Search Posts

nyheder2019november13

How can we support the emotional well-being of teachers? | Sydney Jensen

Teachers emotionally support our kids — but who's supporting our teachers? In this eye-opening talk, educator Sydney Jensen explores how teachers are at risk of "secondary trauma" — the idea that they absorb the emotional weight of their students' experiences — and shows how schools can get creative in supporting everyone's mental health and wellness.

22h

Highway Pileups for Black Holes

Astrophysicists devised a new theory that may explain the formation of black holes with masses exceeding 50 times that of our own sun. black-hole-nice.jpg Image credits: Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech Space Wednesday, November 13, 2019 – 15:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Small black holes may be crashing into each other while orbiting the supermassive black hole at their galaxy's cente

22h

Facebook nixes billions of fake accounts

Facebook on Wednesday said it has nixed 5.4 billion fake accounts already this year, in a sign of a persistent battle on social media against manipulation and disinformation.

22h

With a Floating Bead, This Device Makes Truly 3D Holographs

A floating butterfly created by the Multimodal Acoustic Trap Display. (Credit: Eimontas Jankauskis) With the help of sound waves and a small plastic ball, researchers in the U.K. have designed …

22h

It's Not What the President Did—It's Why He Did It

In his opening statement at today's first public impeachment hearing, the top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee argued that the real story of the Ukraine scandal is not any inappropriate behavior by Donald Trump, but rather the actions of a deep state that hates the president and is determined to subvert his leadership. "Elements of the civil service have decided that they, not the p

22h

Air Pollution Tied to Brain Cancer: Study

Inhaling combustion-produced particles may lead to the development of brain tumors.

22h

Can 'smart toilets' be the next health data wellspring?

Wearable, smart technologies are transforming the ability to monitor and improve health, but a decidedly low-tech commodity — the humble toilet — may have potential to outperform them all.

22h

Still the Undisputed Champs of Mammalian Migrations

Scientists measured distances covered to compile a Top 5 list of ultramarathon runners of land mammals.

22h

Firefighters can ease one another's job stress, but loving spouses may increase it

Strong same-sex friendships among male firefighters can help cut down on their stress — but loving relationships with their wives may increase anxiety for those who constantly face danger, according to a Baylor University study.

22h

Retinal imaging shows promise in early detection of Alzheimer's

A study of 35 people with and without Alzheimer's disease found that hyperspectral imaging of the retina could aid early diagnosis of the disease.

22h

Nature saves us trillions of dollars in healthcare

Just sitting on a bench outside is restorative You probably know intuitively that nature is restorative. That effect is also backed up by research . The benefits of time spent in the great outdoors include reduced stress, better sleep, and improved cognition. And those benefits translate directly to our ability to lead happy and productive lives, which in turn improve the economy through greater

22h

Johnson promises large-scale green investments

Tory election pledges include more charging points for cars and increased wind power

22h

Professor Claims Internet Access Should Be a Human Right

Basic Human Right It's easy to take access to uncensored internet for granted. Now, academics are arguing that internet access should be a basic human right. In a new study published this week in the Journal of Applied Philosophy , University of Birmingham ethicist Merten Reglitz makes the case that the internet is "necessary to enable the realisation of human rights and the promotion of democrac

22h

This Startup Says It Can Create "Meat" Out of Thin Air

Space Bugs While several startups are already selling "meat" made from plants, California's Air Protein says it's figured out how to make meat from thin air — by building on an idea NASA had in the 1960s. According to Air Protein's website , NASA thought it might be able to use microbes called hydrogenotrophs to created a closed-loop feeding system for astronauts in space. The astronauts would br

22h

The EPA's Science Restrictions Go from Bad to Worse

New rules on what studies the agency can cite in making regulations would endanger the public's health and safety — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Google Is Basically Daring the US to Block Its Fitbit Deal

The company's moves into health data will test how serious antitrust enforcers are about privacy issues.

22h

Maybe banking culture doesn't always make people dishonest

Scientists say they were unable to confirm a highly publicized 2014 study that suggested banking culture can promote dishonesty.

22h

The EPA's Science Restrictions Go from Bad to Worse

New rules on what studies the agency can cite in making regulations would endanger the public's health and safety — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Ancient cup given to 1st marathon victor returned to Greece

An ancient Greek cup awarded as a prize to the marathon winner in the first modern Olympics of 1896 has been returned to Athens from a German university.

22h

Mayo Clinic study finds differences in how men and women perceive their own health

A Mayo Clinic study published in the American Journal of Health Behavior investigates differences in how men and women perceive their own health. The study finds that confidence in maintaining good health habits can be influenced by gender.

22h

A new approach to the hunt for dark matter

A study that takes a novel approach to the search for dark matter has been performed by the BASE Collaboration at CERN working together with a team at the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). For the first time the researchers are exploring how dark matter influences antimatter instead of standard matter.

22h

When reporting climate-driven human migration, place matters

Location matters when talking about how climate might or might not be driving migration from Central America. Climate research in the dry corridor region revealed a complex pattern of change. If you average across the entire region you wouldn't see a trend going either way.

22h

Quantum transition makes electrons behave as if they lack spin

Combining experiments under extreme conditions with theoretical analysis, researchers pursue knowledge that could be used in the future to create a new generation of sustainable functional materials for use in quantum information devices or superconductors.

22h

Tuna carbon ratios reveal shift in food web

The ratio of carbon isotopes in three common species of tuna has changed substantially since 2000, suggesting major shifts are taking place in phytoplankton populations that form the base of the ocean's food web, a new international study finds.

22h

Precisely poking cells en masse to cure cancer

What if you could cure cancer by re-engineering patients' cells to better target and destroy their own tumors? With the advent of powerful new cellular engineering technologies, this is no longer the stuff of science fiction.

22h

NASA provides an infrared analysis of Tropical Storm Fengshen

Tropical Storm Fengshen continued to strengthen in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. Infrared imagery from an instrument aboard Terra revealed very high, powerful storms with very cold cloud top temperatures circling the center.

22h

New study proposes light signature for detecting black hole mergers

Gravitational wave detectors are finding black hole mergers in the universe at the rate of one per week. If these mergers occur in empty space, researchers cannot see associated light that is needed to determine where they happened. However, a new study in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, led by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History and the City University of New York (CUNY), sugg

22h

A virtual reality camera captures life and science aboard the space station

With only minutes until sunrise aboard the International Space Station (ISS), astronaut Nick Hague rushed to shut off the lights in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM). Traveling 17,500 miles per hour, the space station orbits Earth 16 times in 24 hours, so every 90 minutes, the space station experiences a sunrise. For this sunrise, though, the speed of their approach was putting a time crunch on

22h

How everyday products are supercharging landfill gas, and what that means

Synthetic compounds increasingly used in everyday products like shampoo and motor oil are finding their way into landfills and supercharging the biogas those landfills produce, researchers at the University of Michigan have found.

22h

Sixth graders learn and collaborate in this video game

An educational video game made using a new framework fostered both learning and collaboration among sixth graders, a proof-of-concept test shows. The framework is one of the first to bring together two well-studied approaches to educational software, narrative-centered learning and collaborative learning techniques, laying the groundwork for future efforts in the field. "There's been a lot of wor

22h

The System Was Blinking Red

George Tenet, the former CIA director, told the 9/11 Commission that, given the stream of intelligence warnings about potential terrorist attacks against the United States before 9/11, " the system was blinking red ." Those words reflected just how widespread the concern was across the U.S. government that something bad was unfolding—in that case, a terrorist attack. It turns out that in the summ

22h

Meet Stella — the pup who knows how to use 29 human words

A speech language pathologist has taught her puppy Stella to use 29 words. Stella "speaks" by stepping on large buttons programmed with recordings of words. The dog expresses her desires, comments on household events, and offers opinions. None It's obvious that dogs have the capacity to understand human words. The family canine's response to "out," "walk," or "car" is both helpful and entertainin

22h

SVT-dokumentär avslöjar miljögifter i Margot Wallströms blod

I den nya dokumentären "Östersjön – hot och hopp" visar forskare hur höga halter av så kallade klorparaffiner som finns i den före detta utrikesministerns blod. – Det var lite chockartat faktiskt, säger Margot Wallström.

23h

Black hole mergers: Cooking with gas

Gravitational wave detectors are finding black hole mergers in the universe at the rate of one per week. If these mergers occur in empty space, researchers cannot see associated light that is needed to determine where they happened. However, a new study suggests that researchers might finally be able to see light from black hole mergers if the collisions happen in the presence of gas.

23h

Improving trauma pain outcomes

A 7-year prospective cohort study from the Corporal Michael J. Crescenz VA Medical Center (CMCVAMC), University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing), and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania examined the relationship between regional anesthesia (RA) administration and patient-reported pain-related outcomes among Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraq

23h

23h

People want self-driving cars to share their personality

Even if we don't have one ourselves, we want to see driverless cars to be agreeable, conscientious, and stable, according to a new study. Researchers set out to examine how the degree to which the vehicle and the rider seemed to share certain "personality" traits influenced someone's perception of safety of an autonomous vehicle . "We wanted to answer the question: If we want to encourage people

23h

23h

How Let's Encrypt doubled the internet's percentage of secure websites in four years

A Q&A with J. Alex Halderman, who co-founded the nonprofit organization behind what's now the world's largest certificate authority.

23h

Even 'minor' surgery can be risky for frail patients

Even a minor surgery can prove to be high-risk and even fatal for frail patients, according to new research. Researchers examined the records of 432,828 patients who underwent a non-cardiac surgical procedure. They found that patients who were classified as frail or very frail had substantially higher mortality rates after surgeries with low and moderate operative stress, with up to 43% dying aft

23h

Ancient Proteins Tell Story Of Gigantopithecus, Largest-Ever Primate

Artist's rendering of how large Gigantopithecus blacki may have been. In life, G. blacki would have spent most of its time on all fours. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons) There's nothing small about Gigantopithecus blacki. The massive extinct animal likely rivaled a modern polar bear in size, weighing more than 1,000 pounds and standing nearly ten feet tall on its back legs. The mystery around G. blacki

23h

See the new Star Wars–like display that could 'revolutionize' virtual reality

A new technology offers moving images, sound, and even touch

23h

A Mathematical Companion for Your Year

My page-a-day calendar will keep your math itch scratched — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

The CDC has some surprisingly good news about antibiotic resistance

A Gram stain revealing the presence of gonorrhea-causing bacteria Twice as many people got antibiotic resistant infections in 2013 than we thought—but stay with us, we promise this is a good thing. Today, more than 2.8 million people get infected and upwards of 35,800 people die each year . Here's the good news: that number has come down by about 18 percent in the last six years. It was back in 2

23h

Sewage sludge, grease combine to create more methane

A new way to convert sewage sludge and restaurant grease into methane is the most efficient yet, say researchers. After treating sewage, wastewater treatment plants are left with solid sludge, called biosolids. For years, utilities have treated biosolids with microbes that produce methane. In recent years, utilities have been adding grease interceptor waste (GIW) into the mix. Grease interceptors

23h

Genetics of species-specific birdsong revealed

Researchers have discovered the genetic mechanism that explains how birds sing different songs depending on their species.

23h

First look at thermostat wars suggests women may be losing these battles

Your characterization of the thermostat war going on in your house is likely to depend at least in part on whether you're a man or a woman, new research suggests. The study has taken an initial glimpse at these skirmishes in a sample of Ohio homes, offering the first known data on joint consumer decision-making around household temperature settings and potential effects of those actions on energy

23h

Microparticles could help fight malnutrition

MIT researchers have now developed a new way to fortify staple foods with these micronutrients by encapsulating them in a biocompatible polymer that prevents the nutrients from being degraded during storage or cooking. In a small clinical trial, they showed that women who ate bread fortified with encapsulated iron were able to absorb iron from the food.

23h

Slowing the progression of multiple sclerosis

Over 77,000 Canadians are living with multiple sclerosis, a disease whose causes still remain unknown. Presently, they have no hope for a cure. In a study published in Science Translational Medicine, researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) identify a molecule named ALCAM which, once blocked, delays the progression of the disease. Their results, obtained from in

23h

Protective microparticles shield and deliver micronutrients to people

A team of scientists has created a new microparticle-based platform that can preserve, protect and deliver micronutrients such as iron to rodents and human volunteers.

23h

Climate change influenced rise and fall of Northern Iraq's Neo-Assyrian Empire

Changes in climate may have contributed to both the rise and collapse of the Neo-Assyrian Empire in northern Iraq, which was considered the most powerful empire of its time, according to a new study. The results suggest that multi-decade megadroughts aligned with the timing of the empire's collapse in 609 BCE, triggering declines in the region's agricultural productivity that led to political and

23h

ELeCt-ing a better candidate for chemo delivery

Chemo drugs are notoriously toxic, in part because so little of the drug actually gets to its target organ, requiring high doses. Scientists at the Wyss Institute and Harvard SEAS found a way to deliver nanoparticles filled with chemo to the lungs with 10x greater success by 'hitchhiking' them onto red blood cells, leading to drastically improved survival in mice with metastatic lung cancer.

23h

After decades of little progress, researchers may be catching up to sepsis

After decades of little or no progress, biomedical researchers are finally making some headway at detecting and treating sepsis, a deadly medical complication that sends a surge of pathogenic infection through the body and remains a major public health problem. They report data Nov. 13 in Science Translational Medicine.

23h

Knowing your neighbors may shape US household yard care practices

Neighbor peer pressure may be linked to increases in yard fertilization and irrigation across several distinct climate regions of the US, according to a study published Nov. 13, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dexter Locke from the USDA Forest Service, US, and colleagues.

23h

Ancient Egyptians gathered birds from the wild for sacrifice and mummification

In ancient Egypt, sacred ibises were collected from their natural habitats to be ritually sacrificed, according to a study released Nov. 13, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sally Wasef of Griffith University, Australia, and colleagues.

23h

Eating tiny nutrient particles could be better than health supplements

Nutrient deficiency affects billions – a solution may be to pack the nutrients into particles that can be cooked before releasing their contents in the stomach

23h

Neutrinos Lead to Unexpected Discovery in Basic Math

After breakfast one morning in August, the mathematician Terence Tao opened an email from three physicists he didn't know. The trio explained that they'd stumbled across a simple formula that, if true, established an unexpected relationship between some of the most basic and important objects in linear algebra. The formula "looked too good to be true," said Tao, who is a professor at the Universi

23h

"Mind Boggling" Behavior of Oxygen on Mars Has NASA Stumped

For three Martian years ending in 2017, the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument aboard the Curiosity Rover analyzed the composition of the Red Planet's air. Most chemicals in the air behaved in a predictable way, increasing and decreasing in relation to the amount of carbon dioxide at any given point in the year. But not oxygen. It unexpectedly increased by upwards of 30 percent in the sprin

23h

The Preppy Murder Unpacks a Tabloid Frenzy

Before Jeremy Meeks went viral gazing soulfully out of a mugshot issued by the Stockton Police Department in 2014, before Dzhokhar Tsarnaev peeked through tousled curls like a teen idol on the cover of Rolling Stone , the American media fell in love with Robert Chambers. In August 1986, the body of an 18-year-old girl named Jennifer Levin was found in Central Park. Within days, detectives had tra

23h

Why Colleges Are Betting Big on Video Games

The varsity dormitory at Harrisburg University is still under construction. A pile of cardboard debris twists around the base of the stairs; the hallway lights beam an industrial, apricot glow; and when 22-year-old Alex Carrell meets me at the entrance and leads me to his room, we have to dodge the contractors installing carpet on their hands and knees. The wooden doors flanking the hallway are e

23h

This Stunning Documentary Depicts an Act of True Love and Trust

Through a thick snowy-mountain haze, a skier emerges. He carves down the slope with the deft comfort of a seasoned athlete. In the low visibility of the whiteout, everything is a specter: the trees, the people, the slow-moving chairlift overhead. But it doesn't matter—the skier is blind. When Krzysztof Sydor lost his vision to a rare genetic disorder 20 years ago, he gave up a lifetime passion fo

23h

Scientists Piece Together the Rise and Fall of an Empire From Evidence Hidden in a Cave

New data sheds light on the impact of an ancient drought. Hall-in-Assyrian-Palace.jpg Restoration of an image of an Assyrian Palace Image credits: New York Public library digital collections Earth Wednesday, November 13, 2019 – 14:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) – Secrets hidden within stalagmites in an Iraqi cave are now shedding light on how climate change influenced both the

1d

Climate change may be behind fall of ancient empire, say researchers

Dramatic shift from wet to dry climate could have caused crop failure in Neo-Assyrian empire The Neo-Assyrian empire was a mighty superpower that dominated the near east for 300 years before its dramatic collapse. Now researchers say they have a novel theory for what was behind its rise and fall: climate change. The empire emerged in about 912BC and grew to stretch from the Mediterranean down to

1d

Experts crack mystery of ancient Egypt's sacred bird mummies

DNA analysis helps work out origin of nearly 6 million mummified ibises An ancient Egyptian mystery has been solved, according to researchers, who say they have cracked the conundrum of where millions of mummified birds came from. Pharaohs and members of the nobility were often mummified , but the practice was not reserved for humans – cats, crocodiles, mice and mongooses are among the mummified

1d

The post-PAM interaction of RNA-guided spCas9 with DNA dictates its target binding and dissociation

Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that targets complementary DNA for cleavage and has been repurposed for many biological usages. Cas9 activities are governed by its direct interactions with DNA. However, information about this interplay and the mechanism involved in its direction of Cas9 activity remain obscure. Using a single-molecule approach, we probed Cas9/sgRNA/DNA interactions along the D

1d

Fibrinogen-like protein 2 controls sepsis catabasis by interacting with resolvin Dp5

The mechanisms that drive programmed resolution of inflammation remain elusive. Here, we report the temporal regulation of soluble (s) and transmembrane (m) fibrinogen-like protein 2 (Fgl2) during inflammation and show that both sFgl2 and mFgl2 correlate with the outcome. The expression and ectodomain shedding of Fgl2 are respectively promoted by miR-466l and metalloproteinases (ADAM10 and ADAM17

1d

Evolutionarily conserved regulation of sleep by epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

The genetic bases for most human sleep disorders and for variation in human sleep quantity and quality are largely unknown. Using the zebrafish, a diurnal vertebrate, to investigate the genetic regulation of sleep, we found that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is necessary and sufficient for normal sleep levels and is required for the normal homeostatic response to sleep depriva

1d

Role of climate in the rise and fall of the Neo-Assyrian Empire

Northern Iraq was the political and economic center of the Neo-Assyrian Empire (c. 912 to 609 BCE)—the largest and most powerful empire of its time. After more than two centuries of regional dominance, the Neo-Assyrian state plummeted from its zenith (c. 670 BCE) to complete political collapse (c. 615 to 609 BCE). Earlier explanations for the Assyrian collapse focused on the roles of internal pol

1d

Erythrocyte leveraged chemotherapy (ELeCt): Nanoparticle assembly on erythrocyte surface to combat lung metastasis

Despite being the mainstay of cancer treatment, chemotherapy has shown limited efficacy for the treatment of lung metastasis due to ineffective targeting and poor tumor accumulation. Here, we report a highly effective erythrocyte leveraged chemotherapy (ELeCt) platform, consisting of biodegradable drug nanoparticles assembled onto the surface of erythrocytes, to enable chemotherapy for lung metas

1d

Pinpointing nitrogen oxide emissions from space

Satellite observations of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) provide valuable information on the location and strength of NO x emissions, but spatial resolution is limited by horizontal transport and smearing of temporal averages due to changing wind fields. In this study, we map NO x emissions on high spatial resolution from TROPOMI observations of NO 2 combined with wind fields based on the continuity eq

1d

In vivo changes of nanoapatite crystals during bone reconstruction and the differences with native bone apatite

Hydroxyapatite (HA) plays an important role in clinical bone repair. However, it remains a challenge to accurately determine its changes during bone reconstruction and to identify its differences from native bone apatite. Here, terbium (Tb) doped uniform HA nanocrystals were implanted into bone tissue and compared with native bone apatite. These comparisons demonstrated the occurrence of composit

1d

1d

Discovery: New biomarker for cancer stem cells

A University of Houston College of Pharmacy associate professor has discovered a new biomarker in cancer stem cells that govern cancer survival and spread, and it's raising hope that drug discovery to kill cancer stem cells could follow suit.

1d

How everyday products are supercharging landfill gas, and what that means

Synthetic compounds increasingly used in everyday products like shampoo and motor oil are finding their way into landfills and supercharging the biogas those landfills produce, researchers at the University of Michigan have found.

1d

Ancient enamel sheds light on extinct giant ape

Now we have some information to go with this face.

1d

Sacred Egyptian ibises were wild birds

Ancient DNA study suggests they were captured, not bred.

1d

Star Wars idea comes to life

3D imaging starts to catch up with science fiction.

1d

New Horizons Flyby Target '2014 MU69' Now Officially Named 'Arrokoth'

NASA's New Horizons mission started making history the moment it launched. The probe set a record as the fastest (at the time) launch in history, and eight years later it became the first spacecraft to visit Pluto. More recently, New Horizons took a look at a small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) known as 2014 MU69. Now, NASA has announced that object has a new name . It's "Arrokoth," a Native American

1d

ELeCt-ing a better candidate for chemo delivery

Chemotherapy has been the backbone of cancer treatment for decades, but it is notorious for its toxicity to healthy cells, severe side effects, and poor targeting of the intended tumors. Efforts to improve chemotherapy's efficacy and tolerability include packaging drugs into nanoparticles, which can protect them from degradation in the body, control their release pattern, and shield the patient fr

1d

Ancient Egyptians gathered birds from the wild for sacrifice and mummification

In ancient Egypt, Sacred Ibises were collected from their natural habitats to be ritually sacrificed, according to a study released November 13, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sally Wasef of Griffith University, Australia and colleagues.

1d

First look at thermostat wars suggests women may be losing these battles

Your characterization of the thermostat war going on in your house is likely to depend at least in part on whether you're a man or a woman, new research suggests.

1d

Knowing your neighbors may shape US household yard care practices

Neighbor peer pressure may be linked to increases in yard fertilization and irrigation across several distinct climate regions of the US, according to a study published November 13, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dexter Locke from the USDA Forest Service, US, and colleagues.

1d

There's more depressing news about anti-depressants

Research highlights impact on fish behaviour.

1d

Hyper-fast star ejected by supermassive black hole

Astronomers see first demonstration of the 'Hills mechanism'.

1d

A shield, a dance and a growing crystal

Study suggests a mechanism for controlling crystallisation.

1d

The Zombie Storefronts of America

During the 1970s and '80s, perhaps no company in America relied more on branding through architecture than Pizza Hut. The pizza chain's burgeoning franchise business flooded the country with red-roofed brick buildings, the shape of which was so recognizable that it eventually became the company's logo. But the design's physical dominance didn't last, as Pizza Hut closed scores of its dine-in buff

1d

William Taylor's Big Impeachment Reveal

It took all of about 90 minutes for the public phase of the House Democrats' impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump to yield its first big new revelation. Appearing this morning before the House Intelligence Committee, Ambassador William Taylor told lawmakers—and the millions of people watching around the world—that on the day after his now-infamous call with Ukrainian President Volod

1d

Disney Plus hits 10M subscribers in 1 day

Disney Plus says it hit more than 10 million sign-ups on its first day of launch, far exceeding expectations.

1d

Flame retardant turns social prairie voles into loners

Early life exposure to a commonly used flame-retardant mixture increases anxiety and affects socioemotional behaviors in prairie voles, particularly in females, a new study shows. The work supports the hypothesis that chemical flame retardants can adversely affect neurological development and social behavior. FireMaster 550 (FM550), a flame-retardant mixture used in foam-based baby products and f

1d

Italy to Launch National Agency for Research

The country's new government appears to have heard the call from academics for an independent body to distribute federal research funds.

1d

3 Cows Swept Out to Sea by Hurricane Dorian Are Found Alive

The cows, believed to have been carried out to sea when the storm hit North Carolina, have been spotted hanging out on the Outer Banks.

1d

New York Identifies Hospitals and Nursing Homes With Deadly Fungus

The policy change, for the virulent drug-resistant germ Candida auris, came as the C.D.C. reported that more people are dying of drug-resistant infections than it previously estimated.

1d

Uddød kæmpeabe er direkte forbundet til den nulevende orangutang

Det er lykkedes forskere ved Københavns Universitet at rekonstruere den evolutionære linje…

1d

Precisely poking cells en masse to cure cancer

A novel microfluidic device addresses one of the most costly steps in the engineered cell therapy manufacturing process, namely gene delivery. Deterministic mechanoporation, or DMP, uses fluid flow to pull each cell in a large population onto its own tiny needle. The flow is then reversed to release the cells from the needles, leaving a singular and precisely defined pore within each cell that all

1d

Puberty may offer window to reset effects of early deprived care on stress-response system

The ability to recalibrate how children respond to stress could offer a way to promote resilience.

1d

Even low-stress surgery can be fatal for frail patients, study finds

Frail patients were more likely to die within 30, 90 and 180 days after surgery than non-frail patients, even if the surgery was classified as low or moderate stress, according to a study that included a researcher from UT Health San Antonio.

1d

Tuna carbon ratios reveal shift in food web

The ratio of carbon isotopes in three common species of tuna has changed substantially since 2000, suggesting major shifts are also taking place in the phytoplankton populations that form the basis of the ocean's food web, according to a new international study involving Duke University researchers. Much of the change occurring in phytoplankton physiology and species composition may be driven by i

1d

NASA provides an infrared analysis of Tropical Storm Fengshen

Tropical Storm Fengshen continued to strengthen in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead. Infrared imagery from an instrument aboard Terra revealed very high, powerful storms with very cold cloud top temperatures circling the center.

1d

Bentley's Flying Spur has a 207-mph top speed and dedicated champagne holders

Behind the wheel of the Flying Spur. (Bentley/) The Route Napoleon is the path that the previously imprisoned former emperor of France, Napoleon Bonaparte, took in his march from Elba to Grenoble in his bid to overthrow King Louis 18th and reclaim lost glory. Today, this route is a scenic and challenging driver's road, twisting through the Alps Maritime, so it seems appropriate that Bentley would

1d

New 3D printer makes multi-material robots

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03513-4 The nozzle design allows for rapid switching between inks.

1d

Venice Underwater: The Highest Tide in 50 Years

Yesterday, strong winds and rainstorms pushed water levels in Venice, Italy, to the second-highest levels ever recorded. The high-water mark hit 74 inches (187 centimeters), just short of the record set in 1966. This exceptional acqua alta has flooded businesses and historic structures, sank boats, and been blamed for one death so far.

1d

Toxic gut bacteria make alcohol-triggered liver disease more deadly

Research team reduced liver disease in mice by killing bacterium with viruses found in sewer

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

Deep neural networks speed up weather and climate models

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

1d

Conference warned of dangers of facial recognition technology

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

1d

It's Official — Tesla Gigafactory 4 Will Be In (Or Near) Berlin

submitted by /u/MesterenR [link] [comments]

1d

1d

The Curiosity rover detects oxygen behaving strangely on Mars

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

1d

We can now make animated 'sound holograms' that you can touch

Using a polystyrene bead, some speakers and a handful of LEDs, it is possible to make colourful animated 3D holograms that a user can touch and interact with

1d

Why US police could be using your genes to profile you right now

A worrying warrant for police access to a genealogy DNA databank in the US means no one's genetic profile is safe – even if you don't use the services

1d

Huge mysterious ape Gigantopithecus was a distant cousin of orangutans

A pioneering technique has given us a glimpse at the family tree of Gigantopithecus, an extinct ape that was 2.5 metres tall and lived 300,000 years ago

1d

Spectacular ice eggs have washed onto a beach in Finland

A combination of cold weather and just the right amount of wave motion has caused strange frozen spheres to cover a Finnish beach

1d

Bloodhound car returns to the track for brake testing

The British supersonic vehicle trials its airbrake system after a weekend in the repair shop.

1d

Ancient Proteins Tell Story Of Gigantopithecus, Largest-Ever Primate

Artist's rendering of how large Gigantopithecus blacki may have been. In life, G. blacki would have spent most of its time on all fours. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons) There's nothing small …

1d

Something old, something new in the ocean's blue

Microbiologists at the Max Planck Institutes in Marburg and Bremen have discovered a new metabolic process in the ocean. Ranging from molecular structures of individual genes and detection of their global distribution, their results give insight into the pathway process and its degradation products and thus provide valuable information for future calculations of the ocean`s carbon dioxide balance.

1d

Predicting evolution

A new method of 're-barcoding' DNA allows scientists to track rapid evolution in yeast. The approach has implications for the prediction of dominant viral strains.

1d

Understanding transporter proteins at a single-molecule level

Research co-led by a St. Jude investigator and researchers from Columbia University and the New York State Psychiatric Institute reveals the mechanics of how some transporter proteins function with stunning specificity.

1d

Oldest molecular information to date illuminates the history of extinct Gigantopithecus

In the study, published in Nature, the team rebuilds multiple dental enamel proteins from an approximately two million-year-old Gigantopithecus molar fossil.

1d

Phage therapy shows promise for treating alcoholic liver disease

A team of researchers including those from King's College London and the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, have for the first time successfully applied bacteriophage (phage) therapy in mice to alcohol-related liver disease. Phages are viruses that specifically destroy bacteria.

1d

Crick researchers unravel protective properties of telomere t-loops

Loops at the ends of telomeres play a vital protective role preventing irretrievable damage to chromosomes, according to new research from the Crick. The study, published in Nature, showed how the winding and unwinding of 't-loops' at the end of telomeres prevents chromosomes from being recognized as DNA damage. The study also uncovered how this process is regulated.

1d

Extinct giant ape directly linked to the living orangutan

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have succeeded in reconstructing the evolutionary relationship between a two million year old giant primate and the living orangutan. It is the first time genetic material this old has been retrieved from a fossil in a subtropical area. This allows the researchers to accurately reconstruct animal, including human, evolutionary processes way beyond the

1d

Could the mysteries of antimatter and dark matter be linked?

RIKEN researchers and collaborators have performed the first laboratory experiments to determine whether a slightly different way in which matter and antimatter interact with dark matter might be a key to solving both mysteries.

1d

Experts unlock key to photosynthesis, a find that could help us meet food security demands

Scientists have solved the structure of one of the key components of photosynthesis, a discovery that could lead to photosynthesis being 'redesigned' to achieve higher yields and meet urgent food security needs.

1d

Phage therapy shows promise for alcoholic liver disease

UC San Diego researchers linked a gut bacteria toxin to worse clinical outcomes in patients with alcoholic liver disease, and discovered that treatment with bacteriophages clears the bacteria and eliminates the disease in mice.

1d

Multimaterial 3D printing manufactures complex objects, fast

3D printing is super cool, but it's also super slow — it would take 115 days to print a detailed, multimaterial object about the size of a grapefruit. A new method from the Wyss Institue and Harvard SEAS allows printing with up to 8 different inks in a fraction of the time, thanks to special printheads that can seamlessly switch inks up to 50 times per second.

1d

Key Photosynthesis Complex Viewed in Spinach

Findings fuel hopes for improved food-crop efficiency — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Key Photosynthesis Complex Viewed in Spinach

Findings fuel hopes for improved food-crop efficiency — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Ældgamle proteiner afslører uddød kæmpeabes nulevende slægtning

Fundet kan få betydning for forskning i menneskets historie.

1d

Turning (more) fat and sewage into natural gas

Researchers have developed what is, to date, the most efficient means of converting sewage sludge and restaurant grease into natural gas.

1d

Study teases out factors associated with postpartum overdose

A new study uncovers several risk factors associated with postpartum opioid overdose.

1d

No such thing as a low-risk surgery for frail patients

Even a minor surgery such as a laparoscopic gallbladder removal can prove to be a high-risk and even fatal procedure for frail patients, according to new research.

1d

Theoretical tubulanes inspire ultrahard polymers

Engineers print 3D blocks based on theoretical tubulanes and find they're nearly as hard as diamond.

1d

Key Photosynthesis Complex Viewed in Spinach

Findings fuel hopes for improved food-crop efficiency — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Microbial clues to a liver disease

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03417-3 Treatment options are limited for alcoholic hepatitis, a liver disease associated with high alcohol intake. Studies in mice reveal that the microorganisms responsible for this condition can be tackled by a viral treatment.

1d

Activity of caspase-8 determines plasticity between cell death pathways

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1752-8 Alternative cell death pathways are revealed in the absence of caspase-8-dependent apoptosis and MLKL-dependent necroptosis.

1d

Link between antimatter and dark matter probed

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03431-5 Ultrasensitive experiments on trapped antiprotons provide a window onto possible differences between matter and antimatter. Now they could also shed light on the identity of dark matter — the 'missing' mass in the Universe.

1d

Selective participation may undermine replication attempts

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1729-7

1d

Podcast: A rapid, multi-material 3D printer, and a bacterium's role in alcoholic hepatitis

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03507-2 Hear this week's science news, with Nick Howe and Shamini Bundell.

1d

Marine Proteobacteria metabolize glycolate via the β-hydroxyaspartate cycle

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1748-4 Marine Proteobacteria use the β-hydroxyaspartate cycle to assimilate glycolate, which is secreted by algae on a petagram scale, providing evidence of a previously undescribed trophic interaction between autotrophic phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterioplankton.

1d

How to print multi-material devices in one go

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03408-4 A multi-nozzle system has been devised that allows the 3D printing of objects using several viscous materials, thereby allowing control over the material properties of objects at the submillimetre scale.

1d

A view on drug resistance in cancer

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1730-1 A review of drug resistance in cancer analyses each biological determinant of resistance separately and discusses existing and new therapeutic strategies to combat the problem as a whole.

1d

Voxelated soft matter via multimaterial multinozzle 3D printing

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1736-8 Voxelated soft matter is designed and fabricated using multimaterial multinozzle three-dimensional printing, which switches between different viscoelastic inks along the same print filament to print multiple materials simultaneously.

1d

Bacteriophage targeting of gut bacterium attenuates alcoholic liver disease

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1742-x In patients with alcoholic hepatitis, cytolysin-positive Enterococcus faecalis strains are correlated with liver disease severity and increased mortality, and in mouse models these strains can be specifically targeted by bacteriophages.

1d

A volumetric display for visual, tactile and audio presentation using acoustic trapping

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1739-5 A volumetric display that can simultaneously deliver visual, tactile and auditory content is demonstrated.

1d

Direct limits on the interaction of antiprotons with axion-like dark matter

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1727-9 Spin-flip resonance data are used to place direct constraints on the interaction of ultralight axion-like particles with antiprotons, improving the sensitivity to the corresponding coupling coefficient by five orders of magnitude.

1d

Cryo-EM structure of the spinach cytochrome b6 f complex at 3.6 Å resolution

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1746-6 A 3.6 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of the dimeric cytochrome b6f complex from spinach reveals the structural basis for operation of the quinol cycle and its redox-sensing function.

1d

Structures of a RAG-like transposase during cut-and-paste transposition

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1753-7 Analysis of multiple structures of the Helicoverpa zea DNA transposase Transib, determined by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, reveals the detailed pathway of the transposition reaction and sheds light on the evolution of the RAG recombinase.

1d

Researchers create 3D display you can see, hear and feel

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03508-1 The display uses ultrasound to deliver 3D visuals and audible sound, as well as tactile feedback

1d

High-resolution lineage tracking reveals travelling wave of adaptation in laboratory yeast

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1749-3 A renewable barcoding system reveals the evolutionary dynamics of laboratory budding yeast, showing that fitness changes over time in a travelling wave of adaptation that can fluctuate owing to leapfrogging events.

1d

Large hydropower and water-storage potential in future glacier-free basins

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1740-z Glacierized regions that are projected to become ice-free in this century could provide substantial water storage and hydroelectric power, according to this worldwide theoretical assessment.

1d

Snapshots of a genetic cut-and-paste

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03428-0 Transposase proteins mediate the movement of 'parasitic' DNA segments in genomes. A series of structures of a transposase catches it in action, and highlights how these proteins evolved for use in immune systems.

1d

CDK phosphorylation of TRF2 controls t-loop dynamics during the cell cycle

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1744-8 A phospho-switch is identified in the shelterin subunit TRF2 that regulates transient recruitment of the RTEL1 helicase to, and release from, telomeres, and provides a narrow window during which RTEL1 can unwind t-loops to facilitate telomere replication.

1d

Thermoelectric performance of a metastable thin-film Heusler alloy

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1751-9 A high intrinsic thermoelectric figure of merit is found for a metastable thin-film Fe2V0.8W0.2Al Heusler alloy.

1d

Enamel proteome shows that Gigantopithecus was an early diverging pongine

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1728-8 The enamel proteome from a 1.9-million-year-old Gigantopithecus tooth shows that the Gigantopithecus and Pongo (orangutan) lineages diverged 12–10 million years ago.

1d

Quantifying secondary transport at single-molecule resolution

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1747-5 Imaging of substrate transport by individual MhsT transporters, members of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family of secondary transporters, at single- and multi-turnover resolution reveals that the rate-limiting step varies with the identity of the transported substrate.

1d

Star Wars-style 3D images created from single speck of foam

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03454-y Ultrasonic speakers steer tiny bead to generate displays that you can touch and hear.

1d

Heterogeneity in banker culture and its influence on dishonesty

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1741-y In contrast to a previous study in which only bankers showed increased dishonesty when reminded of their profession, this study found that such reminders induced some dishonesty in bankers, although the effect was not significant, and that this effect was not unique to bankers.

1d

The right to know: How does censorship affect academics?

Academic freedom is what makes a university space work as a setting to develop students' capacities. It is the permission to think freely, and have contrarian discussions, that leads to new insights. There are whole zones of knowledge that we never get to because of intimidation put on academics: "We simply don't know what we haven't even thought to ask." Self-censorship, especially regarding sen

1d

Hologram-like device animates objects using ultrasound waves

Unlike Star Wars projection, 3D technology whips polystyrene bead round at high speed It may not rival the technology found in a galaxy far, far away, but everyone has to start somewhere. Researchers in Sussex have built a device that displays 3D animated objects that can talk and interact with onlookers. A demonstration of the display showed a butterfly flapping its wings, a countdown spelled ou

1d

Understanding transporter proteins at a single-molecule level

Like a boat helping passengers cross a river, transporters move substances across cell membranes. This process is fundamental to the healthy functioning of cells in life forms from bacteria to humans. The function of these transporters previously had to be inferred from the behavior of hundreds or thousands of them working together. Published today in Nature, new techniques enable the study of one

1d

Something old, something new in the ocean's blue

Charles Darwin suspected something in the "clear blue water" of the ocean that was even smaller than the protozoa he could see under the microscope. "Today we know that every liter of ocean water is swarming with hundreds of millions of microorganisms," explains marine researcher Rudolf Amann, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen. His colleague Tobias Erb from the

1d

Experts unlock key to photosynthesis, a find that could help us meet food security demands

Scientists have solved the structure of one of the key components of photosynthesis, a discovery that could lead to photosynthesis being 'redesigned' to achieve higher yields and meet urgent food security needs.

1d

Could the mysteries of antimatter and dark matter be linked?

Could the profound mysteries of antimatter and dark matter be linked? Thinking that they might be, scientists from the international BASE collaboration, led by Stefan Ulmer of the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research, and collaborators have performed the first laboratory experiments to determine whether a slightly different way in which matter and antimatter interact with dark matter might be a k

1d

Extinct giant ape directly linked to the living orangutan

By using ancient protein sequencing, researchers have retrieved genetic information from a 1.9 million year old extinct, giant primate that used to live in a subtropical area in southern China. The genetic information allows the researchers to uncover the evolutionary position of Gigantopithecus blacki, a three-meter tall and possibly 600 kg primate, revealing the orangutan as its closest living r

1d

What survives, thrives and dominates over a thousand generations? The answer might be even more complex than thought

Aa team of scientists, led by Harvard researchers, has used a new method of DNA "re-barcoding" to track rapid evolution in yeast. The new approach, published in Nature, advances the field of organismic and evolutionary biology and holds promise for real-world results.

1d

Understanding transporter proteins at a single-molecule level

Like a boat helping passengers cross a river, transporters move substances across cell membranes. This process is fundamental to the healthy functioning of cells in life forms from bacteria to humans. The function of these transporters previously had to be inferred from the behavior of hundreds or thousands of them working together. Published today in Nature, new techniques enable the study of one

1d

Experts unlock key to photosynthesis, a find that could help us meet food security demands

Scientists have solved the structure of one of the key components of photosynthesis, a discovery that could lead to photosynthesis being 'redesigned' to achieve higher yields and meet urgent food security needs.

1d

GitHub Finally Has Its Own iOS and Android Apps

First launched in 2008, the open source hub is launching its first apps for iOS and Android.

1d

Hearing Is Seeing: Sound Waves Create a 3-D Display

An interactive system produces levitating images by projecting color onto a tiny bead as it zips around a darkened box — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

'Dragon teeth' reveal ancient ape's place in primate family tree

Method of analyzing enamel proteins may also help sort out human ancestry

1d

Hearing Is Seeing: Sound Waves Create a 3-D Display

An interactive system produces levitating images by projecting color onto a tiny bead as it zips around a darkened box — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Secrets of the largest ape that ever lived

The fossilised tooth of a mysterious extinct ape is shedding new light on the evolution of great apes.

1d

Hearing Is Seeing: Sound Waves Create a 3-D Display

An interactive system produces levitating images by projecting color onto a tiny bead as it zips around a darkened box — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Extinct giant ape directly linked to the living orangutan

By using ancient protein sequencing, researchers have retrieved genetic information from a 1.9 million year old extinct, giant primate that used to live in a subtropical area in southern China. The genetic information allows the researchers to uncover the evolutionary position of Gigantopithecus blacki, a three-meter tall and possibly 600 kg primate, revealing the orangutan as its closest living r

1d

What survives, thrives and dominates over a thousand generations? The answer might be even more complex than thought

Aa team of scientists, led by Harvard researchers, has used a new method of DNA "re-barcoding" to track rapid evolution in yeast. The new approach, published in Nature, advances the field of organismic and evolutionary biology and holds promise for real-world results.

1d

The Influencer Scientists Debunking Online Misinformation

A lot of the hacks and diets on social media are bogus, or even dangerous. These fact-checkers are using YouTube and Instagram to battle bad info.

1d

Veterans Claim Military Immediately Seized Video of UFO Encounter

Immediate Aftermath In September, the United States Navy confirmed the authenticity of footage of its fighter pilots encountering an "unidentified aerial phenomenon" in 2004. Now, several men who witnessed the strange event while serving in the Navy have come forward to speak to Popular Mechanics about the experience — including what happened just after the sighting. Men in Black Gary Voorhis and

1d

Här är världens minsta hovdjur – återfunnet efter nästan 30 år

Den antogs vara utdöd. Men nu har forskarna återfunnit världens minsta hovdjur – efter att i nästan 30 år befarat att den lilla gynnaren var utdöd.

1d

A severe form of epilepsy could be treated with cholesterol medication

A build-up of cholesterol in the brains of people with a severe form of epilepsy can cause prolonged seizures, but it may be possible to treat this with statins

1d

Motorola’s Razr flip phone is back as folding-screen smartphone, for $1,500

The good news: A phone can fit in your pocket again. The bad news: It’s twice the price of an iPhone.

1d

Twenty more smart commands to use with your Amazon Echo

Never misquote a movie again: train with Alexa and geek out like a champ. From speakers to microwaves, Amazon is pushing out more Alexa-enabled hardware devices , and their smart assistant continues to become more responsive. Keep up with the updates and try these 20 new voice commands to use on your Amazon Echo, and add them to the other 20 we've already told you about. There are thousands of co

1d

Hair-raising truth behind pigeons' lost toes

Next time you visit your hairdresser spare a thought for the pigeons.

1d

Study teases out factors associated with postpartum overdose

A new study in the journal Addiction that uncovers several risk factors associated with postpartum opioid overdose.

1d

New artificial intelligence system automatically evolves to evade internet censorship

UMD researchers developed a tool called Geneva (short for Genetic Evasion), which automatically learns to circumvent censorship. Tested in China, India and Kazakhstan, Geneva found dozens of ways to circumvent censorship by exploiting gaps in censors' logic and finding bugs that the researchers say would have been virtually impossible to find manually. Geneva is being presented during a peer-revie

1d

Urban development reduces flash flooding chances in arid West

Urban development in the eastern United States results in an increase in flash flooding in nearby streams, but in the arid West, urbanization has just the opposite effect, according to a Penn State researcher, who suggests there may be lessons to be learned from the sharp contrast.

1d

Hair-raising truth behind pigeons' lost toes

Next time you visit your hairdresser spare a thought for the pigeons.

1d

Teaching doctors about domestic violence benefits patients

A short training program can equip family doctors to respond appropriately to patients experiencing domestic violence, research finds. Researchers analyzed data from a randomized controlled trial of 272 female domestic violence survivors aged 16 to 50 years attending 52 Australian primary care clinics . Doctors in the intervention group participated in a training program designed to help them del

1d

Chitin-binding proteins override host plant's resistance to fungal infection

An insoluble complex carbohydrate, chitin makes up fungal walls and plays a significant role in the interaction between fungal pathogens and their plant hosts. Plant cells harbor immune receptors that perceive chitin and work to stop fungal infection. However, fungal plant pathogens then release chitin-binding proteins that perturb the chitin-triggered immunity.

1d

Chitin-binding proteins override host plant's resistance to fungal infection

An insoluble complex carbohydrate, chitin makes up fungal walls and plays a significant role in the interaction between fungal pathogens and their plant hosts. Plant cells harbor immune receptors that perceive chitin and work to stop fungal infection. However, fungal plant pathogens then release chitin-binding proteins that perturb the chitin-triggered immunity.

1d

Ocean explorers delve beneath the ice

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03464-w To predict how much climate change will raise sea level, researchers are studying ice shelves — where vast expanses of ice meet the ocean.

1d

A sharper view of the world's oceans

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03465-9 Models of the behaviour of the oceans with higher spatial resolution could lead to more accurate climate predictions.

1d

Physical oceanography

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03463-x As the seas rise, our understanding of the processes within them must deepen.

1d

A Supermassive Black Hole Yeeted This Star at 3.7 Million MPH

Yeet! Five million years ago, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way sent an unfortunate star rocketing away at millions of miles per hour. The star, recently spotted by Carnegie Mellon University astronomers, is on its way out of the galaxy at 3.7 million miles per hour — a speed so high that it will never return, according to Space.com . Putting aside how metal it is that a

1d

How to Cut U.S. Carbon Pollution by Nearly 40 Percent in 10 Years

In Washington, the immaculate solution to climate change has a name: a bipartisan, revenue-neutral carbon tax. The idea should have wide appeal. Under the plan, the government would charge companies for every ton of greenhouse gas they emit. Instead of spending that money, the government would immediately send it back to Americans as a tax cut or check. Over time, Americans would make greener cho

1d

How Enceladus got its water-spewing tiger stripes

Study explains how Saturn's frozen moon cracked up

1d

Depending on a caregiver spouse can make men feel like a burden

A spouse who needs caregiving for a chronic illness or disability can create stress for married couples, but that is even more true when husbands are the ones that need the care, researchers report. A new study shows that, when compared to wives or men in non-caregiving relationships, husbands are vulnerable to negative exchanges with their spouses, such as criticizing or letting them down, due t

1d

Body language key to zoo animal welfare

Watching the behaviour and body language of zoo animals could be the key to understanding and improving their welfare, new research suggests. Traditionally, zoos have focused on more straightforward measures such as whether animals are eating, sleeping and breeding.

1d

The smell of old books could help preserve them

Old books give off a complex mélange of odors, ranging from pleasant (almonds, caramel and chocolate) to nasty (formaldehyde, old clothes and trash). Detecting early signs of paper degradation could help guide preservation efforts, but most techniques destroy the very paper historians want to save. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Sensors have developed an electronic nose that can non-destructive

1d

Body language key to zoo animal welfare

Watching the behaviour and body language of zoo animals could be the key to understanding and improving their welfare, new research suggests. Traditionally, zoos have focused on more straightforward measures such as whether animals are eating, sleeping and breeding.

1d

Pacemakers can improve heart function in patients with chemotherapy-induced heart disease

Research has shown that treating chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy with commercially available cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) delivered through a surgically implanted defibrillator or pacemaker can significantly improve patient outcomes.

1d

Aging experts advocate global effort to ensure health spans match life spans

Across the world, more people are living longer. But 'whether the extra years will be good ones — and whether societies and economies will benefit as a result — depends on the actions we take now,' states an editorial in a new supplemental issue of The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences from The Gerontological Society of America.

1d

High expression of apoptosis protein (Api-5) in chemoresistant triple-negative breast cancers

78 TNBC biopsies from patients with different responses to chemotherapy were analysed for API-5 expression before any treatment.Further studies on API-5 expression and inhibition were performed on patient-derived TNBC xenografts, one highly sensitive to chemotherapies and the other resistant to most tested drugs.Clinical analyses of the 78 TNBC biopsies revealed that API-5 was more markedly expres

1d

Study suggests weight-loss surgery may release toxic compounds from fat into bloodstream

Toxic man-made chemicals — such as polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides — that are absorbed into the body and stored in fat may be released into the bloodstream during the rapid fat loss that follows bariatric surgery, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The finding points to the need for further research to understand

1d

Chitin-binding proteins override host plant's resistance to fungal infection

A recent Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions article studies chitin-binding proteins from a soilborne fungus (Verticillium nonalfalfae) that causes vascular wilt in plants. This fungus binds a particular protein (VnaChtBP) to chitin in order to abolish the host plant's chitin-triggered burst of reactive oxygen species and shield the fungus from being digested by the plant.

1d

Yoga improves depression and anxiety symptoms

Yoga and breathing exercises improve symptoms of depression and anxiety in the short term and cumulatively in the longer term, new research suggests. Scientific studies already support yoga practice as a means to reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety. The new findings, which appear in the Journal of Psychiatric Practice , suggest yoga can be a helpful complementary treatment for clinical depr

1d

3 universities, medical center get $1B to teach and research

Three universities and a health care institution are sharing a gift of more than $1 billion that's one of the largest in the history of higher education, they announced Wednesday.

1d

'Give me the calcium!' Tulane virus takes over cellular calcium signaling to replicate

Some gastrointestinal viruses need calcium. They need calcium ions to carry out several essential aspects of viral life, such as entry into host cells, genome replication and building new viruses to invade other cells. The cells invaded by viruses also use calcium. They use it as signals to regulate many of the cells' own processes, but viruses can takeover cellular calcium signaling to satisfy th

1d

Someone, Somewhere review – slow-burn Parisian therapy romance

The meet-cute is neatly postponed in this entertaining story of two next-door neighbours, both seeing therapists and looking for love Much like the process of psychotherapy, patience is required for results while watching this modestly entertaining slow-burn Parisian romance from Cédric Klapisch , who pulls off a neat trick by bumping the meet-cute to the end of the film. What happens before his

1d

'Give me the calcium!' Tulane virus takes over cellular calcium signaling to replicate

Some gastrointestinal viruses need calcium. They need calcium ions to carry out several essential aspects of viral life, such as entry into host cells, genome replication and building new viruses to invade other cells. The cells invaded by viruses also use calcium. They use it as signals to regulate many of the cells' own processes, but viruses can takeover cellular calcium signaling to satisfy th

1d

Researchers capture moving object with ghost imaging

Researchers have developed a way to capture moving objects with the unconventional imaging method known as ghost imaging. The new method could make the imaging technique practical for new applications such as biomedical imaging, security checks and video compression and storage.

1d

Theoretical tubulanes inspire ultrahard polymers

A lightweight material full of holes is nearly as hard as diamond. The mere dents left by speeding bullets prove it.

1d

NASA Reverses Course After Giving Asteroid Nazi Name

Ultima Oops It's the furthest celestial object we've ever visited with a spacecraft — asteroid Ultima Thule has been fascinating scientists ever since NASA's New Horizons spacecraft visited it last winter. Now it's back in the news for an embarrassing reason: NASA renamed the space rock on Tuesday after backlash about its old name's Nazi connotations, Agence France-Press reports . NASA's new name

1d

The smell of old books could help preserve them

Old books give off a complex mélange of odors, ranging from pleasant (almonds, caramel and chocolate) to nasty (formaldehyde, old clothes and trash). Detecting early signs of paper degradation could help guide preservation efforts, but most techniques destroy the very paper historians want to save. Now, researchers have developed an electronic nose that can non-destructively sniff out odors emitte

1d

Leukaemia cells can transform into non-cancerous cells through epigenetic changes

Researchers have discovered that a leukemic cell is capable of transforming into a non-cancerous cell through epigenetic changes.

1d

'Give me the calcium!' Tulane virus takes over cellular calcium signaling to replicate

Researchers uncover the first piece of functional evidence suggesting that Tulane virus and human norovirus use viroporins to control cellular calcium signaling.

1d

Turning (more) fat and sewage into natural gas

North Carolina State University researchers have developed what is, to date, the most efficient means of converting sewage sludge and restaurant grease into methane.

1d

How the cellular recycling system is put on hold while cells divide

Research at the Babraham Institute uniting cell signalling, autophagy, mass spectrometry and imaging expertise has resolved a fundamental question about whether the cellular recycling process is halted during cell division. In addition, the researchers have identified the mechanisms involved and described how the usual repression system and the mitosis-specific repression of autophagy interlink. T

1d

Novel mathematical framework provides a deeper understanding of how drugs interact

Combining two or more drugs can be an effective treatment of diverse diseases, such as cancer. Yet, at the same time, the wrong drug combination can cause major side effects. Currently there is no systematic understanding of how different drugs influence each other. Thus, elucidating how two given drugs interact, and whether they have a beneficial effect, would mean a major step towards drug devel

1d

Microsoft Sends a New Kind of AI Processor Into the Cloud

An innovative chip from Graphcore could push artificial intelligence applications to greater heights.

1d

How the cellular recycling system is put on hold while cells divide

Research at the Babraham Institute uniting cell signalling, autophagy, mass spectrometry and imaging expertise has resolved a fundamental question about whether the cellular recycling process is halted during cell division. In addition, the researchers have identified the mechanisms involved and described how the usual repression system and the mitosis-specific repression of autophagy interlink. T

1d

Novel mathematical framework provides a deeper understanding of how drugs interact

Combining two or more drugs can be an effective treatment of diverse diseases, such as cancer. Yet, at the same time, the wrong drug combination can cause major side effects. Currently there is no systematic understanding of how different drugs influence each other. Thus, elucidating how two given drugs interact, and whether they have a beneficial effect, would mean a major step towards drug devel

1d

Targeting alpha-synuclein in the gut may slow down Parkinson's disease

Aggregates of the protein alpha-synuclein arising in the gut may play a key role in the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Investigators are testing the hypothesis that by targeting the enteric nervous system with a compound that can inhibit the intracellular aggregation of alpha-synuclein, they can restore enteric functioning in the short term, and possibly slow the progressive deterioratio

1d

Turning (more) fat and sewage into natural gas

NC State University researchers have developed what is, to date, the most efficient means of converting sewage sludge and restaurant grease into natural gas.

1d

Chemistry — Five-fold boost in formaldehyde yield

Environmentally benign methods for the industrial production of chemicals are urgently needed. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers recently described such a procedure for the synthesis of formaldehyde, and have now improved it with the aid of machine learning.

1d

Can 'smart toilets' be the next health data wellspring?

Wearable, smart technologies are transforming the ability to monitor and improve health, but a decidedly low-tech commodity — the humble toilet — may have potential to outperform them all.

1d

Dartmouth study assesses fracture risk for patients taking multiple medications

There is a strong association between the number of fracture-associated drugs (FADs) older patients receive and their risk of sustaining a hip fracture, according to a new Dartmouth study.

1d

The Need for a Nuremberg Code for the 21st Century

Science continues to be weaponized in the name of oppression — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

The Need for a Nuremberg Code for the 21st Century

Science continues to be weaponized in the name of oppression — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Professors are Naming Their Kids as Co-authors in Academic Papers

Family Force There's an unusual trend on the rise in South Korean academia: professors are naming children and teens as co-authors on their research, likely to boost their resumes for college admissions. The practice, which first prompted government scrutiny in 2017, has only grown more common since then, according to Nature News . While the South Korean education ministry treats unjustified auth

1d

Perovskite solar cells: Possible aspects of high efficiency uncovered

Solar cells based on perovskites have reached enormously high efficiencies within only a few years. Those with hybrid halide perovskite, i.e. materials containing inorganic and organic components, achieve particularly high efficiencies, but lack long-term stability. Even though inorganic perovskite semiconductors, such as CsPbI3, are less efficient, they are considered interesting as well, since t

1d

Perovskite solar cells: Possible aspects of high efficiency uncovered

A team has demonstrated that hybrid halide perovskites crystallize without an inversion center. Interactions between the organic molecules and adjacent iodine atoms can lead to the formation of ferroelectric domains, which, indirectly, can result in higher solar-cell efficiencies. The formation of these ferroelectric domains cannot occur in purely inorganic perovskites.

1d

Spot the difference: Two identical-looking bird species with very different genes

While reports of species going extinct are sadly becoming common, an international team of scientists has identified a new species of bird living on the Southern coast of China, that diverged from their Northern relatives around half a million years ago.

1d

World's oldest glue used from prehistoric times till the days of the Gauls

By studying artefacts that date back to the first 6 centuries AD through the lens of chemistry, archaeology, and textual analysis, researchers have discovered birch tar was being used right up to late antiquity, if not longer. The artefacts in question — found in a region where birch is scarce, thus raising the question of how it was procured — are testimony to the strength of tradition among th

1d

Researchers capture moving object with ghost imaging

Researchers have developed a way to capture moving objects with the unconventional imaging method known as ghost imaging. The new method could make the imaging technique practical for new applications such as biomedical imaging, security checks and video compression and storage.

1d

Research to make (fun) multi-player gaming an educational experience

A new video game framework brings together two well-studied approaches to educational software in order to keep multiple players engrossed in the learning experience while fostering collaboration and problem solving. The framework is one of the first to integrate narrative-centered learning and collaborative learning techniques, laying the groundwork for future efforts in the field.

1d

Theoretical tubulanes inspire ultrahard polymers

Rice University engineers print 3D blocks based on theoretical tubulanes and find they're nearly as hard as diamond.

1d

How the cellular recycling system is put on hold while cells divide

Research involving several teams at the Babraham Institute, Cambridge, UK, has shown that cellular recycling (autophagy) is repressed during the process of cell division, and how repression of autophagy during mitosis utilises a different master regulator. The findings address a long-standing point of contention in biology.

1d

Explosion in Tianjin Port enhanced atmospheric nitrogen deposition over the Bohai Sea

Total production and the scale of industrial enterprises in China have expanded greatly since late 1970s. As such, long-term accumulated environmental risks have evolved and intensified, and China has entered a period of high incidence of environmental pollution events. In August 2015, a serious explosion occurred in Tianjin Port, leaving at least 50 dead and hundreds injured. Fire and smoke soare

1d

Nu kommer der klimavenlig asfalt på statsvejene

Asfalten er 10 procent dyrere, men sparer brændstof og er både mere holdbar og støjreducerende end alternativerne.

1d

What it's like to live on the International Space Station | Cady Coleman

In this quick, fun talk, astronaut Cady Coleman welcomes us aboard the International Space Station, where she spent nearly six months doing experiments that expanded the frontiers of science. Hear what it's like to fly to work, sleep without gravity and live life hurtling at 17,500 miles per hour around the Earth. "The space station is the place where mission and magic come together," Coleman says

1d

Parents on Reddit skirt shame with 'throwaways'

Social media platforms tend to crack down on temporary, "throwaway" accounts, but they serve parents on Reddit well, a study finds. The new research shows that so-called throwaway profiles on some platforms can be good for adults who need to open up and test the waters on subjects that might cause them shame or pain if they were to share as themselves. "Having a level of anonymity can allow paren

1d

Meet Arrokoth: Ultima Thule, the Most Distant Object Ever Explored, Has a New Name

The small body beyond Pluto visited by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is now officially known as Arrokoth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Laser: Multi-millijoule 3-cycle pulses at 318 W generated

A team has generated multi-millijoule 3-cycle pulses at 318 W average power level. These results mark a significant milestone in few-cycle laser technology paving the way towards industrial applications.

1d

How self-reactive immune cells are allowed to develop

A research team has found the mechanism that controls the growth of B1-cells in mice. The findings may lead to a deeper understanding of certain forms of cancer and autoimmune diseases.

1d

Urban development reduces flash flooding chances in arid Western US

Urban development in the eastern United States results in an increase in flash flooding in nearby streams, but in the arid West, urbanization has just the opposite effect, according to a researcher, who suggests there may be lessons to be learned from the sharp contrast.

1d

Brave Browser Reaches Version 1.0

Brave, the open-source Chromium-based browser that features ad-blocking together with a blockchain-based digital advertising platform, has emerged from its beta. Version 1.0 encompasses …

1d

Artificial intelligence to run the chemical factories of the future

A new proof-of-concept study details how an automated system driven by artificial intelligence can design, build, test and learn complex biochemical pathways to efficiently produce lycopene, a red pigment found in tomatoes and commonly used as a food coloring, opening the door to a wide range of biosynthetic applications, researchers report.

1d

Study finds no such thing as a low-risk surgery for frail patients

Even a minor surgery such as a laparoscopic gallbladder removal can prove to be a high-risk and even fatal procedure for frail patients, according to new research published in JAMA Surgery.

1d

'Give me the calcium!' Tulane virus takes over cellular calcium signaling to replicate

Researchers uncover the first piece of functional evidence suggesting that Tulane virus and human norovirus use viroporins to control cellular calcium signaling.

1d

Research to make (fun) multi-player gaming an educational experience

A new video game framework brings together two well-studied approaches to educational software in order to keep multiple players engrossed in the learning experience while fostering collaboration and problem solving. The framework is one of the first to integrate narrative-centered learning and collaborative learning techniques, laying the groundwork for future efforts in the field.

1d

Researchers capture moving object with ghost imaging

Researchers have developed a way to capture moving objects with the unconventional imaging method known as ghost imaging. The new method could make the imaging technique practical for new applications such as biomedical imaging, security checks and video compression and storage.

1d

World's oldest glue used from prehistoric times till the days of the Gauls

By studying artefacts that date back to the first 6 centuries AD through the lens of chemistry, archaeology, and textual analysis, french researchers have discovered birch tar was being used right up to late antiquity, if not longer. The artefacts in question — found in a region where birch is scarce, thus raising the question of how it was procured — are testimony to the strength of tradition a

1d

Perovskite solar cells: Possible aspects of high efficiency uncovered

Using crystallographic analyses at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) synchrotron in the United Kingdom, an HZB team has demonstrated that hybrid halide perovskites crystallise without inversion centre. Interactions between the organic molecules and adjacent iodine atoms can lead to the formation of ferroelectric domains, which, indirectly, can result in higher solar-cell efficiencies. The formation o

1d

Leukemia cells can transform into non-cancerous cells through epigenetic changes

Researchers of the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute discover that a leukemic cell is capable of transforming into a non-cancerous cell through epigenetic changes.

1d

Scientists spearhead 'major step forward' for malaria vaccine

Researchers have narrowed down the malaria proteins and disease-fighting antibodies that could be used to develop a vaccine against the most severe forms of malaria.

1d

New health insurance benefit at U-M led to increased rates of IVF

In a new research letter appearing in JAMA detailing a first-of-its-kind study, a University of Michigan team compared the use of IVF among university employees before and after the addition of an insurance coverage benefit, finding a marked increase in the rate of use.

1d

Analysis of melanoma in US by age groups

This study used registry data to determine annual rates of melanoma in pediatric, adolescent, young adult and adult age groups, and the findings suggest an apparent decrease among adolescent and young adults between 2006 and 2015 but increases in older adults.

1d

Use changes after recreational marijuana legalization

How the legalization of recreational marijuana in some states was associated with changes in marijuana use and cannabis use disorder compared to other states from 2008 to 2016 was the focus of this study. Researchers used national survey data from nearly 506,000 participants in age groups from 12 to 17, 18 to 25, and 26 or older.

1d

Clinical trial in Australia tests effectiveness of naloxone by nose vs. injection for opioid overdose

A randomized clinical trial in Australia tested whether a dose of naloxone administered through the nose was as effective as the same dose delivered by injection to reverse opioid overdose as measured by the need for a rescue dose delivered by injection 10 minutes after the initial treatment.

1d

Changing weight-loss strategies, attempts

The proportion of adults who tried to lose weight in the previous year increased from 1999 to 2016 but the findings of this observational study suggest the results may have been unsatisfactory. The analysis included data collected from about 48,000 adults ages 40 to 64 as part of a continuing national survey.

1d

In states where recreational marijuana is legal, problematic use increased among adults and teens

Problematic use of marijuana among adolescents and adults increased after legalization of recreational marijuana use, according to a new study from NYU Grossman School of Medicine and Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

1d

Study raises new warnings about frail surgery patients

A Veterans Affairs study has shown that frail surgery patients may be at higher risk than previously thought, leading the researchers to conclude that 'there are no 'low-risk' procedures among frail patients.'

1d

Punishing pregnant women for opioid use increases risks to infants

Many states have sought to address opioid misuse during pregnancy by adopting laws that consider substance use during pregnancy to be a crime or evidence of child neglect. A new study finds that such punitive penalties are associated with higher rates of infants being born experiencing opioid withdrawal.

1d

Study: Melanoma rates drop sharply among teens, young adults

Cases of melanoma among US adolescents and young adults declined markedly from 2006 to 2015 – even as the skin cancer's incidence continued to increase among older adults and the general population during the span, new research shows. The finding, based on national cancer-registry data, suggests that public-health efforts advocating sun protection are changing behaviors among millennials and post-

1d

Increased problematic use of marijuana in states where recreational cannabis is legal

Cannabis use disorder among adults and youth increased after legalization of recreational marijuana use, according to a new study from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and NYU School of Medicine. The study is the first to look at the impact of recreational marijuana legalization on both use and cannabis use disorder across multiple age groups. Findings are published online in JA

1d

Artificial intelligence to run the chemical factories of the future

A new proof-of-concept study details how an automated system driven by artificial intelligence can design, build, test and learn complex biochemical pathways to efficiently produce lycopene, a red pigment found in tomatoes and commonly used as a food coloring, opening the door to a wide range of biosynthetic applications, researchers report.

1d

Google Is Going to Start Offering Bank Accounts

Google Checking Some of the biggest tech companies in the world, including Apple , have been trying to break into the personal banking space by offering credit cards and checking accounts to their customers. Now, according to an exclusive report by The Wall Street Journal , Google is joining those efforts — with a plan to start offering checking accounts to its billions of users. Tech Bank Google

1d

Air pollution shuts schools in Iran's capital

Schools in Tehran were ordered to be closed on Wednesday after the Iranian capital was cloaked in dangerously high levels of air pollution, authorities said.

1d

The Brave Browser Extends Its Payouts to iOS

Nearly four years after Brave proposed paying users to surf the web, that vision is finally coming to the iPhone.

1d

Molecular Scissors Could Help Keep Some Viral Illnesses At Bay

A new technique uses the CRISPR molecule to snip away at the part of RNA viruses that allows them to spread infection by making copies of themselves. (Image credit: Susanna M. Hamilton/Broad Communications)

1d

SpaceX's cheap internet could cost us the night sky

Successful deployment of 60 Starlink satellites confirmed! pic.twitter.com/bpBqO9oYR3 — SpaceX (@SpaceX) November 11, 2019

1d

Flooding drowns St Mark's priceless mosaics in sewage

Dirty water swirls around marble tombs inside the 12th century crypt of St Mark's Basilica in Venice, which suffered untold damage when an unprecedented high tide swept through the city.

1d

Mushjorten fångad på bild – efter 30 år

Den vietnamesiska mushjorten ansågs vara en försvunnen art. Tills nu. Lokalbefolkningen i regnskogen i Vietnam visste att den fortfarande levde, men det var inte bekräftat av forskare. Det lilla djuret är knappt 2 decimeter högt och väger under 5 kilo. Forskarna och djurvårdarna bakom studien ville bevisa att den fortfarande lever. Kameror sattes upp för att fånga djurets rörelser.

1d

Sex workers' preferences for HIV prevention center on convenience

Preventing HIV in sex workers is a powerful tool in lowering the worldwide burden of the disease, and a new study could help ensure that high-risk women take advantage of medical safeguards.

1d

Spot the difference: Two identical-looking bird species with very different genes

While reports of species going extinct are sadly becoming common, an international team of scientists has identified a new species of bird living on the Southern coast of China, that diverged from their Northern relatives around half a million years ago.

1d

New technique aims to improve imaging of cells

In research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute developed and demonstrated a new technique for fluorescence lifetime imaging of tissue and cells in a fast and comprehensive manner — laying the groundwork for use in a clinical setting.

1d

The smell of old books could help preserve them

Old books give off a complex mélange of odors, ranging from pleasant (almonds, caramel and chocolate) to nasty (formaldehyde, old clothes and trash). Detecting early signs of paper degradation could help guide preservation efforts, but most techniques destroy the very paper historians want to save. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Sensors have developed an electronic nose that can non-destructive

1d

A new facial analysis method detects genetic syndromes with high precision and specificity

Developed by Araceli Morales, Gemma Piella and Federico Sukno, members of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, together with researchers from the University of Washington, which they present in a feature in the advanced online edition of Lecture Notes in Computer Science of Oct. 7.

1d

Artificial intelligence to run the chemical factories of the future

A new proof-of-concept study details how an automated system driven by artificial intelligence can design, build, test and learn complex biochemical pathways to efficiently produce lycopene, a red pigment found in tomatoes and commonly used as a food coloring, opening the door to a wide range of biosynthetic applications, researchers report.

1d

Urban development reduces flash flooding chances in arid West

Urban development in the eastern United States results in an increase in flash flooding in nearby streams, but in the arid West, urbanization has just the opposite effect, according to a Penn State researcher, who suggests there may be lessons to be learned from the sharp contrast.

1d

How self-reactive immune cells are allowed to develop

A research team at Lund University in Sweden has found the mechanism that controls the growth of B1-cells in mice. The findings, which may lead to a deeper understanding of certain forms of cancer and autoimmune diseases, was recently published in the journal Science Immunology.

1d

Just what the doctor ordered: Take a yoga class and depression, anxiety improve

Scientific studies already support yoga practice as a means to reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety. Now a new study out of Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) provides evidence that yoga and breathing exercises can improve symptoms of depression and anxiety in both the short term–with each session as well as cumulatively in the longer term, over three months.

1d

Distant worlds under many suns

An astrophysicist has discovered many new multiple star systems that contain exoplanets. For this, he searched more than 1,300 exoplanet host stars. He found that 15 per cent of those stars have at least one companion star, which is only about half the frequency expected for solar like stars. This could indicate that the influence of several stars in a system disrupts the process of planet formati

1d

Cholesterol, fat profiles at birth linked to psychological health at age 5

Babies born with high levels of bad cholesterol and a certain type of fat may face a heightened risk for social and psychological problems in childhood, according to new scientific findings.

1d

Body language key to zoo animal welfare

Watching the behavior and body language of zoo animals could be the key to understanding and improving their welfare, new research suggests.

1d

Insulin can increase mosquitoes' immunity to West Nile virus

A discovery has the potential to inhibit the spread of West Nile virus as well as Zika and dengue viruses. The researchers demonstrated that mammalian insulin activated an antiviral immunity pathway in mosquitoes, increasing the insects' ability to suppress the viruses. Since mosquito bites are the most common way humans are infected with West Nile, stopping the virus among the insects would prote

1d

Novel mathematical framework provides a deeper understanding of how drugs interact

Researchers have developed a new methodology characterizing more precisely how drugs influence each other when combined during treatment. Their analysis of over 30k drug pairs applied to cell lines identified 1,832 interactions between 242 different drugs and sheds new light on how drugs perturb the underlying molecular networks.

1d

Could cytotoxic T-cells be a key to longevity?

Scientists have used single-cell RNA analysis to find that supercentenarians — meaning people over the age of 110 — have an excess of a type of immune cell called cytotoxic CD4 T-cells.

1d

System by which plants have formed secondary buds since ancient times illuminated

A collaborative research group has succeeded in identifying an important transcription factor, GCAM1, which allows liverwort plants to asexually reproduce through creating clonal progenies (vegetative reproduction). Furthermore, this transcription factor was revealed to have the same origin as those which regulate secondary bud formation in angiosperms. It is hoped that these discoveries will lead

1d

The effects of a mock shelter environment on sleep

Researchers conducted an experiment on the nature of sleep in an evacuation shelter environment. This experiment was performed by creating a mock shelter in the university's gymnasium with four of the emergency blankets as well as a standard futon set. The results showed that the low temperature (5°C) inside the gymnasium affected subjects' sleep and body temperature regulation, reducing sleep eff

1d

Read Adam Schiff's Opening Statement in the First Impeachment Hearing

The public hearings in the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump kicked off today, with Acting U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine William Taylor and the State Department official George Kent testifying before the House Intelligence Committee. Representative Adam Schiff of California, who heads the committee, has been a central figure in the impeachment proceedings, guiding Democrats through

1d

World thirst for oil keeps growing, with SUVs a key culprit

The world's thirst for oil will continue to grow until the 2030s, with climate-damaging emissions climbing until at least 2040—and consumers' insatiable appetite for SUVs is a big reason why.

1d

Novel mathematical framework provides a deeper understanding of how drugs interact

Researchers have developed a new methodology characterizing more precisely how drugs influence each other when combined during treatment. Their analysis of over 30k drug pairs applied to cell lines identified 1,832 interactions between 242 different drugs and sheds new light on how drugs perturb the underlying molecular networks.

1d

Judge Blocks Trump Administration From Allowing 3D-Printed Guns, Again

The Trump administration continues to fail at making blueprints for untraceable, undetectable 3D-printed firearms free and easy for anyone to attain. On Tuesday, a federal judge ruled that Trump’s …

1d

Teaching group work to students with autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the fastest growing developmental disability in the United States. According to the American Psychiatric Association, this disability is characterized by "persistent deficits in social communication and social interactions across multiple contexts."

1d

Teaching group work to students with autism

Communication skills and group work could be taught alongside regular curricula and a structured protocol, which promotes communication, can go a long way to help children with ASD to socialize with their peers, thereby aiding their development.

1d

Few-cycle pulses break the 300 W barrier

A team led by researchers from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), Laser-Laboratorium Goettingen (LLG) and Active Fiber Systems (AFS) has generated multi-millijoule 3-cycle pulses at 318 W average power level. These results mark a significant milestone in few-cycle laser technology paving the way towards industrial applications. The report appeared in Op

1d

Distant worlds under many suns

Astrophysicist Dr Markus Mugrauer of Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany, has discovered many new multiple star systems that contain exoplanets. For this, he searched more than 1,300 exoplanet host stars. He found that 15 per cent of those stars have at least one companion star, which is only about half the frequency expected for solar like stars. This could indicate that the influence of

1d

When bubbles bounce back

Ultrapure solvents prove there is more than meets the eye when oil and water mix.

1d

Cholesterol, fat profiles at birth linked to psychological health at age 5

Babies born with high levels of bad cholesterol and a certain type of fat may face a heightened risk for social and psychological problems in childhood, according to new scientific findings.

1d

Female director numbers growing in UK: study

The number of female directors at top UK companies increased in 2019 but more is needed to correct an overall gender imbalance in leadership, a report showed Wednesday.

1d

Delhi smog hits 'emergency' levels as Britain's Prince Charles visits

The Indian capital's notorious air pollution hit "emergency" levels again Wednesday, coinciding with a visit by Britain's Prince Charles.

1d

Shape of the universe: study could force us to rethink everything we know about the cosmos

No matter how elegant your theory is, experimental data will have the last word. Observations of the retrograde motion of the planets were fundamental to the Copernican revolution, in which the sun replaced Earth at the centre of the solar system. And the unusual orbit of Mercury provided a spectacular confirmation of the theory of general relativity. In fact, our entire understanding of the unive

1d

Slow down: Dutch cut max speed limit to rein in pollution

The Dutch government is lowering the top speed limit on highways in a bid to put the brakes on emissions of the pollutant nitrogen oxide.

1d

Taller people have greater risk of atrial fibrillation

Taller people have an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation, research finds. AFib, which affects more than 33 million people worldwide, is an irregular and often rapid heartbeat that can lead to stroke, heart failure, and other complications. The research, which reveals a strong link between the genetic variants associated with height and one's risk for AFib, is the among the first to

1d

Tydligare ansvar ger bättre kultur i Malmö stad

Malmö stads kulturstrategi 2014-2020 är ambitiös. Men den har visat sig vara svår att genomföra. En granskning gjord av Malmöforskaren Jonas Alwall visar att trots lyckade satsningar bör nästa process ha färre åtaganden och ett tydligare ägarskap. – Det handlar mycket om att strukturen var för komplicerad. Det försvårades ytterligare av att Malmö stad under perioden hade en omorganisation, säger

1d

When bubbles bounce back

Collisions between bubbles or droplets suspended in liquid are more complex than previously thought. KAUST researchers have shown that conditions expected to promote coalescence can actually lead to the bubble or droplet pair bouncing right off of each other.

1d

World's oldest glue used from prehistoric times till the days of the Gauls

Birch bark tar, the oldest glue in the world, was in use for at least 50,000 years, from the Palaeolithic Period up until the time of the Gauls. Made by heating birch bark, it served as an adhesive for hafting tools and decorating objects. Scientists mistakenly thought it had been abandoned in western Europe at the end of the Iron Age (800–25 BC) and replaced by conifer resins, around which a full

1d

Few-cycle pulses break the 300 W barrier

A team led by researchers from the Max Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI), Laser-Laboratorium Göttingen (LLG) and Active Fiber Systems (AFS) has generated multi-millijoule 3-cycle pulses at 318 W average power level. These results mark a significant milestone in few-cycle laser technology paving the way towards industrial applications. The report appeared in Opt

1d

A study warns about the ecological impact caused by sediment accumulation in river courses

Insects, crustaceans and other water macroinvertebrates are more affected by the effect of sediment accumulation in river courses than the excess of nitrate in water environments, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE. Sediments that get accumulated in rivers—due intensive agriculture and deforestation in gallery forests—alter the ecological traits of fluvial habitats and deterior

1d

Why flooding is still so difficult to predict and prepare for

Before you read this story, take a minute to stop and look around you. Now imagine your surroundings under two feet of dirty, sewage-filled water. If you're at home, everything is trashed. Never mind your car, your furniture or washing machine. They will be ruined, but those things can be replaced. Think of your wedding album, soaked and spoiled. The music box your grandmother gave you, full of st

1d

Rapidly compressing lead to planetary-core type pressures found to make it stronger than steel

A combined team of researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the U.S. and Atomic Weapons Establishment in the U.K. has found that rapidly compressing lead to planetary-core type pressures makes it stronger than steel. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes how they managed to compress the metal so strongly without melting it.

1d

This researcher created an algorithm that removes the water from underwater images

Why do all the pictures you take underwater look blandly blue-green? The answer has to do with how light travels through water. Derya Akkaynak, an oceangoing engineer, has figured out a way to recover the colorful brilliance of the deep. From: Scientific American

1d

Bats don't rely on gut bacteria the way humans do

Just about all mammals, including humans, rely on a community of helpful bacteria living in our guts to help us digest food and fight off diseases. We've evolved along with these bacteria, to the point that closely related species have similar microbiomes in their guts. Scientists just discovered that bats break that rule. That tells us that bats probably don't rely on their microbiomes the way ot

1d

Havarirapport: Lavt olietryk standsede maskinerne på Viking Sky

PLUS. Rapporten holder fast ved første sikkerhedsadvarsel: Hold øje med olieniveau og olietryk. En af hovedmotorerne var frakoblet for at blive repareret.

1d

Oyster aquaculture has small but positive impact on Chesapeake Bay water quality

The rapid growth of oyster aquaculture in the Chesapeake Bay has raised questions about its effects on water quality, with proponents touting benefits including reduction of water-column nutrients and increased clarity, and other stakeholders pointing to drawbacks such as enrichment of sediment nutrients and altered current patterns.

1d

Astrophysicist discovers numerous multiple star systems with exoplanets

Is Earth the only habitable planet in the universe or are there more worlds somewhere out there that are capable of supporting life? And if there are, what might they look like? In a bid to answer these fundamental questions, scientists are searching space for exoplanets: distant worlds that orbit other stars outside our solar system.

1d

Oyster aquaculture has small but positive impact on Chesapeake Bay water quality

The rapid growth of oyster aquaculture in the Chesapeake Bay has raised questions about its effects on water quality, with proponents touting benefits including reduction of water-column nutrients and increased clarity, and other stakeholders pointing to drawbacks such as enrichment of sediment nutrients and altered current patterns.

1d

ESA's Mars orbiters did not see latest Curiosity methane burst

In June, NASA's Curiosity rover reported the highest burst of methane recorded yet, but neither ESA's Mars Express nor the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter recorded any signs of the illusive gas, despite flying over the same location at a similar time.

1d

Highly selective adsorbent material attracts undesirables to benefit biomanufacturing

A frothy stout, a hearty loaf of bread, a pungent cheese; each the stuff of life, each created by naturally occurring microorganisms. Defined universally as brewing, baking and caseiculture (OK, cheese making), they are examples of what, today, we call biomanufacturing.

1d

Harvesting energy from light using bio-inspired artificial cells

Scientists designed and connected two different artificial cells to each other to produce molecules called ATP (adenosine triphosphate). ATP is the fundamental unit that all living things use to carry and provide energy to run processes in cells. The scientists developed one group of artificial cells that generates protons when it is exposed to light. They also developed different artificial cells

1d

Penn Museum Redesign Aims Beyond Academics

Hundreds of objects from a collection of almost one million artifacts will go on public display for the first time when new galleries open this week.

1d

Harvesting energy from light using bio-inspired artificial cells

Scientists designed and connected two different artificial cells to each other to produce molecules called ATP (adenosine triphosphate). ATP is the fundamental unit that all living things use to carry and provide energy to run processes in cells. The scientists developed one group of artificial cells that generates protons when it is exposed to light. They also developed different artificial cells

1d

Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2019: The winning image

The winner of this year's competition has been crowned, and it looks a little painful.

1d

Explosion in Tianjin Port enhanced atmospheric nitrogen deposition over the Bohai Sea

In August 2015, a serious explosion occurred in Tianjin Port, leaving at least 50 dead and hundreds injured. Fire and smoke soared into the skies of Tianjin. A large amount of nitrogen-containing pollutants generated by the explosion were transmitted to the Bohai Sea. The impact area of the explosion on the Bohai Sea is about 1/5 of the total area of the Bohai Sea

1d

The effects of a mock shelter environment on sleep

Toyohashi University of Technology researchers conducted an experiment on the nature of sleep in an evacuation shelter environment. This experiment was performed by creating a mock shelter in the university's gymnasium with four of the emergency blankets as well as a standard futon set. The results showed that the low temperature (5°C) inside the gymnasium affected subjects' sleep and body tempera

1d

System by which plants have formed secondary buds since ancient times illuminated

A collaborative research group has succeeded in identifying an important transcription factor, GCAM1, which allows liverwort plants to asexually reproduce through creating clonal progenies (vegetative reproduction). Furthermore, this transcription factor was revealed to have the same origin as those which regulate secondary bud formation in angiosperms. It is hoped that these discoveries will lead

1d

Could cytotoxic T-cells be a key to longevity?

Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Science (IMS) and Keio University School of Medicine in Japan have used single-cell RNA analysis to find that supercentenarians–meaning people over the age of 110–have an excess of a type of immune cell called cytotoxic CD4 T-cells.

1d

Device improves life for cancer survivors with heart failure

A pacemaker-like device restored heart function in a group of cancer survivors, mostly women with breast cancer, who had experienced heart failure as a result of chemotherapy, a new study shows. Researchers evaluated the device in a small observational clinical trial at 12 cardio-oncology programs across the US. Researchers have not only suggested that heart disease and cancer risk may be linked,

1d

Plants might be helping each other more than thought

Contrary to the long-held belief that plants in the natural world are always in competition, new research has found that in harsh environments mature plants help smaller ones—and thrive as a result.

1d

Art history specialists: 'Lady in a Fur Wrap' artist identified

Leading international specialists in the field of art history have released the initial findings of a four-year collaborative research project centering around one of Glasgow's most famous paintings, the "Lady in a Fur Wrap."

1d

Five-fold boost in formaldehyde yield

Environmentally benign methods for the industrial production of chemicals are urgently needed. LMU researchers recently described such a procedure for the synthesis of formaldehyde, and have now improved it with the aid of machine learning.

1d

Do biased polls skew elections? Experimental evidence says yes

As an election looms in the UK and a presidential vote approaches in the US next year, opinion polls are everywhere. Citizens will have to navigate a lot of noise as they decide which party or candidate to choose.

1d

Plants might be helping each other more than thought

Contrary to the long-held belief that plants in the natural world are always in competition, new research has found that in harsh environments mature plants help smaller ones—and thrive as a result.

1d

Climate impact of hydropower varies widely

Hydropower is broadly considered to be much more environmentally friendly than electricity generated from fossil fuels, and in many cases this is true. However, a new study reveals that the climate impact of hydropower facilities varies widely throughout the world and over time, with some facilities emitting more greenhouse gases than those burning fossil fuels.

1d

Superfast star found leaving Milky Way at 1,700km per second

Astronomers say S5-HVs1 ventured close to supermassive black hole before being ejected Astronomers have spotted a star heading out of the Milky Way at more than 6m km/h (3.7m mph), or 1,700km per second, after an encounter with the supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy. The star is moving so fast that in about 100m years it will exit the Milky Way and spend the rest of its life sail

1d

Plants might be helping each other more than thought

Contrary to the long-held belief that plants in the natural world are always in competition, new research has found that in harsh environments mature plants help smaller ones — and thrive as a result.

1d

Long-term blood pressure variation and risk of dementia

Scientists report that people who experienced substantial changes in blood pressure over the long term were at greater risk of dementia than those who did not.

1d

Model predicts children likely to go into septic shock

Researchers have developed a unique model allowing them to predict which children arriving in emergency departments are most likely to go into septic shock, a life-threatening condition.

1d

Epitaxially-grown molybdenum oxide advances as a bulk-like 2D dielectric layer

Scalable 2D-type MoO3 nanosheets were synthesized via van der Waal epitaxy growth method. Its electrical and mechanical properties of MoO3 nanosheets are maintained even at a few layer level and the thickness sensitivity is small compared to other 2D materials.

1d

Stretchable, degradable semiconductors

To seamlessly integrate electronics with the natural world, materials are needed that are both stretchable and degradable — for example, flexible medical devices that conform to the surfaces of internal organs, but that dissolve and disappear when no longer needed. However, introducing these properties to electronics has been challenging. Now, researchers have developed stretchable, degradable se

1d

Climate impact of hydropower varies widely

Hydropower is broadly considered to be much more environmentally friendly than electricity generated from fossil fuels, and in many cases this is true. However, a new study reveals that the climate impact of hydropower facilities varies widely throughout the world and over time, with some facilities emitting more greenhouse gases than those burning fossil fuels.

1d

Epitaxially-grown molybdenum oxide advances as a bulk-like 2-D dielectric layer

Since the successful isolation of graphene from bulk graphite, remarkable properties of graphene have attracted many scientists to the brand-new research field of 2-D materials. However, despite excellent carrier mobility of graphene, direct application of graphene to field-effect transistors is severely hindered due to its gapless band structure. Alternatively, semiconducting transition metal dic

1d

How transit scaling shapes cities

The research, published in Nature Sustainability, analyzed data collected from 48 metropolitan areas in the United States, including New York, Boston, Minneapolis and Atlanta, which showed a positive correlation between ridership, residential density, and the convenience of using public transport.

1d

Blood-brain barrier 'road map' may boost drug delivery

The first comprehensive characterization of both the blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers in brain metastases of lung cancer could serve as a road map for treatment development. The greatest obstacle when it comes to treating cancer that has spread to the brain is the blood-brain barrier, the brain's natural defense mechanism that is a collection of blood vessels that can filter out what goes in

1d

Researchers Find More Than 1 Million Alternatives to DNA

Life on Earth uses DNA and RNA to store and utilize genetic information, but what if there's another way? A new analysis from researchers at Emory University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology suggests a plethora of molecules could serve the same basic task of organizing and storing genetic information. They estimate more than a million possible stand-ins for DNA , some of which could help us

1d

In Defense of The Commercial Appeal

A few days ago I published an item about a new online journalistic site in Tennessee, The Daily Memphian . In that item, I quoted some Daily Memphian officials saying that they had been prompted to action by the shift of the long-established local daily, The Commercial Appeal , to a more statewide emphasis in its reporting, under its current Gannett ownership. Yesterday I quoted a response from a

1d

Twenty-One Books to Read After Becoming

Last fall, Shonda Rhimes received an unexpected phone call, with a top-secret invitation. She was given the chance to read an advanced copy of the book; fly to Washington, D.C.; and share her thoughts with the author at a private gathering weeks before the chart-buster would hit bookstores. The superstar producer and writer behind Grey's Anatomy and Scandal told no one. The manuscript was "like a

1d

Environmental groups call for speed limits on ships

Environmental groups Seas At Risk and Transport and Environment have announced the results of a study they commissioned to Reynolds Environmental Sustainability Consultants (RESC). A paper written by the team at RESC has been posted to the Seas At Risk site. In it, the researchers describe their findings—namely that their evidence that implementing speed limits on ships around the world would redu

1d

Betygshets gagnar inte gymnasieskolan

Elever som strävar efter höga betyg baserat på riktlinjer och instruktioner i grundskolan, möts av utmaningar i gymnasieskolans miljö där kunskapsfördjupning och reflekterande färdigheter premieras. Enligt Eric Larsson, forskare vid institutionen för pedagogik och didaktik på Stockholms universitet, finns det fog att ifrågasätta skolvalet och rådande utbildningssystem med betyg som urvalsgrund ti

1d

Like Y Combinator, but for Hollywood Scripts

Imagine Impact uses machine learning to sift through applications for its screenwriter boot camp and identify new voices.

1d

How to Peer Through a Wormhole

Theoretically, the universe may be riddled with tunnels through space and time. Two scientists have now proposed a way to detect the existence of a cosmic escape hatch.

1d

Own a bike you never ride? We need to learn how to fail better at active transport

Once upon a time when something was simple to do we said: "It's as easy as riding a bike." But switching from driving a car to riding a bike as one's main means of transport is anything but easy.

1d

November meteors: Taurids, Leonids and a surprise Monocerotids outburst

For the northern hemisphere observers, November is fireball season. This month, keep an eye out for two sure-fire annual meteor showers, and—just maybe—a wild card outburst from the obscure Alpha Monocerotids worth watching out for.

1d

Novel mathematical framework provides a deeper understanding of how drugs interact

Researchers at the CeMM Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences have developed a new methodology characterizing more precisely how drugs influence each other when combined during treatment. Their analysis of over 30k drug pairs applied to cell lines identified 1,832 interactions between 242 different drugs and sheds new light on how drugs perturb the underlying m

1d

Body language key to zoo animal welfare

Watching the behavior and body language of zoo animals could be the key to understanding and improving their welfare, new research suggests.

1d

Spinal injuries: A new technology of electrostimulation for a more effective approach

Delivering a diversified electric message to different fibres of the injured spinal cord through a new technology able to deliver it in a targeted and independent manner. What is the result? Greater efficiency in recovering the control of voluntary limb movements in the event of serious damage to the spinal cord. By adopting a completely new approach, a new study offers a significant contribution

1d

A study warns about the ecological impact caused by sediment accumulation in river courses

Insects, crustaceans and other water macroinvertebrates are more affected by the effect of sediment accumulation in river courses than the excess of nitrate in water environments, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE. Sediments that get accumulated in rivers — due intensive agriculture and deforestation in gallery forests- alter the ecological traits of fluvial habitats and dete

1d

Long-term blood pressure variation and risk of dementia

In a new research study published in the open access journal PLOS Medicine, Albert Hofman and colleagues at Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, United States report that people who experienced substantial changes in blood pressure over the long term were at greater risk of dementia than those who did not.

1d

Where Should AI Ethics Come From? Not Medicine, New Study Says

A s fears about AI 's disruptive potential have grown, AI ethics has come to the fore in recent years. Concerns around privacy, transparency and the ability of algorithms to warp social and political discourse in unexpected ways have resulted in a flurry of pronouncements from companies, governments, and even supranational organi z ations on how to conduct ethical AI development. The majority hav

1d

Climate Central Solutions Brief: Battery Energy Storage

Download this report as a PDF. Batteries are having a moment. In early October, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to three scientists for their research on lithium-ion batteries. Their work decades ago led to batteries becoming smaller, more powerful, more portable, and rechargeable, all of which have transformed our laptops, our phones, and our lives

1d

Study finds links between early screen exposure, sleep disruption and EBD in kids

A new study has found that first exposure earlier than 18 months of age to screen devices — such as smartphones, tablets, videogame consoles, television etc — and the presence of multiple screen devices in the bedroom are associated with elevated sleep disruption and emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) in preschool children with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs)

1d

AI to determine when to intervene with your driving

Can your AI agent judge when to talk to you while you are driving? According to a research team, their in-vehicle conservation service technology will judge when it is appropriate to contact you to ensure your safety.

1d

Elucidation of cause of electromagnetic noise allows for EM noise-less electric circuits

Researchers have developed equations for quantifying electromagnetic interference (EM noise) and elucidated its origin, allowing for the best circuit configuration to reduce EM noise.

1d

Environmental cost of cryptocurrency mines

Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin and Monero — the names of digital-based 'cryptocurrencies' are being heard more and more frequently. But despite having no physical representation, could these new methods of exchange actually be negatively impacting our planet? It's a question being asked by researchers who are investigating the environmental impacts of mining cryptocurrencies.

1d

Healthy mangroves help coral reef fisheries under climate stress

Healthy mangroves can help fight the consequences of climate change on coral reef fisheries, according to a new study. Researchers say corals have been bleached and reefs have lost their structural complexity as a major consequence of warming seas.

1d

Plant specimens provide powerful data about life in the Anthropocene

Researchers from Carnegie Museum of Natural History and Michigan State University report plant specimens are being used in novel new ways that could influence future environmental policy, species conservation and collections-based science. Specimen digitization and new data analysis technologies increase the relevance of herbaria for scientific research, education, and societal issues like climate

1d

Oldest carnivorous dinosaur fossil unearthed in Brazil

A team of researchers from Universidade Federal de Santa Maria and Universidade de São Paulo, both in Brazil, has found and identified the oldest carnivorous dinosaur fossil to date. In their paper published in the journal PeerJ, the group describes their finding and where they believe it fits in the history of dinosaurs.

1d

Rational transparent conductor design provides a boost to carbon nanotubes application

An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Laboratory of Nanomaterials at the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) has rationally designed a novel p-type flexible transparent conductor using single-walled carbon nanotubes. This opens new avenues for its applications in next generation opto-electronics and energy technologies. The results of the study were

1d

Lady backpacks and manly beer: The folly of gendered products

As women started counting steps and walking to work wearing running shoes and fitness trackers, there was one work-related item that had to change: the briefcase. It's not suited to walking fast and gets in the way of drinking coffee en route to the office. Enter the working women's backpack. It's a trend.

1d

Plant specimens provide powerful data about life in the Anthropocene

Researchers from Carnegie Museum of Natural History and Michigan State University report plant specimens are being used in novel new ways that could influence future environmental policy, species conservation and collections-based science. Specimen digitization and new data analysis technologies increase the relevance of herbaria for scientific research, education, and societal issues like climate

1d

Healthy mangroves help coral reef fisheries under climate stress

Healthy mangroves can help fight the consequences of climate change on coral reef fisheries, according to a University of Queensland-led study.

1d

'Like volcanoes on the ranges': How Australian bushfire writing has changed with the climate

Bushfire writing has long been a part of Australian literature.

1d

Healthy mangroves help coral reef fisheries under climate stress

Healthy mangroves can help fight the consequences of climate change on coral reef fisheries, according to a University of Queensland-led study.

1d

Simulation and Understanding

Roald Hoffmann and Jean-Paul Malrieu have a three-part essay out in Angewandte Chemie on artificial intelligence and machine learning in chemistry research, and I have to say, I'm enjoying it more than I thought I would. I cast no aspersion against the authors (!) – it's just that long thinkpieces from eminent scientists, especially on such broad topics as are covered here, do not have a good tra

1d

Plants might be helping each other more than thought

Contrary to the long-held belief that plants in the natural world are always in competition, new research has found that in harsh environments mature plants help smaller ones — and thrive as a result.

1d

Epitaxially-grown molybdenum oxide advances as a bulk-like 2D dielectric layer

Scalable 2D-type MoO3 nanosheets were synthesized via van der Waal epitaxy growth method. Its electrical and mechanical properties of MoO3 nanosheets are maintained even at a few layer level and the thickness sensitivity is small compared to other 2D materials.

1d

Researchers create model to predict children likely to go into septic shock

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have developed a unique model allowing them to predict which children arriving in emergency departments are most likely to go into septic shock, a life-threatening condition.

1d

Young male cancer survivors may benefit from testosterone replacement

In young male cancer survivors with low testosterone levels, testosterone replacement therapy is associated with an improvement in body composition, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Richard Ross of University of Sheffield, UK, and colleagues.

1d

Forget the Chardonay, pass me the grape stems! Anti-tumor activity in prostate cancer cells

Grape stems are discarded en masse during the production of wine. We love and produce a lot of wine in Nagano prefecture, and have been hoping to find a positive use for the previously discarded grape stems. Scientists at Shinshu University studied compounds within grape stem extracts and found significant anti-cancer activity on tumor cells.

1d

Healthy mangroves help coral reef fisheries under climate stress

Healthy mangroves can help fight the consequences of climate change on coral reef fisheries, according to a University of Queensland-led study. UQ's Professor Peter Mumby said corals have been bleached and reefs have lost their structural complexity as a major consequence of warming seas.

1d

What is a 'mass extinction' and are we in one now?

For more than 3.5 billion years, living organisms have thrived, multiplied and diversified to occupy every ecosystem on Earth. The flip side to this explosion of new species is that species extinctions have also always been part of the evolutionary life cycle.

1d

Lead-tainted water: How to keep homes, schools, daycares and workplaces safe

We worked behind the scenes with dozens of journalists on "Tainted Water," a year-long investigation into lead-contaminated drinking water in Canada. We were shocked by the results.

1d

What is a 'mass extinction' and are we in one now?

For more than 3.5 billion years, living organisms have thrived, multiplied and diversified to occupy every ecosystem on Earth. The flip side to this explosion of new species is that species extinctions have also always been part of the evolutionary life cycle.

1d

Researchers develop thin heat shield for superfast aircraft

The world of aerospace increasingly relies on carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites to build the structures of satellites, rockets and jet aircraft.

1d

How to make neurosurgery possible in the Brazilian Amazon

A new study offers a model for creating a sustainable neurosurgery programs in poor, remote locations. Low- and middle-income countries in remote locations with little access to care can create sustainable neurosurgical programs by recruiting and training young, local doctors, according to the study. The study in the journal World Neurosurgery analyzed the effectiveness over the past 20 years of

1d

Smertebehandling er mere end medicin

Behandling af smerter skal sættes mere i system. Og så skal der være et øget fokus på, at smertebehandling er meget mere end blot medicin, så den medicinske behandling ikke står alene, siger praktiserende læge.

1d

Et kig i almen praksis' værktøjskasse

Almen praksis har de seneste år oplevet store forandringer, hvad angår måden at udvikle og organisere sig på. Derfor er det på tide at få en oversigt over specialets samlede værktøjskasse, siger ledelseskonsulent.

1d

Venice floods: Climate change behind highest tide in 50 years, says mayor

A state of disaster is declared as the Italian city is hit with a high tide of more than 1.87m.

1d

Nuclear Waste Tomb Unlikely to Survive Climate Change

Radiation Situation There's a ticking time bomb in the middle of the Pacific Ocean — and climate change could set it off at any moment. A new investigation by the Los Angeles Times has found that the Runit Dome — a massive "tomb" in the Marshall Islands containing radioactive soil and debris from nuclear bomb tests — is at risk of busting open as climate change causes both sea levels and temperat

1d

Research team illuminates system by which plants have formed secondary buds since ancient times

A collaborative research group has succeeded in identifying an important transcription factor, GCAM1, which allows liverwort plants to asexually reproduce through creating clonal progenies (vegetative reproduction). Furthermore, this transcription factor was revealed to have the same origin as those which regulate secondary bud formation in angiosperms. That this transcription factor was found in

1d

Electronic nose to 'sniff' dogs for deadly tropical disease

Fewer dogs in Brazil may be euthanized unnecessarily after researchers showed that a new test is 95 percent accurate in identifying the deadly disease Leishmaniasis.

1d

Who controls whom: Algae or sea anemone?

Bleached anemones—those lacking symbiotic algae—do not move toward light, a behavior exhibited by healthy, symbiotic anemones. Published in Coral Reefs, this finding from Carnegie's Shawna Foo, Arthur Grossman, and Ken Caldeira, along with Lauren Liddell of the NASA Ames Research Center, is a fascinating case study for exploring the concept of control in a symbiotic relationship.

1d

Research team illuminates system by which plants have formed secondary buds since ancient times

A collaborative research group has succeeded in identifying an important transcription factor, GCAM1, which allows liverwort plants to asexually reproduce through creating clonal progenies (vegetative reproduction). Furthermore, this transcription factor was revealed to have the same origin as those which regulate secondary bud formation in angiosperms. That this transcription factor was found in

1d

Electronic nose to 'sniff' dogs for deadly tropical disease

Fewer dogs in Brazil may be euthanized unnecessarily after researchers showed that a new test is 95 percent accurate in identifying the deadly disease Leishmaniasis.

1d

Fluid dynamics provides insight into wildfire behavior

The Kincade Fire has been burning through Sonoma County, California, displacing people from their homes and leaving destruction in its wake. It is a stark reminder of the increasingly pressing need for a better understanding of how fires begin and spread.

1d

A more sustainable material to reinforce concrete structures

The next generation of ultra high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) has just been created at EPFL. The new material will be used to strengthen and to extend the life span of bridges and other structures—both new and old. What's more, the process of manufacturing this material releases 60–70 percent less CO2 than the previous generation of fiber-reinforced concrete.

1d

Who controls whom: Algae or sea anemone?

Bleached anemones—those lacking symbiotic algae—do not move toward light, a behavior exhibited by healthy, symbiotic anemones. Published in Coral Reefs, this finding from Carnegie's Shawna Foo, Arthur Grossman, and Ken Caldeira, along with Lauren Liddell of the NASA Ames Research Center, is a fascinating case study for exploring the concept of control in a symbiotic relationship.

1d

Elucidation of cause of electromagnetic noise allows for EM noise-less electric circuits

Researchers from Osaka University developed equations for quantifying electromagnetic interference (EM noise) and elucidated its origin, allowing for the best circuit configuration to reduce EM noise.

1d

AI to determine when to intervene with your driving

Can your AI agent judge when to talk to you while you are driving? According to a KAIST research team, their in-vehicle conservation service technology will judge when it is appropriate to contact you to ensure your safety.

1d

Taller people have increased risk for developing atrial fibrillation

Taller people have an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AFib), an irregular and often rapid heartbeat that can lead to stroke, heart failure and other complications, according to a new Penn Medicine study. The research, which reveals a strong link between the genetic variants associated with height and one's risk for AFib, is the among the first to demonstrate that height may be a

1d

The environmental cost of cryptocurrency mines

Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin and Monero – the names of digital-based 'cryptocurrencies' are being heard more and more frequently. But despite having no physical representation, could these new methods of exchange actually be negatively impacting our planet? It's a question being asked by researchers at The University of New Mexico, who are investigating the environmental impacts of mining cryptocur

1d

The Government Report That Got Turned Into a Hollywood Movie

LOS ANGELES—In 2007, when the screenwriter Scott Z. Burns read a Vanity Fair story detailing how two American military psychologists had helped devise the "enhanced interrogation techniques" that the CIA used to torture captured terrorist suspects after the 9/11 attacks, he was fascinated. The son of two psychologists, he grew up in Minnesota seeing psychology "as a tool to understand and help pe

1d

Hayabusa-2: Japan spacecraft leaves asteroid to head home

Hayabusa-2 will return with samples of the asteroid after its yearlong journey back to Earth.

1d

The Stressful Discovery of Type A Personality

How worn-out upholstery in doctors' waiting rooms revealed common psychological traits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

1d

1d

1d

Automation, the future of work and humans in the loop workflows

submitted by /u/manneshiva [link] [comments]

1d

Astronomers conduct one of the most detailed studies of a stellar halo

An international team of astronomers has used the Subaru Telescope to probe the stellar halo of the nearby Messier 81 (M81) galaxy. The observations resulted in one of the most detailed studies of a stellar halo conducted to date. The study is detailed in a paper published October 31 on arXiv.org.

1d

Boks overvåger 21 millioner blodprøvers rejse

PLUS. Bedre sporbarhed, bedre arbejdsmiljø og større patientsikkerhed var med til at sikre Aalborg Universitetshospital Dira Automa­tiseringsprisen 2019.

1d

Læger skal undgå de gængse klagesager

De praktiserende læger står ofte for skud, når der gælder klagesager. Antallet af klagesager stiger, og derfor skal lægerne have redskaber til, hvordan de kan undgå at få en sag på halsen, siger praktiserende læge.

1d

Narrativ medicin kan forbedre patientrelationer og mindske udbrændthed

Narrativ medicin kan fremme en opmærksomhed på værdien af empati mellem læge og patient og kan i den sidste ende minimere stress og udbrændthed hos lægen, siger litteraturforsker.

1d

The Stressful Discovery of Type A Personality

How worn-out upholstery in doctors' waiting rooms revealed common psychological traits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Opioid-based plant might not be best solution to curb habitual alcohol use

A team has examined the effects of kratom and the potential impacts on people with alcohol use disorder.

1d

Baseline predictors of LDL-cholesterol and systolic blood pressure goal attainment after one year in the ISCHEMIA trial

In this analysis of 3,984 participants from ISCHEMIA (78% of 5,179 randomized) with available data, predictors of reaching one-year goals are reported for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and systolic blood pressure (SBP).

1d

Ancient rain gauge: New evidence links groundwater, climate changes in deep time

Changes in groundwater millions of years ago created alternating layers of vivid yellow and brown in the mineral sphalerite, and those variations align with movements in Earth's orbit that impacted climate in the deep past, scientists found.

1d

The smart move: We learn more by trusting than by not trusting

We all know people who have suffered by trusting too much: scammed customers, jilted lovers, shunned friends. Indeed, most of us have been burned by misplaced trust. These personal and vicarious experiences lead us to believe that people are too trusting, often verging on gullibility. In fact, we don't trust enough. Take data about trust in the United States (the same would be true in most wealth

1d

Light at the end of the nanotunnel for future catalysts

Using a new type of nanoreactor, researchers have succeeded in mapping catalytic reactions on individual metallic nanoparticles. Their work could help improve chemical processes, and lead to better catalysts and more environmentally friendly chemical technology.

1d

Privacy, consumer groups seek to block Google-Fitbit deal

Nine privacy, social justice and consumer groups are calling for the U.S. government to block Google's $2.1 billion acquisition of fitness-gadget maker Fitbit, citing antitrust and privacy concerns.

1d

Study finds links between early screen exposure, sleep disruption and EBD in kids

A new study by KK Women's and Children's Hospital (KKH), together with National University of Singapore, has found that first exposure earlier than 18 months of age to screen devices — such as smartphones, tablets, videogame consoles, television etc — and the presence of multiple screen devices in the bedroom are associated with elevated sleep disruption and emotional and behavioural difficultie

1d

Apple MacBook Pro 16-Inch (2019): Price, Specs, and Release Date

MacBook keyboards have been plagued by problems for years. It's high time to say goodbye.

1d

Vad är psykisk ohälsa?

Inom vården går en skiljelinje mellan psykisk och kroppslig ohälsa. En indelning som beror på svårigheterna att mäta och observera psykisk sjukdom. – Men vi inser alltmer att den fysiska ohälsan är beroende av, och sammanblandad med den psykiska ohälsan, säger Johan Fernström, psykiatriker och doktorand vid Lunds universitet, i en intervju i tidskriften Vetenskap & hälsa. Psykiatrin är en egen sp

1d

Climate change expected to shift location of East Asian Monsoons

More than a billion people in Asia depend on seasonal monsoons for their water needs. The Asian monsoon is closely linked to a planetary-scale tropical air flow which, according to a new study, will most likely shift geographically as the climate continues to warm, resulting in less rainfall in certain regions.

1d

Visualizing heat flow in bamboo could help design more energy-efficient and fire-safe buildings

Modified natural materials will be an essential component of a sustainable future, but first a detailed understanding of their properties is needed. The way heat flows across bamboo cell walls has been mapped using advanced scanning thermal microscopy, providing a new understanding of how variations in thermal conductivity are linked to the bamboo's elegant structure. The findings will guide the d

1d

Chronic adversity dampens dopamine production

People exposed to a lifetime of psychosocial adversity may have an impaired ability to produce the dopamine levels needed for coping with acutely stressful situations.

1d

Driver found for more deadly prostate cancer

A transcription factor that aids neuron function also appears to enable a cell conversion in the prostate gland that can make an already recurrent cancer even more deadly, scientists say.

1d

Stalled weather patterns will get bigger due to climate change

Climate change will increase the size of stalled high-pressure systems that can cause heat waves, droughts and other extreme weather, according to a new study.

1d

Light at the end of the nanotunnel for future catalysts

Using a new type of nanoreactor, researchers have succeeded in mapping catalytic reactions on individual metallic nanoparticles. Their work could help improve chemical processes, and lead to better catalysts and more environmentally friendly chemical technology.

1d

Deep learning expands study of nuclear waste remediation

A research collaboration has achieved exaflop performance with a deep learning application used to model subsurface flow in the study of nuclear waste remediation.

1d

Ant expert discovers newly emergent species in his backyard

A global ant expert has traveled the world documenting and discovering ant species. But for his latest discovery, he didn't need to go any farther than his own backyard.

1d

Så funkar tidvattnet

Klicka för att ladda ner grafiken som pdf.

1d

Stretchable, degradable semiconductors

To seamlessly integrate electronics with the natural world, materials are needed that are both stretchable and degradable — for example, flexible medical devices that conform to the surfaces of internal organs, but that dissolve and disappear when no longer needed. However, introducing these properties to electronics has been challenging. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have dev

1d

Climate impact of hydropower varies widely

Hydropower is broadly considered to be much more environmentally friendly than electricity generated from fossil fuels, and in many cases this is true. However, a new study reveals that the climate impact of hydropower facilities varies widely throughout the world and over time, with some facilities emitting more greenhouse gases than those burning fossil fuels. The researchers report their result

1d

Visualizing heat flow in bamboo could help design more energy-efficient and fire-safe buildings

Modified natural materials will be an essential component of a sustainable future, but first a detailed understanding of their properties is needed. The way heat flows across bamboo cell walls has been mapped using advanced scanning thermal microscopy, providing a new understanding of how variations in thermal conductivity are linked to the bamboo's elegant structure. The findings will guide the d

1d

How to explore neurotoxins without animal testing

A new way to assess a group of deadly neurotoxins could replace conventional methods that require killing animal test subjects, researchers say. "The old method, while extremely efficient, is limited in that it's slow and requires the euthanization of animals in order to obtain the necessary tissue," says Bryan Fry of the Venom Evolution Lan at the University of Queensland. "Our new method uses o

1d

Sexism in chemistry, FDA nomination and a long-lost ungulate

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03453-z The latest science news, in brief.

1d

Family album

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03461-z Meet the ancestors.

1d

A New Candidate for Obama's Rightful Heir

Joe Biden rarely goes anywhere without mentioning "my friend Barack." Pete Buttigieg has a line in his stump speech about how he first went to Iowa to campaign for another "young man with a funny name." Even though Barack Obama will not endorse in this primary, he has made a point of meeting with almost all the candidates, and he looms over the race. But the politician personally closest to Obama

1d

Time spent with the New Musical Express falls 72% after magazine switches online-only

A study published in Journalism Practice by City researcher Dr. Neil Thurman and co-author Dr. Richard Fletcher, concludes that the attention periodicals attract via print is unlikely to transfer to their online editions when they go online-only.

1d

Genetic engineering tools produce better-modified plants faster, easier

Plants have big genomes; a rare flower from Japan has a genome that is 50 times the size of a human's. These huge genomes, and associated large genes, can make it challenging for plant scientists to introduce precise genetic changes to provide resistance to a new pest or study the fundamentals of how plants grow.

1d

1d

Zapping a Cold with Copper

Will an overpriced piece of copper prevent or treat the common cold? The science is not there.

1d

Hayabusa 2 begins long journey home carrying Ryugu asteroid samples

With two samples from the interior of the asteroid Ryugu on board, Japan's Hayabusa 2 spacecraft is due to return to Earth at the end of 2020

1d

1d

Genetic engineering tools produce better-modified plants faster, easier

Plants have big genomes; a rare flower from Japan has a genome that is 50 times the size of a human's. These huge genomes, and associated large genes, can make it challenging for plant scientists to introduce precise genetic changes to provide resistance to a new pest or study the fundamentals of how plants grow.

1d

Climate impact of hydropower varies widely

Hydropower is broadly considered to be much more environmentally friendly than electricity generated from fossil fuels, and in many cases this is true. However, a new study reveals that the climate impact of hydropower facilities varies widely throughout the world and over time, with some facilities emitting more greenhouse gases than those burning fossil fuels. The researchers report their result

1d

Stretchable, degradable semiconductors

To seamlessly integrate electronics with the natural world, materials are needed that are both stretchable and degradable—for example, flexible medical devices that conform to the surfaces of internal organs, but that dissolve and disappear when no longer needed. However, introducing these properties to electronics has been challenging. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have develo

1d

Adam Savage on Juggling and How Obsession Makes You Smarter

Genius is a myth, the former *MythBusters* cohost believes. You get smarter by investing time and energy in something you love.

1d

Mere klare regler omkring fravalg af genoplivning

Den enkelte borger bør have selvbestemmelsesret over den vigtige beslutning om genoplivning efter hjertestop, skriver Christian Hassager, formand for Dansk Råd for Genoplivning.

1d

Image of the Day: Reprogrammed Ants

Watch soldier ants behave more like foragers after scientists change their gene expression.

1d

NASA Renames Object After Uproar Over Old Name's Nazi Connotations

Scientists said an object four billion miles from Earth would be given a Native American name: Arrokoth. Its previous, informal name, Ultima Thule, had links to the Third Reich.

1d

Artificial bees from a pressure cooker?

What if we could create artificial bees that helped us with food production? Ola Gjønnes Grendal cooks up the materials needed to do just this.

1d

Why open offices hurt collaboration and what can be done about it

Last year, Ethan Bernstein's research hit a deep cultural nerve.

1d

Study tracks DACA's benefits, limitations for undocumented immigrants

Undocumented young immigrants covered by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy have seen a rise in social mobility since entering the program, according to a new report by the Immigration Initiative at Harvard. Co-authored by Roberto Gonzales, professor of education at the Graduate School of Education (HGSE), and researchers Sayil Camacho, Kristina Brant, and Carlos Aguilar, the

1d

Techniques for observing concrete as it sets could facilitate the development of new cements

A key part of drilling and tapping new oil wells is the use of specialized cements to line the borehole and prevent collapse and leakage of the hole. To keep these cements from hardening too quickly before they penetrate to the deepest levels of the well, they are mixed with chemicals called retarders that slow down the setting process.

1d

Climate change expected to shift location of East Asian Monsoons

More than a billion people in Asia depend on seasonal monsoons for their water needs. The Asian monsoon is closely linked to a planetary-scale tropical air flow which, according to a new study by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), will most likely shift geographically as the climate continues to warm, resulting in less rainfall in certain regions.

1d

Image: Aircraft nose dome assessed in ESA Hertz chamber

ESA test facilities can test more than just space hardware: here, the 2.0m-diameter nose of an Airbus A340 aircraft is seen in ESA's Hertz chamber, undergoing radio-frequency testing.

1d

Video: Proba-2 watches Mercury transit

ESA's Proba-2 had a ring-side seat for the transit of Mercury on 11 November 2019. Proba-2 monitors the sun from Earth orbit and was able to spot Mercury's transit as a small black disc—seen here moving from left to right across the face of the sun.

1d

NASA's Mars 2020 will hunt for microscopic fossils

Scientists with NASA's Mars 2020 rover have discovered what may be one of the best places to look for signs of ancient life in Jezero Crater, where the rover will land on Feb. 18, 2021.

1d

Scientists find two identical-looking bird species have very different genes

While reports of species going extinct are sadly becoming common, an international team of scientists has identified a new species of bird living on the Southern coast of China, that diverged from their Northern relatives around half a million years ago.

1d

The smart move: People learn more by trusting than by not trusting

We all know people who have suffered by trusting too much: scammed customers, jilted lovers, shunned friends. Indeed, most of us have been burned by misplaced trust. These personal and vicarious experiences lead us to believe that people are too trusting, often verging on gullibility.

1d

Unpacking the microstructure of stabilized oil-in-water emulsions using neutron scattering techniques

An international team led by New Zealand food scientists at the Riddet Institute has used neutron scattering techniques to characterize the structure of an oil-in-water emulsion commonly used in foods, such as milk, cream, salad dressings and sauces.

1d

Overfishing of large, predatory fish leaves China's Bohai Sea with only tiny fish

Smaller fish and invertebrates such as gazami crab and Japanese sardinella, are replacing larger, more commercially valuable fish such as largehead hairtail in the Bohai Sea in northeastern China.

1d

Unknown virus discovered in humans

An international team based in Austria has unearthed a previously unknown type of virus in samples of human bodily fluids. The researchers were looking for viruses that infect bacteria, known as bacteriophages, with an emphasis on those that attack the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterium found in the human gut. The team identified a total of 43 bacteriophages in samples of human bodily fluids, pa

1d

Nature Ph.D. survey puts spotlight on mental health, harassment and student debt

The fifth biennial survey of Ph.D. students, conducted by the journal Nature in conjunction with UK education market research company Shift Learning, provides insight into the challenges and concerns currently faced by Ph.D. students worldwide. The survey, which was completed by the highest number of respondents since its inception, included for the first time questions on mental health, bullying,

1d

Scientists find two identical-looking bird species have very different genes

While reports of species going extinct are sadly becoming common, an international team of scientists has identified a new species of bird living on the Southern coast of China, that diverged from their Northern relatives around half a million years ago.

1d

Overfishing of large, predatory fish leaves China's Bohai Sea with only tiny fish

Smaller fish and invertebrates such as gazami crab and Japanese sardinella, are replacing larger, more commercially valuable fish such as largehead hairtail in the Bohai Sea in northeastern China.

1d

Unknown virus discovered in humans

An international team based in Austria has unearthed a previously unknown type of virus in samples of human bodily fluids. The researchers were looking for viruses that infect bacteria, known as bacteriophages, with an emphasis on those that attack the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterium found in the human gut. The team identified a total of 43 bacteriophages in samples of human bodily fluids, pa

1d

Climate change expected to shift location of East Asian Monsoons

More than a billion people in Asia depend on seasonal monsoons for their water needs. The Asian monsoon is closely linked to a planetary-scale tropical air flow which, according to a new study by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, will most likely shift geographically as the climate continues to warm, resulting in less rainfall in certain regions.

1d

Science Groups Pull Brigham Young University Job Ads

Members of two geology societies voiced concerns about the school's prohibition of same-sex relationships.

1d

1d

The mental health of PhD researchers demands urgent attention

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03489-1 Anxiety and depression in graduate students is worsening. The health of the next generation of researchers needs systemic change to research cultures.

1d

PhDs: the tortuous truth

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03459-7 Nature's survey of more than 6,000 graduate students reveals the turbulent nature of doctoral research.

1d

Could digging up the ocean floor help save the planet?

The seabed is rich in metals, but what damage could mining it cause?

1d

How the Dumb Design of a WWII Plane Led to the Macintosh

At first, pilots took the blame for crashes. The true cause, however, lay with the design. That lesson led us into our user-friendly age—but there's peril to come.

1d

Electric car future may depend on deep sea mining

Demand is soaring for the metal cobalt, an essential ingredient in batteries and abundant on the seabed.

1d

The Invisible Victims of Traumatic Brain Injury

Most people know it's a problem for athletes and soldiers—but it affects victims of domestic violence even more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

The Invisible Victims of Traumatic Brain Injury

Most people know it's a problem for athletes and soldiers—but it affects victims of domestic violence even more — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Antidepressants polluting the water can change fish behavior

The Monash scientists who found that pharmaceutical pollutants in waterways altered reproductive behavior, anxiety levels, activity and antipredator responses of fish have now discovered for the first time that such toxicity is also having a disturbing impact on the social behavior of fish.

1d

Antidepressants polluting the water can change fish behavior

The Monash scientists who found that pharmaceutical pollutants in waterways altered reproductive behavior, anxiety levels, activity and antipredator responses of fish have now discovered for the first time that such toxicity is also having a disturbing impact on the social behavior of fish.

1d

Modern apes smarter than pre-humans

New research from the University of Adelaide suggests living great apes are smarter than our pre-human ancestor Australopithecus, a group that included the famous "Lucy."

1d

Modern apes smarter than pre-humans

New research from the University of Adelaide suggests living great apes are smarter than our pre-human ancestor Australopithecus, a group that included the famous "Lucy."

1d

Light at the end of the nanotunnel for future catalysts

Using a new type of nanoreactor, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have mapped catalytic reactions on individual metallic nanoparticles. Their work could improve chemical processes, and lead to better catalysts and more environmentally friendly chemical technology. The results are published in the journal Nature Communications.

1d

A milestone in ultrashort-pulse laser oscillators

With the demonstration of a sub-picosecond thin-disk laser oscillator delivering a record-high 350-watt average output power, physicists at ETH Zurich set a new benchmark and pave the path toward even more powerful lasers.

1d

For Cement's Massive Carbon Footprint, Some Concrete Steps

Companies around the world are experimenting with greener ways of manufacturing cement, one of the global economy's most carbon-polluting industries. But given caution from the construction industry and the absence of strong environmental policies, the prospects for a shift are far from certain.

1d

Sea-thru Brings Clarity to Underwater Photos

A new algorithm counteracts the distorting impact of water — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Two people diagnosed with pneumonic plague in China

Authorities working to contain outbreak of disease that is worse than bubonic plague Two people in China have been diagnosed with plague, the latest cases of a disease more commonly associated with historical catastrophe. Plague is caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and can arise in three forms – a lung infection, known as pneumonic plague; a blood infection, known as septicemic plague; and

1d

Huge meteor lights up Missouri sky – video

The night sky above the US midwest was illuminated by a meteor on 11 November. The fireball was caught on video streaking past the Gateway Arch in St Louis, Missouri. There were more than 100 reported sightings across nine US states Continue reading…

1d

Fejl i Facebooks app aktiverer kameraet i baggrunden

En fejl i Facebooks app til iOS er skyld i, at telefonens kamera i visse tilfælde tænder, mens man bruger telefonen. Facebook indsendte i går en rettelse til Apple's App Store for at fikse fejlen.

1d

How to turn the complex mathematics of vector calculus into simple pictures

Feynman diagrams revolutionized particle physics. Now mathematicians want to do the same for vector calculus.

1d

Holland sætter fartgrænse på 100 km/t i dagtimerne

Tiltaget, som bliver meldt ud i dag, skal medvirke til at begrænse landets voldsomme NOx-forurening, som står i vejen for nyt boligbyggeri.

1d

Arbetsplatsen påverkar fysisk aktivitet

Hur mycket kontorsarbetare rör sig på jobbet hänger samman hur arbetsplatsen är utformad – men även organisation, företagskultur, hälsotillstånd och arbetsbelastning påverkar aktivitetsnivån. – Resultaten tyder på att det kan finnas en gräns för hur mycket man kan minska sittandet bland kontorsarbetare, säger Viktoria Wahlström, doktorand vid Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin vid Um

1d

Stort ryk fra sygehusene: Kræver flere penge til praksissektoren

Der er gode idéer i KL's forslag til en ny sundhedsreform, men praksissektoren mangler penge til den omlægning i behandlingen af kronisk sygdom, som forslaget lægger op til, og kommunerne mangler kompetencer, lyder det forskellige parter.

1d

»Pengene fra Helvede« er forskernes virkelige hovedpine

Private fonde bestemmer, hvad danske forskere beskæftiger sig med. Mange forskere finder det dybt problematisk.

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

'The methodology does not generate the results': Journal corrects accounting study with flawed methods

What a difference a Yi,t=β0+β1IOˆi,t+β2Xi,t+ωt+εi,t.Yi,t=β0+β1IO^i,t+β2Xi,t+ωt+εi,t. makes. The authors of a 2016 paper on institutional investing have corrected their article — to include the equation above — in the wake of persistent questions about their methodology. The move follows the protracted retraction earlier this year of a similar article in The Accounting Review by the duo, … Continue

1d

Air pollution nanoparticles linked to brain cancer for first time

Exclusive : tiny particles produced by motor traffic can invade the brain and carry carcinogens New research has linked air pollution nanoparticles to brain cancer for the first time. The ultra-fine particles (UFPs) are produced by fuel burning, particularly in diesel vehicles, and higher exposures significantly increase people's chances of getting the deadly cancer. Previous work has shown that

1d

When the Staff Can't Tell the Candidate What's Wrong

What the Ukraine scandal reveals about Donald Trump is by now well known: He elevated his political interest above the national interest and demanded foreign interference in an American election. What's received less attention is what the scandal reveals about Joe Biden: He showed poor judgment because his staff shielded him from hard truths. If that sounds faintly familiar, it's because that sam

1d

Conservatives Should Want to Impeach Trump

The House of Representatives begins televised impeachment hearings today, and, if Republicans weren't so desperate to avoid holding President Donald Trump accountable, they could add their own count to the indictment. Each of the three branches of government—the executive, legislative, and judiciary alike—has vital constitutional duties to perform, and no branch is free to delegate those duties t

1d

Tax the Patriarchy

The Rube Goldberg mess of the United States tax code picks winners and losers as it raises trillions of dollars for the federal government. It advantages unearned income over earned income. It advantages big, mortgaged homes over little, rented apartments. It advantages the richest of the rich over the merely rich. And, in many cases, it advantages men over women. That last claim is the contentio

1d

Why the Trolls Booed at Don Jr.'s Event

Donald Trump is 73. Mitch McConnell is 77. Rush Limbaugh is 68. The median Fox News viewer is 65. For good reason, observers of the American right often focus on folks who already qualify for Medicare and Social Security. But anyone wanting to understand the right's future would do well to study the public-speaking appearance that Donald Trump Jr. made Sunday at UCLA. Don Jr. expected leftist pro

1d

The Modern Women of Rural America

Along the way of our reporting for American Futures and Our Towns , I ran into the stories of some remarkable women—living and dead. Eliza Tibbets , who planted the first navel oranges in California; Isabella Greenway , who helped shape the entire copper-mining town of Ajo, Arizona, went on to found an airline company and the iconic Arizona Inn, and became the first woman representing Arizona in

1d

The Sexism Is Getting Sneakier

In the fall of 2017, Hillary Clinton, assessing her defeat in the previous year's presidential election, did something she had spent decades, for the most part, avoiding: She got angry in public. Clinton published a memoir, the bluntly titled What Happened , that included such admissions as "There are times when all I want to do is scream into a pillow" and "Reading the news every morning was lik

1d

KL foreslår sundhedsreform med nytænkning af kronikerområdet

Sundhedsfællesskaber og en omlægning af behandlingen af kronisk sygdom er hovedelementerne i KL's forslag til en sundhedsreform. Ansvarsfordelingen mellem sygehuse, kommuner og almen praksis skal være klarere, siger KL-direktør.

1d

The College Campuses That Moonlight as Wedding Venues

The chapel at Keuka College, in upstate New York, is a campus landmark. Its Douglas-fir trusses, Italian-glass chandeliers, and custom-made pipe organ are so charming that many alumni choose to get married there. So do many non-alumni: About half of the roughly 18 weddings that take place at Keuka College in a given year are for couples without ties to the school. Keuka, which sits on the shores

1d

Visualizing heat flow in bamboo could help design more energy-efficient and fire-safe buildings

Modified natural materials will be an essential component of a sustainable future, but first a detailed understanding of their properties is needed. The way heat flows across bamboo cell walls has been mapped using advanced scanning thermal microscopy, providing a new understanding of how variations in thermal conductivity are linked to the bamboo's elegant structure. The findings, published in th

1d

Avert catastrophe now in Africa's Sahel

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03445-z Governments worldwide must invest in girls' education, family planning, agriculture and security in this vulnerable region.

1d

Baseline predictors of LDL-cholesterol and systolic blood pressure goal attainment after one year in the ISCHEMIA trial

In this analysis of 3,984 participants from ISCHEMIA (78% of 5,179 randomized) with available data, predictors of reaching one-year goals are reported for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and systolic blood pressure (SBP).

1d

Visualizing heat flow in bamboo could help design more energy-efficient and fire-safe buildings

Modified natural materials will be an essential component of a sustainable future, but first a detailed understanding of their properties is needed. The way heat flows across bamboo cell walls has been mapped using advanced scanning thermal microscopy, providing a new understanding of how variations in thermal conductivity are linked to the bamboo's elegant structure. The findings, published in th

1d

Nye hurtige opladere bruger galiumnitrid: Presser USB-standarden til det yderste

Hen over efteråret er det væltet frem med nye hurtige opladere til smartphones og bærbare computere. De er fremstillet af galiumnitrid-halvledere, som gør, at de lader hurtigere og fylder mindre.

1d

Mapping the perturbome network of cellular perturbations

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13058-9 Our understanding of the mechanisms of drug interactions remains limited. Here the authors introduce a framework to study how complex cellular perturbations induced by different drugs affect each other in morphological feature space.

1d

The Firre locus produces a trans-acting RNA molecule that functions in hematopoiesis

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12970-4 LncRNA loci potentially contain multiple modes that can exert function, including DNA regulatory elements. Here, the authors generated genetic models in mice to dissect the role of the syntenically conserved lncRNA Firre in the context of hematopoiesis.

1d

Optical vector analysis with attometer resolution, 90-dB dynamic range and THz bandwidth

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13129-x Typical methods for optical vector analysis have tradeoffs among resolution, dynamic range, and bandwidth. The authors use an asymmetric optical probe signal generator and receiver to perform attometer resolution measurement over a THz of bandwidth while maintaining high dynamic range, aiming to characterize

1d

A meta-analysis of global fungal distribution reveals climate-driven patterns

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13164-8 The authors assemble and analyse previously generated mycobiome data linked to geographical locations across the world. They describe the distribution of fungal taxa and show that climate is an important driver of fungal biogeography and that fungal diversity appears to be concentrated at high latitudes.

1d

Renal clearable nanochelators for iron overload therapy

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13143-z The build-up of iron in the body can have serious consequences; current treatment therapies suffer from adverse side effects and toxicity. Here, the authors developed renal clearable nanochelators with improved pharmacodynamics and demonstrated their efficacy and safety in iron overload animal models.

1d

Clustering knowledge and dispersing abilities enhances collective problem solving in a network

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12650-3 Using agent-based models of a problem-solving task in a network, the authors show that clustering people of similar knowledge maintains solution diversity and increases long run system collective performance. Clustering those with similar abilities, however, lowers solution diversity and performance.

1d

Plant AtEH/Pan1 proteins drive autophagosome formation at ER-PM contact sites with actin and endocytic machinery

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12782-6 Arabidopsis EH/Pan1 proteins are part of the TPLATE complex (TPC) that is required for endocytosis in plants. Here, the authors show AtEH/Pan1 proteins also act in actin-mediated autophagy, by interacting with VAP27-1 at ER-PM contact sites and recruiting TPLATE and AP-2 complex subunits, clathrin and ARP2/3

1d

Homologous bd oxidases share the same architecture but differ in mechanism

Nature Communications, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13122-4 Cytochrome bd oxidases couple quinol oxidation and the release of protons to the periplasmic side with proton uptake from the cytoplasmic side to reduce dioxygen to water and they are the terminal reductases in bacterial and archaeal respiratory chains. Here the authors present the cryo-EM structure of Esche

1d

NASA Renames Object After Uproar Over Old Name's Nazi Connotations

Scientists said an object four billion miles from Earth would be given a Native American name: Arrokoth. Its previous, informal name, Ultima Thule, had links to the Third Reich.

1d

Looking to Scientists to Expand Eco-Tourism Efforts

Hotels, lodges and resorts are bringing in scientists to conduct serious academic inquiries while also offering nature tours, workshops and classes for guests.

1d

MUC4-ErbB2 Oncogenic Complex: Binding studies using Microscale Thermophoresis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53099-0

1d

1d

Characterization of Matricellular Protein Expression Signatures in Mechanistically Diverse Mouse Models of Kidney Injury

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52961-5

1d

A detailed characterization of complex networks using Information Theory

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53167-5

1d

Potential modulations in flatland: near-infrared sensitization of MoS2 phototransistors by a solvatochromic dye directly tethered to sulfur vacancies

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53186-2 Potential modulations in flatland: near-infrared sensitization of MoS 2 phototransistors by a solvatochromic dye directly tethered to sulfur vacancies

1d

Mechanisms of GABAB receptor enhancement of extrasynaptic GABAA receptor currents in cerebellar granule cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53087-4 Mechanisms of GABA B receptor enhancement of extrasynaptic GABA A receptor currents in cerebellar granule cells

1d

Sphingolipid serum profiling in vitamin D deficient and dyslipidemic obese dimorphic adults

Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53122-4

1d

Erdoğan Defies Trump. So Why Do They Get Along?

He defied the United States repeatedly, bought Russian weapons, and assaulted American partners in Syria. Now Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan is headed to the White House for a meeting with Donald Trump. So will he get away with it? Probably. The past few years show a pretty clear pattern: When Turkey released the detained American pastor Andrew Brunson, Trump lifted sanctions he'd imposed

1d

A New Way To Stop Viruses

Scientists in Massachusetts think they may be onto a new approach for treating viral infections, using CRISPR to quickly target the part of the virus that replicates it.

1d

How Best To Use The Few New Drugs To Treat Antibiotic-Resistant Germs?

Infectious disease specialists debate whether it's better to give the strongest antibiotics all at once for drug-resistant germs or save the most innovative medicines for use as a last resort. (Image credit: Science Photo Library/Science Source)

1d

The perks of being a bit neurotic

Scoring high in neuroticism is associated with a slew of negative outcomes for your physical and mental health. However, it appears to be an inherited trait, one that has persisted through the many thousands of years of human evolution. Some researchers argue that in the environment where humans first evolved, being a little neurotic may have been highly beneficial. None Say you're visiting your

1d

Greta Thunberg to sail to Spain climate summit with YouTubers

The 16-year-old climate activist will sail from the US to Madrid for the COP25 summit.

1d

Musk says Tesla to build new factory near Berlin

Tesla CEO Elon Musk says the electric car pioneer plans to build a new factory near Berlin.

1d

WATCH: Dinosaurs traveled other parts of Milky Way than humans

A new video shows how life has evolved on Earth during the planet's most recent revolution around the Milky Way, also known as one galactic year. A galactic year is about 220 million years, and it was the beginning of the Jurassic period the last time Earth was at this point in its revolution. How will Earth look on its next galactic birthday? It's impossible to know for sure, but a few events se

1d

1d

1d

. Podcast with Elon Musk on Neuralink, car Autopilot, Earth future and the Artificial Intelligence." data-inlineentryid="ph1I0CaMDnAbP/AnrA80jkNtpkqxUYZElYlN8IFQrnM=_16e64226dd3:2263f05:97b0c8f7" data-u="0">

1d

Superconducting wind turbine chalks up first test success

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

1d

As 5G Rolls Out, Troubling New Security Flaws Emerge

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

1d

Air Protein just created 'meat' made from air

submitted by /u/HurricaneDorian321 [link] [comments]

1d

Mærsk vil spare på brændstof og CO2-udledning med kæmpebatteri

PLUS. Et batteriprojekt, der snart skal i pilottest, skal hjælpe Maersk med at nå målet om CO2-neutralitet i 2050.

1d

IEA says world needs 'laser-like focus' to bring down emissions

The world must do much more to slash emissions if it is to defuse the climate change time bomb and deliver sustainable energy for a growing population, the International Energy Agency said Wednesday.

1d

Venice underwater as exceptional tide sweeps through canal city

Venice was hit by the highest tide in more than 50 years late Tuesday, with tourists wading through flooded streets to seek shelter as a fierce wind whipped up waves in St. Mark's Square.

1d

Bushfire threat still high as Australia clean up begins

Australians on Wednesday began sifting through the ashes of hundreds of bushfires that have ravaged the country, relieved that their worst fears were unrealised—but wary of a long and brutal summer ahead.

1d

Japan spacecraft starts yearlong journey home from asteroid

Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft departed from a distant asteroid on Wednesday, starting its yearlong journey home after successfully completing its mission to bring back soil samples and data that could provide clues to the origins of the solar system, the country's space agency said.

1d

Shared consciousness, artificial imagination, and the Universe's first seconds: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 13 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03458-8 Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week's best science picks.

1d

PODD: Falska förhoppningar som handelsvara

Den medicinska forskningen gör ständigt stora framsteg. Den har till exempel gjort det möjligt att transplantera organ och gett dödssjuka en ny chans till liv. Barnlösa som längtar efter ett barn kan idag bli hjälpta av olika tekniker och på senare tid har forskning kring stamceller väckt stora, men tyvärr ofta överdrivna förhoppningar om vilka sjukdomar som går att bota med hjälp av stamceller.

1d

Deep neural networks speed up weather and climate models

When you check the weather forecast in the morning, the results you see are more than likely determined by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a comprehensive model that simulates the evolution of many aspects of the physical world around us.

1d

Individual climate models may not provide the complete picture

Equilibrium climate sensitivity—how sensitive the Earth's climate is to changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide—may be underestimated in individual climate models, according to a team of climate scientists.

1d

Astronauts to test drive a lunar robot from the space station

Astronauts could one day remotely control Moon and Mars rovers from orbit. An upcoming test aboard the International Space Station could help make this a possibility. In November, the ESA (European Space Agency) will conduct an experiment in orbit known as ANALOG-1 to see if station crews, scientists on the ground and new technology can work together to guide a rover on a simulated lunar mission.

1d

Material till framtidens katalysatorer testas i nanotunnlar

Med hjälp av en ny sorts nanoreaktor har forskare från Chalmers lyckats kartlägga den katalytiska prestandan hos enskilda metalliska nanopartiklar. Den nya metoden är viktig för att kunna studera och förbättra kemiska processer. Katalysatorer spelar en nyckelroll i vårt samhälle. De underlättar kemiska reaktioner och behövs för att framställa alltifrån bränslen till läkemedel. Katalysatorerna i v

1d

Ant expert discovers newly emergent species in his backyard

Jack Longino is a global ant expert and has traveled the world documenting and discovering ant species. But for his latest discovery, he didn't need to go any farther than his own backyard. In August 2018, just after dark, Longino caught a glimpse of four ants in his garden that really looked out of place. The next day he dug deeper and found more specimens. They reminded him of species he knew fr

1d

High Definition Earth-Viewing payload reaches end-of-life on station, surpassing life expectancy

The International Space Station's High Definition Earth-Viewing (HDEV) payload officially reached end-of-life Aug. 22, 2019, after delivering live Earth views to more than 318 million viewers across the globe.

1d

Ant expert discovers newly emergent species in his backyard

Jack Longino is a global ant expert and has traveled the world documenting and discovering ant species. But for his latest discovery, he didn't need to go any farther than his own backyard. In August 2018, just after dark, Longino caught a glimpse of four ants in his garden that really looked out of place. The next day he dug deeper and found more specimens. They reminded him of species he knew fr

1d

Stalled weather patterns will get bigger due to climate change

Climate change will increase the size of stalled high-pressure weather systems called "blocking events" that have already produced some of the 21st century's deadliest heat waves, according to a Rice University study.

1d

Etalumis 'reverses' simulations to reveal new science

Scientists have built simulations to help explain behavior in the real world, including modeling for disease transmission and prevention, autonomous vehicles, climate science, and in the search for the fundamental secrets of the universe. But how to interpret vast volumes of experimental data in terms of these detailed simulations remains a key challenge. Probabilistic programming offers a solutio

1d

Deep learning expands study of nuclear waste remediation

A research collaboration between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Brown University, and NVIDIA has achieved exaflop performance on the Summit supercomputer with a deep learning application used to model subsurface flow in the study of nuclear waste remediation. Their achievement, which will be presented during the "Deep Learning on

1d

Eva Meijer: 'Of course animals speak. The thing is we don't listen'

The Dutch philosopher and artist believes we should change our relationship to animals. This involves recognising that they talk to us – and granting them proper rights Fagan the horse is enormous, nervy and then, suddenly, inexplicably calm when Eva Meijer strokes his neck and whispers in his twitching ears. Meijer, a Dutch philosopher, novelist, visual artist and singer-songwriter, is visiting

1d

Lægerne skal lære at skelne mellem øjenproblemer

Hvornår er der tale om almindelig øjenbetændelse, og hvornår er situationen akut? Tre hovedpunkter bliver gennemgået på kursus ved Lægedage 2019.

1d

Economic value of protected areas via visitor mental health

Nature Communications, Published online: 12 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12631-6 Parks have a previously unquantified economic value attributable to mental health, a health services value. Here, the authors proposed three methods to estimate this, and applied one of these methods to show that this value is at least US$6 trillion per annum worldwide.

1d

Klimaforandringer skaber større, stærkere og mere ødelæggende orkaner i USA

De sidste 100 år er orkaner blevet både hyppigere og mere destruktive, det viser ny forskning…

1d

Fake spectra googling #CleanYourScience

This guest post invites you to join the hunt for fabricated data in your science field of interest. Use Google image search to #CleanYourScience!

1d

Greta Thunberg har fået lift til klimatopmøde: Skal sejle med kendte youtubere

Den svenske klimaaktivist har løst sit transportproblem til Madrid, hvor COP25 skal afholdes.

1d

1d

1d

1d

Policymaking must catch up with technology – before it's too late

submitted by /u/futuredude [link] [comments]

1d

1d

Dubai wants to 3D print a quarter of every new building by 2025

submitted by /u/futuredude [link] [comments]

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

The Mystery of How The Nile Kept Flowing For 30 Million Years May Finally Be Solved

The Nile should have changed course… so why hasn't it?

1d

Opioid-based plant might not be best solution to curb habitual alcohol use

A Purdue University team published a paper in the British Journal of Pharmacology examining the effects of kratom and the potential impacts on people with alcohol use disorder.

1d

Driver found for more deadly prostate cancer

A transcription factor that aids neuron function also appears to enable a cell conversion in the prostate gland that can make an already recurrent cancer even more deadly, scientists say.

1d

Light at the end of the nanotunnel for future catalysts

Using a new type of nanoreactor, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have succeeded in mapping catalytic reactions on individual metallic nanoparticles. Their work could help improve chemical processes, and lead to better catalysts and more environmentally friendly chemical technology. The results are published in the journal Nature Communications.

1d

Training family doctors to better support domestic violence survivors

Women who are experiencing domestic violence feel better supported, more confident and less depressed when they are counselled by trained family doctors, according to new research.

1d

Talking with trained doctors can help abused women

Women who are experiencing intimate partner violence feel better supported, more confident, and less depressed when trained family doctors counsel them, according to new research in the journal Family Practice.

1d