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Facebook Stored Millions of Passwords in Plaintext—Change Yours Now

Facebook has disclosed that it stored hundreds of millions of user passwords in plaintext, where employees could search them.

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Opting Out of Vaccines Should Opt You Out of American Society

People who are able to take vaccines but refuse to do so are the moral equivalent of drunk drivers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Brief Note About Alzheimer’s

Well, there it is. Biogen and Eisai have announced just this morning that they’re halting Phase III trials of aducanumab, their anti-amyloid antibody, after the monitoring committee judged that further treatment would be futile. I’m not going to do some sort of victory dance, because (once again) this is bad news for Alzheimer’s patients and for their families. I know that I have written many tim

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Using a Brain Computer Interface to Probe Neural Redundancy

The muscles in your arms receive commands from the neurons in your brain. These commands are phrases of a complex language that neurons use to communicate with one another and, in the case of motor neurons, the muscles.. The neural language, like verbal languages, has groups of phrases that are thought to be redundant. This means that a brain commanding an arm to move could use various ‘neural ph

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Tesla Sues Zoox Over Manufacturing and Logistics Secrets

The electric car company says four former employees took proprietary information to their new jobs at Zoox. Oh, and Tesla sued an employee of another rival, too.

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Researchers boost intensity of nanowire LEDs

Nanowire researchers have made ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that, thanks to a special type of shell, produce five times higher light intensity than do comparable LEDs based on a simpler shell design.

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Golden ball in a golden cage

Researchers have synthesized a tiny structure from 32 gold atoms. This nanocluster has a core of 12 gold atoms surrounded by a shell of 20 additional gold atoms. The unusual stability of this cluster results from electronic interactions with amido and phosphine ligands bound to its surface.

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Excess hormones could cause a condition that can lead to blindness in women, study finds

Research has found that increased levels of hormones including testosterone could cause a brain condition that can lead to blindness in women.

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Getting help with the kids slows down ageing in female birds

Seychelles warblers live and breed in family groups on the tiny island of Cousin. In each group, a dominant female and male reproduce. When helpers assist the with incubation and feeding of chicks, the dominant female breeders age more slowly and live longer, a study by biologists shows. The results indicate how cooperative breeding — which also occurs in other species, including humans — can in

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Calling time on 'statistical significance' in science research

Scientists should stop using the term 'statistically significant' in their research, researchers urge.

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Cryptosporidium parasite detected in Minnesota groundwater

When consumed in contaminated water, the microscopic parasite Cryptosporidium can cause symptoms of stomach cramps, diarrhea and fever. Now, researchers have detected evidence of the parasite in about 40 percent of surveyed wells in public water systems in Minnesota — even wells not influenced by surface water. The team emphasizes that they don't know whether the parasite levels are high enough t

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TypeScript’s Quiet, Steady Rise Among Programming Languages

TypeScript, Microsoft's JavaScript Alternative, Continues to Rise in Popularity

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Stricter US state gun laws linked to safer high schools

Adopting stricter state gun laws is linked to a safer school experience for students, finds research published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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New technique could help regrow tissue lost to periodontal disease

About half of all Americans will have periodontal disease at some point in their lives. Characterized by inflamed gums and bone loss around teeth, the condition can cause bad breath, toothache, tender gums and, in severe cases, tooth loss. Now, researchers report development of a membrane that helps periodontal tissue regenerate when implanted into the gums of rats.

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Experts set out targets to eliminate tuberculosis within a generation

A world free of tuberculosis (TB) is possible by 2045 if increased political will and financial resources are directed towards priority areas including providing evidence-based interventions to everyone, especially to high risk groups, and increasing research to develop new ways to diagnose, treat, and prevent TB. Funding this response will require substantial investments, and accountability mecha

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BMI, but not age at puberty, tied to risk of multiple sclerosis

Some studies have suggested that people who are younger when they enter puberty are more likely to later develop multiple sclerosis (MS). But a new study attributes that link to body mass index (BMI).

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Bonanza of Bizarre Cambrian Fossils Reveals Some of the Earliest Animals on Earth

Bizarre fossils in a newly-discovered site include dozens of creatures that are new to science.

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Why are fingernails white?

submitted by /u/markchangizi [link] [comments]

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Finally! A DNA Computer That Can Actually Be Reprogrammed

DNA computers have to date only been able to run one algorithm, but a new design shows how these machines can be made more flexible—and useful.

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A new drug for postpartum depression could help everyone

Health A significant overlap might exist between the two distinct variations of the disease. The first drug to treat postpartum depression, a condition that affects up to 1 in 7 women, was approved by the Food and Drug Administration this week. The medication,…

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Pathogenic, drug-resistant bacteria found in wastewater treatment plants

Infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria are a global public health threat causing serious illness and even death. In a new study, researchers conducted a survey of 20 municipal wastewater plants in England, and isolated drug-resistant Enterococcus faecium from all sites in both untreated and treated wastewater plants except three, which use ultraviolet light disinfection. A genomic comparison

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This Woman Can Smell Parkinson's. It Might Help Lead To Earlier Treatment

Parkinson’s disease stinks. Figuratively. But according to new research, it literally stinks too — to those who have a heightened sense of smell. Thanks to the help of one of these “super-smellers,” a team of scientists has identified subtle volatile compounds produced by Parkinson’s sufferers. These compounds could be used to make much easier, and earlier, diagnostics for the disease. According t

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Another major drug candidate targeting the brain plaques of Alzheimer’s disease has failed. What’s left?

Hope remains for ongoing trials that target amyloid protein clumps, but some studies aim to stave off symptoms, not treat them

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China refutes U.S. claim that it's pushing space 'arms race'

A Chinese foreign minister refuted U.S. claims that China and Russia are developing space weaponry. China and Russia have recently ramped up cooperation on space programs. Meanwhile, the U.S. has been skeptical of both nations, arguing that they're likely developing an array of space weapons. None Amid ongoing disarmament talks in Geneva, a Chinese foreign minister on Wednesday refuted U.S. accus

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: On Speeching Terms

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, March 21. ‣ Flooding in Nebraska after a bomb cyclone this week has caused more than $1 billion in damage, the state’s governor said. More than 2,000 homes and 340 businesses were estimated to have been damaged or destroyed. Here’s what else we’re watching: A Little Redundant: President Donald Trump signed an executive order directing agencies to “take ap

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Study shows alarming increases of firearm deaths in US school-age children

From 1999 to 2017, 38,942 US children ages 5 to 18 years old were killed by firearms, averaging more than 2,000 deaths a year. In 2017 alone, 2,462 school-age children were killed by firearms compared to 144 police officers and 1,000 active military worldwide who died in the line of duty. The study finds significant increases that began with an epidemic in 2009, followed by another one in 2014. Ea

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Plant scraps are the key ingredient in cheap, sustainable jet fuel

Scientists have developed a process for converting plant waste from agriculture and timber harvesting into high-density aviation fuel. Their research may help reduce CO2 emissions from airplanes and rockets.

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New evidence links lifespan extension to metabolic regulation of immune system

Researchers have uncovered a new mechanism of lifespan extension that links caloric restriction with immune system regulation.

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Plant scraps are the key ingredient in cheap, sustainable jet fuel

Scientists have developed a process for converting plant waste from agriculture and timber harvesting into high-density aviation fuel. Their research may help reduce CO2 emissions from airplanes and rockets.

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Spacewatch: private Israeli mission on course for the moon

Beresheet spacecraft will attempt to land on the moon and measure its magnetic field A privately funded mission is on course to orbit the moon on 4 April. All being well, the 150kg spacecraft will then attempt to land a week later. An Israeli not-for-profit organisation, SpaceIL , owns the Beresheet craft, which was built by the space division of Israel Aerospace Industries, and launched on a Spa

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United Nations Calls for Registry of Human Gene-Editing Projects

New Rules The World Health Organization (WHO), an agency of the United Nations, is trying to sort out how scientists could responsibly alter human genomes in their labs — an effort to prevent the next He Jiankui from performing unpublicized genetic experiments on human subjects. Specifically, the WHO announced Tuesday that an advisory committee didn’t recommend banning human gene-editing research

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This supercomputer will perform 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 operations per second

Technology Understanding Aurora, by the numbers. Aurora will be able carry out a quintillion operations each second—a billion billion.

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Is That Wallaby Sprouting a Second Head?

Last week, the first baby wallaby to be born at the Smithsonian's National Zoo in three decades poked its head out of its mother’s pouch

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Boeing sold essential safety features as extras on 737 Max

Boeing charged airlines extra for two safety features that may have been able to detect in advance issues with the 737 Max planes involved in fatal crashes, according to the New York …

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Elevation shapes species survival in changing habitats

Luke Frishkoff, University of Texas at Arlington assistant professor of biology, explores how human land use expedites biodiversity loss in a paper recently published in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

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Elevation shapes species survival in changing habitats

Luke Frishkoff, University of Texas at Arlington assistant professor of biology, explores how human land use expedites biodiversity loss in a paper recently published in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

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Elevation shapes species survival in changing habitats

Luke Frishkoff, University of Texas at Arlington assistant professor of biology, explores how human land use expedites biodiversity loss in a paper recently published in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

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Trying To Do Good

We know our actions affect those around us. But how do we know whether our impact is positive? This week on Hidden Brain , what it means to do good in the world. (Image credit: Hanna Barczyk for NPR)

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Antibodies stabilize plaque in arteries

Researchers have found that type IgG antibodies play an unexpected role in atherosclerosis. A study on mice shows that the antibodies stabilize the plaque that accumulates on the artery walls, which reduces the risk of it rupturing and causing a blood clot. It is hoped that the results will eventually lead to improved therapies.

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The evolution of brain tumors

Scientists have found in a recent study that only three different genetic alterations drive the early development of malignant glioblastomas. At least one of these three cancer drivers was present in all tumors investigated. The tumors develop for up to seven years before they become noticeable as symptoms and are diagnosed. However, in contrast to their early development, glioblastomas, which ret

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Galactic center visualization delivers star power

Want to take a trip to the center of the Milky Way? Check out a new immersive, ultra-high-definition visualization. This 360-movie offers an unparalleled opportunity to look around the center of the galaxy, from the vantage point of the central supermassive black hole, in any direction the user chooses.

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Brain region discovered that only processes spoken, not written words

Patients in a new Northwestern Medicine study were able to comprehend words that were written but not said aloud. They could write the names of things they saw but not verbalize them. For instance, if a patient in the study saw the word 'hippopotamus' written on a piece of paper, they could identify a hippopotamus in flashcards. But when that patient heard someone say 'hippopotamus,' they could no

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Ultra-sharp images make old stars look absolutely marvelous

Using high-resolution adaptive optics imaging from the Gemini Observatory, astronomers have uncovered one of the oldest star clusters in the Milky Way Galaxy. The remarkably sharp image looks back into the early history of our Universe and sheds new insights on how our Galaxy formed.

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Tesla is starting a Zoox suit riot over document theft by ex-employees – Roadshow

The suit names four former Tesla employees who allegedly made off with proprietary logistics documents and improperly poached other Tesla staff.

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You dumped cable? Comcast hopes to reel you back in

Comcast is launching an aggregated bundle of existing streaming-TV apps for $5 a month to appeal to cord-cutters.

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Energy stealthily hitches ride in global trade

Fulfilling the world's growing energy needs summons images of oil pipelines, electric wires and truckloads of coal. But Michigan State University scientists show a lot of energy moves nearly incognito, embedded in the products of a growing society.

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Trump's Golan Announcement Was No Impulse Tweet

Donald Trump once again overturned decades of U.S. policy via Twitter when he declared on Thursday that the United States should recognize Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights, a disputed territory Israel seized in the 1967 war with Syria. The area, he wrote, is “of critical strategic and security importance to the State of Israel and Regional Stability!” The timing of the announcement, ahe

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Trump’s Redundant Executive Order on Campus Speech

President Donald Trump had not yet been in office for one month when he took to Twitter to scold a college. “If U.C. Berkeley does not allow free speech and practices violence on innocent people with a different point of view,” he wrote , “NO FEDERAL FUNDS?” The tweet was in response to protests at the institution, and it worried college leaders—not least because as a candidate, Trump was rather

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When more women make decisions, the environment wins

When more women are involved in group decisions about land management, the group conserves more—particularly when offered financial incentives to do so, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study published this week in Nature Climate Change.

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Show me the gift cards! Reward types impact effectiveness of wellness programs

Employee wellness programs are popular among businesses seeking to increase productivity and cut health care costs. However, many firms have struggled to reap those benefits due to low employee motivation. New research from Brigham Young University finds the problem may lie in how the employees are choosing to reward themselves.

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Study shows first evidence bacterial-induced apoptosis in algae

A new study by UAlberta biologists shows the first evidence of apoptosis, or programmed cell death in algae. The outcomes have broad-reaching implications, from the development of targeted antibiotics to the production of biofuels in industry.

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Study shows first evidence bacterial-induced apoptosis in algae

A new study by UAlberta biologists shows the first evidence of apoptosis, or programmed cell death in algae. The outcomes have broad-reaching implications, from the development of targeted antibiotics to the production of biofuels in industry.

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Sleep and aging: Two sides of one coin?

Oxford University researchers have discovered a brain process common to sleep and ageing in research that could pave the way for new treatments for insomnia.

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Natural plant defense genes provide clues to safener protection in grain sorghum

Weeds often emerge at the same time as vulnerable crop seedlings and sneak between plants as crops grow. How do farmers kill them without harming the crops themselves?

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Sleep and aging: Two sides of one coin?

Oxford University researchers have discovered a brain process common to sleep and ageing in research that could pave the way for new treatments for insomnia.

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Natural plant defense genes provide clues to safener protection in grain sorghum

Weeds often emerge at the same time as vulnerable crop seedlings and sneak between plants as crops grow. How do farmers kill them without harming the crops themselves?

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First of its kind statistics on pregnant women in US prisons

In what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind systematic look at pregnancy frequency and outcomes among imprisoned US women, researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say almost 1,400 pregnant women were admitted to 22 US state and all federal prisons in a recent year. They also found that most of the prison pregnancies — over 90 percent — ended in live births with no maternal deaths.

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Dynamic hydrogel used to make 'soft robot' components and LEGO-like building blocks

Using a new type of dual polymer material capable of responding dynamically to its environment, Brown University researchers have developed a set of modular hydrogel components that could be useful in a variety of "soft robotic" and biomedical applications.

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Researchers create new way to power electric cars

A team of UMass Lowell researchers has pioneered a new, more efficient way to power electric vehicles.

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Finland investigating Nokia for alleged GDPR violations

Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK) notes that in February it received a tip from a Nokia 7 Plus user that his phone frequently sent data packets to an unknown server. When he inspected …

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NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Trevor move into Gulf of Carpentaria

Tropical Cyclone Trevor has crossed Queensland, Australia's Cape York Peninsula and re-emerged into the Gulf of Carpentaria. Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite confirmed the movement back over water.

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Dynamic hydrogel used to make 'soft robot' components and LEGO-like building blocks

A new type of hydrogel material could soon make assembling complex microfluidic or soft robotic devices as simple as putting together a LEGO set.

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You dumped cable? Comcast hopes to reel you back in

Comcast is launching an aggregated bundle of existing streaming-TV apps for $5 a month to appeal to cord-cutters.

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Researchers Say They May Have Found the Cause of SIDS and Other Sudden Death Syndromes

Every parent’s worst fear is not being able to keep their child safe. And a mysterious condition known as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is enough to keep any new parent awake at night. What's so troubling about SIDS is that no one really understands why a seemingly healthy baby goes to sleep and never wakes up. But a new review paper suggests that SIDS and other forms of sudden death syndrom

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Frozen Testes Restore Fertility In Monkeys, Offering Hope To Childhood Cancer Survivors

Childhood cancers rob kids of their youth. The treatment often saves lives but steals their opportunity to have kids of their own. About 30 percent of childhood cancer survivors become permanently infertile thanks to chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Now researchers show they can restore fertility to sterile male monkeys that received chemotherapy as youngsters by cryopreserving immature testi

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Scientists Reversed Rats’ Alcoholism by Firing Lasers at Their Brains

Addiction Switch Scientists at Scripps Research say they’ve found a way to reverse rats’ dependent on alcohol by blasting particular neurons in their brains with laser beams — a change they likened to the “flip of a switch.” “What is so exciting about these findings is that we were able to control the motivation to drink alcohol in severely dependent individuals with the flip of a switch,” said S

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Energy stealthily hitches ride in global trade

Fulfilling the world's growing energy needs summons images of oil pipelines, electric wires and truckloads of coal. But Michigan State University research shows a lot of energy moves nearly incognito, embedded in the products, and leaves its environmental footprint home.

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The Air Force Is Building AI to Fly Fighter Jets Called “Skyborg”

Autopilot The U.S. Air Force recently announced a new artificial intelligence program that it’s calling “Skyborg,” which military leaders hope will be able to autonomously fly drones and fighter jets in the coming years. Even before it’s flying planes on its own — The Drive reports that the Air Force expects drone flights in 2021 and fighter plane flights in 2023 — Skyborg’s AI could help human p

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When more women make decisions, the environment wins

When more women are involved in group decisions about land management, the group conserves more – particularly when offered financial incentives to do so, according to a new study.

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Research elucidates why protons are at the heart of atoms spin

A major new finding about the fundamental structure of all matter has just been published. The research stems from an analysis of data produced by an experiment in polarized proton-proton collisions.

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High-fructose corn syrup boosts intestinal tumor growth in mice

Consuming a daily modest amount of high-fructose corn syrup — the equivalent of people drinking about 12 ounces of a sugar-sweetened beverage daily — accelerates the growth of intestinal tumors in mouse models of the disease, independently of obesity, according to new research.

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Dynamic hydrogel used to make 'soft robot' components and LEGO-like building blocks

A new type of hydrogel material could soon make assembling complex microfluidic or soft robotic devices as simple as putting together a LEGO set.

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Alpine tundra releases long-frozen CO2 to the atmosphere, exacerbating climate warming

Thawing permafrost in high-altitude mountain ecosystems may be a stealthy, underexplored contributor to atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions.

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Medicine and personal care products may lead to new pollutants in waterways

When you flush the toilet, you probably don't think about the traces of the medicine and personal care products in your body that are winding up in sewage treatment plants, streams, rivers, lakes, bays and the ocean. But scientists have found that bacteria in sewage treatment plants may be creating new contaminants that have not been evaluated for potential risks and may affect aquatic environment

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Key to greater efficacy in cancer treatment

Researchers reveal that the number of mitochondria in a cell is, in great part, associated with how the cancer responds to drug therapy.

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Depression in 20s linked to memory loss in 50s

A new large-scale longitudinal study has found a clear link between episodes of depression and anxiety experienced by adults in their twenties, thirties and forties, with a decrease in memory function by the time they are in their fifties.

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Volcano cliffs can affect monitoring data

New research reveals that sharp variations of the surface of volcanoes can affect data collected by monitoring equipment.

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This is the best (and simplest) world map of religions

At a glance, this map shows both the size and distribution of world religions See how religions mix at both national and regional level There's one country in the Americas without a Christian majority – which? China and India are huge religious outliers A picture says more than a thousand words, and that goes for this world map as well. This map conveys not just the size but also the distribution

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Study in mice examines impact of reused cooking oil on breast cancer progression

New study in mice by University of Illinois researchers finds that the compounds in thermally abused cooking oils may trigger genetic, biochemical changes that hasten the progression of late-stage breast cancer, promoting tumor cells' growth and proliferation.

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A Guide to Measuring Drug-Target Residence Times with Biochemical Assays

Download this guide from BellBrook Labs to learn about how to use Transcreener® biochemical assays to measure drug-target residence times, complete with examples and case studies!

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Kicking neural network automation into high gear

Algorithm designs optimized machine-learning models up to 200 times faster than traditional methods.

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In a new quantum simulator, light behaves like a magnet

Physicists propose a new 'quantum simulator': a laser-based device that can be used to study a wide range of quantum systems. Studying it, the researchers have found that photons can behave like magnetic dipoles at temperatures close to absolute zero, following the laws of quantum mechanics. The simple simulator can be used to better understand the properties of complex materials under such extrem

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Physicists reveal why matter dominates our universe

Physicists have confirmed that matter and antimatter decay differently for elementary particles containing charmed quarks.

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New light into the recent evolution of the African rift valley

Continental rift valleys are huge fractures on the surface of the Earth that break continental plates with the eventual development of new oceans. Although instrumental in driving climate and biosphere in certain regions, this process is poorly documented and understood. In a new study, an international group of scientists has shed new light into the recent evolution of the African rift valley by

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Study highlights power of play

Through simple games and day-to-day tasks, parents can help their children learn self-regulation, a skill considered essential for success, a new study has found.

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True-meaning wearable displays: Self-powered, washable and wearable

When we think about clothes, they are usually formed with textiles and have to be both wearable and washable for daily use; however, smart clothing has had a problem with its power sources and moisture permeability, which causes the devices to malfunction. This problem has now been overcome by a research team, who developed a textile-based wearable display module technology that is washable and do

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Ancient birds out of the egg running

Using their own laser imaging technology, scientists have determined the lifestyle of a special hatchling bird by revealing the previously unknown feathering preserved in the fossil specimen found in the ~125 million-year-old Early Cretaceous fossil beds of Los Hoyas, Spain.

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Motherhood Is Monstrous in The Act

Midway through the first episode of The Act , a group of neighbors are chatting on a front porch when Casey Anthony’s name comes up. The scene is set in 2008, smack in the middle of the Nancy Grace –fueled wave of “tot mom” national hysteria that peaked when Anthony was arrested (and then acquitted) for killing her daughter. “Do you believe that Casey Anthony shit?” Shelly (Denitra Isler) exclaim

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A Big, Weird, Pancake-Shaped Fish Keeps Surprising Beachgoers

When an ocean sunfish washed ashore in Australia a few days ago, the people who found it couldn’t help but gawk . The ocean sunfish is fundamentally bizarre, and the weirdest thing about it isn’t the teeth in its throat. It isn’t the way it plays dead on the ocean surface. It isn’t even the way its googly eyes make it perpetually look as if it’s just realized it left the stove on at home. The str

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Hollywood Makes Way for the Disney-Fox Behemoth

The Disney Death Star has finally arrived. The company’s merger with Fox, completed this week, will radically reshape the Hollywood movie landscape. The math reveals a staggering picture: Last year, Disney’s overall market share for the domestic box office was 26 percent —placing the studio ahead of its five major competitors, not to mention a host of smaller independent companies. 20th Century F

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First Baby Monkey Born Using Sperm from Frozen Testicles

Researchers hope that the procedure could be used to restore fertility to human boys undergoing cancer treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Warblers live longer with a little child-rearing help from their friends

Animals Girl power in the wild. Seychelles warblers with a parental support network may age more slowly, according to a new study published in Nature Communications.

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Trilobites: DNA Clues to an Ancient Canary Islands Voyage

The islands’ pioneers likely arrived centuries before European conquest, as part of a large-scale movement of people from North Africa.

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Common cause in sudden death syndromes

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) are syndromes that share many medical similarities but whose physiological causes are poorly understood. An opinion article publishing March 21 in the journal Trends in Neurosciences suggests that the inability for an individual to wake up when their CO2 blood levels rise, likely due to a faulty neural reflex, may

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Engineers demonstrate metamaterials that can solve equations

Engineers have designed a metamaterial device that can solve integral equations. The device works by encoding parameters into the properties of an incoming electromagnetic wave; once inside, the device's unique structure manipulates the wave in such a way that it exits encoded with the solution to a pre-set integral equation for that arbitrary input.

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Hundreds of bubble streams link biology, seismology off Washington's coast

The first survey of methane vent sites off Washington's coast finds 1,778 bubble columns, with most located along a north-south band that is in line with a geologic fault.

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Delusions may stem from sticky beliefs, study finds

Delusions are one of the most common symptoms of psychosis, but little is known about what causes them. A new study offers insight into the development of delusions, which could lead to better treatments for people with psychosis.

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Kicking neural network automation into high gear

Algorithm designs optimized machine-learning models up to 200 times faster than traditional methods.

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New research shows people with PAD could have an omega-3 deficiency

New research published in the March 18 edition of Lipids showed that people who have peripheral artery disease (PAD) have a lower Omega-3 Index compared to those who don't have the disease. Because PAD is essentially atherosclerosis of the leg arteries, researchers in this study believe that patients with PAD may have an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency.

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Lack of Diversity in Genetic Datasets is Risky for Treating Disease

Certain populations have been historically underrepresented in genome sequencing studies, but the NIH, private clinics, and 23andMe and other companies are trying to fix that.

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First Baby Monkey Born Using Sperm from Frozen Testicles

Researchers hope that the procedure could be used to restore fertility to human boys undergoing cancer treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This plant is hiding secret stores of an anti-malaria drug

This plant is hiding secret stores of an anti-malaria drug This plant is hiding secret stores of an anti-malaria drug, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00908-1 Discovery could lead to a more stable supply of the compound artemisinin, which is used when other therapies fail.

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First Baby Monkey Born Using Sperm from Frozen Testicles

Researchers hope that the procedure could be used to restore fertility to human boys undergoing cancer treatment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Discovery may lead to precision-based strategy for triple negative breast cancer

A researcher in the Vera Bradley Foundation Center for Breast Cancer Research at the Indiana University School of Medicine, working in collaboration with researchers from the University of Maryland, recently reported several important findings related to triple negative breast cancer and its future treatment in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

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Första belägget för att socker får tarmtumörer att växa

För första gången har en vetenskaplig studie kunnat visa att läsk och andra söta drycker göder cancerceller, närmare bestämt i tarmen hos möss. Nästa steg är nu att undersöka om det också gäller för människor.

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High-fructose corn syrup promotes colon tumor growth in mice

Consuming the equivalent of one can of soda per day caused mice predisposed to colon cancer to develop larger tumors, according to a study by Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators.

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Sleep and ageing: Two sides of one coin?

Researchers have discovered a brain process common to sleep and ageing in research that could pave the way for new treatments for insomnia.

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New brain research challenges our understanding of sleep

A new study has for the first time uncovered the large-scale brain patterns and networks in the brain which control sleep, providing knowledge which in the future may can in the long term help people who experience problems sleeping.

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Physicists see new difference between matter and antimatter

Physicists see new difference between matter and antimatter Physicists see new difference between matter and antimatter, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00961-w CERN discovery of a tiny effect in particles called D mesons provides fresh way to probe why matter exists.

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Scientists: Anti-Vaxxers Are the Moral Equivalent of Drunk Drivers

Growing Problem Thanks to the anti-vaxxer movement, preventable diseases like measles and the mumps have returned — and scientists, increasingly, are coming out swinging against the anti-science movement. The problem has gotten so bad that FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb recently warned that people willfully-refusing to be vaccinated could cause an epidemic-level outbreak and the World Health Org

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It’s not a good idea to just let your kids get chickenpox

Health The disease can have serious complications. Chickenpox is the most quintessential childhood illness. Here’s the problem: the virus that causes chickenpox isn’t totally innocuous.

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AI can mistakenly see cancer in medical scans after tiny image tweaks

Medical artificial intelligence is brittle. Although it promises to quickly analyse medical scans, it can trip up on seemingly innocuous issues

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Gift card incentives connected to healthier outcomes in employee wellness programs

Previous research shows that when choosing between different incentive options, employees prefer cash rewards. But cash might not be the most effective incentive. Its replacement? Gift cards.

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When more women make decisions, the environment wins

When more women are involved in group decisions about land management, the group conserves more – particularly when offered financial incentives to do so, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study published this week in Nature Climate Change.

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NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Trevor move into Gulf of Carpentaria

Tropical Cyclone Trevor has crossed Queensland, Australia's Cape York Peninsula and re-emerged into the Gulf of Carpentaria. Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite confirmed the movement back over water.

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Natural plant defense genes provide clues to safener protection in grain sorghum

Weeds often emerge at the same time as vulnerable crop seedlings and sneak between plants as crops grow. How do farmers kill them without harming the crops themselves? In a new University of Illinois study, researchers identify genes and metabolic pathways responsible for safener efficacy in grain sorghum.

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Discovery may lead to precision-based strategy for triple negative breast cancer

A researcher in the Vera Bradley Foundation Center for Breast Cancer Research at the Indiana University School of Medicine, working in collaboration with researchers from the University of Maryland, recently reported several important findings related to triple negative breast cancer and its future treatment in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

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Examining ball pits as a playground for pathogenic germs

Ball pits used in children's physical therapy — similar to those made popular by restaurants catering to families — may contribute to germ transmission between patients, according to new research.

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Fossil Treasure Trove of Ancient Animals Unearthed in China

The fossils from the Cambrian Period include dozens of new species and provide a window into life more than 500 million years ago

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Newfound fossils in China highlight a dizzying diversity of Cambrian life

A new treasure trove of Cambrian fossils in China dating to 518 million years ago could rival Canada’s Burgess Shale.

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Fossil Bonanza in China Reveals Secrets from the Dawn of Animal Life

Fossil Bonanza in China Reveals Secrets from the Dawn of Animal Life Newly-discovered fossil deposit contains more than 50 unknown species from the Cambrian Explosion, when most complex body plans appeared. FossilBed.jpg Team digging up Qingjiang Fossils along the Danshui River, in Hubei Province, China. Image credits: Dong King Fu Creature Thursday, March 21, 2019 – 14:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contri

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As the World Watches, New Zealand’s Leader Looks to Unify Her Country

Less than a week after a gunman killed 50 people inside two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, the eyes of the world have focused on the country’s leader as she has sought to unify her reeling country. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has called for a global fight against racism, said that her government will examine what role social media played in the carnage, and on Thursday announced a ban on

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Could family breakfast give kids good body image?

Eating breakfast as a family can help promote a positive body image for children and adolescents, a new study suggests. “We know that developing healthy behaviors in adolescence such as eating breakfast every day and eating family meals can have long-term effects into adulthood,” says Virginia Ramseyer Winter, assistant professor in the School of Social Work and director of the Center for Body Im

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Newfound fossils in China highlight a dizzying diversity of Cambrian life

A new treasure trove of Cambrian fossils in China dating to 518 million years ago could rival Canada’s Burgess Shale.

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Universal Basic Income as a Fix for Job Loss from Automation

submitted by /u/theonb [link] [comments]

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Saving monkey testicle tissue before puberty hints at a new way to preserve fertility

Frozen testicle tissue samples from prepubescent monkeys transplanted back onto those monkeys once they matured produced sperm.

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How team sports change a child's brain

Adult depression has long been associated with shrinkage of the hippocampus, a brain region that plays an important role in memory and response to stress. Now, new research has linked participation in team sports to larger hippocampal volumes in children and less depression in boys ages 9 to 11.

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Hidden differences between pathology of CTE and Alzheimer's disease

A new study challenges the belief that Alzheimer's disease and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy have identical pathology.

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Western bias in human genetic studies is 'both scientifically damaging and unfair'

Despite efforts to include diversity in research, people of European ancestry continue to be vastly overrepresented and ethnically diverse populations largely excluded from human genomics research, according to the authors of a new commentary. This lack of diversity in studies has serious consequences for science and medicine.

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World's smallest bears' facial expressions throw doubt on human superiority

The world's smallest bears can exactly mimic another bear's facial expressions, casting doubt on humans and other primates' supremacy at this subtle form of communication. It is the first time such exact facial mimicry has been seen outside of humans and gorillas.

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The Harsh Reality of Video-Game Addiction

Jonas Odell, a Swedish filmmaker, has long been interested in animation and game design. Like many in his field, he has been keeping up with the recent spate of articles about video-game addiction. One thing Odell noticed, though, was that the addicts themselves were almost never interviewed. “Mostly it was experts or concerned parents talking about the subject,” Odell told me. “I was simply inte

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Why the New Zealand Shooting Video Keeps Circulating

The past six days have been an all-out war between social-media giants and the people who hope to use their platforms to share grisly footage of the Christchurch, New Zealand, mosque shootings. It hasn’t always been clear who’s winning. YouTube described an “unprecedented” rush to upload video of the attack over the weekend, peaking at one attempted upload per second. In a blog post Thursday, Fac

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Sleep and aging: Two sides of one coin?

Oxford University researchers have discovered a brain process common to sleep and aging in research that could pave the way for new treatments for insomnia.

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Researchers restore fertility in non-human primate model of childhood cancer survivorship

In a first, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the Magee-Womens Research Institute have reported in a non-human primate model that immature testicular tissue can be cryopreserved, and later be used to restore fertility to the same animal.

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High-fructose corn syrup boosts intestinal tumor growth in mice

Consuming a daily modest amount of high-fructose corn syrup — the equivalent of people drinking about 12 ounces of a sugar-sweetened beverage daily — accelerates the growth of intestinal tumors in mouse models of the disease, independently of obesity.

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Concerns regarding proposed changes to EPA's causality framework

In this Policy Forum, Gretchen Goldman and Francesca Dominici raise concerns over recent developments at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that 'stand to quietly upend the time-tested and scientifically backed process the agency relies on to protect the public from ambient air pollution.'

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High-fructose corn syrup enhances tumor growth in a mouse model of intestinal cancer

In a new study, researchers have found that consumption of high-fructose corn syrup can enhance tumor growth in mice that are genetically predisposed to develop intestinal cancer.

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A new treasure trove of Cambrian secrets unearthed

Researchers have discovered an early Cambrian fossil assemblage located along the bank of the Danshui River in China.

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Inert nitrogen forced to react with itself

Direct coupling of two molecules of nitrogen: chemists from Würzburg and Frankfurt have achieved what was thought to be impossible. This new reaction is reported in Science magazine and opens new possibilities for one of the most inert molecules on earth.

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Her er spørgsmålet, alle svarer forkert på

PLUS. Astronomisk beregning giver et svar, som nok i første omgang vil overraske de fleste, hvorefter de vil sige ‘nåja’. Og så er der nyt om en magnetisk sans hos mennesker.

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Overraskede læger: Hjertepatienter klarer sig bedre hjemme end på hospitalet

Patienter med alvorlig hjertebetændelse har større chance for at overleve, hvis de bliver udskrevet hurtigt, viser dansk undersøgelse.

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'Mindblowing' haul of fossils over 500m years old unearthed in China

Thousands of fossils date back to huge burst in diversity of life on Earth known as Cambrian explosion A “mindblowing” haul of fossils that captures the riot of evolution that kickstarted the diversity of life on Earth more than half a billion years ago has been discovered by researchers in China. Paleontologists found thousands of fossils in rocks on the bank of the Danshui river in Hubei provin

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Researchers embrace a radical idea: engineering coral to cope with climate change

Australia to move ahead with field tests of new hybrids

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The corn syrup in a soda a day can give mice bigger colon tumors

New study could help explain a rise in the disease among young people

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Machine learning for data-driven discovery in solid Earth geoscience

Understanding the behavior of Earth through the diverse fields of the solid Earth geosciences is an increasingly important task. It is made challenging by the complex, interacting, and multiscale processes needed to understand Earth’s behavior and by the inaccessibility of nearly all of Earth’s subsurface to direct observation. Substantial increases in data availability and in the increasingly re

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Comment on "Insulator-metal transition in dense fluid deuterium"

Celliers et al . (Reports, 17 August 2018, p. 677), in an attempt to reconcile differences in inferred metallization pressures, provide an alternative temperature analysis of the Knudson et al . experiments (Reports, 26 June 2015, p. 1455). We show that this reanalysis implies an anomalously low specific heat for the metallic fluid that is clearly inconsistent with first-principles calculations.

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The reef builders

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Science at Sundance

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Structures of human Nav1.7 channel in complex with auxiliary subunits and animal toxins

Voltage-gated sodium channel Na v 1.7 represents a promising target for pain relief. Here we report the cryo–electron microscopy structures of the human Na v 1.7-β1-β2 complex bound to two combinations of pore blockers and gating modifier toxins (GMTs), tetrodotoxin with protoxin-II and saxitoxin with huwentoxin-IV, both determined at overall resolutions of 3.2 angstroms. The two structures are n

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Molecular basis for pore blockade of human Na+ channel Nav1.2 by the {mu}-conotoxin KIIIA

The voltage-gated sodium channel Na v 1.2 is responsible for the initiation and propagation of action potentials in the central nervous system. We report the cryo–electron microscopy structure of human Na v 1.2 bound to a peptidic pore blocker, the μ-conotoxin KIIIA, in the presence of an auxiliary subunit, β2, to an overall resolution of 3.0 angstroms. The immunoglobulin domain of β2 interacts w

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Autologous grafting of cryopreserved prepubertal rhesus testis produces sperm and offspring

Testicular tissue cryopreservation is an experimental method to preserve the fertility of prepubertal patients before they initiate gonadotoxic therapies for cancer or other conditions. Here we provide the proof of principle that cryopreserved prepubertal testicular tissues can be autologously grafted under the back skin or scrotal skin of castrated pubertal rhesus macaques and matured to produce

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Parallel adaptation of rabbit populations to myxoma virus

In the 1950s the myxoma virus was released into European rabbit populations in Australia and Europe, decimating populations and resulting in the rapid evolution of resistance. We investigated the genetic basis of resistance by comparing the exomes of rabbits collected before and after the pandemic. We found a strong pattern of parallel evolution, with selection on standing genetic variation favor

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Activation of methane to CH3+: A selective industrial route to methanesulfonic acid

Direct methane functionalization to value-added products remains a challenge because of the propensity for overoxidation in many reaction environments. Sulfonation has emerged as an attractive approach for achieving the necessary selectivity. Here, we report a practical process for the production of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) from only two reactants: methane and sulfur trioxide. We have achieved

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The reductive coupling of dinitrogen

The coupling of two or more molecules of dinitrogen (N 2 ) occurs naturally under the radiative conditions present in the ionosphere and may be achieved synthetically under ultrahigh pressure or plasma conditions. However, the comparatively low N–N single-bond enthalpy generally renders the catenation of the strongly triple-bonded N 2 diatomic unfavorable and the decomposition of nitrogen chains

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Inverse-designed metastructures that solve equations

Metastructures hold the potential to bring a new twist to the field of spatial-domain optical analog computing: migrating from free-space and bulky systems into conceptually wavelength-sized elements. We introduce a metamaterial platform capable of solving integral equations using monochromatic electromagnetic fields. For an arbitrary wave as the input function to an equation associated with a pr

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The Qingjiang biota–A Burgess Shale-type fossil Lagerstätte from the early Cambrian of South China

Burgess Shale–type fossil Lagerstätten provide the best evidence for deciphering the biotic patterns and magnitude of the Cambrian explosion. Here, we report a Lagerstätte from South China, the Qingjiang biota (~518 million years old), which is dominated by soft-bodied taxa from a distal shelf setting. The Qingjiang biota is distinguished by pristine carbonaceous preservation of labile organic

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Social genes are selection hotspots in kin groups of a soil microbe

The composition of cooperative systems, including animal societies, organismal bodies, and microbial groups, reflects their past and shapes their future evolution. However, genomic diversity within many multiunit systems remains uncharacterized, limiting our ability to understand and compare their evolutionary character. We have analyzed genomic and social-phenotype variation among 120 natural is

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High-fructose corn syrup enhances intestinal tumor growth in mice

Excessive consumption of beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is associated with obesity and with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Whether HFCS contributes directly to tumorigenesis is unclear. We investigated the effects of daily oral administration of HFCS in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mice, which are predisposed to develop intestinal tumors. The HFCS-tre

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New Products

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Response to Comment on "Insulator-metal transition in dense fluid deuterium"

In their comment, Desjarlais et al . claim that a small temperature drop occurs after isentropic compression of fluid deuterium through the first-order insulator-metal transition. We show that their calculations do not correspond to the experimental thermodynamic path, and that thermodynamic integrations with parameters from first-principles calculations produce results in agreement with our orig

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Damage on plants activates Ca2+-dependent metacaspases for release of immunomodulatory peptides

Physical damage to cells leads to the release of immunomodulatory peptides to elicit a wound defense response in the surrounding tissue. In Arabidopsis thaliana , the plant elicitor peptide 1 (Pep1) is processed from its protein precursor, PRECURSOR OF PEP1 (PROPEP1). We demonstrate that upon damage, both at the tissue and single-cell levels, the cysteine protease METACASPASE4 (MC4) is instantly

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Structural basis of {alpha}-scorpion toxin action on Nav channels

Fast inactivation of voltage-gated sodium (Na v ) channels is essential for electrical signaling, but its mechanism remains poorly understood. Here we determined the structures of a eukaryotic Na v channel alone and in complex with a lethal α-scorpion toxin, AaH2, by electron microscopy, both at 3.5-angstrom resolution. AaH2 wedges into voltage-sensing domain IV (VSD4) to impede fast activation b

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Factors influencing meiotic recombination revealed by whole-genome sequencing of single sperm

Recombination is critical to meiosis and evolution, yet many aspects of the physical exchange of DNA via crossovers remain poorly understood. We report an approach for single-cell whole-genome DNA sequencing by which we sequenced 217 individual hybrid mouse sperm, providing a kilobase-resolution genome-wide map of crossovers. Combining this map with molecular assays measuring stages of recombinat

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Metamaterial solves complex equations at the speed of light

A structure dubbed “Swiss cheese” spits out answers encoded in microwaves. Phil Dooley reports.

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Chinese fossil site rivals Burgess Shale

Some 30,000 soft-bodied fossils more than 500 million years old have so far been excavated. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Researchers warn medical AI is vulnerable to attack

‘Human-invisible change’ can distort results with expensive, or fatal, consequences, warns Harvard-led team. Nick Carne reports.

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Two-step path to shrinking worker bee gonads

The dramatic difference in gonad size between honey bee queens and their female workers in response to their distinct diets requires the switching on of a specific genetic program, according to a new study publishing March 21 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Annika Roth and Martin Beye of Heinrich-Heine University in Dusseldorf and colleagues. The finding is likely to allow more detailed

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Plant immunity cut to size

An international team based in Ghent, Belgium (VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology) and Basel, Switzerland (University of Basel), found a link between a class of enzymes and immune signals that is rapidly triggered upon physical damage in plants. This new discovery will increase the understanding of the plant immune system, and might be exploited to improve crop health and yield in the futu

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Meet Lunewave: URBAN-X Alumni Leading the Advancement of Autonomous Vehicles

Taxis hardly resemble the steel cages on wheels we had in the 20th century. When hailing a cab, customers now choose between bedroom suite taxis, mobile office taxis, gym taxis, and dining taxis to name a few. A new world of consumer choice for transportation is just one of the many benefits of our fully autonomous vehicle ecosystem. Self-driving cars have reduced vehicular accidents by 90% . The

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The Art of Navigating a Family Political Discussion, Peacefully

Lots of American families fight, but most are unlikely to fight about politics: In a study released last month on the extent to which Americans live in “bubbles,” 39 percent of respondents said they see political diversity within their families, as my colleague Emma Green reported . Meanwhile, “roughly three-quarters of Americans’ interactions with people from another political party happen at wo

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Downed 737 Max 8s Lacked Safety Features Boeing Only Sells as Extras

Boeing builds two safety systems that might have helped prevent the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash — but it sells them as extras, not as standard equipment. The post Downed 737 Max 8s Lacked Safety Features Boeing Only Sells as Extras appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Engineers demonstrate metamaterials that can solve equations

The field of metamaterials involves designing complicated, composite structures, some of which can manipulate electromagnetic waves in ways that are impossible in naturally occurring materials.

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Two-step path to shrinking worker bee gonads

The dramatic difference in gonad size between honey bee queens and their female workers in response to their distinct diets requires the switching on of a specific genetic program, according to a new study publishing March 21 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Annika Roth and Martin Beye of Heinrich-Heine University in Dusseldorf and colleagues. The finding is likely to allow more detailed

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Inert nitrogen forced to react with itself

Constituting over 78 % of the air we breathe, nitrogen is the element found the most often in its pure form on earth. The reason for the abundance of elemental nitrogen is the incredible stability and inertness of dinitrogen (N2), a molecule comprising two nitrogen atoms and the form in which most nitrogen exists. Only in very harsh environments, such as in the ionosphere, can dinitrogen be assemb

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Plant immunity cut to size

An international team based in Ghent, Belgium (VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology) and Basel, Switzerland (University of Basel), found a link between a class of enzymes and immune signals that is rapidly triggered upon physical damage in plants. This new discovery will increase the understanding of the plant immune system, and might be exploited to improve crop health and yield in the futu

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Baby monkey is first primate created using sperm from tissue transplanted into dad

Baby monkey is first primate created using sperm from tissue transplanted into dad Baby monkey is first primate created using sperm from tissue transplanted into dad, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00938-9 The technique could help boys made infertile by cancer treatment to become fathers later in life.

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How does tumor acidity help cancer spread?

A pH-probe helps scientists map acidity in tumors and see how acidification alters gene expression in ways that increase cancer's invasiveness and spread.

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Study shows first evidence bacterial-induced apoptosis in algae

A new study by UAlberta biologists shows the first evidence of apoptosis, or programmed cell death in algae. The outcomes have broad-reaching implications, from the development of targeted antibiotics to the production of biofuels in industry.

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Dynamic hydrogel used to make 'soft robot' components and LEGO-like building blocks

A new type of hydrogel material developed by Brown University researchers could soon make assembling complex microfluidic or soft robotic devices as simple as putting together a LEGO set.

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How team sports change a child's brain

Adult depression has long been associated with shrinkage of the hippocampus, a brain region that plays an important role in memory and response to stress. Now, new research from Washington University in St. Louis has linked participation in team sports to larger hippocampal volumes in children and less depression in boys ages 9 to 11.

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Chinese-American Scientist Societies Fear Racial Profiling

Scientists argue that anti-Chinese political rhetoric and policies could harm US research.

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25 States Are at Risk of Serious Flooding This Spring, U.S. Forecast Says

With flooding already reaching historic levels in parts of the United States, federal scientists warn to expect more in the coming months.

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Robots enable bees and fish to talk to each other

submitted by /u/deuceice [link] [comments]

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Universities spooked by Trump order tying free speech to grants

Universities spooked by Trump order tying free speech to grants Universities spooked by Trump order tying free speech to grants, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00962-9 White House policy will require universities to certify that they protect free speech to remain eligible for research funding.

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Boeing’s Starliner Test Flight Delayed by Three Months, Sources Say

The schedule for Boeing's Starliner spacecraft has slipped again, and the company will no longer launch an uncrewed test flight to the International Space Station in April, Reuters has reported. The flight is being pushed back to August. Starliner is Boeing’s entry for NASA’s Commercial Crew Program to ferry both cargo and people to the ISS and back. The company's spaceship is a competitor with Sp

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Space Station Astronauts Prep for Two Spacewalks in One Week

On March 22, two astronauts will take the first spacewalk of Expedition 59 in order to upgrade aging batteries on the International Space Station. The astronauts will be Nick Hague and Anne McClain, and it will be the first spacewalk for both of them. Next week, on March 29, McClain will venture into space again, joined by Christina Koch. This will mark the first all-female spacewalk, a historic e

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MoviePass founder tests app that awards free tickets to users spied on by facial recognition cameras

Called PreShow, users can earn free tickets if they watch several ads. But, in a creepy twist, the app uses facial recognition technology to make sure they're actually watching all of the ads.

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Depressed African Americans more likely to get wrong diagnosis

African-Americans with severe depression are more likely to be misdiagnosed as having schizophrenia, according to a new study. The study, which appears in the journal Psychiatric Services , examined the medical records of 1,657 people at a community behavioral health clinic that included screening for major depression as part of its assessment for schizophrenia in new patients. “By definition, sc

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4 Myths Fueling the Fight Over NYC’s Exclusive High Schools

On Monday, another admissions scandal injected a new dose of disillusionment into the already disillusioned world of elite education. This time the revelations concern not higher education, but Stuyvesant High and New York City’s other elite public high schools. Of the 895 current eighth graders who secured a spot in next year's Stuyvesant freshman class, just seven identify as African American.

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Pathogenic, drug-resistant bacteria found in wastewater treatment plants

Infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria are a global public health threat causing serious illness and even death. Strains of the bacterium Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium) are generally harmless in healthy people, but can be pathogenic in immunocompromised or severely ill patients. E. faecium strains from hospital environments have acquired resistance to commonly used antibiotics, including

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Pathogenic, drug-resistant bacteria found in wastewater treatment plants

Infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria are a global public health threat causing serious illness and even death. Strains of the bacterium Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium) are generally harmless in healthy people, but can be pathogenic in immunocompromised or severely ill patients. E. faecium strains from hospital environments have acquired resistance to commonly used antibiotics, including

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Hundreds of bubble streams link biology, seismology off Washington's coast

Off the coast of Washington, columns of bubbles rise from the seafloor, as if evidence of a sleeping dragon lying below. But these bubbles are methane that is squeezed out of sediment and rises up through the water. The locations where they emerge provide important clues to what will happen during a major offshore earthquake.

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A New Role for Platelets: Boosting Neurogenesis After Exercise

A mouse study finds that when blood platelets are activated during exercise, they release factors that increase the number of newborn neurons in the hippocampus.

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China Is Building up to 20 Floating Nuclear Power Plants

Floating Reactors Later this year, China will begin to construct floating nuclear power plants that could be used to bring power to distant, artificial islands in the South China Sea. Floating nuclear reactors sound perilous, but the China National Nuclear Corp plans to develop them as a cheaper alternative to transmitting power from mainland China, according to the Asia Times — and officials con

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Accurate autocorrelation modeling substantially improves fMRI reliability

Accurate autocorrelation modeling substantially improves fMRI reliability Accurate autocorrelation modeling substantially improves fMRI reliability, Published online: 25 December 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09230-w There has been recent controversy over the validity of commonly-used software packages for functional MRI (fMRI) data analysis. Here, the authors compare the performance of three lead

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Aborted propagation of the Ethiopian rift caused by linkage with the Kenyan rift

Aborted propagation of the Ethiopian rift caused by linkage with the Kenyan rift Aborted propagation of the Ethiopian rift caused by linkage with the Kenyan rift, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09335-2 Continuous continental rift zones evolve from enigmatic interactions between individual propagating rift segments. Here, the authors document progressive focusing of tecton

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A comprehensive, mechanistically detailed, and executable model of the cell division cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

A comprehensive, mechanistically detailed, and executable model of the cell division cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae A comprehensive, mechanistically detailed, and executable model of the cell division cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08903-w Whole-cell models hold great promise for fundamental and translational biology, but genome-scal

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Autophagy within the mushroom body protects from synapse aging in a non-cell autonomous manner

Autophagy within the mushroom body protects from synapse aging in a non-cell autonomous manner Autophagy within the mushroom body protects from synapse aging in a non-cell autonomous manner, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09262-2 The role of macroautophagy in neuronal processes mediating brain maintenance remains enigmatic. Authors show here that impairing autophagy withi

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A highly selective and recyclable NO-responsive nanochannel based on a spiroring opening−closing reaction strategy

A highly selective and recyclable NO-responsive nanochannel based on a spiroring opening−closing reaction strategy A highly selective and recyclable NO-responsive nanochannel based on a spiroring opening−closing reaction strategy, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09163-4 Constructing artificial ion channels to mimic biological process is highly demanded but currently artifi

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Assessing the viability of transplanted gut microbiota by sequential tagging with D-amino acid-based metabolic probes

Assessing the viability of transplanted gut microbiota by sequential tagging with D-amino acid-based metabolic probes Assessing the viability of transplanted gut microbiota by sequential tagging with D-amino acid-based metabolic probes, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09267-x The mechanisms underlying the success or failure of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) are unc

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Capturing site-specific heterogeneity with large-scale N-glycoproteome analysis

Capturing site-specific heterogeneity with large-scale N-glycoproteome analysis Capturing site-specific heterogeneity with large-scale N-glycoproteome analysis, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09222-w Mass spectrometry facilitates large-scale glycosylation profiling but in-depth analysis of intact glycopeptides is still challenging. Here, the authors show that activated io

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Slab morphology and deformation beneath Izu-Bonin

Slab morphology and deformation beneath Izu-Bonin Slab morphology and deformation beneath Izu-Bonin, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09279-7 In the 1000 km long Izu-Bonin subduction zone to the south of Tokyo, the Pacific Plate descends beneath the Philippine Sea Plate. Here the authors use teleseismic double-difference tomography to image the complex morphology of the Izu

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Engineered protein delivers drugs while MRI tracks it

Researchers have created nanoscale protein micelles capable of delivering chemotherapeutic drugs while scientists track it with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The innovation falls into the category of “theranostics,” meaning that it combines diagnostic capability and drug delivery, allowing researchers to administer therapy while also non-invasively monitoring the therapeutic progress and dras

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Bacteria and immunity in cervix may be key to predicting premature births

Spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB), defined as birth before 37 weeks of gestation, and the related complications, are the largest contributors to infant death in the United States and worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have discovered that bacteria and innate immune factors in a woman's birth canal and cervix ma

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Hundreds of bubble streams link biology, seismology off Washington's coast

The first survey of methane vent sites off Washington's coast finds 1,778 bubble columns, with most located along a north-south band that is in line with a geologic fault.

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Pathogenic, drug-resistant bacteria found in wastewater treatment plants

Infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria are a global public health threat causing serious illness and even death. In a study published today in Genome Research, researchers conducted a survey of 20 municipal wastewater plants in England, and isolated drug-resistant Enterococcus faecium from all sites in both untreated and treated wastewater plants except three, which use ultraviolet light dis

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Climate Change Claims Its First Mammal Extinction

submitted by /u/TransPlanetInjection [link] [comments]

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Huge Meteor Explosion a Wake-Up Call for Planetary Defense

Detonating over the Bering Sea, the blast was as powerful as a nuclear bomb — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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IVF ethics pioneer Mary Warnock dies

The philosopher Baroness Mary Warnock has died at the age of 94.

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How to keep raccoons and possums away from your house

Animals Fuzzy pests don’t belong in your trash. How can we respect nature without letting it ruin our yards?

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'Inland Oceans' from One of Southern Hemisphere's Worst Storms Seen from Space

One of the worst cyclones to hit southern Africa left flooding that could be seen from space.

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Examining ball pits as a playground for pathogenic germs

Beware the ball pit. Ball pits used in children's physical therapy — similar to those made popular by restaurants catering to families — may contribute to germ transmission between patients, according to new research published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, published by Elsevier.

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Huge Meteor Explosion a Wake-Up Call for Planetary Defense

Detonating over the Bering Sea, the blast was as powerful as a nuclear bomb — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists Just Got Amazing Results From an Old Fusion Reactor

Wrestle the Vessel A team of scientists achieved high pressure plasma — perhaps laying the groundwork to achieve fusion power, according to a terrific explainer by Ars Technica — at an old fusion reactor in San Diego by reversing the orientation of the vessel that houses the plasma. Despite the promising results, whether or not the modification will lay the groundwork for useful fusion power in t

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How multiparty computing makes it safe to share data

A cryptography technology called secure multiparty computation (MPC) allows collaborative data analysis without revealing private data in the process. Data can help analyze complex problems, shine a light on new solutions, or even resolve otherwise unanswerable questions. But when it comes to using data for the public good, such as finding new drug targets for cancer or understanding how ride-sha

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Chinese Researchers Cloned the 'Sherlock Holmes of Police Dogs', and She Is a Very Good Girl

Chinese police will soon add a cloned puppy detective to their ranks.

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The odds are stacked against maths | Letters

Letters from Dr Helen Drury , Christopher Ormell and Jane Lawson on ‘maths anxiety’ and Britain’s poor numeracy rate The Nuffield Foundation’s report raises very worthy concern about the effects of “maths anxiety” and the impact that it has on children’s prospects ( Report , 14 March). Without highlighting solutions, however, we run an increased risk of making maths anxiety a self-perpetuating phe

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Ethiopian airline defends its pilots' training standards

Ethiopian Airlines said Thursday that its pilots went through all the extra training required by Boeing and the U.S. aviation regulators to fly the 737 Max 8 jet that crashed this month, killing all 157 people on board.

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Tropical Cyclone Savannah dissipating in Suomi NPP satellite imagery

Tropical Cyclone Savannah appeared as a wispy area of low pressure on imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite.

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Facebook admits storing passwords in plain text (Update)

Facebook on Thursday admitted that millions of passwords were stored in plain text on its internal servers, a security slip that left them readable by the social networking platform's employees.

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Förädling mot rotröta ger bättre granar

Förädlingsarbete för att få rötresistenta granar har hittills varit en outnyttjad möjlighet för skogsindustrin. En ny studie från Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU, visar att rötresistenta träd varken växer långsammare eller har mindre attraktiva vedegenskaper än andra träd. Rotröta, som orsakas av svampen rotticka, är svenskt skogsbruks största skadegörare. Genom att bryta ned kärnveden i gran

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Researchers discover hidden differences between pathology of CTE and Alzheimer's disease

An international team of scientists at Indiana University School of Medicine, University of Kansas and the U.K. Medical Research Council have dismantled the belief that Alzheimer's disease and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy have made a discovery that offers options for improved diagnosis and potential targeted treatments.

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Tropical Cyclone Savannah dissipating in Suomi NPP satellite imagery

Tropical Cyclone Savannah appeared as a wispy area of low pressure on imagery from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite.

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Discovery may lead to precision-based strategy for triple negative breast cancer

A researcher in the Vera Bradley Foundation Center for Breast Cancer Research at the Indiana University School of Medicine, working in collaboration with researchers from the University of Maryland, recently reported several important findings related to triple negative breast cancer and its future treatment in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

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African-Americans more likely to be misdiagnosed with schizophrenia, Rutgers study finds

African-Americans with severe depression are more likely to be misdiagnosed as having schizophrenia, according to a new Rutgers study.

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Neglected diseases continue to require attention despite progress

Few novel drugs have been developed to treat neglected diseases in recent decades, Brazilian researchers warn.

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Facebook Stored “Hundreds of Millions” of Passwords as Plain Text

Plain Text Passwords In a damning privacy revelation, Facebook admitted to storing “hundreds of millions” of account passwords in plain text — a flabbergasting breach with good data security practices. “As part of a routine security review in January, we found that some user passwords were being stored in a readable format within our internal data storage systems,” reads a post published today, w

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The Mathematical Madness Behind a Perfect N.C.A.A. Basketball Bracket

Picking a perfect bracket is so unlikely that it will almost certainly never occur, even if March Madness continues for billions of years

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T-Mobile Begins Rolling Out Home LTE Internet Service

Of course, this is all part of T-Mobile's efforts to build support for its attempt to merge with Sprint, becoming the "New T-Mobile." The post T-Mobile Begins Rolling Out Home LTE Internet Service …

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Microsoft Releases Windows Defender Antivirus For Mac

If you have used a Windows PC in the past few years you may have noticed a software from Microsoft called Windows Defender. It’s an antivirus software that is available on Windows PC …

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Facebook admits storing passwords in plain text

Facebook on Thursday admitted that millions of passwords were stored in plain text on its internal servers, a security slip that left them readable by the social networking giant's employees.

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Plants set to power space travel

Chinese research produces rocket fuel from waste cellulose. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Your AirPods Will Die Soon

Two years ago, Desmond Hughes heard so many of his favorite podcasters extolling AirPods, Apple’s tiny, futuristic $170 wireless headphones, that he decided they were worth the splurge. He quickly became a convert. Hughes is still listening to podcasters talk about their AirPods, but now they’re complaining. The battery can no longer hold a charge, they say, rendering them functionally useless. A

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Daily briefing: “We call for the entire concept of statistical significance to be abandoned”

Daily briefing: “We call for the entire concept of statistical significance to be abandoned” Daily briefing: “We call for the entire concept of statistical significance to be abandoned”, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00965-6 “We must learn to embrace uncertainty”, new female PIs get less money and staff and voilà: EU’s biggest research programme ever takes shape.

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Beckman Coulter Life Sciences To Launch New Product Via Live Stream Event

After visiting labs around the world to identify ways to advance its industry-leading cell counting technology, Beckman Coulter Life Sciences will host a live streaming event on March 26 at 10 a.m. EDT / 7 a.m. PDT to announce its latest product innovation.

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She Finds Clues to Future Sustainability in Old Food Webs

On a grassy hill near where I met the ecologist Jennifer Dunne at the Smithsonian National Zoo, a lion craned its shaggy head back to watch a helicopter fly over. It was a stark illustration of humans’ unusual place in the ecosystem. Generations ago, that lion would have hunted us; today, children watch it from behind a fence. But we haven’t removed ourselves from the world’s food webs, Dunne say

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U.S. Communities Urged to Boost Immunity to "Shock Events"

Past disasters point to steps cities and counties can take to bolster their resilience — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Geophysics: A surprising, cascading earthquake

The Kaikoura earthquake in New Zealand in 2016 caused widespread damage. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have now dissected its mechanisms revealing surprising insights on earthquake physics with the aid of simulations carried out on the supercomputer SuperMUC.

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Naltrexone implant helps HIV patients with opioid dependence prevent relapse

A new study, published this month in Lancet HIV by Penn Medicine researchers, shows that a naltrexone implant placed under the skin was more effective at helping HIV-positive patients with an opioid addiction reduce relapse and have better HIV-related outcomes compared to the oral drug.

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Organic semiconductors: One transistor for all purposes

In mobiles, fridges, planes – transistors are everywhere. But they often operate only within a restricted current range. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists have now developed an organic transistor that functions perfectly under both low and high currents.

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How 'sleeper cell' cancer stem cells are maintained in chronic myelogenous leukemia

Even when chronic myelogenous leukemia is in remission, 'sleeper cell,' quiescent leukemic stem cells are maintained in microenvironments in the bone marrow. This maintenance is poorly understood. Researchers now describe how niche-specific expression of a particular chemokine by a particular type of bone marrow cell controls quiescence of these treatment-resistant leukemic stem cells. The chemoki

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Study gives new perspective on production of blood cells and immune cells

A new study provides a thorough accounting of blood cell production from hematopoietic stem cells. The results are important for understanding disorders such as anemia, diseases of the immune system, and blood cancers such as leukemias and lymphomas.

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Eating breakfast with parents is associated with positive body image for teenagers

A new study from the University of Missouri says consistently eating breakfast as a family might promote positive body image for children and adolescents.

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What the Scammers Got Right About College Admissions

Like most other college presidents, R. Gerald Turner, the head of Southern Methodist University, where my son is a student, sends correspondence only when something goes terribly wrong. When I received a mass email from his office this week, I assumed the school had gotten caught up in the fallout of Operation Varsity Blues, the college-admissions cheating and bribery scandal that came to light l

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The Cultural Origins of Aviation Safety

Previously on this topic: “ Is It Time to Worry About the Boeing 737 Max? ,” “ A Shorter Guide to the Ethiopian Tragedy and the 737 Max ,” “ What Was On the Record About Problems With the 737 Max ,” “ ‘Don’t Ground the Planes, Ground the Pilots,’ ” “ The Implications of the 737 Max Crashes ,” “ Training, Regulation, and the 737 Max ,” and “ The Jump-Seat Pilot and the 737 Max .” Yesterday I menti

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Philosopher Mary Warnock dies aged 94

Lady Warnock laid foundations for special needs teaching and fertility treatment regulations The philosopher Mary Warnock, whose work laid the foundations for special needs education and for the regulation of fertility treatments, has died aged 94. After an early career researching ethics and philosophy and then as a headteacher, Lady Warnock was appointed in 1974 to chair a UK inquiry on special

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Genetic diversity maps to help forests survive climate change

Forests have a special magic for many of us. Steeped in folklore and fantasy, they are places for enchantments, mythical creatures and outlaws. But if they are to survive into the future, they may also need a helping hand from science.

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Cern finder ny forskel på stof og antistof

D0-mesonen og dens 'spejlbillede' henfalder ikke på samme vis, fremgår af en komplet analyse af alle data taget med LHCb-detektoren mellem 2011 og 2018.

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Climate Change Claims Its First Mammal Extinction

The Bramble Cay melomys, a tiny island rodent, was wiped out by sea-level rise, according to the government of Australia. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bacteria bide their time when antibiotics attack

If an antibiotic doesn't kill all the bacteria that infects a patient, the surviving bugs may be particularly adept at timing their resurgence.

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Additional details emerge regarding Microsoft's All-Digital Xbox One S

Microsoft’s upcoming disc-free Xbox One S, codenamed Maverick, is tentatively scheduled to be announced next month. According to new documentation received by Windows Central, the console could …

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Child abuse may change brain structure and make depression worse

Brain scans suggest that mistreatment during childhood is linked to changes in brain structure that may make depression more severe in later life

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Markiplier Is Not Done With YouTube

Gamer, vlogger, and sketch comic Mark Edward Fischbach—alias Markiplier, one of YouTube’s most successful stars—reflects on his seven years on the platform.

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Bacteria bide their time when antibiotics attack

If an antibiotic doesn't kill all the bacteria that infects a patient, the surviving bugs may be particularly adept at timing their resurgence.

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New Virus Steals Your Files Until PewDiePie Gets 100M Subscribers

Classic Prank Certain members of YouTube star PewDiePie’s fanbase have started infecting people’s computers with homemade ransomware, according to a new investigation by ZDNet, in the ongoing push to get the YouTuber back on top as the channel with the most subscribers in the world. In the past, mischievous PewDiePie fans have hacked publicly-accessible printers and spammed comments online, urgin

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It's a Short Hop From 'Fortnite' to a New AI Best Friend

Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney knows exactly what he's doing with the battle royale juggernaut: charting a path to the virtual metaverse.

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Bacteria bide their time when antibiotics attack

Rice University scientists build a model to predict how long, on average, it takes to eradicate a bacterial infection with antibiotics. The model could help doctors fight resistance by prescribing antibiotics that neither over- or under-dose a patient.

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NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Veronica affecting Australia's Pilbara Coast

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Veronica skirting the Pilbara coast of Western Australia.

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President Trump Still Wants to Repeal Obamacare

The health-care proposal likely to loom largest over the 2020 presidential election was released last week—and it didn’t come from a Democrat. In the 2020 federal budget that President Donald Trump unveiled , he renewed his commitment to repealing the Affordable Care Act and replacing it with a block-grant system that would likely strip coverage from millions of Americans, especially those in the

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Climate Change Claims Its First Mammal Extinction

The Bramble Cay melomys, a tiny island rodent, was wiped out by sea-level rise, according to the government of Australia. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What I wish my friends and family knew about my PhD

What I wish my friends and family knew about my PhD What I wish my friends and family knew about my PhD, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00948-7 Support must come from a place of understanding, says Kate Samardzic.

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Warmer seas will limit food supply from fisheries

Climate change is beginning to disrupt the complex, interconnected systems that underpin the world’s fisheries and the food they provide, report researchers. Fish provide a vital source of protein for over half the world’s population and more than 56 million people work for or subsist on fisheries. For a new study in Science , researchers looked at historical abundance data for 124 species in 38

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Germany gives seal of approval to truck turning assistant

Germany's transport ministry has issued its first operating license for a driver assistance system meant to reduce the number of cyclists or pedestrians killed by turning vehicles.

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German Wikipedia blacked out in protest of EU copyright plan

Wikipedia's German-language page has been blacked out in protest of a proposal to change European Union copyright rules.

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Report: Great Lakes feeling effects of rapid climate warming (Update)

The Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., a trend likely to bring more extreme storms while also degrading water quality, worsening erosion and posing tougher challenges for farming, scientists reported Thursday.

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Physicists reveal why matter dominates universe

Physicists in the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University have confirmed that matter and antimatter decay differently for elementary particles containing charmed quarks.

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NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Veronica affecting Australia's Pilbara Coast

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Veronica skirting the Pilbara coast of Western Australia.

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Prenatal allergies prompt sexual changes in offspring

A single allergic reaction during pregnancy prompts sexual-development changes in the brains of offspring that last a lifetime, new research suggests.

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World's largest floating solar plant connected in China

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Prenatal allergies prompt sexual changes in offspring

A single allergic reaction during pregnancy prompts sexual-development changes in the brains of offspring that last a lifetime, new research suggests.

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High-potency cannabis, or frequent use, raises the risk of psychosis

In London and Amsterdam, a third or more new psychoses are related

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A way to charge pacemakers using the heart’s own muscle

A cleverly designed piezoelectric device seems to do the job

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Physicists reveal why matter dominates universe

Physicists in the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University have confirmed that matter and antimatter decay differently for elementary particles containing charmed quarks.

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Study identifies possible causes of and protectors against premature birth

Seven types of bacteria and certain immune factors in a woman's vagina and cervix may be responsible for increasing the risk of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) or protect against it, according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Results of the study provide groundbreaking information that the auth

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Will more genetically engineered foods be approved under the FDA's new leadership?

The world of food and drug regulation was rocked earlier this month by the news of a change in leadership at the Food and Drug Administration. Commissioner Scott Gottlieb resigned and will step down in early April. His temporary replacement is Dr. Ned Sharpless, director of the National Cancer Institute.

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Why Doctors Think a Kim Kardashian Selfie Is Important

For better or worse, Kim Kardashian’s appearance has come to signify a particular sort of physical perfection. Kardashian might be most famous for her internet-breaking rear end , but even the minute details of how she presents herself—her glowing skin, the thickness of her eyebrows, her wardrobe—have seeped into American culture. A few posts on her Instagram account, which has 131 million follow

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Will more genetically engineered foods be approved under the FDA's new leadership?

The world of food and drug regulation was rocked earlier this month by the news of a change in leadership at the Food and Drug Administration. Commissioner Scott Gottlieb resigned and will step down in early April. His temporary replacement is Dr. Ned Sharpless, director of the National Cancer Institute.

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Livestreamed massacre means it's time to shut down Facebook Live

When word broke that the massacre in New Zealand was livestreamed on Facebook, I immediately thought of Robert Godwin Sr. In 2017, Godwin was murdered in Cleveland, Ohio, and initial reports indicated that the attacker streamed it on Facebook Live, at the time a relatively new feature of the social network. Facebook later clarified that the graphic video was uploaded after the event, but the incid

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Facebook's plan to protect the European elections comes up short

Intentionally false news stories were shared more than 35m times during the 2016 US presidential election, with Facebook playing a significant role in their spread. Shortly after, the Cambridge Analytica scandal revealed that 50m Facebook profiles had been harvested without authorisation and used to target political ads and fake news for the election and later during the UK's 2016 Brexit referendu

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CERN: Study sheds light on one of physics' biggest mysteries – why there's more matter than antimatter

Why do we exist? This is arguably the most profound question there is and one that may seem completely outside the scope of particle physics. But our new experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider has taken us a step closer to figuring it out.

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Land-cover dynamics unveiled

Billions of image pixels recorded by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission have been used to generate a high-resolution map of land-cover dynamics across Earth's landmasses. This map also depicts the month of the peak of vegetation and gives new insight into land productivity.

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Testing the value of artificial gravity for astronaut health

Test subjects in Cologne, Germany will take to their beds for 60 days from 25 March as part of a groundbreaking study, funded by European Space Agency ESA and US space agency NASA, into how artificial gravity could help astronauts stay healthy in space.

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Your pet on pot, or even CBD: Not a good thing, a vet toxicologist explains

My family and I were on vacation in Florida recently and took advantage of a free afternoon to do some gift shopping for local memorabilia – not your ordinary T-shirts and key chains. Our adventure took us to St. Armand's Key, part of Sarasota, and the many unique shops there.

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With a 'hello,' researchers demonstrate first fully automated DNA data storage

Researchers from the University of Washington and Microsoft have demonstrated the first fully automated system to store and retrieve data in manufactured DNA—a key step in moving the technology out of the research lab and into commercial data centers.

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Stunning picture shows dead star racing away from a massive explosion

A speedy pulsar moving 1100 kilometres per second is racing away from the supernova explosion that created it in this image taken by the Very Large Array radio telescope

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Disney Is Building a Box Office Death Star

The Mouse House just took in a Fox and the ‘Masters of the Universe’ movie might've found its He-Man.

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People Follow a Universal Pattern When Switching Between Cell Phone Apps

One of the best parts of traveling is getting to see how, despite differences in culture and geography, we're all fundamentally alike. “People are the same everywhere,” Morrissey tells us — we laugh, we cry, we find cute things cute. And, it now seems, we also juggle the apps on our smartphones the same way. That's the finding of an international team of computer scientists and neuroscientists, pu

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It's Not Just Humans: Sun Bears Also Communicate by Mimicking Facial Expressions

“A smile is infectious,” so goes the cheesy saying. But there’s actually some validity there. It’s long been known that people, often unintentionally, mimic the facial expressions of those around them. This communication technique was thought to only exist in humans and gorillas, but new research is challenging that idea. A recent study in sun bears, which are the smallest (and possibly cutest) sp

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Your pet on pot, or even CBD: Not a good thing, a vet toxicologist explains

My family and I were on vacation in Florida recently and took advantage of a free afternoon to do some gift shopping for local memorabilia – not your ordinary T-shirts and key chains. Our adventure took us to St. Armand's Key, part of Sarasota, and the many unique shops there.

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With a 'hello,' researchers demonstrate first fully automated DNA data storage

Researchers from the University of Washington and Microsoft have demonstrated the first fully automated system to store and retrieve data in manufactured DNA—a key step in moving the technology out of the research lab and into commercial data centers.

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How to Improve Political Forecasts – Issue 70: Variables

The 2020 Democratic candidates are out of the gate and the pollsters have the call! Bernie Sanders is leading by two lengths with Kamala Harris and Elizabeth Warren right behind, but Cory Booker and Beto O’Rourke are coming on fast! The political horse-race season is upon us and I bet I know what you are thinking: “Stop!” Every election we complain about horse-race coverage and every election we

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Aging Is a Communication Breakdown – Issue 70: Variables

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, the 18th-century poet and philosopher, believed life was hardwired with archetypes, or models, which instructed its development. Yet he was fascinated with how life could, at the same time, be so malleable. One day, while meditating on a leaf, the poet had what you might call a proto-evolutionary thought: Plants were never created “and then locked into the given form”

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Hallucinogen Therapy Is Coming – Issue 70: Variables

Three years later Daniel Kreitman still chokes up when he talks about what he saw, and how it changed him. Kreitman, an upholsterer by trade, had taken psilocybin, a hallucinogen derived from mushrooms, in a trial at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine for nicotine addiction. He was 52, and he’d smoked between one and two packs a day for nearly 40 years. After his first psilocybin session

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Chemically, Earth Is Basically a Less Volatile Version of the Sun

The elemental composition of Earth and sun are unexpectedly similar.

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Increasingly warm winters may reduce the survival of forest tree seedlings

The future climate is expected to be warmer and rainfall is expected to be higher than at present, particularly during the winter. This will increase warm periods and rainfall during the winter, which may lead to a thinner snow cover, local flooding and the formation of ice layers on ground surface and inside the snow cover.

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Quick charging system for E-bikes

The e-bike market is booming. Thanks to electric support, cyclists can choose their routes more freely, elderly people can stay mobile, and commuters reach their workplace stress-free. This makes many people use bicycles instead of cars. Presently, charging of the battery takes about two to four hours. To shorten charging time of e-bikes in particular during daily use in the city, Karlsruhe Instit

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In a new quantum simulator, light behaves like a magnet

Physicists at EPFL propose a new "quantum simulator": a laser-based device that can be used to study a wide range of quantum systems. Studying it, the researchers have found that photons can behave like magnetic dipoles at temperatures close to absolute zero, following the laws of quantum mechanics. The simple simulator can be used to better understand the properties of complex materials under suc

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Human Genomics Research Has A Diversity Problem

Studies on the genetics of human diseases have focused largely on people of European descent. Researchers say this lack of diversity is bad science and exacerbates health inequities. (Image credit: Mint Images/Getty Images)

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Why Is There More Matter Than Antimatter?

A new experiment at the world’s most powerful particle collider sheds light on an enduring cosmic mystery — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Deer Park Fire: Benzene in Texas City’s Air Briefly Forces Everyone Inside

Officials had told residents to stay indoors for the second time in a week after a large chemical fire erupted at a storage tank on Sunday.

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Women shaped cuisine, culture of ancient Cahokia

Archaeologists have struggled to explain the rapid rise and fall of Cahokia—the mysterious Mississippian mound-building culture that sprang up about a thousand years ago in the fertile southern Illinois bottom lands just across the river from modern-day St. Louis.

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Making solar cells is like buttering bread

Formamidinium lead iodide is a very good material for photovoltaic cells, but getting the correct and stable crystal structure is a challenge. The techniques developed so far have produced rather poor results. However, University of Groningen scientists, led by Professor of Photophysics and Optoelectronics Maria Antonietta Loi, have now cracked it — using a blade and a dipping solution. The resul

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Research implicates causative genes in osteoporosis, suggesting new targets for future therapy

Scientists have harnessed powerful data analysis tools and three-dimensional studies of genomic geography to implicate new risk genes for osteoporosis, the chronic bone-weakening condition that affects millions of people. Knowing the causative genes may later open the door to more effective treatments.

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Prenatal allergies prompt sexual changes in offspring

A single allergic reaction during pregnancy prompts sexual-development changes in the brains of offspring that last a lifetime, new research suggests. Female rats born to mothers exposed to an allergen during pregnancy acted more characteristically 'male' — mounting other female rodents, for instance — and had brains and nervous systems that looked more like those seen in typical male animals.

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Open-source solution: Researchers 3D-print system for optical cardiography

Researchers from the George Washington University and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a solution for multiparametric optical mapping of the heart's electrical activity. This technique is a useful tool for enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms behind cardiac arrhythmias. Arrhythmia causes your heart to beat too quickly, too slowly or erratically. Hijacking the

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In a new quantum simulator, light behaves like a magnet

Physicists at EPFL propose a new 'quantum simulator': a laser-based device that can be used to study a wide range of quantum systems. Studying it, the researchers have found that photons can behave like magnetic dipoles at temperatures close to absolute zero, following the laws of quantum mechanics. The simple simulator can be used to better understand the properties of complex materials under suc

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New mechanism identified for influenza-induced bacterial superinfections

Researchers have described a new mechanism by which influenza A viruses (IAV) alter the host immune system and make them more or less susceptible to often deadly co-occurring bacterial infections.

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Study points to new strategy for boosting immunotherapy effectiveness in advanced colorectal cancer

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center revealed the common oncogene KRAS as a possible explanation for why many patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) do not respond to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy.

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Mount Sinai researchers call for diversity in the next generation of personalized medicine

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai reveal that genomic data extracted from population biobanks across the globe contain much less ethnic diversity than desirable. Of the nearly 5 million samples of DNA contributed to biobanks worldwide, 68 percent come from individuals of European ancestry.

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Study examines calcium intake, age-related macular degeneration progression risk

This study looked at the association of calcium intake (dietary and supplementation) with the risk and progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness. Previous research has had mixed results about the role of calcium in AMD progression. This study, a secondary analysis of 4,751 randomized clinical trial participants, found higher calcium intake was associated w

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NIH study finds no evidence that calcium increases risk of AMD

Eating a calcium-rich diet or taking calcium supplements does not appear to increase the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), according to the findings of a study by scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI). AMD is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness among people age 65 and older in the United States. The study findings are published in JAMA Ophthalmology.

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The evolution of brain tumors

Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center found in a recent study that only three different genetic alterations drive the early development of malignant glioblastomas. At least one of these three cancer drivers was present in all tumors investigated. The tumors develop for up to seven years before they become noticeable as symptoms and are diagnosed. However, in contrast to their early dev

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New evidence links lifespan extension to metabolic regulation of immune system

Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center have uncovered a new mechanism of lifespan extension that links caloric restriction with immune system regulation.

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Half-a-billion-year-old fossil reveals the origins of comb jellies

One of the ocean's little known carnivores has been allocated a new place in the evolutionary tree of life after scientists discovered its unmistakable resemblance with other sea-floor dwelling creatures.

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Study finds cells maintain a complete molecular 'memory' of their embryonic origins

In research that casts cells as curators of their own history, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists have discovered that adult tissues retain a memory, inscribed on their DNA, of the embryonic cells from which they arose. The discovery led to one even more intriguing – that the memory is fully retrievable: under certain conditions, cells can play the story of their development in reverse to swi

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Western bias in human genetic studies is 'both scientifically damaging and unfair'

Despite efforts to include diversity in research, people of European ancestry continue to be vastly overrepresented and ethnically diverse populations largely excluded from human genomics research, according to the authors of a commentary published March 21 in a special issue of the journal Cell on human genetics. This lack of diversity in studies has serious consequences for science and medicine.

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Using more-specific 'genetic scissors' may avoid problems associated with gene editing

A study from researchers in Italy suggests that there could be a way to bypass barriers to making CRISPR gene-editing treatments a viable option. The team found that using more-precise gene-editing technology that induces fewer breaks in DNA may keep stem cells' natural damage-response pathways under control. The findings are published March 21 in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

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Researchers point to a common cause in sudden death syndromes

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) are syndromes that share many medical similarities but whose physiological causes are poorly understood. An opinion article publishing March 21 in the journal Trends in Neurosciences suggests that the inability for an individual to wake up when their CO2 blood levels rise, likely due to a faulty neural reflex, may

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Plant scraps are the key ingredient in cheap, sustainable jet fuel

Scientists in China have developed a process for converting plant waste from agriculture and timber harvesting into high-density aviation fuel. Their research, published March 21 in the journal Joule, may help reduce CO2 emissions from airplanes and rockets.

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Southern California's mountain lions might soon go extinct

Environment It's also a warning for the many other isolated populations of big cats across the state In 2011, wildlife researchers in Southern California were overjoyed to find that a new male mountain lion had wandered into the Santa Ana Mountains, joining a small and…

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New report warns of dangers to Great Lakes health and economy from climate change

Roughly 34 million people in the United States and Canada rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water, jobs, recreation and more.

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Russia Is Planning A “Ground Force” of Armed Military Robots

BattleBots The Russian military’s research division is working to develop ground-based, combat-ready robots to assist its infantry. The heavily-armed robots, first displayed in a state-produced video last month, resemble miniature tanks that can be deployed alongside infantry or swarms of quadrotor drones — either of which, according to C4ISRNET , can send targeting information back to the killer

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The FDA Is Considering First-Ever Machine to Treat Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s Device The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is officially considering the use of the first-ever medical device to treat the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. That’s an exciting prospect, for reasons IEEE Spectrum lays out in a new story about the startup Neuronix: no single drug has yet been approved by the FDA that has been shown to slow the progress of the devastating neuro-de

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Skrumpende gletsjere truer vandforsyningen til store dele af Asien

Stigende temperaturer giver øget afstrømning. Men om ca. 20 år kan man nå et vendepunkt med uoverskuelige udfordringer for vandforsyningen.

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Medie: Nokiatelefoner har sendt oplysninger om maste-id, IMEI, MAC og SIM-kort til Kina

Ifølge norske NRK har Nokia-telefoner solgt i Norge sendt data om blandt andet masten, telefonen er tilkoblet, til en server i Kina.

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Apps sharing your personal data is 'routine', and sensitive health info is no exception

Want to keep your sensitive health info private? Think twice before sharing it with an app, research suggests.

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Jet fuel made from waste plants could be one of the most efficient yet

A way of turning cellulose from plants into a superior jet fuel might help limit the growth in greenhouse gas emissions from flying

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Genetics studies are too white – that’s failing people and science

Three-quarters of people in studies linking genetics and health are of white European descent, leading us to miss vital clues, says researcher Scott Williams

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Sun bears copy each other's facial expressions to communicate

The world's smallest bears, sun bears, copy one another's facial expressions as a means of communication. Few other animals are known to do this

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How measurable is online advertising?

Researchers from Northwestern University and Facebook in March published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science that sheds light on whether common approaches for online advertising measurement are as reliable and accurate as the "gold standard" of large-scale, randomized experiments.

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Video: Heroines of the periodic table

In 1871, Dimitri Mendeleev presented his periodic table to the world. Many of the current 118 elements were missing, and he left placeholders for those yet to be discovered. Each element has a unique story of scientific discovery.

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Philosophers and neuroscientists join forces to see whether science can solve the mystery of free will

Newly funded 4-year program aims to better define research questions about free will and bring more rigor to its study

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What Would It Take To Go 100% Solar?

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

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Solving the efficiency of Gram-negative bacteria

Superbugs, also known as Gram-negative bacteria, are causing a global health crisis. Each year in the United States, at least two million people contract an antibiotic-resistant infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Of those, 23,000 people die.

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NIST researchers boost intensity of nanowire LEDs

Nanowire gurus at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that, thanks to a special type of shell, produce five times higher light intensity than do comparable LEDs based on a simpler shell design.

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Study finds cells maintain a complete molecular 'memory' of their embryonic origins

In research that casts cells as curators of their own history, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists have discovered that adult tissues retain a memory, inscribed on their DNA, of the embryonic cells from which they arose. The discovery led to one even more intriguing—that the memory is fully retrievable: under certain conditions, cells can play the story of their development in reverse to switc

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Half-a-billion-year-old fossil reveals the origins of comb jellies

One of the ocean's little known carnivores has been allocated a new place in the evolutionary tree of life after scientists discovered its unmistakable resemblance with other sea-floor dwelling creatures.

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Using more-specific 'genetic scissors' may avoid problems associated with gene editing

Recent studies have suggested a potential barrier to making CRISPR gene-editing treatments a viable option for inherited blood-related disorders such as sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, and primary immunodeficiency syndromes. Stem cells may respond to having their genes edited by shutting down—and trying to get around this roadblock could increase the risk of cancer.

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Solving the efficiency of Gram-negative bacteria

Superbugs, also known as Gram-negative bacteria, are causing a global health crisis. Each year in the United States, at least two million people contract an antibiotic-resistant infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Of those, 23,000 people die.

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Study finds cells maintain a complete molecular 'memory' of their embryonic origins

In research that casts cells as curators of their own history, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists have discovered that adult tissues retain a memory, inscribed on their DNA, of the embryonic cells from which they arose. The discovery led to one even more intriguing—that the memory is fully retrievable: under certain conditions, cells can play the story of their development in reverse to switc

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Using more-specific 'genetic scissors' may avoid problems associated with gene editing

Recent studies have suggested a potential barrier to making CRISPR gene-editing treatments a viable option for inherited blood-related disorders such as sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, and primary immunodeficiency syndromes. Stem cells may respond to having their genes edited by shutting down—and trying to get around this roadblock could increase the risk of cancer.

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Research develops top tips to foster better relationships between scientists and business

University researchers and industry practitioners have developed lists of 'top tips' for businesses and academics to foster better relationships that could potentially benefit all parties.

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Heroines of the periodic table (video)

In 1871, Dimitri Mendeleev's periodic table was presented to the world, but missing many of the 118 elements leaving place-holders for those yet to be discovered. We wish to honor women's history month in the international year of the periodic table by sharing the story of two of chemistry's most brilliant and bold women and their paths of elemental discovery — because what they brought to the ta

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Delusions may stem from sticky beliefs, study finds

Delusions are one of the most common symptoms of psychosis, but little is known about what causes them. A new study from researchers at Columbia University and New York State Psychiatric Institute offers insight into the development of delusions, which could lead to better treatments for people with psychosis.

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Want to increase staff loyalty? You'll need to be seen as important, new research suggests

Offering praise and having a good working relationship isn't always enough to engender loyalty from staff — employees also need to feel that the relationship with their boss is important, according to new research.

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Avoidance or responsible moral choices — what is your supervisor like?

It is important to understand and prevent unethical behavior in working life. Leaders should be able to take responsibility for challenging situations and show commitment to moral values. A recent study at the University of Jyvaskyla charted the different moral identity statuses among Finnish leaders.

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How measurable is online advertising?

Researchers from Northwestern University and Facebook in March published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science that sheds light on whether common approaches for online advertising measurement are as reliable and accurate as the 'gold standard' of large-scale, randomized experiments.

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Magnetoresistive sensors for near future innovative development

Excluding the information recording and reading technology, in the next 15-20 years, the hypersensitive sensors operating under the magnetoresistive principle will be applied in an extensive number of innovative areas. Among them are biomedicine, flexible electronics, position sensors, and human-computer interaction, various types of monitoring, navigation and autonomous transport. An article abou

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New brain research challenges our understanding of sleep

An international study headed by researchers from Aarhus University has for the first time uncovered the large-scale brain patterns and networks in the brain which control sleep, providing knowledge which in the future may can in the long term help the many Danes large proportion of people who experience problems sleeping.

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Plants set to power space travel

Chinese research produces rocket fuel from waste cellulose. Andrew Masterson reports.

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103 km lang finsk-estisk tunnel kan blive til virkelighed bag om ryggen på offentligt projekt

Finsk iværksætter henter 15 milliarder euro fra kinesiske investorer, og vil nu bygge tunnel på rekordtid. Samtidig planlægger myndighederne tilsvarende tunnel.

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Storspiggen hotar Östersjöns gäddor

Vuxna gäddor äter storspigg och är alltså ett hot mot storspiggen som gör allt den kan för att äta upp gäddyngel. I ett fungerande ekosystem är detta helt normalt och i balans. I ingen av arterna hotar den andras överlevnad. Men eftersom gäddorna har minskat i antal på grund av många andra orsaker verkar det nu som att den stora mängden storspigg gör det svårt för gäddbestånden att växa till sig,

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Creative ways to get kids to thrive in school | Olympia Della Flora

To get young kids to thrive in school, we need to do more than teach them how to read and write — we need to teach them how to manage their emotions, says educator Olympia Della Flora. In this practical talk, she shares creative tactics she used to help struggling, sometimes disruptive students — things like stopping for brain breaks, singing songs and even doing yoga poses — all with her exist

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C-sections are seen as breastfeeding barrier in US, but not in other global communities

Amanda Veile, an assistant professor of anthropology at Purdue University, and her team report that indigenous mothers in farming communities in Yucatán, Mexico, breastfeed for about 1.5 months longer following cesarean deliveries than they do following vaginal deliveries. Veile believes this is possible because the mothers live in an exceptionally supportive breastfeeding environment.

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Solving the efficiency of Gram-negative bacteria

Superbugs, also known as Gram-negative bacteria, are causing a global health crisis. To combat antibiotic-resistant infections, researchers are pursuing clever new ways to thwart the bacteria's tough defense system. Now, they have uncovered some of the previously unknown machinery that builds the bacterial outer membrane, information that could lead to new treatments for untreatable infections.

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Golden ball in a golden cage

Researchers have synthesized a tiny structure from 32 gold atoms. This nanocluster has a core of 12 gold atoms surrounded by a shell of 20 additional gold atoms. As the scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the unusual stability of this cluster results from electronic interactions with amido and phosphine ligands bound to its surface.

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NIST researchers boost intensity of nanowire LEDs

Nanowire gurus at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have made ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that, thanks to a special type of shell, produce five times higher light intensity than do comparable LEDs based on a simpler shell design.

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Blue Brain solves a century-old neuroscience problem

In a front-cover paper published in Cerebral Cortex, EPFL's Blue Brain Project, a Swiss Brain Research Initiative, explains how the shapes of neurons can be classified using mathematical methods from the field of algebraic topology. Neuroscientists can now start building a formal catalogue for all the types of cells in the brain. Onto this catalogue of cells, they can systematically map the functi

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Collaboration aims to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in clinical trials

Spencer Hoover, vice president and executive director of the Henry Ford Cancer Institute, is co-author of a manuscript published in the Journal of Oncology Practice aimed at establishing best practices to promote diversity in clinical trials. Interviews were conducted with leaders from US cancer centers with above average recruitment of racial and ethnic minority groups into clinical trials to ide

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Bacteria in urine doesn't always indicate infection

Doctors should think carefully before testing patients for a urinary tract infection (UTI) to avoid over-diagnosis and unnecessary antibiotic treatment, according to updated asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) guidelines released by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Revealing the plant genes that shaped our world

The creation of new library of mutants of the single-celled photosynthetic green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii enabled a Carnegie- and Princeton University-led team of plant scientists to identify more than 300 genes that are potentially required for photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is the process by which plants, algae, and some bacteria convert energy from sunlight into carbohydrates — filling

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Breakthrough in acidic water electrolysis via ruthenium-based catalysts

Prof. Wu Yuen's team successfully prepared a kind of catalyst which is able to significantly accelerate oxygen evolution reaction, which help human get one step further in pursuing applicable hydrogen fuel.

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Green New Deal: universal basic income could make green transition feasible

Within ten years, the US will phase out fossil fuels and source its energy from 100% renewable sources. That's what a letter, signed by over 600 people and sent to Congress on January 10 2019, proposes and demands.

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Need for better forecasting to mitigate repeat of Idai devastation

A better system for forecasting severe weather events in Africa is needed to reduce the impact of storms such as Cyclone Idai, say researchers.

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A new method for ethical data science

Artificial Intelligence is transforming our world, sometimes in ways that its creators did not intend. In Wellcome Data Labs we are developing a new method of applying approaches from the social sciences to the way AI algorithms are produced to solve data science problems. The goal is to avoid potential negative consequences of the algorithms by identifying them earlier in the development process.

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Periodic table discovered at St. Andrews recognized as oldest in the world

A periodic table chart discovered at the University of St Andrews is officially recognised as the oldest in the world by the Guinness World Records.

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'Golden fullerene': ligand-protected nanocluster made of 32 gold atoms

Researchers have synthesized a tiny structure from 32 gold atoms. This nanocluster has a core of 12 gold atoms surrounded by a shell of 20 additional gold atoms. As the scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the unusual stability of this cluster results from electronic interactions with amido and phosphine ligands bound to its surface.

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Researchers evaluate the potential of perovskite solar cells for space applications

Scientists from Skoltech, IPCP RAS, MSU and UFU have considered the application of emerging photovoltaics in spacecrafts and satellites and explored the radiation stability of perovskite solar cells with respect to gamma ray exposure. Results of this study were published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

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Artificial Intelligence will map the chemical space to help navigate through the wide diversity of chemical compounds

Scientists from the Skoltech Center for Computational and Data-Intensive Science and Engineering (CDISE) and Helmholtz Munich Center for Environmental Health (HMGU, Germany) have created a neural network for visualizing the chemical space of compounds that can be of potential value for the pharmaceutical industry. The new method will help to create new chemical compounds and navigate in the space

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Scientists Find New Evidence of What Makes Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Unique

Scientists Find New Evidence of What Makes Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Unique The telltale tau proteins present in the disease known as CTE display distinctive features. BrainImage.jpg Image credits: Andrus Ciprian/Shutterstock Sports Thursday, March 21, 2019 – 10:30 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — In a study of the brains of three people diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopa

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Adhesive gel bonds to eye surface, could repair injuries without surgery

An adhesive gel packed with light-activated chemicals can seal cuts or ulcers on the cornea — the clear surface of the eye — and then encourage the regeneration of corneal tissue, according to a preclinical study. The new technology, named GelCORE (gel for corneal regeneration), could one day reduce the need for surgery to repair injuries to the cornea, including those that would today require c

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KU ruster budgetter til mere frontforskning

Øget ledelsesansvar, bedre dækning af forskningens følgeomkostninger og bedre udnyttelse…

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Michigan could enter the satellite launch business by 2022

Michigan was a major force in the early Space Age, when Chrysler made rockets that carried astronauts and General Motors built the electric buggies they used to explore the moon.

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Unprecedented privacy risk with popular health apps

Researchers call for greater regulation and transparency as analysis of medicines-related apps found most directly shared user data — including sensitive health data — with third parties, posing an unprecedented privacy risk.

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Many recovering from addiction have chronic health problems, diminished quality of life

A study shows that more than a third of individuals who consider themselves in recovery from an alcohol or other substance use disorder continue to suffer from chronic physical disease.

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Early exposure to pesticides linked to small increased risk of autism spectrum disorder

Exposure to common agricultural pesticides before birth and in the first year of life is associated with a small to moderately increased risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with infants of women without such exposure, finds a new study.

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Risk of miscarriage linked strongly to mother's age and pregnancy history

The risk of miscarriage varies greatly with a woman's age, shows a strong pattern of recurrence, and is increased after some pregnancy complications, finds a new study.

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Nu lempes kravene for de særlige pladser i psykiatrien

Siden oprettelsen af de 150 særlige pladser i psykiatrien har størstedelen stået tomme hen. Det skal et nyt lovforslag fra regeringen rode bod på.

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Stamcelleforskere opdager afgørende nyt for fremtidens diabetesbehandling

Et særligt protein har afgørende betydning for, hvordan stamceller opfører sig i kroppen, har forskere fra Københavns Universitet opdaget. Et potentielt vigtigt skridt i fremtidens diabetesbehandling, mener leder af projektet.

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Facial Complexity in Sun Bears: Exact Facial Mimicry and Social Sensitivity

Facial Complexity in Sun Bears: Exact Facial Mimicry and Social Sensitivity Facial Complexity in Sun Bears: Exact Facial Mimicry and Social Sensitivity, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39932-6 Facial Complexity in Sun Bears: Exact Facial Mimicry and Social Sensitivity

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Truly Spooky: How Ghostly Quantum Particles Fly Through Barriers Almost Instantly

Scientists recently unraveled a physics puzzle that has stymied experts since the dawn of quantum mechanics.

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New light into the recent evolution of the African rift valley

Continental rift valleys are huge fractures on the surface of the Earth that break continental plates with the eventual development of new oceans. Although instrumental in driving climate and biosphere in certain regions, this process is poorly documented and understood. In a new study, an international group of scientists has shed new light into the recent evolution of the African rift valley by

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Sports involvement linked to fewer depressive symptoms in children

Participation in team sports is associated with fewer depressive symptoms in children, whereas non-sport activities have no association with symptoms, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier.

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First reputation-based blockchain guarantees security against 51 percent attacks

Researchers at the University of Luxembourg are part of an international team that has proposed the first blockchain system to guarantee proper performance even when more than 51 percent of the system's computing power is controlled by an attacker.

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Research develops top tips to foster better relationships between scientists and business

University researchers and industry practitioners have developed lists of 'top tips' for businesses and academics to foster better relationships that could potentially benefit all parties.

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Girls need more positive experiences of ball skills

Children have high perceptions of motor skills. Some gender differences were identified: girls better in locomotor skills, boys have higher perception and actual skills in ball skills.

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Ancient birds out of the egg running

Using their own laser imaging technology, Dr Michael Pittman from the Department of Earth Sciences at The University of Hong Kong and Thomas G Kaye from the Foundation for Scientific Advancement in the USA determined the lifestyle of a special hatchling bird by revealing the previously unknown feathering preserved in the fossil specimen found in the ~125 million-year-old Early Cretaceous fossil be

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Protecting homes with netting window screens can reduce malaria parasite infection

Protecting houses against mosquitoes with netting window screens can suppress malaria vector populations and dramatically reduce human parasite infection prevalence.

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Study shows alarming increases of firearm deaths in US school-age children

From 1999 to 2017, 38,942 US children ages 5 to 18 years old were killed by firearms, averaging more than 2,000 deaths a year. In 2017 alone, 2,462 school-age children were killed by firearms compared to 144 police officers and 1,000 active military worldwide who died in the line of duty. The study finds significant increases that began with an epidemic in 2009, followed by another one in 2014. Ea

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New microscope captures large groups of neurons in living animals

Researchers have developed a microscope specifically for imaging large groups of interacting cells in their natural environments. The instrument provides scientists with a new tool for imaging neurons in living animals and could provide an unprecedented view into how large networks of neurons interact during various behaviors.

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World's smallest bears' facial expressions throw doubt on human superiority

The world's smallest bears can exactly mimic another bear's facial expressions, casting doubt on humans and other primates' supremacy at this subtle form of communication.It is the first time such exact facial mimicry has been seen outside of humans and gorillas.

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Tesla Sues Four Former Employees For Stealing Trade Secrets

Trade Secrets According to a lawsuit filed yesterday in the U.S. district court for North California, the Elon Musk-led electric car company Tesla is accusing four former employees of stealing proprietary information and trade secrets — and handing the material over to Zoox, a rival self-driving transport startup. “The theft here was blatant and intentional,” Tesla wrote in a filing, as reported

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Yucatec Maya moms breastfeed longer after c-section

Indigenous mothers in farming communities in Yucatán, Mexico, breastfeed for about 1.5 months longer following cesarean deliveries than they do following vaginal deliveries, research finds. Researcher Amanda Veile, assistant professor of anthropology at Purdue University, believes this is possible because the mothers live in an exceptionally supportive breastfeeding environment. “Moms living in t

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Engineers aim to pioneer tissue-engineering approach to TMJ disorders

Here's something to chew on: One in four people are impacted by defects of the temporomandibular – or jaw – joint. Despite the pervasiveness of this affliction, treatments are lacking, and many sufferers resort to palliative measures to cope with the pain and debilitation it causes.

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Adhesive gel bonds to eye surface, could repair injuries without surgery

An adhesive gel packed with light-activated chemicals can seal cuts or ulcers on the cornea — the clear surface of the eye — and then encourage the regeneration of corneal tissue, according to a preclinical study. The new technology, named GelCORE (gel for corneal regeneration), could one day reduce the need for surgery to repair injuries to the cornea, including those that would today require c

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Protein BRCA1 as a stress coach

Two proteins work hand in hand to ensure that the tumor cells of neuroblastoma can grow at full speed. A research team shows how the proteins can do this.

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Laser-targeted removal of prostate tumors works as well complete removal of prostate

Researchers have shown that selectively destroying cancerous prostate tissue is as effective as complete prostate removal or radiation therapy while preserving more sexual and urinary function than the other treatments.

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New model for ICU care discovers causes of health emergencies

A new model for intensive care can help identify preventable — and previously overlooked — factors that often send chronically ill patients to the intensive care unit (ICU).

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CRISPR/Cas libraries open new avenues in cancer research

CRISPR/Cas enables the targeted deactivation of genes by cutting DNA at pre-determined sites. This is accomplished by providing the Cas enzyme with a genetic zip code. Using an entire library of zip codes, it is then possible to simultaneously probe multiple sites within the genome, for example to determine which genes are essential for cancer cell survival. This could revolutionize drug discovery

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Rabbits like to eat plants with lots of DNA

Rabbits prefer to eat plants with plenty of DNA, according to a new study.

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Better water testing, safer produce

Irrigation water's E. coli results can differ between labs, test types.

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Neptune’s Moon Triton Is Destination of Proposed NASA Mission

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Cranfield University launches Metal Additive Manufacturing MSc

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Parents of girls are less likely to stress computer skills

While most first-year college students in a new study had positive feelings about computing and computer-related majors and jobs, gender and socioeconomic status seemed to play a role in whether parents shaped those perceptions. Universities may want to reach out to parents, particularly parents of female students and ones from lower-income households, to boost support of computer majors, the new

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Stats Experts Plead: Just Say No to P-Hacking

Some scientists have been exploiting statistical loopholes to pump out flashy findings. Now, the American Statistical Association (ASA) is looking to tackle the problem head-on, asking researchers to revamp how they use common statistical methods, particularly how they should — and shouldn't — use p-values.

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Spine device trains hands of future physical therapists

A new tool gives physical therapy students a better way to master the complex fine motor skills needed to assess and treat conditions like back pain and spinal cord injuries. Researchers at the University of Melbourne’s School of Computing and Information Systems and the physiotherapy department developed the tool—dubbed SpinalLog—which looks and feels like a human spine. The tool uses smart foam

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Watch the world’s smallest bear copy its friends’ facial expressions

For the first time, researchers observe exact facial mimicry outside humans and primates

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Knock Around a Goat Carcass With These Buzkashi Players

Photographer Anna Huix traveled to Tajikistan to document the centuries-old sporting tradition.

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Semiconductor: A new contender for scalable quantum computing

Recent advances of quantum computing has attracted global attention for its prospective applications in business and industry. Semiconductor quantum devices that are promising for integration with classical CMOS technology is a new contender in this field and has developed with a dramatically fast speed in the last decade. Scientists in China summarize the latest advances in semiconductor quantum

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Otago discovery paves way for precision medicine in future

University of Otago scientists have discovered a way to view the immune cell 'landscape' of bowel cancer tumours, paving the way towards more individualised medicine and treatment for many other diseases in future.

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How spin dances with dipole

The key physical property of multiferroic materials is the existence of a coupling between magnetism and polarization. The origin and manifestations of magnetoelectricity can be very different in the available plethora of multiferroic systems, with multiple possible mechanisms hidden behind the phenomena. In a review, researchers describe the fundamental physics that causes magnetoelectricity from

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Study links perimenopause to accelerated fat mass gains, lean mass losses

A UCLA-led study confirms what women approaching menopause have long suspected: menopause does make fat go up. The study finds that women undergoing perimenopause lost lean body mass and more than doubled their fat mass. The research demonstrates that body mass index (BMI) is a very important clinical tool for predicting health events, such as getting diabetes or having cardiovascular disease — b

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Artificial chemical DNA switch helps understand epigenetic mechanisms

Researchers from the Czech Academy of Sciences and Charles University constructed an artificial chemical DNA switch and made the first step towards artificial epigenetics — targeted switching on and off of genes. Their paper was recently published in the journal Chemical Science.

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Study highlights power of play

Through simple games and day-to-day tasks, parents can help their children learn self-regulation, a skill considered essential for success, a University of Otago, New Zealand, study has found.

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Antiepileptics increase the risk of pneumonia among persons with Alzheimer's disease

People with Alzheimer's disease using antiepileptic drugs have twice the risk of pneumonia compared to non-users, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The risk was highest in the beginning of use, but remained on an elevated level even in long-term use. The results were published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

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True-meaning wearable displays: Self-powered, washable and wearable

When we think about clothes, they are usually formed with textiles and have to be both wearable and washable for daily use; however, smart clothing has had a problem with its power sources and moisture permeability, which causes the devices to malfunction. This problem has now been overcome by a KAIST research team, who developed a textile-based wearable display module technology that is washable

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World's smallest bears' facial expressions throw doubt on human superiority

The world's smallest bears can exactly mimic another bear's facial expressions, casting doubt on humans and other primates' supremacy at this subtle form of communication.

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New microscope captures large groups of neurons in living animals

Researchers have developed a microscope specifically for imaging large groups of interacting cells in their natural environments. The instrument provides scientists with a new tool for imaging neurons in living animals and could provide an unprecedented view into how large networks of neurons interact during various behaviors.

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Are those “inactive” ingredients in my medicine really inactive?

Drugs and supplements contain dozens of inactive ingredients. Is this a concern to those with allergies and sensitivities?

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Rick Sets a New Rookie Season Record | Gold Rush

Rick Ness sticks to his word and finishes his rookie season well over his 1,000 oz goal. With a strong finish, his team breaks a Gold Rush record for rookie miners. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follo

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7 Non-Obvious Trends Shaping the Future

When you think of trends that might be shaping the future, the first things that come to mind probably have something to do with technology: Robots taking over jobs. Artificial intelligence advancing and proliferating. 5G making everything faster, connected cities making everything easier, data making everything more targeted. Technology is undoubtedly changing the way we live, and will continue

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World's smallest bears' facial expressions throw doubt on human superiority

The world's smallest bears can exactly mimic another bear's facial expressions, casting doubt on humans and other primates' supremacy at this subtle form of communication.

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Europeiska matvanor bakom tropisk avskogning

– Man kan säga att EU importerar avskogning av stora arealer varje år. Vill EU nå klimatmålen måste vi ställa hårdare miljökrav på dem som exporterar livsmedel till EU, säger Martin Persson på Chalmers, som är en av forskarna bakom studierna. Att det finns kopplingar mellan produktion av vissa livsmedel och avskogning är inte en nyhet. Men vad Martin Persson och Chalmers-kollegan Florence Pendril

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Study suggests better method to manage kangaroo populations

Landholders need to turn professional in controlling kangaroo populations on their properties and regard the iconic Australian animals as assets rather than pests, new research led by ANU has recommended.

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Intel Unveils New Graphics Command Console at GDC

Intel is serious about getting into the gaming market, starting with a new software front-end. The post Intel Unveils New Graphics Command Console at GDC appeared first on ExtremeTech.

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Facebook to reexamine how recently live videos are flagged after Christchurch shooting

Users flagged the video of the New Zealand terror attack after it streamed live, which may have delayed Facebook's response, the company said.

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Study suggests better method to manage kangaroo populations

Landholders need to turn professional in controlling kangaroo populations on their properties and regard the iconic Australian animals as assets rather than pests, new research led by ANU has recommended.

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These blades can cut nearly anything

Gadgets The sharpest knives, scissors, and razors. Sharp blades are safer. Struggling to force a dull edge through veggies or fabric makes you ore likely to slip and take a bloody trip to the ER.

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Astronomers discover a companion of the nearby star HD 118475

Using radial velocity method and direct imaging, astronomers have found a compact companion of a nearby star known as HD 118475. The finding is detailed in a paper published March 11 on the arXiv pre-print server, in which the authors reveal fundamental parameters of the system and discuss the nature of the newly found companion.

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Caterpillars listen to voicemail by eating soil

Leaf-eating caterpillars greatly enrich their intestinal flora by eating soil. Even effects of plants that previously grew in that soil can be found back in bacteria and fungi in caterpillars. Researchers from the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) and Leiden University write about this discovery in Nature Communications.

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Optical force-induced self-guiding light in human red blood cell suspensions

New photonic tools for medical imaging can be used to understand the nonlinear behavior of laser light in human blood for theranostic applications. When light enters biological fluids it is quickly scattered, however, some cell suspensions can induce nonlinear responses in laser beams to self-focus and enhance the penetration of light for biomedical applications as a quantifiable marker of disease

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Volcanic ash particles under the microscope

Volcanic ash is hazardous to many aspects of our lives. When airborne, it can damage aircraft: its particles abrade aeroplane surfaces and can even cause failure to critical instruments. Once the ash falls, it can harm our health and damage infrastructure, agriculture and the environment. To protect itself from these hazards, society needs to develop effective forecasting methods.

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New technology aims to boost wind energy efficiency in Europe

Researchers are developing tools to substantially reduce the operations and maintenance costs of wind farms. The novel tools will be tested on three European wind farms in 2020.

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Wireless Electricity Is Coming, Here’s Where We’re At

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

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Caterpillars listen to voicemail by eating soil

Leaf-eating caterpillars greatly enrich their intestinal flora by eating soil. Even effects of plants that previously grew in that soil can be found back in bacteria and fungi in caterpillars. Researchers from the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) and Leiden University write about this discovery in Nature Communications.

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NASA’s Working on a Drone to Hunt For Life in Martian Caves

Diving In A flying drone created a 3D map of an Icelandic cave that had been carved out by flowing lava in a matter of minutes, using LIDAR technology. While cool enough on its own, scientists at the SETI Institute and NASA believe that the same base technology could be used to map the many caves dotting the surface of the Moon and Mars, according to research that will be presented this week at t

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Tidligere formand for Yngre Læger bliver chef i Sundhedsstyrelsen

Camilla Noelle Rathcke er ny centerchef i Sundhedsstyrelsens Center for Planlægning.

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Publisher Correction: Glacial expansion of oxygen-depleted seawater in the eastern tropical Pacific

Publisher Correction: Glacial expansion of oxygen-depleted seawater in the eastern tropical Pacific Publisher Correction: Glacial expansion of oxygen-depleted seawater in the eastern tropical Pacific, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-0995-8 Publisher Correction: Glacial expansion of oxygen-depleted seawater in the eastern tropical Pacific

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The Poet of Premature Endings

The former U.S. Poet Laureate W. S. Merwin died last week at the age of 91. His writing career was exceptionally long and decorated: It spanned nearly seven decades, generated hundreds of poems and translations, and garnered rare honors, including two Pulitzer Prizes and a National Book Award. But even in the early years of his career, with dozens of poetry collections and awards still ahead, Mer

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Bloodhound's 1,000mph car project given financial boost

The jet car scheme was given a lifeline by Ian Warhurst, who stepped in to provide finances A British project to build a jet-powered car that will travel at more than 1,000mph is back on track under new ownership after being saved from the scrapyard at the last minute. The Bloodhound scheme was just moments away from the end of the road when a Yorkshire businessman, Ian Warhurst, stepped in to pr

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Expanding gas mining threatens our climate, water and health

Australia, like its competitors Qatar, Canada and the United States, aspires to become the world's largest exporter of gas, arguing this helps importing nations reduce their greenhouse emissions by replacing coal.

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Big gods came after the rise of civilisations, not before, finds study using huge historical database

When you think of religion, you probably think of a god who rewards the good and punishes the wicked. But the idea of morally concerned gods is by no means universal. Social scientists have long known that small-scale traditional societies – the kind missionaries used to dismiss as "pagan" – envisaged a spirit world that cared little about the morality of human behaviour. Their concern was less ab

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Small vessel disease MRI marker linked to worse cognitive health in older adults

Seemingly harmless fluid-filled spaces around the cerebral small vessels, commonly seen on brain MRIs in older adults, are now thought to be associated with more compromised cognitive skills, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Neurology.

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The Lancet Psychiatry: Childhood trauma may affect brain structure, predisposing adults to recurring major depressive disorder

Early life trauma may affect the structure of the brain in a way that makes clinical depression more likely to be severe and recurrent, according to a two-year observational study of 110 patients published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal.

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Many recovering from addiction have chronic health problems, diminished quality of life

A study from the Massachusetts General Hospital Recovery Research Institute shows that more than a third of individuals who consider themselves in recovery from an alcohol or other substance use disorder continue to suffer from chronic physical disease.

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Scientists propose a new benchmark skill for decadal prediction of terrestrial water storage

Scientists find that incorporating the current decadal climate prediction would significantly improve decadal prediction skill of terrestrial water storage over global major river basins.

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New membrane class shown to regenerate tissue and bone, viable solution for periodontitis

Periodontitis affects nearly half of Americans ages 30 and older, and in its advanced stages, it could lead to early tooth loss or worse. UCLA researchers have created a new class of membranes that have shown to regenerate tissue and bone. Findings could lead to a viable solution for periodontitis and wound healing.

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Topical immunotherapy keeps skin cancer risk at bay

A combination of two topical creams already shown to clear precancerous skin lesions from sun-damaged skin also lowers the risk that patients will later develop squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. The study, from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, appears March 21 in JCI Insight.

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Excess hormones could cause a condition that can lead to blindness in women, study finds

Research has found that increased levels of hormones including testosterone could cause a brain condition that can lead to blindness in women.

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Immunotherapy of precancerous skin lesions may prevent squamous cell carcinoma

A treatment previously shown to clear the precancerous skin lesions called actinic keratosis now appears to reduce the chance that the treated skin will develop squamous cell carcinomas, the second most common form of skin cancer.

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Imaging method reveals long-lived patterns in cells of the eye

Cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) form unique patterns that can be used to track changes in this important layer of tissue in the back of the eye, researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have found. Using a combination of adaptive optics imaging and a fluorescent dye, the researchers used the RPE patterns to track individual cells in healthy volunteers and people with retinal d

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Can drugs like Prozac restore vision after stroke?

New research sheds light on how the damage in the brain that strokes cause can lead to permanent vision impairment. The findings could provide researchers with a blueprint to better identify which areas of vision are recoverable, facilitating the development of more effective interventions to encourage vision recovery. Each year, approximately 265,000 Americans have a stroke that causes visual im

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Ny elektrolysecelle skal gøre ammoniak til fremtidens brændstof

PLUS. Haldor Topsøe har udviklet en ny version af en elektro­lysecelle, som kan gøre ammoniakproduktion fra sol og vind langt mere effektiv og dermed billigere.

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Obese patients do better in certain cancer treatments

Studies find obesity linked to ‘paradoxical’ results in immunotherapy strategies. Paul Biegler reports.

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Pulsar cannonball run

Image captures rare high-speed phenomenon.

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Hurricanes to deliver a bigger punch to coasts

When tropical cyclone Idai made landfall near Beira, Mozambique on March 14, a spokesperson for the UN World Meteorological Organization called it possibly the the worst weather-related disaster to hit the southern hemisphere.

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Want a safer world for your children? Teach them about diverse religions and worldviews

Around 80% of secondary school students who had classes about diverse religions claim to have positive views of Muslims. This compares to around 70% who had not attended such classes.

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Finding solutions where science and policy meet

Christopher Scott grew up in the mountain region of India, where, as a child, he used to go hiking in the town of Tehri, India, situated at the confluence of the Bhagirathi and Bhilangna rivers. Today, the town of Tehri, founded in the early 1800s, is underwater.

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Low-cost and energy efficient recording of biodiversity soundscapes

An international team of researchers has built a new sensor network that can monitor two crucial activities, namely biodiversity, or the variety of life, in a particular habitat or ecosystem, and identification of possible illegal activities such as logging or poaching in protected areas. This wireless recording network is capable of recording an ecosystem's sounds with the same quality as devices

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Artificial chemical DNA switch helps understand epigenetic mechanisms

Researchers from the Czech Academy of Sciences and Charles University constructed an artificial chemical DNA switch and made the first step towards artificial epigenetics – targeted switching on and off of genes. Their paper was recently published in the journal Chemical Science.

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Evidence for a Human Geomagnetic Sense

Scientists develop a robust experiment that shows human brain waves respond to changes in Earth-strength magnetic fields.

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A New Wave of Brainy Bikes Do Everything but Ride Themselves

Automated gear changes, app-controlled suspensions, overtaking vehicle alerts, and more smart tech are here for the human-powered two-wheeler.

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Artificial chemical DNA switch helps understand epigenetic mechanisms

Researchers from the Czech Academy of Sciences and Charles University constructed an artificial chemical DNA switch and made the first step towards artificial epigenetics – targeted switching on and off of genes. Their paper was recently published in the journal Chemical Science.

10h

Where do microplastics go in the oceans?

Where do tiny bits of plastic go when they are flushed out to sea?

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The incredible challenge of landing heavy payloads on Mars

It's too bad Mars is such an interesting place, because it's actually one of the most difficult places to visit in the solar system, especially if you want to bring along a lot of luggage. That planet is a graveyard of missions that didn't quite make it.

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True wearable displays: Self-powered, washable and wearable

Clothes are usually made of textiles and have to be both wearable and washable for daily use; however, smart clothing presents a challenge with its power sources and moisture permeability, which causes the devices to malfunction. This problem has now been overcome by a KAIST research team, who developed a textile-based wearable display module technology that is washable and does not require an ext

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Scientists seek to send a drone to Saturn’s moon, Titan

There are plans to visit the complex-looking satellite, arriving in 2034. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Do hopes and prayers work? Looks like that’s a no

Three double-blind studies in 20 years find little evidence that praying improves outcomes for heart patients. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Child and adolescent anxiety could be linked to later alcohol problems

New research led by the University of Bristol has found some evidence that children and adolescents with higher levels of anxiety may be at greater risk of developing alcohol problems. However, the link between anxiety and later binge drinking and later frequency and quantity of drinking was more inconclusive.

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Data sharing by popular health apps is 'routine,' research finds

Researchers call for greater regulation and transparency as analysis of medicines-related apps found most directly shared user data — including sensitive health data — with third parties, posing an unprecedented privacy risk.

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Mæslingeudbrud skaber travlhed hos praktiserende læger

De praktiserende læger får flere henvendelser fra bekymrede forældre efter flere mæslingeudbrud i landet.

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Region Syddanmark står uden en fællestillidsrepræsentant

Som det eneste sted i landet står Region Syddanmark uden en regional fællestillidsrepræsentant for Yngre Læger. Det vækker hovedrysten hos Yngre Læger, der mener, at det har konsekvenser for arbejdsmiljø og uddannelsesforløb.

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CRISPR/Cas libraries open new avenues in cancer research

CRISPR/Cas enables the targeted deactivation of genes by cutting DNA at pre-determined sites. This is accomplished by providing the Cas enzyme with a genetic zip code. Using an entire library of zip codes, it is then possible to simultaneously probe multiple sites within the genome, for example to determine which genes are essential for cancer cell survival. This could revolutionize drug discovery

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A new strategy of fabricating p-n junction in single crystalline Si nanowires, twisting

Can single crystalline materials be used for low dimensional p-n junction design? This is an open and long-standing problem. Microscopic simulations based on the generalized Bloch theorem show that in single crystalline Si nanowires, an axial twist can lead to the separation of p-type and n-type dopants along the nanowire radial dimension, and thus realizes the p-n junction. A bond orbital analysi

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New membrane class shown to regenerate tissue and bone, viable solution for periodontitis

Periodontitis affects nearly half of Americans ages 30 and older, and in its advanced stages, it could lead to early tooth loss or worse. Recent studies have shown that periodontitis could also increase risk of heart disease and Alzheimer's disease.

10h

Australia's animal testing laws are a good start, but don't go far enough

Your lipstick and foundation will be less likely to come at the expense of animal welfare, thanks to Commonwealth legislation that passed in recent weeks.

10h

Cryptosporidium parasite detected in Minnesota groundwater

When consumed in contaminated water, the microscopic parasite Cryptosporidium can cause symptoms of stomach cramps, diarrhea and fever. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology have detected evidence of the parasite in about 40 percent of surveyed wells in public water systems in Minnesota—even wells not influenced by surface water. The team emphasizes that

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CRISPR/Cas libraries open new avenues in cancer research

CRISPR/Cas enables the targeted deactivation of genes by cutting DNA at pre-determined sites. This is accomplished by providing the Cas enzyme with a genetic zip code. Using an entire library of zip codes, it is then possible to simultaneously probe multiple sites within the genome, for example to determine which genes are essential for cancer cell survival. This could revolutionize drug discovery

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Australia's animal testing laws are a good start, but don't go far enough

Your lipstick and foundation will be less likely to come at the expense of animal welfare, thanks to Commonwealth legislation that passed in recent weeks.

10h

ISS Astronauts Test New Antibacterial Coating on the Bathroom Door

Research headed by Elisabeth Grohmann of Beuth University of Applied Sciences Berlin shows that a new antimicrobial substance could eliminate bacteria on surfaces. Surfaces like the bathroom door. The post ISS Astronauts Test New Antibacterial Coating on the Bathroom Door appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Lighting the way to removing radioactive elements

A flick of a switch. An LED light shines on a liquid-filled beaker. Another flick. It goes dark.

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First artificial intelligence Google Doodle features Bach

Google is celebrating composer Johann Sebastian Bach with its first artificial intelligence-powered Doodle.

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1,600 motel guests secretly filmed, livestreamed on website

Seoul police said they booked four people and arrested two for installing tiny spy cams in power outlets, TVs, hairdryer holders, and other places at 30 motels across 10 Korean cities. Measuring …

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Working scientist podcast: Challenges and opportunities for materials researchers in China

Working scientist podcast: Challenges and opportunities for materials researchers in China Working scientist podcast: Challenges and opportunities for materials researchers in China, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00960-x China is looking to lure young materials researchers from other nations, but its trade war with the US could hamper collaboration and innovation.

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From the Archives: The Promise of Ketamine

This month, the FDA approved the use of esketamine , a nasal spray based on the old anesthetic and once-popular club drug ketamine, to treat people with severe depression that has not responded to other treatments. It’s costly and entails visiting the doctor for four hours a week for four weeks, but it’s the first treatment in decades that works in a new way in the brain. That means it might reac

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Skills like 'crap detection' can help kids meet cybersecurity challenges head on

How well are we preparing the typical primary school kid for life when they graduate in 2032?

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We Can't Take the Science Out of Our Clean Air Standards

It sounds crazy, but that is exactly what Trump's EPA is trying to do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fei-Fei Li Wants AI to Care More About Humans

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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New technique could help regrow tissue lost to periodontal disease

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about half of all Americans will have periodontal disease at some point in their lives. Characterized by inflamed gums and bone loss around teeth, the condition can cause bad breath, toothache, tender gums and, in severe cases, tooth loss. Now, in ACS Nano, researchers report development of a membrane that helps periodontal tissue reg

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Cryptosporidium parasite detected in Minnesota groundwater

When consumed in contaminated water, the microscopic parasite Cryptosporidium can cause symptoms of stomach cramps, diarrhea and fever. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology have detected evidence of the parasite in about 40 percent of surveyed wells in public water systems in Minnesota — even wells not influenced by surface water. The team emphasizes th

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Baseball’s Best Player Deserves More Than $430 Million

Tuesday morning, ESPN reported that Mike Trout—the Los Angeles Angels’ star center fielder and, by almost unanimous estimation, the best player of his generation—was preparing to sign a 12-year, $430 million contract extension. The deal is the largest in the history of American sports ; its official signing on Wednesday , with two years left on Trout’s current contract, preemptively squashes an e

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On Pluto, It’s Been Spring Since 1990

Ah, spring. The season of vibrant flowers lining the sidewalk on the commute home, their gentle fragrance wafting into the air. Of sunshine that calls for a light jacket instead of a bulky coat. Of the passionate urge to clean everything in sight. Outside The Atlantic ’s Washington, D.C., headquarters, it’s about 43 degrees Fahrenheit (6 degrees Celsius)—not warm enough for open-toed shoes, but s

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Cyclone Idai shows the deadly reality of climate change in Africa | Landry Nintereste

Vain promises and empty slogans have got us nowhere. Fossil-fuel extraction must end before more lives are lost As Africa climate week unfurls in Ghana, the countries of Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe count the costs of Cyclone Idai , which ripped through villages and towns, taking hundreds of lives and leaving a trail of destruction. For a continent already racked by the effects of the climate c

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Parents of girls, low-income students less likely to urge kids to study computers

While perceptions of computing majors among high school students suggest that the geek stereotype is on the way out, a Penn State Lehigh Valley researcher said that universities may want to reach out to parents, particularly parents of female students and ones from lower-income households, to boost support of computer majors.

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Megapixels: Asteroid Bennu is …exploding?

Space New images reveal peculiar behavior from the celestial object Ever since the NASA spacecraft OSIRIS-REx reached the asteroid known as Bennu in December of last year, it’s been quietly orbiting and snapping photos. It is this…

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Mest mikroplast vid de stora sjöarnas tillflöden

Det blir alltmer vedertaget att plast som sprids på land sedan sprids till haven via sötvattensystem, det vill säga sjöar och floder. Trots att antalet studier av plast i haven globalt har ökat kraftigt de senaste åren är studier av sötvattensmiljöer betydligt ovanligare och utgör mindre än fyra procent av alla publicerade studier om mikroplaster i miljön. Men nu är den första vetenskapliga övers

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Robotic "particles" swarm together to move towards the light

Most robots are usually made to do one particular job, so they're not very adaptable to new situations. But that might change with a set of robots developed by researchers at MIT, Harvard, …

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Light from exotic crystals improves solar panels

A new way to control the light that exotic crystal semiconductors emit could lead to more efficient solar cells and other advances in electronics, according to new research. The study involves crystals called hybrid perovskites, which consist of interlocking organic and inorganic materials, and they have shown great promise for use in solar cells. The finding could lead to novel electronic displa

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Men use these 4 metaphors to describe miscarriage

Women who have a miscarriage often use metaphors to make sense of and deal with the experience. A new study investigates the same among men. Although some people consider miscarriage a “women’s issue,” men also grieve the loss of the baby. Researchers wanted to expand upon a communication model that claims people use narrative-like descriptions to organize and interpret their life experiences. Af

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A Common Anesthetic Could Ease PTSD and Other Stress Disorders

Propofol reduces the intensity of traumatic memories — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The U.S. is on the cusp of an offshore wind energy boom. Why aren't energy companies capitalizing on it?

When it comes to wind energy, the United States is sitting on a gold mine, so to speak.

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The Haunting of Hacker House

How tales of Edward Snowden and Albert Gonzalez possess an old Victorian in the Catskills.

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Why benefits of a cashless society may be overrated

After recreational cannabis use became legal in Canada last October, research shows the number of bank notes in circulation fell sharply. Before, marijuana buyers used cash to keep their transactions anonymous. After, there was a massive switch to the convenience of cashless payments.

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We Can't Take the Science Out of Our Clean Air Standards

It sounds crazy, but that is exactly what Trump's EPA is trying to do — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Common Anesthetic Could Ease PTSD and Other Stress Disorders

Propofol reduces the intensity of traumatic memories — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Common Anesthetic Could Ease PTSD and Other Stress Disorders

Propofol reduces the intensity of traumatic memories — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Image of the Day: Dystrophin Restored

CRISPRed heart muscle cells from humans gain the ability to make a protein missing in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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Super worm moon – in pictures

Wednesday night’s rare occurrence of a super worm moon coincided with the equinox. The name is a nod to the emergence of worms from the soil around the time of the March full moon Continue reading…

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Performance-based pay linked to employee mental health problems, study shows

Roughly seven of 10 companies in the United States, if not around the globe, use some form of pay-for-performance compensation system: bonuses, commissions, piece rates, profit sharing, individual and team goal achievements, and so on. But does such an incentivized workplace create a negative effect on the mental-health wellness of those workers?

11h

Multi-drug resistant UTIs—is the answer in our food?

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the world's most common bacterial infections, affecting around 50 per cent of women and five per cent of men. They can present as low-level cystitis or cause debilitating and potentially life-threatening conditions such as blood sepsis and kidney infection. Each year, treatment costs run to billions of dollars worldwide.

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Marcelo Gleiser Talks Science and Philosophy

Marcelo Gleiser is an astrophysicist and science popularizer. I have not read any of his works previously and was therefore not familiar with him. He recently won the Templeton Prize , of which I am not a fan. The prize is for: The Templeton Prize honors a living person who has made an exceptional contribution to affirming life’s spiritual dimension, whether through insight, discovery, or practic

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'Terminator'-like liquid metal moves and stretches in 3-D space

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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If the internet was somehow able to be installed into the brain, how intelligent would we get?

So we'd become kind of like a hive mind where all available knowledge any collected knowledge becomes everybodies knowledge. You wouldn't have to search for it, you would just think and know instantly. So if everyone has immediate access to all knowledge on the internet with the internet regularly updating as well… How intelligent could we get with this hive mind? What would our progress look l

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[Prediction] What smartphones will be like in the future – forced obsolescence

So for years on end now we've seen manufacturers do everything to make us but new phones every. Be it non-resident batteries, updates that slow down your device, locked (and frequenty non-unlockable) bootloaders, GPL violations (not releasing kernel sources), etc… To someone like me who keeps good devices until they become unreliable and/or obsolete/insufficient (or until there is some other va

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Multi-drug resistant UTIs—is the answer in our food?

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the world's most common bacterial infections, affecting around 50 per cent of women and five per cent of men. They can present as low-level cystitis or cause debilitating and potentially life-threatening conditions such as blood sepsis and kidney infection. Each year, treatment costs run to billions of dollars worldwide.

11h

Machine learning identifies links between world's oceans

Oceanographers studying the physics of the global ocean have long found themselves facing a conundrum: Fluid dynamical balances can vary greatly from point to point, rendering it difficult to make global generalizations.

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Medie: Piloter bladrede febrilsk gennem manual kort før Lion Air-styrt

Optagelser fra det første Boeing 737 Max-styrt kaster nyt lys over piloternes manglende kendskab til MCAS-systemet.

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Internationalt ekspertpanel: Regeringen snyder på vægtskålen ved udregning af forskningsbudgettet

En mere reel udregning vil øge forskningsbudgetterne, som passende kunne gå til Danmarks Innovationsfond, mener panelet.

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Improved control of big power in little motors

Little motors power everything from small comforts, such as desk fans, to larger safety systems, like oven exhaust systems—but they could be more precise, according to a research team from Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories.

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Author Correction: A population of luminous accreting black holes with hidden mergers

Author Correction: A population of luminous accreting black holes with hidden mergers Author Correction: A population of luminous accreting black holes with hidden mergers, Published online: 21 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0827-2 Author Correction: A population of luminous accreting black holes with hidden mergers

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Copernicus Sentinel-1 maps floods in wake of Idai

As millions of people in Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe struggle to cope with the aftermath of what could be the southern hemisphere's worst storm, Copernicus Sentinel-1 is one of the satellite missions being used to map flooded areas to help relief efforts.

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The 'True' Neutrino Has Hidden from Physicists for Decades. Could They Find It in Antarctica?

Neutrinos are the changelings of the subatomic world, but physicists are getting closer to pinning down the particles' true identities.

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Nu kan du købe gentest for type 2 diabetes – men kan man regne med den?

PLUS. Det amerikanske selskab 23andMe tilbyder en gentest, der viser, om man er disponeret for type 2-diabetes. Dansk forsker understreger, at resultater vil være upræcise.

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Arbetsplatsen central för att minska ungas psykiska ohälsa

Enligt Sven Svensson, forskare inom arbetshälsa vid Högskolan i Gävle, ökar sjukrivningar bland unga vuxna. Psykisk ohälsa är den vanligaste orsaken till sjukskrivning i den gruppen. Under fyra år ska forskar undersöka hur det ser ut inom handeln, en sektor som anställer många unga, och ta reda på vad dessa unga människor behöver. – Om chefer kan lära sig att tillgodose unga vuxnas behov så sitte

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A new ketamine-based antidepressant raises hope — and questions

Little is known about the long-term effects on people of a newly approved antidepressant based on the anesthetic ketamine.

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In the Face of Danger, We’re Turning to Surveillance

From the Rose Bowl to upstate New York, people are turning to surveillance systems in the face America’s inability to meaningfully address gun violence.

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Researchers Built an ‘Online Lie Detector.’ Honestly, That Could Be a Problem

Critics point out serious flaws in a study promising an "online polygraph," with potential to create deep biases.

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iPad Mini (2019) Review: Hello, Old Friend

Apple's littlest iPad gets an update.

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Image: Grande America oil spill

Captured just yesterday, 19 March, at 17:11 GMT (18:11 CET) by the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, this image shows the oil spill from the Grande America vessel. The Italian container ship, carrying 2200 tonnes of heavy fuel, caught fire and sank in the Atlantic, about 300 km off the French coast on 12 March.

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Research finds social support helps students overcome 'task overload'

As emerging adults transition to college they may want to examine the current status of their social relationships as researchers from the University of Arkansas and three other institutions found that perceptions of social support could directly and indirectly be related to well-being outcomes for emerging adult college students.

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A mating war in diving beetles has stopped the evolution of species

In nature, male attempts to mate with females can be so extreme that they can harm the females. Such negative impacts of mating interactions have been suggested to promote the emergence of new species under some circumstances. Surprisingly, one type of diving beetle species now shows that this conflict between the sexes can instead lead to an evolutionary standstill in which mating enhances traits

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How fluid viscosity affects earthquake intensity

Fault zones play a key role in shaping the deformation of the Earth's crust. All of these zones contain fluids, which heavily influence how earthquakes propagate. In an article published today in Nature Communications, Chiara Cornelio, a Ph.D. student at EPFL's Laboratory of Experimental Rock Mechanics (LEMR), shows how the viscosity of these fluids directly affects an earthquake's intensity. Afte

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A mating war in diving beetles has stopped the evolution of species

In nature, male attempts to mate with females can be so extreme that they can harm the females. Such negative impacts of mating interactions have been suggested to promote the emergence of new species under some circumstances. Surprisingly, one type of diving beetle species now shows that this conflict between the sexes can instead lead to an evolutionary standstill in which mating enhances traits

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Opting Out of Vaccines Should Opt You Out of American Society

People who are able to take vaccines but refuse to do so are the moral equivalent of drunk drivers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Medicine and personal care products may lead to new pollutants in waterways

When you flush the toilet, you probably don't think about the traces of the medicine and personal care products in your body that are winding up in sewage treatment plants, streams, rivers, lakes, bays and the ocean.

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Complex societies gave birth to big gods, not the other way around: study

An international research team, including a member of the Complexity Science Hub Vienna, investigated the role of "big gods" in the rise of complex large-scale societies. Big gods are defined as moralizing deities who punish ethical transgressions. Contrary to prevailing theories, the team found that beliefs in big gods are a consequence, not a cause, of the evolution of complex societies. The res

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Sustainable fisheries and conservation policy

There are roughly five times as many recreational fishers as commercial fishers throughout the world. And yet, the needs and peculiarities of these 220 million recreational fishers have largely been ignored in international fisheries and conservation policy. This gives rise to conflicts and loss of social welfare, and is not conducive to the sustainable management of fish stocks. An international

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Physicists Think They've Figured Out the Most Extreme Chemical Factories in the Universe

Our world is full of chemicals that shouldn't exist. New research could explain why they exist anyway.

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Sustainable fisheries and conservation policy

There are roughly five times as many recreational fishers as commercial fishers throughout the world. And yet, the needs and peculiarities of these 220 million recreational fishers have largely been ignored in international fisheries and conservation policy. This gives rise to conflicts and loss of social welfare, and is not conducive to the sustainable management of fish stocks. An international

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Image: Magnetometer boom built for ESA's mission to Jupiter

A test version of the 10.5-m long magnetometer boom built for ESA's mission to Jupiter, developed by SENER in Spain, seen being tested at ESA's Test Centre in the Netherlands, its weight borne by balloons.

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