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nyheder2019marts28

EU parliament approves ban on single use plastics

European lawmakers voted overwhelmingly Wednesday for an EU-wide ban on single-use plastic products such as the straws, cutlery and cotton buds that are clogging the world's oceans.

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More Quackery

Yep, folks, we’re doing it wrong. Making these small molecules, these biologics, all of it – we worry about pharmacokinetics and exposure, about side effects and potency and selectivity, and all the time we could be dosing folks with magic water. That’s what you’d get out of reading the literature on “release-active drugs”, anyway, which literature unfortunately exists. There have been several re

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Udbetaling Danmark har registreret oplysninger om 4.500 bisiddere

Oplysninger om bisidders børn, ægtefælle, samt levende og afdøde forældre blev tilføjet sagen for den borger, han hjalp.

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The Huawei Threat Isn't Backdoors. It's Bugs

A British report finds that Huawei equipment, suspected of including backdoors for China's government, suffers from a lack of "basic engineering competence."

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Bumblebee Queens Prefer Layovers to Nonstop Flights

Scientists tracked bumblebee queens with radar when they emerged from hibernation, and found the bees take only brief flights en route to a new nest. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists Discover a Woman Who Feels No Pain or Anxiety. She Thought It Was Normal

She went through childbirth and a full life, never knowing she was different.

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Bumblebee Queens Prefer Layovers to Nonstop Flights

Scientists tracked bumblebee queens with radar when they emerged from hibernation, and found the bees take only brief flights en route to a new nest. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Illuminating water filtration

For the first time, researchers have revealed the molecular structure of membranes used in reverse osmosis.

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Biomedical engineers grow cardiac patches to help people recover from heart attacks

A little goes a long way. Tiny blood vessels are essential for regenerative engineering and a team led by engineers has detailed innovative methods to ensure highly aligned, dense and mature microvasculature in engineered tissue that can be used for cardiac patches.

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3D-printed tissue could fix athletes’ damaged joints

Bioscientists are moving closer to 3D-printed tissues to help heal bone and cartilage damaged in sports injuries to knees, ankles, and elbows. Scientists engineered scaffolds that replicate the physical characteristics of osteochondral tissue—basically, hard bone beneath a compressible layer of cartilage that appears as the smooth surface on the ends of long bones. Injuries to these bones, from s

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Changes in onset of spring linked to more allergies across the US

Human-induced climate change is disrupting nature's calendar, including when plants bloom and the spring season starts, and new research suggests we're increasingly paying the price for it in the form of seasonal allergies. The study, based on over 300,000 respondents between 2002 and 2013, shows that hay fever allergies increase when the timing of spring 'greenup' changes.

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A Human-Spread Fungus Is Killing Amphibians, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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Why procrastination is a form of self-harm

We typically think of procrastinators as having poor time management skills, but research suggests they actually have poor self-regulation. This causes procrastinators to prioritize the wellbeing of their present selves over that of their future selves, ultimately causing way more stress and harm to themselves in the long run. Fortunately, there are a few strategies that chronic procrastinators c

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EPA Science Panel Considering Guidelines That Upend Basic Air Pollution Science

Some panel members said they don't agree that breathing sooty air can cause premature death. The panel's draft recommendations to the EPA would change how it assesses the dangers of air pollution. (Image credit: George Frey/Getty Images)

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Verizon Now Offers Its Robocall Filter For Free

Carriers are finally stepping up now that the robocall menace has got out of hand more than it ever did before. Almost 26 billion calls placed last year were spam calls so it’s clear …

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New molecular diagnostic tool

A new sophisticated computational model is bringing an innovative method of diagnosing rare hereditary conditions.

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Knowledge gap closed in our understanding of degradation of ethane

With a share of up to ten percent, ethane is the second most common component of natural gas and is present in deep-seated land and marine gas deposits all around the world. Up to now, it was unclear how ethane is degraded in the absence of oxygen. Researchers have discovered a single-celled organism able to degrade ethane without oxygen.

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Record efficiency for perovskite-based light-emitting diodes

Efficient near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diodes of perovskite have now been produced in a lab. The external quantum efficiency is 21.6%, which is a record.

59min

Illuminating water filtration

For the first time, researchers have revealed the molecular structure of membranes used in reverse osmosis.

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Ferromagnetic nanoparticle systems show promise for ultrahigh-speed spintronics

In the future, ultrahigh-speed spintronics will require ultrafast coherent magnetization reversal within a picosecond. While this may eventually be achieved via irradiation the small change of magnetization it generates has so far prevented any practical application of this technique. Now researchers report that they have explored ferromagnetic nanoparticles embedded within a semiconductor. Their

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Arbitrary categories improve visual learning transfer, study finds

This type of learning transfer opens the door for applying basic cognitive science research to help patients with vision loss.

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Most precise measurements of sickle cell disease building blocks could lead to new treatments

In a breakthrough study of sickle cell disease, biomedical engineers have revealed that the building blocks of the disease are much less efficient at organizing than previously thought. The findings open the door to new treatments, including new medicines that could be prescribed at lower doses, for the approximately 20 million people worldwide who suffer from the lifelong disease.

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Critical receptor involved in response to antidepressants like ketamine

Effective treatment of clinical depression remains a major mental health issue, with roughly 30 percent of patients who do not respond to any of the available treatments. Researchers have discovered a crucial receptor called mGlu2 that is critical to the mechanism of fast-acting antidepressants such as ketamine when used to treat depression.

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Biologists find a way to boost intestinal stem cell populations

Biologists have found that aging takes a toll on intestinal stem cells and may contribute to increased susceptibility to disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. The researchers could also reverse this effect in aged mice by treating them with an NAD precursor, which helps boost the population of intestinal stem cells.

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Pediatric cell atlas will map single-cell changes for a deeper view of child health and disease

Biomedical researchers plan to create the Pediatric Cell Atlas, a powerful new resource for fine-grained scientific understanding of human growth and development. Drawing on dramatic recent advances in technology, the Atlas will offer an unprecedented window into the unique biology of children by benchmarking healthy and abnormal tissues at the level of single cells — the basic units of biology.

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Biomedical engineers grow cardiac patches to help people recover from heart attacks

A little goes a long way. Tiny blood vessels are essential for regenerative engineering and a team led by engineers has detailed innovative methods to ensure highly aligned, dense and mature microvasculature in engineered tissue that can be used for cardiac patches.

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TB: Promising new drugs for old pathogen Mtb

Researchers are targeting a metabolic pathway, the dihydrofolate reductase pathway, crucial for amino acid synthesis to treat TB infections.

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Future implications?

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Earth's most invasive species is a frog-killing fungus

Environment The international pet trade has helped a fungal infection spread to 501 species of amphibians. A new study, published Thursday in Science quantified the global death toll of the amphibian-killing fungus, chytridiomycosis, which has infected at least 501 distinct…

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Mexico raises alert level as volcano spews ash, lava

Mexico raised the warning level for the Popocatepetl volcano to one step shy of a red alert Thursday, after it repeatedly spewed ash, smoke and lava into the air.

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Five new frog species from Madagascar

Scientists have named five new species of frogs found across the island of Madagascar. The largest could sit on your thumbnail, the smallest is hardly longer than a grain of rice.

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New molecular diagnostic tool

A new sophisticated computational model is bringing an innovative method of diagnosing rare hereditary conditions.

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A ventilation system proves effective at reducing hospital infections

The mechanism produces airflow that removes pathogens present in the air of a hospital room.

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Reducing water consumption in mining

Plenty of water is needed for beneficiation of mineral ores. Taking the raw material fluorite as their example, researchers have now shown how water usage can be optimized. They have developed a new procedure that extends the simulation of the beneficiation process. It indicates the circumstances in which it makes sense for water to be recycled without incurring losses during ore enrichment. The c

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A new class of branched single chain surfactant for enhanced oil recovery reported

A new green surfactant for efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR) has been developed.

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Improving equity in global physician training

Large numbers of U.S. physicians and medical trainees engage in hands-on clinical experiences abroad where they gain skills working across cultures with limited resources. However, providers from low- and middle-income countries traveling to learn from health care in the United States are rarely afforded the same critical hands-on education.

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Knowledge gap closed in our understanding of degradation of ethane

With a share of up to ten percent, ethane is the second most common component of natural gas and is present in deep-seated land and marine gas deposits all around the world. Up to now, it was unclear how ethane is degraded in the absence of oxygen. Researchers have discovered a single-celled organism able to degrade ethane without oxygen.

1h

Record efficiency for perovskite-based light-emitting diodes

Efficient near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diodes of perovskite have now been produced in a lab. The external quantum efficiency is 21.6%, which is a record.

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Breast cancer: The promises of old recipes

Of the three major subtypes of breast cancer, the triple negative is the most lethal and unlike other breast cancers, it is resistant to most existing therapies. By studying the properties of clofazimine, a 70-year-old antibiotic, scientists demonstrate its effectiveness in stopping the progression of the disease in in vivo tests. These results highlight the need to re-examine with a fresh eye the

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New mathematical model could be key to designing effective therapies for brain disorders

A new mathematical model has been developed to quantify the activity of biased G-protein-coupled receptors.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Schiff Storm

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, March 28. President Donald Trump and the Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee called for Democratic Chairman Adam Schiff to resign, arguing that he “abused [his] position to knowingly promote false information” about the Russia investigation. Schiff hit back: And the Department of Housing and Urban Development is suing Facebook for allegedly vi

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Indian satellite destruction creates debris field of 'space junk'

India's destruction of a satellite with a missile created hundreds of pieces of "space junk," a potentially dangerous situation that established space powers have tried to avoid for years.

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Engineers craft the basic building block for electrospun nanofibers

Imagine wounds that heal without scars. It's possible with electrospun nanofibers. A team has streamlined the tissue scaffold production process, cutting out time spent removing toxic solvents and chemicals. Using a unique blend of polymers, they hope to speed up biomedical engineering prototyping using identical materials for a range of tests.

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Maternal diet during pregnancy may modulate the risk of ADHD symptoms in children

A study suggest that the risk of a child developing symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be modulated by the mother's diet during pregnancy. The research analyzed samples of umbilical cord plasma to quantify the levels of omega-6 and omega-3 that reach the fetus. The analysis showed a higher omega-6:omega-3 ratio to be associated with a higher risk of ADHD symptoms at se

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Seismic safety upgrades may cost CA hospitals billions

California hospitals would need to make substantial investments — between $34 billion and $143 billion statewide — to meet 2030 state seismic safety standards, according to a new report.

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New tool uses RNA sequencing to chart rich maps of cellular and tissue function

A new technique gives an unprecedented view of the cellular organization of tissues. Known as Slide-seq, the method uses genetic sequencing to draw detailed, three-dimensional maps of tissues, revealing not only what cell types are present, but where they are located and what they are doing.

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Consider non-surgical brain stimulation for severe depression, say experts

Non-surgical brain stimulation should be considered as alternative or add-on treatments for adults with severe forms of depression, suggests a new study.

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Cities under pressure in changing climate

Experts highlight the challenge we face to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase cities' resilience to extreme weather and also give people quality space to live in.

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Engineers craft the basic building block for electrospun nanofibers

Imagine wounds that heal without scars. It's possible with electrospun nanofibers. A team has streamlined the tissue scaffold production process, cutting out time spent removing toxic solvents and chemicals. Using a unique blend of polymers, they hope to speed up biomedical engineering prototyping using identical materials for a range of tests.

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Fewer reproductive years in women linked to an increased risk of dementia

Women who start their period later, go through menopause earlier or have a hysterectomy may have a greater risk of developing dementia, according to a new study. The study found a link between increased risk of dementia and fewer total reproductive years when women are exposed to higher levels of estrogen hormones.

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Mangroves and seagrasses are key nurseries in coastal habitats

Comprehensive analysis suggests that mangroves and seagrasses provide the greatest value as 'nurseries' for young fishes and invertebrates, providing key guidance for managers of threatened marine resources.

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Alan Alda: Build empathy. Monitor your relationships.

Learn simple exercises that are scientifically proven to boost your empathy. At Big Think Edge, Alan Alda shares his insights on empathy and effective communication. Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships. None Empathy is a superpower for connecting and communicating with others, but it can be surprisingly fragile. Even a bad mood or

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Investors are starting to bet big on psychedelic medicine

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Planet Ships

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Lyft IPO sets rollout for ride-hailing, sharing economy

Lyft is raising some $2.5 billion in its Wall Street offering which is being seen as turning point for the ride-hailing business and the so-called "sharing economy."

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ORNL investigates complex uranium oxides with help from CADES resources

Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to understand both the complex nature of uranium and the various oxide forms it can take during processing steps that might occur throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. An improved understanding of uranium oxides, which fuel the vast majority of the U.S nuclear power fleet, could lead to the development of improved fuel

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Dark matter experiment finds no evidence of axions

Physicists from MIT and elsewhere have performed the first run of a new experiment to detect axions—hypothetical particles that are predicted to be among the lightest particles in the universe. If they exist, axions would be virtually invisible, yet inescapable; they could make up nearly 85 percent of the mass of the universe, in the form of dark matter.

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RIT, zoo researchers capturing sights, sounds and insects of Madagascar

Researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology and Seneca Park Zoo are developing a virtual reality gaming environment that will let zoogoers experience a Madagascar rainforest ecosystem. They recently journeyed to the Centre ValBio field station in Ranomafana National Park on a trip that laid the groundwork for creating accurate 3-D models of the exotic Madagascar wildlife and habitat.

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3D-printed tissues may keep athletes in action

Bioscientists have learned to 3D-print scaffolds that may help heal osteochondral injuries of the sort suffered by many athletes.

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New study: Like humans, world's smallest bears can mimic faces too

Sun bears imitate each other's faces during play. This is the first time this has been seen in non-primate, non-domesticated animals. They're mostly solitary, so this is likely innate, as opposed to a learned behavior. None One of the traditional staples of a performing comic's repertoire are impersonations. In the recent film, All About Nina , in fact, a competitive audition for a network comedy

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RIT, zoo researchers capturing sights, sounds and insects of Madagascar

Researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology and Seneca Park Zoo are developing a virtual reality gaming environment that will let zoogoers experience a Madagascar rainforest ecosystem. They recently journeyed to the Centre ValBio field station in Ranomafana National Park on a trip that laid the groundwork for creating accurate 3-D models of the exotic Madagascar wildlife and habitat.

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3-D printed tissues may keep athletes in action

Bioscientists are moving closer to 3-D-printed artificial tissues to help heal bone and cartilage typically damaged in sports-related injuries to knees, ankles and elbows.

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New way of designing systems against correlated disruptions uses negative probability

In March of 2011, a powerful earthquake off the coast of Japan triggered the automatic shutdown of reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and simultaneously disrupted electricity lines that supported their cooling. Had the earthquake been the only disaster that hit that day, emergency backup generators would have prevented a meltdown. Instead, a tsunami immediately followed the eart

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Saturn's rings coat tiny moons

New findings have emerged about five tiny moons nestled in and near Saturn's rings. The closest-ever flybys by NASA's Cassini spacecraft reveal that the surfaces of these unusual moons are covered with material from the planet's rings — and from icy particles blasting out of Saturn's larger moon Enceladus. The work paints a picture of the competing processes shaping these mini-moons.

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Running upright: The minuscule movements that keep us from falling

Maybe running comes easy, each stride pleasant and light. Maybe it comes hard, each step a slog to the finish. Either way, the human body is constantly calibrating, making microscopic adjustments to keep us from falling as we weekend-warrior our way to greatness.

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Scientists discover potential sustainable energy technology for the household refrigerator

While many advancements have been in improving its efficiency, the refrigerator still consumes considerable energy each year. So researchers in China are working to minimize the cold loss that occurs at the thermal barrier between inside the freezer and outside the fridge. They hypothesized that using part of the cold loss to cool the fresh food compartment could be a promising solution.

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Birds bug out over coffee

New research has found that birds are as picky as coffee snobs when it comes to the trees they'll migrate to for a summer habitat. Migratory birds prefer foraging in native leguminous tree species over non-native and many other trees used on many coffee farms. The findings will help farmers choose trees that are best for both birds and business.

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New potential therapeutic target for pancreatic cancer discovered

Cancer cells demand enormous amounts of molecular 'food' to survive and grow, and a new study may have identified a new approach to starve the cells of one of the most common and deadly cancers, pancreatic cancer.

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Had enough water? Brain's thirst centers make a gut check

Until recently, scientists believed that a brain region called the hypothalamus makes us thirsty when it detects a drop in the hydration of our blood. But neuroscientistts now realize that this couldn't be the whole story.

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Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in global change

Land use in tropical mountain regions leads to considerable changes of biodiversity and ecological functions. The intensity of such changes is greatly affected by the climate.

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3D-printed tissues may keep athletes in action

Bioscientists have learned to 3D-print scaffolds that may help heal osteochondral injuries of the sort suffered by many athletes.

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Novel methodological tool helps detect synergistic phenomena in phytoplankton growth

Researchers have developed a new model allowing them to observe the key drivers of phytoplankton growth (blooms) patterns in the seas surrounding the United Kingdom.

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In mice, single population of stem cells contributes to lifelong hippocampal neurogenesis

In the latest update in the field of adult neurogenesis, a team of researchers has shown in mice that a single lineage of neural progenitors contributes to embryonic, early postnatal, and adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and that these cells are continuously generated throughout a lifetime.

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Galápagos islands have nearly 10 times more alien marine species than once thought

Over 50 non-native species have found their way to the Galápagos Islands, almost 10 times more than scientists previously thought, reports a new study.

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Sea grapes reveal secrets of plant evolution

Scientists decoded the genome of the popular Okinawan seaweed 'umi-budo' or 'sea grapes,' which could help ease the crop's cultivation and address environmental issues caused by the invasive spread of related species.

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Offspring of older mothers are more responsive to aging interventions

Maternal age affects how well offspring respond to dietary interventions that are known to increase lifespan, scientists report in a rotifer study.

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Woman with rare gene mutations feels no pain, anxiety

A woman in Scotland was found to feel virtually no pain and report zero trace of any anxiety or depression. Her body also seems to heal injuries very quickly, leaving little or no scarring. Humans feel pain as a warning before serious injury occurs, so it's not necessarily desirable to feel absolutely no pain. None When 66-year-old Jo Cameron was about to undergo a typically painful hand surgery

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New way of designing systems against correlated disruptions uses negative probability

Until now, systems engineers have struggled with the problem of planning for disaster impacts that are linked by correlation — like those of earthquakes and tsunamis — because of the cumbersome calculations necessary to precisely quantify the probabilities of all possible combinations of disruption occurrences. Now Yanfeng Ouyang and fellow Illinois Engineering researchers have developed a new m

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How Democrats Are Trying to Save the Paris Agreement (And the Climate)

Democrats don’t yet have a consensus plan to address climate change, but they’re trying. On Wednesday, the party’s leadership in Congress issued a demand to President Donald Trump and began searching for long-term footing on the issue. In the House, Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled the Climate Action Now Act , a new bill that would essentially forbid the United States from withdrawing from the Paris

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Novel study links fetal exposure to nicotine and sudden infant death syndrome

In utero exposure to nicotine has postnatal effects on development of the heart and its response to adrenalin and may contribute to explanation of why some babies do not wake up during sleep apnea, according to a new study.

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Nanovaccine boosts immunity in sufferers of metabolic syndrome

A new class of biomaterial developed by researchers for an infectious disease nanovaccine effectively boosted immunity in mice with metabolic disorders linked to gut bacteria — a population that shows resistance to traditional flu and polio vaccines.

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Cancer prevention drug also disables H. pylori bacterium

A medicine currently being tested as a chemoprevention agent for multiple types of cancer has more than one trick in its bag when it comes to preventing stomach cancer, researchers have discovered.

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A bad bout of flu triggers 'taste bud cells' to grow in the lungs

When researchers examined mice that had recovered from severe influenza, they came upon a surprising discovery: Taste bud cells had grown in the animals' lungs. The team believes the cells may play a role in immunity.

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Astronomers Just Spotted an Asteroid Ripping Itself Apart

Cut My Life Into Pieces A few months ago, astronomers noticed that a well-known asteroid that orbits the sun way out past Mars had sprouted a long, comet-like tail. Now, data from the Hubble Telescope reveals that something has set 6478 Gault off kilter and it’s self-destructing, spinning itself into pieces. “It could have been on the brink of instability for 10 million years,” University of Hawa

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A Finnish Startup Is Using Prison Labor to Train AI

Cheap Labor A Finnish AI startup called Vainu has spent the last three months relying on prison labor to train its AI algorithm. Vainu previously paid people through Mechanical Turk, a service where people perform menial tasks — like those necessary for preparing AI’s training data — just like many other startups. But Vainu found that it got more bang for its buck enlisting the Finnish Criminal S

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Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

The number of alien species, likely brought by ship traffic, stunned scientists. And they suspect that the foothold of such creatures may have been underestimated in other tropical habitats, too. (Image credit: Courtesy of Jim Carlton)

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Galapagosöarna invaderas av främmande arter

Tack vare Galapagosöarnas isolerade läge har djur- och växtlivet där utvecklats på ett unikt sätt. Ögruppen är hem för ett stort antal endemiska arter, det vill säga, de finns endast i denna miljö. Galapagos endemiska djurliv var en inspirationskälla för Charles Darwin när han skapade evolutionsteorin.

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Menacing microbes drain host cells with stealthy ‘straw’

Menacing microbes drain host cells with stealthy ‘straw’ Menacing microbes drain host cells with stealthy ‘straw’, Published online: 28 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00996-z Infectious bacteria extend a homegrown tube to tap nutrients in nearby human cells.

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Samsung Made a Flower Vase That’s a Throwable Fire Extinguisher

Ready, Aim… In September, Samsung subsidiary Cheil Worldwide launched a campaign for the Firevase, a flower vase designed to put out fires when you throw it at them like a grenade. Chiel produced 100,000 Firevases, which Samsung Fire & Marine Insurance distributed across South Korea. Now the pair are doubling down on the fire safety campaign, producing an additional 200,000 of their multipurpose

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CDC Reports Unusual Spike in Rare Tick-Borne Disease in Oregon

Four people in Oregon were infected with a rare tick-borne virus, known as Colorado tick fever, in a single month.

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The Serengeti-Mara squeeze — One of the world's most iconic ecosystems under pressure

Increased human activity around one of Africa's most iconic ecosystems is 'squeezing the wildlife in its core', damaging habitation and disrupting the migration routes of wildebeest, zebra and gazelle, an international study has concluded.

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A compass pointing west

Researchers have discovered a special phenomenon of magnetism in the nano range. It enables magnets to be assembled in unusual configurations. This could be used to build computer memories and switches to increase the performance of microprocessors.

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High-speed videos capture how kangaroo rat escapes rattlesnake attack

Kangaroo rats are abundant and seemingly defenseless seed-eating rodents that have to contend with a host of nasty predators, including rattlesnakes — venomous pit vipers well known for their deadly, lightning-quick strikes. Research now shows that desert kangaroo rats frequently foil snakes through a combination of fast reaction times, powerful evasive leaps, and mid-air, ninja-style kicks.

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Dissecting dengue: Innovative model sheds light on confounding immune response

A challenge of dengue infection — for which 40 percent of the global population is at risk — is that it can be caused by one of four versions of the virus, and infection by one type only protects for that version and can cause more severe disease following infection with another type. A new study uncovers details about the human immune response that could help with successful vaccine development

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Designer organelles bring new functionalities into cells

For the first time, scientists have engineered the complex biological process of translation into a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell. Researchers used this technique to create a membraneless organelle that can build proteins from natural and synthetic amino acids carrying new functionality.

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These brain cells naturally stop overeating

Certain brain cells in mice curb their impulse to eat, according to new research. The new study shows that the cells also play a role in regulating memory, and are part of a larger brain circuit that promotes balanced eating. Food is, generally speaking, a good thing. In addition to being quite tasty, it is also necessary for survival. That’s why animals have evolved robust physiological systems

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New drugs that unleash the immune system on cancers may backfire, fueling tumor growth

Scientists are still debating how, and whether, drugs called checkpoint inhibitors trigger tumor "hyperprogression"

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Why Don’t More American Men Get Vasectomies?

It’s vasectomy season in the United States. But American women get sterilized at higher rates.

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Handle Robot Reimagined

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New Yorkers brace for self-cloning Asian longhorned tick

A Columbia University study maps out the increase and spread of the Asian longhorned tick, a new species identified last summer in Westchester and Staten island. What's particularly alarming is that the tick is notorious for its ability to quickly clone itself through asexual reproduction, or reproduce sexually, laying 1,000-2,000 eggs at a time.

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Deep groundwater may generate surface streams on Mars

New research suggests that deep groundwater could still be active on Mars and could originate surface streams in some near-equatorial areas on Mars.

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Designer organelles bring new functionalities into cells

For the first time, scientists have engineered the complex biological process of translation into a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell. Researchers used this technique to create a membraneless organelle that can build proteins from natural and synthetic amino acids carrying new functionality.

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Mass amphibian extinctions globally caused by fungal disease

An international study has found a fungal disease has caused dramatic population declines in more than 500 amphibian species, including 90 extinctions, over the past 50 years.

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'Free lunch' warps inner spatial map in rat brains and, by implication, human brains

Our brains' neural circuitry creates spatial maps as we navigate through new environments, allowing us to recall locations and directions. While it's been known for some time that we have these internal maps, a study shows how, in rats, those maps get redrawn when the rats learn they'll receive a reward at a certain place on the map.

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The president wants NASA back on the moon by 2024—a risky and unrealistic request

Space We'll need more money, more time, or both. At the fifth meeting of the National Space Council, and nearly 50 years after the Apollo 11 moon landing, Vice President Mike Pence said a 2028 deadline for another moon…

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The Failure of NASA's Spacewalk Snafu? How Predictable It Was

Years of ignoring the specific needs of women astronauts led up to this moment.

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Running upright: The minuscule movements that keep us from falling

Maybe running comes easy, each stride pleasant and light. Maybe it comes hard, each step a slog to the finish. Either way, the human body is constantly calibrating, making microscopic adjustments to keep us from falling as we weekend-warrior our way to greatness.

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This AI Learned to “Photoshop” Human Faces

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New Research: Mars Used To Be Covered In Huge Rivers

Huge Rivers A new study by scientists from the University of Chicago theorizes that Mars has been covered in huge rivers during multiple lengthy periods in the distant past. Though many questions remain, the study upends longstanding assumptions about the history of our closest planetary neighbor. “We can start to see that Mars didn’t just have one wet period early in its history and then dried o

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Artificial intelligence can improve X-ray identification of pacemakers in emergencies

Researchers have created new artificial intelligence software that can identify cardiac rhythm devices in x-rays more accurately and quickly than current methods.

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Saturn’s Small Moons Formed From The Dust of Its Rings

NASA's Cassini mission to Saturn may have ended in 2017, but researchers are still analyzing the vast amount of data it sent back over its final spectacular months. Astronomers most recent findings, published Thursday, center on five of Saturn’s small ring moons: Pan, Daphnis, Atlas, Pandora and Epimetheus. During six close flybys near the end of its mission, Cassini uncovered new insights into ho

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How to make self-driving cars safer on roads

At USC, researchers have published a new study that tackles a long-standing problem for autonomous vehicle developers: testing the system's perception algorithms, which allow the car to 'understand' what it 'sees.'

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ORNL investigates complex uranium oxides with help from CADES resources

To accelerate the process of identifying novel uranium oxide phases, an ORNL team studied 4,600 different potential crystal structures of uranium oxide compositions on Metis, a CADES high-performance computing cluster. An improved understanding of uranium oxides, which fuel the vast majority of the U.S. nuclear power fleet, could lead to the development of improved fuels or waste storage materials

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Researchers at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's optimize gene editing for SCD and beta thalassemia

Gene editing of patients' blood stem cells can potentially cure many blood disorders. But introducing targeted edits into these cells has been challenging, and the edits aren't always stable once the cells engraft in the bone marrow. Researchers now report a CRISPR approach that overcomes these technical challenges. In cell and mouse models of sickle disease and beta thalassemia, they show that ed

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Screening for colorectal cancer at 45 would avert deaths, but testing older adults would do more

Starting routine colorectal cancer screening at age 45 rather than 50 would decrease U.S. cancer deaths, but screening a greater number of older and high-risk adults would avert nearly three times as many diagnoses and deaths at a lower cost.

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Inside Trump’s Strategy to Use Mueller on the Campaign Trail

It’s been just four days since the president learned that Robert Mueller found no evidence of collusion, but Rudy Giuliani, Donald Trump’s lawyer, is no longer in the mood to celebrate. He’s thrilled about the outcome, of course, as is his client. Trump told the former New York mayor that “he’s happier than he thought he would be.” But Giuliani, sipping a Diet Coke on Wednesday morning at the Tru

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Nepal’s rivers give green power to remote areas

Researchers are investigating a method of creating power from fast moving streams that many rural areas in Nepal use. They’re looking into why some of these systems work better than others, and whether they could be useful in other countries. 80 percent of the geography of Nepal is composed of mountain ranges like Annapurna, making the big power grids that we take for granted in the developed wor

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Artificial intelligence can improve X-ray identification of pacemakers in emergencies

Researchers have created new artificial intelligence software that can identify cardiac rhythm devices in x-rays more accurately and quickly than current methods.

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Trilobites: Saturn’s Rings Are Sculpted by a Crew of Mini-Moons

Data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft are helping to explain how Atlas, Daphnis, Epimetheus, Pan and Pandora are distinctive among Saturn’s many satellites.

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Poll Reveals Americans’ Grim Predictions for the US in 2050

Road Ahead Americans are not terribly optimistic about the United States’ future. In December 2018, Pew Research Center surveyed 2,524 American adults, asking them what they think the United States will be like in 2050. It recently released the results of that survey , and the general consensus is that the U.S. is a nation in decline — though Americans do see some potential bright spots ahead. Do

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Scientists discover potential sustainable energy technology for the household refrigerator

While many advancements have been in improving its efficiency, the refrigerator still consumes considerable energy each year. So researchers in China are working to minimize the cold loss that occurs at the thermal barrier between inside the freezer and outside the fridge. They hypothesized that using part of the cold loss to cool the fresh food compartment could be a promising solution. They desc

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Dark matter experiment finds no evidence of axions

In a paper published today in Physical Review Letters, an MIT-led team reports that in the first month of observations the experiment detected no sign of axions within the mass range of 0.31 to 8.3 nanoelectronvolts. This means that axions within this mass range, which is equivalent to about one-quintillionth the mass of a proton, either don't exist or they have an even smaller effect on electrici

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Amazon plans 800-job expansion in Austin—but it's not related to HQ2

In a move to build up its presence in the capitol of Texas, Amazon will be adding 800 jobs to its tech hub in Austin.

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Amphibian-Killing Invasive Fungus Causes Record Wildlife Loss

The chytrid fungus has hit 500 species of amphibians, driving dozens to extinction in recent decades — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ninja Rat Drop-Kicks Deadly Rattlesnake in Epic Slow-Motion Video

In the dark desert outside Yuma, Arizona, a showdown is about to occur.

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Human Activity is Disrupting the Heart of Africa's Serengeti Ecosystem

Human Activity is Disrupting the Heart of Africa's Serengeti Ecosystem Repercussions of human pressure ripple from the edges to the center of an enormous protected area. wildebeest_cropped.jpg Image credits: DEMOSH via Flickr Earth Thursday, March 28, 2019 – 14:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — The Serengeti-Mara ecosystem in Tanzania and Kenya is one of the largest and most belove

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3D printed tissues may keep athletes in action

Bioscientists at Rice and the University of Maryland with the Center for Engineering Complex Tissues learn to 3D-print scaffolds that may help heal osteochondral injuries of the sort suffered by many athletes.

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Winds of change…Solar variability weakens the Walker cell

An international team of researchers has found robust evidence for signatures of the 11-year sunspot cycle in the tropical Pacific. They analyzed historical time series of pressure, surface winds, and precipitation with focus on the Walker Circulation — a vast system of atmospheric flow in the tropical Pacific region that affects patterns of tropical rainfall. They have revealed that during perio

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Cancer prevention drug also disables H. pylori bacterium

A medicine currently being tested as a chemoprevention agent for multiple types of cancer has more than one trick in its bag when it comes to preventing stomach cancer, Vanderbilt researchers have discovered.

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A bad bout of flu triggers 'taste bud cells' to grow in the lungs

When researchers from the University of Pennsylvania examined mice that had recovered from severe influenza, they came upon a surprising discovery: Taste bud cells had grown in the animals' lungs. The team believes the cells may play a role in immunity.

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Fungus has decimated the populations of 501 amphibian species worldwide

Survey by researchers in 16 countries is published in Science. Authors say chytrid fungus is responsible for heaviest biodiversity loss ever caused by a single pathogen.

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The Complex Quest to Write a Robocar Driving Test

Self-driving cars are patrolling our roads, and it's about time someone made a proper engineering standard that they can be held to.

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Nearly 100 species of frogs, toads and salamanders wiped out by fungus

The deadly disease caused by chytrid fungus is now thought to have driven nearly 100 amphibian species to extinction and contributed to the decline of over 400 more

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Bogus Virus Scans Cost Office Depot $25 Million

The Federal Trade Commission has fined Office Depot $25 million for bogus virus scans. The company has agreed to pay the fine as part of a settlement with the FTC for allegedly lying to customers …

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WTO confirms US failed to fully comply over Boeing subsidies

The World Trade Organization (WTO) ruled Thursday that Washington failed to fully comply with a 2012 order to halt subsidies to Boeing, marking a partial victory for rival aircraft-maker Airbus and the EU.

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Twitter may tag rule-breaking Trump tweets

Twitter said Thursday it could start tagging tweets from newsworthy figures such as US President Donald Trump that break its rules, while stopping short of deleting them.

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Rising temperatures will help mosquitos infect a billion more people

Nexus Media News "Plain and simple, climate change is going to kill a lot of people." New research indicates that climate change could result in one billion new cases of infectious diseases globally by century's end.

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Matter: The Plague Killing Frogs Everywhere Is Far Worse Than Scientists Thought

As a threat to wildlife, an amphibian fungus has become “the most deadly pathogen known to science.”

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Therapists too quick to assume someone has a personality disorder | Letters

Keir Harding says those who have lived through trauma deserve better, and Ash Charlton says it is a myth that one of the biggest predictors for an adult becoming an abuser is if they have been abused themselves Alexandra Shimo is right to highlight the travesty of people who have lived through traumatic experiences being labelled as having disordered personalities (Opinion, 27 March). Aaron Beck,

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New close-ups of the mini-moons in Saturn's rings

Nestled between Saturn's rings are a collection of mini-moons that NASA's Cassini spacecraft skimmed past in 2017.

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Decision makers need contextual interactive guidance

As decision makers balance economic, environmental and social aspects of living, planners and others need decision-making tools that support the process, but do not dictate the outcomes, so that trade-off choices can reflect a wide array of needs, according to a team of researchers who looked at an interactive program using trade-off diagrams.

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Study identifies a key to soybean cyst nematode growth

The soybean cyst nematode, one of the crop's most destructive pests, isn't like most of its wormy relatives. Whereas the vast majority of nematodes look like the microscopic worms they are, the female soybean cyst nematode shape-shifts into a tiny lemon after feeding on soybean roots. In a new EvoDevo article, a University of Illinois research team explains how it happens and why.

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Amphibian-Killing Invasive Fungus Causes Record Wildlife Loss

The chytrid fungus has hit 500 species of amphibians, driving dozens to extinction in recent decades — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Decision makers need contextual interactive guidance

As decision makers balance economic, environmental and social aspects of living, planners and others need decision-making tools that support the process, but do not dictate the outcomes, so that trade-off choices can reflect a wide array of needs, according to a team of researchers who looked at an interactive program using trade-off diagrams.

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Illinois study identifies a key to soybean cyst nematode growth

The soybean cyst nematode, one of the crop's most destructive pests, isn't like most of its wormy relatives. Whereas the vast majority of nematodes look like the microscopic worms they are, the female soybean cyst nematode shape-shifts into a tiny lemon after feeding on soybean roots. In a new EvoDevo article, a University of Illinois research team explains how it happens and why.

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Changes in onset of spring linked to more allergies across the US

Human-induced climate change is disrupting nature's calendar, including when plants bloom and the spring season starts, and new research from the University of School of Public Health suggests we're increasingly paying the price for it in the form of seasonal allergies. The study, based on over 300,000 respondents between 2002 and 2013, shows that hay fever allergies increase when the timing of sp

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A compass pointing west

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich have discovered a special phenomenon of magnetism in the nano range. It enables magnets to be assembled in unusual configurations. This could be used to build computer memories and switches to increase the performance of microprocessors. The results of this work have now been published in the journal Science.

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Grid cells create 'treasure map' in rat brain

Grid cells and place cells are specialized neurons that allow the brain to create a map of the outside world in which one navigates (Nobel Prize 2014). This brain GPS system is built on grid cells' strikingly regular pattern of activity. This pattern provides the metric coordinates to "triangulate one's position" which is decoded by the place cells providing the "you are here" signal.

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The Serengeti-Mara squeeze — One of the world's most iconic ecosystems under pressure

Increased human activity around one of Africa's most iconic ecosystems is damaging habitation and disrupting the migration routes of wildebeest, zebra, and gazelle, an international study has concluded. The study, led by the University of Groningen and published in the scientific journal Science, revealed that some boundary areas have seen a 400% increase in human population over the past decade w

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Harnessing T-cell 'stemness' could enhance cancer immunotherapy

A new study led by scientists in the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sheds light on one way tumors may continue to grow despite the presence of cancer-killing immune cells. The findings, published March 29, 2019, in Science, suggest a way to enhance the effectiveness of immunotherapies for cancer treatment. NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health.

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The Serengeti-Mara squeeze — One of the world's most iconic ecosystems under pressure

Increased human activity around one of Africa's most iconic ecosystems is 'squeezing the wildlife in its core', damaging habitation and disrupting the migration routes of wildebeest, zebra and gazelle, an international study has concluded.

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Copycat fungus deceives immune system and deactivates body's response to infection

Fungus can imitate signals from our immune system and prevent our body from responding to infection, new research from the University of Sheffield has found.

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Liquid meal replacements contributed to greater weight loss than low-calorie diets: review

Liquid meal replacements helped overweight diabetes patients lose an average of about five pounds more than others who tried a conventional low-calorie diet, according to a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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'Free lunch' warps inner spatial map in rat brains and, by implication, human brains

Our brains' neural circuitry creates spatial maps as we navigate through new environments, allowing us to recall locations and directions. While it's been known for some time that we have these internal maps, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine to be published online March 29, 2019 in Science shows how, in rats, those maps get redrawn when the rats learn they'll receive a rewar

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Speedier stomata in optogenetically enhanced plants improve growth and conserve water

By introducing an extra ion channel into the stomata of mustard plants, researchers have developed a new a way to speed up the stomatal response in their leaves.

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The Serengeti squeeze: Human activities at edges of protected areas undermine these ecosystems

Human activity and landscape degradation in the borderlands surrounding Protected Areas (PAs) may have far-reaching consequences and undermine the ecosystems they aim to protect.

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Bacteria partners with virus to cause chronic wounds, Stanford study finds

A common bacterial pathogen called Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a virus that substantially increases the pathogen's ability to infect us, according to a study by investigators at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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First global tally of an amphibian killer

Chytridiomycosis, a highly virulent fungal amphibian disease, has been linked to the worldwide decline of more than 500 species – including 90 presumed extinctions – over the last 50 years, researchers report.

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Close Cassini flybys of Saturn's ring moons

The properties of five small moons located close to Saturn's rings have been illuminated, thanks to data from the Cassini spacecraft's final orbits.

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Mass amphibian extinctions globally caused by fungal disease

An international study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found a fungal disease has caused dramatic population declines in more than 500 amphibian species, including 90 extinctions, over the past 50 years.

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Designer organelles bring new functionalities into cells

For the first time, scientists have engineered the complex biological process of translation into a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell. Research by the Lemke group at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) — in collaboration with JGU Mainz and IMB Mainz — used this technique to create a membraneless organelle that can build proteins from natural and synthetic amino acids car

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Modelled climate change impact on mosquito-borne virus transmission

Mosquito-borne viruses, such as dengue, chikungunya, and Zika, already threaten over a billion people globally. A study published on March 28, 2019, in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases predicts that climate change and rising global temperatures will lead to both increased and new exposures to humans of diseases carried by mosquito vectors Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus.

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1 billion people will be newly exposed to diseases like dengue fever as world temperatures rise

As many as a billion people could be newly exposed to disease-carrying mosquitoes by the end of the century because of global warming, says a new study that examines temperature changes on a monthly basis across the world.

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Novel methodological tool helps detect synergistic phenomena in phytoplankton growth

Researchers have developed a new model allowing them to observe the key drivers of phytoplankton growth (blooms) patterns in the seas surrounding the United Kingdom, according to a study in PLOS Computational Biology, by Lawrence W. Sheppard, from University of Kansas, USA, and colleagues.

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Study identifies a key to soybean cyst nematode growth

The soybean cyst nematode, one of the crop's most destructive pests, isn't like most of its wormy relatives. Whereas the vast majority of nematodes look like the microscopic worms they are, the female soybean cyst nematode shape-shifts into a tiny lemon after feeding on soybean roots. In a new EvoDevo article, a University of Illinois research team explains how it happens and why.

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How to pick the perfect seat in a movie theater for sound and picture

Technology You paid a lot to get into the theater, make sure it's worth the price of the ticket. If you want Thanos to look and sound just right, pick your spot carefully.

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Starquakes Rock Alien Sun, Revealing Details of a 'Hot Saturn'

NASA's TESS mission has, for the first time, detected a planet orbiting a star with visible starquakes.

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Amphibian-Killing Invasive Fungus Causes Record Wildlife Loss

The chytrid fungus has hit 500 species of amphibians, driving dozens to extinction in recent decades — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Skin-eating fungus is mighty species slayer

Skin-eating fungus is mighty species slayer Skin-eating fungus is mighty species slayer, Published online: 28 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01002-2 Frog-killing chytrid fungus has caused major declines in more species than any other pathogen.

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We could soon make animals with cells that contain two genetic codes

Molecular machinery to make synthetic proteins has been added to human cells in the lab. Next: animals and plants with artificial factories in every cell

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Nearly 100 species of frogs, toads and salamanders wiped out by fungus

The deadly disease caused by chytrid fungus is now thought to have driven nearly 100 amphibian species to extinction and contributed to the decline of over 400 more

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The US Military Just Blew Up an ICBM With Another Missile

Missile Test On Monday, The U.S. Department of Defense’s Missile Defense Agency (MDA) intercepted and shot down an Intercontinental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) that had been launched from the Republic of Marshall Islands. The U.S. was testing its ability to destroy a hostile missile before it reached the U.S. In this case, sensors on the ground, as well as those floating in the Pacific Ocean and orb

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LG G8 ThinQ Lands Stateside On April 11th, T-Mobile Vastly Undercuts Rivals On Price

LG announced its new G8 ThinQ flagship smartphone back at MWC 2019, but it was largely overshadowed by its perennial South Korean rival, Samsung, which unveiled the Galaxy S10 family. With …

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Twitter dark mode is getting even darker

New Night Mode options include Dim, Lights OUt and Automatic Dark Mode

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This fungus has wiped out more species than any other disease

Global study confirms a pathogen is the worst known infectious killer of wildlife

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T cell stemness and dysfunction in tumors are triggered by a common mechanism

A paradox of tumor immunology is that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are dysfunctional in situ, yet are capable of stem cell–like behavior including self-renewal, expansion, and multipotency, resulting in the eradication of large metastatic tumors. We find that the overabundance of potassium in the tumor microenvironment underlies this dichotomy, triggering suppression of T cell effector function

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News at a glance

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Taste for danger

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Saving fossil hill

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AI for the M.D

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Packing of apolar side chains enables accurate design of highly stable membrane proteins

The features that stabilize the structures of membrane proteins remain poorly understood. Polar interactions contribute modestly, and the hydrophobic effect contributes little to the energetics of apolar side-chain packing in membranes. Disruption of steric packing can destabilize the native folds of membrane proteins, but is packing alone sufficient to drive folding in lipids? If so, then membra

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Cross-boundary human impacts compromise the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem

Protected areas provide major benefits for humans in the form of ecosystem services, but landscape degradation by human activity at their edges may compromise their ecological functioning. Using multiple lines of evidence from 40 years of research in the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem, we find that such edge degradation has effectively "squeezed" wildlife into the core protected area and has altered th

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Photocatalytic decarboxylative alkylations mediated by triphenylphosphine and sodium iodide

Most photoredox catalysts in current use are precious metal complexes or synthetically elaborate organic dyes, the cost of which can impede their application for large-scale industrial processes. We found that a combination of triphenylphosphine and sodium iodide under 456-nanometer irradiation by blue light–emitting diodes can catalyze the alkylation of silyl enol ethers by decarboxylative coupl

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Chirally coupled nanomagnets

Magnetically coupled nanomagnets have multiple applications in nonvolatile memories, logic gates, and sensors. The most effective couplings have been found to occur between the magnetic layers in a vertical stack. We achieved strong coupling of laterally adjacent nanomagnets using the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. This coupling is mediated by chiral domain walls between out-of-pl

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Catalyst-controlled stereoselective cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers

The tacticity of vinyl polymers has a profound effect on their physical properties. Despite the well-developed stereoselective methods for the polymerization of propylene and other nonpolar α-olefins, stereoselective polymerization of polar vinyl monomers has proven more challenging. We have designed chiral counterions that systematically bias the reactivity and chain-end stereochemical environme

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The entorhinal cognitive map is attracted to goals

Grid cells with their rigid hexagonal firing fields are thought to provide an invariant metric to the hippocampal cognitive map, yet environmental geometrical features have recently been shown to distort the grid structure. Given that the hippocampal role goes beyond space, we tested the influence of nonspatial information on the grid organization. We trained rats to daily learn three new reward

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Remembered reward locations restructure entorhinal spatial maps

Ethologically relevant navigational strategies often incorporate remembered reward locations. Although neurons in the medial entorhinal cortex provide a maplike representation of the external spatial world, whether this map integrates information regarding learned reward locations remains unknown. We compared entorhinal coding in rats during a free-foraging task and a spatial memory task. Entorhi

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Human impact erodes chimpanzee behavioral diversity

Chimpanzees possess a large number of behavioral and cultural traits among nonhuman species. The "disturbance hypothesis" predicts that human impact depletes resources and disrupts social learning processes necessary for behavioral and cultural transmission. We used a dataset of 144 chimpanzee communities, with information on 31 behaviors, to show that chimpanzees inhabiting areas with high human

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Optogenetic manipulation of stomatal kinetics improves carbon assimilation, water use, and growth

Stomata serve dual and often conflicting roles, facilitating carbon dioxide influx into the plant leaf for photosynthesis and restricting water efflux via transpiration. Strategies for reducing transpiration without incurring a cost for photosynthesis must circumvent this inherent coupling of carbon dioxide and water vapor diffusion. We expressed the synthetic, light-gated K + channel BLINK1 in g

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Amphibian fungal panzootic causes catastrophic and ongoing loss of biodiversity

Anthropogenic trade and development have broken down dispersal barriers, facilitating the spread of diseases that threaten Earth’s biodiversity. We present a global, quantitative assessment of the amphibian chytridiomycosis panzootic, one of the most impactful examples of disease spread, and demonstrate its role in the decline of at least 501 amphibian species over the past half-century, includin

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Slide-seq: A scalable technology for measuring genome-wide expression at high spatial resolution

Spatial positions of cells in tissues strongly influence function, yet a high-throughput, genome-wide readout of gene expression with cellular resolution is lacking. We developed Slide-seq, a method for transferring RNA from tissue sections onto a surface covered in DNA-barcoded beads with known positions, allowing the locations of the RNA to be inferred by sequencing. Using Slide-seq, we localiz

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New Products

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Designer membraneless organelles enable codon reassignment of selected mRNAs in eukaryotes

Nature regulates interference between cellular processes—allowing more complexity of life—by confining specific functions to organelles. Inspired by this concept, we designed an artificial organelle dedicated to protein engineering. We generated a membraneless organelle to translate only one type of messenger RNA—by recruiting an RNA-targeting system, stop codon–suppression machinery, and ribosom

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Natural, incidental, and engineered nanomaterials and their impacts on the Earth system

Nanomaterials are critical components in the Earth system’s past, present, and future characteristics and behavior. They have been present since Earth’s origin in great abundance. Life, from the earliest cells to modern humans, has evolved in intimate association with naturally occurring nanomaterials. This synergy began to shift considerably with human industrialization. Particularly since the I

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Bacteriophage trigger antiviral immunity and prevent clearance of bacterial infection

Bacteriophage are abundant at sites of bacterial infection, but their effects on mammalian hosts are unclear. We have identified pathogenic roles for filamentous Pf bacteriophage produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( Pa ) in suppression of immunity against bacterial infection. Pf promote Pa wound infection in mice and are associated with chronic human Pa wound infections. Murine and human leukocyt

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Virus tricks the immune system into ignoring bacterial infections

Virus tricks the immune system into ignoring bacterial infections Virus tricks the immune system into ignoring bacterial infections, Published online: 28 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00991-4 The finding could explain why the body tolerates some microbes ― and lead to better treatments for chronic infections.

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Robots on the run

Robots on the run Robots on the run, Published online: 28 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00999-w After decades of clumsiness, robots are finally learning to walk, run and grasp with grace. Such progress spells the beginning of an age of physically adept artificial intelligence.

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Goals and Rewards Redraw the Brain’s Map of the World

The iconic cover illustration of The New Yorker ’s March 29, 1976, issue depicted a “view of the world from 9th Avenue,” starring a massive Manhattan that dwarfed not only other U.S. cities but entire countries, reducing the Pacific Ocean to a band of water not much wider across than the Hudson River. But New Yorkers aren’t the only ones with a skewed perception of scale or an idiosyncratic sense

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Chytrid’s frog-killing toll has been tallied — and it’s bad

Losses due to the amphibian-killing chytrid fungus are “the greatest documented loss of biodiversity attributable to a pathogen,” researchers find.

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Saturn’s rings paint some of its moons shades of blue and red

Moons located among Saturn’s inner rings are different colors depending on their distance from the planet, suggesting they’re picking up ring debris.

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Novel methodological tool helps detect synergistic phenomena in phytoplankton growth

Researchers have developed a new model allowing them to observe the key drivers of phytoplankton growth (blooms) patterns in the seas surrounding the United Kingdom, according to a study in PLOS Computational Biology, by Lawrence W. Sheppard, from University of Kansas, USA, and colleagues.

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New tool uses RNA sequencing to chart rich maps of cellular and tissue function

A new technique developed by scientists at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard gives an unprecedented view of the cellular organization of tissues. Known as Slide-seq, the method uses genetic sequencing to draw detailed, three-dimensional maps of tissues, revealing not only what cell types are present, but where they are located and what they are doing.

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The Serengeti-Mara squeeze—One of the world's most iconic ecosystems under pressure

The Serengeti-Mara ecosystem is one of the largest and most protected ecosystems on Earth, spanning 40,000 square kilometres and taking in the Serengeti National Park and Maasai Mara National Reserve in East Africa.

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Deadly skin-eating fungal disease wipes out 90 amphibian species in 50 years

Study reveals extent of chytrid fungus and how devastating it has been for frog, toad and salamander species worldwide A deadly disease that wiped out global populations of amphibians led to the decline of 500 species in the past 50 years, including 90 extinctions, scientists say. A global research effort, led by the Australian National University, has for the first time quantified the worldwide

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Cargo Drones Have One Problem: Not Crashing Into Things

Bonk! So far, no one has solved a relatively simple-sounding problem: how to program a large drone to automatically spot and steer clear of an obstacle in its path. Right now, drones used by the military still need a helping hand when something pops up in their path, but a startup called Sabrewing told IEEE Spectrum that it should have a prototype cargo drone ready for test flights sometime in 20

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Frog fungus drives 500 species towards extinction

First global survey of chytridiomycosis yields grim results. Tanya Loos reports.

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Saturn: bright clumps and a moon like ravioli

Two studies add to the intrigue of Saturn’s rings. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Gene-edited plants aid food security, researchers say

Argument in favour of modified food crops unlikely to meet with unanimous approval. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Skøre hypoteser og nye simuleringer om livet i Mælkevejen

Vrimler Mælkevejen med intelligente civilisationer, der overvåger os, eller kan vi enten være helt alene eller blot ensomme?

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Memories Can Distort the Brain's GPS

Two independent studies in rats find grid cells, which form the brain's map, are more plastic than thought and are subject to the influence of reward.

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Novel methodological tool helps detect synergistic phenomena in phytoplankton growth

Researchers have developed a new model allowing them to observe the key drivers of phytoplankton growth (blooms) patterns in the seas surrounding the United Kingdom, according to a study in PLOS Computational Biology, by Lawrence W. Sheppard, from University of Kansas, USA, and colleagues.

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New tool uses RNA sequencing to chart rich maps of cellular and tissue function

A new technique developed by scientists at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard gives an unprecedented view of the cellular organization of tissues. Known as Slide-seq, the method uses genetic sequencing to draw detailed, three-dimensional maps of tissues, revealing not only what cell types are present, but where they are located and what they are doing.

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The Serengeti-Mara squeeze—One of the world's most iconic ecosystems under pressure

The Serengeti-Mara ecosystem is one of the largest and most protected ecosystems on Earth, spanning 40,000 square kilometres and taking in the Serengeti National Park and Maasai Mara National Reserve in East Africa.

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Mass amphibian extinctions globally caused by fungal disease

An international study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found a fungal disease has caused dramatic population declines in more than 500 amphibian species, including 90 extinctions, over the past 50 years.

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Designer organelles bring new functionalities into cells

For the first time, scientists have engineered the complex biological process of translation into a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell. Research by the Lemke group at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) – in collaboration with JGU Mainz and IMB Mainz—used this technique to create a membraneless organelle that can build proteins from natural and synthetic amino acids carryin

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A compass pointing west

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and ETH Zurich have discovered a special phenomenon of magnetism in the nano range. It enables magnets to be assembled in unusual configurations. This could be used to build computer memories and switches to increase the performance of microprocessors. The results of this work have now been published in the journal Science.

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The Fungi Decimating Amphibians Is Worse Than We Thought

More than 500 species have been ravaged by the chytrid fungi. And that number will probably rise.

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Scientists reveal largest Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton

Paleontologists have discovered and characterized the largest Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton ever found, making it the biggest terrestrial carnivore currently known to science.

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Eyewirer @Atani makes 50 million points!

Many congrats to one of Eyewire’s top players @Atani for cracking 50 million points during Eyewire’s March Marathon! Atani is the 2nd player in Eyewire’s history to reach this score! Now that’s something worth celebrating. @Atani with Eyewire Executive Director @amy at the 2017 NIH Citizen Science Symposium Congrats again and thanks for being a great part of the Eyewire community, and for your im

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The Worst Disease Ever Recorded

A century ago, a strain of pandemic flu killed up to 100 million people—5 percent of the world’s population. In 2013, a new mystery illness swept the western coast of North America, causing starfish to disintegrate . In 2015, a big-nosed Asian antelope known as the saiga lost two-thirds of its population—some 200,000 individuals—to what now looks to be a bacterial infection. But none of these dev

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Spring Is on the Way

As the Northern Hemisphere begins to warm once more and the spring equinox has passed, flowers and trees finally appear to be in bloom—especially in California, blessed by a very wet winter. Gathered here today is a small collection of images from the past few weeks from North America, Asia, and Europe, of poppies, sunshine, and cherry blossoms—surely signs of warmer days to come.

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Mass amphibian extinctions globally caused by fungal disease

An international study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found a fungal disease has caused dramatic population declines in more than 500 amphibian species, including 90 extinctions, over the past 50 years.

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Designer organelles bring new functionalities into cells

For the first time, scientists have engineered the complex biological process of translation into a designer organelle in a living mammalian cell. Research by the Lemke group at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) – in collaboration with JGU Mainz and IMB Mainz—used this technique to create a membraneless organelle that can build proteins from natural and synthetic amino acids carryin

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Caffeine on the mind? Just seeing reminders of coffee can stimulate our brain

A new University of Toronto study finds that just seeing reminders of coffee can arouse us, causing our minds to be more alert and attentive.

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More than 1m childless people over 65 are 'dangerously unsupported'

Older people without children at greater risk of isolation, poor health and inability to access formal care – report More than 1 million people aged over 65 without children are “dangerously unsupported”, and at acute risk of isolation, loneliness, poor health, poverty and being unable to access formal care, according to a report . The number of childless older people in the UK is expected to dou

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How Ether Went From a Recreational 'Frolic' Drug to the First Surgery Anesthetic

Before ether was used as an anesthetic in surgery, doctors relied on less effective techniques for pain relief, such as hypnosis

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Ep. 37: Crisis Mapping, Citation Tracking, and Sexual Harassment in Science

Join journalist and author Seth Mnookin as he chats with investigative reporter Azeen Ghorayshi about her reporting on sexual harassment in the sciences. Also: using social media to improve search and rescue efforts, and the development of a better system to track scholarly citations.

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Israeli lander pioneers private flights to the moon

Other private missions spawned by Lunar XPrize competition are not far behind

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Sexual harassment penalties are too cheap to work

The current federal cap on monetary damages for workplace sexual harassment is far too low to incentivize firms to take stronger measures to prevent the behavior, a new paper argues. Though workplace sexual harassment is illegal under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, the #MeToo movement has shown that it remains prevalent and pernicious. Joni Hersch, a professor of law and economics and co-dire

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Angelina Jolie Might Be in Marvel's 'The Eternals'

This seems like a very good idea, indeed.

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UN report: Extreme weather hit 62 million people in 2018

The United Nations' weather agency says extreme weather last year hit 62 million people worldwide and forced 2 million people to relocate, as man-made climate change worsened.

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Iceland's WOW Air budget carrier collapses, cancels all flights

Iceland's troubled budget carrier WOW Air said it had ceased operations and cancelled all flights on Thursday, stranding thousands of passengers in the low-cost airline industry's latest collapse.

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Doggy diagnosis can sniff out seizures: study

Dogs can use their remarkable sense of smell to recognise the specific scent of seizures, researchers said Thursday, raising hope that canine carers could one day protect sufferers before a fit takes hold.

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Doggy diagnosis can sniff out seizures: study

Dogs can use their remarkable sense of smell to recognise the specific scent of seizures, researchers said Thursday, raising hope that canine carers could one day protect sufferers before a fit takes hold.

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Facebook Charged for Role in Illegal Housing Discrimination

Unfriended In August 2018, the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) filed a complaint against Facebook . It claimed the social network violated the Fair Housing Act by allowing advertisers to prevent certain protected classes of people from seeing their housing ads. Now, HUD is taking the issue one step further, formally charging Facebook with violating the Fair Housing

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Automated Driving Tech to Grow 11.5% per Year Through 2030 | Trucks.com

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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First ever living donor HIV-to-HIV kidney transplant

For the first time, a person living with HIV has donated a kidney to a transplant recipient also living with HIV. A multidisciplinary team from Johns Hopkins Medicine completed the living donor HIV-to-HIV kidney transplant on March 25, 2019. The doctors say both the donor and the recipient are doing well.

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Ocean heat hits record high: UN

Ocean heat hit a record high in 2018, the United Nations said Thursday, raising urgent new concerns about the threat global warming is posing to marine life.

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New England seeing a huge spike in beached sea turtles

At a sea turtle hospital housed at an old New England shipyard, a biologist leans over a table and uses a needle to draw blood from a sick loggerhead before tagging its flailing flipper.

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Government-funded study says red wolves are distinct species

A panel of top scientists concluded Thursday that the endangered red wolf of the southeastern U.S. is a species unto itself, giving the beleaguered canine a scientific and political boost as its numbers plummet in the wild.

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Cuba, Google move to improve island's connectivity

Cuba and Google signed a deal Thursday moving the island one step closer to having a state-of-the-art connection to the modern internet.

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Action demanded after 1,100 dead dolphins wash up in France

The dolphins' bodies were horribly mutilated, the fins cut off.

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NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Joaninha maintaining an eye

Tropical Cyclone Joaninha is not yet ready to close its eye and weaken. Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Joaninha maintaining an eye thanks to low wind shear and warm sea surface temperatures.

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NJIT mathematical sciences professor releases major league baseball predictions

NJIT Mathematical Sciences Professor and Associate Dean Bruce Bukiet has published his model's projections of how the standings should look at the end of Major League Baseball's regular season in 2019. For more than 20 years, Bukiet has applied mathematical models to compute the number of regular season games each Major League Baseball team should win. His mathematically derived projections have c

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What Is An Atmospheric River?

Atmospheric rivers are named as the cause of lots of extreme weather, especially in the western United States. Where do these rivers in the sky come from?

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New England seeing a huge spike in beached sea turtles

At a sea turtle hospital housed at an old New England shipyard, a biologist leans over a table and uses a needle to draw blood from a sick loggerhead before tagging its flailing flipper.

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Government-funded study says red wolves are distinct species

A panel of top scientists concluded Thursday that the endangered red wolf of the southeastern U.S. is a species unto itself, giving the beleaguered canine a scientific and political boost as its numbers plummet in the wild.

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Action demanded after 1,100 dead dolphins wash up in France

The dolphins' bodies were horribly mutilated, the fins cut off.

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How to tackle pollution and waste in Port Harcourt

Environmental activist Wonne Afronelly says she wants to clean up the city sitting at the mouth of the Niger River, which carries a lot of the world's plastic pollution.

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Invasive crayfish sabotages its own success, study says

Since they were first released as live bait in the mid-twentieth century, rusty crayfish have roamed lake bottoms in northern Wisconsin, gobbling native fish eggs, destroying aquatic plants, and generally wreaking havoc on entire lake ecosystems. Today, in some lakes, traps can routinely pull up 50 to 100 rusty crayfish at a time, compared to two or three native species. But in other lakes nearby,

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New evidence of deep groundwater on Mars

In mid-2018, researchers supported by the Italian Space Agency detected the presence of a deep-water lake on Mars under its south polar ice caps. Now, researchers at the USC Arid Climate and Water Research Center (AWARE) have published a study that suggests deep groundwater could still be active on Mars and could originate surface streams in some near-equatorial areas on Mars.

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This Woman Doesn’t Feel Pain. A Tiny Mutation May Be to Thank.

Imagine smelling your burning flesh before feeling it.

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Invasive crayfish sabotages its own success, study says

Since they were first released as live bait in the mid-twentieth century, rusty crayfish have roamed lake bottoms in northern Wisconsin, gobbling native fish eggs, destroying aquatic plants, and generally wreaking havoc on entire lake ecosystems. Today, in some lakes, traps can routinely pull up 50 to 100 rusty crayfish at a time, compared to two or three native species. But in other lakes nearby,

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Dogs can smell when seizures are about to begin, scientists find

Scent linked to epileptic seizures could mean dogs can be trained to warn owners Dogs can detect a telltale scent linked to epileptic seizures, scientists have discovered, raising the possibility that they could be trained to reliably warn owners when a seizure is imminent. The findings may also help explain anecdotal reports that dogs are able to sense when their owner is about to have a seizure

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Daily briefing: The gene mutations that cause a woman to feel no pain or fear

Daily briefing: The gene mutations that cause a woman to feel no pain or fear Daily briefing: The gene mutations that cause a woman to feel no pain or fear, Published online: 28 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01028-6 She also heals quickly (and is forgetful). Plus: A rare collaboration for North Korean physicists and how cellular censuses can guide cancer care.

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Extreme, Hydrogen-Crushing Physicists Are Pushing Us into a 'New Era of Superconductivity'

Lanthanum, diamond crushers and advanced computer models are changing the hunt for this extreme quantum mechanical effect.

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Wood ash recycling program could help save Muskoka's forests and lakes

Implementing a new residential wood ash program to restore calcium levels in Muskoka's forest soils and lakes could help replenish the area's dwindling supply of crayfish and maple sap, according to new research co-led by York University.

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The bigger the evolutionary jump, the more lethal cross-species diseases could be

Some diseases which are fatal in one species can cause only mild discomfort in another—but it's hard for scientists to predict how lethal a disease will be if it leaps across species.

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The bigger the evolutionary jump, the more lethal cross-species diseases could be

Some diseases which are fatal in one species can cause only mild discomfort in another—but it's hard for scientists to predict how lethal a disease will be if it leaps across species.

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Twitter may tag rule-breaking Trump tweets

Twitter said Thursday it could start tagging tweets from newsworthy figures such as US President Donald Trump that break its rules, while stopping short of deleting them.

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Novel insights into soil biodiversity, Earth's global engine

A Virginia Tech professor was part of an international team of researchers that discovered new advances about the major ecological patterns driving the changes in soil biodiversity that occur over millions of years.

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Sea anemones are ingesting plastic microfibers

Tiny fragments of plastic in the ocean are consumed by sea anemones along with their food, and bleached anemones retain these microfibers longer than healthy ones, according to new research from Carnegie's Manoela Romanó de Orte, Sophie Clowez, and Ken Caldeira.

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Feather mites may help clean birds' plumage, study shows

Feather mites help to remove bacteria and fungi from the feathers of birds, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. In fact, the relationship between these mites and their hosts could be considered mutualism, with bird feathers collecting food for mites to eat and mites providing the birds with healthier plumage.

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Feather mites may help clean birds' plumage, study shows

Feather mites help to remove bacteria and fungi from the feathers of birds, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. In fact, the relationship between these mites and their hosts could be considered mutualism, with bird feathers collecting food for mites to eat and mites providing the birds with healthier plumage.

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Studying reintroduction of bull trout with simulations

A multi-institutional team of researchers, led by Meryl Mims, has assessed how environmental, demographic, and genetic factors play a role in the reintroduction of bull trout in Washington State.

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Closing in on a century-old mystery, scientists are figuring out what the body’s ‘tuft cells’ do

Odd-looking cells in intestine seem to use chemical sensors, including taste receptors, to detect pathogens such as parasites and sound the alarm

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Studying reintroduction of bull trout with simulations

A multi-institutional team of researchers, led by Meryl Mims, has assessed how environmental, demographic, and genetic factors play a role in the reintroduction of bull trout in Washington State.

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Hubble watches spun-up asteroid coming apart

A small asteroid has been caught in the process of spinning so fast it's throwing off material, according to new data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and other observatories.

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Twitter's Dark Mode Interface Is Getting an Update

The service is updating its Dark Mode settings, making the color palette more forgiving to users who lurk at all hours.

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How Instagram Replaced the Contacts List

When Chris Rackliffe, a motivational speaker in New York, met a potential friend at a bar last weekend, it never occurred to him to exchange phone numbers. Instead, the two swapped Instagram handles, and have been liking each other’s posts. Rackliffe said they’ll probably meet up in person again soon. “It’s so much more casual to give someone your Instagram handle and keep in touch through storie

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Tiny optical elements could one day replace traditional refractive lenses

A Northwestern University research team has developed tiny optical elements from metal nanoparticles and a polymer that one day could replace traditional refractive lenses to realize portable imaging systems and optoelectronic devices.

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Ferromagnetic nanoparticle systems show promise for ultrahigh-speed spintronics

In the future, ultrahigh-speed spintronics will require ultrafast coherent magnetization reversal within a picosecond—one-trillionth of a second. Spintronics centers on an electron's spin and magnetic moment in solid-state devices. While this may eventually be achieved via irradiation with a nearly monocyclic terahertz pulse, the small change of magnetization, or modulation, it generates has so fa

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Shrimp claw inspires new method of underwater plasma generation

Texas A&M University researchers are looking to nature for inspiration in developing a new method of underwater plasma generation using shrimp as a model—a discovery that could provide significant improvements for actions ranging from water sterilization to drilling.

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Autonomous car learns to handle unknown conditions

In order to make autonomous cars navigate more safely in difficult conditions — like icy roads — researchers are developing new control systems that learn from real-world driving experiences while leveraging insights from physics.

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What Americans know about science

There are substantial differences among Americans when it comes to knowledge and understanding of science and scientific processes. People's level of science knowledge varies by education, race, ethnicity and gender, according to a new study released today by Pew Research Center.

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Being a woman in ancient Egypt: A hidden history of changing rights

Women's rights in ancient Egypt were better before the 4th century BC than during the Greco-Roman period that followed, according to a new book by a University of Kent expert.

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Five Reasons to Love the Pythagorean Theorem

Middle school math teacher Fawn Nguyen tells us why a classic right triangle fact is her favorite mathematical result — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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15th-Century Warlord's Fearsome Sword Now Gleams in 3D

Ali Atar's sword lives at the Toledo Army Museum in Spain, but you can now see it online in 3D

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How social media dethroned Hollywood

Hollywood's power as a global entertainment machine is far from dead and buried but it has been knocked for a six by the extraordinary rise of social media entertainment over the past 10 years.

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Free Throws Should Be Easy. Why Do Basketball Players Miss?

The mechanics of a perfect foul shot are known … but it takes a LOT of practice to get them right each and every time—even for two-time MVP Steve Nash.

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Shape shifting mirror opens a vista for the future

A team of researchers has developed a bimorph deformable mirror that allows for precise shape modification and usage under vacuum, a world first.

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Sexual satisfaction among older people about more than just health

Communication and being in a happy relationship, along with health, are important for sexual satisfaction among older people, according to new research.

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Temporal recalibration: Helping individuals shift perception of time

Playing games in virtual reality (VR) could be a key tool in treating people with neurological conditions such as autism, schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. The technology, according to a recent study, could help individuals with these conditions shift their perceptions of time, which their conditions lead them to perceive differently.

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Woman with novel gene mutation lives almost pain-free

A woman in Scotland can feel virtually no pain due to a mutation in a previously-unidentified gene, according to a research article. She also experiences very little anxiety and fear, and may have enhanced wound healing due to the mutation, which the researchers say could help guide new treatments for a range of conditions.

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Autonomous car learns to handle unknown conditions

In order to make autonomous cars navigate more safely in difficult conditions — like icy roads — researchers are developing new control systems that learn from real-world driving experiences while leveraging insights from physics.

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Climate change: Global impacts 'accelerating' – WMO

The World Meteorological Organization says that the physical and financial impacts of global warming are speeding up.

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Climate change is making the seas rise faster than ever, UN warns

A report by the World Meteorological Organization, a UN agency, warns that global average sea level rose by 3.7 millimetres in 2018, the largest increase in over 30 years

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A crucial population of lions has lost much of its genetic diversity

Lions in the important Kavango-Zambezi conservation area may be less able to adapt to climate change due to a loss of genetic variation over the past century

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How Brexit Could Impact the U.K.'s Climate Goals

The withdrawal from the European Union could disrupt emissions trading to reduce greenhouse gases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The machine that takes in suffering and outputs beauty. Episode 26.

submitted by /u/markchangizi [link] [comments]

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Shrimp claw inspires new method of underwater plasma generation

Researchers are looking to nature for inspiration in developing a new method of underwater plasma generation using shrimp as a model – a discovery that could provide significant improvements for actions ranging from water sterilization to drilling.

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Novel study links fetal exposure to nicotine and sudden infant death syndrome

Fetal exposure to tobacco smoke in utero is associated with sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and cardiac arrhythmias in newborns. In a novel study in rabbits, investigators provide the first evidence linking fetal exposure to nicotine to long-term alterations of the cardiac sodium current. These changes may impair adaptation of the cardiac sodium current to sympathetic tone and prevent awakenin

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Nanovaccine boosts immunity in sufferers of metabolic syndrome

A new class of biomaterial developed by Cornell researchers for an infectious disease nanovaccine effectively boosted immunity in mice with metabolic disorders linked to gut bacteria – a population that shows resistance to traditional flu and polio vaccines.

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Novel insights into soil biodiversity, Earth's global engine

The findings indicate changes in soil biodiversity are driven by changes in plant cover and soil acidification during ecosystem development.

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New evidence of deep groundwater on Mars

Researchers at the USC Arid Climate and Water Research Center (AWARE) have published a study that suggests deep groundwater could still be active on Mars and could originate surface streams in some near-equatorial areas on Mars.

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What's in this plant? The best automated system for finding potential drugs

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have developed a new computational mass-spectrometry system for identifying metabolomes — entire sets of metabolites for different living organisms. When the new method was tested on select tissues from 12 plants species, it was able to note over a thousand metabolites. Among them were dozens that had never been foun

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MLB’s Bold Efforts to Remake Baseball

Earlier this month, the little-known Atlantic League made news. In partnership with Major League Baseball, the independent minor league announced that it would be implementing a series of rule changes designed to “create more balls in play, defensive action, baserunning, and improve player safety.” In other words, the Atlantic League would become a testing ground for tweaks that might find their

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These 3D-Printed Mars Habitats Just Won a NASA Award

Space Habitat NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge that kicked off in 2015 has challenged teams around the U.S. to render, prove the structural integrity, and construct a model of a habitat that could one day shelter humans on the surface of the Moon or even Mars. And yesterday, NASA crowned the top three winners of the Challenge’s latest round, challenging the participating teams to “complete a v

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How Toxic Waste from Coal-Burning Power Plants Can Help Limit Climate Change

Adding fly ash to concrete makes it stronger and greener at the same time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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At 71, She’s Never Felt Pain or Anxiety. Now Scientists Know Why.

Scientists discovered a previously unidentified genetic mutation in a Scottish woman. They hope it could lead to the development of new pain treatment.

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America Secretly Sold Nuclear Tech to Saudi Arabia

Closed Doors On six separate occasions, Secretary of Energy Rick Perry authorized U.S. companies to sell technology to Saudi Arabia that would help the country develop nuclear power plants. According to documents reviewed by Reuters , the Trump Administration obliged the companies’ requests to keep the deals confidential, as similar Department of Energy authorizations have been made public in the

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Bill Designed to Help Cannabis Industry Use Banks Moves Forward

New NORML Despite cannabis now being decriminalized or even legal in some form or another in the majority of states , many banks and financial institutions are reluctant to do business with state-legal marijuana operations due to the plant’s federal status as a Schedule I controlled substance. On Thursday, a key congressional committee voted to send an act that would ease those worries on to the

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Xiaomi Looks Close to Unleashing a Third Contender in the Foldable Phone Wars

Right now, Samsung’s Galaxy Fold and Huawei’s Mate X represent two opposing viewpoints in foldable phone design. And while Xiaomi still hasn’t set a release date for its upcoming flexible handset, …

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New approach could boost energy capacity of lithium batteries

Researchers have found a new way to make cathodes for lithium batteries, offering improvements in the amount of power for both a given weight and a given volume.

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How mosquitoes smell human sweat (and new ways to stop them)

Female mosquitoes are known to rely on an array of sensory information to find people to bite, picking up on carbon dioxide, body odor, heat, moisture, and visual cues. Now researchers have discovered how mosquitoes pick up on acidic volatiles found in human sweat.

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Shrimp claw inspires new method of underwater plasma generation

Researchers are looking to nature for inspiration in developing a new method of underwater plasma generation using shrimp as a model – a discovery that could provide significant improvements for actions ranging from water sterilization to drilling.

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Sea anemones are ingesting plastic microfibers

Tiny fragments of plastic in the ocean are consumed by sea anemones along with their food, and bleached anemones retain these microfibers longer than healthy ones, according to new research. The work is the first-ever investigation of the interactions between plastic microfibers and sea anemones, which are closely related to corals.

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Scientists tie walnuts to gene expressions related to breast cancer

New research links walnut consumption as a contributing factor that could suppress growth and survival of breast cancers.

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Fur discoveries in Iron Age graves testify to respect for animals

Fur remains found in burial sites demonstrate the importance of hunting traditions in Iron Age Finland and Lapland all the way to the 17th century. According to a recently completed study, they speak of a relationship between humans and animals.

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For some people, attractive wives and high status husbands enhance marital quality

Researchers found that maximizing men — those who seek to make the 'best' choice — who had attractive wives were more satisfied at the start of their marriages than maximizing men who had less attractive wives, and maximizing women who had high status husbands experienced less steep declines in satisfaction over time than maximizing women who had low status husbands.

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Same microbe, different effect

Asking a different question about the bacteria in our microbiomes might help target disease more precisely.

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In ancient oceans that resembled our own, oxygen loss triggered mass extinction

Researchers provide first conclusive evidence linking widespread ocean oxygen loss and rising sea levels to a 430-million-year-old mass extinction event.

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What 'Big Data' reveals about the diversity of species

'Big data' and large-scale analyses are critical for biodiversity research to find out how animal and plant species are distributed worldwide and how ecosystems function. The necessary data may come from many sources: museum collections, biological literature, and local databases. Researchers have investigated how this wealth of knowledge can best be integrated so that it can be transported into t

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What Americans know about science

Americans with more formal education fare better on science-related questions, while Republicans and Democrats are roughly similar in their overall levels of science knowledge, according to a new study.

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Big Ideas 2019: 3D Printing for End-Use Parts | ARK Invest

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Researchers Analyze Epigenetic Signatures to Diagnose Rare Diseases

A number of rare diseases show unique epigenetic patterns across the genome, a feature researchers have now exploited to build a diagnostic tool.

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Lastbil spilder sennepsgas på fynsk motorvej

Politiet har afspærret motorvej. Ekspert undrer sig over, hvorfor der kører sennepsgas på danske veje.

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What's in this plant? The best automated system for finding potential drugs

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have developed a new computational mass-spectrometry system for identifying metabolomes—entire sets of metabolites for different living organisms. When the new method was tested on select tissues from 12 plant species, it was able to note over 1000 metabolites. Among them were dozens that had never been found before,

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Wood ash recycling program could help save Muskoka's forests and lakes

Implementing a new residential wood ash recycling program to restore calcium levels in Muskoka's forest soils and lakes could help replenish the area's dwindling supply of crayfish and maple sap, according to new research co-led by York University.

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NJIT mathematical sciences professor releases major league baseball predictions

NJIT Mathematical Sciences Professor and Associate Dean Bruce Bukiet has published his model's projections of how the standings should look at the end of Major League Baseball's regular season in 2019.

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How Toxic Waste from Coal-Burning Power Plants Can Help Limit Climate Change

Adding fly ash to concrete makes it stronger and greener at the same time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hubble watches spun-up asteroid coming apart

A small asteroid has been caught in the process of spinning so fast it's throwing off material, according to new data.

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'Druggable' mechanism of tau protein pathology discovered

Researchers have uncovered a 'druggable' mechanism of pathological tau protein aggregation — a significant advance toward finding an effective treatment for early-stage neurodegenerative diseases.

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This Australian farmer is saving fossils of some of the planet’s weirdest, most ancient creatures

Creatures that look like pancakes or worms with horseshoe heads have been frozen in rock for half a billion years. Now their fossils are protected in a park

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Will your next barista be a robot?

Inhumanly good service coming soon to a café near you

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Networks of cameras are making it easier to track meteors

And also to find the bits that reach the ground

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Tiny optical elements could one day replace traditional refractive lenses

A Northwestern University research team has developed tiny optical elements from metal nanoparticles and a polymer that one day could replace traditional refractive lenses to realize portable imaging systems and optoelectronic devices.

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Studying reintroduction of bull trout with simulations

Their project is one of the first to use an advanced computer model to simulate the genetic and demographic outcomes of the reintroduction by projecting 200 years into the future.

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NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Joaninha maintaining an eye

Tropical Cyclone Joaninha is not yet ready to close its eye and weaken. Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Joaninha maintaining an eye thanks to low wind shear and warm sea surface temperatures.

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New study confirms EpCAM as promising target for cancer immunotherapy

Researchers have shown that cancer immunotherapy targeting the tumor biomarker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is safe and nontoxic in mice and can significantly delay tumor formation and growth.

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Feather mites may help clean birds' plumage, study shows

Feather mites help to remove bacteria and fungi from the feathers of birds, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. In fact, the relationship between these mites and their hosts could be considered mutualism, with bird feathers collecting food for mites to eat and mites providing the birds with healthier plumage.

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Allergic reactions play role in sexual behavior development in unborn males/females

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and colleagues at Ohio State University have discovered that allergic reactions trigger changes in brain behavior development in unborn males and females. This latest brain development discovery will ultimately help researchers better understand how neurological conditions can differ between men and women.

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Researchers target metastasis in fight against cancer

An experimental combination drug therapy attacking the DNA integrity of cancer cells is showing promise for a possible new cancer therapy in the future.Scientists at the University of Alberta used two drugs together to enhance DNA damage to human breast cancer cells in mice and reduce their capacity to repair themselves. By doing so, the researchers were able to dramatically shrink tumours and pre

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Scientists tie walnuts to gene expressions related to breast cancer

New research from Marshall University links walnut consumption as a contributing factor that could suppress growth and survival of breast cancers.

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Research leads to new molecular diagnostic tool

A new sophisticated computational model, developed by scientists at Lawson Health Research Institute, is bringing an innovative method of diagnosing rare hereditary conditions.

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Air pollution science under siege at US environment agency

Air pollution science under siege at US environment agency Air pollution science under siege at US environment agency, Published online: 28 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00937-w Top EPA advisor attacks agency decision-making ahead of major review of air pollution standards.

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Antidepressant prescriptions have reached 70 million in England

The number of antidepressant prescriptions dispensed in England exceeded 70 million in 2018. This is almost double the number dispensed a decade ago

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Politics this week

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Business this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Sony says former CEO Kazuo Hirai to leave firm

Sony chairman Kazuo Hirai, who led a major and successful overhaul at the Japanese electronics giant, announced Thursday he would be leaving the firm after 35 years.

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The world must wake up to the threat of Ebola

The number of confirmed deaths has passed 1,000, making it the second worst in history

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How to make coated wood products last longer

By painting wood products like facades and outdoor furniture you can prolong their service life. However, it is not only the paint that affects the durability, but also the characteristics of the wood. Studied variables were the density and whether the wood consists of heartwood, the inner part of a tree, or of sapwood, the outer part of a tree.

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Turbocharging the switch to efficient engines

Predicting capricious pre-ignition combustion events could enable automakers to build powerful yet more efficient engines.

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Empathy, Morality, Community, Culture—Apes Have It All – Issue 70: Variables

Frans de Waal calls his new book Mama’s Last Hug in reference to an emotional encounter between Mama, a 58-year-old chimpanzee, and Jan van Hooff, an 80-year-old biology professor. Mama is frail and near death when Van Hooff, who had overseen her care for decades, enters her cage at Burgers Zoo in the Netherlands. Mama smiles and Van Hooff bends toward her. She strokes his white hair and drapes o

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How Search Algorithms Are Changing the Course of Mathematics – Issue 70: Variables

Mathematicians long wondered whether it’s possible to express the number 33 as the sum of three cubes—that is, whether the equation 33 = x ³+ y ³+ z ³ has a solution. They knew that 29 could be written as 3³ + 1³ + 1³, for instance, whereas 32 is not expressible as the sum of three integers each raised to the third power. But the case of 33 went unsolved for 64 years. Now, Andrew Booker, a mathem

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A Magician Explains Why We See What’s Not There – Issue 70: Variables

Norman Triplett was a pioneer in the psychology of magic, and back in 1900, he published a wonderful scientific paper on magic that, among many other things, discusses an experiment on an intriguing magical illusion. A magician sat at a table in front of a group of schoolchildren and threw a ball up in the air a few times. Before the final throw, his hand secretly went under the table, letting th

7h

The two key reasons the world can’t reverse climate emissions

New figures show we’re using more energy and still pumping out more emissions—so why aren’t we moving the dial?

7h

Dansk vandrensningsanlæg skal redde orkanofre fra kolera

Partikelfilter, aktivt kulfilter og omvendt osmose filter: Det bliver næsten demineraliseret vand, der kommer ud af rensningen.

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Synergy for storage: Containing nuclear waste for thousands of years

Browsing the Gilcrease Museum's collection of pre-Columbian American art and tools in Tulsa, OK, one keeps coming back to the obsidian knives, arrowheads (or "projectile points," to anthropologists), and even ear ornaments—glossy black, smooth, and glassy. For tens of thousands of years, indigenous peoples fashioned these items out of cooled lava, beautiful but also able to hold a keen edge for mi

8h

Five new frog species from Madagascar

Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich and the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology have named five new species of frogs found across the island of Madagascar. The largest could sit on your thumbnail, the smallest is hardly longer than a grain of rice.

8h

Sea anemones are ingesting plastic microfibers

Tiny fragments of plastic in the ocean are consumed by sea anemones along with their food, and bleached anemones retain these microfibers longer than healthy ones, according to new research from Carnegie ecologists. Their work is the first-ever investigation of the interactions between plastic microfibers and sea anemones, which are closely related to corals.

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Hubble captures rare active asteroid

Thanks to an impressive collaboration bringing together data from ground-based telescopes, all-sky surveys and space-based facilities — including the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope — a rare self-destructing asteroid called 6478 Gault has been observed.

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UAlberta leads urgent call for sample rocks from Mars

In order to answer our most pressing questions about Mars, scientists need samples collected from the planet's surface and returned to Earth for examination.

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Promising new drugs for old pathogen Mtb

UConn researchers are targeting a metabolic pathway, the dihydrofolate reductase pathway, crucial for amino acid synthesis to treat TB infections.

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Biomedical engineers grow cardiac patches to help people recover from heart attacks

A little goes a long way. Tiny blood vessels are essential for regenerative engineering and a team led by engineers from Michigan Tech has detailed innovative methods to ensure highly aligned, dense and mature microvasculature in engineered tissue that can be used for cardiac patches.

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Shrimp claw inspires new method of underwater plasma generation

Texas A&M University researchers are looking to nature for inspiration in developing a new method of underwater plasma generation using shrimp as a model – a discovery that could provide significant improvements for actions ranging from water sterilization to drilling.

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Videos to tell the youngest generations about science

How can we transmit our passion for science in a way that is attractive for new generations? This was one of the questions posed by lecturer at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) Carlos Santiuste, before embarking on a multimedia scientific dissemination project that was subsequently selected by FECYT. The result? Six short video clips that present some scientific advancements at the Univ

8h

'Moving target' breast cancer cells revealed by new imaging technique

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have developed a new imaging technique to visualise key steps in the evolution of cancer cells within tumours, potentially revealing how breast cancers evade treatment.Using a laboratory model of breast cancer, the researchers were able to view tumours in three dimensions, at previously unachievable high resolution. This revealed how cancer cells develop

8h

Stabilizing ends of chromosomes could treat age-related disease

A study has uncovered a new strategy that can potentially treat age-related disease and decline. The report shows that restoring the activity of a class of enzymes called sirtuins with a small compound stabilized telomeres and reduced DNA damage, which in turn improved liver disease in a mouse model. This study suggests that maintaining telomere length might help sustain the regenerative capacity

8h

Crime scene schizophrenia — 30 genes under suspicion

The research group led by Prof. Alex Schier, Director of the University of Basel's Biozentrum, has identified 30 genes associated with schizophrenia. The team was able to show which pathological changes in the brain and behavioral abnormalities are triggered by these genes. The results of the study have now been published in Cell.

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Invasive crayfish sabotages its own success, study says

Understanding when and why invasive species populations crash could help managers decide when and where to apply control efforts. After all, invasive species cost the US economy more than $120 billion dollars annually in control and lost grazing, crop yield, and tourism revenue. Could land managers simply wait out some invasions? A new study led by a University of Illinois researcher aims to find

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Scientists find brain mechanism that naturally combats overeating

Studying a brain region involved in memory, researchers discovered a set of neurons that help mice control their appetite.

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CNIO researchers identify a new gene involved in the development of a rare endocrine tumour

Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are very rare neuroendocrine tumours and also the most hereditary form of all types of cancer. Researchers have for the first time linked mutations in the DLST gene with the development of such tumors. In addition to the importance of this finding for the future therapies, the discovery can broaden the number of families that may benefit from genetic counselli

8h

Arbitrary categories improve visual learning transfer, study finds

This type of learning transfer opens the door for applying basic cognitive science research to help patients with vision loss.

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Cultured stem cells reconstruct sensory nerve and tissue structure in the nose

Researchers have developed a method to grow and maintain olfactory stem cells. The work is a launch pad for developing stem cell transplantation therapies or pharmacologic activation of a patient's own dormant cells, to restore the sense of smell where it has been damaged by injury or degeneration.

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Penn researchers discover the source of new neurons in brain hippocampus

Researchers have shown, in mice, that one type of stem cell that makes adult neurons is the source of this lifetime stock of new cells in the hippocampus. These findings may help neuroscientists figure out how to maintain youthful conditions for learning and memory, and repair and regenerate parts of the brain after injury and aging.

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In mice, single population of stem cells contributes to lifelong hippocampal neurogenesis

In the latest update in the field of adult neurogenesis, a team of researchers has shown in mice that a single lineage of neural progenitors contributes to embryonic, early postnatal, and adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and that these cells are continuously generated throughout a lifetime. The study appears March 28 in the journal Cell.

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How mosquitoes smell human sweat (and new ways to stop them)

Female mosquitoes are known to rely on an array of sensory information to find people to bite, picking up on carbon dioxide, body odor, heat, moisture, and visual cues. Now researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on March 28, 2019 have discovered how mosquitoes pick up on acidic volatiles found in human sweat.

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Pediatric cell atlas will map single-cell changes for a deeper view of child health and disease

Biomedical researchers plan to create the Pediatric Cell Atlas, a powerful new resource for fine-grained scientific understanding of human growth and development. Drawing on dramatic recent advances in technology, the Atlas will offer an unprecedented window into the unique biology of children by benchmarking healthy and abnormal tissues at the level of single cells — the basic units of biology.

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Why Trump Wants to Go to the Moon So Badly

There’s some disagreement about what the last people to visit the moon said just before they left. It could be Gene Cernan telling Jack Schmitt, who was fiddling with a camera, “Now let’s get off. Forget the camera.” It could be what was spoken after that, which NASA’s official transcript of the Apollo 17 mission describes only as “[garbled].” Or it could be, as astronaut lore has it , a few colo

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Geneticists close in on how mosquitoes sniff out human sweat

A long-sought protein proves vital for mosquitoes’ ability to detect lactic acid, a great clue for finding a human.

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Harnessing soil microbes to enhance crop performance

A recently isolated soil microbe could be used to modify crops and protect them against fungal diseases, researchers say.

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In vitro/in silico evaluations of binding affinities of perfluoroalkyl substances to Baikal seal PPARα

A team of researchers at Ehime University revealed the binding affinities of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) to Baikal seal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) using in vitro and in silico approaches. The finding was published on January 16 in the highly reputed environmental science journal, Environmental Science and Technology.

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This woman's genetic mutation shields her from pain and anxiety

Health Her case could help researchers find new ways to alleviate depression. When a 66-year old woman at Raigmore Hospital in Inverness, Scotland, told her doctor that her severely arthritic hand was painless both before and after her operation,…

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Harnessing soil microbes to enhance crop performance

A recently isolated soil microbe could be used to modify crops and protect them against fungal diseases, researchers say.

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How Mosquitoes Sniff Out Human Sweat To Find Us

Female mosquitoes searching for a meal of blood detect people partly by using a special olfactory receptor to home in on our sweat. The finding could lead to new approaches for better repellents. (Image credit: Luis Robayo/AFP/Getty Images)

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Cultured stem cells reconstruct sensory nerve and tissue structure in the nose

A team of researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine developed a method to grow and maintain olfactory stem cells in culture, which can then be used to restore tissue in the nose. The discovery raises hope that future therapies could be developed to restore the sense of smell in individuals where it has been damaged by injury or degeneration.

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How mosquitoes smell human sweat (and new ways to stop them)

Female mosquitoes are known to rely on an array of sensory information to find people to bite, picking up on carbon dioxide, body odor, heat, moisture, and visual cues. Now researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on March 28 have discovered how mosquitoes pick up on acidic volatiles found in human sweat.

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Building a ‘robot scientist’ could start with a worm

Biophysicists have used an automated method to model a living system—the dynamics of a roundworm perceiving and escaping pain. “Our method is one of the first to use machine-learning tools on experimental data to derive simple, interpretable equations of motion for a living system,” says senior author Ilya Nemenman, a professor of physics and biology at Emory University. “We now have proof of pri

8h

Samband mellan självmordsförsök och blodsockerhormoner

– Förståelsen för samspelet mellan psykisk ohälsa och substanser i kroppen har lett till flera viktiga framsteg. Men fortfarande är mycket okänt om exakt vilken roll vissa hormoner spelar. – Att kartlägga det kan leda till att vi ytterligare kan förbättra behandlingen vid psykiska sjukdomar, säger Marie Bendix, doktorand i psykiatri vid Umeå universitet. I sin avhandling har Marie Bendix studerat

8h

10 Breakthrough Technologies with Bill Gates

How the creator of the world’s biggest private foundation thinks about tackling some of the world’s biggest challenges.

8h

Watch a Self-Driving Car Careen Around Corners Like a Racecar

Autonomous Racer Engineers at Stanford University in California figured a way to teach a self-driving car how to make high-speed turns, like a racecar. While that sounds like an inherently unsafe maneuver, the engineers’ findings could end up making passenger-oriented driverless vehicles safer, according to New Scientist , in case they have to swerve suddenly to avoid a collision. “We want our al

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Thanks for the mammaries

New imaging technique promises earlier cancer detection.

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Researchers discover how mosquitoes know where you are

Disabling a specific protein makes them lose interest in using humans as food sources. Samantha Page reports.

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Cultured stem cells reconstruct sensory nerve and tissue structure in the nose

A team of researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine developed a method to grow and maintain olfactory stem cells in culture, which can then be used to restore tissue in the nose. The discovery raises hope that future therapies could be developed to restore the sense of smell in individuals where it has been damaged by injury or degeneration.

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How mosquitoes smell human sweat (and new ways to stop them)

Female mosquitoes are known to rely on an array of sensory information to find people to bite, picking up on carbon dioxide, body odor, heat, moisture, and visual cues. Now researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on March 28 have discovered how mosquitoes pick up on acidic volatiles found in human sweat.

8h

New York Sues Sackler Family Members and Drug Distributors

The state’s lawsuit offers detail on methods allegedly used to flood the market with opioids, fueling an epidemic.

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Top Democrat Assails Bernhardt’s Ethics at Senate Hearing on His Interior Secretary Nomination

Lawmakers must decide whether Mr. Bernhardt, who has faced conflict-of-interest criticisms, is the right person to oversee some 500 million acres of public land as well as the nation’s coastal waters.

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Figenblade kan ikke dække politikernes næser

Man konstruerer et medicinråd og et behandlingsråd, så man kan se ærbar ud mens man bedyrer, at danske kræftpatienter naturligvis skal have den bedst mulige behandling

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Er fagligheden tænkt ind i sundhedsreformen?

Måske skulle man fra politisk hold søge dybere og involvere sagkundskaben mere, før man tænker på at ændre et system, som virker! Det kan vise sig at blive meget dyrere i det lange løb. Kvalitet er billigst i længden.

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In a Bid to ‘Take Back Control,’ Britain Lost It

The central idea behind the Brexit referendum was for Britain to “take back control”—over its laws, its money, its immigration system. For those who campaigned in favor of the United Kingdom leaving the European Union, Brexit would mark the beginning of a new, more global Britain. By leaving the EU, they argued, they would be returning power from Brussels back to lawmakers in Westminster and, by

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Ferromagnetic nanoparticle systems show promise for ultrahigh-speed spintronics

In the future, ultrahigh-speed spintronics will require ultrafast coherent magnetization reversal within a picosecond. While this may eventually be achieved via irradiation the small change of magnetization it generates has so far prevented any practical application of this technique. Now researchers report in Applied Physics Letters that they have explored ferromagnetic nanoparticles embedded wit

8h

Biologists find a way to boost intestinal stem cell populations

MIT and University of Tokyo biologists have found that aging takes a toll on intestinal stem cells and may contribute to increased susceptibility to disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. The researchers could also reverse this effect in aged mice by treating them with an NAD precursor, which helps boost the population of intestinal stem cells.

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Hubble watches spun-up asteroid coming apart

A small asteroid has been caught in the process of spinning so fast it's throwing off material, according to new data from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and other observatories.

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Researchers discover a critical receptor involved in response to antidepressants like ketamine

Effective treatment of clinical depression remains a major mental health issue, with roughly 30 percent of patients who do not respond to any of the available treatments. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have discovered a crucial receptor called mGlu2 that is critical to the mechanism of fast-acting antidepressants such as ketamine when used to treat depression.

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New approach could boost energy capacity of lithium batteries

Researchers at MIT and in China have found a new way to make cathodes for lithium batteries, offering improvements in the amount of power for both a given weight and a given volume.

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UK identifies fresh Huawei risks to telecom networks

Britain has identified "significant" issues in Huawei's engineering processes that pose "new risks" for the nation's telecommunications, a government report found Thursday amid lingering global suspicion over the Chinese technology giant.

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Sony says former CEO Kazuo Hirai to leave firm

Sony chairman Kazuo Hirai, who led a major and successful overhaul at the Japanese electronics giant, announced Thursday he would be leaving the firm after 35 years.

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US accuses Facebook of discrimination over housing ads

US officials accused Facebook of discrimination Thursday for using its targeted advertising to limit who sees postings for certain kinds of housing.

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Taxpayers are asked to support falcons, fight pigeon poop

Along with all the usual declarations and deductions, Massachusetts residents have been asked to keep something else in mind this tax season: pigeon droppings.

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Ride-hailing giants face bumpy road to profitability

Ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft have redefined what we expect from transportation, hooking customers on the immediacy of on-demand rides with a few clicks on a smartphone.

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Boeing Proposes Fixes for Grounded 737 Max Aircraft

The plan includes both updates to the airplane's systems and training for pilots, but it's up to the FAA to approve the plan before any 737 Max 8 aircraft will take to the skies. The post Boeing Proposes Fixes for Grounded 737 Max Aircraft appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Meet the mini frogs of Madagascar—the new species we've discovered

Miniaturised frogs form a fascinating but poorly understood group of amphibians. They have been exceptionally prone to taxonomic underestimation because when frogs evolve small body size they start to look remarkably similar – so it is easy to underestimate how diverse they really are.

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How single women are driving gentrification in Hong Kong and elsewhere

Gentrification is reshaping urban areas all around the world, displacing large segments of the population and making cities increasingly unaffordable.

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What is linguistics?

For decades, MIT has been widely held to have one of the best linguistics programs in the world. But what is linguistics and what does it teach us about human language? To learn more about the ways linguists help make a better world, SHASS Communications recently spoke with David Pesetsky, the Ferrari P. Ward Professor of Modern Languages and Linguistics at MIT. A Margaret MacVicar Faculty Fellow

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Shape shifting mirror opens a vista for the future

A team of researchers from JTEC Corporation and Osaka University developed a bimorph deformable mirror that allows for precise shape modification and usage under vacuum, a world first.

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YouTube's child viewers may struggle to recognise adverts in videos from 'virtual play dates'

YouTube's highest earning star in 2018 was a seven-year-old boy named Ryan. That's right – a child out-earned the likes of the infamous Logan Paul, video game vlogger PewDiePie, and even make-up mogul Jeffree Star. Between June 2017 and June 2018, Ryan is estimated to have earned an impressive US$22m from the platform.

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New technique reduces time lag between component manufacture and checking precision on CMM

Research findings described in a new article by University of Huddersfield scientists will enable engineering firms to make major gains in productivity and efficiency by reducing the often-considerable time-lag between the manufacture of components and checking their precision on a Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM).

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Taxpayers are asked to support falcons, fight pigeon poop

Along with all the usual declarations and deductions, Massachusetts residents have been asked to keep something else in mind this tax season: pigeon droppings.

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Meet the mini frogs of Madagascar—the new species we've discovered

Miniaturised frogs form a fascinating but poorly understood group of amphibians. They have been exceptionally prone to taxonomic underestimation because when frogs evolve small body size they start to look remarkably similar – so it is easy to underestimate how diverse they really are.

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How single women are driving gentrification in Hong Kong and elsewhere

Gentrification is reshaping urban areas all around the world, displacing large segments of the population and making cities increasingly unaffordable.

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A short history of trans people's long fight for equality | Samy Nour Younes

Transgender activist and TED Resident Samy Nour Younes shares the remarkable, centuries-old history of the trans community, filled with courageous stories, inspiring triumphs — and a fight for civil rights that's been raging for a long time. "Imagine how the conversation would shift if we acknowledge just how long trans people have been demanding equality," he says.

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Tomorrow's data memories: Using new technology to explore single molecule magnets in slow motion

When storing data, conventional techniques are increasingly reaching their limits. So-called single molecule magnets could provide a remedy. Research teams from Kaiserslautern and Karlsruhe are investigating their storage properties. The focus lies on metals within molecules, which are responsible for the magnetic characteristics and thus for storage properties. Using a novel method, the teams hav

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Solving the e-waste challenge requires global action

An international team of experts have highlighted the urgent need for global cooperation to reform the e-waste recycling industry and counteract the harm it poses to both human health and environment.

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Lonza Establishes Custom Cell Biology Services to Offer Unique Manufacturing and Testing Capabilities

Lonza has introduced CellBio Services, a comprehensive portfolio of unique, custom solutions designed to meet specific, individual research application needs. Researchers across pharmaceutical and contract manufacturing organizations can now choose from an extensive range of services, including cell-line expansion and banking, media production, cell isolation, cell characterization, transfection s

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Most precise measurements of sickle cell disease building blocks could lead to new treatments

In a breakthrough study of sickle cell disease, biomedical engineers in the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have revealed that the building blocks of the disease are much less efficient at organizing than previously thought. The findings open the door to new treatments, including new medicines that could be prescribed at lower doses, for the approximately 20 million peop

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Illuminating water filtration

For the first time, a team of researchers from Stony Brook University and the US Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have revealed the molecular structure of membranes used in reverse osmosis. The research is reported in a recently published paper in ACS Macro Letters, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

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Surgical implications of rising heroin abuse

With heroin abuse on the rise in the United States, related surgical complications are also increasing, including severe infections and complications related to heroin injection.

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A ventilation system proves effective at reducing hospital infections

The mechanism produces airflow that removes pathogens present in the air of a hospital room.

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Repurposed Drug Could Offer Hope after Many Alzheimer's Trial Failures

An experimental drug for hepatitis D triggers a cellular waste disposal system to rid mice brains of the tau protein, a major culprit in neurodegenerative disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This Samsung flower vase is also a throwable fire extinguisher

submitted by /u/redkemper [link] [comments]

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The regeneration of a cell depends on where it is positioned

A simple tissue sample from a plant, like a branch or leaf, can grow into a whole new plant. This ability could have applications in the production of food, biomass and medicine, and the genes responsible for regeneration in plants could provide insights into which genes might have the same potential in humans. The study of these genes reached a new level of detail in 2009 with the reporting of si

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Principle behind Google's April Fools' pigeon prank proves more than a joke

Google's 2002 April Fools' Day joke purportedly disclosed that its popular search engine was not actually powered by artificial intelligence, but instead by biological intelligence. Google had deployed bunches of birds, dubbed pigeon clusters, to calculate the relative value of web pages because they proved to be faster and more reliable than either human editors or digital computers.

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Bringing Martian rocks back to Earth crucial for science, say researchers

Samples need to be collected from Mars' surface and returned to Earth for examination to answer our most pressing questions about the red planet, according to a group of international scientists.

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Examining the highly organized lives of long-distance commuters

When both parents face lengthy commutes to work, how do families handle the additional stress? An EPFL scientist took an in-depth look at the strategies these parents use for managing their time wisely and dealing with unexpected challenges.

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A deep ocean current shift gives 400-year notice of massive climate change

The warm waters of the Gulf Stream flow up along the east coast of North America, moderating the climate of vast areas of northern and western Europe.

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The regeneration of a cell depends on where it is positioned

A simple tissue sample from a plant, like a branch or leaf, can grow into a whole new plant. This ability could have applications in the production of food, biomass and medicine, and the genes responsible for regeneration in plants could provide insights into which genes might have the same potential in humans. The study of these genes reached a new level of detail in 2009 with the reporting of si

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Principle behind Google's April Fools' pigeon prank proves more than a joke

Google's 2002 April Fools' Day joke purportedly disclosed that its popular search engine was not actually powered by artificial intelligence, but instead by biological intelligence. Google had deployed bunches of birds, dubbed pigeon clusters, to calculate the relative value of web pages because they proved to be faster and more reliable than either human editors or digital computers.

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Investigations with neutrons settle scientific dispute about the structure of fluorine

In toothpaste, Teflon, LEDs and medications, elemental fluorine shows its value, but it is highly toxic. Attempts to determine the crystal structure of solid fluorine using X-rays ended with explosions 50 years ago. A research team has now clarified the actual structure of the fluorine using neutrons from the Heinz Maier Leibnitz Research Neutron Source (FRM II).

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Knowledge gap closed in our understanding of degradation of ethane

With a share of up to ten percent, ethane is the second most common component of natural gas and is present in deep-seated land and marine gas deposits all around the world. Up to now, it was unclear how ethane is degraded in the absence of oxygen. A team of researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) have solved this mystery, after more than fifteen years of research wo

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Årsdagen for Svendborgsagen: Sundhedsminister fremlægger lovforslag med tre punkter fra tillidspakken

På etårsdagen for Svendborgsagens afslutning lægger ministeren et lovforslag med tre punkter fra tillidspakken på bordet. Men det er ikke nok, siger lægeforeninger.

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Repurposed Drug Could Offer Hope after Many Alzheimer's Trial Failures

An experimental drug for hepatitis D triggers a cellular waste disposal system to rid mice brains of the tau protein, a major culprit in neurodegenerative disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Knowledge gap closed in our understanding of degradation of ethane

With a share of up to ten percent, ethane is the second most common component of natural gas and is present in deep-seated land and marine gas deposits all around the world. Up to now, it was unclear how ethane is degraded in the absence of oxygen. A team of researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) have solved this mystery, after more than fifteen years of research wo

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Could dogs be the source of a new flu?

Results from a 10-year study suggest two strains of influenza that could mix and form a dangerous new strain of influenza spread by dogs.

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Lithium ions flow through solid material

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with researchers from Purdue University and Rutgers University, have merged materials science and condensed matter physics in a study of a promising solid material that conducts lithium ions.

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Repurposed Drug Could Offer Hope after Many Alzheimer's Trial Failures

An experimental drug for hepatitis D triggers a cellular waste disposal system to rid mice brains of the tau protein, a major culprit in neurodegenerative disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Efter Storebæltsulykken: EU starter hasteprocedure om lommevogne

Ulykken på Storebælt har sået tvivl om sikkerheden ved de såkaldte lommevogne.

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Could dogs be the source of a new flu?

Results from a 10-year study suggest two strains of influenza that could mix and form a dangerous new strain of influenza spread by dogs.

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What 'Big Data' reveals about the diversity of species

'Big data' and large-scale analyses are critical for biodiversity research to find out how animal and plant species are distributed worldwide and how ecosystems function. The necessary data may come from many sources: museum collections, biological literature, and local databases. Researchers at the University of Göttingen have investigated how this wealth of knowledge can best be integrated so th

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In ancient oceans that resembled our own, oxygen loss triggered mass extinction

Researchers provide first conclusive evidence linking widespread ocean oxygen loss and rising sea levels to a 430-million-year-old mass extinction event.

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Improving equity in global physician training

Large numbers of U.S. physicians and medical trainees engage in hands-on clinical experiences abroad where they gain skills working across cultures with limited resources. However, providers from low- and middle-income countries traveling to learn from health care in the United States are rarely afforded the same critical hands-on education.

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Same microbe, different effect

Asking a different question about the bacteria in our microbiomes might help target disease more precisely.

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For some people, attractive wives and high status husbands enhance marital quality

Researchers from Florida State University found that maximizing men — those who seek to make the 'best' choice — who had attractive wives were more satisfied at the start of their marriages than maximizing men who had less attractive wives, and maximizing women who had high status husbands experienced less steep declines in satisfaction over time than maximizing women who had low status husbands

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New technique reduces time-lag between component manufacture and checking precision on CMM

The technique, developed by Dr. Naeem Mian, calculates how long it takes for a component's temperature to be stabilized so that it can safely be measured by a Coordinate Measuring Machine.

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Shape shifting mirror opens a vista for the future

A team of researchers from JTEC Corporation and Osaka University developed a bimorph deformable mirror that allows for precise shape modification and usage under vacuum, a world first.

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Consumers view nutrition and health claims differently than regulators

Consumers may not consciously differentiate nutrition and health claims on foods in the way that regulatory experts do, new research published in the journal Nutrients reports.

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A new class of branched single chain surfactant for enhanced oil recovery reported

A new green surfactant for efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR) has been developed by scientists at the Energy Safety Research Institute at Swansea University.

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Turbocharging the switch to efficient engines

Predicting capricious pre-ignition combustion events could enable automakers to build powerful yet more efficient engines.

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What Americans know about science

There are substantial differences among Americans when it comes to knowledge and understanding of science and scientific processes. People's level of science knowledge varies by education, race, ethnicity and gender.

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How to cross-examine a machine in court

As society becomes more automated, the structure of evidence rules needs to keep up with the times, argues Ed Cheng, the Hess Professor of Law at Vanderbilt Law School. "Beyond the Witness: Bringing a Process Perspective to Modern Evidence Law," coauthored with University of Arkansas law professor G. Alexander Nunn, will appear in the May issue of the Texas Law Review.

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Trump’s Opponents Have One Assignment Now

The Robert Mueller investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election embodied the hopes of many Donald Trump critics that defeating the president was possible by disqualifying him personally. Whatever further revelations are contained in Mueller’s full report, Attorney General William Barr’s summary last weekend has already signaled it’s unlikely to be that easy. But, on balance, that’s

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Dogs Detect the Scent of Seizures

These very good dogs are very good at what they do—taking a whiff of a chemical during an attack — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dogs can recognise the scent of someone having an epileptic seizure

Service dogs for people with epilepsy can tell when their owners are having a seizure, but we don’t know how. Now an experiment suggests they can smell seizures

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Feeling Self(ie)-Conscious

The perfect poolside vacation selfie. A braggy snap of the spread at your #friendsgiving dinner. That classic gag shot of the Eiffel Tower—with the top pinched between thumb and forefinger just so.

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The sword of a Hispano-Muslim warlord is digitized in 3-D

At age 90, Ali Atar, one of the main military chiefs of King Boabdil of Granada, fought to his death in the Battle of Lucena in 1483. It was there that his magnificent Nasrid sword was taken away from him, and researchers from the Polytechnic University of Valencia and a company from Toledo have now modeled it in order to graphically document and present it on the web.

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Water samples detect low levels of Fukushima-related contamination

A slightly elevated level of radioactive contamination connected to the Fukushima nuclear disaster has been detected in the northern Bering Sea. The level of cesium-137, a radioactive isotope, is extremely low and not considered a health concern, according to state epidemiologists.

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Physicists constrain dark matter

Researchers from Russia, Finland, and the U.S. have put a constraint on the theoretical model of dark matter particles by analyzing data from astronomical observations of active galactic nuclei. The new findings provide an added incentive for research groups around the world trying to crack the mystery of dark matter: No one is quite sure what it is made of. The paper was published in the Journal

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Could squishy cells improve bone marrow transplants?

Modulating the stiffness of blood-forming stem cells could possibly facilitate mobilization procedures in stem cell-based transplants. Temporary squishiness could help drive blood-forming stem cells out of the bone marrow and into the blood, but the cells need to be stiff to stay put and replenish the blood and immune system, the researchers find. The results appear in Cell Stem Cell . How deform

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Dogs Detect the Scent of Seizures

These very good dogs are very good at what they do—taking a whiff of a chemical during an attack — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The space we travel through

When sea-faring nations began to explore new regions of the world, one of their biggest concerns in making the journey safely was how to cope with weather. They could harness the wind for power. They could rely on the Sun and the stars for navigation. They could build sturdy ships. But if a storm rose suddenly, they were at nature's mercy.

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Unusual galaxies defy dark matter theory

After drawing both praise and skepticism, the team of astronomers who discovered NGC 1052-DF2 – the very first known galaxy to contain little to no dark matter – are back with stronger evidence about its bizarre nature.

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A cost-effective method to synthesize chemical building blocks

NUS chemists have developed a cost effective method to synthesise geminal organodiboron compounds which are versatile chemical building blocks for the development of fine chemicals.

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5G could be the foundation of next-gen 'cloud VR'

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Kollapsande blodkärl rättar till trycket i hjärnan

Sambandet mellan gravitation och hjärntryck är viktigt för att förstå vissa sjukdomar och hur vi kan fungera i tyngdlöst tillstånd i rymden. – Upptäckten att effekten av vener i halsen som kollapsar påverkar hjärntrycket kan öppna nya möjligheter att förklara flera neurologiska sjukdomar där avvikelser i halsvenerna spelar roll för sjukdomsutvecklingen, säger Petter Holmlund, doktorand vid Umeå u

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Dogs Detect the Scent of Seizures

These very good dogs are very good at what they do—taking a whiff of a chemical during an attack — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Like another planet': Malham salt cave is world's longest, say researchers

Survey says cave stretches for six miles, beating Iran’s Namakdan cave in length Dripping with stalactites and glistening crystals made of salt, the Malham cave at the southern tip of Israel’s Dead Sea is the world’s longest salt cave system, researchers have claimed, following a survey of its twisting and dramatic tunnels. The cavern, which extends over six miles (10km) underground, is believed

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Matt Hunts Down a Warthog | Naked and Afraid

Elite survivalist Matt Wright manages to catch a warthog to bring back to camp in Africa. Stream Full Episodes of Naked and Afraid: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/naked-and-afraid/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NakedandAfraid https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NakedAndAfraid http

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Knowledge gap closed in our understanding of degradation of ethane

With a share of up to ten percent, ethane is the second most common component of natural gas and is present in deep-seated land and marine gas deposits all around the world. Up to now, it was unclear how ethane is degraded in the absence of oxygen. Using the ProVIS technology platform at the UFZ, researchers have discovered a single-celled organism able to degrade ethane without oxygen. The organi

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KIT expert comments on current topic: Trade war imperils Amazon rainforest

Last year, the United States of America imposed tariffs of up to 25 percent on goods imported from China. The Chinese government reacted by imposing tariffs of 25 percent on US goods, including US soybeans. Exports of US soybeans to China in 2018 dropped by 50 percent, even though the trade war had begun in the middle of the year only. Replacement may be provided by Brazil. This might have dramati

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New mathematical model could be key to designing effective therapies for brain disorders

A collaboration between researchers from the UAB Institute of Neurosciences (INc) and the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline, published in March in Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, describes a mathematical model to quantify the activity of biased G-protein-coupled receptors.

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Reducing water consumption in mining

Plenty of water is needed for beneficiation of mineral ores. Taking the raw material fluorite as their example, researchers at Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology (HIF) have now shown how water usage can be optimized. They have developed a new procedure that extends the simulation of the beneficiation process. It indicates the circumstances in which it makes sense for water to be

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Sexual satisfaction among older people about more than just health

Sexual satisfaction among older people about more than just health.

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Digital health must be reimbursed to cope with chronic disease

Sophia Antipolis, 28 March 2019: Health systems must reimburse digital health and integrate it into routine care to cope with chronic disease. That's the main message of a position paper from European cardiology leaders published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

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Record efficiency for perovskite-based light-emitting diodes

Efficient near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diodes of perovskite have been produced in a laboratory at Linköping University. The external quantum efficiency is 21.6%, which is a record. The results have been published in Nature Photonics.

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Extending Human Longevity With Regenerative Medicine

Lizards can regrow entire limbs. Flatworms, starfish, and sea cucumbers regrow entire bodies. Sharks constantly replace lost teeth, often growing over 20,000 teeth throughout their lifetimes. How can we translate these near-superpowers to humans? The answer: through the cutting-edge innovations of regenerative medicine. While big data and artificial intelligence transform how we practice medicine

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Få guidelines på hjerteområdet lever op til højeste standard for evidens

Kun en mindre del af amerikanske og europæiske guidelines på hjertekarområdet er baseret på stringent evidens, viser ny undersøgelse. Der er behov for flere randomiserede undersøgelser, siger dansk hjertelæge.

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US survey finds science knowledge differs by race and politics

Despite evidence-free policies, conservative Republicans do well. Andrew Masterson reports.

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LIGO and Virgo resume search for ripples in space and time

The National Science Foundation's LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory) is set to resume its hunt for gravitational waves—ripples in space and time—on April 1, after receiving a series of upgrades to its lasers, mirrors, and other components. LIGO—which consists of twin detectors located in Washington and Louisiana—now has a combined increase in sensitivity of about 40 percent

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Can organisms survive on Mars, and can we identify them?

Earth is a very special planet. It is the only celestial body in the solar system on which we know life exists. Could there be life on other planets or moons? Mars is always the first mentioned in this context; it has many properties in common with Earth, and in its geological past water also flowed over its surface. Today, however, conditions on Mars are so extreme that it is hard to imagine that

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Lasting Grief After a Mass Shooting

Editor’s Note: If you are having thoughts of suicide, please know that you are not alone. If you are in danger of acting on suicidal thoughts, call 911. For support and resources, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, or text 741-741 for the Crisis Text Line. Over a period of just 10 days this month, three people directly affected by school shootings committed suicide. Tw

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Dogs Detect the Scent of Seizures

These very good dogs are very good at what they do—taking a whiff of a chemical during an attack — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Can We Overcome Racial Bias? 'Biased' Author Says To Start By Acknowledging It

In her new book, psychology professor Jennifer Eberhardt explores how unconscious racial bias shapes human behavior — and suggests that we examine what situations can trigger racial bias. (Image credit: Viking)

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The extra lenses in your smartphone's camera, explained

Technology Dual-lens? Triple-lens? Do more lenses matter? The differences between ultrawide, telephoto, and depth explained—and how many lenses are too many.

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Third court upholds EPA policy barring grantees from its advisory panels

Critics says the policy favors industry-friendly members over qualified scientists

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Researchers find associations between structural variation in gut microbiome and host health

A team of researchers from Israel, the U.S., the Netherlands and Norway has found what they describe as associations between structural variation in the human gut microbiome and host health. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their genetic study of microbes living in the guts of large groups of people from Israel and the Netherlands, and what they found.

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Breast cancer: The promises of old recipes

Of the three major subtypes of breast cancer, the «triple negative» is the most lethal and unlike other breast cancers, it is resistant to most existing therapies. By studying the properties of clofazimine, a 70-year-old antibiotic, scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Lausanne demonstrate its effectiveness in stopping the progression of the disease in in vivo tests. These results highli

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Anions and cations in dual-ion batteries act like cowherd and weaver girl

A research team led by Prof. TANG Yongbing and Dr. ZHOU Xiaolong at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences along with other collaborators jointly published an invited review article entitled 'Beyond Conventional Batteries: Strategies towards Low-Cost Dual-Ion Batteries with High Performance' on Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.

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Simplified synthesis

For the first time researchers discovered a simple and highly efficient way to produce certain kinds of organic compounds. The team from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Tokyo report their new method – which uses a novel iron catalyst – can not only simplify organic synthesis but would greatly reduce costs and cut down on waste products. This could have huge implications for indust

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Duke-NUS study: New technique shows promise for heart muscle regeneration

Scientists led by Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, have demonstrated a novel technique using a heart muscle associated protein that reliably turns stem cells into heart-healing muscle fibres.

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This Startup Pays Humans to Remotely Operate “Driverless” Cars

Take the Wheel Even today’s most advanced autonomous vehicles (AVs) can’t navigate roads with the same ease as human drivers. Sure, they might do fine on a long stretch of highway, but the vehicles often falter in the face of inclement weather , unpredictable pedestrians , or even birds and shadows . Now, Oregon-based startup Designated Driver has created a system, according to Wired , that allow

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Researchers find associations between structural variation in gut microbiome and host health

A team of researchers from Israel, the U.S., the Netherlands and Norway has found what they describe as associations between structural variation in the human gut microbiome and host health. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their genetic study of microbes living in the guts of large groups of people from Israel and the Netherlands, and what they found.

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The Strange, Unsatisfying End to the Jussie Smollett Case

Earlier this year, the actor Jussie Smollett told Chicago police that he was assaulted by two masked men who wrapped a rope around his neck and yelled, “This is MAGA country!” The news made national headlines and prompted an outpouring of support. Weeks later, Smollett was charged with disorderly conduct for allegedly staging the attack and filing a false police report in the matter. He faced 16

9h

A Portrait of the Artist as a Perpetually Stoned Beach Bum

Harmony Korine is a filmmaker who often traffics in shock value. His career is a laundry list of inflammatory works—from his searing screenwriting debut, Kids , to his fragmented, sometimes frightening directorial efforts, such as Gummo , Trash Humpers , and the surprisingly successful crime thriller Spring Breakers . His newest work, The Beach Bum , shares a gauzy neon aesthetic and Florida sett

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The Dismal Career Opportunities for Military Spouses

During a Thanksgiving morning videoconference call with military personnel overseas, Donald Trump said: “I know I speak on behalf of all Americans when I say that we totally support you—in fact, we love you. We really do. We love you.” And data shows that he was speaking on behalf of most Americans. Nearly three-quarters of Americans expressed confidence in the United States armed forces in 2018,

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Transmit your sound recording from Mars to the Earth

An exciting new competition is giving citizens of planet Earth the opportunity to get their voices to Mars in the next phase of the ExoMars programme. The ExoMars rover and platform will launch to the Red Planet in 2020.

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Studying chiral exchange drag and chirality oscillations in synthetic antiferromagnets

A quasiparticle is a disturbance or excitation (e.g. spin waves, bubbles, etc.) that behaves as a particle and could therefore be regarded as one. Long-range interactions between quasiparticles can give rise to a 'drag,' which affects the fundamental properties of many systems in condensed matter physics.

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Styrelse: Vi havde håndteret Svendborg­sagen anderledes i dag

Var Svendborgsagen sket i dag, havde der været større fokus på det organisatoriske og ikke kun den enkelte læge, siger direktøren i Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed og underbygger det med nye tal. Læger: Der skal mere til.

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Your pre-adult language learning could fit into 1.5 MB

Language acquisition between birth and 18 is a remarkable feat of cognition, rather than something humans are just hardwired to do, according to new research. Researchers have calculated that, from infancy to young adulthood, learners absorb approximately 12.5 million bits of information about language—about two bits per minute—to fully acquire linguistic knowledge. If converted into binary code,

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Driverless car learns to perform high-speed turns without crashing

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Healthy, happy and tropical – world's fastest-growing cities demand our attention

What does it take to be a happy and healthy city? In any city, myriad factors go into the mix – and of course we are not dealing with just one kind of city. But, due to the world history of colonisation, models are still too often European-centric. In particular, we need to adjust how we think about cities in the tropics.

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What will it take for humans to trust self-driving cars?

Cars They're coming—but are we ready to let a computer take the wheel? Autonomous cars could prove safer than fickle human drivers. There's just one problem: we have to be willing to hand over control.

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New approach for potential treatment of liver cancer patients with Hep B virus infection

A new treatment approach using engineered Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) specific T cells has, for the first time, shown promising results in the treatment of HBV related liver cancer in a landmark translational research study between Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore General Hospital and Lion TCR.

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IDA-kampagne beskyldes for politisk slagside

Parallelt med repræsentantskabsvalget lancerer IDA en kampagne til folketingsvalget, som kritiseres for at være partisk. Nej, den er faktuel, mener politiske lister.

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Helping teachers 'practise what they teach' could help them stay teaching for longer

Early career teachers are more likely to stay on if they practise what they teach in their own time. We found that practitioner-teachers – such as art teachers practising art and biology teachers observing nature – see themselves as better quality teachers when measured against key principles of learning and teaching. These principles include providing clear assessment objectives and tasks to stud

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Gravitational Wave Detector LIGO Is Now More Powerful Than Ever

After a series of instrument upgrades, LIGO is coming back online April 1 to search for fainter gravitational waves around the universe. The post Gravitational Wave Detector LIGO Is Now More Powerful Than Ever appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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'World's longest salt cave' discovered in Israel

The cave is near the desert site where the Bible says Lot’s wife was turned into a pillar of salt

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Stop outsourcing the regulation of hate speech to social media

When it comes to dealing with online hate speech, we've ended up in the worst of all possible worlds.

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In ancient oceans that resembled our own, oxygen loss triggered mass extinction

Roughly 430 million years ago, during the Earth's Silurian Period, global oceans were experiencing changes that would seem eerily familiar today. Melting polar ice sheets meant sea levels were steadily rising, and ocean oxygen was falling fast around the world.

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Huckleberry maps locate hungry grizzly bears

Grizzly bears depend on huckleberries as a critical food source to fatten up before winter hibernation. A new approach maps where they grow. When berries reach peak ripeness in mid-July, they make up about half of the diet for the hundreds of grizzly bears that live in and around Montana’s Glacier National Park. Despite the importance of huckleberries to grizzly bears, listed as threatened in the

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Warm weather pushed Neanderthals into cannibalism

Butchered corpses coincide with rapid climate change, researchers discover. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Paywalls block scientific progress. Research should be open to everyone | Jason Schmitt

To democratise scholarly publishing, individual academics need to take action Academic and scientific research needs to be accessible to all. The world’s most pressing problems like clean water or food security deserve to have as many people as possible solving their complexities. Yet our current academic research system has no interest in harnessing our collective intelligence. Scientific progre

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Aftale: Nyt hjertecenter på vej

Regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti er enige om at oprette et nyt center for eksperimentel hjertesvigtbehandling.

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Physicists obtain data on particle self-organization in ultracold dusty plasma

Physicists recently investigated the behavior of particles in a dusty plasma at a temperature below 2 degrees K. The experiment showed that at extremely low temperatures, nanoclusters can form in the plasma, and the synthesis of polymer fibers takes place. The results of the experiment can be used to create new materials with desired and controlled properties. The results of this study are publish

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Kids store 1.5 megabytes of information to master their native language

Learning one's native language may seem effortless. But new research suggests that language acquisition between birth and 18 is a remarkable feat of cognition, rather than something humans are just hardwired to do.

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Codifying the universal language of honey bees

In a paper appearing in April's issue of Animal Behaviour researchers decipher the instructive messages encoded in the insects' movements, called waggle dances.

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Newly discovered role for climbing fibers: Conveying a sensory snapshot to the cerebellum

Though there is a wealth knowledge supporting the idea that sensory cues benefit motor learning, the precise brain circuitry and mechanisms tying these two together has been debated in recent years. Shedding new light on this topic, new research has revealed that a special input pathway into the cerebellum seems to hold the key to coding sensory information.

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A more accurate method to diagnose cancer subtypes

Researchers have developed a method for detecting the products of 'fusion' genes in cancer cells more accurately than current clinical methods.

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Tumor-promoting enzymes USP25 and USP28: Substantial differences identified

Researchers from the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg (JMU) have solved the structures of the cancer-promoting enzymes USP25 and USP28, and identified significant differences in their activities. Both enzymes promote the growth of tumors. The results were published in the journal Molecular Cell and could benefit towards the development of new, low-side-effects anticancer drugs.

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Tumor-promoting enzymes USP25 and USP28: Substantial differences identified

Researchers from the Rudolf Virchow Center of the University of Würzburg (JMU) have solved the structures of the cancer-promoting enzymes USP25 and USP28, and identified significant differences in their activities. Both enzymes promote the growth of tumors. The results were published in the journal Molecular Cell and could benefit towards the development of new, low-side-effects anticancer drugs.

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Tre KU forskere får EU's mest prestigefulde forskningsbevilling

Forskere fra tre forskellige fakulteter på Københavns Universitet modtager det Europæiske…

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How nerve cells control misfolded proteins

Researchers have identified a protein complex that marks misfolded proteins, stops them from interacting with other proteins in the cell and directs them towards disposal. They have identified the so-called Linear Ubiquitin Chain Assembly Complex, Lubac for short, as a crucial player in controlling misfolded proteins in cells. The group is hoping to find a new therapeutic approach to treat neurode

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Fullerenes bridge conductive gap in organic photovoltaics

Organic photovoltaics have achieved remarkably high efficiencies, but finding optimum combinations of materials for high-performance organic solar cells, which are also economically competitive, still presents a challenge. Researchers from the United States and China have now developed an innovative interlayer material to improve device stability and electrode performance. In the journal Angewandt

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Old for new: Using ancient genetic variation to supercharge wheat

A global, collaborative effort sheds light on the genetic basis of biomass accumulation and efficiency in use of light, both of which are bottlenecks in yield improvement in wheat.

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Drug shortages: Limited warnings, followed by rationing and hoarding

In a national survey, hospital pharmacy managers report a lack of advance notice, frequent drug shortages, hoarding and even rationing. Improving the supply of generic medications and creating novel strategies to manage scarce drugs is needed.

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New muscular disease: Myoglobinopathy

Researchers have described a new muscular disease caused by a mutation in the myoglobin gene.

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Computer program predicts risk of deadly irregular heart beats

Combining a wealth of information derived from previous studies with data from more than 500 patients, an international team led by researchers has developed a computer-based set of rules that more accurately predicts when patients with a rare heart condition might benefit — or not — from lifesaving implanted defibrillators.

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US accuses Facebook of discrimination over housing ads

US officials accused Facebook of discrimination Thursday for using its targeted advertising to limit who sees postings for certain kinds of housing.

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Spotify tests new 'Duo' plan that offers two Premium subscriptions at a discounted price

Spotify is testing 'Premium Duo,' a new plan that offers access to Spotify's ad-free subscription tier for two users at a discounted price. It offers two Premium plans for €12.49 a month

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Mirrors control chemical selectivity

A chemical reaction transforms the molecules that make up matter. To influence chemical reactions, chemists typically act on the molecules themselves, rather than the space in which the reaction takes places. However, researchers at the University of Strasbourg have shown that chemical reactions can indeed be influenced simply by conducting them between two appropriately spaced mirrors, kept only

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Modified deep-learning algorithms unveil features of shape-shifting proteins

Using artificial neural networks designed to emulate the inner workings of the human brain, deep-learning algorithms deftly peruse and analyze large quantities of data. Applying this technique to science problems can help unearth historically elusive solutions.

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Lars Løkke slår fast: Medicinstuderende skal alligevel ikke betale for togbilletter

Medicinstuderende skal ikke betale for transportudgifter alligevel, når de skal i klinikophold, foreslår regeringen. Det sker efter pres fra FADL.

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Modified deep-learning algorithms unveil features of shape-shifting proteins

Using artificial neural networks designed to emulate the inner workings of the human brain, deep-learning algorithms deftly peruse and analyze large quantities of data. Applying this technique to science problems can help unearth historically elusive solutions.

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Nanovaccine boosts immunity in sufferers of metabolic syndrome

A new class of biomaterial developed by Cornell researchers for an infectious disease nanovaccine effectively boosted immunity in mice with metabolic disorders linked to gut bacteria – a population that shows resistance to traditional flu and polio vaccines.

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'World's longest salt cave' discovered in Israel

The cave is near the desert site where the Bible says Lot’s wife was turned into a pillar of salt

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Robotic Pets

I warn frequently about the folly of trying to predict the future. Obviously we need to do this to some extent, but we always need to be aware of how difficult it is. It is especially hard to predict how people will use technology, even if the technology itself is inevitable. Until devices are in the hands of actual people out there in the world, who try to incorporate the tech into their daily l

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Back on track

The British-led project to break the Land Speed Record is brought back from the brink of cancellation.

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Study finds nearly a third of cat owners use food puzzles

Cat food puzzles are exactly what they sound like. The puzzles can be any object that holds food and requires your feline friend to figure out how to get it. The puzzles come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. Food could be cleverly hidden inside a ball or other mobile device and only by rolling it or pushing it will the cat capture the tasty treat. Other puzzles are stationary with cups or holes t

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Study finds nearly a third of cat owners use food puzzles

Cat food puzzles are exactly what they sound like. The puzzles can be any object that holds food and requires your feline friend to figure out how to get it. The puzzles come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. Food could be cleverly hidden inside a ball or other mobile device and only by rolling it or pushing it will the cat capture the tasty treat. Other puzzles are stationary with cups or holes t

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Making waves: Researchers shed light on how cilia work

Human bodies have some built-in systems to care for themselves. The cells that line our lungs, nose, brain and reproductive system have cilia, which are tiny, hair-like structures designed to sweep out fluids, cells and microbes to stay healthy. But the mechanisms behind their motion are not well understood.

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Grabbing hold and letting go: The exploding bolts that bring us to space

Space The story of heroic fasteners that will get us to the moon and back. It'll take millions of pounds of rocketry to get humans back to the moon, but only 20,000 will return home. We'd get nowwhere without a group of exploding bolts.

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The biggest revolution in gene editing: Crispr-Cas9 explained – video

Prof Jennifer Doudna, one the pioneers of Crispr-Cas9 gene editing, explains how this revolutionary discovery enables precise changes to our DNA, which can be used to correct mutations that cause genetic diseases and eradicate them from a germ line. Doudna raises the key issues of debate around gene editing and suggests what will have the most immediate impact. Continue reading…

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Research has implications for New Zealand bird conservation

Research by recent Victoria University of Wellington Ph.D. graduate Dr. Nyree Fea shows significant differences in the way bird species respond to conservation efforts.

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Eksperter om Viking Sky-fejl: »Det skulle egentlig ikke være muligt«

Krydstogtskibet Viking Sky fik fuldt motorstop i alle fire motorer, fordi smøreolietrykket blev for lavt. Det undrer eksperter

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Research has implications for New Zealand bird conservation

Research by recent Victoria University of Wellington Ph.D. graduate Dr. Nyree Fea shows significant differences in the way bird species respond to conservation efforts.

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Image of the Day: Wet Planet

An analysis of the scars left by long-gone flows reveals that Mars's rivers may have run even when scientists thought the planet was drying out.

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No pain

Jo Cameron is one of two people on Earth known to have a mutation that means she feels almost no pain.

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What is a waterless barrier and how could it slow cane toads?

A federal parliamentary inquiry into stopping cane toads' relentless march across Australia has proposed creating "waterless barriers" in the semi-arid land between Western Australia's Kimberley and Pilbara regions.

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Søgaard skal have ros for at rykke sig i debatten

Sundhedsøkonomen har tydeligt reflekteret over sundhedspersonalet, der slår alarm. Spørgsmålet er, hvor tæt sundhedsvæsenet er på at kollapse – det kommer der nogle bud på her.

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Researchers dramatically simplify and streamline organic chemical synthesis

For the first time researchers discovered a simple and highly efficient way to produce certain kinds of organic compounds. The team from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Tokyo report their new method—which uses a novel iron catalyst—can not only simplify organic synthesis but would greatly reduce costs and cut down on waste products. This could have huge implications for industries

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What is a waterless barrier and how could it slow cane toads?

A federal parliamentary inquiry into stopping cane toads' relentless march across Australia has proposed creating "waterless barriers" in the semi-arid land between Western Australia's Kimberley and Pilbara regions.

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Divorce's effect on children's educational achievement is not a constant

Conventional wisdom holds that when parents divorce, their children's educational success can be derailed. But research led by UCLA sociology professor Jennie Brand suggests that divorce's effect on a child's education varies widely depending on several factors, especially the family's socioeconomic status.

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The Atlantic Hires Johanna Mayer-Jones to be SVP, Partnerships

March 28, 2019—The Atlantic has hired Johanna Mayer-Jones to oversee its global and multi-platform sales teams as SVP of Partnerships, it was announced today by Publisher and Chief Revenue Officer Hayley Romer. In this newly created role, Mayer-Jones will lead The Atlantic’s thriving advertising business, and its teams in the U.S. and EMEA, at a time of ambitious expansion for The Atlantic’s acro

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The Real Problem With Trigger Warnings

In 2016, Onni Gust, a historian at the University of Nottingham, wrote in The Guardian about using trigger warnings to help students “stop for a moment and breathe” during class. Gust described how a slide presentation might note that the next slide references mutilation, or that the following passage includes a graphic description of sexual violence. The warnings don’t allow students to skip the

11h

Boeing: Nu får piloterne magten over vores software

Det skal være slut med, at software gentagne gange bringer næsen på 737 Max-flyene ned, hvis piloterne retter flyet op. Det er en af de ændringer, som producenten Boeing præsenterede onsdag.

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Okinawan sea grapes reveal secrets of plant evolution

If you've ever dined on the tropical island of Okinawa, Japan, your plate may have been graced by a remarkable pile of seaweed, each strand adorned with tiny green bubbles. Known as umi-budo or sea grapes, the salty snack pairs well with rice, sashimi and a tall glass of beer. But umi-budo is more than an iconic side dish; it's a staple crop for Okinawan farmers. Researchers at the Okinawa Institu

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Okinawan sea grapes reveal secrets of plant evolution

If you've ever dined on the tropical island of Okinawa, Japan, your plate may have been graced by a remarkable pile of seaweed, each strand adorned with tiny green bubbles. Known as umi-budo or sea grapes, the salty snack pairs well with rice, sashimi and a tall glass of beer. But umi-budo is more than an iconic side dish; it's a staple crop for Okinawan farmers. Researchers at the Okinawa Institu

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Lipid vesicles transmit luminous or electrical signals

Liposomes are small spherical vesicles with walls comprising two layers of lipids and containing an aqueous core. These artificial structures have been developed for drug delivery or as carriers of active substances in cosmetic products. Another possible application involves the encapsulation of magnetic nanoparticles in liposomes to use them to transmit signals.

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