Search Posts

nyheder2019marts26

Study shows that patients with or without cancer use different forms of marijuana

A new study shows that compared to other patients, cancer patients use different forms of medical marijuana for unique reasons.

17h

Physicists discover new class of pentaquarks

Tomasz Skwarnicki, professor of physics in the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University, has uncovered new information about a class of particles called pentaquarks. His findings could lead to a new understanding of the structure of matter in the universe.

12h

Rystet politiker til EU: Indfør straksforbud mod fluorstoffer

En ny undersøgelse viser, at de fluorerede stoffer koster mellem 750 og 1250 nordiske borgere livet om året.

10h

In the tree of life, youth has its advantages

New research shows younger groups of organisms, on average, accumulate diversity much more quickly than older groups.

now

Cool Earth theory sheds more light on diamonds

A geologist has a new theory on the thermal evolution of Earth billions of years ago that explains why diamonds have formed as precious gemstones rather than just lumps of common graphite.

now

Artificial womb technology breaks its 4 minute mile

A major advancement in pioneering technology based around the use of an artificial womb to save extremely premature babies is being hailed as a medical and biotechnological breakthrough.

now

Alexa needs a robot body to escape the confines of today’s AI

The man behind Amazon’s voice assistant says AI programs need to see and explore the world if they’re ever going to attain real understanding.

5min

What Happens if Obamacare Is Struck Down?

The Affordable Care Act touches the lives of most Americans. Some 21 million could lose health insurance if the Trump administration were to succeed in having the law ruled unconstitutional.

6min

U.S. Will Lead World ‘In Human Space Exploration,’ Pence Says

During a speech at a meeting of the National Space Council in Huntsville, Ala., Vice President Mike Pence said the Trump administration hopes to have American astronauts back on the moon within the next five years.

6min

The secondary ticketing market is worth $15 billion. How long will fans have to pay?

The secondary ticketing market is predicted to grow to $15.19 billion next year. Artists, athletes, management, and venues see none of this revenue—it all goes to scalpers and ticketing agencies. Some companies are likely in breach of anti-trust laws, but no one seems to be regulating the industry. None Nils Frahm hit another level in an already impressive career when recently performing at Walt

6min

Deciphering the walnut genome

New research could provide a major boost to the state's growing $1.6 billion walnut industry by making it easier to breed walnut trees better equipped to combat the soil-borne pathogens that now plague many of California's 4,800 growers.

14min

Building starch backbones for lab-grown meat using Lego pieces

A new technique to spin starch fibers using Lego pieces could have future applications for lab-grown 'clean' meat, according to a team of food scientists.

14min

Venus flytrap 'teeth' form a 'horrid prison' for medium-sized prey

Researchers investigate the importance of marginal spikes, the 'teeth' lining the outer edge of the plant's snap traps, in successfully capturing prey.

14min

Speciation: Birds of a feather…

Carrion crows and hooded crows are almost indistinguishable genetically, and hybrid offspring are fertile. Biologists now show that the two forms have remained distinct largely owing to the dominant role of plumage color in mate choice.

14min

Widespread losses of pollinating insects in Britain

Many insect pollinator species are disappearing from areas of Great Britain, a new study has found. Research showed one third of wild pollinator species experienced declines in terms of areas in which they were found, while one tenth increased.

14min

Ultra-sharp images make old stars look absolutely marvelous!

Using high-resolution adaptive optics imaging from the Gemini Observatory, astronomers have uncovered one of the oldest star clusters in the Milky Way Galaxy. The remarkably sharp image looks back into the early history of our Universe and sheds new insights on how our Galaxy formed.

14min

Why AI researchers should reconsider protesting involvement in military projects

As employee protests force tech companies to reduce involvement in military initiatives, one former Defense official suggests “constructive engagement” will be more successful than opting out.

19min

Google forms an external council to foster 'responsible' AI

Google is joining Facebook, Stanford and other outfits setting up institutions to support ethical AI. The company has created an Advanced Technology External Advisory Council that will …

19min

US judge recommends partial ban on iPhone imports to US

A US trade judge ruled Tuesday that Apple had violated a Qualcomm chipmaker patent and said she would recommend banning imports of some iPhones.

19min

New 3-D printing approach makes cell-scale lattice structures

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

25min

These Autonomous Bots Battle Blazes Too Dangerous for Firefighters

Dynamic Duo A pair of firefighting robots are ready for action. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) recently demonstrated at Tokyo’s National Research Institute of Fire and Disaster a pair of autonomous wheeled robots designed to battle particularly hazardous fires, such as those at petrochemical plants — and without putting the lives of human firefighters at risk. Hose and Cannon Once on the scene

31min

Study: AIDS-immunocompromised populations see more antibiotic-resistant infections

Populations with a high prevalence of AIDS-immunocompromised people are more likely to see the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, according to a study coauthored by researchers at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and published in PLOS One.

31min

Japan Wants to Send Telepresence Robots to Space

Working Remote By 2020, a fleet of robots may work aboard the International Space Station, handling menial or dangerous tasks so human astronauts can focus on more complex or scientific projects — or even letting people back on Earth beam into robot bodies. At least, that’s the end goal of a new partnership between the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and a space robot startup called

38min

Ethiopian official says plane crash report due this week

A preliminary report on a March 10 Ethiopian Airlines crash that killed 157 people will be made public soon, but it may take months to finish the final report, a spokesman for the country's transport ministry said.

39min

Can China keep it's climate promises?

China can easily meet its Paris climate pledge to peak its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, but sourcing 20 percent of its energy needs from renewables and nuclear power by that date may be considerably harder, researchers said Tuesday.

39min

Apple tries to take a bite out of credit card industry

Apple is rolling out a credit card that it says is designed to do things no other card can. So how does it actually stack up?

39min

UPS launches package delivery by drone

American delivery giant UPS on Tuesday launched the first authorized use of unmanned drones to transport packages to recipients.

39min

Microgels let medical implants fight off bacteria

Joint replacement implants dipped in microgel flecks — and then into a charged solution — can release micro-doses of antibiotics when bacteria approach. The work could play a role in sharply reducing infection rates in one of the most common elective surgeries.

41min

Building starch backbones for lab-grown meat using Lego pieces

A new technique to spin starch fibers using Lego pieces could have future applications for lab-grown 'clean' meat, according to a team of food scientists.

41min

Microgels let medical implants fight off bacteria

Joint replacement implants dipped in microgel flecks — and then into a charged solution — can release micro-doses of antibiotics when bacteria approach. The work could play a role in sharply reducing infection rates in one of the most common elective surgeries.

43min

New tool maps a key food source for grizzly bears: huckleberries

Researchers have developed a new approach to map huckleberry distribution across Glacier National Park that uses publicly available satellite imagery. Tracking where huckleberry plants live can help biologists predict where grizzly bears will also be found.

43min

Droughts could hit aging power plants hard

Droughts will pose a much larger threat to U.S. power plants with once-through cooling systems than scientists previously suspected, a new study shows. If surface waters warm 3 degrees Celsius and river flows drop 20 percent, drought-related impacts will account for about 20 percent of all shutdowns or capacity reductions at these plants. Retrofitting the plants with recirculating cooling systems

43min

US judge recommends partial ban on iPhone imports to US

A US trade judge ruled Tuesday that Apple had violated a Qualcomm chipmaker patent and said she would recommend banning imports of some iPhones.

44min

Scientists to dig Jurassic site in Wyoming this summer

Scientists from the U.S. and Europe hope to learn more about a promising new dinosaur site in northern Wyoming this summer.

44min

Research identifies new e-reader pricing strategy

From Alexa to iTunes to Google Home, for the past few years, tech heavy hitters such as Amazon, Apple, and Google have been building strategic product combinations designed to lure in customers and lock down their loyalty.

44min

Amazon Has Great Deals on Its Tablets and Echo Speakers Now

Amazon is currently offering Cloud Cams, Fire Tablets, and Echo Speakers at a steep discount.

45min

FTC demands details from broadband companies on privacy practices – CNET

The agency is asking the nation's largest broadband providers for specifics about what data it collects, who it shares it with and whether consumers can opt out.

49min

In the Tree of Life, youth has its advantages

It's a question that has captivated naturalists for centuries: Why have some groups of organisms enjoyed incredibly diversity—like fish, birds, insects—while others have contained only a few species—like humans.

51min

Substituting HPS with light-emitting diodes for supplemental lighting in greenhouses

In Canada, as in other higher latitudes, there is not enough natural light for production of many greenhouse commodities during the darker months of the year. In these regions, it is necessary for growers of year-round commodities to augment their naturally occurring lighting deficit with artificial lighting to meet their crops' economic minimum lighting requirements.

51min

In the Tree of Life, youth has its advantages

It's a question that has captivated naturalists for centuries: Why have some groups of organisms enjoyed incredibly diversity—like fish, birds, insects—while others have contained only a few species—like humans.

53min

Substituting HPS with light-emitting diodes for supplemental lighting in greenhouses

In Canada, as in other higher latitudes, there is not enough natural light for production of many greenhouse commodities during the darker months of the year. In these regions, it is necessary for growers of year-round commodities to augment their naturally occurring lighting deficit with artificial lighting to meet their crops' economic minimum lighting requirements.

53min

Genetic tagging may help conserve the world's wildlife

Tracking animals using DNA signatures are ideally suited to answer the pressing questions required to conserve the world's wildlife, providing benefits over invasive methods such as ear tags and collars, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists.

57min

'Scuba-diving' lizard can stay underwater for 16 minutes

A Costa Rican lizard species may have evolved scuba-diving qualities allowing it to stay underwater for 16 minutes, according to researchers.

57min

Sound sense: Brain 'listens' for distinctive features in sounds

For humans to achieve accurate speech recognition and communicate with one another, the auditory system must recognize distinct categories of sounds — such as words — from a continuous incoming stream of sounds. This task becomes complicated when considering the variability in sounds produced by individuals with different accents, pitches, or intonations. In a new paper, researchers detail a com

57min

Ancient Microbes Ate Each Other's Corpses to Survive Beneath the Dead Sea

The dead sea is neither dead nor a sea. Discuss amongst yourselves.

58min

Genetic tagging may help conserve the world's wildlife

Tracking animals using DNA signatures are ideally suited to answer the pressing questions required to conserve the world's wildlife, providing benefits over invasive methods such as ear tags and collars, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists.

1h

A scientist thinks someone alive today will live to be 1,000

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

1h

Compared to sustained inflations for extremely premature infants, standard treatment prevails

Preterm infants must establish regular breathing patterns at delivery. For extremely preterm infants requiring resuscitation at birth, a ventilation strategy involving two sustained inflations, compared with standard intermittent positive pressure ventilation, did not reduce the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia or death at 36 weeks postmenstrual age.

1h

Get 300 coding and creative courses for $59 with Stone River eLearning

Enjoy lifetime access to this huge library. Enjoy lifetime access to this huge library and get 300 coding and creative courses for $59 with Stone River eLearning.

1h

Face off—Cyclists not human enough for drivers: study

A new Australian study has found that more than half of car drivers think cyclists are not completely human, with a link between the dehumanisation of bike riders and acts of deliberate aggression towards them on the road.

1h

Not all carrot germplasm is the same—in terms of salinity tolerance

Salinity stress is considered one of the most important abiotic factors that limits the productivity of crop plants, and the estimated global cost due to salinity is more than $12 billion annually. This is due to the extensive use of irrigation and high rates of evapotranspiration, which result in increased salt accumulation in the soil.

1h

The tremendous supply of apple cultivars in Wyoming

A study out of the University of Wyoming sought to identify heritage apple cultivars planted in the state's homesteads, orchards, and nurseries from as early as 1870. Using microsatellite markers, surviving apple trees identified across Wyoming's rugged landscape provide future specialty crop growers with recommendations for cultivar selection.

1h

Air quality agencies can breathe easier about current emissions regulations

As air quality improves, the invisible chemistry happening in the air around us is changing. Skies should clear up as emissions drop, but recent results suggested that declining nitrogen oxides can create an environment where airborne carbon-containing compounds more easily convert into small particles that harm human health.

1h

Pence: America Will Put Astronauts Back on the Moon in Five Years

The Trump administration wants to put Americans back on the moon by 2024, Vice President Mike Pence announced Tuesday at a meeting of the National Space Council in Huntsville, Alabama. "The first woman and the next man on the moon will both be American astronauts launched by American rockets from American soil,” he pledged. It's an audacious pledge, given NASA's current capabilities, and especiall

1h

Not all carrot germplasm is the same—in terms of salinity tolerance

Salinity stress is considered one of the most important abiotic factors that limits the productivity of crop plants, and the estimated global cost due to salinity is more than $12 billion annually. This is due to the extensive use of irrigation and high rates of evapotranspiration, which result in increased salt accumulation in the soil.

1h

The tremendous supply of apple cultivars in Wyoming

A study out of the University of Wyoming sought to identify heritage apple cultivars planted in the state's homesteads, orchards, and nurseries from as early as 1870. Using microsatellite markers, surviving apple trees identified across Wyoming's rugged landscape provide future specialty crop growers with recommendations for cultivar selection.

1h

Building starch backbones for lab-grown meat using Lego pieces

A new technique to spin starch fibers using Lego pieces could have future applications for lab-grown "clean" meat, according to a team of food scientists from Penn State and the University of Alabama.

1h

McDonald's latest acquisition will bring AI to the drive thru

McDonald’s on Tuesday announced plans to purchase Dynamic Yield, a machine learning start-up that uses predictive algorithms to create personalized recommendations and optimizations in real …

1h

A Male Birth Control Pill Passed Safety Tests — Here's How It Works

Though birth control pills have been available to women for nearly 60 years, there's nothing equivalent on the pharmacy shelves for men.

1h

Microgels let medical implants fight off bacteria

Joint replacements are among the most common elective surgeries—but around one in 100 patients suffer post-surgical infections, turning a routine procedure into an expensive and dangerous ordeal. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have developed a "self-defensive surface" for these implants that release targeted micro-doses of antibiotics when bacteria approach, potentially sharpl

1h

Layered liquids arrange nanoparticles into useful configurations

Materials scientists at Duke University have theorized a new "oil-and-vinegar" approach to engineering self-assembling materials of unusual architectures made out of spherical nanoparticles. The resulting structures could prove useful to applications in optics, plasmonics, electronics and multi-stage chemical catalysis.

1h

Expert: VR Headsets Should Have Brain Interfaces

Mind Control Virtual reality headsets are already pretty good at fooling our eyes and ears into thinking we’re in another world. And soon, we might be able to navigate that world with our thoughts alone. Speaking at this year’s Game Developer’s Conference in San Francisco, Mike Abinder, in-house psychologist and researcher for game developer and distributor Valve, gave a talk on the exciting poss

1h

Microgels let medical implants fight off bacteria

Joint replacement implants dipped in microgel flecks — and then into a charged solution — can release micro-doses of antibiotics when bacteria approach. The work could play a role in sharply reducing infection rates in one of the most common elective surgeries.

1h

Layered liquids arrange nanoparticles into useful configurations

Materials scientists at Duke University have theorized a new 'oil-and-vinegar' approach to engineering self-assembling materials of unusual architectures made out of spherical nanoparticles. The resulting structures could prove useful to applications in optics, plasmonics, electronics and multi-stage catalysis.

1h

We've discovered a massive dinosaur-era river delta under the sea

Some of the first dinosaurs may have lived and hunted on the largest delta plain ever discovered, which was 10 times the size of the Amazon river delta

1h

1h

Over en million ASUS-computere kan være hacket

Et meget sofistikeret og nøje planlagt angreb, vurderer ekspert.

1h

1h

Trained musicians perform better — at paying attention

Musical training produces lasting improvements to a cognitive mechanism that helps individuals be more attentive and less likely to be distracted by irrelevant stimuli while performing demanding tasks.

1h

Banks Are Under Siege by Sophisticated Hackers

Stick Up Bank robbers have traded in masks and guns for VPNs and proxy servers, and there’s more of them than ever. In the last 12 months, 67 percent of financial institutions — banks, credit unions, and the like — that participated in a cybersecurity report published this month by security firm Carbon Black said that they were hit by an increasing rate of attempted cyberattacks and hacks. On top

1h

Substituting HPS with light-emitting diodes for supplemental lighting in greenhouses

LEDs are capable of replacing HPS for supplemental lighting for cut gerbera production during darker periods.

1h

New 3-D printing approach makes cell-scale lattice structures

A new way of making scaffolding for biological cultures could make it possible to grow cells that are highly uniform in shape and size, and potentially with certain functions. The new approach uses an extremely fine-scale form of 3-D printing, using an electric field to draw fibers one-tenth the width of a human hair.

1h

Genetic tagging may help conserve the world's wildlife

Tracking animals using DNA signatures are ideally suited to answer the pressing questions required to conserve the world's wildlife, providing benefits over invasive methods such as ear tags and collars, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists.

1h

Microorganisms are the main emitters of carbon in Amazonian waters

A study performed with microorganisms inhabiting floodplains, which comprises 20 percent of the whole Amazon, showed that the microbial food chain produces 10 times more CO2 than the classical food chain, mostly by decomposing organic matter.

1h

“Fake Alcohol” That Gets You Buzzed but Never Drunk Is on the Way

Bottoms Up Even the most ardent craft beer buff or wine connoisseur would have trouble arguing that alcohol doesn’t have its downsides — but that might not be the case for long. For more than a decade, according to The Guardian , scientist David Nutt had been developing a synthetic alcohol substitute he calls Alcarelle. He claims his creation has the potential to allow drinkers to enjoy all the b

1h

Einstein's Letter Talking About 'Hitler-Insanity' to Be Auctioned

A handful of Albert Einstein's letters, including one in which he talks about the "Hitler-insanity" that had taken over Germany and also describes his son's schizophrenia treatments, are being auctioned off this week to the highest bidder.

2h

Local News Is Dying, and Americans Have No Idea

Local news is in the midst of a long financial crisis, as newsrooms are hit with layoffs, page counts shrink, and entire papers go belly-up. And yet Americans haven’t noticed. Seven in 10 Americans believe that their local news outlets are doing “ very or somewhat well financially ,” according to a new Pew Research survey . This is, to put it mildly, a misapprehension. The newspaper industry has

2h

The next AI explosion will be defined by the chips we build for it

Specialized AI chips are the future, and chipmakers are scrambling to figure out which designs will prevail.

2h

Gesturing related to storytelling style, not nationality, study

New research by University of Alberta scientists suggests that the amount you gesture when telling a story has more to do with what you're saying than where you're from.

2h

The tremendous supply of apple cultivars in Wyoming

Study provides insight into possible heritage apple cultivars that could be grown in Wyoming and also in other states with similar harsh growing conditions.

2h

In the tree of life, youth has its advantages

New research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows younger groups of organisms, on average, accumulate diversity much more quickly than older groups.

2h

Tepper School research identifies new e-reader pricing strategy

New research by Marketing Professor Hui Li suggests a dynamic pricing strategy that also allows tech companies to capture customers at their most profitable.

2h

Planes of the future will feature virtual reality, yoga studios, and lots of cauliflower

Aviation These airlines are betting you'll love spending 20 hours on a plane. We have the technology to keep planes in the air for 20 hours or more. Now we just need to keep passengers happy for that long.

2h

Wagers winter plants make to survive

Ecologists have identified the bets that the most successful annual plants place with water resources.

2h

2h

Amazing Water droplets animation by Gatorade

submitted by /u/8-3P [link] [comments]

2h

Not all carrot germplasm is the same — in terms of salinity tolerance

A study out of The USDA Agricultural Research Service at the University of Wisconsin has evaluated the response of diverse carrot germplasm to salinity stress, identified salt-tolerant carrot germplasm that may be used by breeders, and defined appropriate screening criteria for assessing salt tolerance in germinating carrot seed.

2h

Air quality agencies can breathe easier about current emissions regulations

A University of Washington-led study provides a fuller picture of the relationship between nitrogen oxides — the tailpipe-generated particles at the center of the Volkswagen scandal, also known as NOx, — and PM2.5, the microscopic particles that can lodge in lungs.

2h

Face off — Cyclists not human enough for drivers: study

A new Australian study has found that more than half of car drivers think cyclists are not completely human, with a link between the dehumanisation of bike riders and acts of deliberate aggression towards them on the road.

2h

Here's why NASA really canceled its first all-women spacewalk

Space The reasons are understandable, but they also reinforce concerns about gender bias. This would have been the first time a crew of only women conducted a spacewalk, but logistics—and perhaps systemic bias from decades ago—got in the way.

2h

Daily briefing: Win a beautiful boxed set of all the elements in the periodic table

Daily briefing: Win a beautiful boxed set of all the elements in the periodic table Daily briefing: Win a beautiful boxed set of all the elements in the periodic table, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00997-y Yes, there’s uranium. Plus: space scientists will get their first look at Moon rocks sealed since 1972 and a research-fraud whistleblower is set to receive a US$33-mi

2h

Europe's New Copyright Law Could Be Bad for Memes

The European Parliament approves a sweeping new copyright directive aimed at tech platforms like Google and Facebook.

2h

Can a stem cell trick get heart muscle to regenerate?

Researchers have developed an approach to regenerate heart muscle using stem cells. Their method for priming stem cells to become heart tissues could potentially enable heart regeneration stem cell therapies. The self-regeneration of human heart muscle following injury is extremely limited. Scientists have been studying techniques to prompt different kinds of stem cells to differentiate into hear

2h

Widespread Declines in UK’s Pollinators: Study

Over 30 years, one-third of the wild bees and hoverfly species surveyed sustained losses, likely due to pesticides, habitat loss, and climate change.

2h

New York Suburb to Declare Measles Emergency, Barring Unvaccinated Children From Public

Rockland County’s move to limit the movement of unvaccinated minors is its latest effort to fight New York State’s worst measles outbreak in decades.

2h

Annovera birth control vaginal ring effectively prevents unwanted pregnancy, research finds

A recently approved contraceptive vaginal ring — the first that can be used for an entire year — is a highly effective birth control method, according to new clinical trial data.

2h

Contraceptive jewelry could offer a new family planning approach

Researchers report on a technique for administering contraceptive hormones through special backings on jewelry such as earrings, wristwatches, rings or necklaces. The contraceptive hormones are contained in patches applied to portions of the jewelry in contact with the skin, allowing the drugs to be absorbed into the body.

2h

AIs go up against animals in an epic competition to test intelligence

AIs have some superhuman abilities, but just how clever are they overall? To find out, a new competition will adapt tests used to study animals

2h

4 reasons you should eat more mushrooms

Health A mushrooming list of reasons to embrace fungi. Even setting aside magic mushrooms, our favorite fungal fruiting bodies supposedly have some spectacular healing properties.

2h

if we make the argument "we shouldn't try to create conscious artificial intelligence because it could choose to destroy us," we are neglecting the fact that we give birth to humans everyday with the capacity to be dictators and murderers.

We're so afraid of androids gaining the capacity to hate humans, yet we create humans who have just as much capacity to hate and kill. If we create conscious androids and treat them well, they should have no reason to attack us. You can say "well they might suddenly decide they hate you," but a human might do that as well. If we create androids and raise them to be happy and alive like humans, th

2h

Emissions growth in United States, Asia fueled record carbon levels in 2018

Progress toward Paris goals falters as emissions rise 1.7%

2h

New York Suburb to Declare Measles Emergency, Barring Unvaccinated Children From Public

Rockland County’s move to limit the movement of unvaccinated minors is its latest effort to fight New York State’s worst measles outbreak in decades.

3h

American Astronauts to Return to Moon Within 5 Years, Pence Pledges

As the vice president called for greater urgency by NASA, how the Trump administration intends to accomplish the goal was not made clear.

3h

AIPAC Is Losing Control of the Narrative on Israel

It was the final day of AIPAC’s annual policy conference in Washington, D.C., and the star of the gathering had finally appeared: Benjamin Netanyahu. An estimated 18,000 attendees sat in rows in a large downtown convention center, watching the Israeli prime minister address them through a patchy satellite feed on gigantic blue screens; although Netanyahu met with President Donald Trump in Washing

3h

Building starch backbones for lab-grown meat using Lego pieces

A new technique to spin starch fibers using Lego pieces could have future applications for lab-grown 'clean' meat, according to a team of food scientists from Penn State and the University of Alabama.

3h

Deciphering the walnut genome

New research could provide a major boost to the state's growing $1.6 billion walnut industry by making it easier to breed walnut trees better equipped to combat the soil-borne pathogens that now plague many of California's 4,800 growers.

3h

The US wants to send astronauts to the moon’s south pole in 2024

Vice president Mike Pence has announced that NASA’s newest goal is to land astronauts on the south pole of the moon by 2024, in an effort to beat Russia and China

3h

Europe’s copyright dispute shows just how hard it is to fix the internet’s problems

The EU has just passed the Copyright Directive: now small sites and tech giants alike will have to deal with the fall out and recriminations.

3h

Advanced paternal age increases risk of early-onset schizophrenia in offspring

Advanced paternal age increases the risk in offspring of early-onset schizophrenia, a severe form of the disorder, according to a new study.

3h

NASA Considers a Rover Mission to Go Cave Diving on the Moon

The deep caverns and pits that dot the lunar surface could hold clues to the moon's history and perhaps provide shelter for future human exploration

3h

Droughts could hit aging power plants hard

Older power plants with once-through cooling systems generate about a third of all U.S. electricity, but their future generating capacity will be undercut by droughts and rising water temperatures linked to climate change. These impacts would be exacerbated by environmental regulations that limit water use.

3h

Study finds that income inequality is driving growing income gap between different regions

There's an old saying about a rising tide lifting all boats—and for more than a century, as the gap between the richest and poorest parts of the United States shrank, it seemed as though, in America at least, it might be true.

3h

Venus flytrap 'teeth' form a 'horrid prison' for medium-sized prey

In "Testing Darwin's Hypothesis about the Wonderful Venus Flytrap: Marginal Spikes Form a 'Horrid Prison' for Moderate-Sized Insect Prey," Alexander L. Davis investigates the importance of marginal spikes, the "teeth" lining the outer edge of the plant's snap traps, in successfully capturing prey. He found that Venus flytraps experience a 90 percent decrease in moderate-sized cricket prey capture

3h

Venus flytrap 'teeth' form a 'horrid prison' for medium-sized prey

In "Testing Darwin's Hypothesis about the Wonderful Venus Flytrap: Marginal Spikes Form a 'Horrid Prison' for Moderate-Sized Insect Prey," Alexander L. Davis investigates the importance of marginal spikes, the "teeth" lining the outer edge of the plant's snap traps, in successfully capturing prey. He found that Venus flytraps experience a 90 percent decrease in moderate-sized cricket prey capture

3h

Huawei unveils Eyewear smartglasses designed to be indistinguishable from regular glasses

'Maybe we should change the order to "eyewear smart",' says Gentle Monster CEO

3h

Stricken With the World’s Oldest Affliction

Horatio Baltz was in Cuba participating in a filmmaking workshop led by Werner Herzog when he met 9-year-old Maribel. The schoolgirl, from the small, rural town of Pueblo Textil, wanted to tell him about love. Wearing a red uniform with a red bandana tied around her neck, Maribel professed her unrequited affection for a boy named José. “I always wanted him to tell me that he likes me, that he’s i

3h

The Huawei P30 Pro smartphone camera sees color differently to capture more light

Gadgets Replacing blue filters with yellow ones could make a big difference for letting in light. Huawei's new smartphone has lots of cameras and the main shooter has a very interesting sensor.

3h

NASA Shuffles Crew, Nixing Historic All-Female Spacewalk

NASA’s first all-female spacewalk is on indefinite hold. After Anne McClain and Nick Hague’s successful spacewalk outside the International Space Station on March 22, NASA discovered that they don’t have enough suits of the right size to fit both McClain and Christina Koch, who were scheduled for a spacewalk together on March 29. Earlier this month, the space agency announced it would be the first

3h

Two new planets discovered using artificial intelligence

Astronomers at The University of Texas at Austin, in partnership with Google, have used artificial intelligence (AI) to uncover two more hidden planets in the Kepler space telescope archive. The technique shows promise for identifying many additional planets that traditional methods could not catch.

3h

Droughts could hit aging power plants hard

Droughts will pose a much larger threat to U.S. power plants with once-through cooling systems than scientists previously suspected, a Duke University study shows. If surface waters warm 3oC and river flows drop 20 percent, drought-related impacts will account for about 20 percent of all shutdowns or capacity reductions at these plants. Retrofitting the plants with recirculating cooling systems wi

3h

The income gap, growing

After more than a century of shrinking, the gap between rich and poor communities has increased dramatically over the past four decades, and Robert Manduca believes a large measure of the change can be chalked up to rising income inequality.

3h

Venus flytrap 'teeth' form a 'horrid prison' for medium-sized prey

In 'Testing Darwin's Hypothesis about the Wonderful Venus Flytrap: Marginal Spikes Form a 'Horrid Prison' for Moderate-Sized Insect Prey,' Alexander L. Davis investigates the importance of marginal spikes, the 'teeth' lining the outer edge of the plant's snap traps, in successfully capturing prey.

3h

Study focuses on link between child feeding and health among Marshallese immigrants

A recent study of child-feeding habits among Marshallese in Arkansas is a step toward lowering rates of obesity, diabetes and heart disease, which affect this population at higher rates than the US population in general.

3h

Infertility's roots in DNA packaging

Japanese researchers find one cause of infertility is the incomplete development of the proteins packaging DNA in sperm cells.

3h

Top US institutes still aren’t reporting clinical-trial results on time

Top US institutes still aren’t reporting clinical-trial results on time Top US institutes still aren’t reporting clinical-trial results on time, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00994-1 US law requires researchers to post study findings on a public registry within a year of completion — or face heavy fines.

3h

Airbnb Has a Hidden-Camera Problem

When Max Vest shook hands with the host of his Miami Airbnb back in January, the man introduced himself as Ralph—even though “Ray” was the name he’d used in all their prior communication. This was the first and only indication that something was wrong. But his host had a great rating on the home-sharing site, and many of the comments mentioned how friendly and accommodating he was. So Vest, a chi

3h

US wants astronauts back on Moon within five years: Pence

Vice President Mike Pence announced Tuesday that the United States intends to send astronauts back to the Moon within five years, with a woman first in line to set foot on the lunar surface.

3h

Boeing holds test flights for 737 MAX fix: sources

Boeing has flown test flights of its 737 MAX to evaluate a fix for the system targeted as a potential cause of two deadly plane crashes, two sources familiar with the matter said Tuesday.

3h

New tool maps a key food source for grizzly bears: huckleberries

Grizzly bears depend on huckleberries as a critical food source to fatten up before winter hibernation. When berries reach peak ripeness in mid-July, they make up about half of the diet for the hundreds of grizzly bears that live in and around Montana's Glacier National Park.

3h

Wallace Smith Broecker (1931-2019)

Wallace Smith Broecker (1931-2019) Wallace Smith Broecker (1931-2019), Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00993-2 Geochemist who transformed understanding of the climate system.

3h

Why Cyclone Idai is one of the Southern Hemisphere’s most devastating storms

Why Cyclone Idai is one of the Southern Hemisphere’s most devastating storms Why Cyclone Idai is one of the Southern Hemisphere’s most devastating storms, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00981-6 The catastrophic storm has affected nearly 2 million people in Mozambique alone.

3h

New tool maps a key food source for grizzly bears: huckleberries

Grizzly bears depend on huckleberries as a critical food source to fatten up before winter hibernation. When berries reach peak ripeness in mid-July, they make up about half of the diet for the hundreds of grizzly bears that live in and around Montana's Glacier National Park.

3h

Bacteria could become a future source of electricity

In recent years, researchers have tried to capture the electrical current that bacteria generate through their own metabolism. So far, however, the transfer of the current from the bacteria to a receiving electrode has not been efficient at all. Now, researchers have achieved a slightly more efficient transfer of electrical current.

3h

Infertility's roots in DNA packaging

Pathological infertility is a condition affecting roughly 7 percent of human males, and among those afflicted, 10 to 15 percent are thought to have a genetic cause. However, pinpointing the precise genes responsible for the condition has been difficult due to the extensive number involved in generating and developing sperm cells.

3h

C. elegans roundworms 'harvest' an essential coenzyme from the bacteria they consume

A study conducted in C. elegans nematode roundworms may lead to improved treatment of a rare human genetic disorder that causes severe neurological symptoms leading to death in early childhood.

3h

Yellowstone elk don't budge for wolves, say scientists

Elk roam the winter range that straddles the northern boundary of Yellowstone National Park with little regard for wolves, according to a new study illustrating how elk can tolerate living in close proximity to the large predator.

3h

Ancient Caribbean children helped with grocery shopping in AD 400

Researchers have long thought that snail and clam shells found at Caribbean archaeological sites were evidence of 'starvation food' eaten in times when other resources were lacking. Now, a study suggests these shells may be evidence of children helping with the grocery shopping — AD 400 style.

3h

Bacteria could become a future source of electricity

In recent years, researchers have tried to capture the electrical current that bacteria generate through their own metabolism. So far, however, the transfer of the current from the bacteria to a receiving electrode has not been efficient at all. Now, researchers have achieved a slightly more efficient transfer of electrical current.

3h

European Parliament adopts copyright reform in blow to big tech

The European Parliament on Tuesday adopted controversial copyright reforms championed by news publishers and the media business, but punishing tech giants that lobbied against it.

3h

Intel Blasts Nvidia For ‘Inferior’ Self-Driving Technology

Intel has unloaded on Nvidia with a remarkable blog post, accusing the company of repeatedly copying its work and pretending otherwise. The post Intel Blasts Nvidia For ‘Inferior’ Self-Driving Technology appeared first on ExtremeTech .

3h

Facebook is free, but should it count toward GDP anyway?

For several decades, gross domestic product (GDP), a sum of the value of purchased goods, has been a ubiquitous yardstick of economic activity. More recently, some observers have suggested that GDP falls short because it doesn't include the value of free online goods such as social media, search engines, maps, videos, and more.

3h

New tool maps a key food source for grizzly bears: huckleberries

Researchers have developed a new approach to map huckleberry distribution across Glacier National Park that uses publicly available satellite imagery. Tracking where huckleberry plants live can help biologists predict where grizzly bears will also be found.

3h

In hunt for life, astronomers identify most promising stars

NASA's new Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is designed to ferret out habitable exoplanets, but with hundreds of thousands of sunlike and smaller stars in its camera views, which of those stars could host planets like our own? A team of astronomers from Cornell University, Lehigh University and Vanderbilt University has identified the most promising targets for this search in the new '

3h

Infertility's roots in DNA packaging

Pathological infertility is a condition affecting roughly 7 percent of human males, and among those afflicted, 10 to 15 percent are thought to have a genetic cause. However, pinpointing the precise genes responsible for the condition has been difficult due to the extensive number involved in generating and developing sperm cells.

3h

Researchers unlock the biomechanics of how the Ebola virus attaches to its host cell

It was recently reported that the number of Ebola cases in the Democratic Republic of Congo has surpassed 1,000, making it the second-worst outbreak in history after the 2014 outbreak in West Africa in which 29,000 people were infected and more than 11,000 died. This latest milestone is a stark reminder of the urgent need to develop effective prevention and treatment agents for this frequently dea

3h

A Quarry of Lights in Southern France

In the commune of Les Baux-de-Provence in southern France sits the Carrières de Lumières , or Quarries of Lights. A former limestone quarry that closed down in the 1930s, the site has been transformed into an immersive multimedia exhibit space dedicated to art and music. Projectors mounted around the quarry paint the walls, ceiling, and floors with light, bringing both still and animated images o

3h

The Kinetic Horror of Lupita Nyong’o’s Us Performance

This article contains mild spoilers for the film Us . In his newest film, the Hitchcockian horror Us , the writer, director, and producer Jordan Peele offers a sharp, often funny meditation on the terrifying power of human connection. Bonds are broken, ties are severed. No relationship, even the most fundamental, is quite what it seems. As the film’s lead, the 12 Years a Slave and Black Panther a

3h

Förutsägbar biltrafik är säkrast

Gemensamma ytor för gående, bilar och andra trafikanter, på engelska kallade shared spaces, ska inbjuda till ett levande stadsrum. Det kan till exempel vara ett torg där bilar tillåts att köra. Uppdelningen mellan oskyddade och skyddade trafikanter saknas genom att exempelvis trafik­markeringar och trottoarkanter har tagits bort. Tanken är att skapa en viss osäkerhet – som ska bidra till ökad tra

3h

New drugs are too expensive. Can AI can fix that?

The cost of developing medications is soaring. Machine learning could help—but only if good data is available.

3h

Researchers unlock the biomechanics of how the Ebola virus attaches to its host cell

It was recently reported that the number of Ebola cases in the Democratic Republic of Congo has surpassed 1,000, making it the second-worst outbreak in history after the 2014 outbreak in West Africa in which 29,000 people were infected and more than 11,000 died. This latest milestone is a stark reminder of the urgent need to develop effective prevention and treatment agents for this frequently dea

4h

The solid Earth breathes

The solid Earth breathes as volcanoes "exhale" gases like carbon dioxide (CO2) — which are essential in regulating global climate — while carbon ultimately from CO2 returns into the deep Earth when oceanic tectonic plates are forced to descend into the mantle at subduction zones.

4h

Epileptic seizures may scramble memories during sleep

Overnight seizures seemed to muddle memories in people with epilepsy.

4h

Deactivation of redox mediators in lithium-oxygen batteries by singlet oxygen

Deactivation of redox mediators in lithium-oxygen batteries by singlet oxygen Deactivation of redox mediators in lithium-oxygen batteries by singlet oxygen, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09399-0 Redox mediators can enhance redox reactions in Li-O2 batteries; however, their gradual degradation remains unclear. Here the authors show that organic redox mediators are decompo

4h

Author Correction: Organizing principles of pulvino-cortical functional coupling in humans

Author Correction: Organizing principles of pulvino-cortical functional coupling in humans Author Correction: Organizing principles of pulvino-cortical functional coupling in humans, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09368-7 Author Correction: Organizing principles of pulvino-cortical functional coupling in humans

4h

Author Correction: Hydrophobic pore gates regulate ion permeation in polycystic kidney disease 2 and 2L1 channels

Author Correction: Hydrophobic pore gates regulate ion permeation in polycystic kidney disease 2 and 2L1 channels Author Correction: Hydrophobic pore gates regulate ion permeation in polycystic kidney disease 2 and 2L1 channels, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09422-4 Author Correction: Hydrophobic pore gates regulate ion permeation in polycystic kidney disease 2 and 2L1 c

4h

Metal-free dehydropolymerisation of phosphine-boranes using cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbenes as hydrogen acceptors

Metal-free dehydropolymerisation of phosphine-boranes using cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbenes as hydrogen acceptors Metal-free dehydropolymerisation of phosphine-boranes using cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbenes as hydrogen acceptors, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08967-8 Polymers featuring p-block elements other than carbon are of interest for a range of applications, but access

4h

Assessing the Policy gaps for achieving China’s climate targets in the Paris Agreement

Assessing the Policy gaps for achieving China’s climate targets in the Paris Agreement Assessing the Policy gaps for achieving China’s climate targets in the Paris Agreement, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09159-0 The extent to which China’s existing and forthcoming policies would lead to emission reductions domestically has not been well understood. Here the authors comb

4h

Widespread losses of pollinating insects in Britain

Widespread losses of pollinating insects in Britain Widespread losses of pollinating insects in Britain, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08974-9 Pollinator loss is a concern but data on their status is lacking. Here Powney et al. use occupancy modelling to estimate the degree of loss in wild bee and hoverfly species across Great Britain, and report a 55% decline in upland

4h

Far-field coherent thermal emission from polaritonic resonance in individual anisotropic nanoribbons

Far-field coherent thermal emission from polaritonic resonance in individual anisotropic nanoribbons Far-field coherent thermal emission from polaritonic resonance in individual anisotropic nanoribbons, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09378-5 An approach to achieve and directly measure enhancement of the thermal emission in far-field is lacking. Here, a thermometry platfor

4h

Constructing a synthetic pathway for acetyl-coenzyme A from one-carbon through enzyme design

Constructing a synthetic pathway for acetyl-coenzyme A from one-carbon through enzyme design Constructing a synthetic pathway for acetyl-coenzyme A from one-carbon through enzyme design, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09095-z The microbial synthesis of carbon-containing compounds from single carbon precursors is desirable, yet designed pathways to achieve this goal overla

4h

Startup Unveils “World’s First Automated Cannabis Farm”

Reefer Farm Seedo says it’s taking the guesswork out of growing weed. The Israel-based startup’s flagship product is mini fridge-sized device that automates the process of growing cannabis for home farmers. But now Seedo is taking its tech to the next level with the announcement of what it’s calling the “world’s first automated cannabis farm” — and it could foreshadow the future of the marijuana

4h

4h

4h

The CRISPR fix that could combat inherited blood disorders

The CRISPR fix that could combat inherited blood disorders The CRISPR fix that could combat inherited blood disorders, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00976-3 Researchers have finally identified a reliable way to edit the genes of blood stem cells.

4h

These DJs Are Making Music By Coding on a Huge Screen

DJ Algorithm In the Bay Area, according to Wired , tech-savvy DJs are creating a new style of electronic music. Instead of using sequencers and turntables, some DJs are writing code that generates sounds and beats in real time, assembling new tracks on the fly during what’s become known as an “algorave.” Rave Area One show attended by Wired featured a DJ who projected his code onto the wall behin

4h

Methane bubbles hint at offshore quakes to come

Methane bubbles that squeeze out of sediment and rise from the seafloor off the coast of Washington provide important clues to what will happen during a major offshore earthquake, according to a new study. The first large-scale analysis of these gas emissions finds more than 1,700 bubble plumes, primarily clustered in a north-south band about 30 miles (50 kilometers) from the coast. Analysis of t

4h

Penn Nursing study links nurse work environments and outcomes

Nurses play critical roles in patient safety and are often the last line of defense against medical errors and unsafe practices. Considerable research has explored the relationship between the nurse work environment and a variety of patient and nurse quality and safety outcomes. But until now, no synthesis of this body of research has been made to clearly articulate the association between nurse w

4h

Speciation: Birds of a feather…

Carrion crows and hooded crows are almost indistinguishable genetically, and hybrid offspring are fertile. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists now show that the two forms have remained distinct largely owing to the dominant role of plumage color in mate choice.

4h

Researchers unlock the biomechanics of how the Ebola virus attaches to its host cell

Lehigh University engineers, working with microbiologists at the University of Iowa, have developed a simple model for virus-host cell interaction driven by Ebola's adhesion to cell surface receptors. The findings, published in Scientific Reports, could provide new information to help develop effective antiviral treatments.

4h

Untangling the brain's life-support network

Scientists have created the first global network model of the hypothalamus – a portion of the brain that controls basic survival functions in humans and many other animals.

4h

Mind melding: Understanding the connected, social brain

Parents may often feel like they are not 'on the same wavelength' as their kids. But it turns out that, at least for babies, their brainwaves literally sync with their moms when they are learning from them. In a new study being presented at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society's annual meeting in San Francisco, researchers found that how well babies' neural activity syncs with their moms' predicts h

4h

Why Does This 'Buff Monkey' Look Ridiculously Ripped?

Bea, a white-faced saki monkey, seems as "buff" as a bodybuilder.

4h

The Pentagon is Hiding Info About Google’s Work on Military Drones

Top Secret Nine months after internal protests and public outcry caused Google to stop developing AI for military drones, the Department of Defense is keeping any records of the mysterious Project Maven tightly under wraps. More than a year ago, The Intercept reporter Sam Biddle tried to use public information law to learn more about the drones. Now, Biddle writes that the Department of Defense i

4h

On the Bayesian interpretation of the harmonic mean p-value [Physical Sciences]

I read with much interest the article by Wilson (1) on the harmonic mean p-value (HMP) for combining statistical significance tests. I congratulate the author on a thorough discussion of this proposal. However, I would like to point out that Good (2) had suggested the HMP already in 1958 (see…

4h

Reply to Held: When is a harmonic mean p-value a Bayes factor? [Physical Sciences]

I welcome this opportunity (1) to acknowledge Good’s papers (2–6), which I had missed. Good proposed the harmonic mean p-value (HMP) as a classical analog to a model-averaged Bayes factor (BF) which “should be regarded as an approximate tail-area probability [p-value]” (2). His presentation was amusingly apologetic; for example, “an…

4h

cOAlition S: Response to PNAS [Biological Sciences]

We thank Marcia McNutt (1) for her opinion piece in PNAS where she supports the goal of open access (OA). We agree with her assertion that further changes in scholarly publishing are inevitable as it “aspires to serve science and society.” This ambition is at the heart of the Plan…

4h

Reply to Kiley and Smits: Meeting Plan S’s goal of maximizing access to research [Letters (Online Only)]

Thank you for recognizing the value that scholarly societies bring to the research ecosystem and the scientific enterprise as a whole—and for recognizing the importance of their financial viability (1). And thank you for clearly stating your goal for Plan S (2). A much simpler route toward achieving your goal…

4h

Unexpected systemic phenotypes result from focal combined deficiencies of forebrain insulin receptor/IGF-1 receptor signaling [Neuroscience]

Midlife obesity has recently been identified as a global pandemic (1). Morbidities and mortalities attributable to excess adiposity include atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes (T2D) (2), certain cancers (3), and dementia (4), each of which has reached epidemic proportions on its own. It is no exaggeration to state that T2D and…

4h

Organic enantiomeric high-Tc ferroelectrics [Applied Physical Sciences]

For nearly 100 y, homochiral ferroelectrics were basically multicomponent simple organic amine salts and metal coordination compounds. Single-component homochiral organic ferroelectric crystals with high-Curie temperature (Tc) phase transition were very rarely reported, although the first ferroelectric Rochelle salt discovered in 1920 is a homochiral metal coordination compound. Here, we report…

4h

Cell-free gene-regulatory network engineering with synthetic transcription factors [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Gene-regulatory networks are ubiquitous in nature and critical for bottom-up engineering of synthetic networks. Transcriptional repression is a fundamental function that can be tuned at the level of DNA, protein, and cooperative protein–protein interactions, necessitating high-throughput experimental approaches for in-depth characterization. Here, we used a cell-free system in combination with…

4h

Toddlers and infants expect individuals to refrain from helping an ingroup victim’s aggressor [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Adults and older children are more likely to punish a wrongdoer for a moral transgression when the victim belongs to their group. Building on these results, in violation-of-expectation experiments (n = 198), we examined whether 2.5-year-old toddlers (Exps. 1 and 2) and 1-year-old infants (Exps. 3 and 4) would selectively…

4h

Model-free and model-based learning processes in the updating of explicit and implicit evaluations [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Evaluating stimuli along a good–bad dimension is a fundamental computation performed by the human mind. In recent decades, research has documented dissociations and associations between explicit (i.e., self-reported) and implicit (i.e., indirectly measured) forms of evaluations. However, it is unclear whether such dissociations arise from relatively more superficial differences in…

4h

Global analysis of methionine oxidation provides a census of folding stabilities for the human proteome [Biochemistry]

The stability of proteins influences their tendency to aggregate, undergo degradation, or become modified in cells. Despite their significance to understanding protein folding and function, quantitative analyses of thermodynamic stabilities have been mostly limited to soluble proteins in purified systems. We have used a highly multiplexed proteomics approach, based on…

4h

Regulatory control of Sgs1 and Dna2 during eukaryotic DNA end resection [Biochemistry]

In the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination, the DNA break ends must first be processed into 3′ single-strand DNA overhangs. In budding yeast, end processing requires the helicase Sgs1 (BLM in humans), the nuclease/helicase Dna2, Top3-Rmi1, and replication protein A (RPA). Here, we use single-molecule imaging to…

4h

Human pregnancy zone protein stabilizes misfolded proteins including preeclampsia- and Alzheimer’s-associated amyloid beta peptide [Biochemistry]

Protein misfolding underlies the pathology of a large number of human disorders, many of which are age-related. An exception to this is preeclampsia, a leading cause of pregnancy-associated morbidity and mortality in which misfolded proteins accumulate in body fluids and the placenta. We demonstrate that pregnancy zone protein (PZP), which…

4h

Mechanism for autoinhibition and activation of the MORC3 ATPase [Biochemistry]

Microrchidia 3 (MORC3) is a human protein linked to autoimmune disorders, Down syndrome, and cancer. It is a member of a newly identified family of human ATPases with an uncharacterized mechanism of action. Here, we elucidate the molecular basis for inhibition and activation of MORC3. The crystal structure of the…

4h

Molecular basis of chromatin remodeling by Rhp26, a yeast CSB ortholog [Biochemistry]

CSB/ERCC6 belongs to an orphan subfamily of SWI2/SNF2-related chromatin remodelers and plays crucial roles in gene expression, DNA damage repair, and the maintenance of genome integrity. The molecular basis of chromatin remodeling by Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is not well understood. Here we investigate the molecular mechanism of chromatin…

4h

DNA{middle dot}RNA triple helix formation can function as a cis-acting regulatory mechanism at the human {beta}-globin locus [Biochemistry]

We have identified regulatory mechanisms in which an RNA transcript forms a DNA duplex·RNA triple helix with a gene or one of its regulatory elements, suggesting potential auto-regulatory mechanisms in vivo. We describe an interaction at the human β-globin locus, in which an RNA segment embedded in the second intron…

4h

Intracellular cargo transport by single-headed kinesin motors [Cell Biology]

Kinesin motor proteins that drive intracellular transport share an overall architecture of two motor domain-containing subunits that dimerize through a coiled-coil stalk. Dimerization allows kinesins to be processive motors, taking many steps along the microtubule track before detaching. However, whether dimerization is required for intracellular transport remains unknown. Here, we…

4h

Injured liver-released miRNA-122 elicits acute pulmonary inflammation via activating alveolar macrophage TLR7 signaling pathway [Cell Biology]

Hepatic injury is often accompanied by pulmonary inflammation and tissue damage, but the underlying mechanism is not fully elucidated. Here we identify hepatic miR-122 as a mediator of pulmonary inflammation induced by various liver injuries. Analyses of acute and chronic liver injury mouse models confirm that liver dysfunction can cause…

4h

RBFox2-miR-34a-Jph2 axis contributes to cardiac decompensation during heart failure [Cell Biology]

Heart performance relies on highly coordinated excitation–contraction (EC) coupling, and defects in this critical process may be exacerbated by additional genetic defects and/or environmental insults to cause eventual heart failure. Here we report a regulatory pathway consisting of the RNA binding protein RBFox2, a stress-induced microRNA miR-34a, and the essential…

4h

Mixotrophy in nanoflagellates across environmental gradients in the ocean [Ecology]

Mixotrophy, the combination of autotrophic and heterotrophic nutrition, is a common trophic strategy among unicellular eukaryotes in the ocean. There are a number of hypotheses about the conditions that select for mixotrophy, and field studies have documented the prevalence of mixotrophy in a range of environments. However, there is currently…

4h

Cleave and Rescue, a novel selfish genetic element and general strategy for gene drive [Genetics]

There is great interest in being able to spread beneficial traits throughout wild populations in ways that are self-sustaining. Here, we describe a chromosomal selfish genetic element, CleaveR [Cleave and Rescue (ClvR)], able to achieve this goal. ClvR comprises two linked chromosomal components. One, germline-expressed Cas9 and guide RNAs (gRNAs)—the…

4h

Interplay between DNA sequence and negative superhelicity drives R-loop structures [Genetics]

R-loops are abundant three-stranded nucleic-acid structures that form in cis during transcription. Experimental evidence suggests that R-loop formation is affected by DNA sequence and topology. However, the exact manner by which these factors interact to determine R-loop susceptibility is unclear. To investigate this, we developed a statistical mechanical equilibrium model…

4h

Point centromere activity requires an optimal level of centromeric noncoding RNA [Genetics]

In budding yeast, which possesses simple point centromeres, we discovered that all of its centromeres express long noncoding RNAs (cenRNAs), especially in S phase. Induction of cenRNAs coincides with CENP-ACse4 loading time and is dependent on DNA replication. Centromeric transcription is repressed by centromere-binding factor Cbf1 and histone H2A variant…

4h

Microenvironment tailors nTreg structure and function [Immunology and Inflammation]

Natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) ensure the control of self-tolerance and are currently used in clinical trials to alleviate autoimmune diseases and graft-versus-host disease after hematopoietic stem cell transfer. Based on CD39/CD26 markers, blood nTreg analysis revealed the presence of five different cell subsets, each representing a distinct stage of…

4h

Lipoprotein lipase is active as a monomer [Medical Sciences]

Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), the enzyme that hydrolyzes triglycerides in plasma lipoproteins, is assumed to be active only as a homodimer. In support of this idea, several groups have reported that the size of LPL, as measured by density gradient ultracentrifugation, is ∼110 kDa, twice the size of LPL monomers (∼55…

4h

Uropathogenic Escherichia coli employs both evasion and resistance to subvert innate immune-mediated zinc toxicity for dissemination [Microbiology]

Toll-like receptor (TLR)-inducible zinc toxicity is a recently described macrophage antimicrobial response used against bacterial pathogens. Here we investigated deployment of this pathway against uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the major cause of urinary tract infections. Primary human macrophages subjected EC958, a representative strain of the globally disseminated multidrug-resistant UPE

4h

Leishmania flagellum attachment zone is critical for flagellar pocket shape, development in the sand fly, and pathogenicity in the host [Microbiology]

Leishmania kinetoplastid parasites infect millions of people worldwide and have a distinct cellular architecture depending on location in the host or vector and specific pathogenicity functions. An invagination of the cell body membrane at the base of the flagellum, the flagellar pocket (FP), is an iconic kinetoplastid feature, and is…

4h

Divergent kinase regulates membrane ultrastructure of the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole [Microbiology]

Apicomplexan parasites replicate within a protective organelle, called the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The Toxoplasma gondii PV is filled with a network of tubulated membranes, which are thought to facilitate trafficking of effectors and nutrients. Despite being critical to parasite virulence, there is scant mechanistic understanding of the network’s functions. Here,…

4h

Immunization of V{gamma}2V{delta}2 T cells programs sustained effector memory responses that control tuberculosis in nonhuman primates [Microbiology]

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading killer among infectious diseases, and a better TB vaccine is urgently needed. The critical components and mechanisms of vaccine-induced protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remain incompletely defined. Our previous studies demonstrate that Vγ2Vδ2 T cells specific for (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP) phosphoantigen are unique

4h

Cholecystokinin release triggered by NMDA receptors produces LTP and sound-sound associative memory [Neuroscience]

Memory is stored in neural networks via changes in synaptic strength mediated in part by NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP). Here we show that a cholecystokinin (CCK)-B receptor (CCKBR) antagonist blocks high-frequency stimulation-induced neocortical LTP, whereas local infusion of CCK induces LTP. CCK−/− mice lacked neocortical LTP and showed…

4h

Evidence for the incorporation of temporal duration information in human hippocampal long-term memory sequence representations [Neuroscience]

There has been much interest in how the hippocampus codes time in support of episodic memory. Notably, while rodent hippocampal neurons, including populations in subfield CA1, have been shown to represent the passage of time in the order of seconds between events, there is limited support for a similar mechanism…

4h

Mapping developmental maturation of inner hair cell ribbon synapses in the apical mouse cochlea [Neuroscience]

Ribbon synapses of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) undergo molecular assembly and extensive functional and structural maturation before hearing onset. Here, we characterized the nanostructure of IHC synapses from late prenatal mouse embryo stages (embryonic days 14–18) into adulthood [postnatal day (P)48] using electron microscopy and tomography as well as…

4h

Estimating average single-neuron visual receptive field sizes by fMRI [Neuroscience]

The noninvasive estimation of neuronal receptive field (RF) properties in vivo allows a detailed understanding of brain organization as well as its plasticity by longitudinal following of potential changes. Visual RFs measured invasively by electrophysiology in animal models have traditionally provided a great extent of our current knowledge about the…

4h

(2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine exerts mGlu2 receptor-dependent antidepressant actions [Pharmacology]

Currently approved antidepressant drugs often take months to take full effect, and ∼30% of depressed patients remain treatment resistant. In contrast, ketamine, when administered as a single subanesthetic dose, exerts rapid and sustained antidepressant actions. Preclinical studies indicate that the ketamine metabolite (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine [(2R,6R)-HNK] is a rapid-acting antidepressant drug c

4h

Selective auxin agonists induce specific AUX/IAA protein degradation to modulate plant development [Plant Biology]

Auxin phytohormones control most aspects of plant development through a complex and interconnected signaling network. In the presence of auxin, AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (AUX/IAA) transcriptional repressors are targeted for degradation by the SKP1-CULLIN1-F-BOX (SCF) ubiquitin-protein ligases containing TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESISTANT 1/AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX (TIR1/AFB). CULLIN1-neddylation is requi

4h

Dynamics of bed bug infestations and control under disclosure policies [Population Biology]

Bed bugs have reemerged in the United States and worldwide over recent decades, presenting a major challenge to both public health practitioners and housing authorities. A number of municipalities have proposed or initiated policies to stem the bed bug epidemic, but little guidance is available to evaluate them. One contentious…

4h

Regulation of arousal via online neurofeedback improves human performance in a demanding sensory-motor task [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Our state of arousal can significantly affect our ability to make optimal decisions, judgments, and actions in real-world dynamic environments. The Yerkes–Dodson law, which posits an inverse-U relationship between arousal and task performance, suggests that there is a state of arousal that is optimal for behavioral performance in a given…

4h

Predictability of human differential gene expression [Systems Biology]

Differential expression (DE) is commonly used to explore molecular mechanisms of biological conditions. While many studies report significant results between their groups of interest, the degree to which results are specific to the question at hand is not generally assessed, potentially leading to inaccurate interpretation. This could be particularly problematic…

4h

Primitive Old World monkey from the earliest Miocene of Kenya and the evolution of cercopithecoid bilophodonty [Anthropology]

Old World monkeys (Cercopithecoidea) are a highly successful primate radiation, with more than 130 living species and the broadest geographic range of any extant group except humans. Although cercopithecoids are highly variable in habitat use, social behavior, and diet, a signature dental feature unites all of its extant members: bilophodonty…

4h

Higher offspring mortality with short interbirth intervals in free-ranging rhesus macaques [Anthropology]

Short birth intervals have long been linked to adverse child outcomes in humans. However, it remains unclear the extent to which the birth interval has a direct influence on offspring mortality, independent of the confounding effects of modern environments and human sociocultural practices on reproductive behavior. Outside of humans, the…

4h

Role of contacts in long-range protein conductance [Applied Biological Sciences]

Proteins are widely regarded as insulators, despite reports of electrical conductivity. Here we use measurements of single proteins between electrodes, in their natural aqueous environment to show that the factor controlling measured conductance is the nature of the electrical contact to the protein, and that specific ligands make highly selective…

4h

Antibiotic treatment affects the expression levels of copper transporters and the isotopic composition of copper in the colon of mice [Applied Biological Sciences]

Copper is a critical enzyme cofactor in the body but also a potent cellular toxin when intracellularly unbound. Thus, there is a delicate balance of intracellular copper, maintained by a series of complex interactions between the metal and specific copper transport and binding proteins. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the…

4h

Discovery of novel carbohydrate-active enzymes through the rational exploration of the protein sequences space [Biochemistry]

Over the last two decades, the number of gene/protein sequences gleaned from sequencing projects of individual genomes and environmental DNA has grown exponentially. Only a tiny fraction of these predicted proteins has been experimentally characterized, and the function of most proteins remains hypothetical or only predicted based on sequence similarity….

4h

Crystal structure of human mitochondrial trifunctional protein, a fatty acid {beta}-oxidation metabolon [Biochemistry]

Membrane-bound mitochondrial trifunctional protein (TFP) catalyzes β-oxidation of long chain fatty acyl-CoAs, employing 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase (ECH), 3-hydroxyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD), and 3-ketothiolase (KT) activities consecutively. Inherited deficiency of TFP is a recessive genetic disease, manifesting in hypoketotic hypoglycemia, cardiomyopathy, and sudden death. We have determined the crystal

4h

EZH1/2 function mostly within canonical PRC2 and exhibit proliferation-dependent redundancy that shapes mutational signatures in cancer [Biochemistry]

Genetic mutations affecting chromatin modifiers are widespread in cancers. In malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which plays a crucial role in gene silencing, is inactivated through recurrent mutations in core subunits embryonic ectoderm development (EED) and suppressor of zeste 12 homolog (SUZ12), but mutations…

4h

Array atomic force microscopy for real-time multiparametric analysis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Nanoscale multipoint structure–function analysis is essential for deciphering the complexity of multiscale biological and physical systems. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows nanoscale structure–function imaging in various operating environments and can be integrated seamlessly with disparate probe-based sensing and manipulation technologies. Conventional AFMs only permit sequential single-point

4h

Regulation of T cell expansion by antigen presentation dynamics [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

An essential feature of the adaptive immune system is the proliferation of antigen-specific lymphocytes during an immune reaction to form a large pool of effector cells. This proliferation must be regulated to ensure an effective response to infection while avoiding immunopathology. Recent experiments in mice have demonstrated that the expansion…

4h

Using a system’s equilibrium behavior to reduce its energy dissipation in nonequilibrium processes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cells must operate far from equilibrium, utilizing and dissipating energy continuously to maintain their organization and to avoid stasis and death. However, they must also avoid unnecessary waste of energy. Recent studies have revealed that molecular machines are extremely efficient thermodynamically compared with their macroscopic counterparts. However, the principles governing…

4h

Spatiotemporal regulation of clonogenicity in colorectal cancer xenografts [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cancer evolution is predominantly studied by focusing on differences in the genetic characteristics of malignant cells within tumors. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of clonal outgrowth that underlie evolutionary trajectories remain largely unresolved. Here, we sought to unravel the clonal dynamics of colorectal cancer (CRC) expansion in space and time by…

4h

Mitochondrial UPR repression during Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection requires the bZIP protein ZIP-3 [Cell Biology]

Mitochondria generate most cellular energy and are targeted by multiple pathogens during infection. In turn, metazoans employ surveillance mechanisms such as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) to detect and respond to mitochondrial dysfunction as an indicator of infection. The UPRmt is an adaptive transcriptional program regulated by the transcription…

4h

Spatially defined molecular emitters coupled to plasmonic nanoparticle arrays [Chemistry]

This paper describes how metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) conformally coated on plasmonic nanoparticle arrays can support exciton–plasmon modes with features resembling strong coupling but that are better understood by a weak coupling model. Thin films of Zn-porphyrin MOFs were assembled by dip coating on arrays of silver nanoparticles (NP@MOF) that sustain…

4h

Voltage-induced long-range coherent electron transfer through organic molecules [Chemistry]

Biological structures rely on kinetically tuned charge transfer reactions for energy conversion, biocatalysis, and signaling as well as for oxidative damage repair. Unlike man-made electrical circuitry, which uses metals and semiconductors to direct current flow, charge transfer in living systems proceeds via biomolecules that are nominally insulating. Long-distance charge transport,…

4h

Effects of microstructure formation on the stability of vapor-deposited glasses [Chemistry]

Glasses formed by physical vapor deposition (PVD) are an interesting new class of materials, exhibiting properties thought to be equivalent to those of glasses aged for thousands of years. Exerting control over the structure and properties of PVD glasses formed with different types of glass-forming molecules is now an emerging…

4h

Online learning with an almost perfect expert [Computer Sciences]

We study multiclass online learning, where a forecaster predicts a sequence of elements drawn from a finite set using the advice of n experts. Our main contributions are to analyze the scenario where the best expert makes a bounded number b of mistakes and to show that, in the low-error…

4h

Multiradionuclide evidence for an extreme solar proton event around 2,610 B.P. (~660 BC) [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Recently, it has been confirmed that extreme solar proton events can lead to significantly increased atmospheric production rates of cosmogenic radionuclides. Evidence of such events is recorded in annually resolved natural archives, such as tree rings [carbon-14 (14C)] and ice cores [beryllium-10 (10Be), chlorine-36 (36Cl)]. Here, we show evidence for…

4h

Lead isotopes in silver reveal earliest Phoenician quest for metals in the west Mediterranean [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

When and why did the Phoenicians initiate long-term connections between the Levant and western Europe? This is one of the most hotly debated questions in ancient Mediterranean history and cultural research. In this study, we use silver to answer this question, presenting the largest dataset of chemical and isotopic analyses…

4h

Predictable hydrological and ecological responses to Holocene North Atlantic variability [Ecology]

Climate variations in the North Atlantic region can substantially impact surrounding continents. Notably, the Younger Dryas chronozone was named for the ecosystem effects of abrupt changes in the region at circa (ca.) 12.9–11.7 ka (millennia before 1950 AD). Holocene variations since then, however, have been hard to diagnose, and the…

4h

Wildfires and climate change push low-elevation forests across a critical climate threshold for tree regeneration [Ecology]

Climate change is increasing fire activity in the western United States, which has the potential to accelerate climate-induced shifts in vegetation communities. Wildfire can catalyze vegetation change by killing adult trees that could otherwise persist in climate conditions no longer suitable for seedling establishment and survival. Recently documented declines in…

4h

Earlier phenology of a nonnative plant increases impacts on native competitors [Ecology]

Adaptation to climate is expected to increase the performance of invasive species and their community-level impacts. However, while the fitness gains from adaptation should, in general, promote invader competitive ability, empirical demonstrations of this prediction are scarce. Furthermore, climate adaptation, in the form of altered timing of life cycle transitions,…

4h

Applying modern coexistence theory to priority effects [Ecology]

Modern coexistence theory is increasingly used to explain how differences between competing species lead to coexistence versus competitive exclusion. Although research testing this theory has focused on deterministic cases of competitive exclusion, in which the same species always wins, mounting evidence suggests that competitive exclusion is often historically contingent, such…

4h

Stretchable materials of high toughness and low hysteresis [Engineering]

In materials of all types, hysteresis and toughness are usually correlated. For example, a highly stretchable elastomer or hydrogel of a single polymer network has low hysteresis and low toughness. The single network is commonly toughened by introducing sacrificial bonds, but breaking and possibly reforming the sacrificial bonds causes pronounced…

4h

Light-triggered thermal conductivity switching in azobenzene polymers [Engineering]

Materials that can be switched between low and high thermal conductivity states would advance the control and conversion of thermal energy. Employing in situ time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) and in situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we report a reversible, light-responsive azobenzene polymer that switches between high (0.35 W m−1 K−1) and low…

4h

Multiplexed profiling of single-cell extracellular vesicles secretion [Engineering]

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important intercellular mediators regulating health and diseases. Conventional methods for EV surface marker profiling, which was based on population measurements, masked the cell-to-cell heterogeneity in the quantity and phenotypes of EV secretion. Herein, by using spatially patterned antibody barcodes, we realized multiplexed profiling of single-cell EV…

4h

Incentivizing hospital infection control [Environmental Sciences]

Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) pose a significant burden to patient safety. Institutions can implement hospital infection control (HIC) measures to reduce the impact of HAIs. Since patients can carry pathogens between institutions, there is an economic incentive for hospitals to free ride on the HIC investments of other facilities. Subsidies for…

4h

Mechanisms for achieving high speed and efficiency in biomolecular machines [Evolution]

How does a biomolecular machine achieve high speed at high efficiency? We explore optimization principles using a simple two-state dynamical model. With this model, we establish physical principles—such as the optimal way to distribute free-energy changes and barriers across the machine cycle—and connect them to biological mechanisms. We find that…

4h

Genomic plasticity associated with antimicrobial resistance in Vibrio cholerae [Evolution]

The Bay of Bengal is known as the epicenter for seeding several devastating cholera outbreaks across the globe. Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of cholera, has extraordinary competency to acquire exogenous DNA by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and adapt them into its genome for structuring metabolic processes, developing drug resistance,…

4h

Genomes of skipper butterflies reveal extensive convergence of wing patterns [Evolution]

For centuries, biologists have used phenotypes to infer evolution. For decades, a handful of gene markers have given us a glimpse of the genotype to combine with phenotypic traits. Today, we can sequence entire genomes from hundreds of species and gain yet closer scrutiny. To illustrate the power of genomics,…

4h

Polyandrous bee provides extended offspring care biparentally as an alternative to monandry based eusociality [Evolution]

Parental care behavior evolves to increase the survival of offspring. When offspring care becomes complicated for ecological reasons, cooperation of multiple individuals can be beneficial. There are two types of cooperative care: biparental care and worker (helper)-based care (e.g., eusociality). Although biparental care is common in several groups of vertebrates,…

4h

Fractional coalescent [Evolution]

An approach to the coalescent, the fractional coalescent (f-coalescent), is introduced. The derivation is based on the discrete-time Cannings population model in which the variance of the number of offspring depends on the parameter α. This additional parameter α affects the variability of the patterns of the waiting times; values…

4h

Biphasic mechanosensitivity of T cell receptor-mediated spreading of lymphocytes [Immunology and Inflammation]

Mechanosensing by T cells through the T cell receptor (TCR) is at the heart of immune recognition. While the mechanobiology of the TCR at the molecular level is increasingly well documented, its link to cell-scale response is poorly understood. Here we explore T cell spreading response as a function of…

4h

P-selectin drives complement attack on endothelium during intravascular hemolysis in TLR-4/heme-dependent manner [Immunology and Inflammation]

Hemolytic diseases are frequently linked to multiorgan failure subsequent to vascular damage. Deciphering the mechanisms leading to organ injury upon hemolytic event could bring out therapeutic approaches. Complement system activation occurs in hemolytic disorders, such as sickle cell disease, but the pathological relevance and the acquisition of a complement-activating phenotype…

4h

Transcriptional factor ATF3 protects against colitis by regulating follicular helper T cells in Peyer’s patches [Immunology and Inflammation]

Disruption of mucosal immunity plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, yet its mechanism remains not fully elucidated. Here, we found that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) protects against colitis by regulating follicular helper T (TFH) cells in the gut. The expression of ATF3 in CD4+…

4h

Aspirin-triggered proresolving mediators stimulate resolution in cancer [Immunology and Inflammation]

Inflammation in the tumor microenvironment is a strong promoter of tumor growth. Substantial epidemiologic evidence suggests that aspirin, which suppresses inflammation, reduces the risk of cancer. The mechanism by which aspirin inhibits cancer has remained unclear, and toxicity has limited its clinical use. Aspirin not only blocks the biosynthesis of…

4h

Detection of early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma in asymptomatic HBsAg-seropositive individuals by liquid biopsy [Medical Sciences]

Liquid biopsies, based on cell free DNA (cfDNA) and proteins, have shown the potential to detect early stage cancers of diverse tissue types. However, most of these studies were retrospective, using individuals previously diagnosed with cancer as cases and healthy individuals as controls. Here, we developed a liquid biopsy assay,…

4h

Taurine transporter (TauT) deficiency impairs ammonia detoxification in mouse liver [Medical Sciences]

Hepatic ammonia handling was analyzed in taurine transporter (TauT) KO mice. Surprisingly, hyperammonemia was present at an age of 3 and 12 months despite normal tissue integrity. This was accompanied by cerebral RNA oxidation. As shown in liver perfusion experiments, glutamine production from ammonia was diminished in TauT KO mice,…

4h

Energy conservation by a hydrogenase-dependent chemiosmotic mechanism in an ancient metabolic pathway [Microbiology]

The ancient reductive acetyl-CoA pathway is employed by acetogenic bacteria to form acetate from inorganic energy sources. Since the central pathway does not gain net ATP by substrate-level phosphorylation, chemolithoautotrophic growth relies on the additional formation of ATP via a chemiosmotic mechanism. Genome analyses indicated that some acetogens only have…

4h

Cyclic-di-GMP regulation promotes survival of a slow-replicating subpopulation of intracellular Salmonella Typhimurium [Microbiology]

Salmonella Typhimurium can invade and survive within macrophages where the bacterium encounters a range of host environmental conditions. Like many bacteria, S. Typhimurium rapidly responds to changing environments by the use of second messengers such as cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Here, we generate a fluorescent biosensor to measure c-di-GMP concentrations in…

4h

Insulin signaling in the hippocampus and amygdala regulates metabolism and neurobehavior [Neuroscience]

Previous studies have shown that insulin and IGF-1 signaling in the brain, especially the hypothalamus, is important for regulation of systemic metabolism. Here, we develop mice in which we have specifically inactivated both insulin receptors (IRs) and IGF-1 receptors (IGF1Rs) in the hippocampus (Hippo-DKO) or central amygdala (CeA-DKO) by stereotaxic…

4h

GSAP modulates {gamma}-secretase specificity by inducing conformational change in PS1 [Neuroscience]

The mechanism by which γ-secretase activating protein (GSAP) regulates γ-secretase activity has not yet been elucidated. Here, we show that knockout of GSAP in cultured cells directly reduces γ-secretase activity for Aβ production, but not for Notch1 cleavage, suggesting that GSAP may induce a conformational change contributing to the specificity…

4h

Interhemispheric plasticity is mediated by maximal potentiation of callosal inputs [Neuroscience]

Central or peripheral injury causes reorganization of the brain’s connections and functions. A striking change observed after unilateral stroke or amputation is a recruitment of bilateral cortical responses to sensation or movement of the unaffected peripheral area. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are described in a mouse model of unilateral…

4h

A cell type-selective apoptosis-inducing small molecule for the treatment of brain cancer [Pharmacology]

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM; grade IV astrocytoma) is the most prevalent and aggressive form of primary brain cancer. A subpopulation of multipotent cells termed GBM cancer stem cells (CSCs) play a critical role in tumor initiation, tumor maintenance, metastasis, drug resistance, and recurrence following surgery. Here we report the identification of…

4h

Anomalous quantum criticality in the electron-doped cuprates [Physics]

In the physics of condensed matter, quantum critical phenomena and unconventional superconductivity are two major themes. In electron-doped cuprates, the low critical field (HC2) allows one to study the putative quantum critical point (QCP) at low temperature and to understand its connection to the long-standing problem of the origin of…

4h

Processing bodies control the selective translation for optimal development of Arabidopsis young seedlings [Plant Biology]

Germinated plant seeds buried in soil undergo skotomorphogenic development before emergence to reach the light environment. Young seedlings transitioning from dark to light undergo photomorphogenic development. During photomorphogenesis, light alters the transcriptome and enhances the translation of thousands of mRNAs during the dark-to-light transition in Arabidopsis young seedlings. About 1,500.

4h

Interplay between differentially expressed enzymes contributes to light color acclimation in marine Synechococcus [Plant Biology]

Marine Synechococcus, a globally important group of cyanobacteria, thrives in various light niches in part due to its varied photosynthetic light-harvesting pigments. Many Synechococcus strains use a process known as chromatic acclimation to optimize the ratio of two chromophores, green-light–absorbing phycoerythrobilin (PEB) and blue-light–absorbing phycourobilin (PUB), within their light-harvest

4h

The relationship between implicit intergroup attitudes and beliefs [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Intergroup attitudes (evaluations) are generalized valence attributions to social groups (e.g., white–bad/Asian–good), whereas intergroup beliefs (stereotypes) are specific trait attributions to social groups (e.g., white–dumb/Asian–smart). When explicit (self-report) measures are used, attitudes toward and beliefs about the same social group are often related to each other but can also be…

4h

Students of color show health advantages when they attend schools that emphasize the value of diversity [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

As the United States becomes more diverse, the ways in which mainstream institutions recognize and address race and ethnicity will be increasingly important. Here, we show that one novel and salient characteristic of an institutional environment, that is, whether a school emphasizes the value of racial and ethnic diversity, predicts…

4h

No effect of birth order on adult risk taking [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Does birth order shape people’s propensity to take risks? Evidence is mixed. We used a three-pronged approach to investigate birth-order effects on risk taking. First, we examined the propensity to take risks as measured by a self-report questionnaire administered in the German Socio-Economic Panel, one of the largest and most…

4h

Optimizing schools’ start time and bus routes [Social Sciences]

Maintaining a fleet of buses to transport students to school is a major expense for school districts. To reduce costs by reusing buses between schools, many districts spread start times across the morning. However, assigning each school a time involves estimating the impact on transportation costs and reconciling additional competing…

4h

American geography of opportunity reveals European origins [Social Sciences]

A large literature documents how intergenerational mobility—the degree to which (dis)advantage is passed on from parents to children—varies across and within countries. Less is known about the origin or persistence of such differences. We show that US areas populated by descendants to European immigrants have similar levels of income equality…

4h

On a two-truths phenomenon in spectral graph clustering [Statistics]

Clustering is concerned with coherently grouping observations without any explicit concept of true groupings. Spectral graph clustering—clustering the vertices of a graph based on their spectral embedding—is commonly approached via K-means (or, more generally, Gaussian mixture model) clustering composed with either Laplacian spectral embedding (LSE) or adjacency spectral embedding (ASE)….

4h

Saving endangered species using adaptive management [Sustainability Science]

Adaptive management is a powerful means of learning about complex ecosystems, but is rarely used for recovering endangered species. Here, we demonstrate how it can benefit woodland caribou, which became the first large mammal extirpated from the contiguous United States in recent history. The continental scale of forest alteration and…

4h

Diversifying livestock promotes multidiversity and multifunctionality in managed grasslands [Sustainability Science]

Increasing plant diversity can increase ecosystem functioning, stability, and services in both natural and managed grasslands, but the effects of herbivore diversity, and especially of livestock diversity, remain underexplored. Given that managed grazing is the most extensive land use worldwide, and that land managers can readily change livestock diversity, we…

4h

Inequity in consumption of goods and services adds to racial-ethnic disparities in air pollution exposure [Sustainability Science]

Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution exposure is the largest environmental health risk factor in the United States. Here, we link PM2.5 exposure to the human activities responsible for PM2.5 pollution. We use these results to explore “pollution inequity”: the difference between the environmental health damage caused by a racial–ethnic…

4h

Correction for Imhof et al., CCN1/CYR61-mediated meticulous patrolling by Ly6Clow monocytes fuels vascular inflammation [Corrections]

IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for “CCN1/CYR61-mediated meticulous patrolling by Ly6Clow monocytes fuels vascular inflammation,” by Beat A. Imhof, Stephane Jemelin, Romain Ballet, Christian Vesin, Marco Schapira, Melis Karaca, and Yalin Emre, which was first published August 1, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1607710113 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 113:E4847–E4856). The authors note that the…

4h

Correction for Xu et al., Descending pathway facilitates undulatory wave propagation in Caenorhabditis elegans through gap junctions [Corrections]

NEUROSCIENCE, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Descending pathway facilitates undulatory wave propagation in Caenorhabditis elegans through gap junctions,” by Tianqi Xu, Jing Huo, Shuai Shao, Michelle Po, Taizo Kawano, Yangning Lu, Min Wu, Mei Zhen, and Quan Wen, which was first published April 23, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1717022115 (Proc Natl Acad…

4h

Correction for Casali et al., Altered neural odometry in the vertical dimension [Corrections]

NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Altered neural odometry in the vertical dimension,” by Giulio Casali, Daniel Bush, and Kate Jeffery, which was first published February 15, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1811867116 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 116:4631–4636). The authors note that Fig. 1 appeared incorrectly. The corrected figure and its legend appear below. Fig. 1….

4h

Correction for Blasco-Benito et al., Therapeutic targeting of HER2-CB2R heteromers in HER2-positive breast cancer [Corrections]

PHARMACOLOGY Correction for “Therapeutic targeting of HER2–CB2R heteromers in HER2-positive breast cancer,” by Sandra Blasco-Benito, Estefanía Moreno, Marta Seijo-Vila, Isabel Tundidor, Clara Andradas, María M. Caffarel, Miriam Caro-Villalobos, Leyre Urigüen, Rebeca Diez-Alarcia, Gema Moreno-Bueno, Lucía Hernández, Luis Manso, Patricia Homar-Ruano, Peter J. McCormick, Lucka Bibic, Cristina Bernadó

4h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Silver and the Phoenician expansion ʽEin Hofez silver hoard. Image courtesy of Warhaftig Venezian (photographer) and the Israel Antiquities Authority. Phoenician expansion throughout the Mediterranean in the first millennium BCE is a significant cultural inflection point in the history of northern Africa, southern Europe, and the Levant. The reason for…

4h

Profile of Daniel A. Haber [Profiles]

Research oncologist Daniel Haber may not have treated patients in years, but they are never far from his mind. “When I started my MD/PhD program at Stanford I thought I could be both a physician and a researcher,” says Haber, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center, where…

4h

Archaeological science brightens Mediterranean dark age [Anthropology]

Recent advancements in the integration of methods from the exact and natural sciences are the foundation on which an ongoing revolution in the archaeological research of the Levant is being built, mirroring similar trends in other places around the world (1, 2). After more than a century of large-scale excavations…

4h

Mixotroph ecology: More than the sum of its parts [Ecology]

Marine microbial ecosystems represent an important nexus in the Earth system, linking photosynthesis and biological productivity to global nutrient cycles and climate. Each year, marine biota export billions of tons of organic carbon into the deep ocean, maintaining an oceanic reserve that has a profound moderating effect on our climate…

4h

Pest management by genetic addiction [Genetics]

In the PNAS article “Cleave and Rescue, a novel selfish genetic element and general strategy for gene drive,” Oberhofer et al. (1) describe an exciting new mechanism for enabling a transgenic sequence to increase in frequency within a sexually reproducing population, even if the transgenic sequence causes individuals bearing it…

4h

News Feature: Interested in gauging a population’s health? Look to sewage [Chemistry]

Researchers are mining the stuff we excrete to get a window on drug use, antibiotic resistance, and the overall health of populations. When the Canadian government wanted to assess the impact of legalizing marijuana on its citizens’ drug use, it turned to a rich, though often unappreciated, source of data—sewage….

4h

Team encodes digital ‘hello’ into lab-made DNA

Researchers have successfully encoded the word “hello” in snippets of fabricated DNA and converted it back to digital data using a fully automated end-to-end system. The feat could be a key step in moving the technology out of the research lab and into commercial data centers. DNA can store digital information in a space that is orders of magnitude smaller than data centers in use today. It’s one

4h

As Elsevier Falters, Wiley Succeeds in Open-Access Deal Making

The divergent strategies of scholarly publishers to forge licensing agreements with libraries are yielding different results.

4h

C. elegans roundworms 'harvest' an essential coenzyme from the bacteria they consume

A study conducted in C. elegans nematode roundworms may lead to improved treatment of a rare human genetic disorder that causes severe neurological symptoms leading to death in early childhood. In their report published in Nature Chemical Biology, two Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators describe finding that C. elegans can acquire the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) – a molecule essentia

4h

Facebook is free, but should it count toward GDP anyway?

A new study by MIT researchers puts a dollar value on all those free digital goods people use, and builds the case that online activity can and should become part of GDP some day.

4h

Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Veronica's stripped center along Australia coast

Early on March 26, Tropical Cyclone Veronica continued to move along the coast of Western Australia and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm that showed the storm was stripped of strong thunderstorm development around the center.

4h

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Joaninha affecting Mauritius

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Joaninha as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean triggering warnings in the island nation of Mauritius.

4h

University of Cincinnati provides road map to combat human trafficking in Ohio

More than 1,000 victims of human trafficking in Ohio have been identified thanks to a University of Cincinnati study published Tuesday, March 26, by the Ohio Department of Public Safety's Office of Criminal Justice Services (OCJS). An additional 4,209 individuals were considered to be at risk of trafficking victimization during the same period.The UC study, titled 'Estimating the Prevalence of Hum

4h

Widespread Declines in UK’s Pollinators: Study

Over 30 years, one-third of the wild bees and hoverfly species surveyed sustained losses, likely due to pesticides, habitat loss, and climate change.

4h

Facebook blocks more accounts over influence campaigns

Facebook said Tuesday it shut down more than 2,600 fake accounts linked to Iran, Russia, Macedonia and Kosovo and aiming to influence political sentiment in various parts of the world.

4h

10 tools to upgrade your home bar

Gadgets For all the times you want to twirl your drink imperiously in the comfort of your own home. Ten items to upgrade your home bar from eco-friendly coasters to smart cocktails scales.

4h

The solid Earth breathes

The solid Earth breathes as volcanoes "exhale" gases like carbon dioxide (CO2)—which are essential in regulating global climate—while carbon ultimately from CO2 returns into the deep Earth when oceanic tectonic plates are forced to descend into the mantle at subduction zones. However, the amount of carbon in the sediments and ocean crust that subducts is poorly constrained, as is the fraction of t

4h

Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Veronica's stripped center along Australia coast

Early on March 26, Tropical Cyclone Veronica continued to move along the coast of Western Australia and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the storm that showed the storm was stripped of strong thunderstorm development around the center.

4h

Ancient Caribbean children helped with grocery shopping in AD 400

Researchers have long thought that snail and clam shells found at Caribbean archaeological sites were evidence of "starvation food" eaten in times when other resources were lacking. Now, a University of Florida study suggests these shells may be evidence of children helping with the grocery shopping—A.D. 400 style.

4h

C. elegans roundworms 'harvest' an essential coenzyme from the bacteria they consume

A study conducted in C. elegans nematode roundworms may lead to improved treatment of a rare human genetic disorder that causes severe neurological symptoms leading to death in early childhood. In their report published in Nature Chemical Biology, two Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators describe finding that C. elegans can acquire the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) – a molecule essentia

4h

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Joaninha affecting Mauritius

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Joaninha as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean triggering warnings in the island nation of Mauritius.

4h

100MW Floating Solar Project

submitted by /u/Marusira_SL [link] [comments]

4h

4h

Så håller målade fasader och utemöbler längre

Genom att måla träprodukter som fasader och utemöbler kan man förlänga deras livslängd. Men det är inte bara färgen som påverkar hållbarheten, utan även egenskaperna hos virket. Främst densiteten och om virket består av kärnved, den inre delen av ett träd, eller av splintved, den yttre delen av veden. För målad granpanel utomhus ger kärnved med låg densitet ger bäst beständighet. – Jag fann ingen

5h

Supercomputers Solve a Mystery Hidden Inside Merging Water Droplets

Weird things happen when water droplets smash into each other.

5h

60-Day Bed Rest Study Will Test Effects of Weightlessness, Artificial Gravity

Lying around may not seem particularly brave, but the study participants have to stay in bed without sitting up for 60 days and occasionally go for a spin in a giant centrifuge. The post 60-Day Bed Rest Study Will Test Effects of Weightlessness, Artificial Gravity appeared first on ExtremeTech .

5h

Pioneering medical drone program takes off in North Carolina

A pioneering use of drones to fly blood samples across a North Carolina hospital campus launched Tuesday in the latest move to expand their roles in business and health care.

5h

Stranded dolphins have amyloid plaques in their brains

Dolphins stranded on the beaches of Florida and Massachusetts show in their brains amyloid plaques, a hallmark in human beings of Alzheimer's disease, together with an environmental toxin produced by cyanobacterial blooms.

5h

Smog may be getting worse in some cities thanks to Arctic warming

Rising temperatures in the Arctic may be weakening winds in China and India, lessening air flow over major cities and exacerbating winter smogs

5h

The UAE is Putting Programs in Place to Become a Leader in AI

The UAE is aware that being a pioneer of AI is sure to come with challenges, but they truly believe that a preemptive study will ensure a path to success. The post The UAE is Putting Programs in Place to Become a Leader in AI appeared first on Futurism .

5h

C. elegans roundworms 'harvest' an essential coenzyme from the bacteria they consume

A study conducted in C.elegans nematode roundworms may lead to improved treatment of a rare human genetic disorder that causes severe neurological symptoms leading to death in early childhood.

5h

Ancient Caribbean children helped with grocery shopping in AD 400

Researchers have long thought that snail and clam shells found at Caribbean archaeological sites were evidence of 'starvation food' eaten in times when other resources were lacking. Now, a University of Florida study suggests these shells may be evidence of children helping with the grocery shopping — AD 400 style.

5h

The solid Earth breathes

The solid Earth breathes as volcanoes "exhale" gases like carbon dioxide (CO2) — which are essential in regulating global climate — while carbon ultimately from CO2 returns into the deep Earth when oceanic tectonic plates are forced to descend into the mantle at subduction zones.

5h

Advanced paternal age increases risk of early-onset schizophrenia in offspring

Advanced paternal age increases the risk in offspring of early-onset schizophrenia, a severe form of the disorder, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry, published by Elsevier.

5h

Using connectomics to understand epilepsy

Abnormalities in structural brain networks and how brain regions communicate may underlie a variety of disorders, including epilepsy, which is one focus of a two-part Special Issue on the Brain Connectome in Brain Connectivity, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.

5h

Yellowstone elk don't budge for wolves say scientists

Elk roam the winter range that straddles the northern boundary of Yellowstone National Park with little regard for wolves, according to a new study illustrating how elk can tolerate living in close proximity to the large predator.

5h

Stranded dolphins have amyloid plaques in their brains

Dolphins stranded on the beaches of Florida and Massachusetts show in their brains amyloid plaques, a hallmark in human beings of Alzheimer's disease, together with an environmental toxin produced by cyanobacterial blooms. The research report was published in PLOS One.

5h

Smartphone test spots poisoned water risk to millions of lives

A smartphone device developed at the University of Edinburgh could help millions of people avoid drinking water contaminated by arsenic.

5h

Bacteria could become a future source of electricity

In recent years, researchers have tried to capture the electrical current that bacteria generate through their own metabolism. So far, however, the transfer of the current from the bacteria to a receiving electrode has not been efficient at all. Now, researchers from institutions including Lund University have achieved a slightly more efficient transfer of electrical current.

5h

5h

Your next car could have a built-in road-rage detector

Affectiva, a startup focused on detecting emotion, is testing its technology in vehicles.

5h

5h

How malevolent machine learning could derail AI

AI security expert Dawn Song warns that “adversarial machine learning” could be used to reverse-engineer systems—including those used in defense.

5h

Stranded dolphins have amyloid plaques in their brains

Dolphins stranded on the beaches of Florida and Massachusetts show in their brains amyloid plaques, a hallmark in human beings of Alzheimer's disease, together with an environmental toxin produced by cyanobacterial blooms.

5h

Listening to the quantum vacuum

Since the historic finding of gravitational waves from two black holes colliding over a billion light years away was made in 2015, physicists are advancing knowledge about the limits on the precision of the measurements that will help improve the next generation of tools and technology used by gravitational wave scientists. Physicists have now measured quantum "back action" in the audio band at

5h

Children develop PTSD when they ruminate over their trauma

A new study shows that children are more likely to suffer PTSD if they think their reaction to a traumatic event is not 'normal'. While most children recover well after a traumatic event, some go on to develop PTSD that may stay with them for months, years, or even into adulthood. The research reveals that children begin down this route when they have trouble processing their trauma and perceive t

5h

People who feed birds impact conservation

Researchers analyzed how people who feed birds notice and respond to natural events at their feeders by collaborating with Project FeederWatch, a program that engages more than 25,000 people to observe and collect data on their backyard birds.

5h

Smartphone test spots poisoned water risk to millions of lives

A smartphone device could help millions of people avoid drinking water contaminated by arsenic.

5h

The sense of water—and nitrogen: Studies uncover genome-wide responses that limit crop growth

A team of researchers has tested how each gene within the genome of rice—one of the world's most important staple crops—senses and responds to combinations of water and nutrients. Its findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, potentially point to ways to engineer crops in soils around the world that are currently too dry or lack the nutrients needed to sustain crop growth.

5h

The sense of water—and nitrogen: Studies uncover genome-wide responses that limit crop growth

A team of researchers has tested how each gene within the genome of rice—one of the world's most important staple crops—senses and responds to combinations of water and nutrients. Its findings, published in the journal Nature Communications, potentially point to ways to engineer crops in soils around the world that are currently too dry or lack the nutrients needed to sustain crop growth.

5h

Develop mindfulness to boost your creative intelligence

Try meditation for the first time with this guided lesson or, if you already practice, enjoy being guided by a world-renowned meditation expert. Sharon Salzberg teaches mindfulness meditation for Big Think Edge. Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships. None This mindfulness lesson dispels common myths about meditation and offers a sim

5h

Technique uses well-known dye to watch amyloid plaques in the brain

While amyloid plaques have long been closely associated with mechanisms driving Alzheimer's disease, visualizing how amyloid proteins assemble continues to prove difficult. The nanometer-sized amyloid fibrils are only a fraction of the size that the best light microscopes are able to resolve. New work repurposing one of the oldest known reagents for amyloid looks to help provide a clearer picture

5h

A third of wild bee and hoverfly species are in decline in Britain

Concerns are rising about the loss of pollinators in Britain after analysis found that 33 per cent of bee and hoverfly species have declined since 1980

5h

5h

Your Online-Shopping Experience Was Grown in a Lab

As you scroll through a website—say, TheAtlantic.com—you’re sending a lot of signals. Your eyes dart from headline to headline, bypassing a few before choosing which to read. Your brow furrows at one article. You laugh at a clever turn of phrase in another. Your face flushes in anger when you watch a charged video on an issue important to you. Usually, all these physical cues go nowhere other tha

5h

Develop mindfulness to boost your creative intelligence

Try meditation for the first time with this guided lesson or, if you already practice, enjoy being guided by a world-renowned meditation expert. Sharon Salzberg teaches mindfulness meditation for Big Think Edge. Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships. None This mindfulness lesson dispels common myths about meditation and offers a sim

5h

Sverige världsbäst på att rädda för tidigt födda barn

Studien, ledd från Karolinska Institutet analyserar överlevnaden bland svenska barn som fötts mer än 3,5 månader för tidigt, i graviditetsvecka 22-26, och jämfört överlevnadssiffrorna för åren 2014-2016 med åren 2004-2007. Under den tiden drabbades 2 205 kvinnor av graviditetskomplikationer som ledde fram till extremt för tidig födsel. Samtliga svenska sjukhus är med i studien. Jämfört med 2004-2

5h

Pediatric health researchers offer insights for RSV vaccine

In healthy adults, RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus, feels like the common cold with a runny nose, chest congestion and cough. However, it is the second leading cause of death in infants. . A new publication in Frontiers in Immunology by Stephania Cormier, the LSU Department of Biological Sciences Wiener Chair professor, and colleagues offers new insights for vaccine development to prevent this

5h

Technique uses well-known dye to watch amyloid plaques in the brain

New work repurposing one of the oldest known reagents for amyloid looks to help provide a clearer picture of how fibrils come together.

5h

Student loan forgiveness programs driving physicians to primary care

A 2016 survey of graduating osteopathic medical students showed 33 percent intended to work in primary care. That represents an 18 percent increase from 2007, when only 28 percent of osteopathic medical students indicated a future career in primary care.

5h

Widespread losses of pollinating insects in Britain

Many insect pollinator species are disappearing from areas of Great Britain, a new study has found. Research led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology showed one third of wild pollinator species experienced declines in terms of areas in which they were found, while one tenth increased.

5h

How a kingfisher helped reshape Japan's bullet train

The bullet train used to make a loud boom going through tunnels – but inspiration from the natural world helped fix it.

5h

Tim Burton’s Dumbo Is a Dark Interpretation That Really Soars

Dumbo the big-eared elephant might be Tim Burton’s most complex protagonist in years. Perhaps that’s a backhanded compliment, as the director behind masterworks such as Beetlejuice and Batman has mostly churned out forgettable sludge in recent years, including another remake of a Disney animated classic (the risible Alice in Wonderland ). But in Dumbo , the master of movies about misfits ( Edward

5h

Democrats Need to Learn From Their Al Franken Mistake

Al Franken, the former Democratic senator from Minnesota, should never have been pressured, even bullied, into resigning from office. The accusations against him were not properly vetted. Their seriousness was not properly weighed. Nevertheless, the frenzy that followed the accusations resulted in his Democratic colleagues making it impossible for him to continue as a senator. His departure from

5h

Why Losing Our Newspapers Is Breaking Our Politics

Study finds newspaper closures are linked to partisanship — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

5h

A Clever New Strategy for Treating Cancer, Thanks to Darwin

submitted by /u/SirT6 [link] [comments]

5h

Why Losing Our Newspapers Is Breaking Our Politics

Study finds newspaper closures are linked to partisanship — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Youtube og Facebook har fået nok: Tech-giganterne bekæmper vaccine-vrøvl

Fjernede bøger og søgninger uden resultat er blandt tiltag mod indhold, der advarer mod vaccination.

5h

Fabrik, havn og tunnelportal: Her er de første byggerier til Femern-forbindelsen

Folketinget har givet grønt lys til at starte Femern-byggeriet på dansk grund, og Femern A/S er allerede klar med flere større anlægsplaner.

5h

Bees: Many British pollinating insects in decline, study shows

Rarer pollinators are struggling and scientists say this could threaten the UK's long-term food security.

5h

Interior Nominee Intervened to Block Report on Endangered Species

While serving as deputy secretary, David Bernhardt, President Trump’s choice to lead the Interior Department, adopted a regulatory approach favored by the pesticide industry.

5h

Spending too much time sitting down linked to around early 50,000 deaths per year in the UK

Spending large amounts of time sitting or lounging around during the day is linked to around 50,000 deaths per year in the UK, suggests a new study.

5h

Trees are crucial to the future of our cities

The shade of a single tree can provide welcome relief from the hot summer sun. But when that single tree is part of a small forest, it creates a profound cooling effect. Trees play a big role in keeping our towns and cities cool.

5h

Deep time tracking devices: Fossil barnacles reveal prehistoric whale migrations

Long-distance migrations are common for large whales, but when in their evolutionary past did whales begin to migrate and why? Scientists looked for these answers in fossil whale barnacles.

5h

How Smarter Technology Will Feed the Planet

A tech revolution in agriculture is improving yields and driving down waste — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Biggest T. rex Ever Discovered Was Covered in Battle Scars

During its heyday 66 million years ago, Tyrannosaurus rex was one of the fiercest creatures on Earth. Now, one specimen discovered almost 30 years ago is revealing that the animals grew even larger than fossils have led some to believe. Scientists estimate the behemoth dinosaur weighed close to 10 tons and was about 30 years old. Its age is likely what allowed it to grow so big, the researchers sa

5h

5h

Climate change petition: Oxford students campaign for better teaching on subject

Four school pupils are petitioning for the subject to be taken more seriously in schools.

5h

Widespread losses of pollinating insects in Britain

Many insect pollinator species are disappearing from areas of Great Britain, a new study has found.

5h

How Smarter Technology Will Feed the Planet

A tech revolution in agriculture is improving yields and driving down waste — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

NASA Cancels First All-Female Spacewalk

Space Sub The first all-female spacewalk will have to wait. Earlier this month, NASA confirmed that an International Space Station spacewalk scheduled for March 29 would be the first to feature only female astronauts . But on Monday, the agency announced that male astronaut Nick Hague would be joining Christina Koch for the spacewalk in place of Anne McClain — though that doesn’t mean the first a

5h

The sense of water — and nitrogen: Studies uncover genome-wide responses that limit crop growth

A team of researchers has tested how each gene within the genome of rice–one of the world's most important staple crops–senses and responds to combinations of water and nutrients.

5h

Early valve replacement versus watchful waiting in patients with severe aortic stenosis

Patients with severe aortic stenosis who have no symptoms may benefit more from an aggressive strategy of early valve replacement than from a conservative watch-and-wait approach, according to new research published today online in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

5h

Tumor-associated immune cells hinder frontline chemotherapy drug in pancreatic cancer

A frontline chemotherapy drug given to patients with pancreatic cancer is made less effective because similar compounds released by tumor-associated immune cells block the drug's action, research led by the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center found.

5h

Widespread losses of pollinating insects in Britain

Many insect pollinator species are disappearing from areas of Great Britain, a new study has found.

5h

Cold water currently slowing fastest Greenland glacier

NASA research shows that Jakobshavn Glacier, which has been Greenland's fastest-flowing and fastest-thinning glacier for the last 20 years, has made an unexpected about-face. The glacier is still adding to global sea level rise, but at a slower rate.

5h

How tree diversity regulates invading forest pests

Relationships between tree diversity and pest diversity follow a hump-shaped curve. That's the finding of a national study of US forests that compared two county-level data sets.

5h

Anxiety-associated brain regions regulate threat responses in monkeys

Damage to parts of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), a region within the prefrontal cortex, heightens monkeys' defensive responses to threat, according to new research. The study proposes a critical role for subregions of this brain area in different anxiety disorders.

5h

Researchers unveil effects of dust particles on cloud properties

Scientists have generated significant findings that highlight the impact of high-latitude dusts on the conversion of clouds' water droplets to ice — or glaciation — within low-level clouds in the Arctic region. These results contribute to a better understanding of factors at the land surface and how they affect cloud formations.

5h

Earth's deep mantle flows dynamically

As ancient ocean floors plunge over 1,000 km into the Earth's deep interior, they cause hot rock in the lower mantle to flow much more dynamically than previously thought, finds a new study. The discovery answers long-standing questions on the nature and mechanisms of mantle flow in the inaccessible part of deep Earth. This is key to understanding how quickly Earth is cooling, and the dynamic evol

5h

Diabetes treatment may keep dementia, Alzheimer's at bay

A new study comparing people with diabetes, prediabetes and normal blood sugar finds that diabetes, left untreated, could mean a higher likelihood of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's disease.

5h

CRISPR-chip enables digital detection of DNA without amplification

Researchers have found multiple applications for the CRISPR gene editing technology since it came into use by the scientific community.

5h

EU Parliament Passes Controversial “Meme Ban”

The Final Vote It’s official: the European Parliament has finally approved the controversial Copyright Directive, which is designed to overhaul online copyright law in the EU. The law is divisive. Especially Article 13: opponents call it a “meme ban,” and say it’ll limit freedom of speech by forcing “upload filters” on any user-uploaded content and give big tech an even stronger grip online. Advo

6h

Bakterier ger energi

De senaste åren har forskare försökt att fånga in den elektriska ström som bakterier skapar vid sin ämnesomsättning. Strömöverföringen från själva bakterien till en mottagande elektrod har dock hittills inte varit effektiv alls. Men nu har forskare från bland annat Lunds universitet konstruerat en lite effektivare strömöverföring. – Vi plockar upp elektroner från bakterien och överför dessa till

6h

Vådan av en ständig kemikaliemix i vardagen

Nuvarande riskbedömningar fokuserar på en kemikalie i sänder, men i realiteten exponeras vi hela tiden för många olika konstgjorda ämnen samtidigt. – Vi underskattar systematiskt hälsorisken som kemikalieblandningar utgör, säger professor Åke Bergman, vid Institutionen för miljövetenskap och analytisk kemi, Stockholms universitet, och ledare för forskningsprojektet EDC-MixRisk. EDC-MixRisk har un

6h

Naturopaths use deceptive tactics to support pseudoscience

Earlier this year, a new review paper was published claiming to show evidence that naturopathy was effective (Myers et al. 2019). I’m a bit late to the game on this one, but I still want to briefly talk about this … Continue reading →

6h

6h

Joseph Thomas just earned $33.8 million in a $112.5 million settlement with Duke. Here’s his story.

Tomorrow is Joe Thomas’s 35th birthday. And earlier this week, he received quite a birthday present, even if it wasn’t intended that way: Thomas earned a $33.75 million payout from a lawsuit he filed against Duke University six years ago. As Retraction Watch readers may recall, Thomas was the whistleblower in a case alleging scientific … Continue reading Joseph Thomas just earned $33.8 million in

6h

Trilobites: What Termites Can Teach Us About Cooling Our Buildings

“We think humans are the best designers, but this is not really true,” a researcher said.

6h

Glaciers May Have Covered the Entire Planet—Twice – Facts So Romantic

This story was originally published by Knowable Magazine. Ancient rocks suggest that ice entirely covered our planet on at least two occasions. Those events may help explain the rise of complex life that followed. Photo Illustration by pryzmat / Shutterstock The Earth has endured many changes in its 4.5-billion-year history, with some tumultuous twists and turns along the way. One especially dram

6h

Scientists shine new light on how cells coordinate eye growth in fish

New insight on how cells work together to control growth in the eyes of fish has been published today in eLife.

6h

Scientists shine new light on how cells coordinate eye growth in fish

New insight on how cells work together to control growth in the eyes of fish has been published today in eLife.

6h

Egypt discovers ancient port used by temple builders

Egypt says archaeologists have found a 3,000-year-old port where stones were transported to be used in the building of temples and obelisks.

6h

EU ignores US calls to ban Huawei in 5G security blueprint

The European Commission ignored U.S. calls to ban Chinese tech supplier Huawei as it announced Tuesday a series of cybersecurity recommendations for next-generation mobile networks.

6h

Finding the world's super poopers could save a lot of butts

Health Studies using fecal transplants to treat inflammatory bowel diseases suggest some poop may be better than others. Fecal microbiota transplants don't always work, and researchers have wondered why. Now, some scientists think the key to success may lie in the donor’s stool. It turns…

6h

Scientists uncover novel strategy to target common type of cancer

Researchers have identified a protein critical for the survival of a particular type of tumor cell, according to a study published today in eLife.

6h

Scientists shine new light on how cells coordinate eye growth in fish

New insight on how cells work together to control growth in the eyes of fish has been published today in eLife.

6h

Control of mosquito-borne diseases

Researchers from INRA, CIRAD, CEA, the University of Montpellier, and Chicago and Vanderbilt Universities in the United States have developed an innovative method for analysing the genome of the Wolbachia bacterium. This endosymbiotic* bacterium infects more than 70 percent of insects and is capable of influencing insect transmission of pathogens such as dengue or Zika virus.

6h

BridgIT, a new tool for orphan and novel enzyme reactions

Chemical engineers at EPFL have developed an online tool that can accurately assign genes and proteins to unknown 'orphan' reactions, which are a major headache for biotechnology, drug development, and even medicine.

6h

'Aneurysm Number' may help surgeons make treatment decisions

Aneurysms form as abnormal bulges over an artery, and, if ruptured, can lead to serious health complications or even death. Some can exist for a long time without rupturing, and surgery can be risky, so a parameter to help surgeons is needed. Researchers report in Physics of Fluids that they have developed a simple nondimensional parameter that depends on both geometry and flow waveform to classif

6h

Function decoded: Protein influences growth processes and hormonal signalling

The working group under Junior Professor Dr. Mathias Beller from the Institute of Mathematical Modelling of Biological Systems at Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf has analyzed the function of a lipid droplet-associated protein. They used fruit flies to demonstrate that the protein has a major impact on growth processes and their adaptation to environmental conditions. The results of the stu

6h

Sweden leads the world in saving extremely preterm babies

The survival rate among extremely preterm babies has greatly improved in Sweden, a country that offers top-class neonatal care, a study from Karolinska Institutet published in the esteemed journal JAMA reports.

6h

Probiotic bacteria evolve inside mice's GI tracts

Probiotics — which are living bacteria taken to promote digestive health — evolve once inside the body and have the potential to become less effective and sometimes even harmful, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings suggest that developers of probiotic-based therapeutics must consider how the probiotics might change after administratio

6h

HIV/tuberculosis co-infection: Tunneling towards better diagnosis

1.2 million people in the world are co-infected by the bacteria which causes tuberculosis and AIDS. This combination is deadly: it makes patient diagnosis and treatment difficult, and increases the pathogenicity of these two infectious agents. A team led by researchers at the CNRS and Inserm have revealed that in the presence of tuberculosis, HIV-1 moves from one cell to the next via nanotubes whi

6h

Mouse study examines the underpinnings of hallucinations

In a study publishing March 26 in the journal Cell Reports, researchers looked at how a hallucinogenic drug impacts the brains of mice at the level of individual neurons. They found that visual hallucinations may be triggered by a reduction in signaling within the visual cortex, rather than an increase, and by altered timing of when the neurons fire.

6h

Method predicts when batteries will die

A new testing method can tell how long batteries will last, report researchers. If manufacturers of cell-phone batteries could tell which cells will last at least two years, then they could sell only those to phone makers and send the rest to makers of less demanding devices. The technique could be useful not only in sorting manufactured cells but also in helping new battery designs reach the mar

6h

Koldt havvand bremser afsmeltning fra Grønlands største gletsjer

Afsmeltningen fra Ilulissat Isbræ er aftaget så meget, at forskere fra Nasa måtte dobbelttjekke deres beregninger. Men afsmeltningen vil tage til igen, når temperaturerne stiger, advarer de.

6h

Anti-vaxxer wins libel case in Japan in blow for scientist

Court rules that critic of HPV vaccine did not fabricate his research

6h

The Meaning of Life

Questions about living systems on other planets come with some baggage — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

How Psychedelic Drugs Create Such Weird Hallucinations

Hallucinogenic drugs seem to weaken the brain's visual processing.

6h

Probiotic bacteria evolve inside mice's GI tracts

Probiotics—which are living bacteria taken to promote digestive health—can evolve once inside the body and have the potential to become less effective and sometimes even harmful, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

6h

Function decoded: Protein influences growth processes and hormonal signalling

The working group under Junior Professor Dr. Mathias Beller from the University of Düsseldorf has analyzed the function of a lipid droplet-associated protein. They used fruit flies to demonstrate that the protein has a major impact on growth processes and the fly's adaptation to environmental conditions. The results of the study have now been published in the journal Cell Reports.

6h

Discovery of life-extension pathway in worms demonstrates new way to study aging

An enzyme-blocking molecule can extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms by as much as 45 percent, largely by modulating a cannabinoid biological pathway, according to a study from scientists at Scripps Research.

6h

Germany records hottest year in a century

Germany recorded its warmest year in 2018, a period also marked by a drought lasting months, the country's DWD weather service said Tuesday.

6h

Probiotic bacteria evolve inside mice's GI tracts

Probiotics—which are living bacteria taken to promote digestive health—can evolve once inside the body and have the potential to become less effective and sometimes even harmful, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

6h

'Aneurysm Number' may help surgeons make treatment decisions

Aneurysms form as abnormal bulges or balloonings over an artery, and, if ruptured, can lead to serious health complications or even death. Some aneurysms can exist for a long time without rupturing, and the surgery involved in treating aneurysms can be quite risky, so a parameter to help guide surgeons is needed.

6h

Function decoded: Protein influences growth processes and hormonal signalling

The working group under Junior Professor Dr. Mathias Beller from the University of Düsseldorf has analyzed the function of a lipid droplet-associated protein. They used fruit flies to demonstrate that the protein has a major impact on growth processes and the fly's adaptation to environmental conditions. The results of the study have now been published in the journal Cell Reports.

6h

The 'invisible catalyst' that can supercharge chemical reactions

New findings could revolutionise the way we create chemicals.

6h

Metal nanoclusters can be used as semiconductors: Key properties observed for first time

Tiny nanoclusters of metal atoms—such as gold and silver—have properties which mean they can be used as semiconductors, a joint Swansea-Hamburg research team has discovered.

6h

New gene potentially involved in metastasis identified

Cancers that display a specific combination of sugars, called T-antigen, are more likely to spread through the body and kill a patient. However, what regulates the appearance of T-antigen in cancer cells, the set of proteins modified with T-antigen, and the roles the T-antigen and the modified proteins play during metastasis, is not yet understood.

6h

Sound sense: Brain 'listens' for distinctive features in sounds

For humans to achieve accurate speech recognition and communicate with one another, the auditory system must recognize distinct categories of sounds – such as words – from a continuous incoming stream of sounds. This task becomes complicated when considering the variability in sounds produced by individuals with different accents, pitches, or intonations. In a Nature Communications paper, Universi

6h

New app can secure all your saved emails

Columbia Engineering researchers develop Easy Email Encryption, an app that encrypts all saved emails to prevent hacks and leaks, is easy to install and use, and works with popular email services such as Gmail, Yahoo, etc.

6h

Annovera birth control vaginal ring effectively prevents unwanted pregnancy, research finds

A recently approved contraceptive vaginal ring — the first that can be used for an entire year — is a highly effective birth control method, according to clinical trial data that will be presented Tuesday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La.

6h

Volcanic lightning may be partially fed by Earth’s natural radioactivity

Decay of radioactive atoms could boost electrical charges in eruption plumes

6h

6h

6h

What Would It Mean for AI to Become Conscious?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

6h

6h

Ferrari Built the Track-Slaying P80/C for a Single Customer

The unnamed buyer spent *dio* knows how much on a hypercar that oozes with Ferrari heritage but blazes around corners.

6h

'Scuba-diving' lizard can stay underwater for 16 minutes

A Costa-Rican lizard species may have evolved scuba-diving qualities allowing it to stay underwater for 16 minutes, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

6h

'Scuba-diving' lizard can stay underwater for 16 minutes

A Costa-Rican lizard species may have evolved scuba-diving qualities allowing it to stay underwater for 16 minutes, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

7h

PLO-formand: En god reform med få knaster

Den nye sundhedsreform vækker stor glæde hos PLO, der af aftalens parter er tiltænkt en nøglerolle i fremtidens sundhedsvæsen. Lægerne er dog fortsat kritiske overfor, at de ikke kan søge del i nærhedsfondens midler til læge- og sundhedshuse.

7h

Ekstra penge, lokale ambulancer og borgerråd: Her er aftalen om sundhedsreformen

Regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti har afsat i alt 8,5 mia. kr. til gennemførelsen af sundhedsreformen over de kommende år, som blandt andet skal gå til sundhedshuse, psykiatri og akutberedskaber i udkanten.

7h

Detecting ethylene, the fruit ripening hormone

Ethylene is a gaseous plant hormone which regulates a wide range of biological processes in plants. It is associated with the ripening processes in a number of fruits such as apples and pears. Better understanding of the effects of ethylene concentration on the ripening process can lead to improved management of fruit harvesting, storage and transportation. However, current methods used to measure

7h

Land conservation helps local economies grow

Land conservation modestly increases employment rates, a traditional indicator of economic growth, according to an analysis of New England cities and towns, led by scientists at Amherst College, Harvard Forest, the Highstead Foundation, and Boston University.

7h

Wagers winter plants make to survive

Spend water or save water? Grow or reproduce? For the tiny desert plants that bloom during the winter, the choices are life-or-death gambles, and ecologists at the University of Arizona have identified the wagers that will win.

7h

Ethiopian Airlines CEO: 737 Max 8 Stall Prevention Software Active During Crash

The CEO of Ethiopian Airlines has stated that Flight 302's anti-stall system was active when the aircraft crashed. It's the strongest statement yet implying that the plane's MCAS system was responsible for the disaster. The post Ethiopian Airlines CEO: 737 Max 8 Stall Prevention Software Active During Crash appeared first on ExtremeTech .

7h

Sperm with damaged DNA may cause some repeat miscarriages

An analysis of semen from men whose partners have experienced multiple miscarriages revealed abnormalities, a small study finds.

7h

A new class of drug that could prevent depression and PTSD | Rebecca Brachman

Current treatments for depression and PTSD only suppress symptoms, if they work at all. What if we could prevent these diseases from developing altogether? Neuroscientist and TED Fellow Rebecca Brachman shares the story of her team's accidental discovery of a new class of drug that, for the first time ever, could prevent the negative effects of stress — and boost a person's ability to recover and

7h

Land conservation helps local economies grow

Land conservation modestly increases employment rates, a traditional indicator of economic growth, according to an analysis of New England cities and towns, led by scientists at Amherst College, Harvard Forest, the Highstead Foundation, and Boston University.

7h

Wagers winter plants make to survive

Spend water or save water? Grow or reproduce? For the tiny desert plants that bloom during the winter, the choices are life-or-death gambles, and ecologists at the University of Arizona have identified the wagers that will win.

7h

Salmonella could be combated by enhancing body's natural process

Autophagy — the process of recycling cellular material in the body, can help combat Salmonella and other pathogens according to researchers at the School of Life Sciences, University of Warwick who have studied how autophagy can get rid of bacteria, and prevent diseases developing.

7h

Metal nanoclusters can be used as semiconductors: Key properties observed for first time

Tiny nanoclusters of metal atoms — such as gold and silver — have properties which mean they can be used as semiconductors, a joint Swansea-Hamburg research team has discovered. The finding opens the door to a wide range of potential new applications, from phone displays and flatter screens to wearable technology.

7h

Tracing the process of nitrous oxide formation in the ocean

26 March 2019/Kiel. Nitrogen is an essential element for both the life on land and in the oceans. Moreover, it affects the climate of Earth. However, many factors in the nitrogen cycle are not yet known or sufficiently understood. Marine chemists at the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now for the first time been able to measure a direct indicator of a key process of the nitrog

7h

Immune-repelling protein prolongs function, survival of human stem-cell-derived beta cells

Encapsulating human stem-cell-derived beta cells in microcapsules made with an immune-cell-repelling protein restored glucose metabolism in diabetic mice and protected the cells from immune system attack, preventing the buildup of fibrotic tissue that has plagued previous trials of encapsulated beta cells.

7h

Duckweed: The low-down on a tiny plant

An international research team led by researchers from the University of Münster and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology (both Germany) have found why the giant duckweed has a low genetic diversity despite its large population size: low mutation rates contribute to low genetic diversity. The results are relevant for future studies on the evolution of plants and will accelerate the use of

7h

New brain research challenges our understanding of sleep

An international study headed by researchers from Aarhus University has for the first time uncovered the large-scale brain patterns and networks which control sleep, providing knowledge which in the future may help the large proportion of people who experience problems sleeping.

7h

Discovery of life-extension pathway in worms demonstrates new way to study aging

An enzyme-blocking molecule can extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms by as much as 45 percent, largely by modulating a cannabinoid biological pathway, according to a study from scientists at Scripps Research.

7h

Cultivation of new mint crops could boost rural economies in Uganda

A new collaborative project will support the development of local communities in rural Uganda by creating and commercialising new varieties of mint.

7h

The future of stretchable electronics

Stretchable electronics represent a promising new technology for next-generation wearable devices, according to a review published in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.

7h

Forskarnas plan: Göra bilar mer energisnåla – med hjälp av savoykål

Det går åt mycket bränsle till att övervinna luftmotstånd, för både bilar och flygplan. Nu pågår forskning på KTH i Stockholm för att få fram ytor som hämmar friktionen mot luften och minskar bränsleåtgången. Och savoykål ger en ledtråd.

7h

This Robot Can Make as Much Gourmet Coffee as Four Baristas

Mocha-Making Machine Briggo is taking the human barista out of the coffee-buying experience. The Austin-based startup has built a fully automated robotic “Coffee Haus” capable of filling 100 gourmet coffee orders in one hour. For perspective, that’s about the same output as four human baristas. The machine is already in use in seven Texas locations, with an eighth headed to the San Francisco Inte

7h

The War to Remotely Control Self-Driving Cars Heats Up

Designated Driver is just the latest competitor to enter the market for the teleoperation tech that will make robo-cars work.

7h

Dynasties still run the world, study finds

Want to get into politics? It helps if you come from the right family.

7h

Why endangered species matter

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) was established in 1973 to protect "imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend" and help them recover.

7h

Muon g-2 begins second run

Earlier this month, the Muon g-2 ("g minus two") experiment at Fermilab began its second run to search for hidden particles and forces.

7h

What happened before the Big Bang?

A team of scientists has proposed a powerful new test for inflation, the theory that the universe dramatically expanded in size in a fleeting fraction of a second right after the Big Bang. Their goal is to give insight into a long-standing question: what was the universe like before the Big Bang?

7h

Why endangered species matter

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) was established in 1973 to protect "imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend" and help them recover.

7h

Deciphering the walnut genome

California produces 99 percent of the walnuts grown in the United States. New research could provide a major boost to the state's growing $1.6 billion walnut industry by making it easier to breed walnut trees better equipped to combat the soil-borne pathogens that now plague many of California's 4,800 growers.

7h

Hvad mener du: Skal pensionisternes indflydelse i IDA begrænses?

I dag begynder valget til IDAs repræsentantskab. Der kan stemmes på både erhvervsaktive og pensionister, men ved kommende valg skal kun pensionister, der betaler fuldt kontingent, have indflydelse i IDAs 'folketing', hedder det i et oplæg fra Privatansattes Liste.

7h

Get Yourself a Nemesis

No one has more nemeses than the writer Roxane Gay. Since 2011, she has tweeted blind items about various foes in a stream of captivating updates. “All last night, I visualized crushing my nemesis this weekend,” she tweeted in 2013. “My nemesis is having a good year professionally and has clear skin. It’s a lot to take,” she noted last summer . Gay’s anonymous nemeses have become so well known th

7h

Coastal Conservation Plan Sparks Fight Over Sand

Beach communities that rely on dredging to replenish protective dunes object to expanded federal protections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Deciphering the walnut genome

California produces 99 percent of the walnuts grown in the United States. New research could provide a major boost to the state's growing $1.6 billion walnut industry by making it easier to breed walnut trees better equipped to combat the soil-borne pathogens that now plague many of California's 4,800 growers.

7h

Up to 500,000 displaced by southern Africa cyclone

Survivors of a cyclone that pummelled southern Africa began receiving medicine, food and tents Tuesday as floodwaters receded, while officials warned up to 500,000 people are displaced in the storm-struck region.

7h

European Parliament adopts copyright reform in blow to big tech

The European Parliament on Tuesday adopted copyright reforms championed by news publishers and the media business, in defiance of the tech giants that lobbied against it.

7h

Death toll in 'unprecedented' Iran floods rises to 21

The death toll from major floods swamping much of Iran has risen to 21, emergency services said Tuesday, as authorities sent safety warnings to mobile telephones across the country.

7h

Facebook blocks more accounts over influence campaigns

Facebook said Tuesday it shut down more than 2,600 fake accounts linked to Iran, Russia, Macedonia and Kosovo and aiming to influence political sentiment in various parts of the world.

7h

The hunt is on for closest Earth-like planets

NASA's new Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is designed to ferret out habitable exoplanets, but with hundreds of thousands of sunlike and smaller stars in its camera views, which of those stars could host planets like our own?

7h

Interns ‘kick the butt’ of image compression algorithm

When file size is restricted, humans beat traditional algorithms at representing images, research finds. Sending a link instead of uploading a massive image is one trick humans use to convey information without burning through data. It and other tricks might inspire an entirely new class of image compression algorithms, according to research by a team of Stanford University engineers and high sch

7h

Schools are asking students to bring digital devices to class, but are they actually being used?

It's been over ten years since Kevin Rudd's Digital Education Revolution placed small laptops (also called Rudd-tops) into the hands of every Year 9 and up Australian student. Once the scheme was deemed unsustainable, for obvious reasons, many schools brought in a "bring your own device" (BYOD) scheme.

7h

Violence against long-term care staff 'normalized'

Violence against staff working in long-term care facilities — including physical assault, verbal abuse and sexual harassment — has become 'normalized', according to a new University of Stirling study.

7h

Trained musicians perform better — at paying attention

Musical training produces lasting improvements to a cognitive mechanism that helps individuals be more attentive and less likely to be distracted by irrelevant stimuli while performing demanding tasks.

7h

New 'pulsing' ultrasound technique improves drug delivery to brains of mice

Using rapid short-pulse sequences of ultrasound helps drugs reach the brains of mice, according to new research.

7h

Study finds no causal link between smoking and dementia

A recent study published in the Journal for Alzheimer's Disease has demonstrated that smoking is not associated with a higher risk of dementia. The study used Competing Risk Analysis to determine whether there was a connection between smoking and dementia once the competing risk of death was included.

7h

Bringing endangered species back from the brink

A technique to produce eggs from ovarian tissue in the lab may offer hope for critically endangered species like the Northern White Rhino that have passed what is currently considered the point of no return.

7h

In the future, everyone might use quantum computers

Computers were once considered high-end technology, only accessible to scientists and trained professionals. But there was a seismic shift in the history of computing during the second half of the 1970s. It wasn't just that machines became much smaller and more powerful—though, of course, they did. It was the shift in who would use computers and where: They became available to everyone to use in t

7h

Sum-of-Three-Cubes Problem Solved for ‘Stubborn’ Number 33

Mathematicians long wondered whether it’s possible to express the number 33 as the sum of three cubes — that is, whether the equation 33 = x ³+ y ³+ z ³ has a solution. They knew that 29 could be written as 3³ + 1³ + 1³, for instance, whereas 32 is not expressible as the sum of three integers each raised to the third power. But the case of 33 went unsolved for 64 years. Now, Andrew Booker , a mat

7h

Bringing endangered species back from the brink

A technique to produce eggs from ovarian tissue in the lab may offer hope for critically endangered species like the Northern White Rhino that have passed what is currently considered the point of no return.

7h

New research uncovers why we share or hide knowledge from co-workers

Employees who enjoy their jobs and gain meaning from their roles are more likely to share information with their colleagues, new research led by Curtin University has found.

7h

Apollo 11 brought a message of peace to the Moon—but Neil and Buzz almost forgot to leave it behind

"How about that package out of your sleeve? Get that?" is certainly not the most famous phrase uttered by a human while on the Moon. And the items nestled in a small packet that astronaut Buzz Aldrin had stowed in the pocket just below the shoulder of his extravehicular mobility unit were certainly not mission critical. They were sentimental objects, intended to be left on the Moon purely for symb

7h

Scientists develop protocol for chemical imaging at the nanoscale

Chemical imaging of surfaces is critical to understand the relationships between structural, chemical and functional properties in disciplines ranging across the chemical, material and biological sciences. Conventional methods of chemical analysis are typically restricted by limitations of low sensitivity, microscale spatial resolution, extraneous labelling, high vacuum and destruction of the samp

7h

Seeds inherit memories from their mother

Seeds remain in a dormant state, a temporary blockage of their germination, as long as environmental conditions are not ideal for germination. The depth of this dormancy, which is influenced by various factors, is inherited from their mother, as researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have previously shown. Today, they reveal in the journal eLife how this maternal imprint i

7h

Bivalves reveal big picture of climate change

Climate change has always left its footprint on land and in the seas where bivalves such as mussels, scallops, oysters have lived for millions of years. Their limited mobility has been to their disadvantage resulting in most of them dying in the on-site whenever major unpleasant changes occurred in their environment…

7h

7h

Seeds inherit memories from their mother

Seeds remain in a dormant state, a temporary blockage of their germination, as long as environmental conditions are not ideal for germination. The depth of this dormancy, which is influenced by various factors, is inherited from their mother, as researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have previously shown. Today, they reveal in the journal eLife how this maternal imprint i

7h

Bivalves reveal big picture of climate change

Climate change has always left its footprint on land and in the seas where bivalves such as mussels, scallops, oysters have lived for millions of years. Their limited mobility has been to their disadvantage resulting in most of them dying in the on-site whenever major unpleasant changes occurred in their environment…

7h

Like geese, cancer cells play follow the leader

Cancer cells know how to exploit the power of drafting, letting someone else do the hard work of moving forward while you coast behind. Building on the relatively new discovery that metastatic cancer cells leave tumors and travel in clusters, not singles, biomedical engineers learned a leader-follower behavior helps the process along. Like geese and race car drivers, the front cell expends vastly

7h

The growth of a wheat weed can be predicted to reduce the use of herbicides

Wild oats are a kind of grass weed and one of the greatest enemies of certain grains such as barley, rye and wheat. Wild oats compete with these crops by taking their water, light and nutrients, and their density can double in just a year, causing production losses reaching up to 40%. The AGR124 research group, made up of members from the Department of Graphic and Geomatics Engineering at the Univ

7h

7h

50,000 warehouses to use 4 million robots by 2025, says report

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

7h

Male birth control pill passes first stage of safety trials

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

7h

Half a degree more warming may cause dramatic differences on drought-flood compound risks

The Paris Agreement set goals of keeping global temperature rise below 2.0°C and working to keep that rise to 1.5°C to mitigate impacts of climate change. To predict how these temperature rises will intensify the hydrologic cycle, researchers developed a new metric that reflects dry and wet spell intensity and conducted multi-model ensemble experiments. The scenario with 0.5°C more warming showed

7h

First explanation for mechanism behind magnetism-driven NTE derived in 40 years

Most materials expand upon heating and contract upon cooling. Some behave inversely, a phenomenon known as negative thermal expansion (NTE). NTE observed in inverse perovskite antiferromagnets Mn3AN had remained unexplained for the past 40 years. However, a recent study by scientists successfully provided a theoretical explanation to this mechanism. When turn into practical use, this could help de

7h

Seeds inherit memories from their mother

Seeds remain in a dormant state as long as environmental conditions are not ideal for germination. The depth of this sleep is inherited from their mother. UNIGE'Researchers reveal how this maternal imprint is transmitted through fragments of 'interfering' RNAs, which inactivate genes, and that a similar mechanism enables to transmit another imprint, that of the temperatures present during the deve

7h

Rice cultivation: Balance of phosphorus and nitrogen determines growth and yield

Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences CEPLAS at the University of Cologne cooperates with partners from Beijing to develop new basic knowledge on nutrient signalling pathways in rice plants. This knowledge can contribute to greater food security.

7h

Peking University makes progress in Materials Genome project by modifying the size of atoms

Pan' group takes a first step towards a novel 'effective atomic size' (EAS) model, which takes into consideration the impact of the types and number of neighboring atoms on the relationship between ionic radii and interatomic distances. A set of EAS radii for ionic crystals has been compiled. This model can serve as a foundation to analyze the structure of newly-discovered compounds and to acceler

7h

Quick thinking? It's all down to timing

Synaptic plasticity, which underlies learning and memory, involves the strengthening and weakening of synapses. This process is affected by the relative timing of spikes in electrical activity in the pre- and postsynaptic neurons. Researchers at NUS Medicine have now found that, when both spikes occur simultaneously (or within tens of milliseconds of each other), the synapses were strengthened for

7h

What Would It Mean for AI to Become Conscious?

As artificial intelligence systems take on more tasks and solve more problems, it’s hard to say which is rising faster: our interest in them or our fear of them. Futurist Ray Kurzweil famously predicted that “By 2029, computers will have emotional intelligence and be convincing as people.” We don’t know how accurate this prediction will turn out to be. Even if it takes more than 10 years, though,

7h

From the archive

From the archive From the archive, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00901-8 How Nature reported improved decision-making rules for betting in 1969, and an experiment in international wireless telephony from 1919.

7h

H ardy Brazilian frogs dig deep to escape drought

H ardy Brazilian frogs dig deep to escape drought H ardy Brazilian frogs dig deep to escape drought, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00975-4 Amphibians can burrow to depths of more than 1.5 metres in the damp sand underlying dry waterways.

7h

Long Before Selfies and Memes, People Wanted to Share Pics

*Snap+Share*, a new exhibit at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, explores the evolution of sharing images, from postcards to Ceiling Cat.

7h

Smart tech that turns a home into a party house

Technology Use your connected gadgets for their intended purpose: getting the party started. With a single command, you can turn your smart home into a dance club.

7h

The growth of a wheat weed can be predicted to reduce the use of herbicides

Wild oats are a kind of grass weed and one of the greatest enemies of certain grains such as barley, rye and wheat. Wild oats compete with these crops by taking their water, light and nutrients, and their density can double in just a year, causing production losses reaching up to 40%. The AGR124 research group, made up of members from the Department of Graphic and Geomatics Engineering at the Univ

7h

Researchers develop a hydrogel for enhanced cell encapsulation and delivery

Tissue engineering is a medical solution that uses living cells to repair or replace structural tissue, such as blood vessels, bone, cartilage, etc. Polymeric hydrogels, in both solid and liquid forms, are used as a delivery system for living cells, acting as a protective layer to contain the cells for transplantation into patients to replace diseased or damaged cells.

7h

Researchers develop a hydrogel for enhanced cell encapsulation and delivery

Tissue engineering is a medical solution that uses living cells to repair or replace structural tissue, such as blood vessels, bone, cartilage, etc. Polymeric hydrogels, in both solid and liquid forms, are used as a delivery system for living cells, acting as a protective layer to contain the cells for transplantation into patients to replace diseased or damaged cells.

8h

A #MeToo Nightmare in the World of Competitive College Speech

In the lobby of a deserted student-union building in Peoria, Illinois, the George Mason University speech team falls into formation. Following their coach, a petite, white-haired man in a silk designer tie, they walk single file down an empty hallway and into an empty classroom, where someone plugs in a speaker, turns up the music, and announces that it’s time to dance. On this rainy Saturday mor

8h

Fragtskib fik motorstop lige efter 'Viking Sky': Styrtsø førte til kortslutning i eltavle

Blot få timer efter, at Viking Sky fik blackout, skete det samme med bulkskibet Hagland Captain. Nu skal det bygges om til hybrid drift.

8h

Purdue Pharma and Sacklers Reach $270 Million Settlement in Opioid Lawsuit

The agreement, negotiated with the state of Oklahoma, will allow the maker of OxyContin to avoid a televised courtroom trial.

8h

Inclusion of a crop model in a climate model

Crop models are parameterization schemes that simulate the processes of crop development and production. Their inclusion in climate models can promote the simulation ability of climate models, according to Dr. Jing Zou at the Institute of Oceanographic Instrumentation, Qilu University of Technology.

8h

Optical toric code platform sets new record

Anyons form the basis for topological quantum computation and error correction, where the topological aspect of anyonic braiding is one of the important features that gives rise to fault tolerance. More qubits to control will assist researchers to explore further.

8h

Ancient trash mounds suggest climate change could have hastened fall of part of Byzantine Empire

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Israel has found evidence that suggests rapid climate change might have been a factor in the fall of part of the Byzantine Empire. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of trash mounds outside the boundaries of the ancient settlement of Elusa and what they found.

8h

Color-changing sparks

Sparks are a fascinating phenomenon well-known from campfires, flint stones and electric sparklers and other pyrotechnic articles. Looking at sparks more closely reveals the limited colors in which they appear. Dark red-orange sparks are known from charcoal, iron powder leads to yellow/golden sparks, and hot burning elemental metal powders such as aluminum and titanium can form bright white sparks

8h

United against jammers: Researchers develop more secure method for data transmission

The motto 'united we stand, divided we fall' has found new application in cyber security. Machines must transmit information in order to process it. A self-driving car, for instance, is designed to collect information and respond in kind. But what if there's another, adversarial signal in the mix, jeopardizing the communication? A research team at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign develop

8h

New structural phase transition may broaden the applicability of photo-responsive solids

Japanese scientists discovered a new type of structural phase transition of an organic crystal called the photo-triggered phase transition. Under this phenomenon, the crystal, which exhibits a thermal phase transition that is reversible by heating and cooling, transforms to the identical phase upon light irradiation at temperatures lower than the thermal transition temperature. The photo-triggered

8h

Artificial intelligence identifies key patterns from video footage of infant movements

A simple video recording of an infant lying in bed can be analyzed with artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to extract quantitative information useful for assessing the child's development as well as the efficacy of ongoing therapy.

8h

How the brain 'mentalizes' cooperation

Researchers identify a part of the brain that helps execute cooperative tasks.

8h

Ultra-sharp images make old stars look absolutely marvelous!

Using high-resolution adaptive optics imaging from the Gemini Observatory, astronomers have uncovered one of the oldest star clusters in the Milky Way Galaxy. The remarkably sharp image looks back into the early history of our Universe and sheds new insights on how our Galaxy formed.

8h

Debt relief improves psychological and cognitive function, enabling better decision-making

A new study by the Social Service Research Centre at the National University of Singapore demonstrates that reducing the number of debt accounts lowers the mental burden of the poor, thereby improving psychological and cognitive performance. This enables better decision-making. Hence, poverty interventions should be structured to improve psychological and cognitive functioning in addition to addre

8h

A key player in the maturation of sexual organs

Puberty is a period of extensive changes of body morphology and function. Relatively little is known about what sets the whole process in motion. Thanks to studies in the tiny worm C. elegans, the group of Helge Großhans is getting closer to understanding how the onset of puberty is genetically controlled. Recently, they uncovered a mechanism that initiates sexual organ maturation.

8h

Cellular microRNA detection with miRacles

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding regulatory RNAs that can repress gene expression post-transcriptionally and are therefore increasingly used as biomarkers of disease. Detecting miRNAs can be arduous and expensive as they require amplification, labelling and radioactive probes. In a recent report published on Science Advances, Arun Richard Chandrasekaran and co-workers at the RNA Institute an

8h

Why photosynthesis works better for some plants than others

RuBisCO plays a key role in photosynthesis and is one of the most abundant enzymes in the world. A Japanese research team has revealed how charge distribution on RuBisCO's active sites is linked to the enzyme's ability to recognize carbon dioxide. This discovery can potentially be used to improve the carbon dioxide-fixing ability of RuBisCO, which could boost photosynthesis rates in plants, increa

8h

Electronics at the nanoscale: Challenges and opportunities for making metal nanowires

Silver, gold and copper nanowires are leading contenders for next-generation nanoscale devices, however greater understanding of how they work and improved production methods are needed before they can be widely used, explains a recent review in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.

8h

How empathy can help students grasp past and present

To really understand people and actions of the past, students need to empathise with the spirit of the time. By considering history from past perspectives, they are better placed to understand and evaluate other people's perspectives in the present day.

8h

Why photosynthesis works better for some plants than others

RuBisCO plays a key role in photosynthesis and is one of the most abundant enzymes in the world. A Japanese research team has revealed how charge distribution on RuBisCO's active sites is linked to the enzyme's ability to recognize carbon dioxide. This discovery can potentially be used to improve the carbon dioxide-fixing ability of RuBisCO, which could boost photosynthesis rates in plants, increa

8h

A key player in the maturation of sexual organs

Puberty is a period of extensive changes of body morphology and function. Relatively little is known about what sets the whole process in motion. Thanks to studies in the tiny worm C. elegans, the group of Helge Großhans is getting closer to understanding how the onset of puberty is genetically controlled. Recently, they uncovered a mechanism that initiates sexual organ maturation.

8h

Spotify acquires another podcast network to keep building its original show catalog

Spotify announced today that it’s acquired Parcast, a podcast network that specializes in crime, mystery, and science fiction shows, for an undisclosed amount. The news follows …

8h

Tech Used to Be for the Rich. Now They’re Paying to Avoid It.

Human Touch Milton Pedraza is an expert on how the rich spend their money. The CEO and founder of the Luxury Institute, a luxury goods and services consulting firm, recently told The New York Times that one of the hottest commodities amongst the uber-wealthy right now isn’t a flying motorcycle or $5.5 million yacht — it’s human contact. “What we are seeing now is the luxurification of human engag

8h

New Study Suggests Adult Brains Might Grow New Neurons

Neurogenesis New research has found that the brains of healthy adult humans continue to produce new neurons throughout life. The study , published Monday in Nature Medicine , is the latest on a topic that has divided neuroscientists for decades — if it holds up, it could set the groundwork for new ways to treat conditions ranging from Alzheimer’s to strokes. Back And Forth Adult human neurogenesi

8h

Race at the edge of the sun: Ions are faster than atoms

Scientists at the University of Göttingen, the Institut d'Astrophysique in Paris and the Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno have observed that ions move faster than atoms in the gas streams of a solar prominence. The results of their study were published in The Astrophysical Journal.

8h

Women are 30 percent less likely to be considered for a hiring process than men

Women are on average 30 percent less likely to be called for a job interview than men with the same characteristics. In addition, gender bias is higher for candidates with lower qualifications than those who have knowledge of an additional language and more work experience.

8h

Simulating nature's cosmic laboratory, one helium droplet at a time

Two astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and from the University of Jena have found an elegant new method to measure the energy of simple chemical reactions, under similar conditions as those encountered by atoms and molecules in the early solar system. Their method promises accurate measurements of reaction energies that can be used to understand chemical reactions under space

8h

8h

8h

Omstridt ophavsretsreform vedtaget i Europa-Parlamentet

Europa-Parlamentet har vedtaget det omstridte ophavsretsdirektiv med 348 stemmer for og 274 imod. »Jeg er enormt skuffet,« siger MEP for Folkebevægelsen mod EU Rina Ronja Kari. Koda-direktør: En sejr for demokratiet og for sund politisk dømmekraft

8h

Stort ståhej for en plan, som ikke bliver til noget

Sundhedsreformen falder til jorden, hvis meningsmålingerne står til troende – og uanset udfaldet af folketingsvalget bør der foretages en grundig, faglig analyse af sundhedssektorens problemer før der tages videre skridt.

8h

Kommuner får mere magt i ny sundhedsreform

Regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti har med en en ny sundhedsreform givet kommunerne mere ansvar. Godt, at borgmestre nu bliver tvunget til at fokusere på sundhed, siger borgmester.

8h

Artificial womb technology breaks its 4 minute mile

A major advancement in pioneering technology based around the use of an artificial womb to save extremely premature babies is being hailed as a medical and biotechnological breakthrough.

8h

Cool Earth theory sheds more light on diamonds

A QUT geologist has published a new theory on the thermal evolution of Earth billions of years ago that explains why diamonds have formed as precious gemstones rather than just lumps of common graphite.

8h

Land conservation helps local economies grow

Land conservation modestly increases employment rates, a traditional indicator of economic growth, according to an analysis of New England cities and towns, led by scientists at Amherst College, Harvard Forest, the Highstead Foundation, and Boston University.

8h

'Scuba-diving' lizard can stay underwater for 16 minutes

A Costa Rican lizard species may have evolved scuba-diving qualities allowing it to stay underwater for 16 minutes, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

8h

Discovery of life-extension pathway in worms demonstrates new way to study aging

An enzyme-blocking molecule can extend the lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms by as much as 45 percent, largely by modulating a cannabinoid biological pathway, according to a study from scientists at Scripps Research.

8h

More children could mean higher risk of heart disease

Public health researchers report that, in a national survey of 25,000 participants, 30 percent of parents who said they had five or more children had a heart condition.

8h

Wagers winter plants make to survive

In a recently published study, UA ecologists have identified the bets that the most successful annual plants place with water resources.

8h

Contraceptive jewelry could offer a new family planning approach

Family planning for women might one day be as simple as putting on an earring.

8h

Stirring Bar Contamination

Stir bars – it was the stirring bars all along. That’s the take-home from this paper , which shows definitively that (A) you cannot truly clean one of the things and that (B) the stuff that’s stuck to them can be influencing the next reaction they’re used in. At one level, I think that few organic chemists will be surprised that the Teflon-coating little thingies can be contaminated. We’ve all se

8h

VIDEO: Head Lice Up Close, And All Too Personal

Claws of the louse that afflicts human scalps fit neatly around a single human hair. Louse eggs stick to hair shafts with a sort of glue. Maybe the best remedy for you and the kids? Comb, baby, comb. (Image credit: Josh Cassidy/KQED)

8h

The ethics of artificial intelligence: Teaching computers to be good people

When people think about artificial intelligence, or AI, they can be quick to jump to the all-too-common sci-fi depiction of a heartlessly rational computer willing to kill people to fulfill its programming.

8h

New CERN study sheds light on matter-antimatter mystery

Research has unveiled a new source of particle asymmetry. Physicist Marco Gersabeck from the UK's University of Manchester explains.

8h

Fluid dynamics clue to skin cancer appearance

Physicists' model produces patterns similar to those found on melanomas. Andrew Masterson reports.

8h

A fireball with the force of 10 atomic bombs

NASA cameras capture the moment when a meteorite hots the clouds.

8h

The dead in Neolithic Catalonia took their dogs with them

Archaeologists deduce that for hundreds of years, dogs were used as ritual sacrifices in burial rites. Andrew Masterson reports.

8h

Science history: the man who didn’t invest the flush toilet

Thomas Crapper’s fame is arguably more eponymous than actual. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

8h

The True Dollar Cost of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Medical responders spend millions of tax dollars handling disease outbreaks that could have been prevented—with vaccines.

8h

DJs of the Future Don't Spin Records—They Write Code

"Live-coding" parties are the latest phenomenon in underground electronic music culture.

8h

Scientists turn back evolutionary clock to develop high-CO2-tolerant microalgae

The rapid elevation of atmospheric carbon dioxide level has led to global warming and ocean acidification. Microalgae, accounting for nearly 40 percent of global carbon dioxide fixation on Earth, are on the forefront of mankind's battle against climate change, since many of them are able to directly convert sunlight and industrial carbon dioxide into transportation fuels and energy-rich nutrients.

8h

The forces behind South and Central China's extremely hot summer

The effects of extreme warming have been felt across the globe in recent years, especially with intensely hot summers in eastern Asia, western Europe, and North America. On July 21, 2017, a weather station in Shanghai, China, recorded a high temperature of 40.9 degrees C (105.6 degrees F), the highest temperature recorded at that location since 1873. To understand what caused the extremely hot sum

8h

New paper on the phylogeny of the Brassicaceae

The mustard family Brassicaceae (also known as Crucifers, from the cross-like form of their flowers) comprises ca. 4000 species, including economically important crops such as cabbage and canola, many species adapted to extreme environments, noxious weeds, and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Despite their importance, the relationships among major lineages in the family have remained unresolv

8h

Saving the lost text of a Torah scroll

Lights—red, blue, green, orange—flash in Gregory Heyworth's multispectral imaging lab in the University of Rochester's Rush Rhees Library, strategically tucked beside Rare Books, Special Collections, and Preservation.

8h

A petrifying virus key to evolution

Scientists are constantly discovering new species.

8h

Scientist constructs artificial photosynthetic cells

A team led by associate professor Yutetsu Kuruma of the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) at Tokyo Institute of Technology has constructed simple artificial cells that can produce chemical energy that helps synthesize parts of the cells themselves. This work marks an important milestone in constructing fully photosynthetic artificial cells, and may shed light on how primordial cells used sunligh

8h

New paper on the phylogeny of the Brassicaceae

The mustard family Brassicaceae (also known as Crucifers, from the cross-like form of their flowers) comprises ca. 4000 species, including economically important crops such as cabbage and canola, many species adapted to extreme environments, noxious weeds, and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Despite their importance, the relationships among major lineages in the family have remained unresolv

8h

Physicists create Star Trek-style holograms

Star Trek's famous holodeck is a virtual reality stage that simulates any object in 3-D as if they were real. However, 3-D holographic projection has never been realized. A team of scientists from Bilkent University, Turkey, has now demonstrated the first realistic 3-D holograms that can be viewed from any angle.

8h

Scientist constructs artificial photosynthetic cells

A team led by associate professor Yutetsu Kuruma of the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI) at Tokyo Institute of Technology has constructed simple artificial cells that can produce chemical energy that helps synthesize parts of the cells themselves. This work marks an important milestone in constructing fully photosynthetic artificial cells, and may shed light on how primordial cells used sunligh

8h

A petrifying virus key to evolution

Scientists are constantly discovering new species.

8h

Climate change melts Mount Everest's ice, exposing dead bodies of past climbers

Mt. Everest is the final resting place of about 200 climbers who never made it down. Recent glacial melting, caused by climate change, has made many of the bodies previously hidden by ice and snow visible again. While many bodies are quite visible and well known, others are renowned for being lost for decades. People die trying to reach the top of Mt. Everest. While about 5,000 people have gotten

8h

The precarious, often predatory, world of credit in antebellum Virginia

Amanda Gibson is compiling evidence that traces today's predatory financial practices to economic victimization of free and enslaved African Americans in the pre-emancipation South.

8h

Behandlingsråd skal prioritere nye behandlinger i sundhedsvæsenet

Regeringen og DF er tirsdag blevet enige om en længe ventet sundhedsreform. Det betyder bl.a., at Medicinrådet udvides med et behandlingsråd, som skal vurdere nye dyre medicinteknologier og behandingsformer. Fornuftigt initiativ, der godt kunne bruge flere penge, mener Lægeforeningen og Danske Patienter.

9h

9h

Native marsupial helping revive urban bushland in Perth's north

A native marsupial population that was successfully relocated to a pocket of urban bushland in the northern suburb of Craigie is now helping to regenerate the bush.

9h

Discovery to help wheat cope with salty soils

Scientists from The University of Western Australia have discovered two enzymes that explain the sensitivity of wheat plants to salty soils.

9h

Native marsupial helping revive urban bushland in Perth's north

A native marsupial population that was successfully relocated to a pocket of urban bushland in the northern suburb of Craigie is now helping to regenerate the bush.

9h

Discovery to help wheat cope with salty soils

Scientists from The University of Western Australia have discovered two enzymes that explain the sensitivity of wheat plants to salty soils.

9h

9h

Breeding baby corals for warmer seas

A unique collection of baby corals has just begun to grow under the waves of the Coral Sea.

9h

For a long time, the West shaped the world. That time is over.

Our theories about the world, even about history or the geopolitics of the present, tend to be shaped by Anglo perspectives of the Western industrial democracies, particularly those in the United States and the United Kingdom. The West, however, is not united. Canada, for instance, acts in many ways that are not in line with American or British policies, particularly in regard to populism. Even i

9h

How will retreating from the sea affect our health?

Managed retreat in the face of sea level rise will be a mixed bag, researchers predict. Sea-level rise associated with climate change is a concern for many island and coastal communities. While the dangers may seem far off for large coastal cities like Miami or New Orleans, the advancing oceans are already displacing some small indigenous communities, and many others are at risk around the world.

9h

Samsung issues earnings warning in wake of falling chip prices and OLED demand

The tech giant said it expects Q1 2019 profits to miss expectations due to the falling price and demand of its chips. “The company expects the scope of price declines in main memory chip products …

9h

Machine learning reveals rapid material classification

A research team at The University of Tokyo has developed a powerful machine learning algorithm that predicts the properties and structures of unknown samples from an electron spectrum. This process may rapidly accelerate the process of discovering and testing novel nanomachines, solar cells, and other electronic devices.

9h

Genome-editing record smashed with 13,000 edits made in one cell

A team led by George Church has used CRISPR to make a record number of DNA changes in one cell, taking us a step closer to thoroughly rewriting our genomes

9h

Breeding baby corals for warmer seas

A unique collection of baby corals has just begun to grow under the waves of the Coral Sea.

9h

These Chinese fossil deposits shed light on an explosive period in evolution

Science Tracking the Cambrian Explosion, when the oceans first filled with complex animal life. The speed of transition seemed so shockingly abrupt that it amazed and worried even Charles Darwin. It has long been called the “Cambrian explosion." We now know it was…

9h

New 3-D printing approach makes cell-scale lattice structures

A new way of making scaffolding for biological cultures could make it possible to grow cells that are highly uniform in shape and size, and potentially with certain functions. The new approach uses an extremely fine-scale form of 3-D printing, using an electric field to draw fibers one-tenth the width of a human hair.

9h

Asteroids, hydrogen make great recipe for life on Mars

A new study reveals asteroid impacts on ancient Mars could have produced key ingredients for life if the Martian atmosphere was rich in hydrogen. An early hydrogen-rich atmosphere on Mars could also explain how the planet remained habitable after its atmosphere thinned. The study used data from NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars and was conducted by researchers on Curiosity's Sample Analysis at Mars (

9h

Menu change for corals in warming reefs

Warming coral reefs are losing their capacity to feed themselves from sunlight, making nutritious deep ocean water critical for their survival, according to a University of Queensland study.

9h

Migrants are their country's best and brightest

People who choose to emigrate are those with the best education. This flies in the face of popular opinion, according to researcher Costanza Biavaschi, an associate professor at the Department of Economics at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

9h

Combating fatigue with a smartwatch application

Scientists from EPFL, UNIL and local startup be.care have developed a system that uses heart rate variability to detect fatigue and identify what kind it is. The system then uses the results to suggest lifestyle changes that can make a difference. An initial test has been carried out on university students under real-world conditions.

9h

Menu change for corals in warming reefs

Warming coral reefs are losing their capacity to feed themselves from sunlight, making nutritious deep ocean water critical for their survival, according to a University of Queensland study.

9h

Deep-sea drillers investigate shedding of Antarctic icebergs

The 5.4 million square-mile Antarctic ice sheet is by far the greatest mass of fresh water on earth. If all it were to melt, it would raise global sea levels some 70 meters (220 feet), driving human civilization inland, and obliterating some nations completely. With human-induced climate change now proceeding rapidly, scientists want to know how rapidly the ice might react. One way to find out: st

9h

New cellulose-based material represents three sensors in one

Cellulose soaked in a carefully designed polymer mixture acts as a sensor to measure pressure, temperature and humidity at the same time. The measurements are completely independent of each other. The ability to measure pressure, temperature and humidity is important in many applications, such as monitoring patients at home, robotics, electronic skin, functional textiles, surveillance and security

9h

Pets and owners—you can learn a lot about one by studying the other

There's an old saying that pets and their owners become more similar as time goes by. There may be some truth in that, but can we use information about owners to improve veterinary care?

9h

Biologists report which animals are captured by the carnivorous waterwheel plant

Freiburg biologists Dr. Simon Poppinga, Anna Westermeier and Prof. Dr. Thomas Speck, working in cooperation with researchers from the Ruhr University Bochum and the Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Třeboň (Czech Republic), have for the first time reconstructed in detail the menu of the carnivorous waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa). The study shows that the plant is no

9h

9h

SA doctors use 3D printing in world's first ever middle ear transplant

submitted by /u/Rumple_Tweezer [link] [comments]

9h

9h

9h

9h

Gold soaks up boron, spits out borophene

In the heat of a furnace, boron atoms happily dive into a bath of gold. And when things get cool, they resurface as coveted borophene.

9h

Cool Earth theory sheds more light on diamonds

A QUT geologist has published a new theory on the thermal evolution of Earth billions of years ago that explains why diamonds have formed as precious gemstones rather than just lumps of common graphite.

9h

Pets and owners—you can learn a lot about one by studying the other

There's an old saying that pets and their owners become more similar as time goes by. There may be some truth in that, but can we use information about owners to improve veterinary care?

9h

Biologists report which animals are captured by the carnivorous waterwheel plant

Freiburg biologists Dr. Simon Poppinga, Anna Westermeier and Prof. Dr. Thomas Speck, working in cooperation with researchers from the Ruhr University Bochum and the Institute of Botany of the Czech Academy of Sciences in Třeboň (Czech Republic), have for the first time reconstructed in detail the menu of the carnivorous waterwheel plant (Aldrovanda vesiculosa). The study shows that the plant is no

9h

Traffic control of cells

Cells in the human body can display remarkable differences in their behaviour depending on the mechanical properties of the tissue surrounding them. This is especially true for immune cells, which migrate through the body and are thus constantly exposed to tissues with different properties and must respond appropriately. To enable investigation of how cells respond to dynamic changes in the stiffn

9h

That’s Not a Witch Hunt

Every time I heard someone use the term “witch hunt” recently I was reminded of that quote from Indigo Montoya from The Princess Bride – “You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.” With the recent release of the Mueller report, many news outlets feel obliged to interview people on the street about their opinions. This is an inane practice that provides no useful i

9h

Do nonhuman primates have Zika? Poo can say

Scientists are trying to determine whether Zika has infected nonhuman primates in South America. Fecal samples offer a way to find out. Most emerging infectious diseases affecting people are zoonotic—they make the jump from other animals to humans. Transmission, however, is a two-way street. These zoonotic diseases can also jump from humans to other animals. Even if we eradicate a disease in huma

9h

Traffic control of cells

Cells in the human body can display remarkable differences in their behaviour depending on the mechanical properties of the tissue surrounding them. This is especially true for immune cells, which migrate through the body and are thus constantly exposed to tissues with different properties and must respond appropriately. To enable investigation of how cells respond to dynamic changes in the stiffn

9h

Mastercard Wades Into Murky Waters With Its New Digital ID

The credit card company has more details about its plan for a decentralized, universal digital ID, but questions remain.

9h

Globe to gut: inside Big Food

Globe to gut: inside Big Food Globe to gut: inside Big Food, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00897-1 Felicity Lawrence absorbs three books on the illogical route from farm to fork.

9h

Image of the Day: Wrench in the Works

In cell division, a protein called spastin appears to help tear down a bridge between daughter cells.

9h

Folketinget sætter gang i Femern-byggeri – men kun på den danske side

Den danske forligskreds vil sætte gang i arbejdet med den danske halvdel af Femerntunnellen, men en retssag kan stadig forhale resten af projektet.

9h

NASA cancels first all-women spacewalk due to spacesuit size issue

NASA scheduled the first ever spacewalk with only female astronauts this week, but it has been cancelled because there isn't enough time to configure a spacesuit that fits

9h

Få overblik over den nye sundhedsreform

Regeringen og Dansk Folkepartis nye sundhedsreform betyder bl.a., at regioner bliver nedlagt og forbedrede patientrettigheder. Se de 5 hovedpunkter her:

10h

10h

10h

4D Printing Reconfigurable, Deployable and Mechanically Tunable Metamaterials

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

10h

Tech companies' development of AI is "unethical" says Robot Love curator

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

10h

10h

10h

10h

Samsung Galaxy A70 Officially Unveiled

Samsung’s mid-range smartphones have been improving over the years where we’re starting to see the company incorporate features that might have otherwise been reserved for their …

10h

How to Be a Better Web Searcher: Secrets from Google Scientists

Researchers who study how we use search engines share common mistakes, misperceptions and advice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Why Are the Noses Broken on So Many Ancient Egyptian Statues?

Why do so many Egyptian statues have broken noses?

10h

Meet Scotty, the New T. Rex Heavyweight Champion of the World

The mightiest Tyrannosaurus rex on record is a behemoth named Scotty, who — during its lifetime on Earth about 65 million years ago — weighed a honking 19,555 lbs. (8,870 kilograms), or about as much as 6.5 Volkswagen Beetles, a new study finds.

10h

Red Yeast Rice Supplements Likely Damaged This Woman's Liver

A woman in Michigan developed sudden liver damage after taking a red yeast rice supplement, doctors reported.

10h

Photos: Discoveries at Wadi el-Hudi, an Ancient Egyptian Settlement

Archaeologists have discovered more than 100 inscriptions at an ancient Egyptian site that served as an amethyst mine.

10h

100 Ancient Egyptian Inscriptions Found at Amethyst Mining Site

Archaeologists have uncovered more than 100 ancient inscriptions carved into rock at Wadi el-Hudi, where the ancient Egyptians mined amethyst.

10h

Image: SOHO's equinox sun

Last Wednesday, all locations on our planet enjoyed roughly the same number of hours of day and night. This event, called an equinox, takes place twice a year – around 20 March and then again around 23 September.

10h

Icy giant planets in the laboratory

Giant planets like Uranus and Neptune may contain much less free hydrogen than previously assumed. Researchers from the German Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) drove shock waves through two types of plastic to reach the same temperatures and pressures present inside such planets, and observed the behavior using ultra-strong X-ray laser pulses. Unexpectedly, one of these plastics kept it

10h

Searching for missing anti-matter: A successful start to measurements with Belle II

Since March 25, 2019, the Belle II detector instrument in Japan has been measuring collisions of particles generated in the SuperKEKB accelerator. The new duo produces more than 50 times the number of collisions compared to its predecessor. The huge increase in data means that there is now a greater chance of explaining the imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe.

10h

A fascinating phase transition from one liquid state to another

A team at the University of Tokyo has described in unprecedented detail the rare phenomenon of liquid-to-liquid phase transitions in a pure substance. By showing how a liquid made of just one type of molecule can switch between liquid and glassy states, this research may lead to a novel way to control the transport properties of a liquid.

10h

Scott Walker’s Songs of Sugar and Poison

Scott Walker’s career disproves F. Scott Fitzgerald’s line that there are no second acts in American life. An Ohio boy who became an idol in the smiley ’60s trio the Walker Brothers, Walker transitioned into making auteurist chamber pop, vanished from the public eye, and reemerged in the ’90s with acclaimed experimental compositions involving hammered meat, executioner-blade shings! , and fart so

10h

Five scientists explain how they decided whether to move to another country for their work or studies

Five scientists explain how they decided whether to move to another country for their work or studies Five scientists explain how they decided whether to move to another country for their work or studies, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00902-7 Weighing up the costs and benefits can help when mulling an international move.

10h

Craft breweries increase residential property values

The craft brewery boom is good for home values. Using Charlotte, North Carolina, as a case study, researchers at the University of Toledo and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte found that craft breweries have a positive impact on residential property values. Condominiums in center-city neighborhoods show a nearly 3 percent increase on sales price after a brewery opened within a half mil

10h

How Zello Became a Lifeline for Venezuelans Under Maduro

A dedicated community of Zello moderators uses the voice-chat app to bring news and coordinate aid amid the country's political and economic crisis.

10h

10h

10h

Blockchain-powered marketplaces will be like steroids for crowd investing

Creators of a new breed of fully regulated digital assets have their eyes on remaking how money is raised—and putting the era of sketchy ICOs behind them.

10h

How to Be a Better Web Searcher: Secrets from Google Scientists

Researchers who study how we use search engines share common mistakes, misperceptions and advice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Can Soil Microbes Slow Climate Change?

One scientist has tantalizing results, but others are not convinced — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

EU-borgere trackes på massevis af offentlige hjemmesider

Borgere bliver tracket af reklamevirksomheder på hjemmesider fra det offentlige i mere end 25 EU-lande, konkluderer ny undersøgelse fra dansk virksomhed.

11h

Can Soil Microbes Slow Climate Change?

One scientist has tantalizing results, but others are not convinced — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

11h

Can Soil Microbes Slow Climate Change?

One scientist has tantalizing results, but others are not convinced — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti vil centralisere indsatsen mod jordforurening

PLUS. Indsatsen mod jordforurening skal ligge hos staten, og de penge, der spares ved at nedlægge regionerne, skal gå til indsatsen mod generationsforurening. Men det vil koste på kvaliteten, lyder kritikken.

11h

11h

11h

Sometimes it's not good to be green

The greening or eutrophication of the world's lakes will increase the emission of methane into the atmosphere by 30 to 90 percent during the next 100 years, say authors of a March 26, 2019 paper in Nature Communications. This increased methane emission is equivalent to 18-33 percent of annual carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels. Limiting lake greening is important to preserve fragil

11h

Protein 'spat out' by cancer cells promotes tumor growth

Prostate cancer cells change the behavior of other cells around them, including normal cells, by 'spitting out' a protein from their nucleus, new research has found.

11h

Brexit threatens biosecurity — from data to strategy

Brexit threatens biosecurity — from data to strategy Brexit threatens biosecurity — from data to strategy, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00950-z Brexit threatens biosecurity — from data to strategy

11h

Alexander von Humboldt: the graphic novel

Alexander von Humboldt: the graphic novel Alexander von Humboldt: the graphic novel, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00958-5 Alison Abbott applauds an illustrated treatment of the great Prussian naturalist’s scientific exploits in South America.

11h

C ellular censuses to guide cancer care

C ellular censuses to guide cancer care C ellular censuses to guide cancer care, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00904-5 In the age of immunotherapy, cancer biologists are relying on a new generation of tools to learn how the interplay between tumours and immune cells shapes the course of disease.

11h

Make polluters pay for fluorochemical clean-up

Make polluters pay for fluorochemical clean-up Make polluters pay for fluorochemical clean-up, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00971-8 Make polluters pay for fluorochemical clean-up

11h

Distinct mechanical properties in homologous spectrin-like repeats of utrophin

Distinct mechanical properties in homologous spectrin-like repeats of utrophin Distinct mechanical properties in homologous spectrin-like repeats of utrophin, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41569-4 Distinct mechanical properties in homologous spectrin-like repeats of utrophin

11h

Low Lattice Thermal Conductivity of a Two-Dimensional Phosphorene Oxide

Low Lattice Thermal Conductivity of a Two-Dimensional Phosphorene Oxide Low Lattice Thermal Conductivity of a Two-Dimensional Phosphorene Oxide, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41696-y Low Lattice Thermal Conductivity of a Two-Dimensional Phosphorene Oxide

11h

Band Anti-Crossing Model in Dilute-As GaNAs Alloys

Band Anti-Crossing Model in Dilute-As GaNAs Alloys Band Anti-Crossing Model in Dilute-As GaNAs Alloys, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41286-y Band Anti-Crossing Model in Dilute-As GaNAs Alloys

11h

Genetic structure in the paternal lineages of South East Spain revealed by the analysis of 17 Y-STRs

Genetic structure in the paternal lineages of South East Spain revealed by the analysis of 17 Y-STRs Genetic structure in the paternal lineages of South East Spain revealed by the analysis of 17 Y-STRs, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41580-9 Genetic structure in the paternal lineages of South East Spain revealed by the analysis of 17 Y-STRs

11h

Pancreatic stone protein/regenerating protein is a potential biomarker for endoplasmic reticulum stress in beta cells

Pancreatic stone protein/regenerating protein is a potential biomarker for endoplasmic reticulum stress in beta cells Pancreatic stone protein/regenerating protein is a potential biomarker for endoplasmic reticulum stress in beta cells, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41604-4 Pancreatic stone protein/regenerating protein is a potential biomarker for endoplasmic reticulum s

11h

Unveiling a Scaling and Universal Behavior for the Magnetocaloric Effect in Cubic Crystal Structures: A Monte Carlo Simulation

Unveiling a Scaling and Universal Behavior for the Magnetocaloric Effect in Cubic Crystal Structures: A Monte Carlo Simulation Unveiling a Scaling and Universal Behavior for the Magnetocaloric Effect in Cubic Crystal Structures: A Monte Carlo Simulation, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41321-y Unveiling a Scaling and Universal Behavior for the Magnetocaloric Effect in Cubi

11h

The M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype is important for retinal neuron survival in aging mice

The M 1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype is important for retinal neuron survival in aging mice The M 1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype is important for retinal neuron survival in aging mice, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41425-5 The M 1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype is important for retinal neuron survival in aging mice

11h

Perception of action-outcomes is shaped by life-long and contextual expectations

Perception of action-outcomes is shaped by life-long and contextual expectations Perception of action-outcomes is shaped by life-long and contextual expectations, Published online: 26 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41090-8 Perception of action-outcomes is shaped by life-long and contextual expectations

11h