluo

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Butterfly numbers down by two thirds

Meadows adjacent to high-intensity agricultural areas are home to less than half the number of butterfly species than areas in nature preserves. The number of individuals is even down to one-third of that number. These are results of a research team led by Jan Christian Habel at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Thomas Schmitt at the Senckenberg Nature Research Society.

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Assessment tool predicts chronic fatigue syndrome 6 months after mono

To assess risk factors for chronic fatigue syndrome after mononucleosis, researchers developed and validated a scale for rating the severity of mononucleosis. In a study with 126 college students, they found that participants with a higher mononucleosis severity score had over three times the risk of meeting two or more sets of diagnostic criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome after six months.

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Chromatin changes rapidly in response to low oxygen, study finds

A study by the University of Liverpool reveals new insights into how cells respond to oxygen deprivation.Published in the prestigious journal Science, the researchers found that chromatin, the complex of DNA and proteins where all genes reside, quickly changes in response to low oxygen.

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A mating war in diving beetles has stopped the evolution of species

In nature, males eager attempts to mate with females can be so extreme that they will harm females. Such negative impact of mating interactions has been suggested to promote the emergence of new species under some circumstances. Surprisingly, one type of diving beetle species now show that this conflict between the sexes can instead lead to an evolutionary standstill in which mating enhancing trai

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Herodotus’ mystery vessel turns out to have been real

In 450 BCE, Greek historian Herodotus described a barge that's never been found. When the ancient port of Thonis-Heracleion was discovered, some 70 sunken ships were found resting in its waters. One boat, Ship 17, uncannily matches the Herodotus' description. None From [the acacia] tree they cut pieces of wood about two cubits in length and arrange them like bricks, fastening the boat together by

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Supercomputer simulations shed light on how liquid drops combine

High performance computing has revealed in detail how liquid droplets combine, in a development with applications such as improving 3D printing technologies or the forecasting of thunderstorms.

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Science Should Be More Helpful to New Parents

We need paid leave so young researchers can start families with abandoning STEM careers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Electric shift prompts belt-tightening for German carmakers

German carmakers are increasingly turning to electric vehicles to master tough new emissions limits looming in the EU, but the shift away from internal combustion engines will entail years of lower margins and profits, cost cutting and job losses.

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Some US Muslims identify less as Americans due to negative media coverage

Negative media portrayals of Muslim Americans can have adverse effects on how they view themselves as citizens and their trust in the U.S. government.

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Project aims to tame noise from supersonic military jets with 'swirl' technology

It's cliché to describe something very noisy as "louder than a jet engine." But supersonic jet engines, like those powering fighters flown by the U.S. military, are so much louder than regular jet engines that scientists have a special term for their sound—"broadband shock-associated noise."

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A Call to Action on the First Day of Spring to Help Our Planet

The Arbor Day Foundation partnered with a non-editorial team at Futurism to create this post. There are certain things in nature we take for granted. We wake up and the sun is shining, or temporarily blurred by clouds. We pour a glass of water and trust it’s safe to drink. We take a deep breath of fresh air, not spending a minute worrying whether it will harm us. But some pockets of the world don

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Breaking: Ford is Building a Self-Driving Car Factory in Michigan

Driverless in Michigan Ford is officially building a new plant in Michigan aimed at its line-up of next-generation hybrid cars that could one day drive themselves. The news comes after Alphabet-owned Waymo got approval to open an autonomous vehicle factory in the state in January — another sign that carmakers are refusing to let gloomy public perception stop the march to self-driving vehicles. “T

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Ford repackages investment, boosts new jobs from 850 to 900

Ford Motor Co. is repackaging a previously announced $900 million manufacturing investment in the Detroit area, boosting the number of jobs added from 850 to 900.

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Researchers analyze biodiversity patterns in Antarctic Dry Valleys

Antarctica is a nearly uninhabited, ice-covered continent ravaged by cold, windy, and dry conditions. Virginia Tech researcher Jeb Barrett was part of an international collaborative team that analyzed biodiversity patterns in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica.

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Coral reefs near equator less affected by ocean warming

Ocean warming is threatening coral reefs globally, with persistent thermal stress events degrading coral reefs worldwide, but a new study has found that corals at or near the equator are affected less than corals elsewhere.

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Tagged by scientists, bluefin tuna passing submerged listening lines help reveal species' survival

An array of underwater listening lines that detect passing giant Atlantic bluefin tuna previously caught and tagged by scientists has created a new system to monitor these enormous, fast, powerful and lucrative fish in the open ocean.

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Tagged by scientists, bluefin tuna passing submerged listening lines help reveal species' survival

An array of underwater listening lines that detect passing giant Atlantic bluefin tuna previously caught and tagged by scientists has created a new system to monitor these enormous, fast, powerful and lucrative fish in the open ocean.

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Impenetrable ice, Mars rumbles and nuclear-fusion lab

Impenetrable ice, Mars rumbles and nuclear-fusion lab Impenetrable ice, Mars rumbles and nuclear-fusion lab, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00877-5 The week in science: 15–21 March 2019.

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China Clones Top Police Dog, With Goal of “Mass Production”

Clone Army Chinese officials cloned a top-performing police dog, state media announced , with the goal of stamping out genetically identical dog cops. The pup, named Kunxun, is a clone of the “Sherlock Holmes of police dogs,” according to Reuters . She’s just started police dog training, to see whether the original dog’s aptitude for drug detection and crowd control have carried over. Dog Backlog

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Letters: The Growing Recycling Crisis

Is This the End of Recycling? Last year, China restricted imports of certain recyclables. For decades, the United States had sent the bulk of its recycling there; now, waste-management companies are telling towns, cities, and counties that the market for their recycling no longer exists. These municipalities can either pay much higher rates to get rid of their recycling, or throw it all away. As

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Ford to build new factory in Michigan for autonomous vehicles

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Continents Rising: The Tallest Skyscrapers Under Construction

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It's spring already? Physics explains why time flies as we age

Duke University researchers have a new explanation for why those endless days of childhood seemed to last so much longer than they do now — physics. According to the theory, the apparent temporal discrepancy can be blamed on the ever-slowing speed at which images are obtained and processed by the human brain as the body ages.

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Transformation of VA to 'whole health' model featured in JACM special issue

As medical delivery organizations seek to meet the Triple Aim, address social determinants of health, and move from volume to value, a leading-edge effort is the 'whole health' model in the US Veterans Administration (VA).

4h

Does pregnancy history affect cognitive function?

Healthy cognitive aging is a public health priority, especially as the US population grows older. Until now, not much has been known about the link between pregnancy history and cognitive function in older women. A new study finds that there does not appear to be a link. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

4h

WVU researcher finds some Medicaid populations more likely to die by suicide

A West Virginia University researcher has discovered the suicide rate of some Medicaid-insured youth — including girls and young women — is higher than those with private insurance.

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Researchers identify gene variant associated with cellular aging

It is well known that psychiatric stress is associated with accelerated aging. Now, a new study shows that a gene mutation interacts with multiple types of psychiatric stress including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), pain and sleep disturbances in association with cellular aging.

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Some US Muslims identify less as Americans due to negative media coverage

Negative media portrayals of Muslim Americans can have adverse effects on how they view themselves as citizens and their trust in the US government.

4h

Local extinction of Southern California mountain lions possible within 50 years

Two isolated mountain lion populations in southern California's Santa Ana and Santa Monica Mountains are at risk of local extinction, perhaps as soon as within 50 years, according to a study published in the journal Ecological Applications. The extinction risk is due to low genetic diversity and mortality that affects the stability of the population. But increasing connectivity could help.

4h

Skin diseases are more common than we think

Skin diseases are ranked as the fourth most common cause of human illness, but many affected people do not consult a physician. A new study estimates the prevalence of skin diseases outside the typical medical setting.

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Evidence rogue waves are getting more extreme

Research suggests that 'rogue' waves are occurring less often, but becoming more extreme. Scientists have, for the first time, used long-term data from a wide expanse of ocean to investigate how these rare, unexpected and hazardous ocean phenomena behave.

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Barn och unga berättar om sin uppväxt i Knutby

Knutby Filadelfia har väckt ett enormt intresse hos media och allmänheten ända sedan pastorn Helge Fossmos fru, Alexandra Fossmo, mördades i januari 2004 och det så kallade ”Knutbydramat” dominerade länge svensk nyhetsrapportering. Inte minst har läran om att församlingens karismatiska ledare, Åsa Waldau, skulle vara Kristi brud uppmärksammats, men bestämt tillbakavisats av såväl ledare som medle

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Fear Is Good for the Forest – Facts So Romantic

The reintroduction of predators alone can spark an ecosystem’s revival. Photograph by Thomas Shahan / Flickr In 2011, the renowned evolutionary biologist E.O. Wilson paid a visit to Gorongosa National Park, in Mozambique. It is one of the few places in the world where you can get a feel for the Great African Rift Valley, humanity’s evolutionary home. After a couple hundred thousand years, the are

5h

Apple AirPods 2019: Price, Specs, Release Date

The new AirPods have better battery life, come with a wireless charging option, and ship next week for $159.

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US indoor climate most similar to northeast African outdoors

Americans are most comfortable when their indoor climate is like the northeast African outdoors — warm and relatively dry.

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Researchers analyze biodiversity patterns in Antarctic Dry Valleys

'Surprisingly, we found that biotic, or living, interactions are crucial in shaping biodiversity patterns even in the extreme ecosystems of the Antarctic Dry Valleys.'

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Moms of kids with eczema report sleep troubles

Eczema (atopic dermatitis) is a common childhood condition and this study reports sleep disturbances were common among mothers of children with eczema. This analysis used data from 11,649 mother-child pairs followed through age 11 and it suggests having a child with eczema was associated with reported difficulty falling asleep, subjectively insufficient sleep, and increased daytime exhaustion for

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Tech billionaires could end climate change. So why aren’t they?

Saving the world from the apocalyptic impact of climate change should be a dream for many Silicon Valley titans concerned about legacy, says David Wallace-Wells, and yet few are dedicating themselves to addressing the catastrophe. Negative emissions technology funded by Bill Gates exists. It would cost $3 trillion per year to operate and would mean human industry could continue at current levels

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Asteroid Spit Up

The near-Earth asteroid Bennu seems to be ejecting unexpected particles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Supercomputer simulations shed light on how liquid drops combine

High performance computing has revealed in detail how liquid droplets combine, in a development with applications such as improving 3D printing technologies or the forecasting of thunderstorms.

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Coral reefs near equator less affected by ocean warming

Ocean warming is threatening coral reefs globally, with persistent thermal stress events degrading coral reefs worldwide, but a new study has found that corals at or near the equator are affected less than corals elsewhere.

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Bacterial contamination in household and office building tap water

Water is a source of concern for disseminating the bacteria Legionella pneumophila and Mycobacterium avium, which cause lung disease (legionellosis and pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterium disease, respectively). A new study has examined the presence of these microbes in tap water from residences and office buildings across the United States.

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Wildlife tourism may negatively affect African elephants' behavior

Increasing numbers of tourists are interested in observing wildlife such as African elephants, and income generated from tourism potentially aids in the protection of animals and their habitats. However, a new study reveals that wildlife tourism may be a stressor for free-ranging elephants.

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Complications during birth and later social anxiety in children

A new study indicates that complications during birth may increase the risk that children will develop social anxiety by their pre-teen years.

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Drinking hot tea linked with elevated risk of esophageal cancer

Previous studies have revealed a link between hot tea drinking and risk of esophageal cancer, but until now, no study has examined this association using prospectively and objectively measured tea drinking temperature. A new study achieved this by following 50,045 individuals aged 40 to 75 years for a median of 10 years.

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IPCC is underselling climate change

A new study has revealed that the language used by the global climate change watchdog, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), is overly conservative – and therefore the threats are much greater than the Panel's reports suggest.

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Why public health officials have only ever eradicated one disease

Health 'Eliminated' diseases can return. Eradicating one for good is a near impossible public health undertaking. Measles is still technically eliminated in the United States. The disease was declared eliminated after an effective vaccination program in 2000. However, eliminated…

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Female scientists get less money and staff for their first labs

Female scientists get less money and staff for their first labs Female scientists get less money and staff for their first labs, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00933-0 Women starting up research groups face more obstacles than their male peers, a UK survey finds.

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The Youth Climate Strike as Seen by Teen Photographers

Two young photographers covered last week's global climate protests for WIRED: "There was this pride that we can do this by ourselves if we have to."

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FDA Approves First New Drug Developed for Women with Postpartum Depression

The new drug, Zulresso, can work in days, not the weeks it takes for current treatments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Most powerful thunderstorm ever measured produced 1.3 billion volts

A record-breaking 1.3 billion volts of electric potential were created in a thunderstorm, a voltage that may explain how high-energy gamma rays are made during storms

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Active substance from plant slows down aggressive eye cancer

An active substance that has been known for 30 years could unexpectedly turn into a ray of hope against eye tumors. This is shown by a new study. The plant leaves of which contain the tested substance is anything but rare: At Christmas time you can find it in every well-assorted garden center.

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The recent spread of coyotes across North America did not doom deer populations

Coyotes eat deer, but not enough to limit the deer population at a large scale. A new study of deer numbers across the eastern United States has found that the arrival and establishment of coyote predators has not caused the number of deer harvested by hunters to decline.

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Effects on offspring of epigenetic inheritance via sperm

As an organism grows and responds to its environment, genes in its cells are constantly turning on and off, with different patterns of gene expression in different cells. But can changes in gene expression be passed on from parents to their children and subsequent generations? Researchers have now demonstrated that epigenetic information carried by parental sperm chromosomes can cause changes in g

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Beware of sleeping queen bumblebees underfoot this spring

Scientists have discovered a never before reported behavior of queen bumblebees.

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How our body 'listens' to vibrations

We all know the feeling of a mobile phone vibrating in our hands. We perceive these vibrations so clearly thanks to specialized receptors that transduce them into neural signals sent to our brain. But how does the latter encode their physical characteristics? Neuroscientists have discovered that feeling a phone vibrate or hearing it ring is ultimately based on the same brain codes.

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Gut instinct: Bile acid-triggered bacterial adaptation characterized

An international team has shown how the Salmonella protein RamR senses bile acids present in the gut, leading to the activation of a multidrug efflux system that helps bacterial cells to get rid of toxins. This system helps the bacteria to survive and colonize this habitat despite harsh conditions. These findings could form the basis for new therapeutic approaches aimed at combating bacterial infe

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Seeing through food and drug fakes and frauds

A simple new technique developed by engineers can detect fake drugs from a video taken as the sample undergoes a disturbance. Called 'chronoprinting,' the technology requires only a few relatively inexpensive pieces of equipment and free software to accurately distinguish pure from inferior food and medicines.

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Fish-inspired material changes color using nanocolumns

Inspired by the flashing colors of the neon tetra fish, researchers have developed a technique for changing the color of a material by manipulating the orientation of nanostructured columns in the material.

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How hot spots of genetic variation evolved in human DNA

New research investigates hot spots of genetic variation within the human genome, examining the sections of our DNA that are most likely to differ significantly from one person to another.

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Inflammation inhibitor blocks neurodevelopmental disorders in mouse model

New work shows that an enzyme inhibitor reduced inflammation in the brains of mice born to mothers with maternal immune activation. Inflammation triggered by the enzyme, soluble epoxide hydrolase, is linked to neurodevelopmental disorders in these mice.

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Japan Poised to Declare CRISPR-Edited Foods Safe to Eat

All-Clear The Japanese government seems poised to rule that CRISPR-edited foods are safe to eat. At least, that’s the recommendation made by a panel of scientists who just published a report on how gene-edited foods could safely and responsibly be introduced into the marketplace. Now the final decision rests on the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare, according to Science Magazine —

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New model for ICU care, developed by Rutgers, discovers causes of health emergencies

A new model for intensive care, developed by Rutgers and RWJBarnabas Health System, can help identify preventable — and previously overlooked — factors that often send chronically ill patients to the intensive care unit (ICU).

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Tagged by scientists, bluefin tuna passing submerged listening lines help reveal species' survival

An array of underwater listening lines that detect passing giant Atlantic bluefin tuna previously caught and tagged by scientists has created a new system to monitor these enormous, fast, powerful and lucrative fish in the open ocean.Ten years of research using the technology sheds light on the species' natural mortality as well as migration, important information for sustainable management of the

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Supercomputer simulations shed light on how liquid drops combine

High performance computing has revealed in detail how liquid droplets combine, in a development with applications such as improving 3D printing technologies or the forecasting of thunderstorms.

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Antibodies from earlier exposures affect response to new flu strains

Research from UT Austin highlights role of immunological imprinting — or how the immune system fights the flu after previous exposure to the virus via infections or vaccinations — in the elicitation of new antibodies.

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Improper removal of personal protective equipment contaminates health care workers

More than one-third of healthcare workers were contaminated with multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO) after caring for patients colonized or infected with the bacteria, according to a study published today in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The study found that 39 percent of workers made errors in removing personal pr

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Coral reefs near equator less affected by ocean warming

Ocean warming is threatening coral reefs globally, with persistent thermal stress events degrading coral reefs worldwide, but a new study has found that corals at or near the equator are affected less than corals elsewhere.

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Surrey creates innovative lab test to develop easy-to-swallow medicine for children

Scientists at the University of Surrey and University College London have revealed an innovative in vitro method that can help to develop easy to swallow medicine for children and older people.

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Oculus Rift S VR Headset: Price, Specs, Release Date

The new $399 headset from the Facebook-owned company features some key improvements. But you still have to plug it into a computer.

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U.S. computer science students are crushing it

Undergraduate computer science programs at universities and colleges in the United States appear to produce more skilled students on average than equivalent programs in China, India, and Russia, according to new research. Researchers found that undergraduate seniors studying computer science in the United States outperformed final-year students in China, India, and Russia on a standardized exam m

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Clever math enables MRI to map molecules implicated in multiple sclerosis, other diseases

New techniques wring subtle signals from data already produced by scanners

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Borgmester: Nu skal krydstogtskibene have københavnsk strøm

Københavns Kommune skal følge Cowis anbefalinger for at mindske luftforureningen fra krydstogtskibe, mener overborgmesteren nu.

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Report: Marijuana Is the Fastest Growing Job Sector in the U.S.

Weed Workforce According to a new report by cannabis website Leafly and consultancy firm Whitney Economics, the United States added 64,389 full-time legal cannabis jobs last year — a 44 percent increase in the weed workforce in 2018, meaning it’s the fastest-growing job sector in the U.S. right now. The report calls it “America’s hidden job boom,” estimating that more than 200,000 people work ful

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Weibo’s Free-Speech Failure

At the start of the 2010s, few things better symbolized China’s changing fortunes and new prosperity than the country’s high-speed rail system. Beginning in 2007, Chinese trains, previously a “symbol of backwardness,” were replaced by sleek, gleaming white carriages capable of traveling upwards of 200 kilometers an hour. In the decade that followed, the government spent hundreds of billions of do

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Quantum Machine Appears to Defy Universe’s Push for Disorder

Given enough time, even a tidy room will get messy. Clothes, books and papers will leave their ordered state and scatter across the floor. Annoyingly, this tendency toward untidiness reflects a law of nature: Disorder tends to grow. If, for example, you cut open a pressurized scuba tank, the air molecules inside will spew out and spread throughout the room. Place an ice cube in hot water and the

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What's killing bees — and how to save them | Noah Wilson-Rich

Bees are dying off in record numbers, but ecologist Noah Wilson-Rich is interested in something else: Where are bees healthy and thriving? To find out, he recruited citizen scientists across the US to set up beehives in their backyards, gardens and rooftops. Learn how these little data factories are changing what we know about the habitats bees need to thrive — and keep our future food systems st

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What Is String Theory?

Trying to explain everything with vibrating little strings.

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Early discharge after lung surgery benefits patients without raising readmission risk

The finding indicates that early discharge is a safe practice for institutions with well-established enhanced recovery pathways.

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Ant larvae fight the offspring of parasitic queens

The eggs of a parasitic ant queen living off a foreign species may end up as food for the larvae of the host species.

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How fluid viscosity affects earthquake intensity

Scientists have demonstrated that the viscosity of fluids present in faults has a direct effect on the intensity of earthquakes.

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I Spent My Life in Newsrooms—But in My Novels, Reporters Aren’t the Heroes

I’m a journalist deep in my bones. Like a lot of people in newsrooms, I came to the profession young (at 15, in my case), and have spent more than 45 years at it now—as a reporter, as an editor, as the press critic at the Los Angeles Times , writing books about media, and even running two think tanks that studied the field. One of the books I co-authored with Bill Kovach, The Elements of Journali

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What the Casting Couch Looks Like in the Digital Age

“The days of the casting couch—if they ever existed—are over.” That was the Hollywood casting director Marvin Paige, speaking to the celebrity columnist Dick Kleiner in 1965. Kleiner had noticed that Paige’s office lacked that most metaphorically laden of furniture items—a couch—and Paige had explained its absence in decidedly optimistic terms. Paige, in his pronouncement, may have been willfully

5h

Photos: Mourning in New Zealand

Days after the worst mass shooting in New Zealand’s history, residents of Christchurch gathered at memorial sites that grew outside mosques and churches, bringing flowers, candles, and messages of sorrow and love. As people mourn the 50 killed last Friday, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern is calling for stricter national gun laws, and says she will seek answers from social-media companie

5h

Alternativet-politikere går i rette med partiets egen ordfører

En række stemmer fra Alternativets bagland kaster sig nu ind i debatten om sundhed og evidens. »Alternativet har andre tanker på det her område end dem, Pernille Schnoor giver udtryk for,« siger en af dem.

5h

Glyphosate under fire from San Francisco to Sri Lanka

Glyphosate, the world's most widely used herbicide and the active ingredient in Monsanto's weedkiller Roundup, is the subject of fierce controversy across the globe and is classified by the World Health Organization as "probably" being carcinogenic.

6h

Mitigating the loss of satellite data by using CubeSat remote sensing technology

Advanced infrared and microwave sounding systems, usually onboard traditional polar-orbiting satellites, provide atmospheric sounding information critical for nowcasting and weather forecasting through data assimilation in numerical weather prediction models. This means weather forecasts have become increasingly dependent on satellite observations. But what if we lose one or more of these instrume

6h

Taking gravity from strength to strength

Ten years ago, ESA launched one of its most innovative satellites. GOCE spent four years measuring a fundamental force of nature: gravity. This extraordinary mission not only yielded new insights into our gravity field, but led to some amazing discoveries about our planet, from deep below the surface to high up in the atmosphere and beyond. And, this remarkable mission continues to realise new sci

6h

Jordan Peterson on Joe Rogan: The gender paradox and the importance of competition

Jordan Peterson has constantly been in the headlines for his ideas on gender over the last three years. While on Joe Rogan's podcast, he explains his thoughts on the gender differences in society. On another episode, Peterson discusses the development of character through competition. None Like many people, I first discovered Jordan Peterson on the Joe Rogan Experience. Since Episode 877, the Can

6h

Glyphosate under fire from San Francisco to Sri Lanka

Glyphosate, the world's most widely used herbicide and the active ingredient in Monsanto's weedkiller Roundup, is the subject of fierce controversy across the globe and is classified by the World Health Organization as "probably" being carcinogenic.

6h

Want in on nanotechnology? Capitalize on collaborative environments

The 21st century has been hailed the nano-century, and major technological breakthroughs are expected from the control of the matter at the nanoscale. However, despite its promises, nanotechnology still seems to be stuck in the status of an emerging science, according to Assistant Professor Raphael Zingg of Waseda University and Dr. Marius Fischer of the Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Com

6h

Growing international collaboration not yet enough to halt decline in Japan's research output

Japan's contribution to high-quality scientific research fell by 19.9 per cent between January 2012 and October 2018 according to the Nature Index. But efforts to increase international collaboration, seen as one way to address this trend, are paying off. Since 2014, the proportion of articles from journals tracked by the Index with international co-authors originating from Japanese institutions h

6h

'Terminator'-like liquid metal moves and stretches in 3-D space

In the blockbuster Terminator movie franchise, an evil robot morphs into different human forms and objects and oozes through narrow openings, thanks to its "liquid-metal" composition. Although current robots don't have these capabilities, the technology is getting closer with the development of new liquid metals that can be manipulated in 3-D space with magnets. Reported in ACS Applied Materials &

6h

Pollutants, pathogens could team up to make us sick

Many people view pollutants and pathogens as separate causes of illness. However, recent research indicates that the two can interact, changing how people and animals respond to infectious diseases. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, environmental pollutants appear to weaken the immune system, reduce vaccine effi

6h

‘Quality review’ isn’t fixing veterans’ claims system

A new study turns the spotlight on governance issues that have plagued a cornerstone of the nation’s administrative system for years: rampant errors and a backlog of appeals cases involving veterans’ benefits. The volume of veterans’ appeals—the vast majority of which relate to disability compensation claims—is huge. Some 90 judges in the Board of Veterans’ Appeals (BVA) historically decided abou

6h

Psychology may help explain why male and female serial killers differ

Male and female serial killers tend to choose their victims and commit their crimes in different ways, which may be due to thousands of years of psychological evolution, according to researchers.

6h

Pollutants, pathogens could team up to make us sick

Many people view pollutants and pathogens as separate causes of illness. However, recent research indicates that the two can interact, changing how people and animals respond to infectious diseases. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, environmental pollutants appear to weaken the immune system, reduce vaccine effi

6h

'Terminator'-like liquid metal moves and stretches in 3D space (video)

In the blockbuster 'Terminator' movie franchise, an evil robot morphs into different human forms and objects and oozes through narrow openings, thanks to its 'liquid-metal' composition. Although current robots don't have these capabilities, the technology is getting closer with the development of new liquid metals that can be manipulated in 3D space with magnets. Reported in ACS Applied Materials

6h

How fluid viscosity affects earthquake intensity

A young researcher at EPFL has demonstrated that the viscosity of fluids present in faults has a direct effect on the intensity of earthquakes.

6h

Active substance from plant slows down aggressive eye cancer

An active substance that has been known for 30 years could unexpectedly turn into a ray of hope against eye tumors. This is shown by a study conducted by researchers from the Universities of Bonn and Magdeburg together with US colleagues. The results are published in the renowned journal 'Science Signaling'. The plant leaves of which contain the tested substance is anything but rare: At Christmas

6h

CRISPR/Cas libraries open new avenues in cancer research

CRISPR/Cas enables the targeted deactivation of genes by cutting DNA at pre-determined sites. This is accomplished by providing the Cas enzyme with a genetic zip code. Using an entire library of zip codes, it is then possible to simultaneously probe multiple sites within the genome, for example to determine which genes are essential for cancer cell survival. This could revolutionize drug discovery

6h

Ant larvae fight the offspring of parasitic queens

The eggs of a parasitic ant queen living off a foreign species may end up as food for the larvae of the host species.

6h

Researchers use radiomics to predict who will benefit from chemotherapy

Using data from computed tomography (CT) images, researchers may be able to predict which lung cancer patients will respond to chemotherapy, according to a new study.

6h

Local extinction of Southern California mountain lions possible within 50 years

Two isolated mountain lion populations in southern California's Santa Ana and Santa Monica Mountains are at risk of local extinction, perhaps as soon as within 50 years, according to a study published in the journal Ecological Applications. The extinction risk is due to low genetic diversity and mortality that affects the stability of the population. But increasing connectivity could help.

6h

High-pressure research and a return to China: meet Haiyan Zheng

High-pressure research and a return to China: meet Haiyan Zheng High-pressure research and a return to China: meet Haiyan Zheng, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00887-3 The chemist talks about her work at a Beijing research institute, and about equality in Chinese science.

6h

Japanese universities test collaboration

Japanese universities test collaboration Japanese universities test collaboration, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00830-6 Insular institutions seek ways to better accommodate international research partners.

6h

Unconscious bias l imits women’s careers

Unconscious bias l imits women’s careers Unconscious bias l imits women’s careers, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00832-4 The vast gender gap in Japanese science has leading women researchers calling for change.

6h

Breakthrough in fight against plant diseases

A global research team including scientists from La Trobe University have identified specific locations within plants' chromosomes capable of transferring immunity to their offspring.

6h

Researchers using tissue engineering to create lab-grown meat

Tissue engineering experts at the University of Bath are growing animal cells on blades of grass, as they play their part in helping the UK understand how to effectively scale up production of cultured meat.

6h

Breakthrough in fight against plant diseases

A global research team including scientists from La Trobe University have identified specific locations within plants' chromosomes capable of transferring immunity to their offspring.

6h

Researchers using tissue engineering to create lab-grown meat

Tissue engineering experts at the University of Bath are growing animal cells on blades of grass, as they play their part in helping the UK understand how to effectively scale up production of cultured meat.

6h

HP built a better version of the Oculus Rift

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

6h

Japan’s start-up gulf

Japan’s start-up gulf Japan’s start-up gulf, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00833-3 Academia and industry in Japan remain disconnected, despite efforts to bring them together.

6h

Materials science is helping to transform China into a high-tech economy

Materials science is helping to transform China into a high-tech economy Materials science is helping to transform China into a high-tech economy, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00885-5 Researchers are reaping the benefits of carefully built programmes and a surge in funding.

6h

How biomaterials will support China’s ageing population

How biomaterials will support China’s ageing population How biomaterials will support China’s ageing population, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00888-2 Materials researchers are finding innovative ways to improve the country’s health-care system.

6h

Japan expands international scientific links

Japan expands international scientific links Japan expands international scientific links, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00829-z The country hopes building connections with overseas researchers will help lift its research performance.

6h

Japan’s global connectors

Japan’s global connectors Japan’s global connectors, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00831-5 Six scientists whose transformative work reaches across borders.

6h

A guide to the Nature Index

A guide to the Nature Index A guide to the Nature Index, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00834-2 A description of the terminology and methodology used in this supplement, and a guide to the functionality available free online at natureindex.com

6h

The Chinese researcher painting the printing industry green

The Chinese researcher painting the printing industry green The Chinese researcher painting the printing industry green, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00886-4 Chemist Yanlin Song uses nanomaterials to reduce the pollution caused by conventional lithography.

6h

The subterranean ballet of ALICE

The experiment caverns of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are staging a dazzling performance during Long Shutdown 2 (LS2). The resplendent sub-detectors, released from their underground homes, are performing a fascinating ballet. At the end of February, ALICE removed the two trackers, the inner tracker system and the time projection chamber, from the detector. At the very start of the long shutdow

6h

Ant larvae fight the offspring of parasitic queens

In certain ant species, queens invade the colonies of other species, kill the host queen or queens and lay their eggs in the host nest. After this, the host workers tend to the offspring of the parasitic queen as if their own, just as a bird hatching an egg laid by a cuckoo.

6h

Ant larvae fight the offspring of parasitic queens

In certain ant species, queens invade the colonies of other species, kill the host queen or queens and lay their eggs in the host nest. After this, the host workers tend to the offspring of the parasitic queen as if their own, just as a bird hatching an egg laid by a cuckoo.

6h

Tigers, leopards and humans: creating a co-existent space

How can large carnivores co-exist with human communities? By studying tigers and leopards in Nepal, Babu Ram Lamichhane argues that co-existence is possible if wildlife sites are well conserved while their impacts on humans are minimal and socially acceptable. Ph.D. defense 9 April.

6h

Local extinction of Southern California mountain lions possible within 50 years

Two isolated mountain lion populations in southern California's Santa Ana and Santa Monica Mountains are at risk of local extinction, perhaps as soon as within 50 years, according to a study published in the journal Ecological Applications.

6h

Evidence rogue waves are getting more extreme

Research led by the University of Southampton (UK) suggests that 'rogue' waves are occurring less often, but becoming more extreme.

6h

Novel sensor system improves reliability of high-temperature humidity measurements

A new sensor system developed in Saarbrücken, Germany can not only carefully control drying processes in industrial ovens, but can deliver reliable air humidity measurements even at high temperatures and in the presence of other background vapours. Professor Andreas Schütze, project manager Tilman Sauerwald and their research team at Saarland University have developed with partner companies a sens

6h

SETI Is Making a New ‘Mixtape for Aliens’, and You Can Contribute

For centuries, people have looked up at the sky and wondered whether we’re alone in the universe. Science fiction and popular media have imagined various ways humans might encounter and communicate with life from other parts of the galaxy. When the Voyager spacecrafts were launched in 1977, they carried copies of the Golden Record , a compilation of sounds and images intended to represent humanit

6h

Over 200 plejehjem ignorerer krav om sprinkleranlæg

Flere hundrede plejehjem lever ikke op til krav om brandsikkerhed og 21 kommuner har ikke besvaret lovpligtige brandsikkerheds-spørgsmål fra ministeriet.

6h

Tigers, leopards and humans: creating a co-existent space

How can large carnivores co-exist with human communities? By studying tigers and leopards in Nepal, Babu Ram Lamichhane argues that co-existence is possible if wildlife sites are well conserved while their impacts on humans are minimal and socially acceptable. Ph.D. defense 9 April.

6h

Local extinction of Southern California mountain lions possible within 50 years

Two isolated mountain lion populations in southern California's Santa Ana and Santa Monica Mountains are at risk of local extinction, perhaps as soon as within 50 years, according to a study published in the journal Ecological Applications.

6h

Parker Breaks the All-Time Gold Rush Record | Gold Rush

Despite a rough start to the season, Parker's crew has mined nearly $9 million in gold, a new record for Gold Rush. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush ht

6h

Children grow in a different way, scientists demonstrate

An international group of scientists under the supervision of a staff member of Sechenov University (Russia) and Karolinska Institute (Sweden) found out that earlier views on the mechanisms that provide and regulate skeletal growth were wrong. They discovered a special area of the growth plate (a structure that enables longitudinal growth of bones) called a stem niche that can theoretically produc

6h

Fish-inspired material changes color using nanocolumns

Inspired by the flashing colors of the neon tetra fish, researchers have developed a technique for changing the color of a material by manipulating the orientation of nanostructured columns in the material.

6h

Evidence rogue waves are getting more extreme

Research led by the University of Southampton suggests that 'rogue' waves are occurring less often, but becoming more extreme. Scientists have, for the first time, used long-term data from a wide expanse of ocean to investigate how these rare, unexpected and hazardous ocean phenomena behave. Their findings are published in the journal Scientific Reports.

6h

How our body 'listens' to vibrations

We all know the feeling of a mobile phone vibrating in our hands. We perceive these vibrations so clearly thanks to specialized receptors that transduce them into neural signals sent to our brain. But how does the latter encode their physical characteristics? Neuroscientists from the University of Geneva have discovered that feeling a phone vibrate or hearing it ring is ultimately based on the sam

6h

Levels of autism in China similar to the West, joint Chinese-UK study shows

The first large-scale study of autism in China has revealed that around one in a hundred people in the country has an autism spectrum condition — the same figure as found in the West.

6h

Gut instinct: Bile acid-triggered bacterial adaptation characterized

An international team led by Osaka University researchers has shown how the Salmonella protein RamR senses bile acids present in the gut, leading to the activation of a multidrug efflux system that helps bacterial cells to get rid of toxins. This system helps the bacteria to survive and colonize this habitat despite harsh conditions. These findings could form the basis for new therapeutic approach

6h

Bile acid-triggered bacterial adaptation characterized

When bacteria enter the digestive tracts of their hosts, including humans, they encounter a highly acidic environment. Bacteria have evolved elegant mechanisms to survive and colonize this habitat, such as highly resistant and impermeable outer membranes and systems to pump out any toxins that make it beyond that barrier. However, the molecular mechanisms behind many of these processes have remain

6h

New model shows southern and central Rocky Mountains were formed differently than originally thought

A new model built in part by a University of Alberta geophysicist contradicts a long-held idea about how the southern and central central Rocky Mountains were formed.

6h

Bile acid-triggered bacterial adaptation characterized

When bacteria enter the digestive tracts of their hosts, including humans, they encounter a highly acidic environment. Bacteria have evolved elegant mechanisms to survive and colonize this habitat, such as highly resistant and impermeable outer membranes and systems to pump out any toxins that make it beyond that barrier. However, the molecular mechanisms behind many of these processes have remain

6h

Today’s Spring Equinox Heralds Warmer Months — And a Supermoon

In the Northern Hemisphere, winter's chilly grip will soon start to weaken.

6h

Algae could prevent limb amputation

A new algae-based treatment could reduce the need for amputation in people with critical limb ischemia, according to new research funded by the British Heart Foundation, published today in the journal npj Regenerative Medicine.

6h

Want in on nanotechnology? Capitalize on collaborative environments

Patent law experts demonstrate that private-public partnerships lead to promising innovation output measured in patents. Collaborations between private entities and public institutions have the potential to improve technology transfer in nanotechnology. Nations entering the nano-space can capitalize on collaborative environments, developing frameworks and close institutional networks between entit

6h

New measurement method for radioactive methane

The method developed by Juho Karhu in his PhD thesis work is a first step towards creating a precise measuring device.

6h

A new strategy of fabricating p-n junction in single crystalline Si nanowires, twisting

Can single crystalline materials be used for low dimensional p-n junction design? This is an open and long-standing problem. Microscopic simulations based on the generalized Bloch theorem show that in single crystalline Si nanowires, an axial twist can lead to the separation of p-type and n-type dopants along the nanowire radial dimension, and thus realizes the p-n junction. A bond orbital analysi

6h

GRAPES-3 muon telescope discovers record 1.3 gigavolt potential in a thundercloud

By muon imaging the GRAPES-3 collaboration showed huge voltages develop in supercharged thunderstorms and reported a voltage of 1.3GV on Dec. 1, 2014. This is 10 times larger than previous record of 0.13GV. This verifies the 90-year-old prediction of 1GV by C.T.R. Wilson. Such massive voltages are needed for production of high-energy (100 MeV) gamma-rays detected in terrestrial gamma ray flashes e

6h

Breakthrough in fight against plant diseases

A global research team including scientists from La Trobe University have identified specific locations within plants' chromosomes capable of transferring immunity to their offspring.

6h

Baby step towards breath-testing for gut disorders

Small children may one day avoid invasive, painful and often traumatic esophageal tube-testing for gut damage and celiac disease with a new method of simply blowing into a glass tube to provide effective diagnoses. Research published online in international journal Scientific Reports describes an exciting new breath test that could have global implications on how to detect gastrointestinal damage.

6h

The “Super Worm Moon” Is Ridiculous and It’s Time to Stop

“Super Moon” Boom Novelty Moons are in fashion, and we can only tolerate so much. This year alone, we’ve already endured the Super Blue Blood Moon in January and the Super Snow Moon in February. Today, ready or not, is the Super Worm Moon — and local media outlets are hyped. MARK YOUR CALENDARS: The third and final super moon of 2019 titled the 'Super Worm Moon' rises Wednesday night. https://t.c

6h

Hospitalsdirektør i Horsens konstitueres som koncerndirektør i Midtjylland

Hospitalsdirektør Lisbeth Holsteen Jessen bliver konstitueret koncerndirektør i Region Midtjylland.

6h

Humans switch between apps in 'remarkably similar' ways, scientists find

Humans are unknowingly adhering to a universal pattern when they flick between apps on their smartphones, scientists have discovered.

6h

Amazon's new Kindle is under $100 and lets you read in the dark

Amazon has announced a new base model Kindle which features a front light, the first time the illumination technology has ever been implemented in an entry-level reader from the company.

6h

Apple's new AirPods come with hands-free "Hey Siri," wireless charging option, longer battery life, and more

Following the announcement of its two new iPads and an update to the iMac, Apple has debuted the latest generation of AirPods. They feature the new H1 chip, which brings several improvements.

6h

How to unsubscribe from all your newsletters at once

DIY You bought a belt there once. You don't need to hear from them six times a week for the rest of your life. If you've signed up for several email newsletters too many, here's how to reverse the process as quickly as possible.

6h

'Cash for Clunkers' rebates were too high to prompt car upgrades, study discovers

New research from a team at Arizona State University shows how, even when receiving a big rebate from the government, consumers won't always behave in expected ways.

7h

Humans switch between apps in 'remarkably similar' ways, scientists find

Humans are unknowingly adhering to a universal pattern when they flick between apps on their smartphones, scientists have discovered.

7h

Supercomputer sheds light on how droplets merge

Scientists have revealed the precise molecular mechanisms that cause drops of liquid to combine, in a discovery that could have a range of applications.

7h

Archaeologist debunks alien influence, other conspiracy theories in archaeology

Have you heard the one about the aliens and the pyramids? Or what about the technologically advanced but tragically lost city of Atlantis?

7h

Study investigates pressure-induced superconducting transition in electrides

Researchers at Northeast Normal University, in China, and University of the Basque Country, in Spain, have recently carried out a study investigating the superconducting transition of electrides. The researchers observed that a pressure-induced stable Li6P, identified by first-principles swarm structure calculations, can become a superconductor with a considerably high superconducting transition t

7h

Researchers shed new light on the origins of modern humans

Researchers from the University of Huddersfield, with colleagues from the University of Cambridge and the University of Minho in Braga, have been using a genetic approach to tackle one of the most intractable questions of all—how and when we became truly human.

7h

In 'Horizon,' Considering All That Is Connected

Barry Lopez's new book is a biography and a portrait of some of the world's most delicate places, but at heart it's a contemplation of the belief that the way forward is compassionately, and together. (Image credit: Deckle Edge)

7h

One of crypto’s buzziest stablecoins might be heading for trouble

The SEC’s “crypto czar” has implied that Dai and other stablecoins may be securities—and that would be bad news for its fans.

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Dig planned at rare 'Neolithic mortuary' in Aberdeenshire

Archaeologists hope to uncover new details of a site where dead may have been left for scavengers.

7h

Study: Protein linked to cancer growth drives deadly lung disease

A protein associated with cancer growth appears to drive the deadly lung disease known as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, according to new research from Cedars-Sinai. The discovery, made in laboratory mice and human tissue samples, may have implications for treating the disease using existing anti-cancer therapies that inhibit the protein PD-L1.

7h

Researchers shed new light on the origins of modern humans

The work, published in Scientific Reports, confirms a dispersal of Homo sapiens from southern to eastern Africa immediately preceded the out-of-Africa migration

7h

Children with autism are in 'in-tune' with mom's feelings like other children

New research addresses limitations of prior autism spectrum disorder (ASD) studies on facial emotion recognition by using five distinct facial emotions in unfamiliar and familiar (mom) faces to test the influence of familiarity in children with and without ASD. Findings show no differences in the two groups of children and reveal that children with ASD are perceptive to their mother's emotions, wh

7h

Human microbiome metabolites tip the scale in intestinal E. coli infections

A multi-disciplinary team of biological engineers, microbiologists, and systems biologists at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering working on the Institute's DARPA-supported 'Technologies for Host Resilience' (THoR) Project, whose goal it is to uncover the causes of tolerance to infection exhibited by certain individuals or species, has now succeeded in modeling infection

7h

Study shows IPCC is underselling climate change

A new study has revealed that the language used by the global climate change watchdog, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), is overly conservative – and therefore the threats are much greater than the Panel's reports suggest.

7h

Mitigating the loss of satellite data by using CubeSat remote sensing technology

Scientists provide a possible cost-saving approach to temporarily mitigate data gap problems if anything goes wrong in space or during the launch.

7h

Netflix tells Apple: Count us out of your streaming plans

Whatever Apple intends on announcing at a company event March 25, it won't involve Netflix.

7h

Environmental Protection chief: Unsafe water biggest threat

The Environmental Protection Agency's new administrator says unsafe drinking water is "probably the biggest environmental threat" the world faces.

7h

Toyota to build new hybrid cars in Brexit-facing UK

Toyota on Wednesday said it will build a new hybrid car in Britain for Japanese peer Suzuki—a welcome boost for the UK auto sector which has been hit by Brexit uncertainty.

7h

Labrador retriever most pup-ular US dog breed for 28th year

Labrador retrievers aren't letting go of their hold on U.S. dog lovers, but German shorthaired pointers are tugging on the top ranks of doggy popularity, according to new American Kennel Club data.

7h

EU fines Google for anti-trust breach

The EU's powerful anti-trust regulator slapped tech giant Google with a new fine on Wednesday over unfair competition, in Europe's latest salvo against Silicon Valley.

7h

Beresheet lunar landing site revealed

The main scientific instrument on board the Israeli Beresheet spacecraft, the SpaceIL Magnetometer (SILMAG), has now been successfully turned on in space and data returned to Earth. After its successful launch, Beresheet is circling Earth on its journey to the Moon. Prof. Oded Aharonson of the Weizmann Institute of Science is heading the team that is currently analyzing the SILMAG information to e

7h

Labrador retriever most pup-ular US dog breed for 28th year

Labrador retrievers aren't letting go of their hold on U.S. dog lovers, but German shorthaired pointers are tugging on the top ranks of doggy popularity, according to new American Kennel Club data.

7h

Fish-inspired material changes color using nanocolumns

Inspired by the flashing colors of the neon tetra fish, researchers have developed a technique for changing the color of a material by manipulating the orientation of nanostructured columns in the material.

7h

Gold nanoparticles to facilitate in-situ detection of amplified DNA at room temperature

Detecting a single DNA sequence demands high sensitivity. DNA amplification is used to generate thousands of DNA copies so that it can be easily detected and identified. To do so, scientists often employ a technique called polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This method requires specific equipment, including a heat source, because of the alternate cycles of high and low temperatures needed to perform

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Are self-replicating extraterrestrial spy probes eating each other?

Modelling suggests that von Neumann machines probably aren’t a thing. Lauren Fuge reports.

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It was 50 years ago today …

The year 1969 was a big one for NASA.

7h

Contrary to folklore, alcohol does not help with rheumatoid arthritis

The idea that a glass or two may ease the pain of the disease is an artefact of ‘reverse causation’, researchers say. Andrew Masterson reports.

7h

The experts agree: people will go to Mars

Physicists and astronauts come to together to discuss the prospects for settling on the Red Planet. Brian W Pulling reports.

7h

ATLAS experiment observes light scattering off light

Light-by-light scattering is a very rare phenomenon in which two photons interact, producing another pair of photons. This process was among the earliest predictions of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the quantum theory of electromagnetism, and is forbidden by classical physics theories (such as Maxwell's theory of electrodynamics).

7h

Virtual cleanroom could increase safety, minimize risks, reduce education costs for pharmaceutical professionals

A deadly meningitis outbreak linked to a Massachusetts pharmaceutical lab has drawn new interest to the way drugs are made in the United States and the training for those who work in pharmacies.

7h

Evidence that humans prefer genetically dissimilar partners based on scent

A team of researchers at Université Paris Diderot has found evidence that suggests humans are able to detect via smell which partners are genetically preferable. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in people, and the ability to detect it via smell.

7h

Scientists create fire-retardant sensors for safety gear in harsh environments

Imagine a device that could stand up to even the most intense fires so that it could automatically signal others when a firefighter is immobilized on the job.

7h

Cannabis: The Complete WIRED Guide

Everything you need to know about THC, CBD, terpenes, and the entourage effect.

7h

The Best Kindle Readers You Can Buy (2019)

Amazon just debuted a new ebook reader, and it's already the best Kindle you can buy.

7h

Zodiac Ascending: Astrology Startups Reach for the Stars

Startups like Sanctuary aim to do for astrology what Headspace did for meditation: reinvent it for an anxious, wide-eyed, phone-clutching generation.

7h

Evidence that humans prefer genetically dissimilar partners based on scent

A team of researchers at Université Paris Diderot has found evidence that suggests humans are able to detect via smell which partners are genetically preferable. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in people, and the ability to detect it via smell.

7h

Cities rethink parking as ride-hailing grows and parking revenue declines

A new study published in The Journal of Transportation and Land Use found that people who use ride-hailing are willing to pay more to avoid driving, including the stress and cost of parking. As a result, cities are seeing a reduction in parking demand, particularly at restaurants and bars, event venues, and airports. That reduction could push cities to reconsider and replace parking infrastructure

7h

Preventing elderly falls through low-cost community events

Reducing traumatic injuries sustained by older adults who fall begins with reducing their risk of falls. Research from the University of Vermont suggests that free community-based events are effective in educating and establishing fall risk reduction strategies among older adults.

7h

Measuring impact of drought on groundwater resources from space

A team of Arizona State University scientists has been using the latest space technology, combined with ground measurements, to assess the health of one of the nation's most important sources of underground water, a large aquifer system located in California's San Joaquin Valley.

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A picture is worth

A picture is worth A picture is worth, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00884-6 Soul food.

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Soap-Bubble Pioneer Is First Woman to Win Prestigious Math Prize

Abel-prize winner Karen Keskulla Uhlenbeck built bridges between analysis, geometry and physics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Smart glove for Industry 4.0: Connecting the physical hand to the virtual world

Researchers at Saarland University have created an ultrathin flexible film that can act as a sensor for innovative technologies. Integrated within a glove, the new sensory film can communicate the current position of the wearer's hand and fingers. By establishing a direct connection between the virtual and real working worlds, man and machine can, quite literally, work hand in hand. The research t

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Court says order allowing oil drilling in Everglades was 'issued in error'

A state court said Monday afternoon that an order affirming an oil drilling proposal for the Everglades had been "issued in error."

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Google Stadia can use AI to change a game's art in real-time

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More Than One Reality Exists (in Quantum Physics)

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The World in 2030 and 2040

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Nvidia AI Turns Doodles Into Realistic Landscapes

NVIDIA has shown that AI can use a simple representation of a landscape to render a photorealistic vista that doesn't exist anywhere in the real world. The post Nvidia AI Turns Doodles Into Realistic Landscapes appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Men need these social resources after prison

Men released from prison who receive social, community, and spiritual support have better mental health, research shows. A new study finds that former offenders, particularly those of color, who had access to and used social resources also experienced a more successful reentry back into society than those who did not. The findings suggest that without such supports, incarcerated men could face si

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The return of JellyWatch

Are jellyfish populations increasing around the world? Like the weather, jellyfish blooms are something that many people talk about, but few people do anything about. One exception would be MBARI's Steve Haddock, a marine biologist who has been studying jellies for more than two decades. Haddock recently rolled out a new and improved web site (jellywatch.org) that allows citizen scientists around

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Temperature blob in Pacific Ocean gives a glimpse of climate impact on humpback whales

A team of researchers with the Keiki Kohola Project and California State University reports that a recent "blob" of warm water in the Pacific gives marine scientists a preview of the impact of climate change on humpback whales. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of the whales and what they found.

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An Unexpected Halt in Multiple Myeloma for Venetoclax

Venetoclax (ABT-199) is an unusual drug. But now there’s some unusually bad (and unexpected) news about it. That’s the structure at right, and medicinal chemists will understand immediately why it’s a bit of an outlier. With a molecular weight of 868, that structure just keeps on going, with a somefeatures that you don’t usually see, like that dimethylcyclohexene linkage and the ortho -nitro anil

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The return of JellyWatch

Are jellyfish populations increasing around the world? Like the weather, jellyfish blooms are something that many people talk about, but few people do anything about. One exception would be MBARI's Steve Haddock, a marine biologist who has been studying jellies for more than two decades. Haddock recently rolled out a new and improved web site (jellywatch.org) that allows citizen scientists around

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Temperature blob in Pacific Ocean gives a glimpse of climate impact on humpback whales

A team of researchers with the Keiki Kohola Project and California State University reports that a recent "blob" of warm water in the Pacific gives marine scientists a preview of the impact of climate change on humpback whales. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of the whales and what they found.

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The Rivalry Between Two Doctors to Implant the First Artificial Heart

Featuring titans of Texas medicine, the race was on to develop the cutting-edge technology

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The business of biodiversity: can we put a value on nature?

Nature provides people with everything from food and water to timber, textiles, medicinal resources and pollination of crops. Now, a new approach aims to measure exactly what a specific ecosystem supplies in order to incentivise decision-makers and businesses to help combat biodiversity loss.

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One transistor for all purposes

In mobiles, fridges, planes – transistors are everywhere. But they often operate only within a restricted current range. LMU physicists have now developed an organic transistor that functions perfectly under both low and high currents.

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How Thailand Became the World’s Last Military Dictatorship

If military dictatorship is defined in the strictest sense as the rule of a junta or military officer who comes to power through a coup and then doesn’t hold elections to offer a veneer of legitimacy, then Thailand is the world’s last military dictatorship. It seems difficult to believe that such a peaceful, thriving country that welcomes millions of tourists each year is in fact a military dicta

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Ny overenskomst for uddannelseslæger og vikarer i almen praksis

PLO og Yngre Læger er blevet enige om en ny overenskomst for uddannelseslæger og vikarer i almen praksis, der strækker sig fra 1. april 2018 til 30. marts 2021.

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Opera Adds Free VPN to Android Browser App

Free VPNs are a risky proposition, but Opera seeks to reassure suspicious Android users that it's safe. The post Opera Adds Free VPN to Android Browser App appeared first on ExtremeTech.

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Researchers find Americans set their thermostat to match African environmental temperatures

A team of researchers at North Carolina State University has found that people living in the United States tend to set their thermostats to temperatures that mimic natural environmental conditions in parts of Africa. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study, which involved installing sensors in homes across the U.S., and what they found.

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Electric vehicles as an example of a market failure

Electric vehicle revolution is well under way. Norway ambitiously heads toward having all new cars sold as zero-emission by 2025. China continues to be one of the major drivers of EV boom. The US market experiences strong growth, driven by models from Tesla, Chevrolet and Nissan. The United Kingdom and France have announced they would ban new petrol and diesel vehicles sales by 2040.

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Researchers find Americans set their thermostat to match African environmental temperatures

A team of researchers at North Carolina State University has found that people living in the United States tend to set their thermostats to temperatures that mimic natural environmental conditions in parts of Africa. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study, which involved installing sensors in homes across the U.S., and what they found.

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New Cretaceous fossil sheds light on avian reproduction

A team of scientists led by Alida Bailleul and Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first fossil bird ever found with an egg preserved inside its body. Their findings were published on March 20 in Nature Communications.

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Canadian food and beverage companies get mixed grades on nutrition goals: U of T report

Canada's largest food and beverage manufacturers could aim higher to improve nutrition, reduce obesity and prevent chronic disease, according to a new report by University of Toronto researchers. The study is the first to evaluate Canada's biggest food and beverage companies based on their policies and commitments to sell healthier products.

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Seeing through food and drug fakes and frauds

A simple new technique developed by engineers from the University of California, Riverside that can detect fake drugs from a video taken as the sample undergoes a disturbance. Called 'chronoprinting,' the technology requires only a few relatively inexpensive pieces of equipment and free software to accurately distinguish pure from inferior food and medicines.

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'Chronoprints' identify samples by how they change over space and time

Modern analytical tools like mass spectrometers can identify many unknown substances, allowing scientists to easily tell whether foods or medicines have been altered. However, the cost, size, power consumption and complexity of these instruments often prevent their use in resource-limited regions. Now, in ACS Central Science, researchers report that they have developed a simple, inexpensive method

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The weirdest things we learned this week: animals used to stand trial and apples kept doctors from killing you

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s hit podcast.

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Autonomous transport will shape the future of cities – best get on the right path early

A unique opportunity exists for infrastructure investment in Australia as transport as we know it faces disruption from autonomous vehicles.

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Healthcare Space Seeing a New Sunrise with Artificial Intelligence

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Podcast Suggestions Wanted!

Love this topic, any recommendations on worthwhile podcasts? submitted by /u/lovejazz17 [link] [comments]

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How The Very Hungry Caterpillar Became a Classic

It happens pretty much the same way every time. The day after I’ve partaken in some sort of weekend or holiday eating-and-drinking binge—i.e., the Monday after the Super Bowl, the fifth of July, the first week of January after the entire Thanksgiving-through-New Year’s season officially comes to a close—I engage in the same detoxifying, repenting ritual: the consumption of a fresh, nutrient-rich

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After Two Decades, a Fishy Genetic Mystery Has Been Solved

It has taken her two decades, but Chi-Hing Christina Cheng has finally solved her ultimate cold case—a fishy mystery that extends from one frigid end of the planet to the other. Cheng, a Chinese-born biologist, moved to the United States as a teenager and began working in Antarctica in 1984. There, she and her partner, Arthur DeVries, studied the notothens —a group of fishes that swim in the cont

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When development and conservation clash in the Serengeti

A proposed Northern Serengeti all-weather tarmac road that will bisect Serengeti National Park, a World Heritage site, has sparked considerable debate. Opponents say that the road could disrupt the migration of approximately 1.5 million wildebeest, zebras and gazelles between Serengeti National Park and Masai Mara National Reserve in Kenya, and increase already high levels of poaching. Proponents,

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Spot failed Soviet Venus probe Kosmos 482 in Earth orbit

A ghost from the old Soviet space program may return to Earth in the coming years. Mimicking a campy episode of the '70s series The Six Million Dollar Man, a Soviet Venus lander stranded in Earth orbit will eventually reenter the atmosphere, perhaps as early as late 2019. Fortunately, this isn't the "Venus death probe" that the bionic man Steve Austin had to defeat, but Kosmos 482 is part of a fas

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National service for the environment – what an army of young conservationists could achieve

The school climate strikes show that young people want to fight climate change, but their enthusiasm for collective action is largely untapped. A volunteer conservation army could mobilise their talent and passion by channeling it into work to restore ecosystems.

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Project adds 11,400 intra-American journeys to Slave Voyages database

Blending the power of big data and history, an expanded and redesigned version of Slave Voyages – one of the most utilized resources in the digital humanities – is now available. Housing both trans-Atlantic and intra-American slave trade databases, the Slave Voyages website illuminates the ubiquity of the slave trade from the 16th century to the 19th century. A research team co-led by the Universi

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A surprising, cascading earthquake

The Kaikoura earthquake in New Zealand in 2016 caused widespread damage. LMU researchers have now dissected its mechanisms revealing surprising insights on earthquake physics with the aid of simulations carried out on the supercomputer SuperMUC.

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Fighting Online for SBM

Physicians are being harassed offline by antivax and other trolls. We can't let that happen.

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One in four scientists have experienced harassment or discrimination

A survey of nearly 3700 scientists across Europe and North America suggests that harassment, bullying and discrimination are widespread

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Why I believe humans were in Australia 120,000 years ago

Newly discovered shells and blackened stones are compelling evidence that humans lived in Australia 60,000 years earlier than we thought, says James Bowler

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Study analyzes pre-installed software on Android devices and its privacy risks for users

Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the IMDEA Networks Institute, in collaboration with the International Computer Science Institute (ICSI) at Berkeley (USA) and Stony Brook University of New York (USA), have carried out a study that encompasses 82,000 pre-installed apps in more than 1,700 devices manufactured by 214 brands, revealing the existence of a complex ecosystem of manufacturers,

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BMW warns profits will fall due to costs, trade uncertainty

German automaker BMW said Wednesday that profits in 2019 would be "well below" last year's and that it planned to cut 12 billion euros ($13.6 billion) in costs by the end of 2022 to offset spending on new technology.

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Supercomputers to help supercharge ceramic matrix composite manufacturing

New software capabilities developed by computational scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Rolls Royce Corporation could soon help engineers lift the gas turbine engines of aircraft and power plants to higher efficiencies.

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Five things to know about Bayer and Monsanto

The second cancer victim in a year to win a surprise victory against US pesticide maker Monsanto raises the prospect of a flood of similar lawsuits, potentially leaving the firm's new German owner Bayer with a major case of buyer's remorse.

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Stopper som 44-årig: Praktiserende læge har fået nok

Efter syv år stopper Eva Folkersen som praktiserende læge i Brønshøj. Det koster hende en halv million kr. i goodwill, men uden børn at forsørge er det økonomiske tab til at tolerere. Norge, Privatlægen eller noget tredje venter forude.

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Why Tech Platforms Don’t Treat All Terrorism the Same

Critics say Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter are quicker to block content from ISIS than from white nationalists.

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Seeing through food and drug fakes and frauds

If we could tell authentic from counterfeit or adulterated drugs and foods just by looking at them, we could save money and lives every year, especially in the developing world, where the problem is worst. Unfortunately, the technologies that can detect what a sample is made of are expensive, energy-intensive, and largely unavailable in regions where they are needed most.

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Image of the Day: Ant Imposters

Over the course of their lives, the jumping spider Synemosyna formica wears two different ant disguises to fool preying birds.

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Ny elbil fra Henrik Fisker afføder flere spørgsmål, end den giver svar

PLUS. ANALYSE: Mandag afslørede den danskfødte bildesigner Henrik Fisker en ny elbil. Den skal være klar til levering i anden halvdel af 2021 og bliver en direkte konkurrent til Teslas kommende model Y – både hvad angår pris og design.

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Mærsk-partners plastoprydningsprojekt gået i stå ved Hawaii

Efter forsøg i Stillehavet har flydebommen fra The Ocean Cleanup ikke haft nok fart til at kunne indsamle plastaffald effektivt. En del af et rør er også brækket af på flydebommen.

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Vestager udstikker bøde til Google på 11 milliarder kroner

Google har hæmmet konkurrencen med søgefelt på 3. partssider og krav om Google-annoncer, anfører kommissæren.

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Asteroid's Bumpiness Threatens U.S. Plan to Return a Sample to Earth

NASA mission finds asteroid Bennu littered with big boulders and spraying out particles — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A twofer

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Fear the Economic Singularity

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Study suggests widespread illegal killing of hen harriers on English grouse moors

A new study reveals that young hen harriers in England suffer abnormally high mortality compared to populations in Orkney and mainland Scotland and provides compelling evidence that the most likely cause is illegal killing in areas associated with grouse moor management.

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The Mysterious Exploding Asteroid

Billions of years ago, something—perhaps the vibrations of an exploding star—jostled a cloud of cosmic gas and dust suspended in space. The cloud collapsed on itself and flattened into a spinning disk. The center grew heavy and ignited, forming our sun. The stuff that remained ricocheted, collided, and congealed. The biggest clumps of space stuff smoothed into spheres—the planets and moons. The s

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California state and county officials falling short in evaluating use of agricultural pesticides

Since the 1940s, the responsibility for managing California farmers' use of agricultural pesticides, and the substantial health risks they pose, has been shared by state and county regulators. The state's Department of Pesticide Regulation registers pesticide products; county-level agricultural commissioners issue permits for the use of "restricted" pesticides—those that present significant human

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Study suggests widespread illegal killing of hen harriers on English grouse moors

A new study reveals that young hen harriers in England suffer abnormally high mortality compared to populations in Orkney and mainland Scotland and provides compelling evidence that the most likely cause is illegal killing in areas associated with grouse moor management.

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Homeless on campus? New social work study examines student homelessness

We've all heard stories about them. They couch-surf, find warm classrooms to sleep in, and stay awake half the night to avoid security. They're the student homeless.

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Google tweaks search after EU competition scrutiny

Rival companies' price comparison results will be displayed more prominently thanks to the changes.

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Media coverage of the New Zealand mosque shooting needs scrutiny, Northeastern professor says

The role that social media played in the lead-up and execution of a deadly attack on two mosques in New Zealand is being scrutinized closely by law enforcement officials, elected leaders, and scholars alike.

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Precision control of complex electrochemical interfaces for separations

Researchers working within Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Separations Science program succeeded in coupling a highly controlled way of modifying surfaces, called ion soft landing, with a PNNL-designed and built electrochemical cell to achieve precise control over the chemical composition of complex interfaces. Once achieved, this allowed them to make atom-by-atom changes to elect

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NASA's Mars 2020 rover is put to the test

In a little more than seven minutes in the early afternoon of Feb. 18, 2021, NASA's Mars 2020 rover will execute about 27,000 actions and calculations as it speeds through the hazardous transition from the edge of space to Mars' Jezero Crater. While that will be the first time the wheels of the 2,314-pound (1,050-kilogram) rover touch the Red Planet, the vehicle's network of processors, sensors an

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Researchers teach neural networks to determine crowd emotions

Scholars from the Higher School Of Economics have developed an algorithm that detects emotions in a group of people on a low-quality video. The solution provides a final decision in just one hundredth of a second, which is faster than any other existing algorithms with similar accuracy. The results have been described in the paper 'Emotion Recognition of a Group of People in Video Analytics Using

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Values influence where we spend our time and money

A study carried out by the University of Western Australia has highlighted the important role values play in our daily behaviour, including where we invest our time and money.

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Boeing 737 MAX: After two fatal crashes, an expert explains the issues

The Boeing 737 is the most produced commercial aeroplane in history: over 10,000 have been built since it first flew in 1967, with thousands more on order. Even the UK's Royal Air Force is to put them into service as the P8a Poseidon.

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This robot learns to pick up mugs by learning a theory of mugness

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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The Enigmatic Russian Paying Maria Butina's Legal Bills

Updated at 10:22 a.m. ET on March 20, 2019. In the murky world of Russian influence operations, a troll farm based out of St. Petersburg can flood American voters with propaganda and disinformation at a deniable distance from the Kremlin. A Russian gun-rights group can cultivate U.S. conservatives at arm’s length from Vladimir Putin. And an unregistered Russian agent being held in a Northern Virg

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Five ways media training helped me to boost the impact of my research

Five ways media training helped me to boost the impact of my research Five ways media training helped me to boost the impact of my research, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00883-7 How I learnt to maximize the value of TV, radio and publication interviews to reach and help the people I most want to support.

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Image: BioRock and roll

This fluorescent work of art captures the beauty of biofilms, or the growth of microbes on rocks. In this microscopic image, Sphingomonas desiccabilis is growing on basalt.

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Å-politikere: Sundhedsvidenskabelig evidens skal der ikke rokkes ved

Otte kandidater fra Alternativet understreger, at partiets sundhedspolitik baserer sig på videnskabelig evidens.

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High-Potency Marijuana Use Linked with Psychosis Risk

People who use high-potency marijuana on a daily basis may be at increased risk for developing psychosis.

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More Than One Reality Exists (in Quantum Physics)

Can two versions of reality exist at the same time? Physicists say they can — at the quantum level, that is.

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Loneliness Is Harmful to Our Nation's Health

Research underscores the role of social isolation in disease and mortality — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study shows pressure induces unusually high electrical conductivity in polyiodide

A study into the effects of high mechanical pressure on the polyiodide TEAI showed that it brings unusually high electrical conductivity starting from insulating state, suggesting that the material may be useful as a switchable semiconductor. This system could represent an alternative to gel electrolytes and ionic liquids in dye-synthesized solar cells. The paper, "Pressure-induced Polymerization

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Geothermal plant 'triggered earthquake' in S. Korea

A rare earthquake in South Korea was triggered by the country's first experimental geothermal power plant, a team of government-commissioned experts said Wednesday.

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In Pakistan, People Are Jailed for Blasphemous Facebook Posts

Authorities in Pakistan use stringent laws to prosecute blasphemy—even “crimes” as innocuous as liking a post on Facebook. Vigilantes have been known to murder the accused.

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The First Gene-Edited Food Is Now Being Served

Calyxt is the first with its gene-edited oil, but several other companies also have edited foods in the works.

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A Timeline of MoviePass' Many Ridiculous Business Plans

When it comes to figuring out a membership model, MoviePass is more ‘Groundhog Day’ than ‘Social Network.’

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Mariner's Astrolabe from 1503 Shipwreck Is World's Oldest

An astrolabe found at a shipwreck site in Oman is the oldest one ever discovered.

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Loneliness Is Harmful to Our Nation's Health

Research underscores the role of social isolation in disease and mortality — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dine bildæk rydder regnskoven i Cambodja

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet viser, at omfanget af skovrydning i Cambodja nøje følger…

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'Oumuamua, Our First Interstellar Visitor, May Have Been a Comet After All

New research flags jets of water vapor—rather than alien technology—as the source of the mysterious object’s anomalous motions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Oumuamua, Our First Interstellar Visitor, May Have Been a Comet After All

New research flags jets of water vapor—rather than alien technology—as the source of the mysterious object’s anomalous motions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Genetic risk scores could help the NHS but they aren't ready yet

Analysing huge genetic databases is allowing us to score people on their risk of common diseases, but the technique isn't ready to roll out across the NHS

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Superconducting nanowires could be used to detect dark matter

If physicists have been going about the search the wrong way, these clever sensors might help.

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What oil leaves behind in 2.5 billion gallons of water every day in US

Purdue University researchers have developed a process to remove nearly all traces of oil in produced water.

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Changes in ocean 'conveyor belt' foretold abrupt climate changes by four centuries

In the Atlantic Ocean, a giant 'conveyor belt' carries warm waters from the tropics into the North Atlantic, where they cool and sink and then return southwards in the deep ocean. This circulation pattern is an important player in the global climate. Evidence increasingly suggests that this system is slowing down, and some scientists fear it could have major effects. A new study published in Natur

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Honey bee colonies more successful by foraging on non-crop fields

Honey bee colonies foraging on land with a strong cover of clover species and alfalfa do more than three times as well than if they are put next to crop fields of sunflowers or canola, according to a study just published in Scientific Reports by an Agricultural Research Service scientist and his colleagues.

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Beware of sleeping queens underfoot this spring

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have discovered a never before reported behaviour of queen bumblebees.

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New study shows effects on offspring of epigenetic inheritance via sperm

As an organism grows and responds to its environment, genes in its cells are constantly turning on and off, with different patterns of gene expression in different cells. But can changes in gene expression be passed on from parents to their children and subsequent generations? Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have now demonstrated that epigenetic information carried by parental sperm chromosomes can c

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New Cretaceous fossil sheds light on avian reproduction

A team of scientists led by Alida Bailleul and Jingmai O'Connor from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first fossil bird ever found with an egg preserved inside its body. This new Cretaceous fossil sheds light on avian reproduction.

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Sequence variation at ANAPC1 accounts for 24% of the variability in corneal endothelial cell density

Sequence variation at ANAPC1 accounts for 24% of the variability in corneal endothelial cell density Sequence variation at ANAPC1 accounts for 24% of the variability in corneal endothelial cell density, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09304-9 The corneal endothelium is crucial for proper vision. Here, Ivarsdottir et al. perform genome-wide association studies for various c

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Cascade anchoring strategy for general mass production of high-loading single-atomic metal-nitrogen catalysts

Cascade anchoring strategy for general mass production of high-loading single-atomic metal-nitrogen catalysts Cascade anchoring strategy for general mass production of high-loading single-atomic metal-nitrogen catalysts, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09290-y Although single atom catalysts (SACs) with high-loading metal-Nx have great potential in heterogeneous catalysis,

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Flat-top TIRF illumination boosts DNA-PAINT imaging and quantification

Flat-top TIRF illumination boosts DNA-PAINT imaging and quantification Flat-top TIRF illumination boosts DNA-PAINT imaging and quantification, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09064-6 The use of TIRF microscopy for DNA-PAINT experiments is limited by inhomogeneous illumination. Here the authors show that quantitative analysis of single-molecule TIRF experiments can be impro

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Nonlinear magnetotransport shaped by Fermi surface topology and convexity

Nonlinear magnetotransport shaped by Fermi surface topology and convexity Nonlinear magnetotransport shaped by Fermi surface topology and convexity, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09208-8 The nature of non-saturating magnetoresistance (MR) in topological materials is an important issue in condensed matter research but remains elusive. The authors here report the nonlinear

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Coming together to define membrane contact sites

Coming together to define membrane contact sites Coming together to define membrane contact sites, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09253-3 Given the recent growing interest in interorganelle membrane contact sites, the field will benefit from clear rules to define and study them. In this Perspective, a panel of experts aims to provide this growing field with guidelines for

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Memory phototransistors based on exponential-association photoelectric conversion law

Memory phototransistors based on exponential-association photoelectric conversion law Memory phototransistors based on exponential-association photoelectric conversion law, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09206-w CdS nanostructures can enable memory based photodetection by charge-storage accumulative effect. Here, the authors report CdS nanoribbons-based memory phototransi

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Mechanical behaviour of fluid-lubricated faults

Mechanical behaviour of fluid-lubricated faults Mechanical behaviour of fluid-lubricated faults, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09293-9 The effect of fluid viscosity on fault mechanics is mainly conjectured by theoretical models. Here, the authors present experimental data from rock friction experiments, showing both static and dynamic friction coefficients to decrease wi

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Cryo-EM structure of cardiac amyloid fibrils from an immunoglobulin light chain AL amyloidosis patient

Cryo-EM structure of cardiac amyloid fibrils from an immunoglobulin light chain AL amyloidosis patient Cryo-EM structure of cardiac amyloid fibrils from an immunoglobulin light chain AL amyloidosis patient, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09133-w Immunoglobulin Light Chain Amyloidosis (AL) is the most common systemic amyloidosis occurring in Western countries. Here the aut

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Can a State Abolish the Insanity Defense?

Big-agenda, partisan issues—the census, reapportionment and gerrymandering, the Second Amendment, abortion—are bearing down on the Supreme Court like a ship with black sails. I am not optimistic that a majority will defy Republican orthodoxy on any of these—and if that is correct, the Court will emerge next spring as both a very live political issue and a shadow of its former self. Not every case

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Jagar partiklar som skadar hormonbalansen

I en exponeringskammare vid Lunds tekniska högskola studerar forskarna hur människors hälsa påverkas av olika luftburna partiklar. De under­söker allt från stearinljus och matos till diesel, rengöringsmedel och hårblekningsmedel.

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Protein-slaying drugs could be the next blockbuster therapies

Protein-slaying drugs could be the next blockbuster therapies Protein-slaying drugs could be the next blockbuster therapies, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00879-3 Researchers are hijacking the cell’s protein-disposal system in the fight against Alzheimer’s and intractable cancers.

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New insights into the origin and evolution of α-amylase genes in green plants

New insights into the origin and evolution of α-amylase genes in green plants New insights into the origin and evolution of α-amylase genes in green plants, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41420-w New insights into the origin and evolution of α-amylase genes in green plants

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Structure and Diversity of Soil Bacterial Communities in Offshore Islands

Structure and Diversity of Soil Bacterial Communities in Offshore Islands Structure and Diversity of Soil Bacterial Communities in Offshore Islands, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41170-9 Structure and Diversity of Soil Bacterial Communities in Offshore Islands

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Influence of Different Urban Structures on Metal Contamination in Two Metropolitan Cities

Influence of Different Urban Structures on Metal Contamination in Two Metropolitan Cities Influence of Different Urban Structures on Metal Contamination in Two Metropolitan Cities, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40180-x Influence of Different Urban Structures on Metal Contamination in Two Metropolitan Cities

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Pitx2 cholinergic interneurons are the source of C bouton synapses on brainstem motor neurons

Pitx2 cholinergic interneurons are the source of C bouton synapses on brainstem motor neurons Pitx2 cholinergic interneurons are the source of C bouton synapses on brainstem motor neurons, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39996-4 Pitx2 cholinergic interneurons are the source of C bouton synapses on brainstem motor neurons

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Simple Tyrosine Derivatives Act as Low Molecular Weight Organogelators

Simple Tyrosine Derivatives Act as Low Molecular Weight Organogelators Simple Tyrosine Derivatives Act as Low Molecular Weight Organogelators, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41142-z Simple Tyrosine Derivatives Act as Low Molecular Weight Organogelators

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Global Variation of Nutritional Status in Children Undergoing Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis: A Longitudinal Study of the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network

Global Variation of Nutritional Status in Children Undergoing Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis: A Longitudinal Study of the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network Global Variation of Nutritional Status in Children Undergoing Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis: A Longitudinal Study of the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018-

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Single-trial classification of awareness state during anesthesia by measuring critical dynamics of global brain activity

Single-trial classification of awareness state during anesthesia by measuring critical dynamics of global brain activity Single-trial classification of awareness state during anesthesia by measuring critical dynamics of global brain activity, Published online: 20 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41345-4 Single-trial classification of awareness state during anesthesia by measuring critical dynam

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Health secretary wants NHS to roll out genetic tests to detect diseases

Matt Hancock hails ‘game-changer’ but critics raise racial bias and ‘fatalism’ concerns The health secretary is calling for predictive genetic tests for common cancers and heart disease to be rolled out on the NHS without delay. Matt Hancock, speaking at the Royal Society on Wednesday, revealed he recently took a commercial genetic test that showed he was at heightened risk of developing prostate

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Donald Trump is using Stalinist techniques against climate science | Michael Mann and Bob Ward

A panel to promote an alternative explanation for climate change would be disastrous. Yet that’s what White House officials want Americans should not be fooled by the Stalinist tactics being used by the White House to try to discredit the findings of mainstream climate science. The Trump administration has already purged information about climate change from government websites, gagged federal ex

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Sickle cell screening abstract retracted for host of reasons, including an ambivalent co-author

Researchers have lost a 2018 conference abstract on screening for sickle cell disease in Africa over a dispute over authorship and the lack of appropriate disclosures. The article, “Implementation of a sickle cell disease screening initiative in Uganda with HemoTypeSC(TM),” which was presented at a 2018 conference and then appeared in Blood, described a … Continue reading Sickle cell screening abs

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In a first, a fossilized egg is found preserved inside an ancient bird

Scientists have found the first known fossil of a bird that died with an unlaid egg inside its body. The egg has been crushed by pressure over time.

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Unlaid egg discovered in ancient bird fossil

One hundred and 10–million-year-old discovery could reveal how animal perished

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Inside Airbnb's 'Guerrilla War' Against Local Governments

Airbnb, the nation's second-most-valuable startup, is battling cities from Boston to San Diego over collecting taxes and enforcing zoning rules.

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Honey bee colonies more successful by foraging on non-crop fields

Honey bee colonies foraging on land with a strong cover of clover species and alfalfa do more than three times as well than if they are put next to crop fields of sunflowers or canola, according to a study just published in Scientific Reports by an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist and his colleagues.

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What oil leaves behind in 2.5 billion gallons of water every day in US

About 2.5 billion gallons of produced water, a byproduct from the oil refinery and extraction process, is generated each day in the United States.

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New study shows effects on offspring of epigenetic inheritance via sperm

As an organism grows and responds to its environment, genes in its cells are constantly turning on and off, with different patterns of gene expression in different cells. But can changes in gene expression be passed on from parents to their children and subsequent generations? Although indirect evidence for this phenomenon, called "transgenerational epigenetic inheritance," is growing, it remains

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Changes in ocean 'conveyor belt' foretold abrupt climate changes by four centuries

In the Atlantic Ocean, a giant 'conveyor belt' carries warm waters from the tropics into the North Atlantic, where they cool and sink and then return southwards in the deep ocean. This circulation pattern is an important player in the global climate, regulating weather patterns in the Arctic, Europe, and around the world. Evidence increasingly suggests that this system is slowing down, and some sc

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Honey bee colonies more successful by foraging on non-crop fields

Honey bee colonies foraging on land with a strong cover of clover species and alfalfa do more than three times as well than if they are put next to crop fields of sunflowers or canola, according to a study just published in Scientific Reports by an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist and his colleagues.

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New study shows effects on offspring of epigenetic inheritance via sperm

As an organism grows and responds to its environment, genes in its cells are constantly turning on and off, with different patterns of gene expression in different cells. But can changes in gene expression be passed on from parents to their children and subsequent generations? Although indirect evidence for this phenomenon, called "transgenerational epigenetic inheritance," is growing, it remains

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Beware of sleeping queens underfoot this spring

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have discovered a never before reported behaviour of queen bumblebees.

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Beware of sleeping queens underfoot this spring

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have discovered a never before reported behaviour of queen bumblebees.

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Why Is it So Hard to Match Patients With Their Medical Records?

Accurately matching patients to their medical records bedevils every hospital, doctor’s office, and laboratory in America, risking patient safety, and wasting money on unnecessary tests and procedures. Without a centralized authority, health care systems are struggling to find an adequate solution.

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Generna kan påverka återhämtningen efter stroke

För studien delades patienterna in i två grupper beroende på hur bra de klarat sig tre månader efter ischemisk stroke. I den ena gruppen ingick dels de som inte överlevt, och dels de som var beroende av hjälp från andra för att få sin vardag att fungera. I den andra gruppen placerades de som tre månader efter insjuknandet tillfrisknat så pass att de kunde klara sig själva. Genom att jämföra analy

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Så kan man utvinna mer ur befintliga gruvor

– Det är helt klart realistiskt – förutsättningarna finns. I Bergslagen skulle det potentiellt gå att bryta industrikalk och sulfidmalmer i samma gruvområde, säger Nils Jansson, forskare i malmgeologi vid Luleå tekniska universitet och ledare för projektet VectOre, som sker i nära samarbete med metall- och industrimineralindustrin. I Sverige – och på de allra flesta håll i världen – sker i dag br

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Fredsvalg blandt IDAs studiemedlemmer endte som kampvalg

Der var kamp om pladserne, da et landsdækkende netværk af studiemedlemmer, STEM Students, var samlet til stormøde for at vælge folk til de fire pladser i IDAs repræsentantskab, der er øremærket studerende.

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Asian-American groups vary in life years lost to premature heart disease, stroke

Risks of death from heart disease and stroke vary among American-Asian subgroups, with Asian Indian, Filipino and Vietnamese populations at greatest risk for losing years of life to heart disease or stroke.All Asians had higher years of life lost to stroke than non-Hispanic whites.

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Investors flee Bayer after second glyphosate trial blow (Update)

The threat to German chemical giant Bayer and subsidiary Monsanto from US litigation swelled Wednesday, when its share price plunged after a jury ruled weedkiller Roundup was a "substantial factor" in an amateur gardener's cancer.

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Spring arrival: Public to capture new season in words

The public is being asked to contribute entries to a national nature diary documenting the arrival of spring.

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Hayabusa-2: Asteroid mission exploring a 'rubble pile'

The mission exploring an asteroid finds that it consists of material blasted off another asteroid.

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Review of osteoporosis clinical practice guidelines finds majority lack patient values

Patients' voices are ignored all too often in osteoporosis clinical practice guidelines, say researchers, who reviewed 70 English-language guidelines around the world and found less than 40 percent included any mention of patients' beliefs, values or preferences (BVPs).

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What happens when we run out of food?

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A More Humane Livestock Industry, Brought to You by Crispr

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Historical Map of Cognitive Science – Information Design

submitted by /u/mherrmann [link] [comments]

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At Kenyan orphanage, baby elephants find a new life, and love

Luggard, a lively three-year-old, limps behind the rest of his ragtag troupe of orphan elephants, halting to graze or rub against a tree.

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At Kenyan orphanage, baby elephants find a new life, and love

Luggard, a lively three-year-old, limps behind the rest of his ragtag troupe of orphan elephants, halting to graze or rub against a tree.

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Key to saving lives of newborns lies in half a teaspoon of blood, study claims

Research reveals striking changes in babies’ immune development that could form the basis for lifesaving vaccines A groundbreaking study has claimed that the key to saving the lives of newborns is found in just half a teaspoon of blood. Research has revealed dramatic changes in the immune systems of newborns, which scientists say could transform our understanding of disease in babies. Continue re

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An autonomous robot to park your car on long term airports lot

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Disney closes $71B deal for Fox entertainment assets

Disney has closed its $71 billion acquisition of Fox's entertainment business, putting "Cinderella," "The Simpsons," "Star Wars" and "Dr. Strange" under one corporate roof.

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Not so fantastic: Can Japan end its love affair with plastic?

From bento boxes to individually wrapped bananas, plastic reigns supreme in Japan. But amid global concern about single-use waste, new legislation could help end the country's love affair with plastic.

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Cylcone Trevor causes Australia power outages, set to strengthen

A powerful tropical cyclone that lashed the northeast coast of Australia, closing ports and causing power outages, is expected to strengthen further Wednesday.

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Instagram moves into e-commerce with shopping button

Facebook-owned Instagram on Tuesday made a move into potentially lucrative e-commerce by adding an option to buy products shown off in posts by selected brands.

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Better water testing, safer produce

Salads were recently in the news—and off America's dinner tables—when romaine lettuce was recalled nationwide. Outbreaks of intestinal illness were traced to romaine lettuce contaminated with Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria.

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Wildlife tourism may negatively affect African elephants' behavior

Increasing numbers of tourists are interested in observing wildlife such as African elephants, and income generated from tourism potentially aids in the protection of animals and their habitats. However, a new Journal of Zoology study reveals that wildlife tourism may be a stressor for free-ranging elephants.

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Wildlife tourism may negatively affect African elephants' behavior

Increasing numbers of tourists are interested in observing wildlife such as African elephants, and income generated from tourism potentially aids in the protection of animals and their habitats. However, a new Journal of Zoology study reveals that wildlife tourism may be a stressor for free-ranging elephants.

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Monsanto's Roundup weedkiller contributed to US man's cancer: jury

The weedkiller Roundup was a "substantial factor" in the cancer of a US man who developed a lump in his throat after decades of spraying his garden—the second major legal defeat to agrochemical giant Monsanto in a year.

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Rags-to-riches Skoda mulls post-Brexit sales woes

Once the butt of jokes, Czech-made Skoda cars have won over Brits, but the UK's looming exit from the European Union could deal a heavy blow to the brand and the entire Czech economy.

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Google unveils search changes to placate EU

Google on Tuesday unveiled a series of tweaks to its European search engine results in an effort to avoid further fines from the EU's top anti-trust regulator.

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US official declares drought plan done for Colorado River

Seven states that rely on a major waterway in the U.S. West have finished a yearslong effort to create a plan to protect the Colorado River amid a prolonged drought, the federal government declared Tuesday.

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What Disney gets as its $71.3B buy of Fox assets closes

It's finally complete. Disney closed its $71 billion acquisition of Fox's entertainment assets on Wednesday, more than a year after the mega merger was proposed . Disney gets far ranging properties ranging from Fox's film studios, including "Avatar" and X-Men, to its TV productions such as "The Simpsons" and networks including National Geographic.

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Disney closes $71B deal for Fox entertainment assets

Disney has closed its $71 billion acquisition of Fox's entertainment business, putting "Cinderella," "The Simpsons," "Star Wars" and "Dr. Strange" under one corporate roof.

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The Underappreciated Threat of Volcanic Tsunamis

Tsunamis caused by volcanoes are responsible for nearly a quarter of all deaths caused by eruptions, yet we have only now started to understand them. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Monsanto's Roundup weedkiller contributed to US man's cancer: jury

The weedkiller Roundup was a "substantial factor" in the cancer of a US man who developed a lump in his throat after decades of spraying his garden—the second major legal defeat to agrochemical giant Monsanto in a year.

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Minister begejstret over gældsindrivelse – men nyt it-system er ikke oppe i omdrejninger

Gældsstyrelsen har i 2018 inddrevet 7,1 milliarder kroner, men langt størstedelen af inddrivelsen foregår i gammelt system.

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NASA's Surprise Discovery on Bennu Just Changed What We Know About Asteroids

"One of the biggest surprises of my scientific career."

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Sniffing out Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to progressive brain cell death and extensive loss of motor function. Despite much research being conducted on this disease, there are no definitive diagnostic tests currently available. Now, researchers report the identification of compounds that make up the signature odor of the disease with the help an individual who can detect Park

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Elizabeth Holmes and her firm Theranos show why we must stop fetishising entrepreneurs | Arwa Mahdawi

How did the ex-CEO, now facing criminal charges, find fame and fortune? By aping the persona of a ‘tech genius’ Elizabeth Holmes did not change the world, as she once promised , but she certainly captured its attention. The story of the founder of the now defunct blood-testing company Theranos is everywhere . There is a bestselling book , a popular podcast and a new documentary, The Inventor: Out

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Behind a lesbian furore over a famous palaeontologist lies a deeper truth | Tori Herridge and Becky Wragg Sykes

No one knows if Mary Anning had lovers. But what a new film does get right is the vital role women played in her life The furore over a film portraying the 19th-century palaeontologist Mary Anning as having a female lover probably tells us more about ourselves than it does about historical accuracy onscreen. Francis Lee’s Ammonite might not be a scrupulously backed-up biopic, but it may just hit

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'Super-smeller' helps develop swab test for Parkinson's disease

Distinctive musky odour of people with Parkinson’s could lead to earlier diagnosis Scientists have developed a test for Parkinson’s disease based on its signature odour after teaming up with a woman who can smell the condition before tremors and other clinical symptoms appear. The test could help doctors diagnose patients sooner and identify those in the earliest stages of the disease, who could

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Marathon records predicted for 21st century

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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China clones 'Sherlock Holmes' police dog to cut training times – report

Kunxun was cloned from a police sniffer dog in Beijing but cost of process remains an obstacle Scientists in south-west China’s Yunnan province have reportedly cloned what they called the “Sherlock Holmes of police dogs” in a programme they hope will help cut training times and costs for police dogs. The dog, named Kunxun, was cloned from a police sniffer dog by the Beijing-based Sinogene Biotech

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The Jump-Seat Pilot and the Boeing 737 Max

Previously on this topic: “ Is It Time to Worry About the Boeing 737 Max? ,” “ A Shorter Guide to the Ethiopian Tragedy and the 737 Max ,” “ What Was On the Record About Problems With the 737 Max ,” “ ‘Don’t Ground the Planes, Ground the Pilots,’ ” “ The Implications of the 737 Max Crashes ,” and “ Training, Regulation, and the 737 Max .” A few hours ago Bloomberg broke a story , by Alan Levin an

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Norwegian-piloter kritiserer Boeing og myndigheder: Vi burde have fået besked

Flyselskaber skulle have haft information om den software, som automatisk kan tvinge næsen ned på Boeing 737 Max. Det mener fagforeningen for flyets skandinaviske piloter.

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