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nyheder2019marts27

GRAVITY instrument breaks new ground in exoplanet imaging

The GRAVITY instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) has made the first direct observation of an exoplanet using optical interferometry. This method revealed a complex exoplanetary atmosphere with clouds of iron and silicates swirling in a planet-wide storm. The technique presents unique possibilities for characterising many of the exoplanets known today.

7h

Reducing debt improves psychological functioning and changes decision-making in the poor [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

We examine how chronic debt affects behavior by studying how a large, unanticipated debt-relief program affected psychological functioning and economic decision-making in beneficiaries. A charity granted low-income households debt relief worth up to Singapore dollars 5,000 (∼3 month’s household income). We exploited quasiexperimental variation in the structure of debt relief:…

19h

Regioner: Forurenet jord og overfladevand vil koste os op til 4,3 mia.

Danske Regioner forventer at skulle afværge jordforureninger i ca. 90 vandløb, søer og kystvande i Danmark. Finansieringen skal forhandles på plads sammen med Regeringen senere i år.

14h

Solving a hairy forensic problem

For decades, forensic scientists have tested strands of hair to reveal drug use or poisoning. But in recent years, reports have questioned the technique — in particular, its ability to distinguish between the intake of a substance and external contamination of the hair.

2min

Signs of 1906 earthquake revealed in mapping of offshore northern San Andreas Fault

A new high-resolution map of a poorly known section of the northern San Andreas Fault reveals signs of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and may hold some clues as to how the fault could rupture in the future, according to a new study.

4min

The salt-craving neurons

Pass the potato chips, please! New research discovers neural circuits that regulate craving and satiation for salty tastes.

4min

Solving a hairy forensic problem

For decades, forensic scientists have tested strands of hair to reveal drug use or poisoning. But in recent years, reports have questioned the technique — in particular, its ability to distinguish between the intake of a substance and external contamination of the hair.

4min

Tumor-promoting enzymes USP25 and USP28: Substantial differences identified

Researchers have solved the structures of the cancer-promoting enzymes USP25 and USP28, and identified significant differences in their activities. Both enzymes promote the growth of various tumors. The results could benefit towards the development of new, low-side-effects anticancer drugs.

4min

12min

U of T Mississauga study identifies 'master pacemaker' for biological clocks

What makes a biological clock tick? According to a new study from U of T Mississauga, thesurprising answer lies with a gene typically associated with stem and cancer cells.

13min

Donor muscle training before transplantation expedites rehabilitation process in patients

Researchers at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience of the Higher School of Economics have proposed to train transplanted muscles in advance with new movements so that the brain can learn to use them more quickly after autotransplantation. The results of the study on the prospects of this approach were published in the article 'Perspectives for the Use of Neurotechnologies in Conjunction with M

13min

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Mike Lee talk 'Green New Deal'

Star Wars and climate change – two lawmakers deliver very different views on the "Green New Deal".

14min

North Korean physicists forge rare exchange deal with Italian university

North Korean physicists forge rare exchange deal with Italian university North Korean physicists forge rare exchange deal with Italian university, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00990-5 Researchers from the isolated state get a chance to study neuroscience at prestigious institution.

18min

7 climate change projects that are changing the game

If we do nothing, global temperatures could rise as high as 10 degrees Celsius by the end of the century. Fortunately, humanity is hard at work at keeping temperature increases below the 2 degrees Celsius mark. These 7 projects are just a snapshot of what humanity is collectively doing to fight back and beat climate change. None It's easy to feel hopeless when it comes to the climate. The news is

18min

31min

Mission to Europa Gets New Instrument to Look for Signs of Habitability

Amid technical and political hurdles, a veteran planetary scientist takes charge of a key part of Europa Clipper, a spacecraft targeted at the solar system’s most intriguing moon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

32min

Mission to Europa Gets New Instrument to Look for Signs of Habitability

Amid technical and political hurdles, a veteran planetary scientist takes charge of a key part of Europa Clipper, a spacecraft targeted at the solar system’s most intriguing moon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

32min

Vapor drives a liquid-solid transition in a molecular system

The reversible switching of macrocyclic molecules between a liquid and a solid phase upon exposure to vapor has been reported.

32min

Rivers raged on Mars late into its history

Scientists have catalogued these rivers to conclude that significant river runoff persisted on Mars later into its history than previously thought. According to the study, the runoff was intense — rivers on Mars were wider than those on Earth today — and occurred at hundreds of locations on the red planet.

33min

Lurie Children's offers kids virtual escape from intensive care unit

For the first time in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), patients get a chance to scuba dive, snowboard, and go on a safari or other adventures, all from their hospital bed. The 360 degree immersions into virtual environments were extremely well received by PICU patients and their parents, according to results from a pilot study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago that w

34min

Disastrous spring floods loom for half of the United States

Environment Officials could order evacuations in 25 states. The historic floods that hit the Great Plains last week are perhaps just the start of a very wet and destructive spring. That’s according to the National Oceanic and…

36min

Before self-driving cars can get safer, they need to push their limits

Technology Autonomous vehicles are usually conservative. This one screeches its tires. This research vehicle pushes the limits.

36min

The Temporary Ruins of Harbin’s Melting Ice Sculptures

Remember seeing photos of the Harbin International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival in January—those huge ice sculptures set up in a park, part of an annual festival held in Harbin, northeastern China? Well, when the festival is over and springtime rolls around, those giant ice castles are left to melt and crumble in place, eventually becoming slushy piles cluttered with steel support rods, cables

41min

Identical Twins Who Look Nothing Alike

Adam and Neil Pearson are identical twins, but you’d never know it from looking at them. Although they share the same DNA, their appearances are vastly different; each suffers from neurofibromatosis, a rare genetic disorder that has affected them in divergent ways. They tell their story in Jonathan Braue’s deeply affecting short documentary, The Pearson Twins . “I was always aware that I had the

41min

The "Fantastic" Feeling of a Breakthrough: Q&A with Math Prize Winner Karen Uhlenbeck

The first female winner of the prestigious Abel Prize shares details of life as a mathematician — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

41min

Neural networks stop autonomous cars spinning out

Staying at the ‘limit of friction’ is key to marrying speed and safety. Nick Carne reports.

42min

Apple Again Apologizes For New MacBook Keyboard Failures Affecting ‘Small Number’ Of Users

Keyboards aren’t an unknown quantity in the PC realm; we’ve been using them to input data into our computers for decades, and Apple seemingly was at the top of its game with keyboard design …

42min

US-China trade war 'imperils' Amazon forest, experts warn

The simmering trade war between the United States and China risks devastating the Amazon rainforest as Beijing looks for ways to make up a shortfall in US-grown soya beans, experts warned on Wednesday.

47min

Take It from the 'Crocodile Lady': Conservation Needs More Women (Op-Ed)

I, a crocodile scientist, am a woman in conservation. And here's why we need more women in this field.

49min

The keto diet helps men – not women – lose weight, new research suggests

Medical professionals and dieters have long noticed differences in the efficacy of the keto diet between the sexes. A new study suggests that estrogen plays a role in preventing women from losing weight on the keto diet. More research is needed before scientists know exactly how the keto diet's effects vary between the sexes. None It's long been observed that men seem to have an easier time than

51min

Microsoft: Seizure of sites Iranian hackers used for attacks

Microsoft says it has seized 99 websites used by Iranian hackers to launch cyberattacks.

53min

Signs of 1906 earthquake revealed in mapping of offshore northern San Andreas Fault

A new high-resolution map of a poorly known section of the northern San Andreas Fault reveals signs of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and may hold some clues as to how the fault could rupture in the future, according to a new study published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.

53min

Low-dose radiation therapy improves delivery of therapeutic nanoparticles to brain tumors

A new study led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators finds that radiation therapy may increase the uptake of therapeutic nanoparticles by glioblastomas, raising the possibility of using both growth-factor-targeted and immune-system-based therapies against the deadly brain tumor. The team describes how pretreatment with low-dose radiation increased delivery to tumors of nanoparticl

53min

Signs of 1906 earthquake revealed in mapping of offshore northern San Andreas Fault

A new high-resolution map of a poorly known section of the northern San Andreas Fault reveals signs of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and may hold some clues as to how the fault could rupture in the future, according to a new study published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.

57min

Low-dose radiation therapy improves delivery of therapeutic nanoparticles to brain tumors

A new study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators finds that radiation therapy may increase the uptake of therapeutic nanoparticles by glioblastomas, raising the possibility of using both growth-factor-targeted and immune-system-based therapies against the deadly brain tumor.

57min

Study of female weightlifters crushes stereotype

A new study shows that elite women weightlifters have the same amount, and in some cases more, of the muscle fibers needed for the sport compared to their male counterparts.

57min

Researchers advance effort to manage parasitic roundworms

Roundworms that feed on plants cause approximately $100 billion in annual global crop damage. Now researchers at the University of New Hampshire have made a patent-pending discovery that certain enzymes in roundworms, called nematodes, behave differently than the same enzymes in humans, with amino acids potentially playing a key role.

57min

New potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer discovered

Cancer cells demand enormous amounts of molecular 'food' to survive and grow, and a study published March 27 online in Nature by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center may have identified a new approach to starve the cells of one of the most common and deadly cancers, pancreatic cancer.

57min

Thirst controlled by signal from the gut

Scientists have discovered a new way that the gut talks to the brain, by sending messages about the salt content of the stomach and intestines. The information is one signal the body uses to control thirst.

57min

More bang for the climate buck: study identifies hotspots for adaptation funding

Using a combination of crop models and expertise from farmers and others — and applying them to our current trajectory of high greenhouse gas emissions — scientists built a tool to assess climate risk vulnerability to help pinpoint communities in need of support for adaptation and mitigation. The study was carried out in Vietnam, Uganda and Nicaragua — developing countries that embody many of t

57min

New, more realistic simulator will improve self-driving vehicle safety before road testing

Scientists from the University of Maryland, Baidu Research and the University of Hong Kong have developed data-driven simulation technology that combines photos, videos, real-world trajectory, and behavioral data into a scalable, realistic autonomous driving simulator

57min

Dramatic housing transformation in sub-Saharan Africa revealed for first time

Housing with improved water and sanitation, sufficient living area and durable construction has doubled in sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2015, according to new research published in Nature.

57min

Artificial intelligence can improve X-ray identification of pacemakers in emergencies

Researchers have created new artificial intelligence software that can identify cardiac rhythm devices in x-rays more accurately and quickly than current methods.

57min

Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in global change

Land use in tropical mountain regions leads to considerable changes of biodiversity and ecological functions. The intensity of such changes is greatly affected by the climate.

57min

The salt-craving neurons

Pass the potato chips, please! New research discovers neural circuits that regulate craving and satiation for salty tastes.

57min

Rivers raged on Mars late into its history

A new study by University of Chicago scientists catalogued these rivers to conclude that significant river runoff persisted on Mars later into its history than previously thought. According to the study, published March 27 in Science Advances, the runoff was intense — rivers on Mars were wider than those on Earth today — and occurred at hundreds of locations on the red planet.

57min

Mars' rivers flowed stronger and more recently than previous estimates

A global survey of Mars by Edwin Kite and colleagues concludes that for a given area, the planet's rivers were wider than those on Earth today. Their intense flow may have also persisted as recently as one billion years ago, the researchers say. These findings suggest that climate-driven precipitation may have taken place on Mars even during the time that researchers.

57min

Stanford autonomous car learns to handle unknown conditions

In order to make autonomous cars navigate more safely in difficult conditions — like icy roads — researchers are developing new control systems that learn from real-world driving experiences while leveraging insights from physics.

57min

Had enough water? Brain's thirst centers make a gut check

Until recently, scientists believed that a brain region called the hypothalamus makes us thirsty when it detects a drop in the hydration of our blood. But UCSF neuroscientist Zachary Knight, PhD, an associate professor of physiology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator, realized that this couldn't be the whole story.

57min

Pressure makes best cooling

Recently, an international research team led by Professor LI Bing from the Institute of Metal Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has found that a class of disordered materials, called plastic crystals, exhibits record-large barocaloric effects under very weak pressure.

57min

Dissolving the gordian knot

In a great stride toward finding an effective treatment for early-stage neurodegenerative diseases, UC Santa Barbara neurobiologist Kenneth S. Kosik and collaborators have uncovered a 'druggable' mechanism of pathological tau protein aggregation. For the millions of people at risk for frontotemporal dementia and a host of other such conditions including Alzheimer's, this could signal a shift towar

57min

Artificial intelligence can predict premature death, study finds

Computers which are capable of teaching themselves to predict premature death could greatly improve preventative healthcare in the future, suggests a new study by experts at the University of Nottingham.

57min

Self-sustaining, bioengineered blood vessels could replace damaged vessels in patients

A research team has bioengineered blood vessels that safely and effectively integrated into the native circulatory systems of 60 patients with end-stage kidney failure over a four-year phase 2 clinical trial.

57min

Using smartphones and laptops to simulate deadly heart arrhythmias

Using graphics processing chips designed for gaming applications and software that runs on ordinary web browsers, researchers have moved the modeling of deadly spiral wave heart arrhythmias to less costly computers, and even to high-end smartphones.

57min

Wastewater reveals the levels of antibiotic resistance in a region

A comparison of seven European countries shows that the amount of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater reflects the prevalence of clinical antibiotic resistance in the region. However, modern wastewater treatment plants seem to be able to eliminate antibiotic resistance efficiently.

57min

Historical trade of tortoiseshell reveals origins of modern wildlife trafficking networks

Monterey Bay Aquarium research finds that historical tortoiseshell trade routes may have established the groundwork for modern illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. The study also concludes that the tortoiseshell trade harvested nine million turtles, more than six times previous estimates.

57min

Social media has remarkably small impact on Americans' beliefs

Social media had only a small influence on how much people believed falsehoods about candidates and issues in the last two presidential elections, a pair of new national studies found. And Facebook — which came under fire for spreading misinformation in the 2016 campaign — actually reduced misperceptions by users in that election compared to those who consumed only other social media.

57min

Astronomers Get A Direct, Detailed Look At An Exoplanet's Atmosphere

Most exoplanet observations are indirect, inferring the existence and characteristics of a planet by watching the light or motion of its host star. But direct exoplanet observations have begun, and the GRAVITY instrument on the Very Large Telescope Interferometer in Cerro Paranal, Chile, is leading the way. In a paper published March 27 in Astronomy & Astrophysics, the GRAVITY Collaboration presen

57min

Cosmic fireworks in the clouds: Volunteer detectives sought for Magellanic Clouds Cluster Search

Caught in a cosmic dance, our nearest neighbor galaxies, the Magellanic Clouds, are cartwheeling and circling each other as they fall toward our galaxy, the Milky Way. The gravitational interaction between the Clouds sparks cosmic fireworks—bursts of star formation as new clusters of stars flame on. How many and what kind of star clusters have been born this way over the history of the Clouds? A n

59min

Despite Passenger Fears, Automation is the Future of Aviation

In the wake of the Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines crashes of Boeing 737 Max planes, people are thinking about how much of their air travel is handled by software and automated systems – as opposed to the friendly pilots sitting in the cockpit. Older commercial airliners, such as the Beechcraft 1900, which are still in service mostly as small commuter aircraft, often do not have any autopilot inst

59min

Researchers optimize aptamer with enhanced myelin-binding properties for MS treatment

A new study has demonstrated the enhanced ability of an optimized 20-nucleotide derivative of a larger DNA aptamer to bind myelin in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

1h

Spintronics: Ultra-short spin waves in an astoundingly simple material

Due to its potential to make computers faster and smartphones more efficient, spintronics is considered a promising concept for the future of electronics. A team of researchers has now successfully generated so-called spin waves much more easily and efficiently than was previously deemed possible.

1h

Glowing tumors show scientists where cancer drugs are working

Experimenting with mice, researchers report they have successfully used positron emission tomography (PET) scans to calculate in real time how much of an immunotherapy drug reaches a tumor and what parts of a cancer remain unaffected.

1h

Cull invasive mammals to save island species, experts urge

Move ‘would save 10% of all endangered birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles’ Nearly 10% of the world’s bird, mammal, amphibian and reptile species currently on the brink of extinction could be saved by killing invasive mammals such as cats and rats on 169 islands, according to a new study. Islands comprise just 5.3% of the Earth’s landmass yet have experienced 75% of known bird, mammal, amphib

1h

Error mitigation extends the computational reach of a noisy quantum processor

Error mitigation extends the computational reach of a noisy quantum processor Error mitigation extends the computational reach of a noisy quantum processor, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1040-7 The accuracy of computations on noisy, near-term quantum systems can be enhanced by extrapolating results from experiments with various noise levels, without requiring additional

1h

Efficient, stable and scalable perovskite solar cells using poly(3-hexylthiophene)

Efficient, stable and scalable perovskite solar cells using poly(3-hexylthiophene) Efficient, stable and scalable perovskite solar cells using poly(3-hexylthiophene), Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1036-3 A double-layered halide architecture for perovskite solar cells enables the use of dopant-free poly(3-hexylthiophene) as a hole-transport material, forming stable and sc

1h

Elusive microbe that consumes ethane found under the sea

Elusive microbe that consumes ethane found under the sea Elusive microbe that consumes ethane found under the sea, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00842-2 A microorganism that consumes ethane in the absence of environmental oxygen has been discovered. In the depths of the sea, this microbe, which oxidizes ethane, partners with another that reduces sulfate to sulfide.

1h

Refrigeration based on plastic crystals

Refrigeration based on plastic crystals Refrigeration based on plastic crystals, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00974-5 Materials called plastic crystals have been found to undergo huge temperature changes when subjected to small pressures near room temperature. Such materials could form the basis of future refrigeration technologies.

1h

Syndecan 1 is a critical mediator of macropinocytosis in pancreatic cancer

Syndecan 1 is a critical mediator of macropinocytosis in pancreatic cancer Syndecan 1 is a critical mediator of macropinocytosis in pancreatic cancer, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1062-1 In an inducible mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the signalling defect that underlies 90% of these tumours causes increased cell-surface expression of syndecan 1, leadin

1h

Climate–land-use interactions shape tropical mountain biodiversity and ecosystem functions

Climate–land-use interactions shape tropical mountain biodiversity and ecosystem functions Climate–land-use interactions shape tropical mountain biodiversity and ecosystem functions, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1048-z Elevational trends in biodiversity and ecosystem functions across natural and anthropogenic habitats on Mount Kilimanjaro show that the effects of land u

1h

How climate and human activity shape a mountain ecosystem

How climate and human activity shape a mountain ecosystem How climate and human activity shape a mountain ecosystem, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00939-8 A detailed biological assessment of Africa’s highest mountain explores how climate modulates the effects of human land use on plants, animals, microorganisms and a diverse array of ecosystem functions.

1h

Mapping changes in housing in sub-Saharan Africa from 2000 to 2015

Mapping changes in housing in sub-Saharan Africa from 2000 to 2015 Mapping changes in housing in sub-Saharan Africa from 2000 to 2015, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1050-5 The prevalence of improved housing (with improved drinking water and sanitation, sufficient living area and durable construction) in urban and rural sub-Saharan Africa doubled between 2000 and 2015.

1h

Chemosensory modulation of neural circuits for sodium appetite

Chemosensory modulation of neural circuits for sodium appetite Chemosensory modulation of neural circuits for sodium appetite, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1053-2 Sodium appetite in mice is driven by a neural circuit that is focused on neurons of the pre-locus coeruleus and integrates the sensory detection of sodium and internal signals.

1h

Mid-latitude net precipitation decreased with Arctic warming during the Holocene

Mid-latitude net precipitation decreased with Arctic warming during the Holocene Mid-latitude net precipitation decreased with Arctic warming during the Holocene, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1060-3 A reduced gradient in temperatures between low and high latitudes during the Holocene led to drier mid-latitudes.

1h

Structural variation in the gut microbiome associates with host health

Structural variation in the gut microbiome associates with host health Structural variation in the gut microbiome associates with host health, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1065-y The authors systematically characterize structural variation in the genomes of gut microbiota and show that they are associated with bacterial fitness and with host risk factors, and that exami

1h

Attachment of the blastoderm to the vitelline envelope affects gastrulation of insects

Attachment of the blastoderm to the vitelline envelope affects gastrulation of insects Attachment of the blastoderm to the vitelline envelope affects gastrulation of insects, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1044-3 In the red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) and fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster), spatiotemporally coordinated integrin-dependent attachments between the bl

1h

Anaerobic oxidation of ethane by archaea from a marine hydrocarbon seep

Anaerobic oxidation of ethane by archaea from a marine hydrocarbon seep Anaerobic oxidation of ethane by archaea from a marine hydrocarbon seep, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1063-0 An archaeon, ‘Candidatus Argoarchaeum ethanivorans’, which is involved in the oxidation of ethane observed in anoxic marine habitats, is identified and metabolically characterized.

1h

CAR T cell trogocytosis and cooperative killing regulate tumour antigen escape

CAR T cell trogocytosis and cooperative killing regulate tumour antigen escape CAR T cell trogocytosis and cooperative killing regulate tumour antigen escape, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1054-1 Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) promote antigen loss in tumour cells by trogocytosis, which results in T cell fratricide killing and exhaustion but can be counteracted by coop

1h

Colossal barocaloric effects in plastic crystals

Colossal barocaloric effects in plastic crystals Colossal barocaloric effects in plastic crystals, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1042-5 Colossal barocaloric effects are observed in the plastic crystal neopentylglycol and found to originate from the extensive molecular orientational disorder, giant compressibility and highly anharmonic lattice dynamics of the material.

1h

A gut-to-brain signal of fluid osmolarity controls thirst satiation

A gut-to-brain signal of fluid osmolarity controls thirst satiation A gut-to-brain signal of fluid osmolarity controls thirst satiation, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1066-x Drinking behaviour in mice is regulated by a signal derived from the water and salt content of the gastrointestinal tract that is transmitted to forebrain neurons that control thirst via the vagus ne

1h

Why the US–China trade war spells disaster for the Amazon

Why the US–China trade war spells disaster for the Amazon Why the US–China trade war spells disaster for the Amazon, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00896-2 An analysis of global soya-bean production forecasts massive deforestation in Brazil — stakeholders must act fast to prevent it, warn Richard Fuchs and colleagues.

1h

Solar cells boosted by an improved charge-carrying material

Solar cells boosted by an improved charge-carrying material Solar cells boosted by an improved charge-carrying material, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00936-x The commercialization of a promising class of solar cell has been hindered by issues associated with the components needed to construct it. A possible solution has now been reported.

1h

Van der Waals contacts between three-dimensional metals and two-dimensional semiconductors

Van der Waals contacts between three-dimensional metals and two-dimensional semiconductors Van der Waals contacts between three-dimensional metals and two-dimensional semiconductors, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1052-3 Ultraclean van der Waals bonds between gold-capped indium and a monolayer of the two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenide molybdenum disulfide sho

1h

How Does the Body Know When to Stop Drinking Water?

Too little or too much water is dangerous for the body.

1h

The "Fantastic" Feeling of a Breakthrough: Q&A with Math Prize Winner Karen Uhlenbeck

The first female winner of the prestigious Abel Prize shares details of life as a mathematician — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

'Space butterfly' is home to hundreds of baby stars

What looks like a red butterfly in space is in reality a nursery for hundreds of baby stars, revealed in this infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Officially named Westerhout 40 (W40), the butterfly is a nebula—a giant cloud of gas and dust in space where new stars may form. The butterfly's two "wings" are giant bubbles of hot, interstellar gas blowing from the hottest, most massive

1h

Driverless car learns to perform high-speed turns without crashing

An autonomous car has learned to make high-speed racing turns without spinning out, paving the way for safer manoeuvres in emergency conditions

1h

Fridges made from plastic crystals could help cut carbon emissions

Cooling devices like refrigerators and air conditioners consume a quarter of the world's electricity, but a plastic-based material could make them much greener

1h

Mars used to have massive flowing rivers twice as wide as Earth’s

Mars is now a freezing desert, but its surface used to be flowing with water and it turns out its rivers were once wider than Earth’s

1h

Lab-grown blood vessels given to people who need dialysis

Lab-grown blood vessels have been implanted in people for use with dialysis. The vessels could one day replace arteries damaged by heart disease

1h

The UK's plan to block online pornography could be a privacy disaster

A scheme designed to limit children's access to adult content could end up creating a massive database of people's pornography habits

1h

Rivers raged on Mars late into its history

Long ago on Mars, water carved deep riverbeds into the planet's surface—but we still don't know what kind of weather fed them. Scientists aren't sure, because their understanding of the Martian climate billions of years ago remains incomplete.

1h

Artificial intelligence can predict premature death, study finds

Computers which are capable of teaching themselves to predict premature death could greatly improve preventative healthcare in the future, suggests a new study by experts at the University of Nottingham.

1h

Historical trade of tortoiseshell reveals origins of modern wildlife trafficking networks

New research from the Monterey Bay Aquarium finds that historical tortoiseshell trade routes may have established the groundwork for modern illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. The study published today in the journal Science Advances, "The historical development of complex global trafficking networks for marine wildlife," analyzes 150 years of tortoiseshell trade records and derives

1h

Researchers advance effort to manage parasitic roundworms

Roundworms that feed on plants cause approximately $100 billion in annual global crop damage. Now researchers at the University of New Hampshire have made a patent-pending discovery that certain enzymes in roundworms, called nematodes, behave differently than the same enzymes in humans, with amino acids potentially playing a key role.

1h

Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in global change

2019 marks the 250th anniversary of Alexander von Humboldt. He was one of the first naturalists to document the distribution and adaptation of species on tropical mountains in the 19th century. Humboldt also observed that high mountains represent a microcosm of the earth's climate zones. Today, his scientific findings are more relevant than ever.

1h

More bang for the climate buck: Study identifies hotspots for adaptation funding

Climate change is already making life harder on farmers, especially in developing nations. New sources of funding can alleviate the burden but resources are limited. So where should governments, philanthropists and development agencies prioritize investment?

1h

Pressure makes best cooling

Phase transitions take place as heat (i.e., entropy) is exchanged between materials and the environment. When such processes are driven by pressure, the induced cooling effect is called the barocaloric effect, which is a promising alternative to the conventional vapor compression cycle.

1h

Social media has remarkably small impact on Americans' beliefs: study

Social media had only a small influence on how much people believed falsehoods about candidates and issues in the last two presidential elections, a pair of new national studies found.

1h

Dramatic housing transformation in sub-Saharan Africa revealed for first time

Housing with improved water and sanitation, sufficient living area and durable construction has doubled in sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2015, according to new research published in Nature.

1h

Laborer, doorkeeper, future queen: Neurobiology in turtle ants reflects division of labor

The neurobiology of turtle ants differs significantly according to their specialized role within the colony, according to a study published March 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Darcy Greer Gordon from Boston University and colleagues.

1h

Escherichia coli as a platform for the study of phosphoinositide biology

Despite being a minor component of cells, phosphoinositides are essential for eukaryotic membrane biology, serving as markers of organelle identity and involved in several signaling cascades. Their many functions, combined with alternative synthesis pathways, make in vivo study very difficult. In vitro studies are limited by their inability to fully recapitulate the complexities of membranes in l

1h

Micronutrient-fortified rice can be a significant source of dietary bioavailable iron in schoolchildren from rural Ghana

Iron deficiency and anemia are prominent contributors to the preventable disease burden worldwide. A substantial proportion of people with inadequate dietary iron rely on rice as a staple food, but fortification efforts are limited by low iron bioavailability. Furthermore, using high iron fortification dosages may not always be prudent in tropical regions. To identify alternative fortification fo

1h

The weakening relationship between Eurasian spring snow cover and Indian summer monsoon rainfall

Substantial progress has been made in understanding how Eurasian snow cover variabilities affect the Indian summer monsoon, but the snow-monsoon relationship in a warming atmosphere remains controversial. Using long-term observational snow and rainfall data (1967–2015), we identified that the widely recognized inverse relationship of central Eurasian spring snow cover with the Indian summer monso

1h

Antibiotic resistance in European wastewater treatment plants mirrors the pattern of clinical antibiotic resistance prevalence

Integrated antibiotic resistance (AR) surveillance is one of the objectives of the World Health Organization global action plan on antimicrobial resistance. Urban wastewater treatment plants (UWTPs) are among the most important receptors and sources of environmental AR. On the basis of the consistent observation of an increasing north-to-south clinical AR prevalence in Europe, this study compared

1h

SIRT7-mediated ATM deacetylation is essential for its deactivation and DNA damage repair

The activation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) upon DNA damage involves a cascade of reactions, including acetylation by TIP60 and autophosphorylation. However, how ATM is progressively deactivated after completing DNA damage repair remains obscure. Here, we report that sirtuin 7 (SIRT7)–mediated deacetylation is essential for dephosphorylation and deactivation of ATM. We show that SIRT7,

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Elastocapillary self-assembled neurotassels for stable neural activity recordings

Implantable neural probes that are mechanically compliant with brain tissue offer important opportunities for stable neural interfaces in both basic neuroscience and clinical applications. Here, we developed a Neurotassel consisting of an array of flexible and high–aspect ratio microelectrode filaments. A Neurotassel can spontaneously assemble into a thin and implantable fiber through elastocapil

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Taiji: System-level identification of key transcription factors reveals transcriptional waves in mouse embryonic development

Transcriptional regulation is pivotal to the specification of distinct cell types during embryonic development. However, it still lacks a systematic way to identify key transcription factors (TFs) orchestrating the temporal and tissue specificity of gene expression. Here, we integrated epigenomic and transcriptomic data to reveal key regulators from two cells to postnatal day 0 in mouse embryogen

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Persistent hippocampal neural firing and hippocampal-cortical coupling predict verbal working memory load

The maintenance of items in working memory relies on persistent neural activity in a widespread network of brain areas. To investigate the influence of load on working memory, we asked human subjects to maintain sets of letters in memory while we recorded single neurons and intracranial encephalography (EEG) in the medial temporal lobe and scalp EEG. Along the periods of a trial, hippocampal neur

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The historical development of complex global trafficking networks for marine wildlife

The complexity of trade networks is a major challenge to controlling wildlife trafficking and illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing. These networks may not be modern inventions, but have developed over centuries, from integrated global markets that preceded modern regulatory policies. To understand these linkages, we curated 150 years of tortoiseshell transactions and derived biologi

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Real-time interactive simulations of large-scale systems on personal computers and cell phones: Toward patient-specific heart modeling and other applications

Cardiac dynamics modeling has been useful for studying and treating arrhythmias. However, it is a multiscale problem requiring the solution of billions of differential equations describing the complex electrophysiology of interconnected cells. Therefore, large-scale cardiac modeling has been limited to groups with access to supercomputers and clusters. Many areas of computational science face sim

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Hybrid nanocarriers incorporating mechanistically distinct drugs for lymphatic CD4+ T cell activation and HIV-1 latency reversal

A proposed strategy to cure HIV uses latency-reversing agents (LRAs) to reactivate latent proviruses for purging HIV reservoirs. A variety of LRAs have been identified, but none has yet proven effective in reducing the reservoir size in vivo. Nanocarriers could address some major challenges by improving drug solubility and safety, providing sustained drug release, and simultaneously delivering mu

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Persistence of intense, climate-driven runoff late in Mars history

Mars is dry today, but numerous precipitation-fed paleo-rivers are found across the planet’s surface. These rivers’ existence is a challenge to models of planetary climate evolution. We report results indicating that, for a given catchment area, rivers on Mars were wider than rivers on Earth today. We use the scale (width and wavelength) of Mars paleo-rivers as a proxy for past runoff production.

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Respiratory infections drive hepcidin-mediated blockade of iron absorption leading to iron deficiency anemia in African children

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most prevalent nutritional condition worldwide. We studied the contribution of hepcidin-mediated iron blockade to IDA in African children. We measured hepcidin and hemoglobin weekly, and hematological, inflammatory, and iron biomarkers at baseline, 7 weeks, and 12 weeks in 407 anemic (hemoglobin P P

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Immunomodulatory nanogels overcome restricted immunity in a murine model of gut microbiome-mediated metabolic syndrome

Biomaterials-based nanovaccines, such as those made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), can induce stronger immunity than soluble antigens in healthy wild-type mouse models. However, whether metabolic syndrome can influence the immunological responses of nanovaccines remains poorly understood. Here, we first show that alteration in the sensing of the gut microbiome through Toll-like receptor

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GameStop Doubles Down on eSports Gaming With Texas 'Performance Center'

The field of eSports has simply exploded in size over the last decade. Many corporations are throwing a lot of money at training facilities, tournament stadiums, and professional gaming teams. …

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Researchers estimate it takes approximately 1.5 megabytes of data to store language information in the brain

A pair of researchers, one with the University of Rochester the other the University of California has found that combining all the data necessary to store and use the English language in the …

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Mars Was Once Covered in Wide, Raging Rivers

Mars was very wet until suddenly it wasn't. And scientists still aren't sure why.

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AI Is Good (Perhaps Too Good) at Predicting Who Will Die Prematurely

Medical researchers have unlocked an unsettling ability in artificial intelligence.

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Researchers advance effort to manage parasitic roundworms

Roundworms that feed on plants cause approximately $100 billion in annual global crop damage. Now researchers at the University of New Hampshire have made a patent-pending discovery that certain enzymes in roundworms, called nematodes, behave differently than the same enzymes in humans, with amino acids potentially playing a key role.

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Master any discipline, with the real-life Ron Swanson

Practice doesn't make perfect—it makes better , says actor, writer and woodworker Nick Offerman. Perfectionism is the enemy of growth because it can paralyze us in the face of mistakes, rather than treating them as learning opportunities. Sharing stories from his life, Offerman imparts a valuable lesson in betterment for Big Think Edge that will reframe your attitude toward success and happiness.

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Historical trade of tortoiseshell reveals origins of modern wildlife trafficking networks

New research from the Monterey Bay Aquarium finds that historical tortoiseshell trade routes may have established the groundwork for modern illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. The study published today in the journal Science Advances, "The historical development of complex global trafficking networks for marine wildlife," analyzes 150 years of tortoiseshell trade records and derives

1h

Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in global change

2019 marks the 250th anniversary of Alexander von Humboldt. He was one of the first naturalists to document the distribution and adaptation of species on tropical mountains in the 19th century. Humboldt also observed that high mountains represent a microcosm of the earth's climate zones. Today, his scientific findings are more relevant than ever.

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Laborer, doorkeeper, future queen: Neurobiology in turtle ants reflects division of labor

The neurobiology of turtle ants differs significantly according to their specialized role within the colony, according to a study published March 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Darcy Greer Gordon from Boston University and colleagues.

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India 4th nation to successfully test anti-satellite missile

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Hangover-free alcohol could be available in just a few years

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Lying, sitting or standing: Resting postures determined by animals' size

Cows always lie on their chests so that their digestion is not impaired. Rodents sometimes rest sitting down, while kangaroos sometimes lie on their backs. The larger the animal, the less often it lies down, and when it does, it is more likely to lie on its side – but there are exceptions.

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The regeneration of a cell depends on where it is positioned

Researchers report a new single-cell RNA sequencing technology, single cell-digital gene expression, which can measure the transcriptome while preserving the positional information of the cell in the tissue. The technique was validated in the moss plant Physcomitrella patens by measuring how the location of a cell in a leaf influences its regenerative properties.

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People 'hear' flashes due to disinhibited flow of signals around the brain, suggests study

A synaesthesia-like effect in which people 'hear' silent flashes or movement, such as in popular 'noisy GIFs' and memes, could be due to a reduction of inhibition of signals that travel between visual and auditory areas of the brain, according to a new study. It was also found that musicians taking part in the study were significantly more likely to report experiencing visual ear than non-musician

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On the keto diet? Ditch the cheat day

The often embraced 'cheat day' is a common theme in many diets and the popular ketogenic diet is no exception. But new research says that just one 75-gram dose of glucose — the equivalent a large bottle of soda or a plate of fries — while on a high fat, low carbohydrate diet can lead to damaged blood vessels.

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New medication gives mice bigger muscles

Researchers have studied a new group of medicinal products which increase the muscle- and bone mass of mice over a few weeks. This offers hope to the elderly and people suffering from weak muscles and bones due to illness.

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Vapor drives a liquid-solid transition in a molecular system

The reversible switching of macrocyclic molecules between a liquid and a solid phase upon exposure to vapor has been reported.

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Fluorine: Toxic and aggressive, but widely used

In toothpaste, Teflon, LEDs and medications, it shows its sunny side – but elemental fluorine is extremely aggressive and highly toxic. Attempts to determine the crystal structure of solid fluorine using X-rays ended with explosions 50 years ago.

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Blood vessels built from a patient’s cells could help people on dialysis

Bioengineered blood vessels could provide a safer alternative than donor vessels or synthetic implants.

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Treating cystic fibrosis patients before birth could safeguard organs

Starting a cystic fibrosis drug sooner than usual may protect an afflicted child’s lungs, pancreases and reproductive tissue, a study in ferrets hints.

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UPS Is Now Using Drones to Deliver Blood to a Hospital

Saving Lives The cargo for the first revenue-generating drone delivery in the United States wasn’t an Amazon package or 7-Eleven Slurpee — it was blood. On Tuesday, UPS launched a new service using drones to transport blood and other medical samples between the various buildings at WakeMed Raleigh’s medical campus in North Carolina — and the speed at which the drones deliver the samples could lit

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Scientists Are Teaching AI-Powered Robots to Reproduce, Evolve

Plug And Play So-called evolutionary roboticists raise the question: why go to the trouble of building a new and improved machine when current robots could do it for you? The idea invokes a high-tech Darwinism , in which researchers’ ultimate goal is to design artificial intelligence and robots that can analyze their own source code and mate with others by combining bits and pieces of their code

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Neural networks stop autonomous cars spinning out

Staying at the ‘limit of friction’ is key to marrying speed and safety. Nick Carne reports.

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Tortoiseshell history reveals current turtle and fish black markets

A century and a half of records throw an illegal trade into sharp focus. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Researchers bio-engineer blood vessels that are self-sustaining

Implanted artificial structures become colonised by patient cells, avoiding rejection issues. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Human gene editing must be guided by all

The whole species must inform the debate before any genetic revolution is unleashed

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Wastewater reveals the levels of antibiotic resistance in a region

An international study compares the number of antibiotic resistance genes found in the water treatment plants of Finland, Norway, Germany, Ireland, Spain, Portugal and Cyprus. The results show that the number of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater corresponds with the number of such bacteria found in samples collected from patients in that region, as well as with overall antibiotic consumpti

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Southwest cuts sales outlook as 737 MAX grounding hits US carriers

Southwest Airlines trimmed its revenue estimate Wednesday, citing flight cancellations due to the Boeing 737 MAX grounding among key factors dragging on earnings.

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NASA defends scrapping all-women spacewalk

NASA responded to accusations of sexism Wednesday over its decision to cancel a planned historic spacewalk by two women astronauts due to a lack of well-fitting spacesuits.

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State geologist, partners create new surface geology maps for Massachusetts

Anyone who digs in the earth needs a geologic map, says State Geologist Stephen Mabee at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and now he and colleagues have finished a federal-state collaboration that began 81 years ago to create the first complete set of 189 surficial geologic maps of Massachusetts in 7.5-minute quadrangles, the same useful scale as the topographical maps used by hikers.

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Traveling-wave tubes: The unsung heroes of space exploration

What do televisions and space exploration have in common? No, we're not talking about a cheesy physics joke; rather, this is the story of an often-overlooked piece of equipment that deserves a place in the annals of telecommunication history. Some would argue that the traveling-wave tube (TWT) has not received the recognition it deserves when it comes to the history of space travel and communicati

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How Do Scientists Know What Colors Prehistoric Animals Were?

Fossil expert Maria McNamara explains how paleontologists are starting to investigate the hues of the past

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Why do antidepressants fail for some?

Differences in genes and structures of nerve cell that make and use serotonin could explain why some people with major depression do not respond to SSRIs.

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Kenyan who won Global Teacher Prize says invest in youth

The Kenyan who won the $1 million Global Teacher Prize returned home on Wednesday to pomp and pageantry. The Franciscan friar had a message for Africa: Invest in youth.

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Women’s life expectancy in poor areas falls by almost 100 days

Men in least deprived areas of England are living almost 10 years longer than those in most deprived The life expectancy of women in the poorest parts of England has fallen by three months, while that of women in the wealthiest areas rose by almost as much, new figures show. There was a drop of 98 days in life expectancy at birth among women in the most deprived areas between 2012-14 and 2015-17,

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Autonomous weed control via smart robots

Soybean fields are becoming increasingly infested with a glyphosate-resistant weed called 'palmer amaranth.' One pesticide currently used for controlling it is 'Dicamba,' but it has devastating effects on adjacent areas, because it tends to drift when sprayed during windy conditions. Researchers report that they have now developed a drift-free, weed-specific applicator, which will pave the way for

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Kids store 1.5 megabytes of information to master their native language

Learning one's native language may seem effortless. But new research from UC Berkeley suggests that language acquisition between birth and 18 is a remarkable feat of cognition, rather than something humans are just hardwired to do.

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Gut microbiome research takes center stage in APS-ASPET Presidential Symposium series

Researchers will speak in a four-part series on the gut microbiome and its role in wound recovery, hypertension and nervous system function. The symposia are organized by American Physiological Society (APS) President Jeff Sands, MD, and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET) President Edward T. Morgan, PhD, both of Emory University School of Medicine. The APS-ASPE

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Mammogram Centers Must Tell Women if They Have Dense Breasts, F.D.A. Proposes

A new rule would require mammogram providers to let women know if they have dense breast tissue, which can hide cancer from X-rays.

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Turing Award Won by 3 Pioneers in Artificial Intelligence

For their work on neural networks, Geoffrey Hinton, Yann LeCun and Yoshua Bengio will share $1 million for what many consider the Nobel Prize of computing.

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To Understand Us, Pay Attention to the Outfits

This story contains major spoilers for Us. Near the end of Jordan Peele’s Us , viewers finally witness the confrontation the entire story has been building toward. The protagonist, Adelaide Wilson (played by Lupita Nyong’o), faces off against her jumpsuited doppelgänger, Red (also played by Nyong’o), in an underground chamber inhabited by clones known as the Tethered. Adelaide and her family spen

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EA lays off 350 people

Though Apex Legends continues to be a bright spot for EA, the game publisher and the industry as a whole still have hurdles ahead. Today, EA confirmed that it laid off 350 people in marketing, …

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Facebook bans white nationalists in abrupt policy turnaround

People who search for white supremacy terms on Facebook and Instagram will be directed to resources focused on helping people leave behind hate groups

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Where you live determines when you’ll die

These maps show strong links between location and life expectancy Hawaiians live longest, Mississippians die earliest County-level ranking shows short-life hotspots in Kentucky, long-life ones in Colorado High in Hawaii… Tell me where you live, and I'll tell you how long you've got left. Fortunately, it's not quite that simple; but as these maps show, there is a strong link between location and

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Traveling-wave tubes: The unsung heroes of space exploration

What do televisions and space exploration have in common? No, we're not talking about a cheesy physics joke; rather, this is the story of an often-overlooked piece of equipment that deserves a place in the annals of telecommunication history. Now, researchers have reviewed the history of TWTs.

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Retinal prion disease study redefines role for brain cells

Scientists studying the progression of inherited and infectious eye diseases that can cause blindness have found that microglia, a type of nervous system cell suspected to cause retinal damage, surprisingly had no damaging role during prion disease in mice. In contrast, the study findings indicated that microglia might delay disease progression.

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Freshwater coastal erosion alters global carbon budget

Shoreline erosion can transform freshwater wetlands from carbon-storage pools to carbon sources, according to a new study. Wave action and high water levels sweep away soils and plants at a rate much higher than nature can replace them. An accurate measurement of this carbon budget imbalance may help better prioritize coastal management efforts and improve global carbon-cycle models.

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Autonomous weed control via smart robots

Soybean fields are becoming increasingly infested with a glyphosate-resistant weed called 'palmer amaranth.' One pesticide currently used for controlling it is 'Dicamba,' but it has devastating effects on adjacent areas, because it tends to drift when sprayed during windy conditions. Researchers report that they have now developed a drift-free, weed-specific applicator, which will pave the way for

1h

Implant to better track brain chemical gone rogue after neurotrauma

Engineers have built a tiny, flexible sensor that is faster and more precise than past attempts at tracking a brain chemical elevated in brain diseases and neurotrauma.

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Smartphone app detects diet cheat

According to a recent study, a first-of-its-kind smartphone app called OnTrack can predict ahead of time when users are likely to lapse in their weight loss plan and help them stay on track.

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Scientists strike back against statistical tyranny

Many claim the use of ‘probability values’ is confusing

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Machine learning used to understand and predict dynamics of worm behavior

Biophysicists have used an automated method to model a living system—the dynamics of a worm perceiving and escaping pain. The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) published the results, which worked with data from experiments on the C. elegans roundworm.

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White people's eating habits produce most greenhouse gases

White individuals disproportionately affect the environment through their eating habits by eating more foods that require more water and release more greenhouse gases through their production compared to foods black and Latinx individuals eat, according to a new report published in the Journal of Industrial Ecology.

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Retinal prion disease study redefines role for brain cells

National Institutes of Health scientists studying the progression of inherited and infectious eye diseases that can cause blindness have found that microglia, a type of nervous system cell suspected to cause retinal damage, surprisingly had no damaging role during prion disease in mice. In contrast, the study findings indicated that microglia might delay disease progression.

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Traveling-wave tubes: The unsung heroes of space exploration

What do televisions and space exploration have in common? No, we're not talking about a cheesy physics joke; rather, this is the story of an often-overlooked piece of equipment that deserves a place in the annals of telecommunication history. Now, a group of researchers based at the Aix-Marseille Université in France have reviewed the history of TWTs, in a paper recently published in the European

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The 'wonder material' — how graphene is changing the world

submitted by /u/mareacaspica [link] [comments]

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Putting the science in science communication

Bring science to people where they are. That's the driving philosophy that propels U biology professor Nalini Nadkarni to stretch the possibilities of science communication and bring the beauty of science to people and places that others have overlooked.

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Countries demand their fossils back, forcing natural history museums to confront their past

Curators face up to colonial-era exploitation in the acquisition of dinosaurs, other specimens

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Daily briefing: Three ‘godfathers of artificial intelligence’ win the Turing Award

Daily briefing: Three ‘godfathers of artificial intelligence’ win the Turing Award Daily briefing: Three ‘godfathers of artificial intelligence’ win the Turing Award, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01017-9 Deep neural networks, Cyclone Idai and the oldest-ever ice core.

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Tweets about embarrassment spike in Trump era

There has been a 45-percent increase in people tweeting about embarrassment since President Donald Trump took office, according to a new study. In an analysis of Twitter traffic between June 2015 and June 2017, researchers reveal how the platform’s users responded to Trump’s actions at high-profile events. “The Twitter data across America are really powerful. People are tweeting far more about em

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Autistic Australians are being locked out of the workforce, study finds

Of unemployed people with autism, 54% surveyed said they had never held a job despite wanting to Australians living with autism are being locked out of the workforce, while some of those who found paid employment say they have previously lost a job because they are on the spectrum, new research claims. A study commissioned by autism peak body Amaze, and described as an Australian-first by its aut

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Does jailing people before trial make cities safer? Not always, new research suggests

Social scientists partner with prosecutors to get definitive answers

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Implant to better track brain chemical gone rogue after neurotrauma

Your chances of getting a nasty migraine increase following a spinal cord injury, thanks to a chemical messenger in the brain that spikes to toxic levels, past studies have suggested.

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Researchers beginning to uncover the mystery of hagfish's zombie hearts

They are the scavengers of the deep and the dead.

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Researchers beginning to uncover the mystery of hagfish's zombie hearts

They are the scavengers of the deep and the dead.

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Heart patients may fare better at teaching hospitals

Heart attack patients treated at hospitals with low care scores are at greater risk for another heart attack and even death, researchers report. The new study, which appears in the American Journal of Cardiology , compared care scores in the New Jersey Hospital Performance Reports with one-month and one-year rates of readmission for heart attack or death due to cardiovascular causes. Researchers

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High-speed videos capture how kangaroo rat escapes rattlesnake attack

Kangaroo rats are abundant and seemingly defenseless seed-eating rodents that have to contend with a host of nasty predators, including rattlesnakes—venomous pit vipers well known for their deadly, lightning-quick strikes.

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High-speed videos capture how kangaroo rat escapes rattlesnake attack

Kangaroo rats are abundant and seemingly defenseless seed-eating rodents that have to contend with a host of nasty predators, including rattlesnakes—venomous pit vipers well known for their deadly, lightning-quick strikes.

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What to Do When the Russian Government Wants to Blackmail You

MOSCOW—From Jeff Bezos’s allegations of extortion and blackmail by the National Enquirer , a publication with links to President Donald Trump, to Trump’s relations with the Kremlin, one particular word has gained prominence, and it’s not even an English one. Opponents of the government here in Moscow are well versed in the risk of their foibles and vices—from hidden-camera footage of them in bed

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Selfies can take you out of the moment

Taking pictures for the purpose of sharing can detract from the enjoyment of the experience, according to new research. While other studies have focused on the emotions—often of pride and joy—that result when we see likes and comments on our Facebook or Instagram posts, a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research is the first to explore how the presence of the “sharing goal” can trigger anxie

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Autonomous weed control via smart robots

Driving across Iowa, Hendrik J. Viljoen, distinguished professor of chemical and biological engineering at the University of Nebraska, noticed that soybean fields were becoming increasingly infested with weeds each season. The culprit is a glyphosate-resistant weed called "palmer amaranth," which is threatening crops in the Midwest.

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NASA's Aqua Satellite keeps an 'eye' on Tropical Cyclone Joaninha

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed a visible eye remained in Tropical Cyclone Joaninha is it continued moving through the central Southern Indian Ocean.

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Danmarks første flydende vindmølle skal stå langt ude på havet og kunne samles som Lego

I dag kan havvindmøller kun stilles på lavt vand, men det kan snart ændre sig.

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Team cracks soybean pest’s puzzling genome

Researchers have sequenced the genome of the soybean cyst nematode. The discovery paves the way for better management practices to combat the pest. Soybean cyst nematodes are parasitic roundworms that infect the roots of soybeans and can devastate yields in infected fields. Nematode populations build up in fields and stay for years, meaning infested acres become a perennial management concern for

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Lavt olietryk og høje bølger årsag til Viking Skys motorstop

Ifølge det norske Sjøfartsdirektorat var den direkte årsag til at alle fire motorer på krydstogtsskibet Viking Sky gik i stå i hård sø, at olietrykket i motorerne var for lavt.

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NASA's Aqua Satellite keeps an 'eye' on Tropical Cyclone Joaninha

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed a visible eye remained in Tropical Cyclone Joaninha is it continued moving through the central Southern Indian Ocean.

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Genome-editing record smashed with 13,000 edits made in one cell

submitted by /u/StcStasi [link] [comments]

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Magic Leap’s $2,295 headset is going on sale at a few AT&T stores next week

While Magic Leap’s first augmented reality headset launch wasn’t the earth-shattering drop they had sort of pitched the world on, the company is about to see a major corporate partnership …

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The space mission to buy us vital extra hours before a solar storm strikes

The sun’s violent activity can shut down the power grid and knock out satellites. ESA’s Lagrange mission will be our early warning system.

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GOP Counteroffer to Green New Deal Pushes Innovation

Senator Lamar Alexander’s proposal would beef up funding for energy research and carbon capture — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New Method Could Help Astronomers Find Life-Supporting Exoplanets

Hot Pursuit For the first time, astronomers have used a technique known as optical interferometry to study an exoplanet. That planet, HR 8799e, is a “super-Jupiter” with a surface temperature of a hellish 880 degrees Celsius (1,616 degrees Fahrenheit), meaning it’s highly unlikely to support life — but the unprecedented quality of the astronomers’ observations suggest that optical interferometry

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The Other Reasons People Don't Get Vaccines

When it comes to the flu, refusal often has nothing to do with the fear of autism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Proof Finds That All Change Is a Mix of Order and Randomness

Imagine a garden filled with every variety of flower in the world — delicate orchids, towering sunflowers, the waxy blossoms of the saguaro cactus and the corpse flower’s putrid eruptions. Now imagine that all that floral diversity reduced to just two varieties, and that by crossbreeding those two you could produce all the rest. That is the nature of one of the most sweeping results in mathematic

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Google’s Revived Robotics Department Prioritizes Powerful AI

Actual Android Google is working to revitalize its lapsed robotics program. And this time, it’s working under the assumption that the secret to powerful robots is better artificial intelligence. That means that Google’s robots will produce fewer humanoid robots and instead focus on simpler machines running powerful software, according to The New York Times — a tack which, with the resources of on

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Herd thinking can make us worse at forecasting

Herding behavior can make us “individually smarter, but collectively dumber,” according to new research on how people make forecasts in a group. With a web browser or a cellphone, consumers today are making decisions about causes to fund, stocks to pick, movies to watch, restaurants to visit, products to buy, and music to hear partly based on the answer to a single question: What does everyone el

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Biophysicists use machine learning to understand, predict dynamics of worm behavior

Biophysicists have used an automated method to model a living system — the dynamics of a worm perceiving and escaping pain. The model makes accurate predictions about the dynamics of the worm behavior, and these predictions are biologically interpretable and have been experimentally verified.

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White people's eating habits produce most greenhouse gases

White individuals disproportionately affect the environment through their eating habits by eating more foods that require more water and release more greenhouse gases through their production compared to foods black and Latinx individuals eat, according to a new report published in the Journal of Industrial Ecology.

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Newly discovered role for climbing fibers: Conveying a sensory snapshot to the cerebellum

Though there is a wealth knowledge supporting the idea that sensory cues benefit motor learning, the precise brain circuitry and mechanisms tying these two together has been debated in recent years. Shedding new light on this topic, a paper in Neuron from the lab of Dr. Jason Christie at the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, has revealed that a special input pathway into the cerebellu

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Implant to better track brain chemical gone rogue after neurotrauma

Purdue University engineers have built a tiny, flexible sensor that is faster and more precise than past attempts at tracking a brain chemical elevated in brain diseases and neurotrauma.

2h

Autonomous weed control via smart robots

Soybean fields are becoming increasingly infested with a glyphosate-resistant weed called 'palmer amaranth.' One pesticide currently used for controlling it is 'Dicamba,' but it has devastating effects on adjacent areas, because it tends to drift when sprayed during windy conditions. Researchers report in Physics of Fluids that they were inspired to develop a drift-free, weed-specific applicator,

2h

High-speed videos capture how kangaroo rat escapes rattlesnake attack

Kangaroo rats are abundant and seemingly defenseless seed-eating rodents that have to contend with a host of nasty predators, including rattlesnakes — venomous pit vipers well known for their deadly, lightning-quick strikes. Research by a student-led team from UC Riverside, San Diego State University, and UC Davis now shows that desert kangaroo rats frequently foil snakes through a combination of

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Lipid vesicles transmit luminous or electrical signals

Fluorescent molecules or charges enable liposomes to transmit light or electrical signals. Magnetic particles added to the material allow transmission to be controlled by means of magnets.

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Heating up tumors could make CAR T therapy more effective, study finds

A preclinical study led by scientists at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer suggests that heating solid tumors during CAR T-cell therapy can enhance the treatment's success.

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UTSA study quantifies injuries and combat casualty care trends during War on Terror

UTSA researcher, Jeffrey Howard, published an article today in JAMA Surgery that takes a closer look at the casualties of war and the trauma care they received during the military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq that began after September 11, 2001.

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Researchers beginning to uncover the mystery of hagfish's zombie hearts

University of Guelph researchers deprived hagfish hearts of oxygen and then fed the organs saline containing either glucose, glycerol or no fuel source. The researchers found feeding the hearts glycerol enhanced the hearts' contraction even more so then glucose, which is typically the fuel muscles prefer. These findings could have implications for preventing tissue damage to the human heart when o

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Exercise helps prevent cartilage damage caused by arthritis

Exercise helps to prevent the degradation of cartilage caused by osteoarthritis, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.

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Vitamin C can shorten the length of stay in the ICU

Vitamin C administration shortened the length of stay in the intensive care unit on average by 8 percent in 12 trials with 1766 patients according to a meta-analysis published in Nutrients.

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Pairing music with medication offers potential therapeutic strategy to manage pain

Researchers at University of Utah Health found pairing music with one of four pain medications offered a promising complementary strategy to treat pain.

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Southern Europeans, non-Europeans less likely to have matched stem cell donors

Although the pool of registered bone marrow donors has increased in recent years, a new study suggests that most people of southern-European and non-European descent are unlikely to have a suitable match if they need a life-saving bone marrow transplant.

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Putting the science in science communication

Building public trust in science is about more than just providing information and improving science literacy, she says. It's about building relationships between scientists and communities that are founded on shared values. It's called the 'Ambassador Model,' and Nadkarni now has the data to say that the approach works, at relatively low cost and with high effectiveness.

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US regulators under fire, Boeing launches charm offensive

The head of the US air safety agency faces harsh questions from senators Wednesday over its relationship with and oversight of Boeing, while the aerospace giant launches a charm offensive to try to restore its reputation after two air disasters in recent months killed 346 people.

2h

Godt nyt fra Grønland: Kæmpe-gletsjer vokser for første gang i 20 år

Afsmeltningen fra Jakobshavn Isbræ har taget sig en pause. Desværre vil den snart tage til igen.

2h

The Tiny Poisonous Toads Taking Over Florida Yards

The cane-toad invasion of Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, began, according to one resident, with a few toads in her pool last Thursday. “We weren’t sure what they were, so we removed them,” she told The Palm Beach Post . “Friday morning, it was like a mass exodus of toads. Baby toads.” In photographs, tiny amphibian bodies swarmed a swimming pool, clambered up walls, and carpeted a hallway—countless

3h

Step it up: Does running cadence matter? Not as much as previously thought

Contrary to long-standing popular belief, running at a prescribed, one-size-fits-all "optimal" cadence doesn't play as big a role in speed and efficiency as once thought.

3h

3D printer threads electronic fibers onto fabrics

The potential for wearable electronics goes far beyond smart watches, but our current options for battery packs and circuit boards don't make for the most comfortable E-socks. One solution, being developed by scientists in China, is to simply print flexible fibers on to transitional textiles or clothes. For example, they printed patterns that can harvest and store electricity onto fabrics.

3h

Are no-fun fungi keeping fertilizer from plants?

Research explores soil, fungi, phosphorus dynamics.

3h

Colder temperatures foster greater microbial diversity on amphibian skin

A far-reaching global study has found that climate is a critical determinant of microbial diversity on amphibian skin, with colder, more variable temperatures producing richer bacterial communities than warmer, more stable environments.

3h

Meet America's Biggest Machine-Gun Enthusiasts

These bullet-ridden storage containers and pickup trucks are all that remains after three days of mayhem.

3h

Freshwater coastal erosion alters global carbon budget

Shoreline erosion can transform freshwater wetlands from carbon-storage pools to carbon sources, according to a new study led by Illinois State Geological Survey researchers. Wave action and high water levels sweep away soils and plants at a rate much higher than nature can replace them. An accurate measurement of this carbon budget imbalance may help better prioritize coastal management efforts a

3h

Researchers decipher and codify the universal language of honey bees

For Virginia Tech researchers Margaret Couvillon and Roger Schürch, the Tower of Babel origin myth—intended to explain the genesis of the world's many languages—holds great meaning.

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Researchers decipher and codify the universal language of honey bees

For Virginia Tech researchers Margaret Couvillon and Roger Schürch, the Tower of Babel origin myth—intended to explain the genesis of the world's many languages—holds great meaning.

3h

Old for new, using ancient genetic variation to supercharge wheat

Wheat is responsible for half of global calories consumed either directly or as animal feed and we need to make a lot more of it in the coming decades. Now, an important paper marks a step change in how breeders might approach wheat breeding using previously untapped sources of variation to increase yields to meet demand.

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The weirdest things we learned this week: you can mummify yourself to death and Disney is full of military tech

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s hit podcast.

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Microsoft bans public-facing April Fools' Day pranks

In an internal memo obtained and verified by The Verge, Microsoft’s Chief Marketing Officer Chris Capossela said it’s the time of year when tech companies try to show their creativity with April …

3h

EU May Mandate Devices That Make Cars Slow Down Automatically

The European Union is expected to enact new regulations which will mandate that cars come with technology that can automatically force them to slow down or brake when the driver goes over …

3h

Old for new, using ancient genetic variation to supercharge wheat

Wheat is responsible for half of global calories consumed either directly or as animal feed and we need to make a lot more of it in the coming decades. Now, an important paper marks a step change in how breeders might approach wheat breeding using previously untapped sources of variation to increase yields to meet demand.

3h

Bro mellem Als og Fyn vil dagligt stjæle 1000 Femern-biler

En fast forbindelse mellem Fyn og Als vil få 1000 køretøjer i døgnet til at fravælge Femern-tunnelen. Det viser ny rapport fra Vejdirektoratet.

3h

Trump’s Call for Russian Hacking Makes Even Less Sense After Mueller

For the first year of his presidential campaign, Donald Trump was a devoted exponent of the press conference. He seemed to revel in the format: the jousts with reporters, the free-associative possibilities, the chance to shock. But almost 1,000 days ago, Trump’s press conferences reached their apogee. Speaking in Miami on July 27, 2016 , Trump gave the final and weirdest press conference of his c

3h

Patrick Shanahan’s Endless Limbo

Late Monday night, the Defense Department announced that it was directing $1 billion to help fund a border fence. Tuesday morning, the House Armed Services Committee chairman, Adam Smith, made public a letter saying that his committee would deny the request—right in the middle of Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan’s own testimony to that very committee. It’s not clear that Congress can act

3h

The Resistance Media Weren’t Ready for This

These are turbulent times for Resistance Inc. The Robert Mueller fetishization cottage industry is collapsing . Russia conspiracy theorists are frantically tweet-storming as though their life—or livelihood—depends on it. And across liberal America, cable-news obsessives and keyboard warriors who have spent years waiting for investigators to produce a presidency-ending bombshell are in a state of

3h

The Other Reasons People Don't Get Vaccines

When it comes to the flu, refusal often has nothing to do with the fear of autism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Organisms Survived on the Outside of the Space Station

533 Days of Space Outer space is a tough environment for living organisms: no atmosphere, no oxygen, no gravity, a ton of radiation, and extreme temperatures. But the German Aerospace Center just made a bombshell discovery : as part of a project called the Biology and Mars Experiment, they found that samples of organisms including bacteria, algae, lichens and fungi survived on the exterior of the

3h

Jim O’Neill demands action on superbugs

Biotech companies need big pharma to bring innovative antibiotics to market

3h

Massive earthquakes provide new insight into deep Earth

In a first-ever study of two of the largest deep earthquakes ever recorded in human history, researchers reveal new and surprising information about our planet's mysterious, ever-changing interior.

3h

Helping infants survive brain cancer

Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is a particularly challenging type of brain cancer: The tumor most commonly arises in infants under the age of one. Progress in developing effective therapies has been hindered by the lack of models that could help researchers better understand the cancer. Now, scientists from SBP have developed a novel mouse model of CPC and have used it to identify multiple potenti

3h

A simple strategy to improve your mood in 12 minutes

We all have a remedy — a glass of wine or a piece of chocolate — for lifting our spirits when we're in a bad mood. Rather than focusing on ways to make ourselves feel better, a team of researchers suggests wishing others well.

3h

Interest in RNA editing heats up

The gene-editing technology known as CRISPR has attracted much excitement and investor interest with its potential to someday treat diseases by fixing faulty copies of genes. But recently, a different approach called RNA editing, which could offer advantages over CRISPR, has been gaining ground in academic labs and start-ups, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN).

3h

Killer robots already exist, and they’ve been here a very long time

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Codifying the universal language of honey bees

In a paper appearing in April's issue of Animal Behaviour researchers decipher the instructive messages encoded in the insects' movements, called waggle dances.

3h

Mini microscope is the new GoPro for studies of brain disease in living mice

Working with mice, a team of Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers has developed a relatively inexpensive, portable mini microscope that could improve scientists' ability to image the effects of cancer, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and other conditions in the brains of living and active mice over time. The device, which measures less than 5 cubic centimeters, is docked onto animals' heads and gathers

3h

Freshwater coastal erosion alters global carbon budget

Shoreline erosion can transform freshwater wetlands from carbon-storage pools to carbon sources, according to a new study led by Illinois State Geological Survey researchers. Wave action and high water levels sweep away soils and plants at a rate much higher than nature can replace them. An accurate measurement of this carbon budget imbalance may help better prioritize coastal management efforts a

3h

Physicists constrain dark matter

Researchers from Russia, Finland, and the U.S. have put a constraint on the theoretical model of dark matter particles by analyzing data from astronomical observations of active galactic nuclei. The new findings provide an added incentive for research groups around the world trying to crack the mystery of dark matter: No one is quite sure what it is made of.

3h

Lying, sitting or standing: Resting postures determined by animals' size

Cows always lie on their chests so that their digestion is not impaired. Rodents sometimes rest sitting down, while kangaroos sometimes lie on their backs. The larger the animal, the less often it lies down, and when it does, it is more likely to lie on its side – but there are exceptions. A team from UZH investigated the resting postures of mammals.

3h

Interest in RNA editing heats up

The gene-editing technology known as CRISPR has attracted much excitement and investor interest with its potential to someday treat diseases by fixing faulty copies of genes. But recently, a different approach called RNA editing, which could offer advantages over CRISPR, has been gaining ground in academic labs and start-ups, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN).

3h

Solving a hairy forensic problem

For decades, forensic scientists have tested strands of hair to reveal drug use or poisoning. But in recent years, reports have questioned the technique—in particular, its ability to distinguish between the intake of a substance and external contamination of the hair. Now, researchers have reported a new method that appears to do just that in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry.

3h

Massive earthquakes provide new insight into deep Earth

In the waning months of 2018, two of the mightiest deep earthquakes ever recorded in human history rattled the Tonga-Fiji region of the South Pacific.

3h

Teenage psychotic experiences linked to high levels of air pollution

A study has found that psychotic experiences are more common among teenagers in the UK’s most polluted areas

3h

Tesla Installed a Massive Powerpack in a Japanese Train Station

Training Day Tesla just built what Electrek claims is Asia’s largest energy storage system at Osaka’s extremely busy train station in Japan — in just two days. Rather than providing households cheaper and reliable power, it’s designed to make sure trains at the station don’t get stuck and help reduce energy demand on the Osaka grid during peak hours. “In the event of a grid outage, this Osaka Pow

3h

Dash of Meson, Pinch of Baryon: Scientists Find Recipe for Ultrarare Pentaquarks

Researchers now know what's going on inside mysterious particles called pentaquarks.

3h

An Expensive Choice for Duke

You may have seen the headlines about a large settlement ($112.5 million) that Duke University is paying the government. This goes back to Erin Potts-Kant, a clinical research coordinator at Duke Health, as well as (former) professor William Foster and (former) chief of the Pulmonary Division Monica Kraft. The details are many, and some of them are in filings that are under seal, but the broad ou

3h

Osteoblastic cell stimulation by pulsed electromagnetic fields

Bone fracture healing can be augmented with the application of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs), but a consensus regarding idealized conditions is lacking.

3h

Drexel study: Smartphone app detects diet cheat

According to a recent study, led by Evan Forman, PhD, a psychology professor in Drexel University's College of Arts and Sciences, a first-of-its-kind smartphone app called OnTrack can predict ahead of time when users are likely to lapse in their weight loss plan and help them stay on track.

3h

Massive earthquakes provide new insight into deep Earth

In a first-ever study of two of the largest deep earthquakes ever recorded in human history, FSU researchers reveal new and surprising information about our planet's mysterious, ever-changing interior.

3h

Grindr's Chinese Parent Company Strong-Armed Into Selling Dating Service Over National Security Concerns

Beijing Kunlun Tech, the parent company of dating app Grindr, is planning to sell the service after a national security committee in the U.S. found its acquisition of the dating app last year …

3h

Uber's Ride Pass is now available in more than 20 cities

Uber has expanded its Ride Pass subscription offering to 16 additional cities this week, pushing the total number of participating areas to over 20.

3h

Whale Experts 'Cautiously Optimistic' That Once Starving Grandma Orca Will Survive

A grandmother orca who was on death's door late last year is still alive, although her health remains in a precarious state, according to researchers who spotted her swimming off the western Canadian coast last week.

3h

3 Myths (and 1 Truth) About Grain-Fed Beef

There’s a lot to consider when deciding what kind of meat to buy—or even whether to eat meat at all. The least we can do is start with accurate information — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Meet Roxie Laybourne, the Feather Detective Who Changed Aviation

A new Sidedoor episode tells the story of Roxy Laybourne, a Smithsonian scientist who pioneered the field of forensic ornithology

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EU consumption results in high carbon emissions from tropical deforestation, studies show

A sixth of all emissions resulting from the typical diet of an EU citizen can be directly linked to deforestation of tropical forests. Two new studies shed new light on this impact, by combining satellite imagery of the rainforest, global land use statistics and data of international trade patterns.

3h

Maths shows that this week's Brexit votes won't solve the UK's crisis

The UK House of Commons is voting to try to agree on a solution to Brexit, but game theory suggests it has chosen a particularly bad way of doing so, says Petros Sekeris

3h

AI Performed Like a Human on a Gestalt Psychology Test

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

3h

Two new planets have been discovered using A.I.

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

3h

Researchers optimize aptamer with enhanced myelin-binding properties for MS treatment

A new study has demonstrated the enhanced ability of an optimized 20-nucleotide derivative of a larger DNA aptamer to bind myelin in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

3h

A simple strategy to improve your mood in 12 minutes

We all have a remedy — a glass of wine or a piece of chocolate — for lifting our spirits when we're in a bad mood. Rather than focusing on ways to make ourselves feel better, a team of Iowa State University researchers suggests wishing others well.

3h

Drug shortages: Limited warnings, followed by rationing and hoarding

In a national survey, hospital pharmacy managers report a lack of advance notice, frequent drug shortages, hoarding and even rationing. Improving the supply of generic medications and creating novel strategies to manage scarce drugs is needed.

3h

Cannabis during pregnancy bumps psychosis risk in offspring

Pregnant women who use cannabis may slightly increase the risk their unborn child will develop psychosis later in life, suggests new research from Washington University in St. Louis.

3h

Factors associated with increased survival among US military combat casualties in Afghanistan, Iraq

This study analyzed combat casualty statistics to look at factors associated with reductions in mortality during the current conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq.

3h

Study: To keep leftover opioids out of harm's way, give surgery patients disposal bags

Many surgery patients head home from the hospital with opioid pain medicine prescriptions, and most will have pills left over after they finish recovering from their procedure. Now, a new study suggests patients should also leave the hospital with something to help them safely get rid of those leftovers — and keep the potentially addictive pills from being misused or polluting the environment.

3h

3D printer threads electronic fibers onto fabrics

The potential for wearable electronics goes far beyond smart watches, but our current options for battery packs and circuit boards don't make for the most comfortable E-socks. One solution, being developed by scientists in China, is to simply print flexible fibers on to transitional textiles or clothes. For example, they printed patterns that can harvest and store electricity onto fabrics. The adv

3h

What is gender equality in science? Common solutions may not be solving the problem

Despite the scientific community taking action on gender inequality, the problem persists. In a review published March 27 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, researchers say that achieving equality for women in STEM requires us to ask, 'What is equality?' To create authentic equality, and not only regarding gender, the authors promote a simple first step: define the problem before findin

3h

Letters: ‘The Deck Is Heavily Stacked Against Low-Income Students’

Elite Colleges Constantly Tell Low-Income Students That They Do Not Belong In mid-March, the Justice Department charged 50 people for their alleged involvement in a scheme to influence college-admissions decisions through bribery and deception. The scandal, Clint Smith argued shortly after , provides an opportunity to examine the systematic ways universities amplify and exacerbate class differenc

3h

Brush up on autism history with this website

The Autism History Project highlights the people, ideas, and topics that were instrumental in shaping autism during the 20th century in the United States. The internet is full of research and debate, but historian Ellen Herman found little in the way of context about autism. She decided to help fill that gap with a project tracing the modern history of autism from its early recognition to today.

4h

3 Myths (and 1 Truth) About Grain-Fed Beef

There’s a lot to consider when deciding what kind of meat to buy—or even whether to eat meat at all. The least we can do is start with accurate information — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Fiat Chrysler weighs potential Europe and Asia mergers

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is torn over what partnership would most help the company turn around in its European fortunes and face looming EU emissions limits, analysts said Wednesday.

4h

Ford to shut three factories, stop making passenger cars in Russia

US carmaker Ford will close three of the four factories of its Russian joint venture after deciding to stop making passenger cars in a country where car sales have slumped in recent years, the company said Wednesday.

4h

Australia Reveals Cyberwar Against ISIS, Asks for Help

Digital Front In a speech on Wednesday, the Australian government revealed that it’s been engaged in a targeted cyberwar against ISIS. “Just as the Coalition forces were preparing to attack the terrorists’ position, our offensive cyber operators were at their keyboards in Australia — firing highly targeted bits and bytes into cyberspace,” said Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) Director-General

4h

New Strategies Take On the Worst Cancer–Glioblastoma

Among the various malignancies that can afflict the human body, few bring with them the dour prognoses of brain tumors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

EU aims to put speed limit technology on cars

The European Union is moving to require cars and trucks to have technology that would deter speeding as well as data recorders to document the circumstances of accidents.

4h

Apple vs. Netflix: Why turf wars are flaring in big tech

Apple's latest move into streaming video illustrates an escalating trend: Tech's biggest companies, faced with limits to their growth, are encroaching on each other's turf.

4h

Hvert fjerde IDA-medlem vil stemme – hvis meningsmåling holder stik

Ingeniørens egen statistisk usikre måling viser, at valgdeltagelsen ved IDAs repræsentantskabsvalg vil nå niveauet for valget i 2013.

4h

Insect species that prefer crops prosper while majority decline

Many species of flower-visiting insect are in trouble in Britain, according to a new report from the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH) near Oxford, which drew on almost 750,000 observations of insects between 1980 and 2013. The study used population records of 353 wild bee and hoverfly species over large areas of Great Britain to show that one third of these pollinating species declined in ra

4h

New Strategies Take On the Worst Cancer–Glioblastoma

Among the various malignancies that can afflict the human body, few bring with them the dour prognoses of brain tumors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Pollution can fuel ‘psychotic experiences’ in teenagers, study finds

Mental health problems such as paranoia are more common in areas with dirtier air

4h

Solving a hairy forensic problem

For decades, forensic scientists have tested strands of hair to reveal drug use or poisoning. But in recent years, reports have questioned the technique — in particular, its ability to distinguish between the intake of a substance and external contamination of the hair. Now, researchers have reported a new method that appears to do just that in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry.

4h

Old for new, using ancient genetic variation to supercharge wheat

A global, collaborative effort led by the Earlham Institute, UK and CIMMYT, Mexico sheds light on the genetic basis of biomass accumulation and efficiency in use of light, both of which are bottlenecks in yield improvement in wheat.

4h

Step it up: Does running cadence matter? Not as much as previously thought

Contrary to long-standing popular belief, running at a prescribed, one-size-fits-all "optimal" cadence doesn't play as big a role in speed and efficiency as once thought.

4h

What is gender equality in science? Common solutions may not be solving the problem

Despite the scientific community taking action on gender inequality, the problem persists. In a review published March 27 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, researchers say that achieving equality for women in STEM requires us to ask, "What is equality?" To create authentic equality, and not only regarding gender, the authors promote a simple first step: define the problem before findin

4h

Why it's so hard to trace the patterns of unsustainable fossil fuel use

Our future depends on a transition away from fossil fuels. To map out a path, we need to get to grips with how, and why, the use of coal, gas and oil has risen to unsustainable levels.

4h

Insect species that prefer crops prosper while majority decline

Many species of flower-visiting insect are in trouble in Britain, according to a new report from the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH) near Oxford, which drew on almost 750,000 observations of insects between 1980 and 2013. The study used population records of 353 wild bee and hoverfly species over large areas of Great Britain to show that one third of these pollinating species declined in ra

4h

Negative equity house price risk could be ended, new research confirms

The risk of house prices crashing and leaving millions of homeowners in negative equity could be removed if the financial sector adopts new models of investment for housing that are widely used in other areas of finance, according to major new research.

4h

America Is Too Glib About Breast Implants

If you’ve commuted in an American city in the past decade, you’ve probably seen some kind of cheeky ad for affordable, accessible breast implants. A young woman comparing tangerines with grapefruits has greeted subway riders in New York City for the past several years. A giant close-up of cleavage promising “a gift you can both enjoy” loomed over the streets of one Utah town in 2007. Almost a dec

4h

Researchers aim to demystify complex ag water requirements for Produce Safety Rule

In an effort to ensure the safety of fresh fruits and vegetables for consumers, Cornell University's Produce Safety Alliance is helping to explain complex federal food safety rules and develop new ways to assess agricultural water use.

4h

Waiting for neutrinos

On Feb. 24, 1987, light from a supernova that exploded 168,000 years ago in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a neighbor of the Milky Way, reached Earth. Astronomers Ian Shelton and Oscar Duhalde at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile first reported the supernova, called SN 1987A (or simply 87A), which was one of the brightest in nearly four centuries.

4h

The life and death of a 'city of worms'

Twenty thousand years ago, when giant sloths and saber-toothed tigers roamed the Los Angeles Basin, in the dark ocean depths lived an immense colony of worms. Not your garden-variety earthworms, but furtive creatures that lived in little shell-like tubes hundreds of meters below the sea surface.

4h

Mirage software automates design of optical metamaterials

Sandia National Laboratories has created the first inverse-design software for optical metamaterials—meaning users start by describing the result they want, and the software fills in the steps to get there. The modern design approach takes guesswork out of engineering as-yet theoretical technologies like ultracompact, high-performance cameras and cloaking armor that could make wearers invisible to

4h

To detect diseases earlier, let's speak bacteria's secret language | Fatima AlZahra'a Alatraktchi

Bacteria "talk" to each other, sending chemical information to coordinate attacks. What if we could listen to what they were saying? Nanophysicist Fatima AlZahra'a Alatraktchi invented a tool to spy on bacterial chatter and translate their secret communication into human language. Her work could pave the way for early diagnosis of disease — before we even get sick.

4h

Ny CFCS-lov: Ansatte kan blive underkastet tvungen overvågning af pc’ere og smartphones

Forsvarsministeren har fremsat ny CFCS-lov. Den åbner for tvungen tilkobling til statens sniffernetværket, kaldet netsikkerhedstjenesten. Det vil dog maksimalt ramme ni virksomheder årligt, lyder det.

4h

The life and death of a 'city of worms'

Twenty thousand years ago, when giant sloths and saber-toothed tigers roamed the Los Angeles Basin, in the dark ocean depths lived an immense colony of worms. Not your garden-variety earthworms, but furtive creatures that lived in little shell-like tubes hundreds of meters below the sea surface.

4h

Fullerenes bridge conductive gap in organic photovoltaics

Organic photovoltaics have achieved remarkably high efficiencies, but finding optimum combinations of materials for high-performance organic solar cells, which are also economically competitive, still presents a challenge. Researchers from the United States and China have now developed an innovative interlayer material to improve device stability and electrode performance. In the journal Angewandt

4h

Negative equity house price risk could be ended, new research confirms

The risk of house prices crashing and leaving millions of homeowners in negative equity could be removed if the financial sector adopts new models of investment for housing that are widely used in other areas of finance, according to major new research.

4h

Fluorine: Toxic and aggressive, but widely used

In toothpaste, Teflon, LEDs and medications, it shows its sunny side – but elemental fluorine is extremely aggressive and highly toxic. Attempts to determine the crystal structure of solid fluorine using X-rays ended with explosions 50 years ago. A research team has now clarified the actual structure of the fluorine using neutrons from the Heinz Maier Leibnitz Research Neutron Source (FRM II).

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Researchers aim to demystify complex ag water requirements for Produce Safety Rule

In an effort to ensure the safety of fresh fruits and vegetables for consumers, Cornell University's Produce Safety Alliance is helping to explain complex federal food safety rules and develop new ways to assess agricultural water use.

4h

6G på vej: Forskere og teleindustri kridter banen op

PLUS. Amerikanske telemyndigheder åbner for netværkseksperimenter på nye høje frekvensbånd, mens forskere og teleindustrien netop nu diskuterer 6G i Finland.

4h

Tackling India's e-waste recycling crisis

India's share of the world's massive e-waste problem has seen unskilled recyclers exposing themselves to dangerous processes. Jeevesh Kumar is working to delete the recycling danger, and reboot the benefits.

4h

Killer robots already exist, and they've been here a very long time

Humans will always make the final decision on whether armed robots can shoot, according to a statement by the US Department of Defense. Their clarification comes amid fears about a new advanced targeting system, known as ATLAS, that will use artificial intelligence in combat vehicles to target and execute threats. While the public may feel uneasy about so-called "killer robots", the concept is not

4h

Two letters by inventor Nikola Tesla surface in Serbia

A culture society in Serbia made public this month two letters that they say were written by late 19th- and early 20th-century inventor and electricity pioneer Nikola Tesla.

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Character Is Destiny. And Michael Avenatti Is a Bloviator.

Nobody would ever describe Michael Avenatti as circumspect. But this month, the outspoken lawyer, Donald Trump adversary, and media enthusiast achieved historic levels of recklessness, culminating in the FBI arresting him Monday morning in the lavish Manhattan offices of the power firm Boies Schiller Flexner LLP. In a dramatic reversal of fortune, the man who made the president of the United Stat

4h

The Public Needs to See Robert Mueller’s Report

Nancy Pelosi knew. As a ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee during George W. Bush’s administration, she repeatedly received classified briefings about the CIA’s torture program and the National Security Agency’s surveillance regime. Her inaction means there will always be doubt as to whether she has the judgment necessary to safeguard the rule of law on behalf of the American pub

4h

Fleets of autonomous satellites to coordinate tasks among themselves

Space missions have long benefited from some autonomous operations being carried out aboard spacecraft, but with a sharp increase expected in the number of satellites being launched in the next few years, researchers are using automation and artificial intelligence to make them smarter and more effective.

4h

Incivility as a barrier to knowledge sharing in the ICT workplace

If people who work together don't have good interpersonal relationships, and more to the point, there is actual incivility between them, this can seriously impede the flow of knowledge within a company. A survey conducted among workers in the information technology and communications industry is analysed and discussed in the International Journal of Information Systems and Change Management. Inciv

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After spending winter in a fridge, Minsk bats return to the wild

After spending the winter months hibernating inside a fridge at a rescue centre in Belarus, a group of bats awaken and are released into the wild.

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Critically endangered birds still alive on King Island

A new study has found two critically endangered bird species feared to be near extinction on King Island in the Bass Strait are not only still alive, but their populations may be larger than previously thought.

4h

This Nootropics Company Developed the Keto Diet Hack You’ve Been Waiting For

Over the last few years, the keto diet has become a very popular weight loss method, and it’s not hard to understand why. If you do keto right, not only will you burn fat and shed pounds, but you’ll also feel more clear-headed and experience fewer fluctuations in your energy levels. Generally speaking, those are all good things. Unfortunately, as most doctors and nutritionists will tell you, keto

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After spending winter in a fridge, Minsk bats return to the wild

After spending the winter months hibernating inside a fridge at a rescue centre in Belarus, a group of bats awaken and are released into the wild.

4h

Critically endangered birds still alive on King Island

A new study has found two critically endangered bird species feared to be near extinction on King Island in the Bass Strait are not only still alive, but their populations may be larger than previously thought.

4h

Coffee for the birds

Coffee grown under a tree canopy is promoted as good habitat for birds, but recent University of Delaware research shows that some of these coffee farms may not be as friendly to our feathered friends as advertised.

4h

India Just Shot Down a Satellite With a Missile

Satellite Killer Indian authorities claim to have successfully tested an anti-satellite missile. “India is now a major space power,” said Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, according to local news . “India has achieved a big feat today.” Election Season The destroyed satellite was one of India’s own, orbiting the Earth at 186 miles (300 km). The Independent reports that it may have been a mini-

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Coffee for the birds

Coffee grown under a tree canopy is promoted as good habitat for birds, but recent University of Delaware research shows that some of these coffee farms may not be as friendly to our feathered friends as advertised.

4h

Lægernes Pension investerer millioner i selskaber med forbindelse til Saudi-Arabien

138,1 mio. kr. har Lægernes Pension investeret i selskaber, der leverer militært udstyr til Saudi-Arabien.

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To offset drought, retrofit older power plants

Droughts and rising water temperatures linked to climate change will undercut the future generating capacity of some power plants, research finds. Further, environmental regulations that limit water use could exacerbate the problem. But don’t scrap the regulations, the study recommends. Scrap the old cooling systems instead. These older power plants with once-through cooling systems generate abou

4h

Ultrabright X-rays reveal the molecular structure of membranes used to desalinate seawater

For the first time, a team of researchers from Stony Brook University and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has revealed the molecular structure of membranes used in reverse osmosis. The research is reported in a recently published paper in ACS Macro Letters, a journal of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

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How light from street lamps and trees influence the activity of urban bats

Artificial light is rightly considered a major social, cultural and economic achievement. Yet artificial light at night is also said to pose a threat to biodiversity, especially affecting nocturnal species in metropolitan areas. It has become clear that the response by wildlife to artificial light at night may vary across species, seasons and lamp types. A study conducted by a team led by the Leib

4h

The inside story on crime within prison

I've spent many years working within the prison system, in minimum and maximum security facilities, with adults and juveniles, men and women. I often hear people say that people who commit crimes, particularly serious crimes, should be imprisoned so they can no longer hurt people.

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Are more Aussie trees dying of drought? Scientists need your help spotting dead trees

Most citizen science initiatives ask people to record living things, like frogs, wombats, or feral animals. But dead things can also be hugely informative for science. We have just launched a new citizen science project, The Dead Tree Detective, which aims to record where and when trees have died in Australia.

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When even winning is losing: The surprising cost of defeating Philip Morris over plain packaging

Australia scored a victory over the tobacco giant Philip Morris in the High Court in 2012. The court held that Australia's plain cigarette packaging laws were legal and did not constitute an unjust confiscation of trademarks and intellectual property. Philip Morris had to pay all of Australia's costs.

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Let's not make big waves

Due to its potential to make computers faster and smartphones more efficient, spintronics is considered a promising concept for the future of electronics. In a collaboration including the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems (MPI-IS) and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), a team of researchers has now successfully generated so-called spin waves much more easily and efficientl

4h

Fullerenes bridge conductive gap in organic photovoltaics

Organic photovoltaics have achieved remarkably high efficiencies, but finding optimum combinations of materials for high-performance organic solar cells, which are also economically competitive, still presents a challenge. Researchers from the United States and China have now developed an innovative interlayer material to improve device stability and electrode performance. In the journal Angewandt

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Glowing tumors show scientists where cancer drugs are working

Experimenting with mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have successfully used positron emission tomography (PET) scans to calculate in real time how much of an immunotherapy drug reaches a tumor and what parts of a cancer remain unaffected.

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Laser physics: Downsizing the particle accelerator

Munich physicists have succeeded in demonstrating plasma wakefield acceleration of subatomic particles in a miniaturized, laser-driven model. The new system provides a broader basis for the development of the next generation of particle accelerators.

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Russian physicists obtained data on particles self-organization in ultracold dusty plasma

It is for the first time that physicists investigated the behavior of particles in a dusty plasma at a temperature below 2 K. The experiment showed that at extremely low temperatures nanoclusters can form in the plasma, and the synthesis of polymer fibers takes place. The results of the experiment can be used to create new materials with desired and controlled properties. The results of this study

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How light from street lamps and trees influence the activity of urban bats

Artificial light is rightly considered a major social, cultural and economic achievement. Yet artificial light at night is also said to pose a threat to biodiversity, especially affecting nocturnal species in metropolitan areas. It has become clear that the response by wildlife to artificial light at night may vary across species, seasons and lamp types. A study conducted by a team led by the Leib

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How light from street lamps and trees influence the activity of urban bats

A study sheds new light on how exactly ultraviolet (UV) emitting and non-UV emitting street lamps influence the activity of bats in the Berlin metropolitan area and whether tree cover might mitigate any effect of light pollution.

5h

Eating small amounts of red and processed meats may increase risk of early death

A new study suggests that eating red and processed meats — even in small amounts — may increase the risk of death from all causes, especially cardiovascular disease.

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Patients say lack of physician guidance and fear of side effects are why they don't take statins as prescribed

Despite national guidelines indicating that statins can lower risk of heart attack and stroke, many patients who could benefit do not take them. Most of these patients say they were never offered the cholesterol-lowering drugs, or they experienced or were fearful of possible side effects.

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Future of elephants living in captivity hangs in the balance

Scientists are looking at ways to boost captive populations of Asian elephants without relying on taking them from the wild.

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Extreme weather news may not change climate change skeptics' minds

The year 2018 brought particularly devastating natural disasters, including hurricanes, droughts, floods and fires – just the kinds of extreme weather events scientists predict will be exacerbated by climate change.

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Beyond 'Bandersnatch,' the future of interactive TV is bright

Make a choice: Do you want to engage with your media passively or actively?

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The social animals that are inspiring new behaviours for robot swarms

From flocks of birds to fish schools in the sea, or towering termite mounds, many social groups in nature exist together to survive and thrive. This cooperative behaviour can be used by engineers as "bio-inspiration" to solve practical human problems, and by computer scientists studying swarm intelligence.

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The future of renewable infrastructure is uncertain without good planning

In 2005, a small hydropower plant was installed in the Sukajaya district of West Java, Indonesia. This was an off-the-grid project, owned by the community, that provided electricity locally through a mini-grid to about 150 households mainly for lighting. But after 10 years the plant was discontinued when the community was connected to the recently expanded central grid.

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Microorganisms are the main emitters of carbon in Amazonian waters

A new study has found that the microbial food web accounts for most of the carbon circulating in Amazonia's lakes, floodplains and wetlands.

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North America's carbon cycle

University of Delaware associate professor Rodrigo Vargas and more than 200 experts from the United States, Canada and Mexico recently unveiled Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2), a state-of-the-art assessment of carbon cycle science across North America and its connection with climate and society.

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Daring underwater mission reveals how deep ocean floor currents can travel thousands of kilometres

An international team of scientists, including Dr. Esther Sumner from Ocean and Earth Science and Prof Stephen Darby from Geography and Environmental Sciences, has discovered how giant density-driven submarine flows are able to travel thousands of kilometres into the deep ocean.

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Van Allen Probes prepare for final descent into Earth's atmosphere

Two tough, resilient NASA spacecraft have been orbiting Earth for the past six and a half years, flying repeatedly through a hazardous zone of charged particles known as the Van Allen radiation belts. The twin Van Allen Probes have confirmed scientific theories and revealed new structures, compositions, and processes at work in these dynamic regions.

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An introduction to the complexities of the German research scene

An introduction to the complexities of the German research scene An introduction to the complexities of the German research scene, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00910-7 The country’s diverse academic landscape is defined by its applied and basic science institutes.

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Offbeat approaches to cancer research

Offbeat approaches to cancer research Offbeat approaches to cancer research, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00906-3 Creative thinking can pay dividends for researchers taking on cancer.

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Scientists in Germany identify first hybrid hominin

Scientists in Germany identify first hybrid hominin Scientists in Germany identify first hybrid hominin, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00913-4 DNA sequencing reveals the earliest recorded incidence of interbreeding between human ancestors.

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Ten research collaborations between Germany and the rest of the world

Ten research collaborations between Germany and the rest of the world Ten research collaborations between Germany and the rest of the world, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00918-z The programmes are spread over the globe.

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Career Guide: Germany

Career Guide: Germany Career Guide: Germany, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00909-0 How the world’s fourth-largest economy has grown its research scene.

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Germany’s attitude to start-up firms is undergoing profound change

Germany’s attitude to start-up firms is undergoing profound change Germany’s attitude to start-up firms is undergoing profound change, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00920-5 The country has been slow to welcome start-up science culture, but the scene looks set to take off.

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Germany faces its future as a pioneer in sustainability and renewable energy

Germany faces its future as a pioneer in sustainability and renewable energy Germany faces its future as a pioneer in sustainability and renewable energy, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00916-1 The country’s future-proofing programmes face profound challenges.

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How Germany is winning at turning its research to commercial application

How Germany is winning at turning its research to commercial application How Germany is winning at turning its research to commercial application, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00911-6 The country is using science for economic benefit.

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Meet the Iranian aquaculturist refugee who found a new home in Germany

Meet the Iranian aquaculturist refugee who found a new home in Germany Meet the Iranian aquaculturist refugee who found a new home in Germany, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00914-3 Amirhossein Karamyar fled an oppressive political climate to eventually join a research institution in Bremerhaven.

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Sexism is still a problem for German research

Sexism is still a problem for German research Sexism is still a problem for German research, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00919-y The country is a world leader in scientific research, but falls behind when it comes to diversity in science.

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Preceded by 967 men: meet the first woman in charge of the 600-year-old Leipzig University

Preceded by 967 men: meet the first woman in charge of the 600-year-old Leipzig University Preceded by 967 men: meet the first woman in charge of the 600-year-old Leipzig University, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00921-4 Beate Schücking was re-elected to the position in 2017.

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The second coming of solar

The second coming of solar The second coming of solar, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00917-0 Lured back to Germany by funding opportunities, Eva Unger thinks that the country’s solar-cell research could be entering a boom period.

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No more career headaches

No more career headaches No more career headaches, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00924-1 How Markus Dahlem took advantage of a government stipend to build his migraine tracking app.

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Ten reasons to move to Germany as a researcher

Ten reasons to move to Germany as a researcher Ten reasons to move to Germany as a researcher, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00912-5 Why Germany is becoming a career destination for many researchers.

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British chemist battles xenophobia in Germany

British chemist battles xenophobia in Germany British chemist battles xenophobia in Germany, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00915-2 Celina Love talks about her work as an activist in the scientific research hub of Dresden.

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Microorganisms are the main emitters of carbon in Amazonian waters

A new study has found that the microbial food web accounts for most of the carbon circulating in Amazonia's lakes, floodplains and wetlands.

5h

Image: Proba-V view of Galápagos

A Proba-V view of the internationally protected, volcanic archipelago of the Galápagos and its surrounding marine reserve. This island chain is renowned for its many endemic species that were studied by Charles Darwin, directly contributing to his famous theory of evolution by means of natural selection.

5h

Why buildings keep collapsing in Lagos and what can be done about it

There's been a spate of building collapses in Lagos, Nigeria. In some cases, people have died. In one instance a building had been marked for demolition at least three times. There are also concerns about hundreds of other buildings in the city. The Conversation Africa's Moina Spooner spoke to Ndubisi Onwuanyi about this.

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There’s No Such Thing as “Robot-Proofing”

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Astronomers Catch the Formation of a Dark Vortex on Neptune

After seeing several dark vortexes appear in the ice giant's clouds over the decades, scientists have finally been able to watch one form, and it was a big one. The post Astronomers Catch the Formation of a Dark Vortex on Neptune appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Tumor-promoting enzymes USP25 and USP28: Substantial differences identified

Researchers from the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg (JMU) have solved the structures of the cancer-promoting enzymes USP25 and USP28, and identified significant differences in their activities. Both enzymes promote the growth of various tumors. The results were published in the journal Molecular Cell and could benefit towards the development of new, low-side-effects anticancer

5h

The sword of a Hispano-Muslim warlord is digitized in 3D

At age 90, Ali Atar, one of the main military chiefs of King Boabdil of Granada, fought to his death in the Battle of Lucena in 1483. It was there that his magnificent Nasrid sword was taken away from him, and researchers from the Polytechnic University of Valencia and a company from Toledo have now modelled it in order to graphically document and present it on the web.

5h

Transplanting adult spinal cord tissues: A new strategy of repair spinal cord injury

Spinal cord injury repair is one of the most challenging medical problems, and no effective therapeutic methods has been developed. Now researchers from China reported transplantation of adult spinal cord tissue for treatment of adult complete spinal cord injury. This work provided valuable information for future clinical application.

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Harvesting water energy using slippery surfaces

Inspired by natural pitcher plant surface that exhibits a peculiar slippery property, a novel slippery lubricant-impregnated porous surface (SLIPS) based triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG), referred to as SLIPS-TENG, is developed to efficiently harvest energy from the most abundant, affordable resource, water. The SLIPS-TENG exhibits many remarkable advantages over conventional design including op

5h

How nerve cells control misfolded proteins

Researchers have identified a protein complex that marks misfolded proteins, stops them from interacting with other proteins in the cell and directs them towards disposal. They have identified the so-called Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex, Lubac for short, as a crucial player in controlling misfolded proteins in cells. The group is hoping to find a new therapeutic approach to treat neurode

5h

Two novel pancreatic cancer cell lines with highly metastatic activity were established and analyzed

A recent research established two human pancreatic cancer cell sublines with high metastasis potential, MIA PaCa-2 In8 and Panc-1 In8, by Matrigel induction assay.

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AI Performed Like a Human on a Gestalt Psychology Test

Dr. Been Kim wants to rip open the black box of deep learning. A senior researcher at Google Brain, Kim specializes in a sort of AI psychology . Like cognitive psychologists before her, she develops various ways to probe the alien minds of artificial neural networks (ANNs), digging into their gory details to better understand the models and their responses to inputs. The more interpretable ANNs a

5h

Things Weren’t Always This Bad Between the U.S. and China

The United States and China are again seeking to resolve their long-running dispute on trade this week as a high-level delegation from Washington arrives in Beijing for another round of negotiations. In recent days, however, peaceful engagement with the Middle Kingdom hasn’t been on Washington’s mind. The U.S. dispatched warships through the strait between the Chinese mainland and Taiwan, earning

5h

Cory Booker Is Happy to Be Under the Radar—For Now

AMES, Iowa—Cory Booker drew the second-biggest crowd of the weekend in Iowa at the Prairie Moon Winery here earlier this month. Then he attracted the biggest crowd, more than 300 people, similarly diverse, a few hours later in Davenport. Few reporters went to either. Booker and his campaign say that’s all part of the plan. Check back with them in seven or eight months. The other 2020 Democrats wi

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Indonesia foils illegal Facebook sale of komodo dragons

Indonesian authorities said Wednesday they had seized five komodo dragons and dozens of other animals being sold on Facebook, as the country battles to clamp down on the illegal wildlife trade.

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New structural phase transition may broaden the applicability of photo-responsive solids

A team of scientists from Waseda University in Tokyo and Rigaku Corporation has discovered a new type of organic crystal structural phase transition called the photo-triggered phase transition. Hideko Koshima, a visiting professor at Waseda's Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation and leading author of the study, says, "Phase transition mechanisms are widely used in memory, switch, and a

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Indonesia foils illegal Facebook sale of komodo dragons

Indonesian authorities said Wednesday they had seized five komodo dragons and dozens of other animals being sold on Facebook, as the country battles to clamp down on the illegal wildlife trade.

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Why the feds should protect Midwest wolves from slaughter

The bald eagle is America's symbol, but 70 years ago it was nearly extinct. Once numbering as many as half a million, the population in the lower 48 states had been reduced to fewer than 1,000 by pesticides, hunting and destruction of habitat. Under the Endangered Species Act, bald eagles made a comeback. There are now some 70,000 across North America, including every state but Hawaii.

5h

FADL aflyser demonstration

Efter oplysninger om, at politikerne vil ændre regler om transportstøtte, aflyser FADL sin demonstration. Det glæder formanden for FADL, at de medicinstuderendes protester er blevet hørt.

5h

Sundhedsstyrelsen overvejer ny metode til KBU-fordeling

I dag fordeles KBU-stillinger til nye læger via lodtrækning, men det skal skiftes ud med en mere effektiv algoritme, hvis det står til både FADL, Yngre Læger og Lægeforeningen. Sundhedsstyrelsen kigger på muligheden.

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Why the feds should protect Midwest wolves from slaughter

The bald eagle is America's symbol, but 70 years ago it was nearly extinct. Once numbering as many as half a million, the population in the lower 48 states had been reduced to fewer than 1,000 by pesticides, hunting and destruction of habitat. Under the Endangered Species Act, bald eagles made a comeback. There are now some 70,000 across North America, including every state but Hawaii.

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Half a degree more warming may cause dramatic differences on drought-flood compound risks

In 2015, to combat the urgent threats posed by climate change, most of the world's countries came together to establish the Paris Agreement, an ambitious plan to prevent the global temperature from rising 2 degrees C above pre-industrial levels, and to work to further limit that temperature rise to 1.5 degrees C. These seemingly small numbers can mask the staggering impact and complexity that shif

5h

Scholar invents new tangram games to test children's visual-related literacy skills

A scholar from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) has developed a new series of games that can be used to train and test children's reading, writing and word identification skills at an early age.

5h

Tracing the process of nitrous oxide formation in the ocean

Nitrogen is of fundamental importance for life on Earth. Depending on the forms and compounds in which it occurs, it can promote life, but also limit it. In addition, some nitrogen compounds, such as nitrous oxide, are extremely effective greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is therefore important to understand the formation processes of various nitrogen compounds in nature and the factors that

5h

Kuiper Belt dust may be in our atmosphere (and NASA labs) right now

Bits of space debris that collect in Earth’s atmosphere may come from as far as the cold, distant Kuiper Belt region beyond Neptune.

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How to buy smart—and secure—gadgets

DIY The Internet of Things is cool, but it can be risky. Here’s how to protect yourself. Smart home gadgets are undeniably cool, but these internet-connected devices are still just computers and come with similar security risks .

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EU officials approve speed limit technology for autos

European Union officials have struck a provisional political deal to require new safety features on autos that would include technology to keep cars within legal speed limits.

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Record-breaking gene edit disables 13,200 LINE-1 Transposons in a single cell

An international team of researchers has succeeded in making 13,200 edits to a single cell—and the cell survived. In their paper uploaded to the bioRxiv preprint server, the team describes the edits they made, how they did it and why.

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Record-breaking gene edit disables 13,200 LINE-1 Transposons in a single cell

An international team of researchers has succeeded in making 13,200 edits to a single cell—and the cell survived. In their paper uploaded to the bioRxiv preprint server, the team describes the edits they made, how they did it and why.

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PolyU develops electrostatically charged nanofiber for airborne filtration

The Department of Mechanical Engineering of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has recently developed an electrostatically charged nanofiber filter with multiple separator layers, which can capture pollutant particles that are below 100 nm in diameter (covering the most common airborne nano-particles and viruses). The novel nanofiber filter demonstrates better performance in terms of bre

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EU consumption results in high carbon emissions from tropical deforestation, new studies show

A sixth of all emissions resulting from the typical diet of an EU citizen can be directly linked to deforestation of tropical forests. Two new studies, from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shed new light on this impact, by combining satellite imagery of the rainforest, global land use statistics and data of international trade patterns.

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Author Correction: Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of mouse and human microglia at single-cell resolution

Author Correction: Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of mouse and human microglia at single-cell resolution Author Correction: Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of mouse and human microglia at single-cell resolution, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1045-2 Author Correction: Spatial and temporal heterogeneity of mouse and human microglia at single-cell resolution

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New medication gives mice bigger muscles

Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have studied a new group of medicinal products which increase the muscle- and bone mass of mice over a few weeks. This offers hope to the elderly and people suffering from weak muscles and bones due to illness.

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Human protein produced in CHO-cells can save donor blood

Researchers from DTU Biosustain have successfully produced mammalian cell lines (CHO) that can produce 1.2 g/L recombinant Alpha-1-antitrypsin proteins with human glycosylation profiles.

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Common medication used in pregnancy may lead to obesity in children

Metformin, a common drug used for type 2 diabetes, has several benefits when the mother has PCOS. But children are at greater risk for obesity later in life.

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Vapor drives a liquid-solid transition in a molecular system

The reversible switching of macrocyclic molecules between a liquid and a solid phase upon exposure to vapor has been reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society by researchers at Kanazawa University.

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Spinning-prism microscope helps gather stem cells for regenerative medicine

Pluripotent stem cells are crucial to regenerative medicine, but better screening methods are needed to isolate safe and effective cells for medical use. Researchers at Tsukuba University developed a new microscopy technique that identifies stem cells with the greatest transformative potential based on the extent of mitochondrial activity in each cell. The technology may offer a streamlined screen

5h

Helping infants survive brain cancer

Choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) is a particularly challenging type of brain cancer: The tumor most commonly arises in infants under the age of one. Progress in developing effective therapies has been hindered by the lack of models that could help researchers better understand the cancer. Now, scientists from SBP have developed a novel mouse model of CPC and have used it to identify multiple potenti

5h

On the keto diet? Ditch the cheat day, says UBC study

The often embraced 'cheat day' is a common theme in many diets and the popular ketogenic diet is no exception. But new research from UBC's Okanagan campus says that just one 75-gram dose of glucose — the equivalent a large bottle of soda or a plate of fries — while on a high fat, low carbohydrate diet can lead to damaged blood vessels.

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A more accurate method to diagnose cancer subtypes

Garvan researchers have developed a method for detecting the products of 'fusion' genes in cancer cells more accurately than current clinical methods.

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2019 Global Food Policy Report: Crises in rural areas threatens progress in hunger and poverty reduction

IFPRI's 2019 Global Food Policy Report highlights the urgency of rural revitalization to address the crisis in rural areas. Policies, institutions, and investments that take advantage of new opportunities and technologies, increase access to basic services, create more and better rural jobs, foster gender equality, promote good governance, and restore the environment can make rural areas vibrant a

5h

The regeneration of a cell depends on where it is positioned

Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report a new single-cell RNA sequencing technology, single cell-digital gene expression, which can measure the transcriptome while preserving the positional information of the cell in the tissue. The technique was validated in the moss plant Physcomitrella patens by measuring how the location of a cell in a leaf influences its reg

5h

Banning exotic leather in fashion hurts snakes and crocodiles in the long run

We are all familiar with the concept of "fake news": stories that are factually incorrect, but succeed because their message fits well with the recipient's prior beliefs.

5h

A direct current (DC) remote cloak to hide arbitrary objects

The ability to hide an arbitrary object with a cloak at a distance from the object is a unique task in photonics research, although the phenomenon is yet to be realized in practice. In a recent study now published in Light: Science & Applications, Tianhang Chen and co-workers at the Key laboratory of Micro-Nano Electronics and Smart Systems, and the State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumen

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Invest in green space to boost wellbeing across cities, say researchers

More funding should be made available to improve, maintain and encourage people to connect with green spaces in cities so residents can reap the health and wellbeing rewards they provide, according to researchers at the University of Sheffield.

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Male birth pill control passes human safety test

submitted by /u/running_with_swords [link] [comments]

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Banning exotic leather in fashion hurts snakes and crocodiles in the long run

We are all familiar with the concept of "fake news": stories that are factually incorrect, but succeed because their message fits well with the recipient's prior beliefs.

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Antarctic project to drill for oldest-ever ice core

Antarctic project to drill for oldest-ever ice core Antarctic project to drill for oldest-ever ice core, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-018-07588-3 International team plans to extract 1.5-million-year-old ice that holds secrets about the planet’s ancient climate.

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Why you need a support team

Why you need a support team Why you need a support team , Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00992-3 By forming a network of experienced peers, says Ruth Gotian, you can gain crucial career guidance and inspiration.

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The Giant Rodents Eating Louisiana’s Coast

By doing battle with the nutria, there is the sense that trappers are fighting to maintain their way of life. But the precariousness of the situation also demonstrates the larger, unwieldy political, industrial, and environmental forces that the citizens of the region have been at the mercy of for years.

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Why the sexes don’t feel pain the same way

Why the sexes don’t feel pain the same way Why the sexes don’t feel pain the same way, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00895-3 After decades of assuming that pain processing is equivalent in all sexes, scientists are finding that different biological pathways can produce an ‘ouch!’.

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Development of a technology to produce dorsal cortical neurons

Expectation on the identification of the mechanism of causing brain diseases and regeneration treatment for brain tissues

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Urban biodiversity to lower chronic disease

Replanting urban environments with native flora could be a cost effective way to improve public health because it will help 'rewild' the environmental and human microbiota, University of Adelaide researchers say.

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Rejuvenation of aging cells helps to cure osteoarthritis through gene therapy

Recently, scientists from the Institute of Zoology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Peking University and the Institute of Biophysics of CAS, found a protein factor, CBX4, safeguarded hMSCs against cellular senescence through the regulation of nucleolar architecture and function.

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Smart speakers are everywhere—and they're listening to more than you think

Smart speakers equipped with digital voice assistants such as Siri and Alexa are now the fastest-growing consumer technology since the smartphone.

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United against jammers: Researchers develop more secure method for data transmission

The motto "united we stand, divided we fall" has found new application in an unlikely discipline—cyber security.

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Research examines stream restorations with an eye on improving Chesapeake Bay

When it comes to improving the waters of the Chesapeake Bay, one Penn State Harrisburg researcher suggests taking the long view. As a geologist, Jennifer Sliko, assistant teaching professor of earth and geosciences in the School of Science, Engineering, and Technology, is used to studying the earth in the context of thousands of years. But for the Bay, she's only currently talking about decades.

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Baby monkey, antimatter puzzle and Alzheimer’s disappointment

Baby monkey, antimatter puzzle and Alzheimer’s disappointment Baby monkey, antimatter puzzle and Alzheimer’s disappointment, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00894-4 The week in science: 22–28 March 2019.

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The librarian

The librarian The librarian, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00905-4 Methods of preservation.

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'Nightmarish' antlions' spiral digging techniques create effective and deadly traps

A team of biologists and physicists, led by the University of Bristol, have uncovered new insights into how antlions – one of the fiercest and most terrifying predators in the insect kingdom – build their deadly pit traps.

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Parental support linked to how well millennials transition to college life

Researchers show that how well parents or guardians support millennials' psychological needs prior to their transition to college is an important predictor of their psychological well-being as they adapt to college life.

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Compared to sustained inflations for extremely premature infants, standard treatment prevails

Preterm infants must establish regular breathing patterns at delivery. For extremely preterm infants requiring resuscitation at birth, a ventilation strategy involving two sustained inflations, compared with standard intermittent positive pressure ventilation, did not reduce the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia or death at 36 weeks postmenstrual age.

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Substituting HPS with light-emitting diodes for supplemental lighting in greenhouses

LEDs are capable of replacing HPS for supplemental lighting for cut gerbera production during darker periods.

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'Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice' Is All About the Fight

Fights in 'Sekiro' aren't won by hiding, or dodging, or trickery. They're won through relentless, decisive action. You fight because fighting is the only way forward.

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Astronaut trainees discover new crustacean species in cave training course

In the absolute darkness of caves, rare creatures have returned to living in water to survive. Astronauts looking for life in the underworld during the CAVES training courses discovered a new species of crustaceans that have completed an evolutionary full circle – from water to land, and back to water again.

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Bacteria could be a future source of electricity

In recent years, researchers have tried to capture the electrical current that bacteria generate through metabolism. So far, however, the transfer of current from the bacteria to a receiving electrode has been highly inefficient. Now, researchers from institutions including Lund University have achieved a slightly more efficient transfer of electrical current.

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A Pleistocene GPS tracker

Molluscs contain detailed information recording where and when their giant hosts travelled.

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Artificial astronomers spot new planets

Applying algorithms to noisy Kepler data produces results. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Exoplanet observations reveal unexpected atmosphere

Direct imaging of a distant planet refines size, temperature and composition, illustrating exciting new approach. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Feature: Power shift

Our energy system is woefully antiquated and based on a preposterously rickety 19th century concept. But a revolution in finally under way. Wilson da Silva reports.

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Astronomers investigate supermassive black hole in the radio galaxy PKS 2251+11

Italian astronomers have conducted an X-ray analysis of the accreting supermassive black hole in the broad line radio galaxy PKS 2251+11 as part of a study aimed at investigating the galaxy's nuclear environment. The new research, presented in a paper published March 15 on arXiv.org, could improve the understanding of active galactic nuclei.

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Astronaut trainees discover new crustacean species in cave training course

In the absolute darkness of caves, rare creatures have returned to living in water to survive. Astronauts looking for life in the underworld during the CAVES training courses discovered a new species of crustaceans that have completed an evolutionary full circle – from water to land, and back to water again.

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Your Apples May Soon Be Picked By Laser-Shooting Robots

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Repeat heart attack and early death linked to hospitals with low care scores

Heart attack patients treated at hospitals with low care scores are at greater risk for another heart attack and/or death due to cardiovascular causes, researchers found. Their study compared care scores in the New Jersey Hospital Performance Reports with one-month and one-year rates of readmission for heart attack or death due to cardiovascular causes.

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Microorganisms are the main emitters of carbon in Amazonian waters

A study performed with microorganisms inhabiting floodplains, which comprises 20 percent of the whole Amazon, showed that the microbial food chain produces 10 times more CO2 than the classical food chain, mostly by decomposing organic matter.

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Nurse work environments linked to outcomes

Nurses play critical roles in patient safety and are often the last line of defense against medical errors and unsafe practices. Considerable research has explored the relationship between the nurse work environment and a variety of patient and nurse quality and safety outcomes. But until now, no synthesis of this body of research has been made to clearly articulate the association between nurse w

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Mind melding: Understanding the connected, social brain

Parents may often feel like they are not 'on the same wavelength' as their kids. But it turns out that, at least for babies, their brainwaves literally sync with their moms when they are learning from them. In a new study, researchers found that how well babies' neural activity syncs with their moms' predicts how well they learn social cues about new toys.

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Smartphone test spots poisoned water risk to millions of lives

A smartphone device could help millions of people avoid drinking water contaminated by arsenic.

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Pediatric health researchers offer insights for RSV vaccine

In healthy adults, RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus, feels like the common cold with a runny nose, chest congestion and cough. However, it is the second leading cause of death in infants.

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Tumor-associated immune cells hinder frontline chemotherapy drug in pancreatic cancer

A frontline chemotherapy drug given to patients with pancreatic cancer is made less effective because similar compounds released by tumor-associated immune cells block the drug's action.

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Early valve replacement versus watchful waiting in patients with severe aortic stenosis

Patients with severe aortic stenosis who have no symptoms may benefit more from an aggressive strategy of early valve replacement than from a conservative watch-and-wait approach, according to new research.

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Technique uses well-known dye to watch amyloid plaques in the brain

New work repurposing one of the oldest known reagents for amyloid looks to help provide a clearer picture of how fibrils come together.

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The ocean captures gigatonnes of our CO2

Researchers have determined how much human-made CO 2 emissions the ocean took up between 1994 and 2007. Not all of the CO 2 that the combustion of fossil fuels generates remains in the atmosphere and contributes to global warming. The ocean and the ecosystems on land take up considerable quantities of these human-made CO 2 emissions from the atmosphere. The ocean takes up CO 2 in two steps: first

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US aims for humans on Moon in five years

Vice-President Mike Pence says he wants Nasa to return astronauts to the Moon within five years.

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Article 13: A guide to the new EU copyright rules and the ban on memes

What is Article 13? How does it affect the way you use the internet? Should you be worried? Your questions answered about the EU's new copyright rules

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Researchers blown away by hurricane simulation

Nearly 30 years ago, Harvard Forest scientists began a unique, long-running experiment on a 2-acre forest tract using a long steel cable, a winch, and a heavy-duty logging vehicle called a skidder.

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Rice cultivation: Balance of phosphorus and nitrogen determines growth and yield

In the future, a newly discovered mechanism in control of plant nutrition could help to achieve higher harvests in a sustainable way. Scientists from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China) discovered this mechanism in their research on Asian rice in collaboration with Professor Dr. Stanislav Kopriva from the University of Cologne's Botanic

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Researchers demonstrate miniaturized, laser-driven particle accelerator

Munich physicists have succeeded in demonstrating plasma wakefield acceleration of subatomic particles in a miniaturized, laser-driven model. The new system provides a broader basis for the development of the next generation of particle accelerators.

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Rice cultivation: Balance of phosphorus and nitrogen determines growth and yield

In the future, a newly discovered mechanism in control of plant nutrition could help to achieve higher harvests in a sustainable way. Scientists from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China) discovered this mechanism in their research on Asian rice in collaboration with Professor Dr. Stanislav Kopriva from the University of Cologne's Botanic

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Technique uses well-known dye to watch amyloid plaques in the brain

New work repurposing one of the oldest known reagents for amyloid looks to help provide a clearer picture of how fibrils come together.

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A fascinating phase transition: From one liquid state to another

Scientists have described a rare 'liquid-to-liquid' phase transition in pure triphenyl phosphite. This may improve our control of transport properties of a liquid.

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How nerve cells control misfolded proteins

Researchers have identified a protein complex that marks misfolded proteins, stops them from interacting with other proteins in the cell, and directs them toward disposal. In collaboration with the neurology department at the Ruhr-Ubiversität's St. Josef-Hospital and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, an interdisciplinary team led by Professor Konstanze Winklhof

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Analysis of Philadelphia's sweet-drink 'sin tax' finds a flaw in the system

The price of certain sugar-sweetened beverages, including soda, has gone up in recent years in places including San Francisco, Seattle, and Philadelphia.

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Urban biodiversity to lower chronic disease

Replanting urban environments with native flora could be a cost effective way to improve public health because it will help 'rewild' the environmental and human microbiota, University of Adelaide researchers say.

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Male crickets use female scent to rate fertility prospects

A new study by researchers at The University of Western Australia has found that male insects are able to use female scent to assess not only how many eggs she will produce but also the egg-laying potential of their daughters.

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Bacteria could be a future source of electricity

In recent years, researchers have tried to capture the electrical current that bacteria generate through metabolism. So far, however, the transfer of current from the bacteria to a receiving electrode has been highly inefficient. Now, researchers from institutions including Lund University have achieved a slightly more efficient transfer of electrical current.

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Researchers study corvid speciation in restricted zone where crow hybrids thrive

Carrion crows and hooded crows are almost indistinguishable genetically, and hybrid offspring are fertile. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists now show that the two forms have remained distinct largely owing to the dominant role of plumage color in mate choice.

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How nerve cells control misfolded proteins

Researchers have identified a protein complex that marks misfolded proteins, stops them from interacting with other proteins in the cell, and directs them toward disposal. In collaboration with the neurology department at the Ruhr-Ubiversität's St. Josef-Hospital and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, an interdisciplinary team led by Professor Konstanze Winklhof

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Urban biodiversity to lower chronic disease

Replanting urban environments with native flora could be a cost effective way to improve public health because it will help 'rewild' the environmental and human microbiota, University of Adelaide researchers say.

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Male crickets use female scent to rate fertility prospects

A new study by researchers at The University of Western Australia has found that male insects are able to use female scent to assess not only how many eggs she will produce but also the egg-laying potential of their daughters.

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Researchers study corvid speciation in restricted zone where crow hybrids thrive

Carrion crows and hooded crows are almost indistinguishable genetically, and hybrid offspring are fertile. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists now show that the two forms have remained distinct largely owing to the dominant role of plumage color in mate choice.

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BridgIT, a new tool for orphan and novel enzyme reactions

Effective protein engineering can give us control over the generated products inside a cell. However, for many of the biochemical reactions responsible for these products, we don't we don't know the specific protein or enzyme-producing gene responsible. These so-called orphan reactions have become a big problem for protein engineers.

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What we're still learning from the Exxon Valdez environmental debacle 3 decades later

Before dawn on March 24, 1989, Dan Lawn stepped off of a small boat and onto the boarding ladder dangling from the side of the grounded Exxon Valdez oil tanker. As he made the crossover, he peered down into the water of Prince William Sound, and saw, in the glare of the lights, an ugly spectacle he would never forget.

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India tests anti-satellite missile by destroying one of its satellites

While the test has almost certainly created a cloud of space debris, it was done at such a low altitude that the debris should soon fall to Earth

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Nye forsøg: Vandfald kan opstå helt af sig selv

PLUS. Laboratorieforsøg viser overraskende, at en flod kan blive til et vandfald uden ydre påvirkninger eller inhomogeniteter.

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Artificial intelligence pioneers win Turing Award

Computing's 'Nobel Prize' winners Yoshua Bengio, Geoffrey Hinton and Yann LeCun helped lead to breakthroughs in computer vision, speech recognition and robotics.

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BridgIT, a new tool for orphan and novel enzyme reactions

Effective protein engineering can give us control over the generated products inside a cell. However, for many of the biochemical reactions responsible for these products, we don't we don't know the specific protein or enzyme-producing gene responsible. These so-called orphan reactions have become a big problem for protein engineers.

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Abused kids text crisis hotlines to find help

Children who need a discreet way to report abuse are turning to text-based crisis communication services, report researchers. “She says she will burn the house down with me in it.” “He threatened to pull a gun on me.” “He told me he could kill me in an instant if he wanted to.” These are just a few of the texts children have sent to crisis hotlines in the last several years, researchers say. “The

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New research explores graphene-silicon devices for photonics applications

If you use a smartphone, laptop, or tablet, then you benefit from research in photonics, the study of light. At the University of Delaware, a team led by Tingyi Gu, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, is developing cutting-edge technology for photonics devices that could enable faster communications between devices and thus, the people who use them.

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AMERICA 2050: Inequality Crisis, Automation Threat, Debt Shock

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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GRAVITY instrument breaks new ground in exoplanet imaging

The GRAVITY instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) has made the first direct observation of an exoplanet using optical interferometry. This method revealed a complex exoplanetary atmosphere with clouds of iron and silicates swirling in a planet-wide storm. The technique presents unique possibilities for characterizing many of the exoplanets known today.

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'Aneurysm Number' may help surgeons make treatment decisions

Aneurysms form as abnormal bulges over an artery, and, if ruptured, can lead to serious health complications or even death. Some can exist for a long time without rupturing, and surgery can be risky, so a parameter to help surgeons is needed. Researchers report that they have developed a simple nondimensional parameter that depends on both geometry and flow waveform to classify the flow mode in bo

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9000 borgere på Mors kan nu benytte sig af videokonsultation

Borgere tilknyttet regionsklinikkerne på Mors får i disse dage besked om, at de kan få videokonsultation som supplement til almindelige lægekonsultationer

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»Vi skal tage højde for, at den praktiserende læge er under gevaldig forandring«

Størstedelen af kommende speciallæger i almen medicin er kvinder med børn. Og hvis så mange som muligt skal ende som praktiserende læger, kræver det mere fleksible rammer om praksislivet, mener Yngre Læger. Vi kigger på muligheden, siger PLA.

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Duckweed: The low-down on a tiny plant

Duckweeds are a treat for many aquatic animals like ducks and snails, but for pond owners, they're sometimes a thorn in the side. The tiny and fast-growing plants are of great interest to researchers, not at least because of their industrial applications—for example, to purify wastewater or generate energy. An international research team from Münster, Jena (both Germany), Zurich (Switzerland) and

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Mechanism behind magnetism-driven negative thermal expansion (NTE) explained for the first time

Computers, cell phones and other devices are built from many small parts and components that are prone to poor performance and damage caused by overheating. As such, there is a market demand to develop machine parts that can resist damage and changes in size and length due to heat.

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Duckweed: The low-down on a tiny plant

Duckweeds are a treat for many aquatic animals like ducks and snails, but for pond owners, they're sometimes a thorn in the side. The tiny and fast-growing plants are of great interest to researchers, not at least because of their industrial applications—for example, to purify wastewater or generate energy. An international research team from Münster, Jena (both Germany), Zurich (Switzerland) and

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Politicians will have to force us to adopt climate-friendly lifestyles

People are happy to make small tweaks to their lifestyle to combat climate change, but we will need governments to force us to achieve large emissions reductions

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Modi's space weapon announcement struggles for lift-off

India’s PM criticised for making televised address about missile test during election campaign India’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, has announced the successful test of the country’s first space weapon, an anti-satellite missile, in a surprise televised address in the middle of the election campaign. The dramatic nature of the announcement – during a caretaker period when governments are restri

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Fighting for air, mathematical mayhem, and beguiling bats: Books in brief

Fighting for air, mathematical mayhem, and beguiling bats: Books in brief Fighting for air, mathematical mayhem, and beguiling bats: Books in brief, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00899-z Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

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Statistical Significance and Toxicity

Researchers propose to get rid of the use statistical significance in science reporting. The idea has merit.

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Whatever you do, don't change your birth year to 2007 on Twitter

People are falling victim to a social media hoax that leaves them locked out of their accounts.

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Image of the Day: Neuron Guides

A gene helps motor neurons successfully venture out from the spinal cord to muscles during mouse development.

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Burley Encore X Review: A Fun but Flawed Bike Trailer

Burley’s new multisport bike trailer is a good way to haul your kids, but it may not be ready for the long haul.

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Watch the nightmarish attack of a phantom midge larvae

High-speed video reveals a lake predator’s lightning strike

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Katastrofen der forsvandt

En by blev jævnet med jorden, og mange tusinde mennesker taget til fange og bortført til Babylon…

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All the info our brain needs for language nearly fits on a floppy disc

To learn language, we store information about word sounds, syntax and more. It turns out that all this amounts to about 1.5 megabytes of data – just over the size of a floppy disc

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Derfor skal Aalborg have 20 km ny motorvej over naturskønne Egholm

PLUS. 20 kilometers dugfrisk motorvej med både tunnel og bro skal løse trængselsproblemerne i Aalborg, men Egholm var langtfra den eneste mulighed for den nye vej.

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Fleets of autonomous satellites to coordinate tasks among themselves

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Are we close to solving the puzzle of consciousness?

submitted by /u/ngt_ [link] [comments]

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New drugs are too expensive. Can AI can fix that?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Weather Channel sued for $125m over storm chase death

The lawsuit alleges two Weather Channel workers hit a storm spotter while chasing a tornado.

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The Original Sin of NASA Space Suits

The crew of the International Space Station spends most of their time inside, but sometimes they venture out. Astronauts have conducted more than 200 space walks in the past two decades, often to spruce up the station, and on the next one, two astronauts are scheduled to replace some old solar-panel batteries. It was going to be a historic excursion: For the first time in history, both of the spa

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How I self-advocate for researchers with disabilities and illnesses

How I self-advocate for researchers with disabilities and illnesses How I self-advocate for researchers with disabilities and illnesses, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00903-6 Isobel Williams has an autoimmune disease. The support network that she co-founded is helping to improve life in academia for people with long-term health conditions.

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GRAVITY instrument breaks new ground in exoplanet imaging

The GRAVITY instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) has made the first direct observation of an exoplanet using optical interferometry. This method revealed a complex exoplanetary atmosphere with clouds of iron and silicates swirling in a planet-wide storm. The technique presents unique possibilities for characterising many of the exoplanets known today.

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Your Apples May Soon Be Picked By Laser-Shooting Robots

It takes a deft touch to harvest fruit and veggies. Which is why roboticists are inventing hyper-specialized machines to pick crops.

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How Big Data Can Help Save the World

Emerging analytic and computing tools are enabling much better use of huge data sets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dansk landbrugskoncern producerer nu CO2-neutralt svinekød

1,3 mio svin kan nu årligt produceres på CO2-neutral vis fra svinekødsproducenten Goodvalley. Eksperter vurderer dog, at beregningerne er »på kanten af det rimelige.«

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How Big Data Can Help Save the World

Emerging analytic and computing tools are enabling much better use of huge data sets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rita Rapp Fed America’s Space Travelers

NASA’s food packages now in the collections of the Air and Space Museum tell the story how a physiologist brought better eating to outer space

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Løkke fastslår igen: Danmarks sygehuse skal have ét it-system

I forbindelse med fremlæggelsen af blå bloks sundhedsreform, understreger statsminister Lars Løkke Rasmussen igen, at Danmark er for lille til at have flere EPJ-systemer på sygehusene

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PODD: Screening – potentiellt sjuk

Det är många som drar en lättnadens suck när provsvaret från screeningundersökningen inte visade några ”fynd” utan är normalt. Att på detta sätt söka efter sjukdomar – eller förstadier till sjukdomar – i symtomfria människor, har uppenbara fördelar: behandling kan sättas in i tidigt skede. Samtidigt finns det aspekter av screening som vi kanske inte tänker så ofta på. Mer om detta i onsdagens podd

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Historisk kvinde-rumvandring aflyst: Nasa mangler en rumdragt

Rumfartsorganisationen har kun én klargjort dragt i størrelse medium til kvinder, fastslår Nasa.

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The next AI explosion will be defined by the chips we build for it

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Artificial Intelligence Beyond Deep Neural Networks

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Russia's New Nuclear Missiles Squeeze Response Time

As treaties end, Russia focuses on hypersonic weapons that could “tighten the noose” on current U.S. defenses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Russia's New Nuclear Missiles Squeeze Response Time

As treaties end, Russia focuses on hypersonic weapons that could “tighten the noose” on current U.S. defenses — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mördare fångad av släktforskare

Curtis Rogers hade aldrig hört talas om The Golden State Killer innan han öppnade mejlet. Han läste att polisen i Kalifornien just hade gripit en misstänkt massmördare – och att han själv hade spelat en avgörande roll i dramat. – Det blev en chock, säger Curtis Rogers, 80, som tidigare var affärsman i livsmedelsbranschen.

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Fastest-Thinning Greenland Glacier Threw NASA Scientists for a Loop. It's Actually Growing.

Instead of shrinking, this giant glacier is growing, NASA scientists found.

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7 Biblical Sites Ravaged by Modern-Day Looters

These historical ruins from the time of Jesus attract more than the public eye — Looters continue to raid the archaeological remains in hopes of selling what they find.

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Volkswagen to network factories in the cloud with Amazon

Volkswagen said Wednesday it is partnering with Amazon to develop cloud computing capacity aimed at improving efficiency and coordination across the automaker's vast global factory network.

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Hubble Telescope Reveals What 200 Billion Stars Look Like

Two incredible new images from the Hubble Space Telescope show galaxies in all their shining glory.

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New muscular disease: Myoglobinopathy

Institute (IDIBELL) led by Dr. Montse Olivé have described in Nature Communications a new muscular disease caused by a mutation in the myoglobin gene. The study has been possible thanks to a collaboration with a group of geneticists from the University of Western Australia (UWA), led by Prof. Nigel Laing, and researchers from the Karolinska Institute (Stockholm, Sweden).

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A facile approach to calculating superconducting transition temperatures in the bismuth solid phases

A facile approach to calculating superconducting transition temperatures in the bismuth solid phases A facile approach to calculating superconducting transition temperatures in the bismuth solid phases, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41401-z A facile approach to calculating superconducting transition temperatures in the bismuth solid phases

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Distinct endophytes are used by diverse plants for adaptation to karst regions

Distinct endophytes are used by diverse plants for adaptation to karst regions Distinct endophytes are used by diverse plants for adaptation to karst regions, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41802-0 Distinct endophytes are used by diverse plants for adaptation to karst regions

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RNA-seq reveals the involvement of key genes for aerobic adaptation in rice

RNA-seq reveals the involvement of key genes for aerobic adaptation in rice RNA-seq reveals the involvement of key genes for aerobic adaptation in rice, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41703-2 RNA-seq reveals the involvement of key genes for aerobic adaptation in rice

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Improving eDNA yield and inhibitor reduction through increased water volumes and multi-filter isolation techniques

Improving eDNA yield and inhibitor reduction through increased water volumes and multi-filter isolation techniques Improving eDNA yield and inhibitor reduction through increased water volumes and multi-filter isolation techniques, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40977-w Improving eDNA yield and inhibitor reduction through increased water volumes and multi-filter isolation

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Effects of propofol on the inflammatory response during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a prospective randomized controlled study

Effects of propofol on the inflammatory response during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a prospective randomized controlled study Effects of propofol on the inflammatory response during robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: a prospective randomized controlled study, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41708-x Effects of propofol on the inflammat

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Sequential conditioning-stimulation reveals distinct gene- and stimulus-specific effects of Type I and II IFN on human macrophage functions

Sequential conditioning-stimulation reveals distinct gene- and stimulus-specific effects of Type I and II IFN on human macrophage functions Sequential conditioning-stimulation reveals distinct gene- and stimulus-specific effects of Type I and II IFN on human macrophage functions, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40503-y Sequential conditioning-stimulation reveals distinct g

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Response of fluorescence morphs of the mesophotic coral Euphyllia paradivisa to ultra-violet radiation

Response of fluorescence morphs of the mesophotic coral Euphyllia paradivisa to ultra-violet radiation Response of fluorescence morphs of the mesophotic coral Euphyllia paradivisa to ultra-violet radiation, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41710-3 Response of fluorescence morphs of the mesophotic coral Euphyllia paradivisa to ultra-violet radiation

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Prioritization of potential vaccine targets using comparative proteomics and designing of the chimeric multi-epitope vaccine against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Prioritization of potential vaccine targets using comparative proteomics and designing of the chimeric multi-epitope vaccine against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Prioritization of potential vaccine targets using comparative proteomics and designing of the chimeric multi-epitope vaccine against Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41496-4 Prioritization of pot

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Americans Are Getting Secondhand Embarrassment From Trump

It was a 2017 meeting between German Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Donald Trump, and reporters wanted a handshake. Merkel leaned in toward Trump and seemed, to many observers, to say something like, “Shall we have a handshake?” Trump appeared to ignore her and glared straight at the camera, in what many considered a breach of protocol. Or at least an awkward moment. Merkel pursed her lip

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Expectations for the Mueller Report Were Set Too High

For more than a year, many members of the American media treated Robert Mueller as if he were in the entertainment business, and the Mueller report as if it were the season finale of U.S. politics, one that would deliver a shocking twist. Although more responsible journalists repeatedly warned that a big-bang showpiece was unlikely—that just isn’t Mueller’s style—the expectations were set impossi

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How One AIPAC Speech Exemplified the Democrats’ Israel Challenge

To appreciate the predicament the Democratic Party finds itself in with respect to Israel, look no further than the speech that House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer delivered this week to the AIPAC conference in Washington, D.C. It was an impassioned and enthusiastically received defense of the U.S.-Israel alliance, punctuated repeatedly with rousing ovations and betraying not a sliver of daylight b

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A Controversial Play Asserts the Humanity of Sex Offenders

The four men who live together in Downstate , Bruce Norris’s new play, are—for the most part—likable. Endearing, even. Fred (played in the National Theatre’s current production in London by Francis Guinan), a septuagenarian piano teacher in an electric wheelchair, is amiable, folksy, and seemingly naive (he’s described in the play’s text as “not unlike Fred Rogers”). Dee (K. Todd Freeman), who’s

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Cathay Pacific to buy budget airline HK Express for $628 mn

Hong Kong flag carrier Cathay Pacific said on Wednesday it will buy budget airline HK Express for more than US$600 million as it moves to counter competition from the increasing number of low-cost carriers in the region.

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Modi declares India a 'space superpower' as satellite downed by missile

India said Wednesday it destroyed a low-orbiting satellite in a missile test that proved the nation was among the world's most advanced space powers.

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Plans for blockbuster cryptocurrency IPO shelved amid bitcoin slump

The world's largest maker of cryptocurrency mining chips has shelved plans for an ambitious initial public offering in Hong Kong, becoming the latest victim of bitcoin's price plunge.

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Jury begins deliberations in Roundup trial phase 2

"Monsanto knew" its weedkiller Roundup was carcinogenic yet sold it anyway, the lawyer for an American retiree said on the last day of a trial to determine the agriculture giant's culpability for his cancer.

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US scientists to climb Everest, collect data on climate

A team of American scientists flew to the Mount Everest region Wednesday to study how pollution has impacted the Himalayan mountains and glaciers that are melting due to global warming.

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McDonald's will use AI to automatically tweak drive-thru menus

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Jury begins deliberations in Roundup trial phase 2

"Monsanto knew" its weedkiller Roundup was carcinogenic yet sold it anyway, the lawyer for an American retiree said on the last day of a trial to determine the agriculture giant's culpability for his cancer.

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New report identifies how to supercharge agriculture science in the US

A new report issued today showed how U.S. farmers—facing a surge of weather events and disease outbreaks—can increase production and revenues with innovations produced by federally funded agricultural research.

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Elsevier looking into how “unorthodox” paper featuring ancient astronauts was published

Elsevier is looking into how one of its journals published a paper which makes bizarre claims about the knowledge of the ancients and contains an acronym with unmistakable and horrific historical significance. The article, “Puratana Aakasha-Yantrika Nirmana Sadhanavasthu (Ancient Aero-mechanical manufacturing materials),” appeared in a 2017 issue of Materials Today Proceedings and was written by …

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New report identifies how to supercharge agriculture science in the US

A new report issued today showed how U.S. farmers—facing a surge of weather events and disease outbreaks—can increase production and revenues with innovations produced by federally funded agricultural research.

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Mozambique city battled climate change, then came a cyclone

Long before Cyclone Idai roared in and tore apart Mozambique's seaside city of Beira, the mayor dreamed of protecting his people from climate change.

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The Godfathers of the AI Boom Win the Turing Award

Yoshua Bengio, Geoff Hinton, and Yann LeCun pioneered work in artificial neural networks, paving the way for self-driving cars and facial-recognition software.

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How Much Prenatal Genetic Information Do You Actually Want?

Now that dozens of tests are on the market, patients can scan their unborn children for less serious diseases too. But what will we, as a society, do with that information?

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Male Birth Control Could Actually Happen. But Do Men Want It?

The contraceptive gel is being tested in nine cities. It seems to work, but it’s hard to know how eager men are for the new option.

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Universal basic income: The plan to give $12,000 to every American adult

The Freedom Dividend is a universal basic income proposal initiated by 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang. Yang's plan would give $1,000 a month, or $12,000 per year, to every American over the age of 18, every year. This would get every U.S. adult just below the poverty line which is currently $12,770 a year. How would it be funded? Yang suggests a value added tax on megacorps like Amazon (

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Video: Se den dramatiske redningsaktion på 'Viking Sky'

Se video af redningsaktionen og følg skibstrafikken fra døgnet, hvor Viking Sky havnede i havsnød.

9h

The CBD boom is way ahead of the science

As CBD-laced foods and health products gain popularity, researchers are just beginning to fill the gaping holes in knowledge about this cannabis molecule’s benefits.

9h

Are sexual abuse victims being diagnosed with a mental disorder they don't have?

The lack of recognition for complex PTSD by the psychiatric establishment means it is difficult for sexual abuse victims who might suffer from it to receive the right diagnosis Suppose, for the sake of a thought experiment, that a new psychological disorder was discovered. It is supported by dozens of studies and recognized by some of the world’s leading psychiatrists and psychologists, but not b

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Patients say lack of physician guidance and fear of side effects are why they don't take statins as prescribed

Despite national guidelines indicating that statins can lower risk of heart attack and stroke, many patients who could benefit do not take them. Most of these patients say they were never offered the cholesterol-lowering drugs, or they experienced or were fearful of possible side effects.

9h

Ericsson: Vi kører automationssystemer over 5G om få år

Den svenske netværksgigant arbejder med at rykke industriens automationssystemer over på næste generations mobile netværk 5G, som blandt andet skal kunne køre Profinet trådløst.

10h

Plagiarism detectors are a crutch, and a problem

Plagiarism detectors are a crutch, and a problem Plagiarism detectors are a crutch, and a problem, Published online: 27 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00893-5 Academics and editors need to stop pretending that software always catches recycled text and start reading more carefully, says Debora Weber-Wulff.

10h

If you’re thinking about embracing AI: just jump in

Andrew Ng had some stirring words of advice for any businesses that might be toying with the idea of introducing artificial intelligence into how they work.

10h

This Is How Humans Will Become Immortal By 2090

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

10h

Eating small amounts of red and processed meats may increase risk of death

A new study out of Loma Linda University Health suggests that eating red and processed meats — even in small amounts — may increase the risk of death from all causes, especially cardiovascular disease.

10h

Bodybags, rats, waste: Disaster response turns to VR for grim training

A Thai policewoman trudges through waste and ruined buildings looking for bodies—but she needs only a joystick and a virtual reality headset for the grim task, as technology comes to the aid of disaster management training.

11h

End of an era in Indian aviation as Goyal bows out

Jet Airways founder Naresh Goyal rose from humble beginnings to be undisputed king of India's skies. But now, at 69, massive debts have forced him to cede control of the pioneering airline he founded.

11h

Robotic arms and temporary motorisation—the next generation of wheelchairs

Next-generation wheelchairs could incorporate brain-controlled robotic arms and rentable add-on motors in order to help people with disabilities more easily carry out daily tasks or get around a city.

11h

US zoo to return beloved giant pandas to China

Two giant pandas that have been a star attraction at the San Diego Zoo for decades will soon be returned home to China, officials announced.

11h

Boeing 737 MAX makes emergency landing during US transfer: FAA

A Boeing 737 MAX aircraft operated by Southwest Airlines made an emergency landing Tuesday after experiencing an engine problem as it was being ferried from Florida to California, the US Federal Aviation Agency said.

11h

Major revamp planned for FAA's oversight process

America's standing as the model for aviation-safety regulation will be on trial as congressional hearings begin into the Federal Aviation Administration's oversight of Boeing before and after two deadly crashes of its best-selling airliner.

11h

Ancient West Bank site draws Christians, and controversy

Deep in the West Bank, Israeli settlers have transformed an archaeological site into a biblical tourist attraction that attracts tens of thousands of evangelical Christians each year.

11h

Are no-fun fungi keeping fertilizer from plants?

Crops just can't do without phosphorus.

11h

Colder temperatures foster greater microbial diversity on amphibian skin

A far-reaching global study led by University of Colorado Boulder scientists has found that climate is a critical determinant of microbial diversity on amphibian skin, with colder, more variable temperatures producing richer bacterial communities than warmer, more stable environments.

11h

US zoo to return beloved giant pandas to China

Two giant pandas that have been a star attraction at the San Diego Zoo for decades will soon be returned home to China, officials announced.

11h

Colder temperatures foster greater microbial diversity on amphibian skin

A far-reaching global study led by University of Colorado Boulder scientists has found that climate is a critical determinant of microbial diversity on amphibian skin, with colder, more variable temperatures producing richer bacterial communities than warmer, more stable environments.

11h

Imperial launches one of world's first online Masters in Machine Learning

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Cringeworthy politics: Trump sparks 'embarrassment' spikes on Twitter

A piece of not-fake-news: there has been a 45-percent increase in people tweeting about embarrassment since Donald Trump took office. In an analysis of Twitter traffic between June 2015 and June 2017, researchers revealed how the platform's users responded to Trump's actions at high-profile events.

11h

Cringeworthy politics: Trump sparks 'embarrassment' spikes on Twitter

A piece of not-fake-news: there has been a 45-percent increase in people tweeting about embarrassment since Donald Trump took office. In an analysis of Twitter traffic between June 2015 and June 2017, researchers revealed how the platform's users responded to Trump's actions at high-profile events.

11h

Spike in tweets about 'embarrassment' under Trump, study finds

Scientists analysed millions of US Twitter posts to find 45% rise in references in 13 months Donald Trump was, the researchers concede, an easy target. Having cringed themselves when he was on the campaign trail, they felt compelled to test their hypothesis: that the election of the 45th president of the US had prompted an upturn in national embarrassment. The scientists, with no official records

12h

'Bucket-list shot': Australian gets rare photo of space station in front of moon

Amateur astronomer Ken Lawson says it took him eight years but he finally lined up the ‘perfect’ shot An amateur Australian astronomer who took a “perfect” photo of the International Space Station passing in front of the moon says it took him eight years to set up. Ken Lawson, from Geraldton in Western Australia, has been an avid astronomer and photographer since childhood. On 14 March he capture

12h

Deadly Meningitis Appears to Be Cleared With Antipsychotics in Early Trials

In some ways, they might work better than antibiotics.

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Tjek om Asus-malware har været på udkig efter netop din mac-adresse

Signeret malware skubbet ud via Asus' officielle distribuerings-kanal er gået målrettet efter mere end 600 mac-adresser, oplyser it-sikkerhedsfirma.

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Strange Earth Organisms Have Somehow Survived Living Outside The ISS

They were bought back to Earth as survivors after 18 months in space.

13h

Robert F Kennedy Invents a New Vaccine Conspiracy Theory, And It Could Kill Someone

Another person with influence making wildly irresponsible comments on Twitter.

13h

Former Cosmos editor wins high honour

Elizabeth Finkel awarded medal by Australian science advocacy organisation.

13h

How light from street lamps and trees influence the activity of urban bats

A study conducted by a team led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) sheds new light on how exactly ultraviolet (UV) emitting and non-UV emitting street lamps influence the activity of bats in the Berlin metropolitan area and whether tree cover might mitigate any effect of light pollution. The study is published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evo

13h

Scenic City Sights Linked to Higher Happiness

Tracking the location and mood of 15,000 people, researchers found that scenic beauty was linked to happiness—including near urban sights like bridges and buildings. Christopher Intagliata reports.

14h

People 'hear' flashes due to disinhibited flow of signals around the brain, suggests study

A synaesthesia-like effect in which people 'hear' silent flashes or movement, such as in popular 'noisy GIFs' and memes, could be due to a reduction of inhibition of signals that travel between visual and auditory areas of the brain, according to a new study led by researchers at City, University of London. It was also found that musicians taking part in the study were significantly more likely to

14h

Childhood methylphenidate treatment predicts antidepressant use during adolescence

A new, 12-year longitudinal study, which monitored 6,830 children from early childhood into adolescence, has shown that consistent treatment with MPH-based medications during childhood increases the risk of antidepressant use during adolescence. The study is the first of its kind to examine the connection between children diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed MPH between the ages of six and eight, an

14h

EU consumption results in high carbon emissions from tropical deforestation, studies show

A sixth of all emissions resulting from the typical diet of an EU citizen can be directly linked to deforestation of tropical forests. Two new studies, from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shed new light on this impact, by combining satellite imagery of the rainforest, global land use statistics and data of international trade patterns.

14h

Are no-fun fungi keeping fertilizer from plants?

Research explores soil, fungi, phosphorus dynamics.

14h

Colder temperatures foster greater microbial diversity on amphibian skin

A far-reaching global study led by University of Colorado Boulder scientists has found that climate is a critical determinant of microbial diversity on amphibian skin, with colder, more variable temperatures producing richer bacterial communities than warmer, more stable environments.

14h

Computer program predicts risk of deadly irregular heart beats

Combining a wealth of information derived from previous studies with data from more than 500 patients, an international team led by researchers from Johns Hopkins has developed a computer-based set of rules that more accurately predicts when patients with a rare heart condition might benefit — or not — from lifesaving implanted defibrillators.

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15h

Scenic City Sights Linked to Higher Happiness

Tracking the location and mood of 15,000 people, researchers found that scenic beauty was linked to happiness—including near urban sights like bridges and buildings. Christopher Intagliata… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Scenic City Sights Linked to Higher Happiness

Tracking the location and mood of 15,000 people, researchers found that scenic beauty was linked to happiness—including near urban sights like bridges and buildings. Christopher Intagliata… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Could reddit become the new internet media giant in the long run?

With subreddits becoming the new websites, adding features like reddit streaming, the ability for people to pay posters like twitch does with bits/donations creating reddit journalists, writers, filmmakers,… Would it be possible for reddit to grow that large over the next 5-10-20-50-… years? Just a thought after being here for over 7 years and seeing reddit grow and add stuff like their own i

16h

The 3 Democrats Who Voted Against the Green New Deal

The Senate rejected the Green New Deal on Tuesday, in a decisive 57–0 vote that Democrats decried as a political stunt meant to divide their caucus. All the Republican senators opposed the measure. They were joined by four senators who caucus with the Democrats— Senator Joe Manchin, from the coal-heavy state of West Virginia, along with Senators Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, Doug Jones of Alabama, a

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16h

Google appoints an “AI council” to head off controversy, but it proves controversial

A team that includes philosophers, engineers, and policy experts will determine how ethical Google’s AI projects are—but some have already criticized its makeup.

17h

Is "Scotty" the Biggest T. rex? Maybe Not.

A huge T. rex was crowned as king of the tyrants. But the bones may tell a different tale. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How artificial intelligence is helping farmers and babies in the developing world

Health workers are using smartphones and AI tools to spot low-birth-weight babies in India.

17h

Climate change: Drilling in 'Iceberg Alley'

The huge blocks of ice that drift away from Antarctica have a story to tell about Earth's past – and its future.

17h

Making a Sarlacc Pit: How Tiny Antlions Lay the Best Traps

The lair of an antlion looks like nothing more than a pit from above. To an ant walking on the surface, it probably looks like nothing at all. But one wrong step can send an unfortunate insect tumbling to the bottom of a clever trap in a shower of sand. There, a pair of merciless jaws await, held wide open to deliver a deadly embrace. To those of us with even a bit of pop culture knowledge, the pi

17h

Duckweed: The low-down on a tiny plant

Researchers have found why the giant duckweed has a low genetic diversity despite its large population size: low mutation rates contribute to low genetic diversity. The results are relevant for future studies on the evolution of plants and will accelerate the use of duckweeds both for basic research and industrial applications.

18h

Encapsulating human stem-cell-derived beta cells with immune-repelling protein prolongs function and survival

Encapsulating human stem-cell-derived beta cells in microcapsules made with an immune-cell-repelling protein restored glucose metabolism in diabetic mice and protected the cells from immune system attack, preventing the buildup of fibrotic tissue that has plagued previous trials of encapsulated beta cells.

18h

New cellulose-based material gives three sensors in one

Cellulose soaked in a carefully designed polymer mixture acts as a sensor to measure pressure, temperature and humidity — at the same time. The measurements are completely independent of each other. The sensor may be highly significant in fields such as robotics, healthcare and security.

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BridgIT, a new tool for orphan and novel enzyme reactions

Chemical engineers have developed an online tool that can accurately assign genes and proteins to unknown 'orphan' reactions, which are a major headache for biotechnology, drug development, and even medicine.

18h

BridgIT, a new tool for orphan and novel enzyme reactions

Chemical engineers have developed an online tool that can accurately assign genes and proteins to unknown 'orphan' reactions, which are a major headache for biotechnology, drug development, and even medicine.

18h

Salmonella could be combated by enhancing body's natural process

Autophagy — the process of recycling cellular material in the body — can help combat Salmonella and other pathogens, according to researchers who have studied how autophagy can get rid of bacteria, and prevent diseases developing.

18h

Future of elephants living in captivity hangs in the balance

Scientists at the University of Sheffield and University of Turku are looking at ways to boost captive populations of Asian elephants without relying on taking them from the wild.

18h

'Nightmarish' antlions' spiral digging techniques create effective and deadly traps

A team of biologists and physicists, led by the University of Bristol, have uncovered new insights into how antlions – one of the fiercest and most terrifying predators in the insect kingdom – build their deadly pit traps.

18h

Parental support linked to how well millennials transition to college life

Researchers show that how well parents or guardians support millennials' psychological needs prior to their transition to college is an important predictor of their psychological well-being as they adapt to college life.

18h

All the info our brain needs for language nearly fits on a floppy disk

To learn language, we store information about word sounds, syntax and more. It turns out that all this amounts to about 1.5 megabytes of data – just over the size of a floppy disk

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Can we reverse engineer the brain like a computer?

Neuroscientists have a dizzying array of methods to listen in on hundreds or even thousands of neurons in the brain and have even developed tools to manipulate the activity of individual cells. Will this unprecedented access to the brain allow us to finally crack the mystery of how it works? In 2017, Jonas and Kording published a controversial research article, “ Could a Neuroscientist Understand

18h

Longleat: Koala conservation scheme 'working despite death'

Longleat Safari Park says its project is still helping koalas despite criticism after one animal died.

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