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nyheder2019marts31

66-million-year-old deathbed linked to dinosaur-killing meteor

Paleontologists have found a fossil site in North Dakota that contains animals and plants killed and buried within an hour of the meteor impact that killed the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. This is the richest K-T boundary site ever found, incorporating insects, fish, mammals, dinosaurs and plants living at the end of the Cretaceous, mixed with tektites and rock created and scattered by the impa

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66-million-year-old deathbed linked to dinosaur-killing meteor

Paleontologists have found a fossil site in North Dakota that contains animals and plants killed and buried within an hour of the meteor impact that killed the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. This is the richest K-T boundary site ever found, incorporating insects, fish, mammals, dinosaurs and plants living at the end of the Cretaceous, mixed with tektites and rock created and scattered by the impa

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66-million-year-old deathbed linked to dinosaur-killing meteor

The beginning of the end started with violent shaking that raised giant waves in the waters of an inland sea in what is now North Dakota.

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Junked Teslas still held unencrypted video recordings

An experiment conducted by white hat hackers and reported by CNBC show that Tesla vehicles store more information than you might think — and they even keep your data unencrypted. It's …

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Solar panels of Swiss Insolight achieve efficiency of 29%

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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UK, US and Russia among those opposing killer robot ban | Science

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Mark Zuckerberg: OK, Fine, Regulate Facebook

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg—whose company has blundered its way into controversies over everything from user privacy and data breaches to amplification of extremist content and literal genocide …

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E is for ethics in AI — and Montreal’s playing a leading role

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Artificial Intelligence Colloquium: AI R&D Ethics

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Joe Rogan Talks Artificial Intelligence with a Yale Professor

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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First-confirmed occurrence of a lambeosaurine dinosaur found on Alaska's North Slope

Paleontologists have discovered the first-confirmed occurrence of a lambeosaurine (crested 'duck-billed' dinosaur) from the Arctic — part of the skull of a lambeosaurine dinosaur from the Liscomb Bonebed (71-68 Ma) found on Alaska's North Slope. The discovery proves for the first time that lambeosaurines inhabited the Arctic during the Late Cretaceous.

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Verden går i sort for 13. gang

I dag markeres 'Earth Hour' – et klimaopråb, hvor lysene slukkes i én time.

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Are Small Stars a Bit Useless?

For photon-eating life, smaller stars are unavoidably inferior providers – according to thermodynamics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Swamp Thing Is Coming Out Sooner Than You May Expect, and a Bunch of Other DC Universe Release Dates

This weekend is WonderCon, which means an opportunity for some exciting new announcements, and yesterday DC Universe dropped a whole bevy of ‘em. Read more…

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Google’s DeepMind asks what it means for AI to fail

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Marijuana is somehow making millions violently sick

Millions of long-time marijuana users are developing intense stomach pain, nausea and bouts of vomiting. The condition is called "cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome," or "CHS." What makes it happen is unclear, but the only way to stop it is to cease consumption of cannabis. None It's no longer illegal to smoke marijuana in 10 U.S. states and its medical use is allowed in 33. In Colorado, it's been

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Less than one-third of businesses plan to invest in AI: Survey

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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US intelligence wants to use your face to train AI systems

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Trump’s Order to Open Arctic Waters to Oil Drilling Was Unlawful, Federal Judge Finds

The decision has broad implications for Mr. Trump’s effort to push drilling across the American coastline and on public lands.

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Andrew Yang, presidential candidate, talks Space Force, drones, automation

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Air Force Capt. Mike Kanaan focuses on Artificial Intelligence

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Colorado River Basin states agree on ‘pain-sharing’ plan to deal with drought affecting 40 million Americans

But the stop-gap measure, now before Congress, includes a provision that some regard as a major step backward For the 40 million people who depend on water from the Colorado River Basin, including me, there’s no escaping this stark reality: Our thirst for water exceeds what’s actually available. That’s mostly because rising temperatures are sapping moisture from the environment even as demand for

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Geological Society of London Celebrates the First Female Fellows

An important upcoming conference on women in the geosciences happens on May 21st. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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WWF: Fortfarande viktigt med Earth Hour

På lördagskvällen 20.30 släcker världen lamporna för miljöns skull. För tolfte året i rad står Världsnaturfonden WWF bakom kampanjen Earth Hour, som startade i Sydney 2007 och blev global året därpå.

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How Pain Tolerance and Anxiety Seem to Be Connected

An article about the case of a woman who feels little pain or anxiety raised many questions, such as: Do low-anxiety people seem to feel less pain?

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Trump’s Order to Open Arctic Waters to Drilling Was Unlawful, Federal Judge Finds

The decision has broad implications for Mr. Trump’s effort to push drilling across the American coastline and on public lands.

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Rationalist Manifesto: Part 1 – Who Controls AI Design Choices

This is a story about you. This is a story about your life. Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, recently said “we’re not going to withhold technology from institutions that we have elected" as he defends his firm’s $479 million military contract for AI gear against employee outcries – and it has terrified me to write this manifesto – I hope you help spread its thoughts. Based on statistics regardi

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Mind games: what magic reveals about how our brains work

The art of magic offers a fascinating insight into the psychology of reality and perception The magician picks up a coin, conceals it in his hand and, after a magical gesture, it mysteriously disappears, only to reappear from behind your ear. As you watch this performance, you fully understand that objects cannot simply materialise from thin air, yet this is exactly what you have just experienced

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2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #13

A chronological listing of news articles posted on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week, i.e., Sun, Mar 24 through Sat, Mar 30, 2019 Editor's Pick Earth Hour 2019: switch off your lights, and become an innovator On March 30, millions of people switch off their lights for Earth Hour Let’s take 30 seconds to think about innovators. What do they look like? Where do they work? Wha

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Fireball Earth

Heads up! Our planet is under constant bombardment — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sega Genesis and Mega Drive mini consoles get September launch date

Sega around this time last year announced plans to produce a miniature version of its Mega Drive console, better known as the Sega Genesis in North America. The retro gaming system was due out …

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Bill Gates 'thrilled' by legislative boost for nuclear

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Big autonomous machines

submitted by /u/AangTheAirBender [link] [comments]

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The internet made us weird – just not in the right way

Technological advancements were supposed to free up our time and free up our minds, leading to a cognitive surplus. That hasn't happened, says Douglas Rushkoff. The digital media environment deals in absolutes: yes or no; thumbs up or thumbs down. Chasing weird uncertainties and lines of thought is not a trademark of today's culture. More time should equal more thought. But humanity seems to be s

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Garfield beach phone mystery solved after 30 years

For more than 30 years bright orange "Garfield" phones have been washing up on the French coast to the bemusement of local beach cleaners, who have finally cracked the mystery behind them.

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Weekend reads: Autism-“male brain” paper retracted; impact factor poison; meet a data detective

Before we present this week’s Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured a $112.5 million settlement at Duke following allegations of misconduct; … Continue reading Weekend reads: Autism-“male brai

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New Yorkers brace for self-cloning Asian longhorned tick

A new study maps out the increase and spread of the Asian longhorned tick, a new species identified last summer in Westchester and Staten island. What's particularly alarming is that the tick is notorious for its ability to quickly clone itself through asexual reproduction, or reproduce sexually, laying 1,000-2,000 eggs at a time.

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Space Photos of the Week: Keep Space Weird

From pulsars to asteroids, the dark nothingness is full of surprises.

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Kartoffel-scanner finder skjulte middelaldertekster

PLUS. Biblioteksforskere på SDU har fået hjælp af fynske maskinbyggere til at finde skjulte middelaldertekster i den store Herlufsholm-samling med hyperspektrale billeder.

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Unlucky Dylan McWilliams Takes on the Naked and Afraid Challenge

Dylan McWilliams, a survivor of rattlesnake, shark and bear attacks teams with Brooke, an elite hunter and wife of N&A veteran Matt Wright. Stream Full Episodes of Naked and Afraid: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/naked-and-afraid/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NakedandAfraid https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us o

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This Week’s Awesome Stories From Around the Web (Through March 30)

GENE EDITING Genome Engineers Made More Than 13,000 Genome Edits in a Single Cell Antonio Regalado | MIT Technology Review “The group, led by gene technologist George Church, wants to rewrite genomes at a far larger scale than has currently been possible, something it says could ultimately lead to the ‘radical redesign’ of species—even humans.” ROBOTICS Inside Google’s Rebooted Robotics Program C

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The Secrets of an Aging Athlete

Bestselling author and fitness guru Brad Kearns joins Get-Fit Guy, Brock Armstrong, to explain how we can stay fit now, and well into the future — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to enable 'dark mode' everywhere

DIY The guide to a more soothing visual experience on Android, iPhone, Windows, Youtube, Reddit, Slack, and more. Black text on a white background isn’t just boring, it’s blinding. When you’re using your phone or computer at night, the last thing you need is a bright screen torching…

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Stress | How it Shrinks Your Brain & Decreases Your Memory

submitted by /u/LizMeyers [link] [comments]

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Things We Loved in March: iPads, AirPods, Fitbits, and Pizza Ovens

These are the best products we tested, handled, and carried with us this month.

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Sci-Fi Writers Are Imagining a Path Back to Normality

The science fiction world has gotten more political recently, shouting back at the Trump administration's policies.

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Google Play Store’s Malware Problem, and More Security News This Week

Plus, Russia cracks down on VPNs, Microsoft cracks down on Iranian hackers, and more of the week's top security news.

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Spain Gets a New Fossil Flying Reptile

A fossil snout connects flying reptiles from the Iberian Peninsula and China. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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An Interview with Anthropologist Richard Wrangham – How humans domesticated themselves

http://www.spiegel.de/international/interview-with-anthropologist-richard-wrangham-a-1259252.html A very interesting observation of how humans (may have) evolved into less aggressive people (compared to say the chimpanzees), with similar traits as pets, and how this process is still going on. According to Wrangham, we bred out aggression by killing the alpha males. submitted by /u/Starfox5 [link]

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'The Leggings problem': can we just never hear about them again?

The spandex-based controversy has been broiling in the west for years; and it’s not just men policing women’s bodies, women are doing it to themselves Sign up for the Week in Patriarchy , a newsletter on feminism and sexism sent every Saturday. Continue reading…

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Frans de Waal (primatologist) – You’re such a social animal

The lifelong gratitude of a chimp de Waal taught to bottle-feed and adopt an orphan Trump's alpha male display during the 2016 debates How B.F. Skinner screwed up behavioral science for half a century None When I was a kid, there used to be a TV commercial for this series of animal videos you could order that were basically nothing but killing and sex. The tagline was "Find out why we call them .

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The science of CBD lags behind its marketing

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses the lack of scientific research on CBD.

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Readers respond to classroom robots, soil erosion and more

Readers had comments and questions about robots in classrooms, benzodiazepines and more.

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Why Do Babies Babble?

It's not nearly as nonsensical as it may seem.

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Gila Monster Photos: The Sluggish and Scaly Sweethearts of the American Desert

These modern-day monsters are a major part of the legend, lore and symbols of the American Wild West.

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The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending March 30, 2019)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv

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Apple AirPods (2019) Review: Little, Better, Not That Different

You’d think the new AirPods would be leaps and bounds better. That’s not the case.

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5 Best Rain Jackets for 2019: Lightweight, Hiking, and More

We test-drove more than a dozen rain jackets to get you outside this spring. These heavy and lightweight waterproof jackets kept us cool and dry in the city and on the trails.

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The Case of a Woman Who Feels Almost No Pain Leads Scientists to a New Gene Mutation

The discovery may have implications for treating acute and chronic pain — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Boaton dynamics robot doing heavy warehouse work.

submitted by /u/SaswataM18 [link] [comments]

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Valve Index virtual reality headset announced, to take on Oculus, Sony – CNET

As if there weren't enough VR headsets out there, the game maker Valve is throwing a hat into the ring. More to come in May.

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Ugens debat: Hvordan kunne det gå så galt med Viking sky?

Et firedobbelt motorstop under en storm gav sidste weekend store vanskeligheder for krydstogtskibet Viking Sky ud for Norge. Det lykkedes at genstarte tre motorer, og efter evakuering af næsten 500 passagerer kom skibet søndag i havn for egen kraft. Mange læsere på ing.dk havde teorier om, hvad d…

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Agnès Varda’s Films Made the Invisible Visible

PARIS—There’s a scene at the beginning of Faces Places , Agnès Varda and JR’s unassuming 2017 documentary of their road trip around France, when the film director and photographer meet a woman who refuses to move out of her home in public housing once built for families of coal miners, even though the local authorities want to move her elsewhere. Varda, a pioneer of the French New Wave who died o

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The Biggest 'Matrix' Question of All: Red Pill or Blue Pill?

Is it better to free your mind? Or live in blissful ignorance? Two WIRED writers argue it out.

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Machine Learning for March Madness Is a Competition In Itself

You’re more likely to win the Powerball jackpot than fill out the perfect bracket. So statisticians are using AI to improve these dismal odds as much as possible.

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17 Best Deals on Laptops, 4K TVs, and More Awesome Tech

Peruse our picks from Dell's March Madness sale, along with cheap workout headphones, smart tablets, and more.

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*The Matrix* Is Nothing Without Its Sequels—Nothing!

A cultural majority of dweeby gasbags holds that the *Matrix* sequels are trash. Go unplug yourself.

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Lights out in Sydney for Earth Hour conservation campaign

The Sydney Opera House and the Harbour Bridge were plunged into darkness for an hour Saturday to raise awareness about climate change and its impact on the planet's vanishing biodiversity.

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He Helped Create A.I. Now, He Worries About ‘Killer Robots.’

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Crispr Gene Editing Could One Day Cut Away Human Pain

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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The 5 biggest physics questions that LIGO's reboot could soon answer

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory is about to switch on after a big upgrade and it should tell us all about black holes and much more

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Barclays funds climate breakdown. We are determined to make it stop | Seema Syeda

The bank is a huge backer of the fossil fuel industry and attendant climate catastrophe. Direct action is vital From Cyclone Idai , which has killed hundreds in south-east Africa, to flooding in Bangladesh – where my family is from – for decades climate change has been devastating communities in the global south. More recently these effects have begun to be felt by people in the UK too: just last

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The Middle East’s Authoritarians Have Come for Conservationists

Amirhossein Khaleghi thought he knew danger. For much of the past 12 years, he had tracked Persian leopards and Asiatic cheetahs across the rugged splendor of Iran’s national parks. He would spend months at a time out in the bush, negotiating with sometimes hostile locals (such is his innate affability that he even persuaded notorious poachers to curtail their activities). He would spend months m

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Freedom Am Won: A Linguistic Mystery

When I was a tot, my mother made me read Alex Haley’s Roots all the way through. Even though my linguist days were far ahead of me, I was struck by one sentence: At the end of the Revolutionary War, a slave exclaims, “Freedom am won!” That seemed an off rendition of black speech to me then, and I assumed that Haley had innocently concocted that am usage. Yet Haley was hardly alone in putting into

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The Federal Government Gave Up on Retirement Security

Recently, the U.S. Treasury said that it is perfectly okay for companies to swindle employees out of their pension by offering one-time payments worth less than the pension that those employees are giving up. The Department of Labor, nominally responsible for protecting workers in retirement plans, said nothing. This isn’t the first time the government stood by as American businesses shifted risk

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Breaking up Big Tech not the answer: EU commissioner

Breaking up the world's tech titans is not the best way to counter their power, EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said Friday, while leaving room for that eventuality as a "last resort."

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Facebook to tighten live stream access after mosque attacks

Facebook on Friday said it is tightening live video streaming rules in response to the service being used to broadcast deadly attacks on mosques in New Zealand.

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Stranded baby elephants rescued by Thai rangers

Six baby elephants separated from their parents and trapped in a muddy pit for days have been rescued by park rangers in rural Thailand, officials said Saturday.

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Sheep nibble Madrid's largest park into shape

It's a rustic scene: sheep graze placidly on grass as a shepherd keeps watch. But this is Madrid's largest public park, not the tranquil countryside.

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Alaska bakes under heat wave linked to climate change

Alaska residents accustomed to subzero temperatures are experiencing a heat wave of sorts that is shattering records, with the thermometer jumping to more than 30 degrees Fahrenheit (16.7 Celsius) above normal in some regions.

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New Australian laws could see social media execs jailed over terror images

Australia pledged Saturday to introduce new laws that could see social media executives jailed and tech giants fined billions for failing to remove extremist material from their platforms.

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Stranded baby elephants rescued by Thai rangers

Six baby elephants separated from their parents and trapped in a muddy pit for days have been rescued by park rangers in rural Thailand, officials said Saturday.

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Sheep nibble Madrid's largest park into shape

It's a rustic scene: sheep graze placidly on grass as a shepherd keeps watch. But this is Madrid's largest public park, not the tranquil countryside.

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Financial pressure mounts to fix Boeing's troubled jetliner

Boeing is facing mounting pressure to roll out a software update on its best-selling plane in time for airlines to use the jets during the peak summer travel season.

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US boots on the Moon in 2024? It won't be easy

For the past 15 years, America has sought to put its astronauts back on the Moon, but NASA did not think it could be done before 2028.

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Giant viruses have weaponised CRISPR against their bacterial hosts

Hundreds of giant viruses that infect bacteria have been discovered. Some seem to deploy CRISPR – the system used for gene editing – to fight their hosts

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EROI on full life cycle of Tesla Powerwall combined with Solar?

Hi I really would like to know what the eroi is of solar panels and say a Tesla powerwall when manufacturing, transportation and recycling are taken into account. Previous studies I've seen did not seem to take these into account. Can anyone point me towards some good research on this? If we are to switch to a distributed solar + battery storage energy grid, I think it's very important that we ge

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Venus may have had a climate suitable for life billions of years ago

Nowadays, Venus is sweltering with no liquid water on its surface. But billions of years ago it may have had an ocean and a relatively pleasant climate

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New research, March 18-24, 2019

A selection of new climate related research articles is shown below. This post has separate sections for: Climate Change, Climate Change Impacts, Climate Change Mitigation, and Other Papers. Climate change mitigation Climate change communication The growth of climate change misinformation in US philanthropy: evidence from natural language processing (open access) Just don't call it climate change

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Spørg Fagfolket: Når der overhovedet noget koffein med ud i en espresso?

Det går hurtigt at lave en espresso, og eftersom det tager tid at trække koffein ud, betyder det så, at der næsten ikke er noget koffein i espresso. Det svarer Copenhagen Coffee Lab på.

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Can organisms survive on Mars, and can we identify them?

submitted by /u/Xaron [link] [comments]

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Trips to the toilet at night are a sign of high blood pressure

Trips to the toilet at night are a sign of high blood pressure, according to results from the Watari study presented today at the 83rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society (JCS 2019).

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Svampesygdom forårsager massedød: Hundredevis af paddearter er truede

Med menneskers hjælp har en svampesygdom udryddet op mod 90 arter af frøer, tudser og salamandere.

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Se: hela universums historia på två minuter

Med sin nya bok tar historikern David Christian sig an hela universums förflutna. Han menar att bara genom att se helheten kan vi förstå världen idag och vad som väntar mänskligheten i framtiden.

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How we make decision

submitted by /u/Scripit [link] [comments]

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The Jeep Gladiator Pickup Is an Off-Roading Tough Mudder

The $33,545 Gladiator is made for the toughest off-road conditions you can find—with a few creature comforts thrown in.

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Tasmanian devils 'adapting to coexist with cancer'

There is hope for the world's largest carnivorous marsupials whose numbers have been ravaged by disease.

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Photothermal-responsive nanosized hybrid polymersome as versatile therapeutics codelivery nanovehicle for effective tumor suppression [Medical Sciences]

Effective cancer therapies often demand delivery of combinations of drugs to inhibit multidrug resistance through synergism, and the development of multifunctional nanovehicles with enhanced drug loading and delivery efficiency for combination therapy is currently a major challenge in nanotechnology. However, such combinations are more challenging to administer than single drugs…

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Shining light on microbial signaling to distant organs [Commentaries]

Almost all organisms, from insects to mammals, have coevolved with microorganisms, establishing symbiotic interactions. Whereas most such interactions are based on nutrition (1), there are other examples, among which one of the most well studied is symbioses involving light-emitting bacteria. The bobtailed squid, Euprymna scolopes, forms a symbiosis with the…

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Loss of postnatal quiescence of neural stem cells through mTOR activation upon genetic removal of cysteine string protein-{alpha} [Neuroscience]

Neural stem cells continuously generate newborn neurons that integrate into and modify neural circuitry in the adult hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms that regulate or perturb neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we have found that mouse hippocampal radial glia-like (RGL) neural stem cells express the…

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Hepatic posttranscriptional network comprised of CCR4-NOT deadenylase and FGF21 maintains systemic metabolic homeostasis [Medical Sciences]

Whole-body metabolic homeostasis is tightly controlled by hormone-like factors with systemic or paracrine effects that are derived from nonendocrine organs, including adipose tissue (adipokines) and liver (hepatokines). Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a hormone-like protein, which is emerging as a major regulator of whole-body metabolism and has therapeutic potential…

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Small-molecule factor B inhibitor for the treatment of complement-mediated diseases [Immunology and Inflammation]

Dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway (AP) predisposes individuals to a number of diseases including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and C3 glomerulopathy. Moreover, glomerular Ig deposits can lead to complement-driven nephropathies. Here we describe the discovery of a highly potent, reversible, and selective small-molecule inhibitor of factor

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Precise small-molecule cleavage of an r(CUG) repeat expansion in a myotonic dystrophy mouse model [Applied Biological Sciences]

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an incurable neuromuscular disorder caused by an expanded CTG repeat that is transcribed into r(CUG)exp. The RNA repeat expansion sequesters regulatory proteins such as Muscleblind-like protein 1 (MBNL1), which causes pre-mRNA splicing defects. The disease-causing r(CUG)exp has been targeted by antisense oligonucleotides, CRISPR-based approaches,…

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Spontaneous driving forces give rise to protein-RNA condensates with coexisting phases and complex material properties [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Phase separation of multivalent protein and RNA molecules underlies the biogenesis of biomolecular condensates such as membraneless organelles. In vivo, these condensates encompass hundreds of distinct types of molecules that typically organize into multilayered structures supporting the differential partitioning of molecules into distinct regions with distinct material properties. The interplay..

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Unsupervised learning by competing hidden units [Computer Sciences]

It is widely believed that end-to-end training with the backpropagation algorithm is essential for learning good feature detectors in early layers of artificial neural networks, so that these detectors are useful for the task performed by the higher layers of that neural network. At the same time, the traditional form…

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Slowdown of the Walker circulation at solar cycle maximum [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC) fluctuates on interannual and multidecadal timescales under the influence of internal variability and external forcings. Here, we provide observational evidence that the 11-y solar cycle (SC) affects the PWC on decadal timescales. We observe a robust reduction of east–west sea-level pressure gradients over the Indo-Pacific…

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Disease mortality in domesticated animals is predicted by host evolutionary relationships [Evolution]

Infectious diseases of domesticated animals impact human well-being via food insecurity, loss of livelihoods, and human infections. While much research has focused on parasites that infect single host species, most parasites of domesticated mammals infect multiple species. The impact of multihost parasites varies across hosts; some rarely result in death,…

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Advances in understanding the long-term population decline of monarch butterflies [Commentaries]

Monarch butterflies are an icon of nature: spectacular in form, known for their unfathomable annual migration, and frequent visitors in our backyards (Fig. 1). It is no wonder they are a darling among invertebrates. And what has now captured our attention is the striking and precipitous decline of monarch populations…

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Predicting future invaders and future invasions [Ecology]

Invasive alien species are a great threat to biodiversity and human livelihoods worldwide. The most effective way to limit their impacts and costs is to prevent their introduction into new areas. Identifying invaders and invasions before their occurrence would arguably be the most efficient strategy. Here, we provide a profiling…

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Synthetic ubiquitinated proteins meet the proteasome: Distinct roles of ubiquitin in a chain [Commentaries]

Protein homeostasis is tightly regulated, and multiple cellular mechanisms are in place to dispose of misfolded or no-longer-needed proteins. One of the key players is the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome system (UPS), in which a variety of specific ligases mark substrate proteins with a Ub “flag” to be recognized by the proteolytic…

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Structural analysis of Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing 2 (PSR2) reveals a conserved modular fold contributing to virulence [Plant Biology]

Phytophthora are eukaryotic pathogens that cause enormous losses in agriculture and forestry. Each Phytophthora species encodes hundreds of effector proteins that collectively have essential roles in manipulating host cellular processes and facilitating disease development. Here we report the crystal structure of the effector Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing 2 (PSR2)….

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Apple's AirPower Gets the Ax, Rickshaws Get a Boost, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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Google Accidentally Outs Nest Home Hub Max With 10-inch Smart Display

Home smart devices have increasingly become multifunctional and serve consumers through screens, cameras, stereos, and virtual assistants. Google already offers a range of home devices, but …

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Book Review: Building a Foundation in Environmental Citizen Science

Dickinson, Janis L. & Bonney, Rick. (eds). Citizen Science: Public Participation in Environmental Research. Cornell University Press, 2012. 279 pages. Paperback $US 29.95. Though it was published in 2012, Citizen Science: Public Participation in Environmental Research is relevant to our present moment. As discussions of environmental research increase in frequency and urgency, institutions at all

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Gastrointestinal complaints in children could signal future mental health problem

Researchers have linked disruption of a child's gastrointestinal microbiome triggered by early-life adversity — such as parental separation — with activity in the regions of the brain associated with emotional health.

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Poor lung function in shorter people linked to increased risk of heart disease

Results from a new study has found that an association between shorter stature and higher risk of heart disease is mainly attributed to our lungs.

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Does March Madness Really Mean 'Vasectomy Season'?

According to some news outlets, March Madness is tied to an increase in men getting vasectomies. But is this real, or just hearsay?

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Fossil Site Reveals Day That Meteor Hit Earth and, Maybe, Wiped Out Dinosaurs

A jumble of entombed plants and creatures offers a vivid glimpse of the apocalypse that all but ended life 66 million years ago.

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Facebook to tighten live stream access after mosque attacks

Facebook on Friday said it is tightening live video streaming rules in response to the service being used to broadcast deadly attacks on mosques in New Zealand.

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58 percent off a quadcopter drone and other great deals happening today

Gadgets The low-down on the day's best discounts. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Supercomputers help supercharge protein assembly

Using proteins derived from jellyfish, scientists assembled a complex sixteen protein structure composed of two stacked octamers by supercharging alone. This research could be applied to useful technologies such as pharmaceutical targeting, artificial energy harvesting, 'smart' sensing and building materials, and more. Computational modeling through XSEDE allocations on Stampede2 (TACC) and Comet

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Consider women juggling research/childcare

Offering financial aid to cover childcare costs for female academics attending conferences is one of the suggestions offered by researchers who surveyed Australian women on how caring for children has affected their careers. They also recommend institutions and funding bodies that use publication and citation benchmarks as a key criteria for appointment, promotion and the awarding of grants should

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New gene essential for making ears of corn

New research extends the growing biological understanding of how different parts of corn plants develop, which is important information for a crop that is a mainstay of the global food supply.

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The Atlantic Daily: A Billion Dollar-Losing Company Goes Public

What We’re Following Lyft became a public company on Friday with an eye-popping $24 billion valuation —yet the company lost nearly a billion dollars last year. So why are Wall Street bigwigs pouring money into the company? Alongside Uber, Lyft is one of two ride-sharing behemoths—and with about 40 percent of the market, it’s quickly gaining on its archrival. The company is accumulating users, but

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Apple killed AirPower because a dead product is better than a bad one

Gadgets Apple has "high standards" and couldn't get this wireless charging pad to meet them. RIP AirPower. We never even knew you.

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Here's What Scientists Hope to Learn as LIGO Resumes Hunting Gravitational Waves

After a year of downtime to perform hardware upgrades, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is ready for action and will turn on its twin detectors, one in Washington state and the other in Louisiana, on April 1. This time, it will also be joined by the Virgo collaboration based out of Italy, and possibly also by the KAGRA detector in Japan later in the year. Combined wit

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Hunting Cosmic Fireworks in the Magellanic Clouds

The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) are two of the most stunning naked-eye sights you can spot in the southern sky. Over the past few billion years, these two satellite galaxies of the Milky Way have been locked in a complex dance that has led to numerous interactions between them. And each time they get close, their gravitational forces disrupt the gas clouds wit

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The Case for Trident: NASA's Shrinking Window for a Mission to Triton

The last and only time astronomers got a close look at Neptune’s moon Triton was in 1989, when Voyager 2 sped by, taking images of just one side of the moon. But that brief encounter revealed plumes of material shooting out from a world so distant and cold that any activity was immediately fascinating. Scientists now think the moon has an underground ocean. This makes it a prime target for finding

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Quantum teleportation is real, but it's not what you think

Science A commute so quick you could just die. A neat trick known as quantum teleportation could be the secret to super-secure data transfers—but it won't get you to work.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Final Countdown

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, March 29. ‣ Linda McMahon, a former pro-wrestling executive and the current head of the Small Business Administration, will reportedly resign from her position to chair President Donald Trump’s super PAC, America First Action. Here’s what else we’re watching: Will the Public Ever See the Mueller Report?: Attorney General William Barr said he plans to share

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RIP AirPower: Apple Kills Its Elusive Wireless Charging Pad

The iPhone charging accessory was announced in September 2017 but failed to materialize. And now it never will.

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NASA Announces Successful Completion of ISS Spacewalk

ISS Success It wasn’t the spacewalk that was planned, but it was a success nonetheless. On Friday, NASA astronauts Nick Hague and Christina Koch left the relative safety of the International Space Station’s (ISS) interior to embark on a nearly seven-hour-long spacewalk that wrapped up at 2:27 p.m. EDT. Substitute Spacewalker Astronaut Anne McClain was originally supposed to join Koch on this ISS

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Waste Disposal

Are there any or has there ever been, a project idea to dispose of waste by firing toward the sun ? Are there any papers or articles about everything required to send it up, then figure out how to aim it toward our star? submitted by /u/stevec0000 [link] [comments]

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Judas Iscariot: The Mysterious Disciple Who Betrayed Jesus with a Kiss

Was Judas nothing more than a greedy villain?

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Canadians Sue Ontario for Canceling Its Basic Income Trial

Early Grave Participants in a canceled basic income trial aren’t giving up the money without a fight. In April 2017, Ontario, Canada, announced plans to launch a basic income experiment. It was supposed to last for three years, but Ontario canceled it after just one — and now several of the project’s participants have filed a class-action lawsuit against the province for the hardship that early c

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Gastrointestinal complaints in children could signal future mental health problems

Columbia University researchers are among the first to link disruption of a child's gastrointestinal microbiome triggered by early-life adversity — such as parental separation — with activity in the regions of the brain associated with emotional health.

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Apple pulls plug on AirPower wireless charging mat

Apple confirmed on Friday that it will not deliver on its promise of helping usher in a wireless future with an AirPower mat for charging its devices.

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Investors hitch a ride on Lyft's IPO at $72 a share

Lyft had little trouble getting investors to hop on board its increasingly popular ride-hailing service, as its initial public offering fetched a $72 per-share price that exceeded even its own …

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Dual rotors could make the Defiant one of the world's fastest helicopters

Technology This machine will challenge the way you think about chopper design. The Defiant sports a coaxial design and big pusher propeller in the back, for speed.

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Quantum optical cooling of nanoparticles

One important requirement to see quantum effects is to remove all thermal energy from the particle motion, i.e. to cool it as close as possible to absolute zero temperature. Researchers are now one step closer to reaching this goal by demonstrating a new method for cooling levitated nanoparticles.

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Odd reaction creates a stir in the lab

Chemists show how PTFE – aka Teflon – in standard lab stir bars affects a chemical reaction used to reduce nanotubes, skewing the results.

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Supercomputers help supercharge protein assembly

Red blood cells are amazing. They pick up oxygen from our lungs and carry it all over our body to keep us alive. The hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells transports oxygen by changing its shape in an all-or-nothing fashion. Four copies of the same protein in hemoglobin open and close like flower petals, structurally coupled to respond to each other. Using supercomputers, scientists are just star

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Crispr Gene Editing Could One Day Cut Away Human Pain

But the technology could also, theoretically, be used to develop placid super-soldiers.

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EPA panel seeks to bring back fired scientists for clean-air review

Critics say the panel lacks necessary expertise

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Stunning discovery offers glimpse of minutes following 'dinosaur-killer' Chicxulub impact

At a site called Tanis in North Dakota's Hell Creek Formation, a team of paleontologists whose headquarters are at the University of Kansas unearthed a motherlode of exquisitely preserved animal and fish fossils that were killed suddenly in events triggered by the Chicxulub impact.

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Exercise is more critical than diet to maintain weight loss

The study showed successful weight-loss maintainers rely on physical activity to remain in energy balance (rather than chronic restriction of dietary intake) to avoid weight regain. Successful weight-loss maintainers are individuals who maintain a reduced body weight of 30 pounds or more for over a year. The study, published in the March issue of Obesity, was selected as the Editor's Choice articl

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April Fools hoax stories could offer clues to help identify 'fake news'

Academic experts in natural language processing who are interested in deception have compared the language used within written April Fools hoaxes and fake news stories. They have discovered that there are similarities in the written structure of humorous April Fools hoaxes — the spoof articles published by media outlets every April 1 — and malicious fake news stories.

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Hyundai finds new engine problem, prompting another recall

Hyundai has found a new problem that can cause its car engines to fail or catch fire, issuing yet another recall to fix problems that have affected more than 6 million vehicles during the past 3,5 years.

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Supercomputers help supercharge protein assembly

Red blood cells are amazing. They pick up oxygen from our lungs and carry it all over our body to keep us alive. The hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells transports oxygen by changing its shape in an all-or-nothing fashion. Four copies of the same protein in hemoglobin open and close like flower petals, structurally coupled to respond to each other. Using supercomputers, scientists are just star

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Here's What the Speed of Light Looks Like in Slow Motion

What does the speed of light look like? CalTech researchers built the world's fastest camera to find out.

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Notorious "swatter" gets 20 years behind bars

Fifteen months after the most infamous instance of ‘swatting’ drew the world’s attention to the practice, Tyler Barriss – the man who made the hoax call – has been sentenced to 20 years in prison.

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How 'The Matrix' Built a Bullet-Proof Legacy

Before its release, audiences had never seen anything like the Wachowskis' sci-fi action flick—and they were about to be blown away.

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Solar carports thrive on dual-use concept

submitted by /u/bebesiege [link] [comments]

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Only 60 Years of Farming Left If Soil Degradation Continues

submitted by /u/WarbleHead [link] [comments]

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Researchers Detect “Deep Groundwater” on Mars

Deep Mars Researchers at the University of Southern California dropped a bold claim Thursday: based on a new analysis, Mars likely harbors a “deep groundwater” system that probably extends far beyond the planet’s poles and bubbles to the surface through cracks in craters. “We have seen the same mechanisms in the North African Sahara and in the Arabian Peninsula, and it helped us explore the same

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Pointing molecules in the right direction yields a better plastic

Pointing molecules in the right direction yields a better plastic Pointing molecules in the right direction yields a better plastic, Published online: 29 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01020-0 An extra ingredient reroutes reaction, creating a sturdy plastic instead of a sticky liquid.

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We Shouldn't be Scared of Nuclear Rockets in Space

A few weeks ago, a spending bill passed by Congress included $100 million earmarked for NASA to develop nuclear thermal rocket engines. In spite of the ever-present backlash to nuclear material, it’s not uncommon when it comes to space exploration. The Curiosity rover is just one of many NASA missions powered by nuclear material, in this case, a multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator

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Supercomputers help supercharge protein assembly

Using proteins derived from jellyfish, scientists assembled a complex sixteen protein structure composed of two stacked octamers by supercharging alone. This research could be applied to useful technologies such as pharmaceutical targeting, artificial energy harvesting, 'smart' sensing and building materials, and more. Computational modeling through XSEDE allocations on Stampede2 (TACC) and Comet

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Gadget Lab Podcast: The Case for Male Birth Control

Contraceptives for men have been explored in some way since at least the 1950’s, but there haven’t been many viable options. A new sperm-reducing gel could change that.

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Infecting Females with STDs Could Give Male Animals an Advantage

Infecting Females with STDs Could Give Male Animals an Advantage Some male animals may evolve weak immune responses so they can give their mates diseases. mating-ladybugs_cropped.jpg Image credits: Christian Gloor via Flickr Creature Friday, March 29, 2019 – 15:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — In the battle of the sexes, sexually transmitted diseases may sometimes be a weapon that

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These Scientists Are 3D-Printing New Body Parts for Athletes

Injuries Out A team of bioengineers has successfully 3D-printed tissues they believe doctors could one day implant into patients to help heal the knee, ankle, and elbow injuries that have ended the careers of countless athletes. “I think this will be a powerful tool to help people with common sports injuries,” Rice University researcher Sean Bittner said in a press release — though the impact of

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See what happens when tapeworms infest your brain

Health A tragic case report shows the horrifying result when tapeworms don't stay confined to your intestines. Tapeworms are revolting no matter where you find them, but at least in your gut they’re where they belong. We are, unfortunately, their primary host and, as parasites,…

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The Family Weekly: For Survivors of Mass Shootings, There’s No Straight Line to Recovery

(Emma Gonzalez’ sneaker, on the one year anniversary of the school shooting in Parkland Florida. Mike Segar / Reuters ) This Week in Family At the tail end of March, three people affected by school shootings died by suicide; two were survivors of the Parkland, Florida, massacre last year, and the third was the father of a student killed in 2012 at Sandy Hook Elementary School. It’s not uncommon f

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NASA Tests Mars 2020 Helicopter Under Mars-Like Conditions

Helicopters are a common sight in the skies above Earth, but they may soon come to the red planet. The post NASA Tests Mars 2020 Helicopter Under Mars-Like Conditions appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Space Agency Seeks Women to Stay in Bed for 2 Months. Pancakes Will Be Provided.

Would you be willing to spend 60 days in bed for $19,000?

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Ever dream of controlling robot swarms? This new virtual reality headset could help

New system lets humans move up to 50 robots with a flick of the wrist

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Sun-loving microbe chows down on electricity for fuel

A new study explains the cellular processes that allow a sun-loving microbe to “eat” electricity—transferring electrons to fix carbon dioxide to fuel its growth. Researchers showed how a naturally occurring strain of Rhodopseudomonas palustris takes up electrons from conductive substances like metal oxides or rust. The work appears in the journal Nature Communications . The study builds on a prev

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A mysterious disease is ravaging Florida's coral, and now it might be spreading elsewhere

Environment Even if it's not stony coral tissue loss disease, the reefs are in trouble. Recent reports suggest that stony coral tissue loss disease, which has ravaged Florida reefs over the last half-decade, has moved into the Caribbean.

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Uterine artery embolization can be considered for well controlled symptomatic leiomyomas

A new study published in the April 2019 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) investigates the safety of uterine artery embolization (UAE) for symptomatic leiomyomas in patients with various autoimmune diseases.

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Contrast-enhanced MRI provides useful findings in discordant core biopsy management

An essential part of breast intervention is the process of assessing concordance between imaging findings and core biopsy results. When pathology results are considered benign discordant, current standard of care is surgical excision, even though many of these lesions will ultimately be found benign.

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Lumbar spine MRI reports are too difficult for patients to understand

As increasing numbers of patients gain online access to their radiology reports, a new study published in the April 2019 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) assesses how thoroughly patients understand these complex documents.

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Patient factors contribute to imaging follow-up rates

A new study published in the April 2019 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) considers several potential factors that might have led to disparities in follow-up imaging rates among patients with indeterminate initial abdominal imaging findings.

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Frog-Killing Chytrid Fungus Far Deadlier than Scientists Realized

A survey reveals the disease has decimated populations in Central and South America and tropical Australia and contributed to the extinction of 90 species.

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The New Old Age: Where There’s Rarely a Doctor in the House: Assisted Living

As residents become older and more frail, some facilities are bringing in doctors and nurses instead of relying on 911.

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Backchat: Calls for a research moratorium, and the evolution of science reporting.

Backchat: Calls for a research moratorium, and the evolution of science reporting. Backchat: Calls for a research moratorium, and the evolution of science reporting., Published online: 29 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01051-7 Benjamin Thompson hosts our regular roundtable discussion, with guests David Cyranoski, Alison Abbott and Heidi Ledford.

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Doctors more likely to prescribe preventive therapy if prompted by EMR

Penn Medicine study shows technology tied to patient records pushing doctors toward a new therapy was more effective than just peer education.

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The ‘Caliphate’ Is Gone. Where’s the ‘Caliph’?

As the last shred of Islamic State territory in Syria fell to Kurdish-backed forces this month, thousands of people, including fighters, fled the enclave or surrendered. Yet when the exodus was over and the “caliphate” was extinguished, a mystery lingered: Where was the “caliph”? “We don’t know where he is,” James Jeffrey, the U.S. special envoy to the global coalition to defeat ISIS, told report

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Photos of the Week: Stasi Museum, Pink Lake, Swamp Creature

A volcanic eruption in Mexico, a drifting cruise ship off Norway’s coast, a skyscraper fire in Bangladesh, “Mausoleum of the Giants” in England, the end of the ISIS “caliphate” in Syria, severe flooding in Mozambique, a festival along the Salton Sea, another crippling blackout in Venezuela, severe flooding in Nebraska, a slimy Chris Pratt in Los Angeles, a Trump rally in Michigan, and much more

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Under just the right light , ice turns into a twisting labyrinth

Under just the right light , ice turns into a twisting labyrinth Under just the right light , ice turns into a twisting labyrinth, Published online: 29 March 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01005-z Ice absorbs near-infrared light more efficiently than does water, triggering the formation of intricate patterns.

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New plant breeding technologies for food security

Scientists argue that new plant breeding technologies can contribute significantly to food security and sustainable development. Genome editing techniques in particular, such as CRISPR/Cas, could help to make agriculture more productive and environmentally friendly. The researchers advocate the responsible use and support of these new technologies.

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Sweeping census provides new population estimate for western chimpanzees

A sweeping new census estimates 52,800 western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) live in eight countries in western Africa, with most of them found outside of protected areas, some of which are threatened by intense development pressures.

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Two new genes discovered in the developmental defects of canine enamel

In addition to humans, hereditary disorders of enamel development occur in dogs, greatly impacting their dental health and wellbeing. A recent study reveals canine enamel disorders similar to those found in humans, linking them with ENAM and ACP4, two genes previously described in humans.

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Hubble spots flock of cosmic ducks

This star-studded image shows us a portion of Messier 11, an open star cluster in the southern constellation of Scutum (the Shield). Messier 11 is also known as the Wild Duck Cluster, as its brightest stars form a 'V' shape that somewhat resembles a flock of ducks in flight.

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This Robot Reads the Bible to Old People in Nursing Homes

BibleBot Seniors in search of some high-tech companionship may find comfort in a small robot that can listen to them and read relevant scripture. SanTO is a foot-and-a-half tall robot resembles the sort of altar or figurine a Catholic may use to decorate their home. But it’s equipped with software it uses to listen to people, scan their faces for signs of specific emotions, and select religious t

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Chicxulub asteroid impact: Stunning fossils record dinosaurs' demise

Remarkable specimens shed light on the minutes and hours following the Earth-changing asteroid strike.

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More adults wrongly think vaping is worse than cigarettes

An increasing number of US adults believe e-cigarettes are as or more harmful to health than cigarettes, research finds. The study, which appears in JAMA Network Open , finds the proportion of American adults who perceived e-cigarettes to be more harmful than cigarettes more than tripled from 2012 to 2017. During the same period, the percentage of US adults who perceived e-cigarettes to be equall

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Can a protein in cord blood predict risk of death, cerebral palsy in preterm infants?

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that some preterm babies born without haptoglobin, a protein in blood cells, have higher odds of brain bleeding, cerebral palsy and death. Their findings suggest that the absence of the protein could serve as a potential biomarker indicating a need for increased monitoring or other preventive interventions.

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Scientists develop way to perform supercomputer simulations of the heart on cellphones

You can now perform supercomputer simulations of the heart's electrophysiology in real time on desktop computers and even cellphones. A team of scientists from Rochester Institute of Technology and Georgia Tech developed a new approach that can not only help diagnose heart conditions and test new treatments, but pushes the boundaries of cardiac science by opening up a floodgate of new cardiac rese

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March's Stellar Space Pictures

Space Spring has sprung: Interstellar edition. 03/29/2019 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator To read more…

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March's Stellar Space Pictures

March's Stellar Space Pictures Spring has sprung: Interstellar edition. 1crop_exoplanet2b.jpg An illustration of potential plants on an alien planet that orbits two suns. Image credits: Mark Garlick Space Friday, March 29, 2019 – 14:00 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — This March, we take a look at images of space that echo the signs of spring we're starting to see in the Nort

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Last week in tech: New Apple services, a super-strong robotic ostrich, and more

Technology This isn't just content—it's content plus. Look back at all the week's big news stories and check out the latest edition of the Techathlon podcast.

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Evidence of pair-density wave in spin-valley locked systems

Cooper pairs with a finite center-of-mass momentum form a remarkable state in which the superconducting order parameter is modulated periodically in space. Although intense interest in such a "pair-density wave" (PDW) state has emerged due to recent discoveries in high T c superconductors, there is little theoretical understanding of the mechanism driving this exotic state. The challenge is that

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Experimental learning of quantum states

The number of parameters describing a quantum state is well known to grow exponentially with the number of particles. This scaling limits our ability to characterize and simulate the evolution of arbitrary states to systems, with no more than a few qubits. However, from a computational learning theory perspective, it can be shown that quantum states can be approximately learned using a number of

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Optical pulling at macroscopic distances

Optical tractor beams, proposed in 2011 and experimentally demonstrated soon after, offer the ability to pull particles against light propagation. It has attracted much research and public interest. Yet, its limited microscopic-scale range severely restricts its applicability. The dilemma is that a long-range Bessel beam, the most accessible beam for optical traction, has a small half-cone angle,

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Labyrinth ice pattern formation induced by near-infrared irradiation

Patterns are broad phenomena that relate to biology, chemistry, and physics. The dendritic growth of crystals is the most well-known ice pattern formation process. Tyndall figures are water-melting patterns that occur when ice absorbs light and becomes superheated. Here, we report a previously undescribed ice and water pattern formation process induced by near-infrared irradiation that heats one

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Nanoscale ferroelastic twins formed in strained LaCoO3 films

The coexistence and coupling of ferroelasticity and magnetic ordering in a single material offers a great opportunity to realize novel devices with multiple tuning knobs. Complex oxides are a particularly promising class of materials to find multiferroic interactions due to their rich phase diagrams, and are sensitive to external perturbations. Still, there are very few examples of these systems.

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Label-free surface-sensitive photonic microscopy with high spatial resolution using azimuthal rotation illumination

Surface plasmon resonance microscopy (SPRM) with single-direction illumination is a powerful platform for biomedical imaging because of its wide-field, label-free, and high-surface-sensitivity imaging capabilities. However, two disadvantages prevent wider use of SPRM. The first is its poor spatial resolution that can be as large as several micrometers. The second is that SPRM requires use of meta

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Contribution of biomimetic collagen-ligand interaction to intrafibrillar mineralization

Contemporary models of intrafibrillar mineralization mechanisms are established using collagen fibrils as templates without considering the contribution from collagen-bound apatite nucleation inhibitors. However, collagen matrices destined for mineralization in vertebrates contain bound matrix proteins for intrafibrillar mineralization. Negatively charged, high–molecular weight polycarboxylic aci

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Intermolecular dialkylation of alkenes with two distinct C(sp3)boxhH bonds enabled by synergistic photoredox catalysis and iron catalysis

The functionalization of unactivated C(sp 3 )H bonds represents one of the most powerful and most atom-economical tools for the formation of new carbon-based chemical bonds in synthesis. Although cross-dehydrogenative coupling reactions of two distinct CH bonds for the formation of carbon-carbon bonds have been well investigated, controlled functionalizations of two or more different C(sp 3 )H bo

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Why Don’t We Have Functional Biofuel Yet?

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Boston Dynamics New Robot – Will it Take our Jobs?

submitted by /u/MightEnlightenYou [link] [comments]

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Engineering for high-speed devices

A research team from the University of Delaware has developed cutting-edge technology for photonics devices that could enable faster communications between phones and computers.

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Making waves: Researchers shed light on how cilia work

Scientists have found the most efficient length for cilia, the tiny hair-like structures designed to sweep out the body's fluids, cells and microbes to stay healthy.

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Proposed reintroduction of the Eurasian lynx to Scotland

Experts have used an innovative approach to model the proposed reintroduction of the Eurasian lynx to Scotland.

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Need to increase diversity within genetic data sets

Polygenic scores developed by studying Europeans do a better job at predicting disease risk for people of European ancestry than for those of other ancestries.

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Making waves: Researchers shed light on how cilia work

Scientists have found the most efficient length for cilia, the tiny hair-like structures designed to sweep out the body's fluids, cells and microbes to stay healthy.

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UN talks on space peace treaty fail to reach consensus

United Nations-backed talks to prevent an arms race in outer space ended without agreement on Friday, delivering another blow to global disarmament diplomacy.

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Climate Change May Be Giving You Seasonal Allergies

Changing Seasons If you’ve found yourself suffering from seasonal allergies more often in recent years, climate change might be to blame. Recorded shifts in when the four seasons begin and end are just one example of how man-made climate change is affecting our planet. Now, a new study provides evidence that places in the United States where spring is starting earlier or later than normal are see

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Watch a desert kangaroo rat drop-kick a rattlesnake

Desert kangaroo rats have a wide arsenal for dodging rattlesnake ambushes. But the most dramatic might be their powerful midair kick.

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Antihistamine-infused Contact Lenses Could Help With Allergies

With the warm weather upon us and the once-frozen plants coming back to life, springtime feels like a long-awaited oasis for most people. But for some, the resurgence of trees and grass can trigger seasonal allergies, and turn springtime into a sneezy, snotty mess. Instead of just popping your allergy meds and hoping for the best, a group of researchers think they may have just enabled a new appro

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Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Stew In Wastewater Treatment Plants

Antibiotics save us from all kinds of unfortunate ailments, from strep throat to ear infections. But the bacteria that cause these and other ailments are gaining an edge. Antibiotic resistant bacteria are on the rise around the world and spreading in people as well as the environment, making it harder to treat infectious diseases. Antibiotic resistant bacteria grow in places that humans interact w

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George Dantzig: The real Will Hunting

One of the iconic scenes from Good Will Hunting shows Matt Damon's character anonymously solving a nigh-impossible math problem on a blackboard at the university where he works as a janitor. This story, while modified for the purposes of the film, actually happened. George Dantzig, who would later become a famous mathematician, was late to his graduate statistics class one day when he saw two sta

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Last-minute deal grants European money to U.K.-based fusion reactor

Joint European Torus fusion reactor in the United Kingdom gets €100 million to continue to operate as a European facility

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Mary Warnock, Who Offered Guidance on Embryo Use, Dies at 94

Ms. Warnock a British moral philosopher, oversaw a committee that examined how to regulate the creation of human life in laboratories.

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Plastic Bags, or Paper? Here’s What to Consider When You Hit the Grocery Store

Plastic and paper both have downsides. Here are a few broad lessons to keep in mind.

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Indian missile adds to space debris risks | Letter

The country’s anti-satellite missile test should be condemned, writes Sa’id Mosteshar On Wednesday the space Mission Shakti was carried out by India, in which it successfully targeted a low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite ( Report , 28 March). Prime Minister Narendra Modi declared: “In the journey of every nation there are moments that bring pride and have a historic impact on generations to come. One

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This Silly, Bug-Eyed Dwarf Deity Was Defender of 'Everything Good'

Archaeologists recently found a piece of pottery decorated with the funny face of an ancient deity who is often depicted as a bearded dwarf with a big face and bug eyes.

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Not Quite Triplets, Not Just Siblings

Five weeks ago, a 20-year-old named Arifa Sultana delivered a baby in a hospital in southwestern Bangladesh. As the BBC has reported , Sultana had received limited prenatal care in her rural village, but she had no problems during delivery and returned home with her husband and infant son. Less than a month later, on March 21, Sultana was rushed to another hospital with stomach pain and another b

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Veep’s Final Season Ponders a Horrifying Thought

This article contains minor plot details for the first three episodes of Veep , Season 7. It’s no spoiler to say that the once and possibly future President Selina Meyer (played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus) finds herself in a colossally embarrassing situation early in the seventh season of Veep . Her life is generally a parade of mortification and mishaps, interrupted by moments of power-grabbing glor

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New York state prepares to ban plastic bags

After several failed attempts, New York state is poised to ban single-use plastic bags provided by stores, making it only the second US state, after California, to pass such a rule.

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'Cow toilets' in Netherlands aim to cut e-moo-ssions

Teaching cows to use the toilet is not the easiest task, but a Dutch inventor is banking on a new bovine urinal to help cut emissions that cause environmental damage.

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Researchers find ancient Maya farms in Mexican wetlands

Archaeologists with the University of Cincinnati used the latest technology to find evidence suggesting ancient Maya people grew surplus crops to support an active trade with neighbors up and down the Yucatan Peninsula.

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Physicists predict a way to squeeze light from the vacuum of empty space

Experiment could test theory of quantum electrodynamics—if it ever can be done

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Could computers provide short-term warnings of the world’s worst floods?

Better global terrain data are needed to improve forecasts in developing countries

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Human noise may be scrambling the eggs of baby fish

Study finds embryos of two species grow differently when exposed to humanmade sounds

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Dust from Melting Glaciers Could Create Clouds

Any shift in cloud formation over the Arctic could further influence its changing climate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Novel insights into soil biodiversity, Earth's global engine

New findings indicate changes in soil biodiversity are driven by changes in plant cover and soil acidification during ecosystem development.

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CHART: Where Disease-Carrying Mosquitoes Will Go In The Future

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Making waves: Researchers shed light on how cilia work

An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the McKelvey School of Engineering and the School of Medicine have found the most efficient length for cilia, the tiny hair-like structures designed to sweep out the body's fluids, cells and microbes to stay healthy.

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Engineering for high-speed devices

A research team from the University of Delaware has developed cutting-edge technology for photonics devices that could enable faster communications between phones and computers.

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Study finds white sharks with high levels of mercury, arsenic and lead in their blood

Researchers found high concentrations of mercury, arsenic, and lead, in blood samples obtained from Great white sharks in South Africa. The samples had levels that would be considered toxic to many animals. However, the study found no apparent negative consequences of these heavy metals on several health parameters measured in the sharks, including body condition, total leukocytes, and granulocyte

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Study finds white sharks with high levels of mercury, arsenic and lead in their blood

Researchers found high concentrations of mercury, arsenic, and lead, in blood samples obtained from Great white sharks in South Africa. The samples had levels that would be considered toxic to many animals. However, the study found no apparent negative consequences of these heavy metals on several health parameters measured in the sharks, including body condition, total leukocytes, and granulocyte

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