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nyheder2019november07

Modified CRISPR gene editing tool could improve therapies for HIV, sickle cell disease

City of Hope researchers may have found a way to sharpen the fastest, cheapest and most accurate gene editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9, so that it can more successfully cut out undesirable genetic information. This improved cutting ability could one day fast-track potential therapies for HIV, sickle cell disease and, potentially, other immune conditions.

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SDHI pesticides are toxic for human cells

French scientists led by a CNRS researcher have just revealed that eight succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor pesticide molecules do not just inhibit the SDH activity of fungi, but can also block that of earthworms, bees, and human cells in varying proportions. They demonstrated that the conditions of current regulatory tests for toxicity mask a very important effect that SDH inhibitors have on human

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Study provides insights on the effects of cannabidiol on severe form of epilepsy

Results from a study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology may help explain why cannabidiol — a chemical component of marijuana with no psychoactive properties — reduces the frequency of seizures in patients with a severe form of epilepsy.

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Scientists take action to prevent sexual harassment and bias

In a policy paper published in the journal Science, scientists from a variety of fields highlight key ways institutions and funding agencies can help address sexual harassment and gender bias in the STEM workplace.

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GP clinics could help bridge mental health treatment gap, study finds

Patients experiencing mild to moderate mental health issues could be managed effectively by GP practices, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. This could also help reduce the stigma faced by these individuals. However, specialist treatment may still prove more cost-effective in the long term, say the researchers.

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One-third of reproductive age women have health conditions that may complicate pregnancy

One in three women of reproductive age have at least one chronic condition that could compromise their health or lead to adverse outcomes during pregnancy, according to University of Utah Health scientists. Yet few of these women are using the most effective forms of contraception to prevent unplanned pregnancies. The researchers say this could be a sign that women with preexisting health problems

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Stanford researchers lay out first genetic history of Rome

Despite extensive records of the history of Rome, little is known about the city's population over time. A new genetic history of the Eternal City reveals a dynamic population shaped in part by political and historical events.

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Ancient roman DNA reveals genetic crossroads of Europe and Mediterranean

All roads may lead to Rome, and in ancient times, a great many European genetic lineages did too, according to a new study. Its results, perhaps the most detailed analysis of changing genetic variation patterns in the region to date, reveal a dynamic population history from the Mesolithic (~10,000 BCE) into modern times, and spanning the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

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The medieval Catholic church's influence on psychology of Western, industrialized societies

The Western Catholic church's influence on marriage and family structures during the Middle Ages shaped the cultural evolution of the beliefs and behaviors now common among Western Europeans and their cultural descendants, researchers report.

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Trapping versus dropping atoms expands 'interrogation' to 20 seconds

Trapped atoms, suspended aloft on a lattice of laser light for as long as 20 seconds, allow for highly sensitive measurements of gravity, according to a new study, which describes a new approach to atom interferometers.

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Satellite observations show shifting trends in nitrogen oxide lifetimes over North American cities

For the first time, remote satellite observations are used to measure the lifetime of the urban air pollutants known as NOx above select major North American cities, showing how they've changed over time.

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Mated female mosquitoes are more likely to transmit malaria parasites

Female mosquitoes that have mated are more likely to transmit malaria parasites than virgin females, according to a study published Nov. 7 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Farah Dahalan of Imperial College London, Mara Lawniczak from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, and colleagues.

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Acetaminophen during pregnancy linked to higher risk of ADHD, autism later

Exposure to acetaminophen in the womb may increase a child's risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or autism spectrum disorder, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed data from the Boston Birth Cohort, a 20-year study of early life factors influencing pregnancy and child development. They found that children whose cord blood samples contained the highest levels of acetaminophe

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Millions at stake in dinosaur fight: Are fossils minerals?

The discovery of two fossilized dinosaur skeletons intertwined in what looks like a final death match could make a Montana ranching couple rich beyond their dreams. Or they may have to share the wealth.

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NASA satellite imagery finds Typhoon Halong resembles a boxing glove

Typhoon Halong has packed quite a punch and imagery from NASA's Terra satellite found that the storm resembled a boxing glove.

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Western Individualism Arose from Incest Taboo

Researchers link a Catholic Church ban on cousins marrying in the Middle Ages to the emergence of a way of life that made the West an outlier — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Indoor bug zappers that keep mosquitoes away without the stink

Bug bites are the worst part of warm weather. (Amazon/) Mosquitoes are invaluable pollinators and a crucial component of our ecosystem. But they can also carry diseases like Zika, malaria, and dengue fever. The bites are also just irritating. When your mosquito sprays and repellents aren't quite cutting it, here are some indoor bug zappers to get the job done: For a sporty satisfaction of immedia

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Top Tech Trucks of the the North American Commercial Vehicle Show

NACV 2019 North American Commercial Vehicle show October 2019 Atlanta Big trucks are big (obviously), sometimes noisy, get 6 mpg hauling 80,000 pounds), and occasionally cut you off — just not as much as we cut them off. And they're changing, to be more fuel-efficient, pollute less, and get the goods to far flung customers at lower cost. All that was on display this week at the North American Com

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds Tropical Storm Nakri affecting Kalayaan

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nakri and captured a visible image of the storm in the South China Sea. Although the bulk of the storm was not over any land areas, Nakri's southwestern quadrant was over the island of Kalayaan, Palawan.

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Western Individualism Arose from Incest Taboo

Researchers link a Catholic Church ban on cousins marrying in the Middle Ages to the emergence of a way of life that made the West an outlier — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Many imperial Romans had roots in the Middle East, genetic history shows

At the height of Rome's power, city residents showed little European DNA

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Revamped cancer drug starves tumors in mice

Compound that robs tumors of essential amino acid headed for clinical trials

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How the early Christian church gave birth to today's WEIRD Europeans

Centuries-old incest ban made Westerners more independent and trusting of strangers, study argues

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Caribbean excavation offers intimate look at the lives of enslaved Africans

"These stories are not going to be lost. They're going to be remembered."

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Revolutions in agriculture chart a course for targeted breeding of old and new crops

The dominance of the major crops that feed humans and their livestock arose from agricultural revolutions that increased productivity and adapted plants to large-scale farming practices. Two hormone systems that universally control flowering and plant architecture, florigen and gibberellin, were the source of multiple revolutions that modified reproductive transitions and proportional growth amon

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Beyond vetting donors

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News at a glance

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Bound to rock

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Fighting fire

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Cultural evolution

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Avoiding ant jams

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Warm, melt, crack

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Ancient Rome: A genetic crossroads of Europe and the Mediterranean

Ancient Rome was the capital of an empire of ~70 million inhabitants, but little is known about the genetics of ancient Romans. Here we present 127 genomes from 29 archaeological sites in and around Rome, spanning the past 12,000 years. We observe two major prehistoric ancestry transitions: one with the introduction of farming and another prior to the Iron Age. By the founding of Rome, the geneti

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Double PIK3CA mutations in cis increase oncogenicity and sensitivity to PI3K{alpha} inhibitors

Activating mutations in PIK3CA are frequent in human breast cancer, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase alpha (PI3Kα) inhibitors have been approved for therapy. To characterize determinants of sensitivity to these agents, we analyzed PIK3CA -mutant cancer genomes and observed the presence of multiple PIK3CA mutations in 12 to 15% of breast cancers and other tumor types, most of which (95%) are double m

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Direct observation of changing NOx lifetime in North American cities

NO x lifetime relates nonlinearly to its own concentration; therefore, by observing how NO x lifetime changes with changes in its concentration, inferences can be made about the dominant chemistry occurring in an urban plume. We used satellite observations of NO 2 from a new high-resolution product to show that NO x lifetime in approximately 30 North American cities has changed between 2005 and 2

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Engineering spin-orbit synthetic Hamiltonians in liquid-crystal optical cavities

Spin-orbit interactions lead to distinctive functionalities in photonic systems. They exploit the analogy between the quantum mechanical description of a complex electronic spin-orbit system and synthetic Hamiltonians derived for the propagation of electromagnetic waves in dedicated spatial structures. We realize an artificial Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction in a liquid crystal–filled o

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Kinship-based social inequality in Bronze Age Europe

Revealing and understanding the mechanisms behind social inequality in prehistoric societies is a major challenge. By combining genome-wide data, isotopic evidence, and anthropological and archaeological data, we have gone beyond the dominating supraregional approaches in archaeogenetics to shed light on the complexity of social status, inheritance rules, and mobility during the Bronze Age. We ap

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Alternative polyadenylation of Pax3 controls muscle stem cell fate and muscle function

Adult stem cells are essential for tissue homeostasis. In skeletal muscle, muscle stem cells (MuSCs) reside in a quiescent state, but little is known about the mechanisms that control homeostatic turnover. Here we show that, in mice, the variation in MuSC activation rate among different muscles (for example, limb versus diaphragm muscles) is determined by the levels of the transcription factor Pa

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Gravitational lensing reveals ionizing ultraviolet photons escaping from a distant galaxy

During the epoch of reionization, neutral gas in the early Universe was ionized by hard ultraviolet radiation emitted by young stars in the first galaxies. To do so, ionizing ultraviolet photons must escape from the host galaxy. We present Hubble Space Telescope observations of the gravitationally lensed post-reionization galaxy PSZ1-ARC G311.6602–18.4624 (nicknamed the "Sunburst Arc"), revealing

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Mineralogical control on the fate of continentally derived organic matter in the ocean

First-order relationships between organic matter content and mineral surface area have been widely reported and are implicated in stabilization and long-term preservation of organic matter. However, the nature and stability of organomineral interactions and their connection with mineralogical composition have remained uncertain. In this study, we find that continentally derived organic matter of

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Probing gravity by holding atoms for 20 seconds

Atom interferometers are powerful tools for both measurements in fundamental physics and inertial sensing applications. Their performance, however, has been limited by the available interrogation time of freely falling atoms in a gravitational field. By suspending the spatially separated atomic wave packets in a lattice formed by the mode of an optical cavity, we realize an interrogation time of

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Efficient, stable solar cells by using inherent bandgap of {alpha}-phase formamidinium lead iodide

In general, mixed cations and anions containing formamidinium (FA), methylammonium (MA), caesium, iodine, and bromine ions are used to stabilize the black α-phase of the FA-based lead triiodide (FAPbI 3 ) in perovskite solar cells. However, additives such as MA, caesium, and bromine widen its bandgap and reduce the thermal stability. We stabilized the α-FAPbI 3 phase by doping with methylenediamm

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Stereosequenced crystalline polyhydroxyalkanoates from diastereomeric monomer mixtures

Stereoselective polymerization of chiral or prochiral monomers is a powerful method to produce high-performance stereoregular crystalline polymeric materials. However, for monomers with two stereogenic centers, it is generally necessary to separate diastereomers before polymerization, resulting in substantial material loss and added energy cost associated with the separation and purification proc

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New Products

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Respect the poster

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Response to Comment on "Protein assemblies ejected directly from native membranes yield complexes for mass spectrometry"

Hirst et al . claim that proteins ejected directly from mitochondrial membranes in our study are degraded, are incorrectly assigned, lack lipids, and show discrepancies with "native states" mostly obtained in detergent micelles. Here, we add further evidence in full support of our assignments and show that all complexes are either ejected intact or in known intermediate states, with core subunit

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Structures of a dimodular nonribosomal peptide synthetase reveal conformational flexibility

Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) are biosynthetic enzymes that synthesize natural product therapeutics using a modular synthetic logic, whereby each module adds one aminoacyl substrate to the nascent peptide. We have determined five x-ray crystal structures of large constructs of the NRPS linear gramicidin synthetase, including a structure of a full core dimodule in conformations organize

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The Church, intensive kinship, and global psychological variation

Recent research not only confirms the existence of substantial psychological variation around the globe but also highlights the peculiarity of many Western populations. We propose that part of this variation can be traced back to the action and diffusion of the Western Church, the branch of Christianity that evolved into the Roman Catholic Church. Specifically, we propose that the Western Church'

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Comment on "Protein assemblies ejected directly from native membranes yield complexes for mass spectrometry"

Chorev et al . (Reports, 16 November 2018, p. 829) describe mass spectrometry on mitochondrial membrane proteins ionized directly from their native environment. However, the assignments made to measured masses are incorrect or inconclusive and lack experimental validation. The proteins are not in their "native" condition: They have been stripped of tightly bound lipids, and the complexes are frag

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Texas Taxpayers to Give Cancer Research Another $3 Billion

Voters approved a measure to double the state's Cancer Prevention & Research Institute of Texas.

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Bound to rock

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Fighting fire

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Cultural evolution

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Personalized gene networks enhance study of disease

Researchers at Penn State College of Medicine have developed a new method to model how genes interact with each other — and it may someday contribute to the development of personalized treatments for patients.

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Argonne collaborates to review current battery recycling processes for electric vehicles

Nature has published a new review co-authored by Argonne analyst Linda Gaines. The review evaluates the state of EV battery recycling today and what's needed to build a more sustainable future.

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NASA satellite imagery finds Typhoon Halong resembles a boxing glove

Typhoon Halong has packed quite a punch and imagery from NASA's Terra satellite found that the storm resembled a boxing glove.

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Learning to stop cancer at its roots

Leukemia stem cells initiate and sustain leukemia, but researchers have found a way to steer them toward a path of self-destruction.

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Vitamin D and Omega 3 supplements do not reduce risk of systemic inflammation

An analysis of the VITamin D and OmegA-3 TriaL (VITAL) by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital indicates that neither vitamin D nor omega-3s were effective at reducing systemic inflammation.

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds Tropical Storm Nakri affecting Kalayaan

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Nakri and captured a visible image of the storm in the South China Sea. Although the bulk of the storm was not over any land areas, Nakri's southwestern quadrant was over the island of Kalayaan, Palawan.

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Knowing when to hold and fold 'em: the explore/exploit dilemma

I've been staring at the menu for over 10 minutes. I can feel the server's eyes boring holes into the back of my head, urging me to hurry up and pick something. Still I sit and ponder; should I get my old favorite, the California burrito? Or maybe I should try something new like a […]

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Cancer Cells Increase DNA Mutations to Evade Treatment

Colorectal tumor cells limit their DNA repair in response to a targeted therapy, giving them a greater chance to develop resistance to the drug.

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The West won out when cousins stopped kissing

The Catholic Church's obsession with incest cleared a path for the rise of independent thought, researchers say.

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Why mammals have such complex backbones

Dramatic evolutionary changes were linked to their active nature and high metabolisms, research suggests.

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Play it again, Sam

Second study looks at what makes a popular song popular.

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Playing in the right dirt could have a calming effect

Research finds biodiverse soil makes mice less anxious.

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Melting arctic sea ice linked to virus in marine mammals

Loss of ice opens pathways for disease transmission, study shows.

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Scientists take action to prevent sexual harassment and bias

A diverse group of scientists gathered last December at the Banbury Center in Cold Spring Harbor, NY, to confront how institutions and funding agencies can prevent sexual harassment and gender bias in the STEM workforce.

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Researchers lay out first genetic history of Rome

Scholars have been studying Rome for hundreds of years, but it still holds some secrets—for instance, relatively little is known about the ancestral origins of the city's denizens. Now, an international team led by researchers from Stanford University, the University of Vienna and Sapienza University of Rome is filling in the gaps with a genetic history that shows just how much the Eternal City's

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Faster heartbeat helps deer mice to survive at high altitudes

Mice living at high altitudes in the American West carry a genetic variant that increases their heart rate, helping them cope with the low oxygen levels that occur at high elevations. Rena Schweizer of the University of Montana and colleagues report these findings in a new study published 30th October in PLOS Genetics.

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Faster heartbeat helps deer mice to survive at high altitudes

Mice living at high altitudes in the American West carry a genetic variant that increases their heart rate, helping them cope with the low oxygen levels that occur at high elevations. Rena Schweizer of the University of Montana and colleagues report these findings in a new study published 30th October in PLOS Genetics.

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Free the Eggplant

Eggplant is at its best and most abundant in late summer. I rarely cook it, but I've learned its schedule over the past few years because of a recurring social-media gag. When sturdy purple aubergines begin to fill farmers' markets in the United States, people will post pictures of eggplants along with captions that vaguely imply the scene is, in the abbreviated language of the internet, NSFW. So

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Plants and fungi together could slow climate change

A new global assessment shows that human impacts have greatly reduced plant-fungus symbioses, which play a key role in sequestering carbon in soils. Restoring these ecosystems could be one strategy to slow climate change.

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Delicate flower makes a surprise appearance

Rumours of its extinction were greatly exaggerated.

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Stem cell transplants used to grow fully functional lungs in mice

Researchers at Columbia University used transplanted stem cells to grow lungs in mice. Findings could lead to new options for lung transplant patients.

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Research brief: Origin of deadly wheat pathogen revealed

A team of researchers has uncovered the basis of stem rust pathogen Ug99's wide virulence, attacking a direct threat to the world wheat supply.

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The way of making memories

How does the brain translate information from the outside world into something we remember? An international team of researchers working in the Human Brain Project have zoomed in on the neuronal circuits in the striatum, a brain structure involved in memory, behavior and reward learning. The findings, published in the PLOS Computational Biology Journal, increase our knowledge of the basic function

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Giving billions of live bacteria to boost the gut health of premature babies

Boosting the milk of premature babies with healthy bacteria may have helped half the number of serious gut problems and infections, according to new research. Researchers reviewed the outcomes of almost 1,000 very premature babies who were admitted to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) over a 10-year period.

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Flexible yet sturdy robot is designed to 'grow' like a plant

MIT engineers have developed a robot designed to extend a chain-like appendage flexible enough to twist and turn in any necessary configuration, yet rigid enough to support heavy loads or apply torque to assemble parts in tight spaces. When the task is complete, the robot can retract the appendage and extend it again, at a different length and shape, to suit the next task.

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In the Kiki Ballroom Scene, Queer Kids of Color Can Be Themselves

Every year, thousands of LGBTQ teens are forced to leave their home. Though data are sparse, studies have found that when gay teens come out to their family, about a quarter are kicked out, and a third are assaulted by parents or caregivers. Life can be even harder for LGBTQ youth of color, who say they're the frequent target of racial discrimination and harassment in schools and communities. Hom

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How The Morning Show Interrogates the #MeToo Debate

This article contains spoilers through Episode 3 of The Morning Show . When she boarded Apple TV+'s flagship series The Morning Show as showrunner, Kerry Ehrin figured the job would be less stressful than her previous one as an executive producer on Bates Motel , the A&E series that prequelized Psycho . Writing about the people who help Americans start their day, Ehrin assumed, had to be more ple

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Backchat: Nature's 150th anniversary

Nature, Published online: 07 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03425-3 Benjamin Thompson hosts our roundtable discussion, with guests Magdalena Skipper, Ritu Dhand and Helen Pearson.

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E-cigs and opioids: The next FDA chief will face several ongoing crises

Nature, Published online: 07 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03433-3 Trump has nominated cancer physician Stephen Hahn to lead a food and drug agency in turmoil.

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Detecting breast cancer 5 years before clinical signs

A blood test that spots breast cancer five years ahead of clinical signs could give new meaning to "early detection." Auto-antibodies for tumor antigens predict the presence of the disease. Researchers say the blood test could be clinic-ready in 4-5 years. None Researchers from the University of Nottingham have developed a method of blood screening they believe could ultimately lead to the detect

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Something Strange Happened to Human Heart Cells in Space

Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine found that heart muscle cells derived from stem cells adapted to microgravity by quickly altering the expression of thousands of genes. Remarkably, the cells mostly snapped back to normal within ten days of returning to Earth after spending just over a month aboard the International Space Station. The findings could "help shed light on h

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Study finds sex bias in bird conservation plans

After pairing up and raising chicks, males and females of some bird species spend their winter break apart. At the end of their journey to Central or South America, you might find mostly males in one habitat, and females in another. Yet conservation strategies have typically overlooked the habitats needed by females, putting already-declining species in even more peril, according to a new study in

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Rapper T.I.'s Daughter Should Never Have Had a 'Virginity Test'

There is no exam to verify virginity, medical experts say, and the attempt violates a woman's rights.

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Study finds sex bias in bird conservation plans

After pairing up and raising chicks, males and females of some bird species spend their winter break apart. At the end of their journey to Central or South America, you might find mostly males in one habitat, and females in another. Yet conservation strategies have typically overlooked the habitats needed by females, putting already-declining species in even more peril, according to a new study in

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Program improves short term nutritional outcomes in a conflict zone

A study led by a researcher at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health finds that a multidisciplinary program within a conflict zone in Armenia was successful in improving several measures of childhood nutrition. Results appear in the journal Public Health Nutrition.

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Imagined movements can alter our brains

Brain-computer interfaces have a structural impact on brain substance.

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Community house hemodialysis offers many benefits to patients with kidney failure

Community house hemodialysis is a dialysis modality that overcomes many of the barriers to home hemodialysis. Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2019 Nov. 5-10 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C.

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Watch: Spinal fluid waves flow into your brain as you sleep

While you sleep, cerebrospinal fluid flows through your brain in rhythmic, pulsing waves, researchers report. The research shows that when you're asleep, your neurons go quiet and, a few seconds later, blood flows out of your head. Then, a watery liquid called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flows in, washing through your brain. The study is the first to illustrate that the brain's CSF pulses during sl

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Elon Musk Alarmed That Teslas Beep Constantly in Drive-Thru Lanes

Close Quarters The close confines of a drive-thru lane apparently mess with Teslas' parking sensors, resulting in a cacophony of annoying beeps and alarms. Parking sensors can help drivers avoid annoying dings and dangerous collisions as they try to back into a spot. But now Tesla CEO Elon Musk says he's looking into providing the option to turn them off, Business Insider reports , to spare hungr

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Life in One of the Whitest Towns in America

I got into town just after sunset. The lights were on at a place called the Brick House Grill, and if you were out on South Main Street on a Friday night in February, chances are, that's where you were going. So I went in, too. I took a seat at the bar. A man two stools over from me struck up a conversation. I told him I was a journalist from Chicago and asked him to tell me about this town. "You

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Danske forskere finder nyt våben i kampen mod metanudledning fra køer

Danske forskere har i laboratorieforsøg fundet et stof, der kan reducere metandannelsen fra foderets forgæring i vommen hos køer med 99%. Nu skal stoffet testes på levende dyr.

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Rapamycin prevents age-related brain vascular deterioration in rats

A newly released study found that rats of advanced age, treated with the drug rapamycin, maintained superior blood flow to the brain compared to younger, untreated rats. The treated rats also exhibited improved memory.

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Cytoplasm of scrambled frog eggs organizes into cell-like structures

The cytoplasm of ruptured Xenopus frog eggs spontaneously reorganizes into cell-like compartments, according to a study.

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How Human Population came from our ability to cooperate

Humans' ability to cooperate during child-bearing years by sharing food, labor, and childcare duties is the story of population growth.

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Vinden blæser, som skoven brænder

PLUS. Der eksisterer et kompliceret samspil mellem vind og ild ved store skovbrande.

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Mycotoxin detection by graphene field-effect transistor

The struggle for living space concerns not only people and animals but can refer also to molds. When mold (fungi) contaminated the food in case of bad environment for its development it states to produce second metabolites—mycotoxins—to prevent of growth of another fungus on the same substance. One some of mycotoxins do not effect on animals and people others can cause the drastic effect on health

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AI Copernicus 'discovers' that Earth orbits the Sun

Nature, Published online: 07 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03332-7 A neural network that teaches itself the laws of physics could help to solve quantum-mechanics mysteries.

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A cancer spreads worldwide, thanks to global shipping

Nature, Published online: 07 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03427-1 A tumour affecting mussels in Chile and France is traced to a single Northern Hemisphere mussel of a separate species.

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Contingency plans for elite UK research funder fleshed out

Nature, Published online: 07 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03444-0 Report recommends creating 'British ERC' if the United Kingdom drops out of European Union funding programmes after Brexit.

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Daily briefing: New Zealand passes landmark climate law pledging zero carbon by 2050

Nature, Published online: 07 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03447-x Paris climate accord commitments enshrined in law. Plus: why some left-handed women can smell despite missing an 'essential' part of the brain, and the most stunning science images of the month.

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Study finds sex bias in bird conservation plans

After pairing up and raising chicks, males and females of some bird species spend their winter break apart. At the end of their journey to Central or South America, you might find mostly males in one habitat, and females in another. Yet conservation strategies have typically overlooked the habitats needed by females, putting already-declining species in even more peril.

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How Einstein's work survived 'scientific nationalism' of WWI

This Veterans Day, the parades and memorials should remind all of us that ultra-nationalism—surging anew in Europe, the US, and South America—harbors the spark to ignite another catastrophic international conflict, historian Matthew Stanley argues. "I would say we are pretty far down that road again," warns Stanley , a professor in New York University's Gallatin School of Individualized Study, hi

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UK needs to act to prevent electric vehicle battery waste mountain

Recycling technologies for end-of-life lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are not keeping pace with the rapid rise of electric vehicles, storing up a potentially huge waste management problem for the future, according to a new study.

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Horses blink less, twitch eyelids more when stressed

A horse will blink less and twitch its eyelids more when it's under mild stress, the research team found — a new finding that could offer handlers a simple, easy-to-spot sign their animal is becoming agitated.

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Researchers discover how cells know their future and forget their past

Stem cells all share the potential of developing into any specific cell in the body. Many researchers are therefore trying to answer the fundamental questions of what determines the cells' developmental fate as well as when and why the cells lose the potential of developing into any cell.

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A balloon-based solar observatory

Southwest Research Institute successfully demonstrated a miniature solar observatory on a high-altitude balloon November 1. The SwRI Solar Instrument Pointing Platform (SSIPP)—a reusable, high-precision solar observatory about the size of a mini fridge and weighing 160 pounds—was carried by a stratospheric balloon, collecting 75 minutes of solar images in the proof-of-concept flight.

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Researchers discover how cells know their future and forget their past

Stem cells all share the potential of developing into any specific cell in the body. Many researchers are therefore trying to answer the fundamental questions of what determines the cells' developmental fate as well as when and why the cells lose the potential of developing into any cell.

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Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways

Scientists say a failure of national management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals—many now banned in other countries such as the EU, U.S. and Canada—are damaging the nation's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef.

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CO biosynthesis required for the assembly of the active site in NiFe-hydrogenase

A research group including researchers from the Exploratory Research Center on Life and Living Systems (ExCELLS), Institute for Molecular Science (IMS) in National Institutes of Natural Sciences, and Osaka University have revealed the detailed mechanism of the biosynthesis of carbon monoxide essential for the maturation of the active site of NiFe-hydrogenase.

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YouTube Debuts New Look For Desktop, Tablets

YouTube's homepage makeover makes it easier to find the next great video to watch (via YouTube) YouTube got a makeover. The video-sharing platform on …

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Sony appoints Guerrilla Games’ Hermen Hulst new head of PlayStation worldwide studios

His predecessor, Shuhei Yoshida, will oversee a newly formed division in the company focused on "nurturing external independent creators.”

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CO biosynthesis required for the assembly of the active site in NiFe-hydrogenase

A research group including researchers from the Exploratory Research Center on Life and Living Systems (ExCELLS), Institute for Molecular Science (IMS) in National Institutes of Natural Sciences, and Osaka University have revealed the detailed mechanism of the biosynthesis of carbon monoxide essential for the maturation of the active site of NiFe-hydrogenase.

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Skull features among Asian and Asian-derived groups differ significantly

Forensic anthropologists have now discovered that several skull features in Asian and Asian-derived groups differ significantly with regard to shape, such that they can be distinguished using statistical analyses. These findings highlight the future potential for developing more nuanced statistical methods that can potentially differentiate between groups that comprise the broad "Asian" ancestral

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The hidden ability of synchrotron radiation to perform coherent control

Coherent control is a method to manipulate the populations and pathways in matter by light, and is currently one of the most attractive research areas in optical physics and photochemistry. Lasers have been considered as unique light sources enabling one to perform coherent control, and, thanks to the development of laser technology, the on-going research is moving rapidly into the regime of extre

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Skull features among Asian and Asian-derived groups differ significantly

Forensic anthropologists have now discovered that several skull features in Asian and Asian-derived groups differ significantly with regard to shape, such that they can be distinguished using statistical analyses. These findings highlight the future potential for developing more nuanced statistical methods that can potentially differentiate between groups that comprise the broad "Asian" ancestral

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Drought parches southern Africa, millions faced with hunger

An estimated 45 million people are threatened with hunger by a severe drought strangling wide stretches of southern Africa.

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You're more likely to believe polls when your candidate leads

People disproportionately find polls more credible when their preferred candidate is leading, according to a new study. The study also implies that there are potential benefits of emphasizing polls' methodological quality to mitigate people's biases. "On a number of fronts, it is clear that people believe what they want to believe," says Josh Pasek, an associate professor of communication and med

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Sounds of mosquito mating rituals could lead to quieter drones

Mosquitoes flap their wings not just to stay aloft but for two other critical purposes: to generate sound and to point that buzz in the direction of a potential mate, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have discovered.Their findings about the aerodynamics of mosquito wings could have implications for building quieter drones and for devising nontoxic methods to trap and exterminate the pests.

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Debunking common misperceptions of Asian community health

Common misperceptions about Asian health issues contribute to a lack of health awareness and a reluctance to seek care, according to research published in Public Relations Review.

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Concordia research shows how climate change will affect hydropower production in Canada

Changing climate and weather patterns are going to have dramatic impacts on Canada's production potential of hydroelectricity, according to new Concordia research. hydropower giant Quebec will see its hydroelectricity output potential jump by as much as 15%. In contrast, British Columbia, the second biggest hydropower producer in Canada, as well as Alberta, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, w

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Study shows artificial intelligence can detect language problems tied to liver failure

Natural language processing, the technology that lets computers read, decipher, understand and make sense of human language, is the driving force behind internet search engines, email filters, digital assistants such as Amazon's Alexa and Apple's Siri, and language-to-language translation apps. Now, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have given this technology a new job as a clinical dete

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New molecule reduces the aggressiveness of pediatric cancer

A microRNA inhibitor identified by researchers at the FAPESP-supported Human Genome and Stem Cell Research Center reduced the sizes of aggressive tumors and improved survival in mice.

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Simplifying Patient Participation in Clinical Research Studies

Sanguine Biosciences invites you to join them for an educational webinar.

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Scientists: Human Extinction Is Extremely Likely

Forget nuclear weapons , biological warfare , and the slew of other ways humanity could cause its own destruction for a moment. If you take into account only naturally occurring phenomena — supervolcanic eruptions , asteroid impacts , and the like — researchers from the University of Oxford recently determined that the probability of our entire species going extinct in any given year is as high a

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Seven quick tricks to do more with Slack

Trust us—There's more you could be doing with Slack. Slack is on a mission to improve communication and collaboration in the workplace. Big companies such as Airbnb , EA, and Target, have adopted the platform as an official information channel, and your employer might as well have joined the ranks. The service works seamlessly on desktop and mobile devices, and if you think there's a lot you're a

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Why the Assault Allegations Against Trump Don't Stick

Earlier this week, E. Jean Carroll took legal action against the president: The writer and advice columnist is suing Donald Trump for defamation . The suit is a sequel, of sorts. This summer, Carroll came forward to say that Trump, in the mid-1990s, had assaulted her in a dressing room at a department store in New York City, pinning her against the wall and forcibly penetrating her with his penis

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Bill Gates's Fortune Isn't Going Anywhere

Money: It's a concern. But the problem it poses is different for the wealthy than it is for ordinary folks—or even for just plain rich people. When most Americans worry about money, we're worrying about income: Will I make enough money this week, this month, or this year to cover my expenses—let alone to sock some away for vacation, a down payment, retirement, college? Modestly rich people face t

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Skull features among Asian and Asian-derived groups differ significantly

Forensic anthropologists have now discovered that several skull features in Asian and Asian-derived groups differ significantly with regard to shape, such that they can be distinguished using statistical analyses. These findings highlight the future potential for developing more nuanced statistical methods that can potentially differentiate between groups that comprise the broad 'Asian' ancestral

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World's most comprehensive study of a deadly heart condition yields 1st results

Researchers have revealed the initial results from the world's largest comprehensive study of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, an abnormal thickening of the heart that often goes undiagnosed and can prove deadly. The condition can present at any age, and it is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in young athletes.

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Researchers discover how cells know their future and forget their past

All cells in the body contain the same genetic material. The difference between cells therefore depends solely on which genes are expressed or 'turned on'. Now, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have gained new insights into how genes are turned on and off and how the cells "forget their past" while developing into a specific cell in the body. This new knowledge is published in Nature

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Where does Parkinson's disease start? In the brain or gut? Or both?

Does Parkinson's disease (PD) start in the brain or the gut? In a new contribution published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, scientists hypothesize that PD can be divided into two subtypes: gut-first, originating in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) of the gut and spreading to the brain; and brain-first, originating in the brain, or entering the brain via the olfactory system, and spreadi

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Can our thoughts alter our brains?

Brain-computer interfaces (BCI) can measure changes in electrical brain activity that just by thinking about performing a task. These changes can be converted into signals via machine learning, which can operate a computer or a prosthesis. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences and TU Berlin demonstrated that after just one hour's training with a BCI there

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British broadcasters join up for new BritBox streaming service

A streaming service created by British broadcasters ITV and the BBC and went live on Thursday, entering a market dominated by Netflix and Amazon with a 5.99 pound ($7.70) a month offer focused …

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Sequencing the genome of every UK baby would be an ethical minefield

UK health minister Matt Hancock has announced plans for the NHS to analyse everyone's DNA at birth, but the idea may breach ethical guidelines on genetic testing

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Youth brain: How does your office view aging?

Professional biohacker Dave Asprey says the healthier you are, the better you're paid at work. So taking care of yourself doesn't just serve the ego, it can also provide for your family. This can differ between men and women, however, as the latter face age discrimination more heavily. Taking measures to benefit the health of your mind and body can get you ahead in the workplace culture of youthf

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Good-looking pie dishes that bake great, too

One slice for you and the rest for me. (Sheri Silver via Unsplash/) There's not a season that doesn't go great with pie. Stuffed with apples and cinnamon, made out of pumpkin (or some kind of squash anyway ), stacked with berries and peaches, stuffed with game meat and thyme—whatever your fancy, when the need for pie strikes, you'll need just the right pan for baking and serving. The best pie dis

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Are We Doing Everything We Can to Treat Infertility?

To aid couples along the path to conception, a higher-tech approach is needed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Noise' in the Brain Encodes Surprisingly Important Signals

At every moment, neurons whisper, shout, sputter and sing, filling the brain with a dizzying cacophony of voices. Yet many of those voices don't seem to be saying anything meaningful at all. They register as habitual echoes of noise, not signal; as static, not discourse. Since scientists first became capable of recording from single neurons 60 years ago, they've known that brain activity is highl

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This Ingenious Hat Blocks Facial Recognition

Yo Dawg Protestors and police in Hong Kong have found themselves in an escalating arms race of high tech surveillance. While the protestors have used lasers to disable the facial recognition-equipped surveillance cameras, police have taken to spraying them with dye so they can be identified and arrested up later on. Now, one Redditor is showing off a prototype of a hat that he says can block faci

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Amazon Fire HD 8 Kids Deal: The Best Kids Tablet Is $40 Off

If your youngster is ready for a device of their own, this discounted option is a good pre-Black Friday deal.

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Hideo Kojima's 'Death Stranding' Is Beautiful, Smart—and Kinda Boring

Here are 10 things you should know about the auteur's latest game.

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Galactic fountains and carousels: Order emerging from chaos

Scientists have unveiled the results of a newly-completed, state of the art simulation of the evolution of galaxies. For the first time, it reveals that the geometry of the cosmic gas flows around galaxies determines galaxies' structures, and vice versa.

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AI could help diagnose dogs suffering from chronic pain and Chiari-like malformation

A new artificial intelligence (AI) technique could eventually help veterinarians quickly identify Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (CKCS) dogs with a chronic disease that causes crippling pain. The same technique identified unique biomarkers which inspired further research into the facial changes in dogs affected by Chiari-like malformation (CM).

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Minimizing post-harvest food losses

Researchers develop biological methods to improve the shelf life of fruit and vegetables.

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Enjoyment of pop music classics linked to combination of uncertainty and surprise

Why is it that people find songs such as James Taylor's 'Country Roads,' UB40's 'Red, Red Wine,' or The Beatles' 'Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da' so irresistibly enjoyable? Researchers analyze 80,000 chords in 745 classic US Billboard pop songs — including those three — and find that musical pleasure comes from the right combination of uncertainty and surprise.

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Geoscientists hope to make induced earthquakes predictable

Geoscientists have created a model to forecast induced earthquake activity from the disposal of wastewater after oil and gas production.

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Rewritable optical components for 2D light waves

In 1884, a schoolmaster and theologian named Edwin Abbott wrote a novella called Flatland, which tells the story of a world populated by sentient two-dimensional shapes. While intended as a satire of rigid Victorian social norms, Flatland has long fascinated mathematicians and physicists and served as the setting for many a thought experiment.

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Parker Hits Nearly A Half-Million Dollars in One Week! | Gold Rush

After a disappointing bedrock test, Parker and team weigh out their gold total for the week. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discov

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Thorium superconductivity: Scientists discover a new high-temperature superconductor

A group of scientists led by Artem Oganov, Professor at Skoltech and MIPT, and Dr. Ivan Troyan at the Institute of Crystallography of RAS have succeeded in synthesizing thorium decahydride (ThH10), a new superconducting material with a very high critical temperature (161 K). The results of their study supported by a Russian Science Foundation (RSF) grant were published in the journal Materials Tod

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Thorium superconductivity: Scientists discover new high-temperature superconductor

A group of scientists led by Artem Oganov of Skoltech and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and Ivan Troyan of the Institute of Crystallography of RAS has succeeded in synthesizing thorium decahydride (ThH10), a new superconducting material with the very high critical temperature of 161 kelvins.

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Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways

Scientists say a failure of Australian management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals — many now banned in countries such as the EU, USA and Canada — are damaging the country's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef.

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No more traffic blues for information transfer: decongesting wireless channels

The increasing number of devices connected over wireless networks is causing channels of information flow to be congested with heavy information traffic. But, these devices are resource-constrained and cannot support existing decongestion techniques. In a new study, scientists from Tokyo University of Science and Keio University have applied a certain machine-learning technique that can enable eve

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Are We Doing Everything We Can to Treat Infertility?

To aid couples along the path to conception, a higher-tech approach is needed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This Scientist Wants to Gene-Hack Hybrid Humans to Survive Mars

DNA Upgrades Traveling to Mars is too dangerous for humans , and will remain so unless scientists figure out how to properly shield astronauts from the onslaught of deadly cosmic radiation. Typically, proposals to protect astronauts on the year-long round-trip journey involve better shielding on spacecraft. But Space.com reports that Weill Cornell University geneticist Chris Mason has a different

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The Teen With The Bionic Arms | SHAKE MY BEAUTY

submitted by /u/Professional-Dragon [link] [comments]

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Majority of UK public back 2030 zero-carbon target – poll

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

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The Gene-Editing Revolution Is Already Here

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Spaceflight Alters Genes of Human Stem Cell–Derived Heart Cells

Cardiomyocytes made from iPSCs aboard the International Space Station had upregulated mitochondrial functioning.

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Melting Arctic sea ice linked to emergence of deadly virus in marine mammals

Scientists have linked the decline in Arctic sea ice to the emergence of a deadly virus that could threaten marine mammals in the North Pacific, according to a study.

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Hurricane Tweet That Angered Trump Wasn't About Trump, Forecasters Say

Meteorologists were addressing public concern, not the president's tweets, when they assured Alabamians that a hurricane would not hit them, according to new documents.

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US sues Gilead over HIV patent infringements

Lawsuit claims drugmaker reaped billions of dollars through taxpayer-funded research

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Why beta-blockers cause skin inflammation

Beta-blockers are often used to treat high blood pressure and other cardiovascular diseases. However, in some patients they can trigger or exacerbate psoriasis, an inflammatory skin disease. Scientists at the University of Bonn and Freie Universität Berlin have now found a possible cause for this. Their results have been published in the renowned journal 'Autophagy'.

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Researchers challenge myth of the relationship between mental illness and incarceration

Researchers examined the relationship between psychiatric diagnoses and future incarceration by merging data from psychiatric interviews that took place in the 1980s with 30 years of follow-up data. Among other things, they found that diagnoses of substance use and antisocial personality were predictors of future incarceration but that other psychiatric diagnoses (i.e., schizophrenia, affective di

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Here's How Boeing is Planning to Get Astronauts to the Moon

Moon 2024 Boeing just sent NASA its proposal for a crewed lunar lander that could ferry astronauts to the Moon by 2024. The plan is to send astronauts to the lunar surface via NASA's planned "Lunar Gateway," a small stepping stone space station in the Moon's orbit. But it won't have to wait for NASA to build the Gateway either, if that project runs behind. "It can dock with the Gateway lunar orbi

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Microbes harvest electrons: Novel process discovered

New work reveals how one kind of bacteria 'eats' electricity by pulling in electrons straight from an electrode source.

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Dryers wreck your clothes. Indoor drying racks are your solution.

Line-drying is great, but not necessarily the best use of space. (Bruno Nascime via Unsplash/) There are few things that damage and age clothes quicker than hot settings and high spin cycles in the drying machine. Want to keep your linens and cottons nicer for longer, while saving energy and money? Try switching to air drying your clothes. If you've got clothes pins and drying lines in your yard,

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New findings on gut microbiome's interactions with GI diseases

A study offers new insight on how the gut bacteria of dogs interact with a healthy vs. unhealthy GI tract, which could contribute to the development of new therapies for GI diseases in both dogs and humans.

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Reassessing strategies to reduce phosphorus levels in the Detroit river watershed

In an effort to control the cyanobacteria blooms and dead zones that plague Lake Erie each summer, fueled by excess nutrients, the United States and Canada in 2016 called for a 40% reduction in the amount of phosphorus entering the lake's western and central basins, including the Detroit River's contribution.

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Physical activity linked to lower risk of fracture

Regular physical activity, including lighter intensity activities such as walking, is associated with reduced risk of hip and total fracture in postmenopausal women.

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The Global South Is Redefining Tech Innovation

Opinion: Top-down, unsustainable Silicon Valley needs to learn from Africa, South Asia, and South America, where tech is built for and by users.

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How big is the proton? Particle-size puzzle leaps closer to resolution

Nature, Published online: 07 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03432-4 Precise measurement affirms that the particle's radius is smaller than physicists once thought.

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Covering science: The history of Nature's front page

Nature, Published online: 07 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03442-2 A look back through 150 years of Nature front page designs.

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Disco octopus, cosmic pretzel and a scavenging fest — October's best science images

Nature, Published online: 07 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03390-x The month's sharpest science shots, selected by Nature's photo team.

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Structure of the human metapneumovirus polymerase phosphoprotein complex

Nature, Published online: 07 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1759-1

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AI could help diagnose dogs suffering from chronic pain and Chiari-like malformation

A new artificial intelligence (AI) technique developed by the University of Surrey could eventually help veterinarians quickly identify Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (CKCS) dogs with a chronic disease that causes crippling pain. The same technique identified unique biomarkers which inspired further research into the facial changes in dogs affected by Chiari-like malformation (CM).

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Galactic fountains and carousels: order emerging from chaos

Scientists from Germany and the United States have unveiled the results of a newly-completed, state of the art simulation of the evolution of galaxies. For the first time, it reveals that the geometry of the cosmic gas flows around galaxies determines galaxies' structures, and vice versa. The researchers publish their results in two papers in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical S

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Minimizing post-harvest food losses

Research team from Graz, Austria, develops biological methods to improve the shelf life of fruit and vegetables.

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KIER Identified Ion Transfer Principles of Salinity Gradient Power Generation Technology

Dr. Kim Hanki of Jeju Global Research Center, Korea Institute of Energy Research(KIER) developed a mathematical analysis model that can identify the ion transfer principle of salinity gradient power technology. The result was published in 'Water Research,' which is the top authority in the field of water resources.

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CO biosynthesis required for the assembly of the active site in NiFe-hydrogenase

The research group including researchers of National Institutes of Natural Sciences (ExCELLS/IMS), and Osaka University have revealed the detail mechanism of the biosynthesis of carbon monoxide essential for the maturation of the active site of NiFe-hydrogenase. The paper has been published in Communications Biology on October 18, 2019.

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Predicting the response of HIV-infected individuals to checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy

Scientists led by Andreas Meyerhans and Gennady Bocharov have designed a mathematical model to predict the response of HIV-infected individuals to a type of cancer immunotherapy.

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The hidden ability of synchrotron radiation to perform coherent control

Researchers have discovered that synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons has a hitherto unremarked ability to manipulate populations and pathways in matters. There is no technical restriction on the application of this brand-new coherent-control concept at shorter wavelengths as far as the hard x-ray range.

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Study helps explain why exercise guards against heart disease

Researchers have identified a previously unknown biological pathway that promotes chronic inflammation and may help explain why sedentary people have an increased risk for heart disease and strokes.

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Protein decoy stymies lung cancer growth in mice, Stanford-UCSF study finds

Scientists at Stanford and UC-San Francisco have developed an experimental drug that targets a currently untreatable type of lung cancer responsible for generating roughly 500,000 newly diagnosed cases worldwide each year.

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Researchers find potential new target for treatment of inflammatory disease

Researchers led by the University of Birmingham have found a potential new target to treat inflammatory disease.

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Melting arctic sea ice linked to emergence of deadly virus in marine mammals

Scientists have linked the decline in Arctic sea ice to the emergence of a deadly virus that could threaten marine mammals in the North Pacific, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.

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Biology: Artic sea ice loss may facilitate disease spread in marine mammals

Artic sea ice reduction due to climate change may allow pathogens infecting sea mammals to spread more regularly between the North Atlantic and North Pacific oceans, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. Shifts in the environment, such as loss of sea ice, may drive exposure to new pathogens by altering animal behavior and opening up water routes that allow for contact between previ

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Enjoyment of pop music classics linked to combination of uncertainty and surprise

Why is it that people find songs such as James Taylor's 'Country Roads,' UB40's 'Red, Red Wine,' or The Beatles' 'Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da' so irresistibly enjoyable? In a study reported in the journal Current Biology on Nov. 7, researchers analyze 80,000 chords in 745 classic US Billboard pop songs — including those three — and find that musical pleasure comes from the right combination of uncertaint

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Human heart cells are altered by spaceflight, but return to (mostly) normal on Earth

Heart muscle cells derived from stem cells show remarkable adaptability to their environment during and after spaceflight, according to a study publishing Nov. 7 in Stem Cell Reports. The researchers examined cell-level cardiac function and gene expression in human heart cells cultured aboard the International Space Station for 5.5 weeks. Exposure to microgravity altered the expression of thousand

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Fake news via OpenAI: Eloquently incoherent?

OpenAI's text generator, machine learning-powered—so powerful that it was thought too dangerous to release to the public, has, guess what, been released.

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Sundhedsstyrelsen ønsker bedre dialog mellem henvisende og visiterende læger

Kommunikationen mellem sektorerne om henvisninger og visitationer trænger til et service-eftersyn, peger møde i Sundhedsstyrelsen på.

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Five upgrade lenses that go beyond your kit zoom

This story originally published on Popular Photography . A kit lens can only take you so far, these five lenses make a great upgrade option. (Amazon/) The standard 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 kit lens can only take you so far. Sooner or later, you'll need to buy your first proper lens. That's why we've put together this roundup of the five lenses you should consider when it's time to step up your game. Fro

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Spaceflight alters heart cells but they quickly recover back on Earth

Spaceflight causes thousands of changes in the ways heart cell genes are expressed, but these revert mostly to normal within weeks of being back on Earth

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A deadly seal virus may be spreading faster due to melting Arctic ice

A reduction in Arctic sea ice due to climate change may be helping a virus that can kill seals spread more easily between oceans

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MicroMedicine to Launch Automated, Microfluidics-based Cell Isolation Technology at the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) Meeting

MicroMedicine, Inc., a life sciences technology company, today announced that it will be launching its patented one-of-a-kind white blood cell isolation technology, the Sorterra™ Cell Isolation System, at the 34th Annual SITC Conference.

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Mexican mammoth trap provides first evidence of prehistoric hunting pits

More than 800 bones found including one with spear wound 'This is evidence of direct attacks on mammoths' Mexican archaeologists say they have made the first ever discovery of pits built around 15,000 years ago to trap mammoths. Related: Mexico: hundreds gather for funerals of nine Mormons killed in cartel attack Continue reading…

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A new CRISPR-Cas9 protein to increase precision of gene editing

Researchers have recently developed a new protein that can help increase the targeting accuracy in the genome editing process. It is believed that it would be useful for future gene therapies in humans, which require high precision.

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Researchers link specific protein mutations to ataxia disease symptoms

Medical researchers have linked the specific biochemical changes to a protein called CHIP to specific disease characteristics of patients with a wide range of rare disorders. The research shows it is possible to merge analyses of protein biochemistry with patient characteristics to better understand spinocerebellar ataxia autosomal recessive 16, or SCAR16.

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Showing robots 'tough love' helps them succeed

According to a new study by computer scientists, to help a robot succeed, you might need to show it some tough love. In a computer-simulated manipulation task, the researchers found that training a robot with a human adversary significantly improved its grasp of objects.

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Admitting patterns of junior doctors may be behind 'weekend effect' in hospitals

A study links the 'weekend effect' of increased hospital mortality to junior doctors admitting a lower proportion of healthy patients at the weekend compared to weekdays.

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Pharmacy in the jungle study reveals indigenous people's choice of medicinal plants

In one of the most diverse studies of the non-random medicinal plants selection by gender, age and exposure to outside influences from working with ecotourism projects, researchers worked with the Kichwa communities of Chichico Rumi and Kamak Maki in the Ecuadorian Amazon. They discovered a novel method to uncover the intracultural heterogeneity of traditional knowledge while testing the non-rando

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'Nanopieces' may deliver drugs to treat incurable bone cancer

Researchers have used nanotechnology to identify a potentially groundbreaking treatment for an aggressive bone cancer that has proven disappointingly unresponsive to existing therapies, a new study shows. The new approach to treating chondrosarcoma, a rare cancer that typically afflicts adults and has poor survival rates, appears in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics . The research, using

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Melting arctic sea ice linked to emergence of deadly virus in marine mammals

Scientists have linked the decline in Arctic sea ice to the emergence of a deadly virus that could threaten marine mammals in the North Pacific, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.

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Geoscientist hopes to make induced earthquakes predictable

University of Oklahoma Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy assistant professor Xiaowei Chen and a group of geoscientists from Arizona State University and the University of California, Berkeley, have created a model to forecast induced earthquake activity from the disposal of wastewater after oil and gas production.

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Rapport: Offentlige myndigheders hjemmesider indsamler i stor stil cookies til marketing

På 94 pct. af de offentlige myndigheders hjemmesider kan borgerne risikere at få personlige informationer givet videre til tredjeparter, og i 74 pct. af de tilfælde bruger disse tredjeparter de indsamlede data til marketingformål, fremgår det af rapport.

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Voyager 2′s journey beyond the solar system reveals new cosmic secrets

Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 are the only spacecraft to touch the bubble that surrounds the sun. The Voyager 2 spacecraft spent more than four decades surfing the solar wind away from the sun and out into the galaxy. Then, in less than a day, the probe burst from our sun's protective bubble out into an interstellar sea of alien particles. The exact shape of that bubble—which repels about 70 percent of

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How to Opt Out of the Sites That Sell Your Personal Data

It's much harder than it should be to get your name off of data broker and people-search sites, but it's possible.

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What obligation do social media platforms have to the greater good? | Eli Pariser

Social media has become our new home. Can we build it better? Taking design cues from urban planners and social scientists, technologist Eli Pariser shows how the problems we're encountering on digital platforms aren't all that new — and shares how, by following the model of thriving towns and cities, we can create trustworthy online communities.

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Heart attack modeled with human stem cells

A model of ischemic heart disease was developed using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC).This model can provide a useful platform for developing effective drugs without sacrificing animals.

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Melting arctic sea ice linked to emergence of deadly virus in marine mammals

Scientists have linked the decline in Arctic sea ice to the emergence of a deadly virus that could threaten marine mammals in the North Pacific, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.

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Thorium superconductivity: Scientists discover new high-temperature superconductor

A group of scientists led by Artem Oganov of Skoltech and the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and Ivan Troyan of the Institute of Crystallography of RAS has succeeded in synthesizing thorium decahydride (ThH10), a new superconducting material with the very high critical temperature of 161 kelvins. The results of their study, supported by a Russian Science Foundation grant, were publish

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Proton pump inhibitors for babies up infection risk

The use of proton pump inhibitors among children is on the rise and so are potential side effects, according to a new study. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)—such as Prilosec, Protonix, and Nexium—have long been among the most prescribed medications in the country to help reduce stomach acid. The study examined DNA from patients up to three years old at the time of PPI exposure. "PPIs are commonly u

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Sugar-coating proteins can help us understand brain disease

Researchers have developed a new way to tag proteins in human cells with a small sugar molecule called O-GlcNAc. The exact role played by O-GlcNAc remains a mystery but the molecule is found on proteins related to Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, motor neuron disease and intellectual disability.

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Investigation of oceanic 'black carbon' uncovers mystery in global carbon cycle

An unexpected finding challenges a long-held assumption about the origin of oceanic black coal, and introduces a tantalizing new mystery: If oceanic black carbon is significantly different from the black carbon found in rivers, where did it come from?

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How hot (and not-so-hot) compounds in chili peppers change during ripening

Anyone who has tasted a hot chili pepper has felt the burn of capsaicinoids, the compounds that give peppers their spiciness, as well as possible health benefits. Related pepper compounds, called capsinoids, have similar properties, minus the heat, so they are attractive as potential functional food ingredients and supplements. Now, researchers have measured amounts of both compounds in three type

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Spherical exosomes may deliver what an injured kidney needs

Like a swarm of construction workers in the aftermath of a destructive storm, cargo-filled, nanometer-sized spheres arrive on the scene following an acute kidney injury.

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Combatting air pollution with nature

Air pollution is composed of particles and gases that can have negative impacts on both the environment and human health. Technologies to mitigate pollution have become widespread in recent years, but scientists are now exploring a new, pared-down approach: using nature to restore ecological balance.

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Preemies who develop chronic lung disease had more stem cells at birth

In the first large-scale clinical study to characterize stem cells from the umbilical cord blood and tissues of premature infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia — a severe, chronic lung disease — researchers found that these babies had more stem cells at birth.

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Most surfing injuries involve shoulder or knee, surgery usually not required

A new study characterizes MRI patterns of acute surfing-related injuries in patients seeking care at HSS. Researchers also report on the proportion of those injuries that required orthopedic surgical intervention. The study found that the most common injuries involved the knee or shoulder. Surgery was usually not necessary.

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Mutations linked to expression of genes associated with complex traits

Hard-to-study mutations in the human genome, called short tandem repeats, known as STRs or microsatellites, are implicated in the expression of genes associated with complex traits including schizophrenia, inflammatory bowel disease and even height and intelligence. That's the conclusion of a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of Nature Genetics by a team of researchers at the University of Calif

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Huge trove of mammoth skeletons found in Mexico

Archaeologists said Wednesday they have made the largest-ever discovery of mammoth remains: a trove of 800 bones from at least 14 of the extinct giants found in central Mexico.

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Fortsat stor utilfredshed med Sundheds­platformen

Størstedelen af medarbejderne i Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland – især lægerne – er fortsat utilfredse med den tre år gamle patientjournal Sundhedsplatformen, viser en brugerundersøgelse fra september.

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Chefredaktør stopper

Nicolai Döllner stopper som chefredaktør på Dagens Medicin.

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China Unveils Plan to Send Astronauts to Mars

Red Planet In a story published by state news network China Daily , the China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation announced plans to send astronauts to the surface of Mars. "Sending astronauts there will give man better opportunities to look for traces of life on Mars," Pang Zhihao, a space technology researcher in Beijing told China Daily . "There are theories that Mars was very similar

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Forsker: Politikere må indse truslen fra deepfakes

PLUS. Der er brug for proaktive politikere til at håndtere deepfakes, mener forsker og data scientist Katja Bego.

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Water war shifts to southwest Georgia as Florida takes aim at farmers

Christopher Worsham's 5,000-acre family farm produces a sweet corn crop twice a year that's sold fresh at grocery stores across the U.S. and Canada, made possible by southwest Georgia's warm climate and water irrigated from the nearby Flint River basin.

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DNA sites propose security plans to address genetic privacy fears

Recent weeks have seen a range of theoretical attacks against genetic genealogy services that could give access to people's DNA, but there is a plan to prevent them

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Big for-profit dialysis companies worsen patient care

Acquisitions by for-profit dialysis companies hurt patient health, survival, and transplant rates, research finds. As the large dialysis chains acquired more than 1,200 smaller providers across the US from 1998 to 2010, they cut skilled medical staff, increased patient volumes, altered drug regimens, among other practices, report researchers from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business. "…if y

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Eight tips for promoting men's health

With November comes Movember, putting the spotlight on men's health, and UBC nursing professor John Oliffe has a few tips that can help ensure the success of men's health programs.

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