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nyheder2019marts25

1h

Pregnant women who work nights may have a greater risk of miscarriage

Working two or more night shifts in a week may increase a pregnant woman's risk of miscarriage the following week by around a third, shows a prospective study.

1h

Why it’s so hard to reproduce HeLa cell findings

Scientists have used HeLa cells in hundreds of thousands of life sciences experiments, but scientists can’t always reproduce the findings. To get to the bottom of the lack of reproducibility of these cloned descendants of human cancer cells, a group of system biologists embarked on a massive project: molecular cell measurement. Here, Ruedi Aebersold, a professor at ETH Zurich, explains the projec

33min

Duke University to Pay $112.5 Million to Settle Claims of Research Misconduct

The university submitted falsified data in connection with 30 grants obtained from the N.I.H. and E.P.A., according to a whistle-blower lawsuit.

now

Nasa cancels all-female spacewalk, citing lack of suit in woman's size

Space agency blames shortage of outerwear after first-of-its-kind mission falls through Nasa’s plans for an all-female spacewalk have fallen through – at least in part because the agency doesn’t have enough spacesuits that fit the astronauts. Early this month, Nasa announced that Christina Koch and Anne McClain would take part in the first-of-its kind mission on 29 March, walking outside the inte

12min

How machine learning is accelerating last mile, and last meter, delivery

Wise Systems’ routing software helped one company cut late deliveries by 85%.

12min

26min

Hidden flaws in common piece of lab kit could botch experiments

Hidden flaws in common piece of lab kit could botch experiments Hidden flaws in common piece of lab kit could botch experiments, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00980-7 Well-used magnetic stirrers harbour metal atoms that could bias the results of chemical and biochemical reactions.

42min

Is China's fishing fleet taking all of West Africa's fish?

The BBC investigates illegal and unsustainable fishing off the west coast of Africa to find out how one of the most fertile ecosystems on earth has been pushed to the brink.

48min

Patient online consultation requests 'mirror' busiest surgery times

Patients are using online consultations in the same way they would arrange a consultation via traditional means, a new independent evaluation by the University of Warwick reveals.

51min

Machine learning reveals rapid material classification

Scientists at the University of Tokyo introduced a novel machine learning algorithm for the rapid prediction of a materials properties and structures based on spectral scans. The program may be extremely useful for researchers when prototyping novel nanodevices.

51min

The ex-poachers saving snow leopards in Russia

In Sailugemsky National Park, snow leopards have found an unlikely ally – ex-poachers

54min

Robot ‘eyes’ aid people with profound motor impairments

An interface system with augmented reality technology could help people with profound motor impairments operate a humanoid robot to feed themselves and perform routine personal care tasks. Those tasks might include feeding and performing routine personal care tasks such as scratching an itch and applying skin lotion. The web-based interface displays a “robot’s eye view” of surroundings to help us

55min

Don't You Dare Call It Meat – Scientific American Blog Network

submitted by /u/speakhyroglyphically [link] [comments]

56min

Global carbon emissions from energy hit a record high in 2018

Renewable energy use is rising but 2018 still saw a record increase in global carbon emissions – the equivalent of doubling emissions from all air travel in a single year

57min

1h

Working Out Helps Boost Memory for the Long-term, New Study Finds

Whether it’s playing basketball, lifting weights or taking a brisk walk, a good workout can leave you feeling energized and confident. It’s well known that frequent bouts of exercise make you stronger and improve your cardiovascular health, but a new study is adding another, unexpected benefit to the mix. Research presented at the annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society meeting on March 24 shows tha

1h

Wood-based technology creates electricity from body heat

A research team has developed a flexible, wood-based membrane that someday could turn body heat into electricity.

1h

Model learns how individual amino acids determine protein function

A machine-learning model computationally breaks down how segments of amino acid chains determine a protein's function, which could help researchers design and test new proteins for drug development or biological research.

1h

Tropical Storm Iba has formed off the Brazilian coast — a real rarity in this part of the world

For the first time since 2010, a full-fledged tropical cyclone has formed in the South Atlantic Ocean. Say hello to Tropical Storm Iba. You can see it in the animation above, about 500 miles northeast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The animation consists of infrared imagery from the GOES-16 weather satellite. It shows Iba as it strengthened on Sunday. The false colors correspond to the temperature of

1h

The March Marathon is here!

There’s a certain feeling in the air… could it be a marathon? Why yes, yes it is! We’re ready for the March Marathon here at HQ, and we hope you’ll join us. Stretch out, touch your toes, and let the race begin. Starting at 8 PM EDT on 3/27 you’ll have 24 hours to grow and complete 1-2 cells! Special Guidelines for Scythes Bonus: Normal SC bonuses are doubled! Naming: Admins will be counting every

1h

Duke University to Pay $112.5 Million to Settle Claims of Research Misconduct

The university submitted falsified data in connection with 30 grants obtained from the N.I.H. and E.P.A., according to a whistle-blower lawsuit.

1h

Two Top Medical Groups Call for Soda Taxes and Advertising Curbs on Sugary Drinks

The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association said the measures were necessary to combat the nation’s crisis of obesity and chronic disease

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1h

Wood-based technology creates electricity from body heat

A research team has developed a flexible, wood-based membrane that someday could turn body heat into electricity.

1h

Model learns how individual amino acids determine protein function

A machine-learning model computationally breaks down how segments of amino acid chains determine a protein's function, which could help researchers design and test new proteins for drug development or biological research.

1h

The Atlantic Daily: Rorschach Report

What We’re Following The summary of the Mueller investigation released by the attorney general had one big conclusion: No collusion. Though the actual report hasn’t yet been made public, Trump and his allies were quick to spin the SparkNotes version as a political win. Though the investigation once looked like it might imperil Trump’s presidency, Barr’s initial interpretation seems to now be a tc

1h

Widely used malaria treatment to prevent malaria in pregnant women

A global team of researchers, led by a research team at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), are calling for a review of drug-based strategies used to prevent malaria infections in pregnant women, in areas where there is widespread resistance to existing antimalarial medicines.

1h

Restoring this enzyme's function protects against heart disease in lupus and beyond

Patients with lupus are at increased risk of heart disease. Exposing endothelial cells — known to protect against heart disease, in part by producing nitric oxide — to the serum of patients with lupus decreased nitric oxide production. Administering L-sepiapterin restored that production.

1h

Surge in cannabis use among youth preceded legalization in Canada

National discussions on cannabis legalization, along with increased access to medical marijuana, may have encouraged more high school students to consume the drug years before it became legal in Canada.

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2h

2h

New virtual reality tool allows you to see the world through the eyes of a tiny primate

Imagine that you live in the rainforests of Southeast Asia, you're a pint-sized primate with enormous eyes and you look a little like Gizmo from the movie, 'Gremlins.' You're a tarsier — a nocturnal animal whose giant eyes provide you with exceptional visual sensitivity, enabling a predatory advantage. A new virtual reality (VR) software, Tarsier Goggles, simulates a tarsier's vision and illustra

2h

Replacing sitting time with physical activity associated with lower risk of death

For those who get the least amount of physical activity, replacing a half hour of sitting time with physical activity was associated with up to a nearly 50 percent reduction in mortality, according to a new study.

2h

Apple Enters the Credit Card Market With—Yep—Apple Card

Apple Card lives both in the existing Wallet app and as a status-signaling physical titanium card.

2h

Rubbery figures: scientists create an entirely soft robot

Prototype without electronics or hard surfaces could be perfect for emergency situations. Nick Carne reports.

2h

Robots won’t make it into our houses until they get common sense

AI’s big advances have so far relied on algorithms that train on huge piles of data. If robots are going to work in the real world, that will have to change.

2h

2h

Apple highlights privacy in new services in jab at rivals

Apple says its services respect your digital boundaries—and it wants you to know it.

2h

2h

‘Natural health’ statin alternative may cause liver damage, doctors warn

Red yeast rice is biologically similar to some cholesterol meds, but lacks proper regulation. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

2h

Sitting down too long kills 50,000 Brits each year

Sedentary lifestyles carry increased risks for several serious diseases, modelling reveals. Samantha Page reports.

2h

Deepfakes are solvable—but don’t forget that “shallowfakes” are already pervasive

Malicious synthetic videos are not yet mainstream, which gives tech companies a chance to prevent future misinformation. But it won’t fix our current flood of fake news.

2h

Breaking Down Apple News+, Apple TV+, Apple Card and More

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

2h

McDonald's Acquires Machine-Learning Startup Dynamic Yield for $300 Million

The fast-food giant's largest acquisition in 20 years is bringing machine learning to the drive-thru.

2h

Squishy robots now have squishy computers to control them

Technology Driven by a soft-drive. Robots that have this computer as part of their design will be completely made of soft parts.

3h

Study suggests trees are crucial to the future of our cities

The shade of a single tree can provide welcome relief from the hot summer sun. But when that single tree is part of a small forest, it creates a profound cooling effect. According to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, trees play a big role in keeping our towns and cities cool.

3h

New computational tool harnesses big data, deep learning to reveal dark matter of the transcriptome

A research team at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has developed an innovative computational tool offering researchers an efficient method for detecting the different ways RNA is pieced together (spliced) when copied from DNA. Because variations in how RNA is spliced play crucial roles in many diseases, this new analytical tool will provide greater capabilities for discovering disease b

3h

New computational tool harnesses big data, deep learning to reveal dark matter of the transcriptome

A research team at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has developed an innovative computational tool offering researchers an efficient method for detecting the different ways RNA is pieced together (spliced) when copied from DNA. Because variations in how RNA is spliced play crucial roles in many diseases, this new analytical tool will provide greater capabilities for discovering disease b

3h

The largest delta plain in Earth's history

The largest delta plain in Earth's history formed along the northern coast of the supercontinent Pangea in the late Triassic. Its size out-scales modern counterparts by an order of magnitude, and approximates 1% of the total land area of the modern world. And although contenders are found in the rock record, no ancient counterpart exceeds the extent of the Triassic delta plain mapped in the subsur

3h

Rapid magnetic 3-D printing of human cells

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

3h

Hubble Catches Neptune Forming New, Massive Storms

Neptune has a new storm, in the form of a large dark spot that appeared in late 2018. By analyzing Hubble images dating back to 2015, astronomers have discovered high-altitude clouds that formed years ahead of the visible storm, indicating it was already forming there, swirling beneath the clouds and haze. The telltale clouds are teaching astronomers more about how such storms form and evolve on a

3h

Titan's Slot Canyons of Ice Rival Those of Zion National Park

The American southwest is littered with slot canyons – deep, narrow passages worn through by the erosive force of water. But there’s another place in the solar system with this majestic geology: Saturn’s moon, Titan. “Titan’s canyons are wider, generally deeper, and have slightly more sloping walls (than Earth),” says Tracy Gregg, a geologist at the University of Buffalo in New York. Gregg present

3h

All the Cannabinoids in Marijuana That Aren't THC

Medical marijuana is legal in 33 states as of November 2018. Yet the federal government still insists marijuana has no legal use and is easy to abuse. In the meantime, medical marijuana dispensaries have an increasing array of products available for pain, anxiety, sex and more. The glass counters and their jars of products in the dispensary resemble an 18th century pharmacy. Many strains for sale

3h

The Politics & Policy Daily: The Barr for Obstruction of Justice

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, March 25. ‣ Senator Tom Udall, a Democrat from New Mexico, announced that he will not run for reelection in 2020. “The worst thing anyone in public office can do is believe the office belongs to them, rather than to the people they represent,” Udall said in a statement. ‣ Michael Avenatti, the former lawyer for the adult-film star Stormy Daniels, was arrest

3h

The largest delta plain in Earth's history

The largest delta plain in Earth's history formed along the northern coast of the supercontinent Pangea in the late Triassic. Its size out-scales modern counterparts by an order of magnitude, and approximates 1 percent of the total land area of the modern world. And although contenders are found in the rock record, no ancient counterpart exceeds the extent of the Triassic delta plain mapped in the

3h

AI researchers must confront “missed opportunities” to achieve social good

Deeper collaboration with social sciences and underserved communities is required to make sure that AI tools don’t cause more problems than they solve.

3h

All the New Services Apple Announced: News+, TV+, Apple Card, Apple Arcade

Apple held a media event at its Cupertino, California campus on Monday morning. It showed off a host of new content services and launched its own credit card.

3h

Apple TV+ Isn’t Trying to Be the New Netflix

Apple’s formal announcement of its new original-TV service, rolled out Monday, was high on prestige and low on details. A keynote presentation given at the company’s headquarters in Cupertino, California, began with hefty explanations of other projects the company has in the works, including a credit card, a news subscription service, and an updated gaming platform. Finally, Apple CEO Tim Cook tu

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Edibles are tied to more severe health issues than smoking marijuana

Most marijuana-linked cases at a Denver hospital involved weed smokers. But people who ate the drug were more likely to have heart or psych issues.

3h

3h

"Burn the Boats": The U.S. Navy Wants To Mount Laser Weapons on a Destroyer

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

3h

Apple launches a credit card called "Apple Card" with no fees

submitted by /u/MainBuilder [link] [comments]

3h

Melting Mount Everest Ice Is Exposing a Grisly Sight: Scores of Dead Bodies

Melting glaciers are revealing dozens of dead bodies on the world's tallest mountain

4h

Groups: EPA has dragged heels on oil dispersant rules

Environmental groups and women from Alaska and Louisiana say the Environmental Protection Agency has dragged its heels on issuing rules for oil spill dispersants, and they're ready to sue to demand them.

4h

Duke University pays $112M to settle faked-research lawsuit

Duke University will pay $112 million to settle a whistleblower lawsuit after federal prosecutors said a research technician's fake data landed millions of dollars in federal grants, the school and the government said Monday.

4h

This weighted down blanket can help you get a better night’s sleep

Enjoy deep pressure touch, now with 19 percent off MSRP. This weighted down blanket can help you get a better night’s sleep. Enjoy deep pressure touch, now with 19 percent off MSRP.

4h

Duke Whistleblower Gets More Than $33 Million In Research Fraud Settlement

Duke University is paying the U.S. government $112.5 million to settle accusations that it submitted bogus data to win federal research grants. (Image credit: Chris Keane/Reuters)

4h

Traffic control of cells

Researchers develop a hydrogel whose stiffness and permeability to cells can be controlled with light.

4h

New virtual reality tool allows you to see the world through the eyes of a tiny primate

Imagine that you live in the rainforests of Southeast Asia, you're a pint-sized primate with enormous eyes that are roughly the same size as your brain, and you look a little like Gizmo from the movie, "Gremlins". You're a tarsier— a nocturnal animal whose giant eyes provide you with exceptional visual sensitivity, enabling a predatory advantage. A new virtual reality software, Tarsier Goggles, de

4h

New computational tool harnesses big data, deep learning to reveal dark matter of the transcriptome

A research team at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has developed an innovative computational tool offering researchers an efficient method for detecting the different ways RNA is pieced together (spliced) when copied from DNA. Because variations in how RNA is spliced play crucial roles in many diseases, this new analytical tool will provide greater capabilities for discovering disease biomarke

4h

Study suggests trees are crucial to the future of our cities

The shade of a single tree can provide welcome relief from the hot summer sun. But when that single tree is part of a small forest, it creates a profound cooling effect. According to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, trees play a big role in keeping our towns and cities cool.

4h

The largest delta plain in Earth's history

The largest delta plain in Earth's history formed along the northern coast of the supercontinent Pangea in the late Triassic. Its size out-scales modern counterparts by an order of magnitude, and approximates 1 percent of the total land area of the modern world. And although contenders are found in the rock record, no ancient counterpart exceeds the extent of the Triassic delta plain mapped in the

4h

Traffic control of cells

Researchers develop a hydrogel whose stiffness and permeability to cells can be controlled with light.

4h

Satellite tracks Tropical Cyclone Veronica along Australia coast

On March 25, Tropical Cyclone Veronica continued to move in southerly direction along the coast of Western Australia in the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

4h

Crisis management: When your celebrity advertising endorser generates negative publicity

Researchers from the University of Connecticut and Free University of Berlin published new research in the INFORMS journal Management Science that provides companies with substantiated, actionable insights on strategies for effectively responding to situations where their highly compensated celebrity endorsers generate negative publicity.

4h

Echoes of Clinton Emails in the Mueller Report's End

The justice system cannot please everyone, but it at least aims to provide some sort of closure. That’s why one of the least satisfying outcomes of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the election, as summarized by Attorney General William Barr, is its approach to the question of whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice. Though this message was delivered in

4h

The most aggressive spider societies are not always the ones that flourish

Evolutionary biologists at McMaster University who study the social lives and behaviour of colony spiders—some of which are docile, others aggressive— have found that the success of their cooperative societies depend on their neighbours.

4h

NASA finds heavy rainfall around Tropical Cyclone Joaninha's center

NASA calculated the rainfall rates occurring in Tropical Cyclone Joaninha as it moved through the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean.

4h

Wood-based technology creates electricity from heat

A University of Maryland-led team of researchers has created a heat-to-electricity device that runs on ions and which could someday harness the body's heat to provide energy.

4h

Matter waves and quantum splinters

Physicists in the United States, Austria and Brazil have shown that shaking ultracold Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) can cause them to either divide into uniform segments or shatter into unpredictable splinters, depending on the frequency of the shaking.

4h

Physicists Are Starting to Suspect Physical Reality Is an Illusion

Master of Reality A provocative new column in Scientific American floats the idea that what’s fundamentally real in the universe — its actual, base reality — isn’t the quarks, fields, and quantum phenomena that seem to comprise it. Instead, according to scientist and philosopher Bernardo Kastrup, some are starting to suspect that matter itself is an illusion — and that the only real thing is info

4h

The most aggressive spider societies are not always the ones that flourish

Evolutionary biologists at McMaster University who study the social lives and behaviour of colony spiders—some of which are docile, others aggressive— have found that the success of their cooperative societies depend on their neighbours.

4h

New virtual reality tool allows you to see the world through the eyes of a tiny primate

Imagine that you live in the rainforests of Southeast Asia, you're a pint-sized primate with enormous eyes and you look a little like Gizmo from the movie, 'Gremlins.' You're a tarsier — a nocturnal animal whose giant eyes provide you with exceptional visual sensitivity, enabling a predatory advantage. A new virtual reality (VR) software, Tarsier Goggles, developed at Dartmouth College, simulates

4h

Apple pivot led by star-packed video service

With Hollywood stars galore, Apple unveiled its streaming video plans Monday along with news and game subscription offerings as part of an effort to shift its focus to digital content and services to break free of its reliance on iPhone sales.

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Plant seed research provides basis for sustainable alternatives to chemical fertilizers

Scientists assessed the seed microbiomes of two successive plant generations for the first time and discovered that seeds are an important vector for transmission of beneficial endophytes across generations.

4h

Alpine glaciers: Another decade of loss

Guest Commentary by Mauri Pelto (Nichols College) Preliminary data reported from the reference glaciers of the World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS) in 2018 from Argentina, Austria, China, France, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Switzerland and United States indicate that 2018 will be the 30th consecutive year of significant negative annual balance (> -200mm); with

4h

UMD-Led researchers' wood-based technology creates electricity from heat

A University of Maryland-led research team has developed a flexible, wood-based membrane that someday could turn body heat into electricity.

4h

New in Ethics & Human Research, March-April 2019

Anticipatory waivers of consent for pediatric biobanking, a case study of unethical US experiments in Guatemala, and more in the current issue of Ethics & Human Research.

4h

Restoring this enzyme's function protects against heart disease in lupus and beyond

Patients with lupus are at increased risk of heart disease. Exposing endothelial cells — known to protect against heart disease, in part by producing nitric oxide — to the serum of patients with lupus decreased nitric oxide production. Administering L-sepiapterin restored that production. These findings, reported by Medical University of South Carolina researchers in Lupus Science & Medicine, pr

4h

How to Check Your Computer for Hacked Asus Software Update

Hackers compromised Asus’s Live Update tool to distribute malware to almost 1 million people. Here’s how to see if your computer has it.

4h

Pårørende er oplagte medarbejdere i psykiatrien

I kølvandet på bekymrende nationale tal for pårørendes tilfredshed med psykiatrien, kan medarbejdere med pårørendebaggrund måske være en del af løsningen, der kan vende udviklingen.

4h

25 percent off a Garmin fitness tracker and other great deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

5h

The stroke care paradox: Close-knit social networks increase delays in hospital arrival

Patients with closer-knit social networks, including family members and spouses, were more likely to delay seeking hospital care for a stroke whereas those with a more dispersed network of acquaintances were more likely to seek care faster.

5h

Mystery shrouding oldest animal fossils solved

Scientists have discovered that 558 million-year-old Dickinsonia fossils do not reveal all of the features of the earliest known animals, which potentially had mouths and guts.

5h

Predicting the useful life of batteries with data and AI

In an advance that could accelerate battery development and improve manufacturing, scientists have found how to accurately predict the useful lifespan of lithium-ion batteries, used in devices from mobile phones to electric cars.

5h

Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum computing

A new method allows the quantum state of atomic 'qubits'–the basic unit of information in quantum computers — to be measured with twenty times less error than was previously possible, without losing any atoms.

5h

She Was Betrayed by a Gentleman’s Handshake

The history of invention is littered with men who took credit for women’s ideas. Take Monopoly, for example: As the story goes, an unemployed man named Charles Darrow invented the beloved American board game in the 1930s, sold it, and became a millionaire. All of that happened, except the part where he invented the game. In reality, a woman named Elizabeth Magie Phillips, who has been described a

5h

Extinct 'Pig-Footed Bandicoot' Galloped Around Australia Like a Wonky Little Horse

An extinct Australian marsupial looks like a kangaroo, an opossum and a deer got a bit too friendly at the local watering hole.

5h

What anti-vaxxers are actually afraid of (it's not all about autism)

University of Pittsburgh researchers identified four major trends fueling the anti-vaxx movement. Using comments originating from a Facebook video, they documented 197 profiles as the basis of their paper. Every major medical institution agrees that vaccines are safe and effective, but the movement persists thanks to false information spread online. None Andrew Wakefield's infamous 1998 study con

5h

Past Climate Change May Have Weakened the Byzantine Empire

Past Climate Change May Have Weakened the Byzantine Empire Analysis of trash mounds shows how a regional hub collapsed after the onset of the Late Antiquity Little Ice Age. TrashMound_topNteaser.jpg View of Elusa trash mound. Image credits: Image courtesy of Guy Bar-Oz. Culture Monday, March 25, 2019 – 15:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — By examining the literal dustbins of his

5h

Discrimination, PTSD may lead to high preterm-birth rates among African-American women

African-American women are nearly twice as likely to give birth prematurely as white women. Amelia Gavin, an associate professor in the University of Washington School of Social Work, connects preterm birth to racial discrimination via PTSD.

5h

Climate warming accelerates tallgrass prairie bioiversity

A study on climate warming in an Oklahoma tallgrass prairie has implications for understanding and predicting ecological consequences of climate change and ecosystem management strategies. More rapid changes in biodiversity are expected in a warmer world. In addition, ecosystem functions and services may become more vulnerable as the structure of an ecosystem is linked to the functions it performs

5h

Commercial hybrid-electric aircraft, reduced carbon emissions

Although we're still a long way from commercial airplanes powered by a combination of fossil fuel and batteries, a recent feasibility study explored fuel/battery configurations and the energy lifecycle to learn the trade-offs needed to yield the greatest reductions in carbon dioxide emissions.

5h

Race at the edge of the Sun: Ions are faster than atoms

Ions move faster than atoms in the gas streams of a solar prominence. Scientists have now observed this.

5h

Oprah brings two documentaries and her book club to Apple TV Plus – CNET

The queen of daytime TV is coming to Apple's new platform.

5h

A Colonial-Era Cemetery Resurfaces in Philadelphia

Remains buried in the First Baptist cemetery were believed to have been moved in 1860. But many coffins and bones were still there.

5h

Gibraltar just banned balloons in bid to save marine life

submitted by /u/chap0000 [link] [comments]

5h

Is VR the last creative medium? What could possibly come after it?

I fail to see how anything could push creative mediums further. Anything you can do in real life, you can VR. Anything you can't do in real life, you can do in VR. It likely be a lot easier to do the things you can do in real life in VR instead. Edit: Not referring to VR in it's current state, but at the height in may reach in the future submitted by /u/SuchRush [link] [comments]

5h

New U.S. sanctions put spotlight on Iranian research institute

Trove of stolen documents apparently fueled action against 31 researchers and entities

5h

Replacing sitting time with physical activity associated with lower risk of death

For those who get the least amount of physical activity, replacing a half hour of sitting time with physical activity was associated with up to a nearly 50 percent reduction in mortality, according to a new study from the American Cancer Society

5h

Satellite tracks Tropical Cyclone Veronica along Australia coast

On March 25, 2019 Tropical Cyclone Veronica continued to move in southerly direction along the coast of Western Australia in the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm.

5h

Sådan stopper vi dødsspiralen

Ryd op i arbejdsopgaverne og –funktionerne, reducér dokumentationen, prioritér, send flere penge og ’importér’ sygeplejersker fra ikke-EU-lande.

5h

Here's how many trees are required to cool a city street

Environment An equation for throwing shade Urban planners are looking for ways to mitigate the heat island effect, and the pretty obvious winner might be trees. By blocking the sunlight and using…

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My month trying out Marie Kondo's Method

Marie Kondo's 2014 book, The Life-changing Magic of Tidying Up , has sold over 9 million copies. The Japanese organizer's success has turned into a popular Netflix show, Tidying Up With Marie Kondo . De-cluttering your home has an emotional resonance, says Kondo. None A bad habit: I tend to avoid popular trends. While it saves me the hassle of terrible pop music and "influencer" nonsense, gems sl

5h

These Beautiful Maps Capture the Rivers That Pulse Through Our World

Cartographer Robert Szucs creates colorful maps of the watersheds that creep across states, countries, continents and the globe

5h

Apple TV+ Is Here—but the Streaming Service Has a Long Way to Go

The streaming service has big names, and deep pockets, but must-watch programming? Dunno.

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Oprah brings Apple CEO Tim Cook to tears – CNET

Apple's star-studded event to launch Apple TV Plus ends with the company's signature "One last thing…" surprise: Oprah Winfrey.

5h

Matter waves and quantum splinters

Physicists in the United States, Austria and Brazil have shown that shaking ultracold Bose-Einstein condensates can cause them to either divide into uniform segments or shatter into unpredictable splinters, depending on the frequency of the shaking.

5h

Fossil barnacles, the original GPS, help track ancient whale migrations

Whale barnacles add new shell throughout the year that has been shown to reflect, through oxygen isotope ratios, the conditions of the seas through which the whale traveled. UC Berkeley paleobiologists have now shown that fossilized whale barnacles retain this isotopic signature, revealing the ocean conditions through which whales traveled millions of years ago. This could help reveal details abou

5h

A fascinating phase transition: From one liquid state to another

Scientists at the University of Tokyo described a rare 'liquid-to-liquid' phase transition in pure triphenyl phosphite. This may improve our control of transport properties of a liquid.

5h

How tree diversity affects invasive forest pests

A broad-scale study of US forest data suggests a significant — but not simple — relationship between the number of native tree species and the number of nonnative forest pests. The study results suggest that facilitation and dilution are both occurring in a forest community, but the importance of each shifts with overall tree diversity. The researchers hope their results will inform monitoring e

5h

Deep time tracking devices: Fossil barnacles reveal prehistoric whale migrations

Long-distance migrations are common for large whales, but when in their evolutionary past did whales begin to migrate and why? Scientists from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the University of California, Berkeley looked for these answers in fossil whale barnacles.

5h

Brain stem cells age faster in MS patients

Brain stem cells in people with the most severe form of multiple sclerosis look much older than they really are, according to a study led by UConn Health and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The prematurely old cells act differently in the brain than normal ones, and could be the key to new treatments for the disease.

5h

New angle of attack drives cellular HIV-reservoirs to self-destruction

While current therapies for HIV can successfully manage active infection, the virus can survive in tissue reservoirs, including macrophage cells, and remain a persistent problem. Now, Dr. David Russell, William Kaplan Professor of Infection Biology at Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, and his research team have pinpointed a novel angle of attack that could selectively eradicate th

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How tree diversity regulates invading forest pests

Relationships between tree diversity and pest diversity follow a hump-shaped curve. That's the finding of a national study of US forests that compared two county-level data sets.

5h

Why the ocean you know and love won’t exist in 50 years

Coral reefs may not be able to survive another human decade because of the environmental stress we have placed on them, says author David Wallace-Wells. He posits that without meaningful changes to policies, the trend of them dying out, even in light of recent advances, will continue. The World Wildlife Fund says that 60 percent of all vertebrate mammals have died since just 1970. On top of this,

5h

Matter waves and quantum splinters

Physicists have shown that shaking ultracold Bose-Einstein condensates can cause them to either divide into uniform segments or shatter into unpredictable splinters, depending on the frequency of the shaking.

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The struggle for life in the Dead Sea sediments: Necrophagy as a survival mechanism

The Dead Sea is not completely dead. The most saline lake on Earth (more than 10 times saltier than sea water) is a harsh environment where only salt-loving microbes from the Archaea domain, known as extreme halophiles, are able to survive. Geologists are interested in the evolution of this lake and have been investigating its subsurface to reconstruct its biological and geological history.

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The most aggressive spider societies are not always the ones that flourish

Evolutionary biologists who study the social lives and behavior of colony spiders — some of which are docile, others aggressive — have found that the success of their cooperative societies depend on their neighbors.

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Testosterone can help men with hypogonadism lose weight, keep it off

Long-term testosterone therapy can help men with hypogonadism lose weight and maintain their weight loss, researchers report.

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Tesla starts unlocking more power in existing Supercharger stations

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Directed energy weapons are ready for the spotlight, expert says

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New CRISPR-powered device detects genetic mutations in minutes

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Tech companies must anticipate the looming risks as AI gets creative

Governments will need to enact stricter regulations as well, says one Microsoft AI expert.

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Women at Breast Implant Hearing Call for Disclosure of Safety Risks

While industry representatives insisted the implants are safe, others at an F.D.A. panel meeting urged for warnings about links to illnesses and cancer.

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DARPA Wants to Use Noisy Shrimp to Detect Enemy Subs

Underwater Spies As Russia, China, and the United States race to build undetectable submarines or underwater drones, scientists are recruiting some unlikely help to keep up. A DARPA-funded program called Persistent Aquatic Living Sensors — adorably abbreviated to “PALS” — is developing a way to use the endless bubbling, snapping, and clicking of underwater shrimp as a sort of ubiquitous sonar, ac

6h

Pretty Sly for a Whitefly

When plants are bitten by insects, they release a chemical scream—a cocktail of compounds that travel through the air. Some deter pests directly by confusing or repelling them; others indirectly protect plants by summoning predatory ants or parasitic wasps . Still others raise the alarm in parts of the plant that aren’t yet under attack, telling them to ramp up their defenses in preparation. Thes

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The Aftermath of Cyclone Idai in Mozambique and Zimbabwe

Ten days ago, Cyclone Idai, one of the most devastating storms to hit Africa in decades, made landfall in Mozambique with sustained winds of 120 mph (195 kph), damaging or destroying thousands of structures. The tropical storm then moved inland, bringing heavy rain and flooding to more parts of Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Malawi. More than 750 deaths are attributed to Idai so far, while thousands r

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Dragged Across Concrete and the Sloppy Provocations of S. Craig Zahler

Dragged Across Concrete , S. Craig Zahler’s new film about two hard-nosed cops who descend into a criminal underworld, begins with a drug bust that goes too far. The detectives, Brett Ridgeman (played by Mel Gibson) and Anthony Lurasetti (Vince Vaughn), dispense excessive force with casual aloofness. In an early scene, one of them puts his foot on a suspect’s head to hold him still, and the other

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Improving T Cell Function in the Solid Tumor Microenvironment

Download this eBook from IsoPlexis to learn about addressing challenges in solid tumors with the Polyfunctional Strength Index (PSITM) and employing PSI to discover novel agonist and cell therapy combinations against solid tumors

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We’re in the middle of the second-deadliest Ebola outbreak ever

Health The hemorrhagic fever has infected more than 1,000 in the Democratic Republic of Congo. More than 1,000 people have been infected with Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo, making it the second-biggest outbreak in recorded history.

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Rubbery figures: scientists create an entirely soft robot

Prototype without electronics or hard surfaces could be perfect for emergency situations. Nick Carne reports.

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A criminal multi-million dollar crypto-mining ecosystem has been uncovered

Using stolen processing power to mine cryptocurrencies is a profitable criminal enterprise. But nobody realised the scale of the activity, until now.

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How tree diversity regulates invading forest pests

A national-scale study of U.S. forests found strong relationships between the diversity of native tree species and the number of nonnative pests that pose economic and ecological threats to the nation's forests.

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Fossil barnacles, the original GPS, help track ancient whale migrations

Barnacles that hitch rides on the backs of humpback and gray whales not only record details about the whales' yearly travels, they also retain this information after they become fossilized, helping scientists reconstruct the migrations of whale populations millions of years in the past, according to a new University of California, Berkeley, study.

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How tree diversity regulates invading forest pests

A national-scale study of U.S. forests found strong relationships between the diversity of native tree species and the number of nonnative pests that pose economic and ecological threats to the nation's forests.

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Fossil barnacles, the original GPS, help track ancient whale migrations

Barnacles that hitch rides on the backs of humpback and gray whales not only record details about the whales' yearly travels, they also retain this information after they become fossilized, helping scientists reconstruct the migrations of whale populations millions of years in the past, according to a new University of California, Berkeley, study.

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Machines Shouldn’t Have to Spy On Us to Learn

We need a breakthrough that allows us to reap the benefits of AI without savaging data privacy.

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Model learns how individual amino acids determine protein function

A machine-learning model from MIT researchers computationally breaks down how segments of amino acid chains determine a protein's function, which could help researchers design and test new proteins for drug development or biological research.

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NASA finds heavy rainfall around Tropical Cyclone Joaninha's center

NASA calculated the rainfall rates occurring in Tropical Cyclone Joaninha as it moved through the open waters of the Southern Indian Ocean.

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Abused kids use text-based services to seek help, study shows

Minors aren't just using crisis services to report suicidal thoughts and depression — they're using them to report abuse, a new study shows.

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Train Service in Tokyo Powered Fully by Renewable Energy

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Low-cost ankle exoskeleton boosts leg strength discretely

submitted by /u/QuietCakeBionics [link] [comments]

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Estonia is Building a “Robot Judge” to Help Clear Legal Backlog

Robo-Judge The Estonian Ministry of Justice has officially asked Ott Velsberg, the country’s chief data officer, to design a “robot judge” to take care of a backlog of small claims court disputes, Wired reports . The artificial intelligence-powered “judge” is supposed to analyze legal documents and other relevant information and come to a decision. Though a human judge will have an opportunity to

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To unlock creativity, you need to step away

There’s an effective way to unlock creative potential, research finds. Employers should incentivize workers to produce an abundance of ideas—even mediocre ones—and then have them step away from the project for an “incubation period.” “Even when you’re doing something else, your subconscious mind works in the background. Then, all of a sudden, you may get this epiphany,” says study coauthor Steven

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Meet LockerGoga, the Ransomware Crippling Industrial Firms

The new strain of malware represents a dangerous combination of aggressive disruption and high-stakes targets.

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Apple Arcade is a game subscription service for iPhones, Mac and Apple TV – CNET

For a monthly fee, people can access a bundle of exclusive premium games through the App Store.

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Apple includes 300 magazines in subscription news service

Apple launched a subscription news service Monday that includes more than 300 magazines as part of the iPhone maker's pivot to services.

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The stroke care paradox: Close-knit social networks increase delays in hospital arrival

Patients with closer-knit social networks, including family members and spouses, were more likely to delay seeking hospital care for a stroke whereas those with a more dispersed network of acquaintances were more likely to seek care faster.

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The most aggressive spider societies are not always the ones that flourish

Evolutionary biologists at McMaster University who study the social lives and behaviour of colony spiders — some of which are docile, others aggressive — have found that the success of their cooperative societies depend on their neighbours.

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Crisis management: When your celebrity advertising endorser generates negative publicity

Researchers from the University of Connecticut and Free University of Berlin published new research in the INFORMS journal Management Science that provides companies with substantiated, actionable insights on strategies for effectively responding to situations where their highly compensated celebrity endorsers generate negative publicity.

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Advanced imaging technology predicts cardiovascular risk from inflammation detected in arteries

The PESA-CNIC-Santander study analyzes the role of arterial inflammation in this process, providing information that will allow early diagnosis and the development of new anti-inflammatory treatments.

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Apple Launches Apple News+ Paid Subscription Service

Apple News Plus will cost $10 a month and provide subscribers with feature stories from hundreds of magazines and newspapers.

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Osteoporosis: New tools help pinpoint potential risk genes

Genome analysis and 3D DNA studies helped scientists to identify two new genes that impact bone-producing cells to potentially alter osteoporosis risk.

7h

Roadworks ahead: Pompeiians patched potholes with iron

Roadworks ahead: Pompeiians patched potholes with iron Roadworks ahead: Pompeiians patched potholes with iron, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00966-5 Ancient city’s streets are paved with volcanic rock, studded with hundreds of repairs.

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The best ways to spend on online services—whether you have $50, $75 or $100 a month

DIY The digital subscriptions you should be signing up for. In the last few years, online subscription services such as Netflix and Spotify have exploded in popularity and scope, and there are more on the way: Apple and Disney…

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A Cheap Diabetes Drug Shows Potential as a Life-Extension Therapy

Off-Label Angel investor Ariel Poler thinks he’s discovered a way to live a longer, healthier life — and it’s only costing him $2 a month. Millions of people with diabetes take the drug metformin to help lower their blood sugar levels. But in recent years, Poler and a growing number of Silicon Valley residents have begun taking the cheap generic medication in the hopes it will extend their lives.

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In 'Killer Robots' debate, Japan shuns fully automated arms

Japan's ambassador to the United Nations-backed Conference on Disarmament says his country has not developed fully autonomous weapons systems and has no plans to do so.

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New Jersey orders cleanup of clothing, cookware chemicals

New Jersey is ordering five companies that manufacture chemicals used to stain-proof clothing and produce non-stick cookware to spend what could be hundreds of millions of dollars to clean up contamination from the substances.

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Everything That's Happening With Apple's News+ Subscription Service

As expected, today Apple unveiled its overhauled News app with a shiny new subscription tier titled Apple News+. For $10 per month, you’ll now be able to side-step paywalls and get all your …

7h

Apple reveals new credit card

Apple introduced a new credit card run by them, not a bank, at a live event March 25.

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Health care: Information tech must catch up to medical marvels

The United States health care system has much room for improvement, and big tech may be laying the foundation for those improvements. Technological progress in medicine is coming from two fronts: medical technology and information technology. As information technology develops, patients will become active participants in their health care, and value-based care may become a reality. None In his

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Apple includes 300 magazines in subscription news service

Apple launched a subscription news service Monday that includes more than 300 magazines as part of the iPhone maker's pivot to services.

7h

Big U-turn: Key melting Greenland glacier is growing again

A major Greenland glacier that was one of the fastest shrinking ice and snow masses on Earth is growing again, a new NASA study finds.

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Researchers measure quantum behavior at room temperature, visible to the naked eye

Since the historic finding of gravitational waves from two black holes colliding over a billion light years away was made in 2015, physicists are advancing knowledge about the limits on the precision of the measurements that will help improve the next generation of tools and technology used by gravitational wave scientists.

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Duke University settles research misconduct lawsuit for $112.5 million

Former university biologist who blew the whistle on data fabrication could get as much as one-third of total

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The struggle for life in the Dead Sea sediments: Necrophagy as a survival mechanism

The Dead Sea is not completely dead. The most saline lake on Earth (more than 10 times saltier than sea water) is a harsh environment where only salt-loving microbes from the Archaea domain, known as extreme halophiles, are able to survive. Geologists are interested in the evolution of this lake and have been investigating its subsurface to reconstruct its biological and geological history. The sa

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Study finds climate warming accelerates tallgrass prairie bioiversity

A University of Oklahoma study on climate warming in an Oklahoma tallgrass prairie has implications for understanding and predicting ecological consequences of climate change and ecosystem management strategies. More rapid changes in biodiversity are expected in a warmer world. In addition, ecosystem functions and services may become more vulnerable as the structure of an ecosystem is linked to th

7h

Crashed Boeing 737s lacked upgrades that could have warned pilots

Reports suggest a flight control system and missing safety features could have contributed to the recent crashes involving Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft

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Study finds climate warming accelerates tallgrass prairie bioiversity

A University of Oklahoma study on climate warming in an Oklahoma tallgrass prairie has implications for understanding and predicting ecological consequences of climate change and ecosystem management strategies. More rapid changes in biodiversity are expected in a warmer world. In addition, ecosystem functions and services may become more vulnerable as the structure of an ecosystem is linked to th

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The tiniest tools scientists use

Science Nanobots, magnetic beads, and bird bands. To manipulate wee objects, you need spectacularly tiny tools. We asked scientists to tell us about the cutest li'l instruments they use in their research.

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How hawkish is the Chinese public?

Chinese Communist Party officials often invoke the outrage of the Chinese people when disputing a foreign government's actions or demands. International observers are often skeptical of these claims about the overarching feelings of 1.3 billion people.

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Fossil Bonanza in China Reveals Secrets from the Dawn of Animal Life

(Inside Science) — A new trove of outstandingly preserved fossils in China from the dawn of animal life rivals the horde of weird creatures found in legendary sites such as the Burgess Shale, and may shed light on many puzzles concerning the animal family tree, a new study finds. The earliest hints of life in the roughly 4.5 billion-year history of Earth may have appeared 3.95 billion years ago,

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High Fructose Corn Syrup Can Help One Kind of Tumor Grow

Health experts have been wary of high fructose corn syrup for years. The sweetener — common in soda and processed foods — has increasingly crept its way into our meals. At the same time, rates of obesity and diseases like type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure have increased. Now, a new study out in Science has given us another reason to worry about the sugary additive: it can boost tumor growth

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Plant seed research provides basis for sustainable alternatives to chemical fertilizers

Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed scientists to access and assess previously undetectable plant microorganisms. Scientists have long known that various plant-associated microorganisms contribute to plant health and productivity but were unable to analyze them in plant seeds due to technical restrictions. Thanks to the enhanced development of high-throughput se

7h

House hunting for hellbenders: Pick right-sized rock or be eaten by cannibal neighbors

For young hellbenders, choosing the right home is more than a major life decision. Their survival can depend on it.

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Anxiety-associated brain regions regulate threat responses in monkeys

Damage to parts of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), a region within the prefrontal cortex, heightens monkeys' defensive responses to threat, according to new research published in JNeurosci. The study proposes a critical role for subregions of this brain area in different anxiety disorders.

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Sex-based bias: Women in Japan are less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation in public places from bystanders

Japanese women under 65 are less likely to receive cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by bystanders when they suffer a sudden cardiac arrest in a public location compared to in a residential location, report investigators in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, published by Elsevier. They speculate that cultural attitudes may influence bystanders and propose that correct knowledge of CPR and better understan

7h

Defying Laws of Nature, Scientists Force 'Supercrystals' Into Existence

A team of physicists used lasers to create "supercrystals," even as the structures fought to not exist at all.

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House hunting for hellbenders

For young hellbenders, choosing the right home is more than a major life decision. Their survival can depend on it.

7h

Plant seed research provides basis for sustainable alternatives to chemical fertilizers

Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed scientists to access and assess previously undetectable plant microorganisms. Scientists have long known that various plant-associated microorganisms contribute to plant health and productivity but were unable to analyze them in plant seeds due to technical restrictions. Thanks to the enhanced development of high-throughput se

7h

Grab a bit of asteroid Bennu? Not so fast

The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft’s first up-close observations of its target, the asteroid Bennu, suggest it poses a bigger challenge than mission engineers and scientists thought. While the spacecraft’s observations confirm many of the measurements obtained by ground-based observations, Bennu turns out to be a more challenging target than what the mission was originally designed for. Its surface is rou

7h

Study examines commercial hybrid-electric aircraft, reduced carbon emissions

Although we're still a long way from commercial airplanes powered by a combination of fossil fuel and batteries, a recent feasibility study at the University of Illinois explored fuel/battery configurations and the energy lifecycle to learn the tradeoffs needed to yield the greatest reductions in carbon dioxide emissions.

7h

Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum computing

A new method allows the quantum state of atomic "qubits"—the basic unit of information in quantum computers—to be measured with twenty times less error than was previously possible, without losing any atoms. Accurately measuring qubit states, which are analogous to the one or zero states of bits in traditional computing, is a vital step in the development of quantum computers. A paper describing t

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Daily briefing: The toxic legacy of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, 30 years later

Daily briefing: The toxic legacy of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, 30 years later Daily briefing: The toxic legacy of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, 30 years later, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00985-2 The memories (and the oil) remain. Plus: how some UK scientists are trying to put the brakes on Brexit and how Japanese science is working to go global.

7h

Everything you need to know about Apple's new subscription services

Technology Rumor has it the company is working on news, music, and video streaming offersings Apple has some big announcements to make about subscriptions.

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Did you solve it? Turn it up to 11

The solutions to today’s puzzles Earlier today I set you the following two puzzles: 1) Why is every even digit palindrome divisible by 11? (An even digit palindrome is a palindromic number that contains an even number of digits, like 1221, or 678876.) Continue reading…

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House hunting for hellbenders: Pick right-sized rock or be eaten by cannibal neighbors

For young hellbenders, choosing the right home is more than a major life decision. Their survival can depend on it.

8h

Along the Mighty Mississippi, Cities Swap Sandbags for Marshes

Several towns have restored natural wetlands to absorb floodwaters — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How hydrogen could make Scotland a green energy superpower

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The Adult Brain Does Grow New Neurons After All, Study Says

Study points toward lifelong neuron formation in the human brain’s hippocampus, with implications for memory and disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Meta-Post: Posts on War and Peace

Cross-Check columns on war and related topics. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Scientist Thinks Someone Alive Today Will Live to be 1,000

Happy Birthday! Aubrey de Grey, a scientist who studies regenerative medicine, thinks that new biotechnology will let people who are already alive today reach the ripe old age of 1,000. “It’s extraordinary to me that it’s such an incendiary claim,” de Grey said according to a new overview by The Week . De Grey is just one of many in Silicon Valley who are determined to expand the human lifespan a

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Beneath Earth's Crust, Hot Rocks Creep As Oceanic Plates Plunge Toward the Core

The deep part of Earth's middle layer is on the move.

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The Adult Brain Does Grow New Neurons After All, Study Says

Study points toward lifelong neuron formation in the human brain’s hippocampus, with implications for memory and disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study suggests how, when to support military couples after homecoming

Military couples look forward to joyful reunions after long deployments, but difficulties may lie ahead. A study with more than 500 couples in the months after homecoming offers guidance on how and when to help. University of Illinois communication professor Leanne Knobloch, the lead author, notes that military couples are "incredibly resilient," and military branches offer support services, but t

8h

Race at the edge of the Sun: Ions are faster than atoms

Ions move faster than atoms in the gas streams of a solar prominence. Scientists at the University of Göttingen, the Institut d'Astrophysique in Paris and the Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno have observed this. The results of the study were published in The Astrophysical Journal.

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Listening to the quantum vacuum

Since the historic finding of gravitational waves from two black holes colliding over a billion light years away was made in 2015, physicists are advancing knowledge about the limits on the precision of the measurements that will help improve the next generation of tools and technology used by gravitational wave scientists. Physicists at Louisiana State University measure quantum "back action" in

8h

OU study finds climate warming accelerates tallgrass prairie bioiversity

A University of Oklahoma study on climate warming in an Oklahoma tallgrass prairie has implications for understanding and predicting ecological consequences of climate change and ecosystem management strategies. More rapid changes in biodiversity are expected in a warmer world. In addition, ecosystem functions and services may become more vulnerable as the structure of an ecosystem is linked to th

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New cellulose-based material gives three sensors in one

Cellulose soaked in a carefully designed polymer mixture acts as a sensor to measure pressure, temperature and humidity — at the same time! The measurements are completely independent of each other. The sensor may be highly significant in fields such as robotics, healthcare and security.

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The struggle for life in the Dead Sea sediments: Necrophagy as a survival mechanism

The Dead Sea is not completely dead. The most saline lake on Earth (more than 10 times saltier than sea water) is a harsh environment where only salt-loving microbes from the Archaea domain, known as extreme halophiles, are able to survive. Geologists are interested in the evolution of this lake and have been investigating its subsurface to reconstruct its biological and geological history.

8h

House hunting for hellbenders

For young hellbenders, choosing the right home is more than a major life decision. Their survival can depend on it.

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Spotting hacks automatically, before the hackers do

In response to serious new security flaws found in almost every computer chip on the market today, researchers at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany, in collaboration with scientists at Stanford, have developed a mathematical algorithm to automate and expedite the process of finding flaws in future designs prior to production.

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Who Was Pontius Pilate?

Little is known about Pontius Pilate, the man who presided over the trial of Jesus.

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The Adult Brain Does Grow New Neurons After All, Study Says

Study points toward lifelong neuron formation in the human brain’s hippocampus, with implications for memory and disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Antarctic snowfall dominated by a few extreme snowstorms

A new study reveals the importance of a small number of intense storms around Antarctica in controlling the amount of snow falling across the continent.

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The Time Crunch on Standardized Tests Is Unnecessary

Operation Varsity Blues was full of salacious accusations detailing how wealthy parents allegedly cheated to get their kids into elite schools through hefty bribes and outright lies. But one particular deceit orchestrated by William Singer, the college-consultant fixer at the center of the scam, drew the ire of the disabilities-rights community: the abuse of extended-time accommodations on standa

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Bayer and Johnson & Johnson Settle Lawsuits Over Xarelto, a Blood Thinner, for $775 Million

The settlement resolves about 25,000 lawsuits, which claimed the companies failed to warn about deadly bleeding episodes caused by the drug.

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New paper on the phylogeny of the Brassicaceae

A recent study from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne, published in the New Phytologist, helps resolve these issues by reporting new insights into the relationships among Brassicaceae species

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Peer relations linked to smoking behavior in vocational students

In a Nursing Open study, peer relations and self-rated health were associated with smoking behavior in both girls and boys studying in upper secondary vocational schools.

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Study examines commercial hybrid-electric aircraft, reduced carbon emissions

Although we're still a long way from commercial airplanes powered by a combination of fossil fuel and batteries, a recent feasibility study at the University of Illinois explored fuel/battery configurations and the energy lifecycle to learn the tradeoffs needed to yield the greatest reductions in carbon dioxide emissions.

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Scientists home in on microRNA processing for novel cancer therapies

More than a decade of research on the mda-7/IL-24 gene has shown that it helps to suppress a majority of cancer types, and now scientists are focusing on how the gene drives this process by influencing microRNAs. Published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the findings could potentially have implications beyond cancer for a variety of cardiovascular and neur

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Study: Chinese youth more hawkish than older generations

Younger Chinese are more hawkish in their foreign policy beliefs than older generations, according to new research by Cornell University professor Jessica Chen Weiss.

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Chinese famine and the Type 2 diabetes epidemic: Challenges of connecting the dots

The Chinese Famine of 1959-61 has been widely interpreted as an important contributor to later epidemics of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitis (T2DM, but in re-examining 17 related Chinese studies researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Leiden University Medical Center, found little evidence for this association.

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Traffic control of cells

Researchers develop a hydrogel whose stiffness and permeability to cells can be controlled with light

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A key player in the maturation of sexual organs

Puberty is a period of extensive changes of body morphology and function. As much as we are familiar with these life-altering changes, relatively little is known about what sets the whole process in motion. Thanks to studies in the tiny worm C. elegans, the group of Helge Großhans is getting closer to understanding how the onset of puberty is genetically controlled. Recently they uncovered a mecha

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Duke settles case alleging data doctoring for $112.5 million

Retraction Watch readers may recall the name Erin Potts-Kant. We’ve been reporting on retractions by Potts-Kant, a former lab tech at Duke, since 2013. (The count is now 17.) Along the way, we learned that she had been convicted of embezzlement, but that there was a bigger story: There was a False Claims Act case … Continue reading Duke settles case alleging data doctoring for $112.5 million

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“BirthStrikers” Refuse to Reproduce Because of Climate Change

Climate Catastrophe In February, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez noted during an Instagram Live video that many young people are currently questioning whether it’s “ okay to still have children ” with climate catastrophe on the horizon. For a group of people calling themselves BirthStrikers, the answer is “No.” The members of the growing BirthStrike movement have publicly vowed not to procreate due

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How the Brain Links Gestures, Perception and Meaning

Remember the last time someone flipped you the bird? Whether or not that single finger was accompanied by spoken obscenities, you knew exactly what it meant. The conversion from movement into meaning is both seamless and direct, because we are endowed with the capacity to speak without talking and comprehend without hearing. We can direct attention by pointing, enhance narrative by miming, emphas

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Google Glitch Wrongly Claimed That Ghana’s Economy Collapsed

“Minor Glitch” On March 15, people looking up Ghana’s exchange rate got a bit of a shock — according to Google’s exchange rate service, the Ghanaian Cedi was trading at one-fourth its normal value, signaling some sort of economic cataclysm. In actual fact, a U.S. dollar is currently trading for about 5.10 Cedi. But an error that Google has since referred to as a “minor glitch” shifted the exchang

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What is the Japanese blood type theory of personality?

In Japan and South Korea, there is a common belief that blood types determine character much in the same way Western countries believe in the zodiac. While there's little scientific evidence to back up the claim, the blood type theory of personality remains wildly popular. However, how this theory came to be has its roots in a dark history. None If you were to ask a stranger at a bar what their b

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Humans can make new brain cells into their 90s, scientists discover

Study may help diagnose and identify people at risk of developing Alzheimer’s much earlier Humans can make fresh brain cells until they are well into their 90s, but the production of new neurons falls in those with Alzheimer’s, even when the disease has recently taken hold, scientists have found. The findings may help doctors to diagnose Alzheimer’s at an earlier stage, and identify those most at

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Study: Privacy concerns keep men from HIV testing, treatment

Privacy concerns linked to both health facilities and providers are major barriers to increasing the number of men who are tested and treated for HIV in Cote d'Ivoire, suggests new Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) research. CCP is based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Plant seed research provides basis for sustainable alternatives to chemical fertilizers

Scientists assessed the seed microbiomes of two successive plant generations for the first time and discovered that seeds are an important vector for transmission of beneficial endophytes across generations.

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Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum computing

A new method allows the quantum state of atomic 'qubits'–the basic unit of information in quantum computers — to be measured with twenty times less error than was previously possible, without losing any atoms.

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Diabetes treatment may keep dementia, Alzheimer's at bay

A USC Dornsife study comparing people with diabetes, prediabetes and normal blood sugar finds that diabetes, left untreated, could mean a higher likelihood of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease.

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Experts reveal that clouds have moderated warming triggered by climate change

Led by Swansea University's Tree Ring Research Group, researchers from Sweden, Finland and Norway have analysed information contained in the rings of ancient pine trees from northern Scandinavia to reveal how clouds have reduced the impact of natural phases of warmth in the past and are doing so again now to moderate the warming caused by anthropogenic climate change.

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Removal of 'zombie cells' alleviates causes of diabetes in obese mice

Mayo Clinic researchers and their collaborators have shown that when senescent cells — also known as 'zombie cells' — are removed from fat tissue in obese mice, severity of diabetes and a range of its causes or consequences decline or disappear.

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ANU scientists solve mystery shrouding oldest animal fossils

Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) have discovered that 558 million-year-old Dickinsonia fossils do not reveal all of the features of the earliest known animals, which potentially had mouths and guts.

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Researchers unveil effects of dust particles on cloud properties

An international team led by Japanese scientists has generated significant findings that highlight the impact of high-latitude dusts on the conversion of clouds' water droplets to ice — or glaciation — within low-level clouds in the Arctic region. These results contribute to a better understanding of factors at the land surface and how they affect cloud formations.

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Mount Sinai researchers identify over 400 genes associated with schizophrenia development

In the largest study of its kind, involving more than 100,000 people, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have applied a novel machine learning method to identify 413 genetic associations with schizophrenia across 13 brain regions. In examining gene expression at the tissue level researchers were able to not only identify new genes associated with schizophrenia, but also pin

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New CRISPR-powered device detects genetic mutations in minutes

A team of engineers combined CRISPR with electronic transistors made from graphene to create a new hand-held device that can detect specific genetic mutations in a matter of minutes. The device, dubbed CRISPR-Chip, could be used to rapidly diagnose genetic diseases or to evaluate the accuracy of gene-editing techniques. The team used the device to identify genetic mutations in DNA samples from Duc

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Earth's deep mantle flows dynamically

As ancient ocean floors plunge over 1,000 km into the Earth's deep interior, they cause hot rock in the lower mantle to flow much more dynamically than previously thought, finds a new UCL-led study.The discovery answers long-standing questions on the nature and mechanisms of mantle flow in the inaccessible part of deep Earth. This is key to understanding how quickly Earth is cooling, and the dynam

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Team led by Stanford and MIT predicts the useful life of batteries with data and AI

In an advance that could accelerate battery development and improve manufacturing, scientists have found how to accurately predict the useful lifespan of lithium-ion batteries, used in devices from mobile phones to electric cars.

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CRISPR-chip enables digital detection of DNA without amplification

Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) Assistant Professor and University of California, Berkeley Visiting Scientist Kiana Aran led the multi-university research team responsible for the work described in the paper 'CRISPR-Chip: A CRISPR-based Graphene-enhanced Field Effect Biosensor for Electronic Detection of Unamplified Target Genes,' to be published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering on March

8h

Automated drug delivery system combats low blood sugar after weight-loss surgery

A new automated drug delivery system can help prevent dangerously low blood sugar in patients who have undergone weight-loss surgery, according to a study to be presented Monday, March 25, at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

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Endocrine disruptors alter female reproduction throughout multiple generations

Endocrine disruptors, hormone-altering chemicals that are widespread in our environment, can shape the brain through four generations, altering offspring's maternal behavior, sexual development and reproduction, according to a new animal study. The results of this study will be presented Monday at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

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Experimental drug reverses high cholesterol, obesity-related nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in animal study

Scientists have discovered a novel molecular pathway for an enzyme inhibitor in humans that plays a direct role in the development of high cholesterol and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which they then were able to reverse in mice with an investigational drug. The study results will be presented Monday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La., by researchers from

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White women with PCOS more likely to have anxiety than black women with condition

White women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have significantly higher anxiety symptoms compared to black women with the condition, a new study suggests. These symptoms may be related to obesity, according to the research to be presented Monday, March 25, at ENDO 2019, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in New Orleans, La.

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Clouds have moderated warming triggered by climate change

Researchers have analyzed information contained in the rings of ancient pine trees from northern Scandinavia to reveal how clouds have reduced the impact of natural phases of warmth in the past and are doing so again now to moderate the warming caused by anthropogenic climate change.

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Hubble captures birth of giant storm on Neptune

Images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope document the formation of a Great Dark Spot on Neptune for the first time, report researchers in a new study.

8h

Why immunotherapy is not effective for some patients with metastatic melanoma and kidney cancer

White blood cells known as B cells have been shown to be effective for predicting which cancer patients will respond to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy, according to a new study.

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A varied menu for the carnivorous waterwheel plant

Biologists have for the first time reconstructed in detail the "menu" of the carnivorous waterwheel plant. This shows that the plant is not at all fussy about what it eats, and catches anything and everything that fits into its trap and triggers the snap mechanism.

8h

A viable alternative to Medicare-for-all?

Medicare-for-all, a solution that would bring United States healthcare policies more in line with other industrial nations, faces strong opposition and is unlikely to be enacted in the foreseeable future. Researchers now propose another approach that they believe would achieve wider access to care without triggering widespread opposition: a Medicare buy-in option for individuals under 65 years of

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Removal of 'zombie cells' alleviates causes of diabetes in obese mice

Researchers have shown that when senescent cells — also known as 'zombie cells' — are removed from fat tissue in obese mice, severity of diabetes and a range of its causes or consequences decline or disappear.

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Our brains may be able to make new neurons throughout adulthood

Most of our brain cells are in place at birth, but new research suggests we may keep producing new neurons throughout adulthood and even into our 80s

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Spørg Fagfolket: Er stående arbejde lige så effektivt som at løbe et maraton?

En læser har fået brev fra pensionskassen, der opfordrer til at stå op at arbejde, fordi det er lige så effektivt som at løbe maraton. Kan man drage den sammenligning? Det svarer ernæringsforsker Lars Klingenberg på.

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Handshakes or contracts?

Neighbouring fire departments often work together to improve outcomes and reduce the extra firefighters each would otherwise need to ensure enough coverage for all emergencies.

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Experts reveal that clouds have moderated warming triggered by climate change

A new study has revealed how clouds are modifying the warming created by human-caused climate change in some parts of the world.

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Exclusive: Thousands of security flaws found on UK government websites

The Wannacry attack locked down NHS computers in 2017. Now an investigation as uncovered thousands of unpatched vulnerabilities on UK government websites

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The Comedian With the Best Trump Impression? None of Them

Few, if any, actors have been able to accurately mimic the president's style.

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Continued PTSD in women exposed to deepwater horizon oil spill

A study reports that women exposed to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (BP) Oil Spill continue to experience symptoms of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Less than half reported receiving past-year mental health treatment despite the high levels of PTSD symptoms, which suggests that many affected women may not be receiving needed mental health care.

9h

Bacterial population growth rate linked to how individual cells control their size

Physicists have developed a model that describes how individual parameters, like the variability in growth and the timing of cell division, can influence population dynamics in bacteria. Progress in this new field of study, which sits at the interface of math, physics, and biology, can help researchers better understand how individual-level metrics connect to population-level changes.

9h

Study questions value of genetic risk scores

What's known as the genome-wide polygenic score, or GPS, combines information from many thousands of genetic markers, each with only a minimal effect, to produce an overall assessment of disease risk based on an individual's entire genetic background. While a recent publication claimed that the GPS could be used by doctors to identify patients at high risk of conditions such as heart disease, canc

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Effective fear of heights treatment without a therapist using virtual reality, study suggests

A fully self-guided treatment using virtual reality (VR) is effective in reducing fear of heights. A team of researchers developed ZeroPhobia, a treatment delivered through a smartphone app and a basic VR viewer.

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Mothers of fussy babies at higher risk of depressive symptoms

As FDA approval of the first postpartum depression drug hits the news, study looks at how infant fussiness and a baby's level of prematurity may influence the severity of maternal depressive symptoms.

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New heart valve aimed at high-risk patients

Researchers have created the first-ever nanocomposite biomaterial heart-valve developed to reduce or eliminate complications related to heart transplants. By using a newly developed technique, the researchers were able to build a more durable valve that enables the heart to adapt faster and more seamlessly.

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Parasitic worms cause cancer — and could help cure it

Billions worldwide are infected with tropical worms. Unsurprisingly, most of these people live in poor countries, kept poor by the effects of worm-related malnourishment. What may surprise many is that worms also cause the majority of cases of some cancers in these countries.

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Genetic variants may influence poststroke recovery

Our genes may have a bearing not only on our stroke risk, but probably also on how well we recover after stroke. For the first time, scientists have identified common genetic variants that are associated with outcome after ischemic stroke.

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Cesarean deliveries in India: Too many and yet too few

Had India fallen prey to the epidemic of cesarean currently affecting many countries in the world?

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Newly discovered Medusavirus give new insights on how organisms and viruses co-evolved

Researchers find a new giant virus in the hot springs of northern Japan. It's unique genetic makeup of histones and capsid proteins brings new insight into virus evolution.

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Searching for missing anti-matter: A successful start to measurements with Belle II

The Belle II detector got off to a successful start in Japan. Since March 25, 2019, the instrument has been measuring the first particle collisions, which are generated in the modernized SuperKEKB accelerator. The new duo produces more than 50 times the number of collisions compared to its predecessor. The huge increase in evaluable data means that there is not a greater chance of finding out why

9h

Researchers unveil effects of dust particles on cloud properties

An international team led by Japanese scientists has generated significant findings that highlight the impact of high-latitude dust on the conversion of water droplets in clouds into ice—or glaciation—within low-level clouds in the Arctic region. These results contribute to a better understanding of factors at the land surface and how they affect cloud formations. The research findings also add to

9h

Earth's deep mantle flows dynamically

As ancient ocean floors plunge over 1,000 km into the Earth's deep interior, they cause hot rock in the lower mantle to flow much more dynamically than previously thought, finds a new UCL-led study.

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Scientists solve mystery shrouding oldest animal fossils

Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) have discovered that 558 million-year-old Dickinsonia fossils do not reveal all of the features of the earliest known animals, which potentially had mouths and guts.

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New CRISPR-powered device detects genetic mutations in minutes

A team of engineers at the University of California, Berkeley and the Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) of The Claremont Colleges combined CRISPR with electronic transistors made from graphene to create a new hand-held device that can detect specific genetic mutations in a matter of minutes.

9h

'Us' Broke a Lot of Box Office Records

Jordan Peele's horror flick made a lot of cash this weekend. Also, one of the Jonas Brothers knows how 'Game of Thrones' ends.

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More Evidence that Humans Do Appear to Create New Neurons in Old Age

Despite doubts last year about human adult neurogenesis, a study shows even 80-year-olds develop new cells in the hippocampus, but such growth is diminished in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

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New neurons for life? Old people can still make fresh brain cells, study finds

A new salvo in the debate over whether humans still make new brain cells as we get older

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How to Deal with Chaos in Climate and Politics

In complex systems, small changes can make big differences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Signs of new nerve cells spotted in adult brains

A study finds new evidence that adult brains grow new nerve cells, even the brain of an octogenarian.

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Transcriptome-scale super-resolved imaging in tissues by RNA seqFISH+

Transcriptome-scale super-resolved imaging in tissues by RNA seqFISH+ Transcriptome-scale super-resolved imaging in tissues by RNA seqFISH+, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1049-y seqFISH+, an evolution of sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization with super-resolution imaging capabilities, is used to image mRNAs of 10,000 genes in cultured cells and mouse brain slices

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Measurement of quantum back action in the audio band at room temperature

Measurement of quantum back action in the audio band at room temperature Measurement of quantum back action in the audio band at room temperature, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1051-4 Future gravitational-wave detectors are expected to be limited by quantum back action, which is now found in the audio band in a low-loss optomechanical system.

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Debate about birth of new neurons in adult brains extends to Alzheimer’s disease

Debate about birth of new neurons in adult brains extends to Alzheimer’s disease Debate about birth of new neurons in adult brains extends to Alzheimer’s disease, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00891-7 The surprise finding that neurogenesis drops in diseased brains could throw open a new route to therapies.

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Antipsychotic meds show promise in treating meningitis

French scientists find common mental health drugs combat rapid and sometimes deadly brain infection. Andrew Masterson reports.

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A viable alternative to Medicare-for-all? We can and must do better!

Medicare-for-all, a solution that would bring United States healthcare policies more in line with other industrial nations, faces strong opposition and is unlikely to be enacted in the foreseeable future. A commentary appearing in The American Journal of Medicine, published by Elsevier, proposes another approach that the authors believe would achieve wider access to care without triggering widespr

9h

Antarctic snowfall dominated by a few extreme snowstorms

A new study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, reveals the importance of a small number of intense storms around Antarctica in controlling the amount of snow falling across the continent.

9h

Handshakes or contracts?

A new study of US fire departments has found improvements differ for property damage and personal injuries or deaths, depending on whether the collaborations were informal, formal, or based on formal contracts without any prior history of working together.

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In vivo data show effects of spaceflight microgravity on stem cells and tissue regeneration

A new review of data from 12 spaceflight experiments and simulated microgravity studies has shown that microgravity does not have a negative effect on stem-like cell-dependent tissue regeneration in newts, but in some tissues regeneration is faster and more robust.

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Handheld CRISPR Device Diagnoses Genetic Disease in 15 Minutes

Standardized Testing To help make genetic screening easier and more accessible, scientists built a handheld device that uses CRISPR gene-editing technology to scan for mutations much more easily than existing labs can. The device, which Keck Graduate Institute bioengineer Kiana Aran told Futurism looks a bit like a blood glucose monitor, can analyze a purified DNA sample for signs of Duchenne Mus

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New CRISPR-powered device detects genetic mutations in minutes

A team of engineers at the University of California, Berkeley and the Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) of The Claremont Colleges combined CRISPR with electronic transistors made from graphene to create a new hand-held device that can detect specific genetic mutations in a matter of minutes.

9h

Scientist constructs artificial photosynthetic cells

Scientists build artificial cells as models of primitive cells. Research team have constructed artificial cells using minimal components that are able to supply energy to drive gene expression inside a microcompartment, thus these artificial cells can produce energy that helps synthesize parts of the cells themselves. This work marks an important milestone in constructing artificial autotrophic ce

9h

How to Deal with Chaos in Climate and Politics

In complex systems, small changes can make big differences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fresh look at Apollo Moon rocks reveals Solar System secrets

Fresh look at Apollo Moon rocks reveals Solar System secrets Fresh look at Apollo Moon rocks reveals Solar System secrets, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00963-8 The discoveries could guide a new era of lunar exploration.

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Hearing loss before 50 may mean higher risk of drug and alcohol issues

People under age 50 with hearing loss misuse prescription opioids at twice the rate of their hearing peers, and are also more likely to misuse alcohol and other drugs, a new national study finds. This means that health care providers may need to take special care when treating pain and mental health conditions in deaf and hard-of-hearing young adults, the researchers say.

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Icy giant planets in the laboratory

Giant planets like Neptune may contain much less free hydrogen than previously assumed. Researchers drove shock waves through two different types of plastic to reach the same temperatures and pressures present inside such planets, and observed the behavior using ultra-strong X-ray laser pulses. Unexpectedly, one of these plastics kept its crystalline structure even at the most extreme pressures. S

9h

Groin and hips of hockey players examined in five-second test

Five seconds is enough to assess the status of a hockey player's groin. For the first time, a simple field test, called the five-second squeeze test, has been used on icehockey players to see if it can indicate current hip/groin function and hip muscle strength. According to the new study, there is a clear correlation between pain levels during the five second squeeze test and impaired sporting fu

9h

Drug diversity in bacteria

Bacteria produce a cocktail of various bioactive natural products in order to survive in hostile environments with competing (micro)organisms. Researchers demonstrate that they do so by modifying basic structures, similar to the approach taken in pharmaceutical research.

9h

Scientist constructs artificial photosynthetic cells

Scientists build artificial cells as models of primitive cells. Research team have constructed artificial cells using minimal components that are able to supply energy to drive gene expression inside a microcompartment, thus these artificial cells can produce energy that helps synthesize parts of the cells themselves. This work marks an important milestone in constructing artificial autotrophic ce

9h

The growth of a wheat weed can be predicted to reduce the use of herbicides

The study focuses on wild oats and is based on precision agriculture as well as the use of multispectral images.

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Measurement of thoughts during knowledge acquisition

How does the brain represent our knowledge of the world? Does it have a kind of map, similar to our sense of direction? And if so, how is it organized? Scientists have come one step closer to demonstrating the existence of such a mental navigation system.

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Hubble captures birth of giant storm on Neptune

Images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope document the formation of a Great Dark Spot on Neptune for the first time, report researchers in a new study.

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Study explores why 'progressive teetotalers' may emerge from college engineering programs

First-year engineering students who gravitate toward progressive ideas, including about gender equity in the workplace, tend to drink less alcohol, according to a study by a University of Kansas researcher. The findings could inform efforts to recruit underrepresented students to engineering as well as work to reduce problem drinking at colleges.

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Grocery Stores Are at the Front Line of Turkey’s Latest Political Battle

ISTANBUL—Every morning, men and women queue up outside a cavernous white tent on Taksim Square, here in central Istanbul, well before the first government trucks arrive carrying tomatoes, peppers, and other supplies. When they are let in, they calmly stock up on the few kilograms of fruit and vegetables they are allowed. The scene is becoming a familiar one as Turkey sinks into recession . Dozens

9h

Konstgjorda molekyler kan bli behandling av typ 2-diabetes

Antagomirer kan påverka funktionen av en gen genom att rikta in sig på ett specifikt microRNA. MicroRNA (miRNA) är mycket små men kraftfulla molekyler som har en viktig roll vid regleringen av gener. Typ 2-diabetes kännetecknas av förhöjda blodsockernivåer till följd av kroppens oförmåga att tillverka eller tillgodogöra sig insulin. Mängden av microRNA, däribland miR-132, som reglerar mängden pro

9h

New Climate Books Stress We Are Already Far Down The Road To A Different Earth

David Wallace-Wells' The Uninhabitable Earth and Nathaniel Rich's Losing Earth offer valuable perspectives on climate change — if we're committed to being adult enough to face the future. (Image credit: Alexander Gerst/ESA/Getty Images)

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A varied menu

Freiburg biologists have analyzed in detail for the first time which animals are captured by the carnivorous waterwheel plant

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Study explores why 'progressive teetotalers' may emerge from college engineering programs

First-year engineering students who gravitate toward progressive ideas, including about gender equity in the workplace, tend to drink less alcohol, according to a study by a University of Kansas researcher.

9h

Hubble captures birth of giant storm on Neptune

Images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope document the formation of a Great Dark Spot on Neptune for the first time, report researchers in a new study.

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MD Anderson study may explain why immunotherapy not effective for some patients with metastatic melanoma and kidney cancer

White blood cells known as B cells have been shown to be effective for predicting which cancer patients will respond to immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) therapy, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Study results will be presented April 2 at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019 in Atlanta.

9h

Women are 30 percent less likely to be considered for a hiring process than men

Women are on average 30% less likely to be called for a job interview than men with the same characteristics. In addition, gender bias is higher if the candidates have lower qualifications than if, in addition to what is required, they have knowledge of an additional language and more work experience.

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Researchers reveal new molecular mechanism involved in pancreas repair

Ramón Muñoz-Chápuli and Rita Carmona, researchers of the UMA Department of Animal Biology, have identified a new molecular mechanism involved in pancreas repair.These experts have demonstrated that Wt1 gene deletion causes deterioration of pancreas. A mouse study has evidenced that, a few days after silencing this gene, pancreatic tissue deteriorates, acini -producers of pancreatic enzymes- losses

9h

Surge in cannabis use among youth preceded legalization in Canada

National discussions on cannabis legalization, along with increased access to medical marijuana, may have encouraged more high school students to consume the drug years before it became legal in Canada.

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SAfrica's Naspers to list internet assets in Europe

South African conglomerate Naspers, the continent's biggest media company, said Monday that it will spin off online assets into a new company with a primary listing in Amsterdam, creating Europe's biggest listed consumer internet company.

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Hypothesis: Bacteria use ‘air bridge’ to travel the world

Instead of hitching a ride on people or animals, some bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air, according to a new study. This “air bridge” hypothesis could shed light on how harmful bacteria share antibiotic resistance genes, researchers say. “Our research suggests that there must be a planet-wide mechanism that ensures the exchange of bacteria between faraway places,” says senior

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Bacterial population growth rate linked to how individual cells control their size

When family weddings all seem to coincide with one another, the phenomenon happens for a reason. An individual and their first cousins tend to be of a similar age, so their weddings usually happen in a similar time frame. But weddings for extended family members, say second and third cousins, tend to be more spread out. This is because the time between one generation to the next varies, meaning th

9h

Q&A: How Diamonds Gain Color

Deformation, impurities, radiation — many factors lend unexpected color to a diamond.

9h

Matter: Why Would an Animal Trade One Body for Another?

Most species undergo metamorphosis, but scientists aren’t sure why the process evolved. One new theory: Metamorphosis gives animals greater access to food.

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California Company Recalls Avocados From Six States Over Listeria Fears

The recalled avocados were packed at a facility in California and distributed in that state, Arizona, Florida, New Hampshire, North Carolina and Wisconsin.

9h

Tesla Is Now Building Cars With Hardware For “Full Self-Driving”

“Full Self-Driving” According to a Tesla vehicle inventory data website , Tesla is installing a system called Hardware 3 (HW3) in its cars that will enable “Full Self-Driving” capabilities. Tesla news site Teslarati made the discovery — which could represent a major step up from the latest iteration of the company’s Autopilot feature. A New Chip Hardware 3 is supposed to finally make Tesla cars f

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'Technoference': We're more tired and less productive because of our phones

One in five women and one in eight men are now losing sleep due to the time they spend on their mobile phones, according to new QUT-led research that has found a jump in 'technoference' over …

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Study questions value of genetic risk scores

What's known as the genome-wide polygenic score, or GPS, combines information from many thousands of genetic markers, each with only a minimal effect, to produce an overall assessment of disease risk based on an individual's entire genetic background. While a recent publication claimed that the GPS could be used by doctors to identify patients at high risk of conditions such as heart disease, canc

9h

Hearing loss before 50 may mean higher risk of drug and alcohol issues

People under age 50 with hearing loss misuse prescription opioids at twice the rate of their hearing peers, and are also more likely to misuse alcohol and other drugs, a new national study finds. This means that health care providers may need to take special care when treating pain and mental health conditions in deaf and hard-of-hearing young adults, the researchers say.

9h

Bacterial population growth rate linked to how individual cells control their size

Physicists from the University of Pennsylvania have developed a model that describes how individual parameters, like the variability in growth and the timing of cell division, can influence population dynamics in bacteria. Progress in this new field of study, which sits at the interface of math, physics, and biology, can help researchers better understand how individual-level metrics connect to po

9h

LSU Health study reports continued PTSD in women exposed to deepwater horizon oil spill

A study led by LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health reports that women exposed to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (BP) Oil Spill continue to experience symptoms of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Less than half reported receiving past-year mental health treatment despite the high levels of PTSD symptoms, which suggests that many affected women may not be receiving needed men

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BU researchers discover therapeutic target of melanoma

Researchers have identified a biomarker and a possible new therapy for melanoma.

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Outcomes for smallest infants born weighing less than 400 grams

This observational study adds to information about outcomes for the smallest infants born weighing less than 400 grams, which is less than a pound. The primary outcome of the study of 205 infants was survival to discharge among the infants who received any potentially lifesaving intervention after being born.

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Study examines racial segregation, inequality of care in NICUs

This observational study looked at the extent of racial segregation and inequality of care for very low-birth-weight and very preterm infants at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across the United States.

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Does wearable behavioral intervention improve social behavior in kids with autism spectrum disorder?

This randomized clinical trial of 71 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) tested a wearable behavioral intervention deployed on Google Glass and worn by children at home to reinforce facial engagement and emotion recognition to improve social behavior.

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Recovery from sperm suppression due to performance-enhancing drug abuse is slow

Decreased sperm and testosterone production caused by abuse of performing-enhancing hormones may be fully reversible once men stop taking the drugs, but full recovery can take at least nine to 18 months, according to research to be presented Sunday, March 24 at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

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Second potential male birth control pill passes human safety tests

A new male birth control pill passed tests of safety and tolerability when healthy men used it daily for a month, and it produced hormone responses consistent with effective contraception, according to researchers at two institutions testing the drug. The phase 1 study results was presented Sunday, March 24, at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

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Hormone therapy helps strengthen brain connections in transgender women

In transgender women who have had their testes removed as part of the gender-affirming process, a form of estrogen called estradiol strengthens connections between areas of the brain involved in fine motor skills, learning, emotions and sensory perception, according a study to be presented Monday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. These findings reflect change

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No jetpacks. Zero flying cars. Where is the future we were promised?

Technology A state of four of our top people-moving dreams. We've been looking forward to jetpacks, flying cars, hyperloops, and autonomous vehicles for what feels like forever. Will they ever get here?

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Hopes rise for male contraceptive pill breakthrough

Trial of once-daily capsule appeared to reduce sperm count with few side-effects Hopes for a male contraceptive pill have increased after a trial showed a once-daily capsule appeared to work with no significant side-effects. The drug aims to suppress levels of hormones that drive the production of sperm and testosterone in the testes. Continue reading…

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Natural History Museum to start dinosaur dig in US

Project Mission Jurassic will excavate land in Wyoming where brachiosaurus and diplodocus have been unearthed The Natural History Museum is embarking on its first major overseas dig since the 1980s in the hope of unearthing new Jurassic-era dinosaurs. The project, entitled Mission Jurassic, which will excavate a square mile of land in Wyoming, US, will involve a team from the Natural History Muse

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Letters: ‘First Rule of Wite-Out. Don’t Talk About Wite-Out.’

Who Still Buys Wite-Out, and Why? Last week, I asked who still uses correction fluids such as Wite-Out, and why . The answer, it turns out, is many of you. And while I noted a few possible reasons that the correction-fluids business remains strong—sales of Wite-Out itself jumped 10 percent in 2017—there are a great many more unorthodox uses for sticky white fluid and its tape-based sibling that I

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The Trump Scandals That Have Slipped by Congress

The allegations at the center of Robert Mueller’s just-completed investigation , electoral collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government and obstruction of justice, were rightly considered the biggest presidential scandal in a generation, and perhaps in all of United States history. They were also, for the purposes of congressional oversight, a monumental distraction. Consider t

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Influenza kan være mere dødelig end mæslinger: Hvornår kommer der en bedre vaccine?

Det er svært at lave en vaccine, der gør meget mere end at halvere din risiko for influenza en enkelt vinter.

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'Technoference': We're more tired and less productive because of our phones

An Australian survey of 709 mobile phone users (aged 18 to 83) has found one in five women and one in eight men are losing sleep due to bad phone habits. The study identified other rising 'technoference' impacts, including physical aches and pains, and found 24% of women and 15% of men are now classified as "problematic users".

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Engineering cellular function without living cells

Scientists have come up with a systematic method for studying and even predicting gene expression – without using cells. Using their innovative, quantitative approach, they measured important parameters governing gene regulation. This allowed them to design and construct a synthetic biological logic gate, which could one day be used to introduce new functions into cells.

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Tuck into colourful fruits and vegetables and see the light

A $5.7 billion global medical bill to restore sight for the estimated 45 million people with cataracts could be slashed in half by a diet rich in colourful fruits and vegetables, according to an international study.

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New computational tool could change how we study pathogens

A sophisticated new analysis too incorporating advanced mathematical strategies could help revolutionize the way researchers investigate the spread and distribution of dangerous, fast-evolving disease vectors.

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Hubblekonstanten er havnet i et dilemma

PLUS. To forskellige, men meget præcise målinger, er uenige om, hvor hurtigt Universet udvider sig. En tredje teknik kan måske være med til at afgøre, hvad der er korrekt, og om den kosmologiske standardmodel skal justeres i den anledning.

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'Mission Jurassic' dinosaur hunt to get under way

British scientists are about to participate in one of their biggest dinosaur hunts in decades.

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The Human Brain Project

The Human Brain Project should lay the technical foundations for a new model of ICT-based brain research, driving integration between data and knowledge from different disciplines, and catalysing a community effort to achieve a new understanding of the brain, new treatments for brain disease and new brain-like computing technologies. From: HumanBrainProject

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Bone marrow central memory and memory stem T-cell exhaustion in AML patients relapsing after HSCT

Bone marrow central memory and memory stem T-cell exhaustion in AML patients relapsing after HSCT Bone marrow central memory and memory stem T-cell exhaustion in AML patients relapsing after HSCT, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08871-1 Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is the standard treatment of acute myeloid leukemia, but many patients relapse. Here the aut

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Climate change melts Mount Everest's ice, exposing dead bodies of past climbers

Mt. Everest is the final resting place of about 200 climbers who never made it down. Recent glacial melting, caused by climate change, has made many of the bodies previously hidden by ice and snow visible again. While many bodies are quite visible and well known, others are renowned for being lost for decades. People die trying to reach the top of Mt. Everest. While about 5,000 people have gotten

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Collective intelligence out-diagnoses even professionals

The Human Diagnosis Project can develop medical diagnoses with startling accuracy. The platform combines the knowledge of medical professionals and artifical intelligence. The goal of the project is to provide open, readily available high-level guidance and training to health care professionals across the globe. None The world-class Mayo Clinic is often the place patients go for a second opinion

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Scientists squeeze catalysts inside host materials like a ship into a bottle

Scientists have found a way to place catalysts inside the tiniest pores of different host materials, a bit like when model ships are unfolded inside a bottle.

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Tissue engineering: Hydrogel for enhanced cell encapsulation and delivery

Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) hydrogel has great potential as a cell-encapsulation delivery carrier for sustained release of paracrine factors and for tissue regeneration, with unique versatility for injection, scaffolding, and 3D bioprinting.

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Type 2 diabetes screening in community pharmacies could increase early diagnosis

New research shows that community pharmacies are well placed to screen patients for type 2 diabetes. The study finds that the move could increase early diagnosis and significantly reduce NHS costs.

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Effective fear of heights treatment without a therapist using virtual reality

A fully self-guided treatment using virtual reality (VR) is effective in reducing fear of heights. A team of researchers from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (VU) and the University of Twente, led by Dr. Tara Donker, developed ZeroPhobia (www.zerophobia.app), a treatment delivered through a smartphone app and a basic VR viewer. The results of the study were published today in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Mothers of fussy babies at higher risk of depressive symptoms

As FDA approval of the first postpartum depression drug hits the news, study looks at how infant fussiness and a baby's level of prematurity may influence the severity of maternal depressive symptoms.

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Measurement of thoughts during knowledge acquisition

How does the brain represent our knowledge of the world? Does it have a kind of map, similar to our sense of direction? And if so, how is it organized? Stephanie Theves and Christian F. Doeller have come one step closer to demonstrating the existence of such a mental navigation system.

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The growth of a wheat weed can be predicted to reduce the use of herbicides

The study focuses on wild oats and is based on precision agriculture as well as the use of multispectral images.

10h

Hackers attacked one million-plus Asus users through malicious update

Hackers were able to deliver malware to the more one million-plus Asus computer owners last year by hijacking the company's software update system, security researchers said on Monday.

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Five Cell Culture Crises… and How to Fix Them!

Download this poster from Sartorius to find out about five common problems in a cell culture laboratory and learn how to fix them!

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3D models reveal why bigger bumblebees see better

By generating 3D images of bumblebees' compound eyes, researchers have discovered how bumblebees differ in their vision. The results could contribute to increased knowledge about the pollination process – once researchers are able to determine which flowers different bees see easily, and which ones they find it harder to distinguish.

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Giving intravenous therapy to children at home is costly, lowers parents' quality of life

When treating patients, doctors sometimes overlook how their decisions impact a world they never see: a patient's home life. In the case of some serious infections in children, oral antimicrobial drugs are just as good at treating these ailments at home as the standard, intravenous medications. But according to new research, by-mouth medications excel in the important measure of preserving parents

10h

Scientists squeeze catalysts inside host materials like a ship into a bottle

Scientists have found a way to place catalysts inside the tiniest pores of different host materials, a bit like when model ships are unfolded inside a bottle.

10h

Tissue engineering: Hydrogel for enhanced cell encapsulation and delivery

Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) hydrogel has great potential as a cell-encapsulation delivery carrier for sustained release of paracrine factors and for tissue regeneration, with unique versatility for injection, scaffolding, and 3D bioprinting.

10h

Detrimental effect of overlooking female athletes' nutritional needs

As poor nutrition can negatively affect everything from bone to reproductive health, more attention needs to be paid to the specific nutritional needs of female athletes, researchers argue.

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Aspirin to fight an expensive global killer infection

Tuberculosis is far from eradicated around the world and still infects more than 1,400 people per year in Australia. Antibiotic resistant tuberculosis is particularly deadly and expensive to treat, costing up to $250,000 to treat a single case in Australia. Scientists have been working on new ways to treat tuberculosis by increasing the effectiveness of the immune system.

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Does story time with an e-book change how parents and toddlers interact?

Traditional print books may have an edge over e-books when it comes to quality time shared between parents and their children, a new study suggests.

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What it's like to have Tourette's — and how music gives me back control | Esha Alwani

Esha Alwani began writing songs when she was six years old, shortly after being diagnosed with Tourette syndrome. And she noticed something amazing: whenever she played music, her involuntary tics suddenly went away. Listen along as Alwani explores the power of music and delights the audience with an ethereal performance of her piano ballad "I'm Not Loving You (My Mask)."

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Intel Is Building the World's Most Powerful Supercomputer

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Efter flere ugers teatertorden: Aftale om sundhedsreform tæt på

Forhandlingerne om en sundhedsreform er gået ind i den absolutte slutfase, og en aftale ventes forhandlet på plads inden for få dage.

10h

GPs key in ensuring the new Faster Diagnosis Standard for Cancer is a success

GPs will have a pivotal role in ensuring the success of the new Faster Diagnosis Standard (FDS) for Cancer, new research from the University of Surrey finds.

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Groin and hips of hockey players examined in five-second test

Five seconds is enough to assess the status of a hockey player's groin. For the first time, a simple field test, called the five-second squeeze test, has been used on icehockey players to see if it can indicate current hip/groin function and hip muscle strength. According to the new study from Lund University in Sweden, there is a clear correlation between pain levels during the five second squeez

10h

New properties of perovskite solar cells

Perovskite solar cells are lighter and cheaper than silicon, their production is non-toxic. The elements can be made thin and flexible, which makes them promising for use in space.

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Migrants are their country's best and brightest

It flies in the face of popular perception — but people who choose to emigrate are those with the best education.

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Searching for disappeared anti-matter: A successful start to measurements with Belle II

The Belle II detector got off to a successful start in Japan. Since March 25, 2019, the instrument has been measuring the first particle collisions, which are generated in the modernized SuperKEKB accelerator. The new duo produces more than 50 times the number of collisions compared to its predecessor. The huge increase in evaluable data means that there is not a greater chance of finding out why

10h

Icy giant planets in the laboratory

Giant planets like Neptune may contain much less free hydrogen than previously assumed. HZDR researchers drove shock waves through two different types of plastic to reach the same temperatures and pressures present inside such planets, and observed the behavior using ultra-strong X-ray laser pulses. Unexpectedly, one of these plastics kept its crystalline structure even at the most extreme pressur

10h

Can you 'catch' cancer?

Billions worldwide are infected with tropical worms. Unsurprisingly, most of these people live in poor countries, kept poor by the effects of worm-related malnourishment.What may surprise many is that worms also cause the majority of cases of some cancers in these countries.Published in Frontiers in Medicine as a special article collection on parasite-associated malignancy, new research aims to in

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Bepansrat tulpandjur hade fångstarmar och svans

Fossilet visar ett tulpanformat djur med en muskulös svans och två fångstarmar, delvis täckt av hårda plattor. Förmodligen var svansen, som också innehöll en tarmkanal, nedkörd i havsbotten medan den letade näring med fångstarmarna. Forskarna hittade fossilet i Kina och det är 530 miljoner år gammalt vilket betyder att den levde mitt i det som kallas för den kambriska explosionen, då livet på jor

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Første GDPR-bøde kan være på vej – mod et taxiselskab

Knap 9 mio. personhenførbare taxature er blevet gemt uden et sagligt formål, vurderer Datatilsynet.

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Facebook Live post nets wiretapping guilty plea for student

A Maryland university student has pleaded guilty to illegally wiretapping a congressional staffer and putting the conversation on Facebook Live without consent.

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Ethiopian Airlines says pilots got appropriate training

Ethiopian Airlines' CEO says the pilots who flew the plane that crashed on March 10 had trained on "all appropriate simulators," rejecting reports that they had not been adequately prepared to handle the new aircraft.

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Study: Sexual torture widespread for migrants seeking Europe

Migrants trying to reach Europe face routine rape and sexual torture throughout their journey and especially in Libya, with men facing abuse nearly as routinely as women, according to a study based on dozens of interviews with aid workers and migrants.

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Nintendo could launch a cheaper version of the Switch and a 'premium' model as soon as this summer

Nintendo could soon launch two successors to its wildly popular Switch gaming console, a cheaper version and a premium model. They could arrive as soon as the E3 conference in June.

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Why long car rides seem to last forever

Head Trip Time is subjective. Almost anyone will tell you that long road trips feel eternal. This effect, researchers say, happens because humans make pretty terrible timekeepers.

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Archeologists believe Norway find is rare Viking ship burial

Archeologists believe they have found a rare Viking ship burial site in a region of Norway known for its Viking-era treasures, Norwegian officials said Monday.

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Overland migration of Arctic Terns revealed

Data from a landmark three year study of the world's longest migrating seabird reveals how overland migration is an integral part of their amazing journey.

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New type of mobile tracking link shoppers' physical movements, buying choices

A new study used a targeting strategy that tracks where, when, and for how long consumers are in a shopping mall to determine how shoppers' physical movements affect their economic choices. The study found that targeting potential customers in this way can significantly improve advertising via mobile phones.

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Peptide shows promise for protecting kidneys from nephritis

A synthetic peptide appears to directly disrupt the destructive inflammation that occurs in nephritis, enabling the kidneys to better recover and maintain their important functions, investigators report.

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Genetic variants may influence poststroke recovery

Our genes may have a bearing not only on our stroke risk, but probably also on how well we recover after stroke. For the first time, in international collaboration, scientists at the University of Gothenburg and elsewhere have identified common genetic variants that are associated with outcome after ischemic stroke.

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ELSI scientist constructs artificial photosynthetic cells

Scientists build artificial cells as models of primitive cells. Research team have constructed artificial cells using minimal components that are able to supply energy to drive gene expression inside a microcompartment, thus these artificial cells can produce energy that helps synthesize parts of the cells themselves. This work marks an important milestone in constructing artificial autotrophic ce

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Cesarean deliveries in India: Too many and yet too few

Had India fallen prey to the epidemic of cesarean currently affecting many countries in the world? Thanks to the data issued from the latest National Family and Health Survey, Christophe Z. Guilmoto and Alexandre Dumont, both IRD researchers, have been able to chart some of the main trends and differentials.

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Drug diversity in bacteria

Bacteria produce a cocktail of various bioactive natural products in order to survive in hostile environments with competing (micro)organisms. In the current issue of Nature Chemical Biology, researchers at Goethe University demonstrate that they do so by modifying basic structures, similar to the approach taken in pharmaceutical research.

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A petrifying virus key to evolution

Japanese researchers find a new giant virus in the hot springs of northern Japan. It's unique genetic makeup of histones and capsid proteins brings new insight into virus evolution

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SUTD researchers develop a hydrogel for enhanced cell encapsulation and delivery

Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) hydrogel has great potential as a cell-encapsulation delivery carrier for sustained release of paracrine factors and for tissue regeneration, with unique versatility for injection, scaffolding, and 3D bioprinting.

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Scientists squeeze catalysts inside host materials like a ship into a bottle

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have found a way to place catalysts inside the tiniest pores of different host materials, a bit like when model ships are unfolded inside a bottle.

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Giving intravenous therapy to children at home is costly, lowers parents' quality of life

When treating patients, doctors sometimes overlook how their decisions impact a world they never see: a patient's home life. In the case of some serious infections in children, oral antimicrobial drugs are just as good at treating these ailments at home as the standard, intravenous medications. But according to new research led by investigators at University of Utah Health, by-mouth medications ex

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New insights into genetics of fly longevity

Alexey Moskalev, Ph.D., Head of the Laboratory of Molecular Radiobiology and Gerontology Institute of Biology, and co-authors from the Institute of biology of Komi Science Center of RAS, Engelgard's Institute of molecular biology, involved in the study of the aging mechanisms and longevity of model animals announce the publication of a scientific article titled: 'The Neuronal Overexpression of Gcl

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'Technoference': We're more tired & less productive because of our phones

An Australian survey of 709 mobile phone users (aged 18 to 83), led by Queensland University of Technology, has found one in five women and one in eight men are losing sleep due to bad phone habits. The study identified other rising 'technoference' impacts, including physical aches and pains, and found 24% of women and 15% of men are now classified as "problematic users".

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Animal poo could propel nations towards food independence

Animal poo could propel nations towards food independence Animal poo could propel nations towards food independence, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00952-x Manure, food waste and similar sources could be recycled to curb reliance on imported phosphate rock used for agriculture.

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Tracking down one of the most elusive species on the planet

Picture the scene: you're trekking through one of the remotest regions in steepest, starkest Kyrgyzstan, on the trail of a species so elusive that it might just as well be the stuff of legend. At the risk of stating the obvious, it's like searching for the proverbial needle in a haystack.

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Pumped storage hydropower a 'game-changer'

A series of Pumped Storage Hydropower (PSH) projects planned across 5 states could triple Australia's electricity storage capacity, according to a new study by a researcher at The Australian National University (ANU).

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Two Speakers Examine Mental Health

Flying University is a speakeasy-style lecture series featuring storytellers, experts, professors, and comedians shining a light on ideas, people, science, and moments in history that have been erased or overlooked. On Tuesday night, the series presented “ Mind Playing Tricks on Me ” an intimate look at the people and mechanisms behind mental health diagnoses. The program was held in conjunction

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Tracking down one of the most elusive species on the planet

Picture the scene: you're trekking through one of the remotest regions in steepest, starkest Kyrgyzstan, on the trail of a species so elusive that it might just as well be the stuff of legend. At the risk of stating the obvious, it's like searching for the proverbial needle in a haystack.

11h

Some Natural Product Weirdness

Let us take a moment to gaze upon the weirdness of natural products. For an organic chemist, these things can at times be startlingly weird, with structures that keep bringing on the “Well, I never would have thought of that ” response. I collect especially odd ones as I see them in the current literature, so allow me to unload a few. First off is populosone , made by the desert poplar ( Populus

11h

Fish fights: Britain has a long history of trading away access to coastal waters

The British boats were outnumbered by about eight to one by the French. Before long there were collisions and projectiles were thrown. The British were forced to retreat, returning to port with broken windows but luckily no injuries.

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University of Wollongong uses stem cells to 3D-print human ears

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AI can be trusted to take our 911 calls

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Expense report of the future reduces fraud and headaches

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Intel Is Building the World’s Most Powerful Supercomputer

A supercomputer capable of a quintillion operations a second will go online in 2021 after the US government handed Intel and supercomputer manufacturer Cray a contract to build an exascale computer called Aurora. This machine is being built from the bottom up to run AI at unprecedented scales. Today’s most powerful supercomputers measure their performance in petaflops—one petaflop is a quadrillio

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Optical toric code platform sets new record

A research group led by professor PAN Jianwei and LU Chaoyang of University of Science and Technology of China successfully designed the largest planar code platform at present using photons, and demonstrated path-independent property in optical system for the first time.

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3D models reveal why bigger bumblebees see better

By generating 3D images of bumblebees' compound eyes, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered how bumblebees differ in their vision. The results could contribute to increased knowledge about the pollination process – once researchers are able to determine which flowers different bees see easily, and which ones they find it harder to distinguish.

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Inclusion of a crop model in a climate model to promote climate modeling

A new crop-climate model provides a good tool to investigate the relationship between crop development and climate change for global change studies.

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Engineering cellular function without living cells

EPFL scientists have come up with a systematic method for studying and even predicting gene expression – without using cells. Using their innovative, quantitative approach, they measured important parameters governing gene regulation. This allowed them to design and construct a synthetic biological logic gate, which could one day be used to introduce new functions into cells. Their research has ju

11h

Youth smoking and vaping: What does it mean for tobacco control

New research from PIRE/PRC features analysis of in-depth, qualitative interviews with young vapers in California between 15 and 25. Results show that the most common pathway of use reported by participants was smoking to vaping (74 percent) followed by vaping prior to smoking, and then vaping but never smoking. Youth were generally aware of the health consequences of smoking. They perceive the use

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Techathlon podcast: Electric cars, essential video games, and the week’s biggest technology news

Technology Test your tech knowledge and maybe even learn something. How much do you know about electric cars, tech news, and video games? Let's find out!

11h

Telegram rolls out 'delete everywhere' feature that lets users nuke the chat history for everyone

The encrypted chat app on Monday launched 'delete everywhere,' a feature that lets users delete messages from not just their end of the conversation, but for all recipients.

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3-D models reveal why bigger bumblebees see better

By generating 3-D images of bumblebees' compound eyes, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered how bumblebees differ in their vision. The results could contribute to increased …

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Spotting hacks automatically, before the hackers do

In early 2018, cybersecurity researchers discovered two security flaws they said were present in almost every high-end processor made and used by major companies. Known ominously as Spectre and Meltdown, these flaws were troubling because they represented a new type of breach not previously known that could allow hackers to infer secret data—passwords, social security numbers, medical records—from

11h

Kinesiske elbusser sparer mere diesel end alle verdens elbiler tilsammen

Brugen af elbusser sparer på verdensplan 270.000 tønder diesel om dagen. Langt størstedelen af busserne stammer fra Kina.

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A fail-safe mechanism for DNA repair

Single-molecule fluorescent measurements provide fresh insights into a process for keeping errors out of our genomes.

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The Forces behind South and Central China's Extremely Hot Summer

The effects of extreme warming have been felt across the globe in recent years. What caused the extremely hot summer for South and Central China? The researchers found the heat was directly caused by a high-pressure system in the atmosphere, which greatly impacted the surface temperature. In addition to the effects of the high-pressure system, the ocean has continued to warm over the last decade a

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Elementary mathematics brings Star Trek’s Holodeck closer to reality

For many years we have been hearing that holographic technology is one step closer to realizing Star Trek’s famous Holodeck, a virtual reality stage that simulates any object in 3D as if they are real. Sadly, 3D holographic projection has never been realized. A team of scientists from Bilkent University, Turkey, again raised our hopes on Holodeck realization by showing the first realistic 3D holog

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Tuck into colourful fruits and vegetables and see the light

A $5.7 billion global medical bill to restore sight for the estimated 45 million people with cataracts could be slashed in half by a diet rich in colourful fruits and vegetables, according to an international study.

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Study highlights detrimental effect of overlooking female athletes' nutritional needs

As poor nutrition can negatively affect everything from bone to reproductive health, more attention needs to be paid to the specific nutritional needs of female athletes, a collaborative study from New Zealand's University of Otago and University of Waikato argues.

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Scientists turn back evolutionary clock to develop high-CO2-tolerant microalgae

A team of scientists led by Prof. XU Jian from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT), Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Prof. Ansgar Poetsch from Ruhr University, developed a way to improve tolerance to high levels of CO2 in the industrial oil-producing microalgae Nannochloropsis.

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A fail-safe mechanism for DNA repair

Single-molecule fluorescent measurements provide fresh insights into a process for keeping errors out of our genomes.

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Study reveals properties of a Type Ib supernova in NGC 4080

A recent study conducted by astronomers has revealed important observational properties of a Type Ib supernova designated MASTER OT J120451.50+265946.6, which exploded in the galaxy NGC 4080. The research, presented in a paper published March 14 on the arXiv pre-print repository, provides crucial hints about the nature of the supernova, what could disclose the progenitor of this stellar explosion.

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Toxin-spewing bacteria decoded

Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine have identified a central regulator of toxin production in the bacterium C. difficile, the most common cause of healthcare-associated infections in the United States. C. difficile is a major cause of persistent diarrhea, occurring most often after taking antibiotics.

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New tool allows scientists to catch elusive protein in action

Like many of the processes that drive a cell's basic functions, those enabling the splitting of a newly-replicated cell into two, shown above, happen quickly. So quickly, in fact, that scientists often have a hard time pinpointing the functions of the molecules involved.

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Drug diversity in bacteria

Bacteria produce a cocktail of various bioactive natural products in order to survive in hostile environments with competing (micro)organisms. In the current issue of Nature Chemical Biology, researchers at Goethe University demonstrate that they do so by modifying basic structures, similar to the approach taken in pharmaceutical research.

11h

MBARI design used in ocean-acidification experiments around the world

MBARI scientists and engineers have been developing new methods to study ocean acidification and its effects on marine organisms in their natural habitats for 15 years. Researchers around the world have been adapting MBARI instruments to perform their own experiments in habitats ranging from coral reefs to the Antarctic seafloor. These diverse projects have recently been highlighted in an article

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Toxin-spewing bacteria decoded

Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine have identified a central regulator of toxin production in the bacterium C. difficile, the most common cause of healthcare-associated infections in the United States. C. difficile is a major cause of persistent diarrhea, occurring most often after taking antibiotics.

11h

Researchers discover new species of extinct Australian mammal

A team of researchers at the Natural History Museum in London and the Western Australian Museum have discovered a new species of very small, incredibly fast, extinct Australian Pigfooted Bandicoot.

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Researchers measure quantum power increase in quantum boost engine for the first time

An international team of researchers has measured a quantum power increase in a quantum boost engine for the first time. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group outlines their experiments with quantum boost engines and what they learned.

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New tool allows scientists to catch elusive protein in action

Like many of the processes that drive a cell's basic functions, those enabling the splitting of a newly-replicated cell into two, shown above, happen quickly. So quickly, in fact, that scientists often have a hard time pinpointing the functions of the molecules involved.

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Researchers discover new species of extinct Australian mammal

A team of researchers at the Natural History Museum in London and the Western Australian Museum have discovered a new species of very small, incredibly fast, extinct Australian Pigfooted Bandicoot.

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Despite consumer worries, the future of aviation will be more automated

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RVR, the Customizable Bot That You Can Make Do Many, Many Things

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Big, burly, and bad to the bone

Canadian researchers claim their T.rex is bigger than your T.rex.

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YouTube is stepping away from expensive originals, will instead invest in music and gaming

Sources familiar with the matter tell Bloomberg that YouTube is no longer fielding pitches for expensive scripted shows. Casualties of the decision include the comedy “Overthinking with Kat …

11h

UBC researchers develop new heart valve aimed at high-risk patients

Researchers at UBC have created the first-ever nanocomposite biomaterial heart-valve developed to reduce or eliminate complications related to heart transplants. By using a newly developed technique, the researchers were able to build a more durable valve that enables the heart to adapt faster and more seamlessly.

11h

Aspirin to fight an expensive global killer infection

Tuberculosis is far from eradicated around the world and still infects more than 1,400 people per year in Australia. Antibiotic resistant tuberculosis is particularly deadly and expensive to treat, costing up to $250,000 to treat a single case in Australia. Scientists at the Centenary Institute have been working on new ways to treat tuberculosis by increasing the effectiveness of the immune system

11h

Many postmenopausal women do not receive treatment for osteoporosis

The benefits of treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women outweigh the perceived risks, according to a Clinical Practice Guideline issued today by the Endocrine Society. The Society introduced the guideline during a news conference on Monday at ENDO 2019, its annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

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Walking downhill after meals boosts bone health in postmenopausal women with diabetes

Walking downhill after eating can reduce bone resorption, the process in which old bone is broken down and removed from the body, in postmenopausal women with diabetes, according to research to be presented Sunday, March 24, at ENDO 2019, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in New Orleans, La. Walking uphill does not have the same benefit, the study found.

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Sex hormone levels in older men are linked to lower biological age

Older men tend to have lower biological age if they have higher levels of sex hormones, particularly the estradiol form of estrogen, a large new study from Australia finds. The study results will be presented on Sunday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La., and appear online in the journal Clinical Endocrinology.

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Time-restricted eating may help prevent breast cancer, mouse study suggests

Changing when you eat rather than what you eat may prove to be a dietary intervention against breast cancer, suggests a new mouse study to be presented Saturday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

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Rapid magnetic 3D printing of human cells

A team of McMaster University engineers has found a way to use 3D printing technology to create artificial tumours to help researchers test new drugs and therapies, which could lead to personalized medicine.

11h

Drug diversity in bacteria

Bacteria produce a cocktail of various bioactive natural products in order to survive in hostile environments with competing (micro)organisms. In the current issue of Nature Chemical Biology, researchers at Goethe University demonstrate that they do so by modifying basic structures, similar to the approach taken in pharmaceutical research.

11h

Scientists squeeze catalysts inside host materials like a ship into a bottle

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have found a way to place catalysts inside the tiniest pores of different host materials, a bit like when model ships are unfolded inside a bottle.

11h

3-D models reveal why bigger bumblebees see better

By generating 3-D images of bumblebees' compound eyes, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered how bumblebees differ in their vision. The results could contribute to increased knowledge about the pollination process—once researchers are able to determine which flowers different bees see easily, and which ones they find it harder to distinguish.

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Antarctic snowfall dominated by a few extreme snowstorms

A new study reveals the importance of a small number of intense storms around Antarctica in controlling the amount of snow falling across the continent.

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3-D models reveal why bigger bumblebees see better

By generating 3-D images of bumblebees' compound eyes, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered how bumblebees differ in their vision. The results could contribute to increased knowledge about the pollination process—once researchers are able to determine which flowers different bees see easily, and which ones they find it harder to distinguish.

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Global carbon dioxide growth in 2018 reached 4th highest on record

By the end of 2018, NOAA's atmospheric observatory at Mauna Loa recorded the fourth-highest annual growth in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) in 60 years of record-keeping.

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More efficient satellite launch platform on the horizon

An efficient and cost-effective satellite launch platform could soon be a reality in Australia thanks to a world first engine that's being developed by University of Sydney combustion experts.

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Call for wetland decade under the U.N. decade on ecosystem restoration (2021-2030)

The environmental health of wetlands across the world is deteriorating. The authoritative Global Wetland Outlook released by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands in 2018 highlighted an alarming trend in wetland loss; at least 35 percent of the world's natural wetlands have been lost since 1970.

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Test yourself: Can you think like a computer?

When the circumstances are right, people can think like computers, researchers report. Computers, like those that power self-driving cars, can mistake random scribbles for trains, fences, and even school busses. People aren’t supposed to be able to see how those images trip up computers but in a new study, researchers show most people actually can. The findings suggest modern computers may not be

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Klimavenlig flygtningelejr kan mindske konflikter

PLUS. Flygtningelejre sætter lokal­områder under pres på grund af skovrydning, affald og udfordringer med energi og sanitet. Danske virksomheder kan både hjælpe og tjene penge.

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Inside out? Ediacaran fossils might represent internal structures, researchers say.

At 560 million-years-old, Ediacarans are truly ancient organisms, but do palaeontologists really know what they looked like? Elizabeth Finkel reports.

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Mother birds live longer with a little help from their friends

Warbler study finds females who raise chicks cooperatively age more slowly than those who don’t. Tanya Loos reports.

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After 50 years, Apollo’s moon rocks still have much to give

Some samples brought back by the moon-landing missions have yet to be opened. Richard A Lovett reports.

12h

Heartburn Gave My Dad Cancer. What About the Rest of Us?

It used to be that most instances of esophageal cancer in the U.S. were associated with alcohol and tobacco use. Today, however, Americans are much more likely to be diagnosed with esophageal adenocarcinoma, which is associated with chronic heartburn. Why that is remains something of a mystery.

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Catalyst advance removes pollutants at low temperatures

Researchers have developed a catalyst that can both withstand high temperatures and convert pollutants at near room temperature — an important advance for reducing pollution in modern cars.

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Simple Experiments Show How Motion Is Equivalent to Heat

A big idea in thermodynamics is the mechanical equivalent of heat, a concept that spells out how moving objects and changing temperatures relate.

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How humans derailed the Earth's climate in just 160 years

Climate change might be the most urgent issue of our day, both politically and in terms of life on Earth. There is mounting awareness that the global climate is a matter for public action.

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Facebook has shut down accounts spreading fake news, but is it accountable?

Since late last year, Facebook has been actively shutting down accounts responsible for spreading hoaxes in some countries, especially those holding general elections.

12h

Many meds for late-stage cancer patients are pointless

Swedish study finds drugs for long-term health outcomes are needlessly prescribed to people with less than a year to live. Andrew Masterson reports.

12h

Big, burly, and bad to the bone

Canadian researchers claim their T.rex is bigger than your T.rex.

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The next step in making arrays of single atoms

The next step in making arrays of single atoms The next step in making arrays of single atoms, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00935-y Three studies have demonstrated the cooling and trapping of single strontium and ytterbium atoms in two-dimensional arrays. Such arrays could lead to advances in atomic-clock technology and in quantum simulation and computing.

12h

Stalagmite holds key to predicting droughts, floods for India

By studying the last 50 years of growth of a stalagmite from Mawmluh Cave, they found an unexpected connection between winter rainfall amounts in northeast India and climatic conditions in the Pacific Ocean.

12h

Understanding gene interactions holds key to personalized medicine

Scientists outline a new framework for studying gene function — not in isolation, gene by gene, but as a network, to understand how multiple genes and genetic background influence trait inheritance.

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Catalyst advance removes pollutants at low temperatures

Researchers have developed a catalyst that can both withstand high temperatures and convert pollutants at near room temperature — an important advance for reducing pollution in modern cars.

12h

Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air globally

Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air worldwide instead of hitching rides with people and animals, according to scientists. Their 'air bridge' hypothesis could shed light on how harmful bacteria share antibiotic resistance genes.

12h

How watching TV and movies helps people with attachment issues

People who have trouble with romantic relationships may watch movies and TV shows for more than just a chance to escape from their lives for a bit. New research suggests that people with attachment issues are more likely than others to be engaged in the stories – for instance, to say that they feel connected to the fictional characters and think about what they would do if they were in the same si

12h

Gmail IFTTT Integration Will Soon Be Gutted As Part Of Google Security Sweep

For anyone who uses IFTTT (If This Then That), a free web-based service to create chains of simple conditional statements via applets, be aware that Gmail integration is about to be broken …

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Meet Eugenia walkerae, a newly named plant species from Anguilla

Once relegated to the dustbin of history, a Caribbean plant now has a name and a family.

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Meet Eugenia walkerae, a newly named plant species from Anguilla

Once relegated to the dustbin of history, a Caribbean plant now has a name and a family.

12h

How to Write Poetry About Conflict

The poet Carolyn Forché has devoted much of her career to writing what she calls the poetry of witness. She coined the term in her introduction to Against Forgetting , a 1993 anthology in which she collected works by 145 “poets who endured conditions of historical and social extremity during the twentieth century.” Forché herself had not endured such conditions, but she had seen them. From 1978 t

12h

Not all coral reefs mind warm water

Hot water means bleaching coral, so it stands to reason that reefs in warm water near the equator have a higher risk. A new study finds that’s not quite the case. “I think that’s what most people probably think, that you would see more bleaching in places where it’s warmer year-round, and that was one of my assumptions as well,” says Deron Burkepile, an associate professor in the University of Ca

12h

Colonization in slow motion

There is a wide variety of animals living on the Arctic seabed. Attached to rocks, they feed by removing nutrients from the water using filters or tentacles. But it can take decades for these colonies to become established, and they probably don't achieve their natural diversity until much later. These are the findings of a unique 18-year study by researchers from the Alfred Wegener Institute Helm

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Open source software helps researchers extract key insights from huge sensor datasets

Professor Andreas Schütze and his team of experts in measurement and sensor technology at Saarland University have released a free data processing tool called simply Dave—is a MATLAB toolbox that allows rapid evaluation of signals, pattern recognition and data visualization when processing huge datasets. The free software enables very large volumes of data, such as those produced by modern sensor

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Report outlines growing climate change-related threats to Great Lakes region

A team of Midwestern climate scientists has released a new report with grim predictions about the impact of climate change on the Great Lakes region. The report foresees a growing trend of wetter winters and springs, with increases in heavy rain events leading to flooding, particularly in urban areas with hard surfaces that cannot absorb the excess water. Rural areas will likely see more erosion,

12h

Physics Is Pointing Inexorably to Mind

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Ultimate future of humanity with Artificial general intelligence (AGI) and Artificial super intelligence (ASI). Speculation on effect of the singularity on humanity and why it is not ideal for original humans.

There are the 5 only possible predictions for humanity I can think of for after the singularity, I left my justified assumptions at the end if you want to read them. 1- Humanity is extinct before they are able to create the first AGI and reaching the singularity. 2- Humanity manages to create AGI/ASI and ASI other destroys humans or turns humans into trans-humans forcefully whether through ma

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This company claims it can eliminate the need for dams. Thoughts?

submitted by /u/nuclearpwr [link] [comments]

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Effects of dengue immunity on Zika virus infection

Effects of dengue immunity on Zika virus infection Effects of dengue immunity on Zika virus infection, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00868-6 The factors that contributed to the explosive nature of the 2015 Zika outbreak in the Americas are not well understood. A new analysis explores the link between prior dengue virus exposure and Zika virus infection.

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Obesity speeds up the start of puberty in boys

Girls are not the only ones who go through puberty early if they have obesity. Boys with obesity enter puberty at an earlier age than average, according to a new study.

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Autoimmune diseases are related to each other, some more than others

Researchers using the world's largest twin registry to study seven autoimmune diseases found the risk of developing the seven diseases is largely inherited, but that some diseases are more closely related than others.

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Investigational obesity drug, oxytocin, weakens brain's reward signals for food

The hormone oxytocin reduces the communication between different brain areas involved in the cognitive, sensory and emotional processing of food cues that people with obesity demonstrate when they look at high-calorie foods.

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Adipose hormone may play role in obesity-related asthma

New research suggests a hormone released from fat tissue is critical in the development of obesity-related asthma and may be a target of future treatments for the disease.

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Exposure to HIV virus, treatment before birth linked to obesity later in life

Teens and young adults who were exposed to HIV and antiretroviral therapy before birth but are HIV-negative themselves are at increased risk of obesity and asthma-like symptoms.

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Screen time plus snacking a risk for metabolic disorder in teens

Teens who sit for hours watching TV, using the computer or playing video games while eating unhealthy snacks are at increased risk for a group of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes.

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Chemicals in household dust may promote fat cell development

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals present in household dust promote the development of fat cells in a cell model and could contribute to increased growth in children relative to their age.

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Particulate air pollution linked with reduced sperm production in mice

Exposure to tiny air pollution particles may lead to reduced sperm production, suggests new research in mice.

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BPA exposure during pregnancy can alter circadian rhythms

Exposure to the widely used chemical bisphenol A (BPA) during pregnancy, even at levels lower than the regulated 'safe' human exposure level, can lead to changes in circadian rhythms, according to a mice study. The researchers report these changes may be a contributing factor in hyperactivity seen in BPA-exposed mice.

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Here's what that house proud mouse was doing – plus five other animals who take cleaning seriously

A house proud mouse, considerately tidying up the workbench of the shed in which it lives, has been captured on video and shared online. The mouse pops out of a box, picks up some screws, nail clippers and a metal chain and carries them back into the box. It's tempting to think the mouse is cleaning up its home in the same way that a human would. Of course, in biology, things are rarely that simpl

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Craft breweries increase residential property values

Researchers focused on properties sold between 2002 and 2017 in Charlotte, North Carolina, within a half mile of a brewery.

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New publication examines consequences of groundwater depletion to agriculture

A new Council of Agricultural Science and Technology, or CAST, paper examines the causes and consequences of groundwater depletion throughout the U.S. with a focus on how this will affect agriculture—the largest sector of groundwater use.

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Climate changes make some aspects of weather forecasting increasingly difficult

Ongoing climate changes make it increasingly difficult to predict certain aspects of weather, according to a new study from Stockholm University. The study, focusing on weather forecasts in the northern hemisphere spanning three to 10 days ahead, concludes that the greatest uncertainty increase will be regarding summer downpours, which is of critical importance when it comes to our ability to pred

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Here's what that house proud mouse was doing – plus five other animals who take cleaning seriously

A house proud mouse, considerately tidying up the workbench of the shed in which it lives, has been captured on video and shared online. The mouse pops out of a box, picks up some screws, nail clippers and a metal chain and carries them back into the box. It's tempting to think the mouse is cleaning up its home in the same way that a human would. Of course, in biology, things are rarely that simpl

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Researchers discover the connection that enables bilateral visual coordination in mammals

The laboratory of researcher Eloísa Herrera has discovered that during the development of the brain's visual areas, the two retinas communicate with each other temporarily through nervous projections. This connection is important for synchronizing and aligning the representation of the two images from the eyes in the visual cortex, which ensures they can merge coherently.

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What animals can teach us about politics – podcast

Decades of studying primates has convinced me that animal politics are not so different from our own – and even in the wild, leadership is about much more than being a bully • Read the text version here Continue reading…

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America Blew It on Arugula

In hindsight, there were plenty of indications over the past decade that American politics were headed toward the partisan sniping and low-stakes media obsessions that crowd the news cycle today. Take Arugulagate. In 2007, Barack Obama was in Iowa, speaking as a presidential hopeful to a group of farmers who were worried about the stagnation of their crop prices while America’s grocery bills cont

13h

The Mueller-Industrial Complex Collapses

In a letter to Congress on Sunday, Attorney General William Barr declared that while Robert Mueller’s report found evidence of Russian meddling in the 2016 election and did not exonerate President Donald Trump, it also did “not conclude that the president committed a crime.” And so the special counsel’s months-long investigation into Trump’s dealings with Russia ended with an inconclusive conclus

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Novel technique to characterise chemical composition and structure of samples

Raman spectroscopy is an essential technique used in the study of materials – including nanostructures – and biological systems to analyse their composition. Its applications range from the medical industry to planetary explorations. Despite their popularity as a non-destructive, fast and efficient tool for the identification and verification of various substances, Raman spectrometers have histori

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Vapor drives a liquid–solid transition in a molecular system

The reversible switching of macrocyclic molecules between a liquid and a solid phase upon exposure to vapor has been reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society by researchers at Kanazawa University.

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Researchers discover the connection that enables bilateral visual coordination in mammals

The laboratory of researcher Eloísa Herrera has discovered that during the development of the brain's visual areas, the two retinas communicate with each other temporarily through nervous projections. This connection is important for synchronizing and aligning the representation of the two images from the eyes in the visual cortex, which ensures they can merge coherently.

13h

Water in space

Did you know that up to 80% of the water on the International Space Station is recycled? Astronauts living and working 400 km above our planet might prefer not to think about it, but the water they drink is recycled from their colleague's sweat and exhaled breath – collected as condensation on the Space Station's walls.

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The man who saved Japan's iconic cherry blossoms from extinction

Environment Excerpt: The Sakura Obsession Collingwood Ingram arrived in Nagasaki on 30 March 1926, in what would be the final year of Emperor Taishō’s reign. He left about seven weeks later, ‘veiled’, as he…

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Challenging Academic Publishing

A pilot collaboration between Springer Nature and ResearchGate aims to boost visibility for research articles on a network for connecting with peers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Image of the Day: Scotty the T. rex

The world's largest T. rex found to date likely weighed nearly 20,000 pounds during its life.

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What Good Journalism Looks Like

It’s refreshing to encounter a well-researched piece of excellent journalism that is not afraid to communicate an accurate picture of the subject. The headline of this article reads, “ Naturopaths are snake-oil salespeople masquerading as health professionals ,” by Gary Nunn writing for the Guardian. He begins: When I began researching and conducting interviews for a feature about naturopaths, I

13h

In Germany, Solar-Powered Homes Are Really Catching On

The country is getting closer to the solar home revolution: a panel on every roof, an EV in every garage, and a battery in every basement.

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The history and mystery of Polynesian navigation

The islands of Polynesia stretch over thousands of miles of ocean, presenting a daunting barrier to ancient people before the invention of magnetic compasses and modern navigation equipment.

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Challenging Academic Publishing

A pilot collaboration between Springer Nature and ResearchGate aims to boost visibility for research articles on a network for connecting with peers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air globally

Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air worldwide instead of hitching rides with people and animals, according to Rutgers and other scientists. Their "air bridge" hypothesis could …

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How the 'good feeling' can influence the purchase of sustainable chocolate

More and more products carry ethical labels such as fair-trade or organic, which consumers usually view positively. Nevertheless, the sales figures of these products often remain low, even though they offer advantages for the environment or for society. A team of scientists from the University of Göttingen has investigated to what extent factors which affect consumers' own benefit—such as the so-c

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Protecting wetlands from underground mining impacts

UNSW Engineers want to learn more about the impact of coal mining on wetlands—before and after mining occurs.

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Breakthrough in air purification with a catalyst that works at room temperature

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University report that a newly engineered catalyst made of gold nanoparticles supported on a metal oxide framework shows breakdown of ammonia impurities in air, with excellent selectivity for conversion to nitrogen gas. Importantly, it is effective at room temperature, making it suitable for everyday air purification systems. The team successfully identified the

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Key evidence associating hydrophobicity with effective acid catalysis

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have shown that the tunable hydrophobic nature of dense siloxane gels is strongly correlated with their catalytic activity, explicitly demonstrating how molecules with different hydrophobic nature at the molecular level interact differently with surfaces of differing hydrophobicity. This is also the first time a siloxane gel has been shown to be highl

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Jupiter's unknown journey through the early solar system revealed

It is known that gas giants around other stars are often located very near their sun. According to accepted theory, these gas planets were formed far away and subsequently migrated to an orbit closer to the star. Now, researchers from Lund University and other institutions have used advanced computer simulations to learn more about Jupiter's journey through our own solar system approximately 4.5 b

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Novel MD simulation sheds light on mystery of hydrated electron's structure

Extra electrons solvated in liquid water, known as hydrated electrons, were first reported 50 years ago. However, their structure is still not well understood. MARVEL researchers at the University of Zurich, ETH and the Swiss National Supercomputing Center CSCS have now taken a step toward solving the mystery. Their paper, "Dynamics of the Bulk Hydrated Electron from Many Body Wave Function Theory

13h

Engineering cellular function without living cells

Genes in living cells are activated – or not – by proteins called transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these proteins activate certain genes and deactivate others play a fundamental role in many biological processes. However, these mechanisms are extremely complex and scientists have been spending years trying to unlock their secrets.

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New research shows highest energy density all-solid-state batteries now possible

Scientists from Tohoku University and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization have developed a new complex hydride lithium superionic conductor that could result in all-solid-state batteries with the highest energy density to date. The researchers say the new material, achieved by designing structures of hydrogen clusters (complex anions), shows markedly high stability against lithium me

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Engineering cellular function without living cells

Genes in living cells are activated – or not – by proteins called transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these proteins activate certain genes and deactivate others play a fundamental role in many biological processes. However, these mechanisms are extremely complex and scientists have been spending years trying to unlock their secrets.

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Speaking up for invisible raptors

Birds of prey such as owls, eagles, falcons and vultures are soaring and elegant predators. But many raptors worldwide have flown under the scientific radar and are all but invisible: Ten species of raptors, out of 557 total, comprise one-third of all raptor research, and one-fifth of all species have never been studied in a scientific publication. That's the conclusion of a recent paper in Divers

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Speaking up for invisible raptors

Birds of prey such as owls, eagles, falcons and vultures are soaring and elegant predators. But many raptors worldwide have flown under the scientific radar and are all but invisible: Ten species of raptors, out of 557 total, comprise one-third of all raptor research, and one-fifth of all species have never been studied in a scientific publication. That's the conclusion of a recent paper in Divers

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Scientists set sail on expedition to investigate 'Iceberg Alley' off Antarctica

The 5.4 million-square-mile Antarctic Ice Sheet is the greatest mass of fresh water on Earth. If it all were to melt, it would raise global sea levels some 220 feet. Searching for answers to how fast the ice might react to changes in climate, scientists are now studying how that ice reacted to past warm periods similar to today's.

13h

What ionized the universe?

The sparsely distributed hot gas that exists in the space between galaxies, the intergalactic medium, is ionized. The question is, how? Astronomers know that once the early universe expanded and cooled enough, hydrogen (its main constituent) recombined into neutral atoms. Then, once newly formed massive stars began to shine in the so-called "era of reionization," their extreme ultraviolet radiatio

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Model learns how individual amino acids determine protein function

A machine-learning model from MIT researchers computationally breaks down how segments of amino acid chains determine a protein's function, which could help researchers design and test new proteins for drug development or biological research.

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Author Correction: Anti-tumour immunity controlled through mRNA m6A methylation and YTHDF1 in dendritic cells

Author Correction: Anti-tumour immunity controlled through mRNA m 6 A methylation and YTHDF1 in dendritic cells Author Correction: Anti-tumour immunity controlled through mRNA m 6 A methylation and YTHDF1 in dendritic cells, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1046-1 Author Correction: Anti-tumour immunity controlled through mRNA m 6 A methylation and YTHDF1 in dendritic cells

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The joy of stats

The joy of stats The joy of stats, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00898-0 Evelyn Lamb enjoys a rich study on number-crunching and its ubiquitous fruit.

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Hvordan kan alle motorer på et krydstogtskib fejle? Her er fire teorier

Det norske Sjøfartsdirektoratet sender deres egne inspektører om bord på krydstogtskibet Viking Sky mandag formiddag for at få førstehåndsviden om, hvad der gik galt om bord.

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EU-generaladvokat: Forindstillede cookie-bokse tæller ikke som samtykke

EU-Domstolen har netop dømt i en sag, som viser, at det ikke kan regnes som villigt og velinformeret samtykke, når en cookie-boks som udgangspunkt er sat som bekræftet.

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Huge T. rex fossil suggests many dinosaurs were bigger than we thought

The discovery of a T. rex that was 400 kilograms heavier than any other found so far suggests we may have underestimated the size of this and other dinosaurs

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Model learns how individual amino acids determine protein function

A machine-learning model from MIT researchers computationally breaks down how segments of amino acid chains determine a protein's function, which could help researchers design and test new proteins for drug development or biological research.

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WOW Air seeks debt restructuring as Icelandair quits talks

Iceland's loss-making carrier WOW Air said it was in talks to restructure its debt after Icelandair ended brief negotiations aimed at buying a stake in the no-frills airline.

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Exploring Mercury in a new book

Up until 2008, only one spacecraft had ever visited the planet Mercury, and it didn't linger long. NASA's Mariner 10 mission flew past the tiny world three times in the 1970s, giving humanity a helpful but limited glimpse of the solar system's innermost planet. Mariner 10 imaged about 45 percent of Mercury's surface and discovered its internal magnetic field, among other things.

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Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air globally

Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air worldwide instead of hitching rides with people and animals, according to Rutgers and other scientists. Their "air bridge" hypothesis could shed light on how harmful bacteria share antibiotic resistance genes.

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Scientists map 'deepest' parts of Southern Ocean

A team of researchers led by British Antarctic Survey has for the first time mapped the deepest part of the South Sandwich Trench in the Southern Ocean. This part of the ocean is more than seven kilometres deep in places and could reveal how the densest water in the ocean is changing.

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Frankfurt flights reduced by air traffic control IT glitch

Scores of flights to and from Germany's biggest airport Frankfurt were scrapped Monday because of a software problem affecting the national air traffic control service.

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Founder of India's beleaguered Jet Airways quits

India's troubled Jet Airways said Monday that founder Naresh Goyal has stepped down as chairman and left the company board as part of a rescue plan.

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Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air globally

Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air worldwide instead of hitching rides with people and animals, according to Rutgers and other scientists. Their "air bridge" hypothesis could shed light on how harmful bacteria share antibiotic resistance genes.

13h

How watching TV and movies helps people with attachment issues

People who have trouble with romantic relationships may watch movies and TV shows for more than just a chance to escape from their lives for a bit.New research suggests that people with attachment issues are more likely than others to be engaged in the stories – for instance, to say that they feel connected to the fictional characters and think about what they would do if they were in the same sit

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Indopererede hjertestartere er sårbare for livsfarlige hacks

Hjerteimplantater fra Medtronic er omfattet af alvorlige sikkerhedshuller – implantatet kan potentielt hackes og bruges til at fremprovokere et hjerteanfald.

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Physics Is Pointing Inexorably to Mind

So-called “information realism” has some surprising implications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Organisation utan hierarkier viktigt för feministiskt serietecknarnätverk

– Dotterbolaget har på ett tydligt sätt visat att det går att samarbeta i stället för att konkurrera. I dyningarna efter metoo-rörelsen tror jag att andra branscher skulle ha mycket att lära sig av Dotterbolagets arbetssätt. Ur ett större perspektiv, om vi ser till hur osäkert det kan vara för aktörer inom den kulturella sektorn, så tror jag att nätverkande kan vara ett sätt att skapa mer trygghe

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Physics Is Pointing Inexorably to Mind

So-called “information realism” has some surprising implications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dear Therapist: My Wife Is Pregnant With a Child Neither of Us Wants

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My wife and I recently discovered she's about six weeks pregnant. This is devastating news for both of us. We have a 17-month-old daughter and we planned on having only one child. The birth control we had been

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How a proton gets its spin is surprisingly complicated

Pinning down the source of protons’ spin is surprisingly complicated.

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Can AI Be a Fair Judge in Court? Estonia Thinks So

Estonia plans to use an artificial intelligence program to decide some small-claims cases, part of a push to make government services smarter.

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Physics Is Pointing Inexorably to Mind

So-called “information realism” has some surprising implications — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New mechanism of action found for agricultural pesticide fludioxonil

A fungicide commonly used by the agricultural industry to protect grains, fruit and vegetables from mold damage seems to kill fungi by a previously uncharacterized mechanism that delivers a …

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WhatsApp test highlights frequently forwarded messages to curb fake news

WhatsApp is experimenting with yet more tools to help fight the spread of fake news. A new beta for Android labels messages you send as "frequently forwarded" if they've …

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Aarhusianere vil suge ressourcer ud af spildevandet

PLUS. Når Aarhus i 2026 har et nyt renseanlæg, kan det trække ressourcer ud af spildevandet, og universiteter og innovative virksomheder skal have muligheder for at teste nye ideer.

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How 3-D Printing Could Break into the Building Industry

Imagine a single trained operator making a bridge, home or barracks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers Gave People Synthetic Pot. Here's What Happened.

A group of researchers in the Netherlands tested the substance's effects on 17 healthy volunteers in the lab

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'Unseen' Meteor That Exploded Over Bering Sea Caught on Camera After All

A meteor that snuck by the world's telescopes and exploded over the Bering Sea was caught on camera after all.

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Herlev og Gentofte Hospital har fundet ny vicedirektør

Bodil Ørkild bliver ny vicedirektør på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital.

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How 3-D Printing Could Break into the Building Industry

Imagine a single trained operator making a bridge, home or barracks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A TonB-dependent transporter is required for secretion of protease PopC across the bacterial outer membrane

A TonB-dependent transporter is required for secretion of protease PopC across the bacterial outer membrane A TonB-dependent transporter is required for secretion of protease PopC across the bacterial outer membrane, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09366-9 TonB-dependent transporters (TBDTs) are outer membrane proteins that import nutrients and bacteriocins in bacteria. He

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Discontinuous rate-stiffening in a granular composite modeled after cornstarch and water

Discontinuous rate-stiffening in a granular composite modeled after cornstarch and water Discontinuous rate-stiffening in a granular composite modeled after cornstarch and water, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09300-z Cornstarch and water is a mixture that solidifies under impact. The authors find that ordinary sand behaves in a similar way when coated with a thin layer o

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Molecular evidence supports a genic capture resolution of the lek paradox

Molecular evidence supports a genic capture resolution of the lek paradox Molecular evidence supports a genic capture resolution of the lek paradox, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09371-y Females are choosy about their mates, which should erode genetic diversity but in practice does not. Here, selection and genomic resequencing of Drosophila supports the hypothesis that t

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A TRIM71 binding long noncoding RNA Trincr1 represses FGF/ERK signaling in embryonic stem cells

A TRIM71 binding long noncoding RNA Trincr1 represses FGF/ERK signaling in embryonic stem cells A TRIM71 binding long noncoding RNA Trincr1 represses FGF/ERK signaling in embryonic stem cells, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08911-w FGF signaling through ERK is known to promote the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ES cells). Here, the authors demonstrate that the l

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Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air globally

Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air worldwide instead of hitching rides with people and animals, according to Rutgers and other scientists. Their 'air bridge' hypothesis could shed light on how harmful bacteria share antibiotic resistance genes.

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Stalagmite holds key to predicting droughts, floods for India, Vanderbilt team finds

By studying the last 50 years of growth of a stalagmite from Mawmluh Cave, they found an unexpected connection between winter rainfall amounts in northeast India and climatic conditions in the Pacific Ocean.

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Catalyst advance removes pollutants at low temperatures

Researchers at Washington State University, University of New Mexico, Eindhoven University of Technology, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a catalyst that can both withstand high temperatures and convert pollutants at near room temperature — an important advance for reducing pollution in modern cars.

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New mechanism of action found for agricultural pesticide fludioxonil

A fungicide commonly used by the agricultural industry to protect grains, fruit and vegetables from mold damage seems to kill fungi by a previously uncharacterized mechanism that delivers a metabolic shock to cells, new research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison finds.

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Hurricane Maria study warns: Future climate-driven storms may raze many tropical forests

A new study shows that damage inflicted on trees in Puerto Rico by Hurricane Maria was unprecedented in modern times, and suggests that more frequent big storms whipped up by warming climate could permanently alter forests not only here, but across much of the Atlantic tropics.

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Automatic diagnosis of neurological diseases using MEG signals with a deep neural network

Automatic diagnosis of neurological diseases using MEG signals with a deep neural network Automatic diagnosis of neurological diseases using MEG signals with a deep neural network, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41500-x Automatic diagnosis of neurological diseases using MEG signals with a deep neural network

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Kisspeptin/kisspeptin receptor system in pseudopregnant rabbit corpora lutea: presence and function

Kisspeptin/kisspeptin receptor system in pseudopregnant rabbit corpora lutea: presence and function Kisspeptin/kisspeptin receptor system in pseudopregnant rabbit corpora lutea: presence and function, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41623-1 Kisspeptin/kisspeptin receptor system in pseudopregnant rabbit corpora lutea: presence and function

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Diversity and Disparity of Therocephalia: Macroevolutionary Patterns through Two Mass Extinctions

Diversity and Disparity of Therocephalia: Macroevolutionary Patterns through Two Mass Extinctions Diversity and Disparity of Therocephalia: Macroevolutionary Patterns through Two Mass Extinctions, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41628-w Diversity and Disparity of Therocephalia: Macroevolutionary Patterns through Two Mass Extinctions

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Combining magnetic forces for contactless manipulation of fluids in microelectrode-microfluidic systems

Combining magnetic forces for contactless manipulation of fluids in microelectrode-microfluidic systems Combining magnetic forces for contactless manipulation of fluids in microelectrode-microfluidic systems, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41284-0 Combining magnetic forces for contactless manipulation of fluids in microelectrode-microfluidic systems

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Characterization of an HPV33 natural variant with enhanced transcriptional activity suggests a role for C/EBPβ in the regulation of the viral early promoter

Characterization of an HPV33 natural variant with enhanced transcriptional activity suggests a role for C/EBPβ in the regulation of the viral early promoter Characterization of an HPV33 natural variant with enhanced transcriptional activity suggests a role for C/EBPβ in the regulation of the viral early promoter, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41102-7 Characterization of

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An individual participant data meta-analysis on metabolomics profiles for obesity and insulin resistance in European children

An individual participant data meta-analysis on metabolomics profiles for obesity and insulin resistance in European children An individual participant data meta-analysis on metabolomics profiles for obesity and insulin resistance in European children, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41449-x An individual participant data meta-analysis on metabolomics profiles for obesity

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Sensitivity of speleothem records in the Indian Summer Monsoon region to dry season infiltration

Sensitivity of speleothem records in the Indian Summer Monsoon region to dry season infiltration Sensitivity of speleothem records in the Indian Summer Monsoon region to dry season infiltration, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41630-2 Sensitivity of speleothem records in the Indian Summer Monsoon region to dry season infiltration

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Efficient Genomic Interval Queries Using Augmented Range Trees

Efficient Genomic Interval Queries Using Augmented Range Trees Efficient Genomic Interval Queries Using Augmented Range Trees, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41451-3 Efficient Genomic Interval Queries Using Augmented Range Trees

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We Drew Congressional Maps for Partisan Advantage. That Was the Point.

“I propose that we draw the maps to give a partisan advantage to 10 Republicans and three Democrats, because I do not believe it’s possible to draw a map with 11 Republicans and two Democrats,” one of us said in 2016, as the North Carolina legislature drew new congressional maps. It’s a made-for-headlines statement, an apparent gaffe that reveals what everybody knows but nobody says. And on Tuesd

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Läroböcker varnar för civil olydnad

Skolans demokratiuppdrag innebär att eleverna ska formas till goda samhällsmedborgare och samtidigt utbildas till att vara kritiska och ifrågasättande. – Min analys visar att läroböcker likställer demokrati med ett liberalt, representativt statsskick och att de beskriver det existerande svenska statsskicket som ett demokratiskt, rationellt och effektivt sätt att styra ett land, säger Kurt Wicke,

15h

Montenegro just made plagiarism illegal. What does it hope to achieve?

The parliament of Montenegro, a small country in the southeast of Europe, approved a law on academic integrity earlier this month that effectively criminalizes plagiarism, self-plagiarism and donation of authorship. We spoke to Mubera Kurpejović, director of higher education at the country’s Ministry of Education, explains why the law was needed and what they hope it … Continue reading Montenegro

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Evidence of early Australian arrival is best judged with an open mind

Signs that our ancestors reached Australia 120,000 years ago may be "difficult to credit", but recent discoveries have shattered many similar preconceptions

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Liveblog: Live Updates From Apple's March 25 Event

On Monday morning, Apple hosts an event to outline plans for its news distribution and media streaming services. Our live coverage starts at 9 am Pacific.

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Angry Nerd: The Next Big One Will Be a Dataquake

Platforms have become the slabs of virtual bedrock underlying life. And every day they shift.

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Synthetic Biology Could Bring a Pox on Us All

New methods are making it easier than ever to produce life-saving vaccines—and life-taking viruses that humanity is not prepared to fight.

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A Clever New Strategy for Treating Cancer, Thanks to Darwin

Most advanced-stage cancers mutate, resisting drugs meant to kill them. Now doctors are harnessing the principles of evolution to thwart that lethal adaptation.

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On the Trail of the Robocall King

An investigator set out to discover the source of one scammy robocall. Turns out, his target made them by the millions.

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What Happens When a Jury Grapples With Perplexing Science

Two decades ago, a new form of genetic testing helped send a man to prison. But the case exposed the limits of using complicated forensics in a criminal trial.

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The Beautiful Benefits of Contemplating Doom

The Doomsday Clock reminds us that global catastrophe is closer than ever. But it doesn't have to be all gloom.

15h

The Engine Propelling the Fastest Woman on Four Wheels

A turbojet engine used on F-4 Phantom jets during the Vietnam War finds a new purpose.

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We Might Be Reaching 'Peak Indifference' on Climate Change

Anyone who wants to deal with climate change may have only a brief window to sell the public on a plan.

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Privatansattes Liste inden IDA-valg: Sænk kontingentet med 10 procent

Privatansattes Liste vil lade pensionister betale fuldt kontingent, hvis de vil have fuld indflydelse, ligesom sociale arrangementer i IDA skal beskæres med 3 millioner kroner.

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New mechanism of action found for agricultural pesticide fludioxonil

A fungicide commonly used by the agricultural industry to protect grains, fruit and vegetables from mold damage seems to kill fungi by a previously uncharacterized mechanism that delivers a metabolic shock to cells, new research finds.

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Soluble TREM2 ameliorates pathological phenotypes by modulating microglial functions in an Alzheimer’s disease model

Soluble TREM2 ameliorates pathological phenotypes by modulating microglial functions in an Alzheimer’s disease model Soluble TREM2 ameliorates pathological phenotypes by modulating microglial functions in an Alzheimer’s disease model, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09118-9 TREM2 is a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease, and soluble TREM2 (sTREM2) in the CSF correl

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ZEB1 protects skeletal muscle from damage and is required for its regeneration

ZEB1 protects skeletal muscle from damage and is required for its regeneration ZEB1 protects skeletal muscle from damage and is required for its regeneration, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08983-8 Following muscle damage, an inflammatory response is associated to activation of satellite cells, which drive muscle repair. Here, the authors show that upregulation of Zeb1 in

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Hurricane María tripled stem breaks and doubled tree mortality relative to other major storms

Hurricane María tripled stem breaks and doubled tree mortality relative to other major storms Hurricane María tripled stem breaks and doubled tree mortality relative to other major storms, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09319-2 Given the potential for increasingly common and intense tropical storms, it is important to understand their effects on island forest communities.

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A stem group echinoderm from the basal Cambrian of China and the origins of Ambulacraria

A stem group echinoderm from the basal Cambrian of China and the origins of Ambulacraria A stem group echinoderm from the basal Cambrian of China and the origins of Ambulacraria, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09059-3 The early evolution of the deuterostomes is not well resolved. Here, Topper and colleagues investigate the early Cambrian metazoan Yanjiahella biscarpa, con

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Hemozoin-catalyzed precipitation polymerization as an assay for malaria diagnosis

Hemozoin-catalyzed precipitation polymerization as an assay for malaria diagnosis Hemozoin-catalyzed precipitation polymerization as an assay for malaria diagnosis, Published online: 25 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09122-z Methods to diagnose malaria are of interest but can be costly or not sensitive enough to detect low levels of parasitemia. Here the authors report an ultrasensitive metho

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Catalyst advance removes pollutants at low temperatures

Researchers at Washington State University, University of New Mexico, Eindhoven University of Technology, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a catalyst that can both withstand high temperatures and convert pollutants at near room temperature—an important advance for reducing pollution in modern cars.

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Stalagmite holds key to predicting droughts, floods for India

A team of Vanderbilt University earth scientists returned to an unusual cave in India to unlock secrets about climate change that could have far-reaching implications.

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Hurricane Maria study warns: Future climate-driven storms may raze many tropical forests

A new study shows that damage inflicted on trees in Puerto Rico by Hurricane Maria was unprecedented in modern times, and suggests that more frequent big storms whipped up by a warming climate could permanently alter forests not only here, but across much of the Atlantic tropics. Biodiversity could suffer as result, and more carbon could be added to the atmosphere, say the authors. The study appea

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New mechanism of action found for agricultural pesticide fludioxonil

A fungicide commonly used by the agricultural industry to protect grains, fruit and vegetables from mold damage seems to kill fungi by a previously uncharacterized mechanism that delivers a metabolic shock to cells, new research finds.

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Germany works to fix air traffic control software glitch

Germany's air traffic control agency says a software issue that has caused disruption for several days won't be resolved until at least midweek.

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Polish dailies print blank front page in EU copyright appeal

Major Polish newspapers printed blank front pages on Monday in an appeal to the European Parliament to adopt controversial copyright reforms that have pitted traditional media firms against internet giants.

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Statistikere vil smide 'statistisk signifikans' på porten

PLUS. Det giver anledning til alt for mange fejltolkninger – selv blandt forskere – at skelne mellem, om noget er statistisk signifikant eller ej, advarer mere end 800 forskere. To danske statistikere er helt enige.

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How Orkney reinvented the future with hydrogen

submitted by /u/chopchopped [link] [comments]

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For Many Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Bright Hope Lies Just Beyond Reach

Scientists are testing nearly two dozen treatments that might stop the disease. But enrollment in the trials is very restricted, and few children qualify.

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New type of mobile tracking link shoppers' physical movements, buying choices

Improvements in the precision of mobile technologies make it possible for advertisers to go beyond using static location and contextual information about consumers to increase the effectiveness …

16h

Faraday Future gets another lifeline to build EVs in China

Electric vehicle startup Faraday Future, which has been on life support for the past couple of years, has received a surprise cash injection from a mobile gaming company called The9 …

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