Search Posts

nyheder2019november20

Extraterrestrial ribose and other sugars in primitive meteorites [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Sugars are essential molecules for all terrestrial biota working in many biological processes. Ribose is particularly essential as a building block of RNA, which could have both stored information and catalyzed reactions in primitive life on Earth. Meteorites contain a number of organic compounds including key building blocks of life,…

20h

What Happens When You Remove a Police-Installed GPS Tracker

The Supreme Court ruled that cops need a warrant to attach a GPS device to your car. But if you find one, can you remove it?

6h

Danske patienter dør af svampeinfektion, som landbruget har gjort resistent

PLUS. En opgørelse fra Statens Serum Institut viser, at sprøjtemidler, som er udbredt i landbruget, fører til infektion med dødelig, resistent svamp.

16h

Sponsored

Why Career Diplomats Are Becoming Campaign Advisers

Battered by haphazard decisions and neglect, the State Department has seen a mass exodus of diplomats during the Trump administration. Now some former diplomats are so worried about what another Trump term would mean—further erosion of alliances, more loss of credibility with friends and foes alike—that they are for the first time taking their services and experience to 2020 candidates, hoping to

now

Democrats Should Talk About Place-Based Policy

Staying versus moving is one of the eternal tensions of American life. Americans have frequently moved: Consider how the geographic center of the population has shifted over the past century, from east of Baltimore, when the Constitution was written, to west of the Mississippi now. The "mean center of population"—the point where half the U.S. population lives to the North and half to the South, a

now

US academic-science mentoring falls short of best practices, say National Academies

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03598-x Report calls for universities to create tenure and promotion incentives.

now

Solidarity is not dead: How workers can force progressive change

In November last year, 20,000 Google employees across the world walked out of work. They were protesting the ways in which their employer had failed to address sexual harassment in the workplace. Less than a year later, most of the leaders of the walkout have left Google accusing the company of retaliation and intimidation. It all came to a head when The New York Times reported in October 2018 th

2min

Probing the role of an inflammation resolution sensor in obesity and heart failure

After heart attack injury, ALX/FPR2 is activated by resolvin D1 in immune cells in the spleen and in immune cells at the heart attack site. This speeds expedited resolution of the heart attack injury. Researchers now have used mice that completely lack ALX/FPR2 to learn more about the pathways this resolution sensor uses to target inflammation. Such knowledge will help in finding treatments to del

2min

Vicious circles: Ring-shaped DNA provides cancer cells with a malignant twist

Researchers describe how circular extrachromosomal DNA in cancer cells boosts aggressiveness and resistance to therapies.

2min

A new link between migraines, opioid overuse may be key to treating pain

Researchers have discovered that a peptide links together migraine pain and pain induced by opioid overuse.

2min

Be aware of potential complications following tongue-tie surgery in babies

Complications following a procedure to treat tongue-tie in babies are occurring that can result in admission to hospital, something a paediatrician says needs to be better understood by both health practitioners and parents.

2min

A third of Africa's tropical flora threatened with extinction: study

A third of the species of tropical plants in Africa are potentially threatened with extinction, according to a preliminary estimate published Wednesday by the journal Science Advances.

2min

Experimental HIV vaccine successfully elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies to the virus

An experimental HIV vaccine developed by scientists at Scripps Research and the nonprofit vaccine research organization IAVI has reached an important milestone by eliciting antibodies that can neutralize a wide variety of HIV strains. The tests, in rabbits, showed that these "broadly neutralizing" antibodies targeted at least two critical sites on the virus. Researchers widely assume that a vaccin

8min

Neural compass

Harvard Medical School neuroscientists have decoded how visual cues can rapidly reorganize the activity of compass neurons in fruit flies to maintain an accurate sense of direction. By tracking individual neurons as flies navigate a virtual reality environment, the researchers shed light on neural mechanisms that allow organisms to build a spatial map of their world, as well as processes involved

8min

Severe pregnancy-related depression may be rooted in inflammation

A runaway, inflammatory immune response may be responsible for triggering severe depression during and after pregnancy, according to a new study published in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity.

8min

Only eat oysters in months with an 'r'? Rule of thumb is at least 4,000 years old

Foodie tradition dictates only eating wild oysters during months containing the letter 'r' — from September to April. Now, a new study suggests people have been following this practice for at least 4,000 years.

8min

Behavioral sciences in the promotion of oral health

The importance and value of behavioral sciences in dentistry has long been recognized and over time behavioral sciences have expanded our understanding of oral health beyond 'disease' to a broader biopsychosocial concept of oral health. In the JDR Centennial article 'Behavioral Sciences in the Promotion of Oral Health,' Colman McGrath, University of Hong Kong, SAR, China, discusses how this broade

8min

Estimating the environmental impact of Bitcoin mining

As an alternative to government-issued money, the cryptocurrency Bitcoin offers relative anonymity, no sales tax and freedom from bank and government interference. But some people argue that these benefits have an enormous environmental impact, particularly with regard to Bitcoin mining — the process used to secure the cryptocurrency. Now, researchers have estimated that past and future environme

16min

Making tiny antennas for wearable electronics

When it comes to electronics, bigger usually isn't better. This is especially true for a new generation of wearable communication systems that promise to connect people, machines and other objects in a wireless 'internet of things.' To make the devices small and comfortable enough to wear, scientists need to miniaturize their components. Now, researchers have made the tiniest radio-frequency anten

16min

4D imaging with liquid crystal microlenses

Most images captured by a camera lens are flat and two dimensional. Increasingly, 3D imaging technologies are providing the crucial context of depth for scientific and medical applications. 4D imaging, which adds information on light polarization, could open up even more possibilities, but usually the equipment is bulky, expensive and complicated. Now, researchers have developed self-assembling li

16min

New water-based optical device revolutionizes the field of optics research

Using the optical properties of a material to manipulate light signals is called light modulation, a method widely used in optical communication. In a groundbreaking study, a group of scientists has come up with a novel method of modulating light, using water as a medium. This method is inexpensive and more efficient than existing ones, paving the way for new, improved optical devices.

16min

System locates shooters using smartphone video

Researchers have developed a system that can accurately locate a shooter based on video recordings from as few as three smartphones.

16min

Sepsis survivors require follow-up support

Survivors of sepsis — a life-threatening response to an infection — have expressed a need for advocacy and follow-up support, according to a new study.

16min

The first global map of Titan reveals Earth-like features with a peculiar twist

The Cassini spacecraft has been peeling back Titan's shroud for more than a decade. Here, it's imaged in near-infrared. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. Arizona/Univ. Idaho/) Before astronauts can hike through Titan's gentle hills or slide down its colossal dunes , they'll have to know where they're going. Researchers have taken a major step toward the exploration of Titan, Saturn's largest moon, by produ

17min

A third of Africa's tropical flora threatened with extinction: study

A third of the species of tropical plants in Africa are potentially threatened with extinction, according to a preliminary estimate published Wednesday by the journal Science Advances.

17min

Dead-zone report card reflects improving water quality in Chesapeake Bay

An annual model-based report on "dead-zone" conditions in the Chesapeake Bay during 2019 indicates the total volume of low-oxygen, "hypoxic" water was on the high end of the normal range for 1985 to 2018, a finding that scientists consider relatively good news.

17min

Rekordenergi från kosmisk explosion uppmätt

På en sekund kan en gammablixt stråla ut lika mycket energi som vår sol gör under hela sin existens. Det gör dem till de kraftigaste explosioner vi känner till i universum. Gammablixtar uppstår när en stor stjärna kollapsar till ett svart hål, och sänder ut gammastrålning med fotoner (ljuspartiklar) som kan ha hundratals miljarder gånger så hög energi som fotonerna i synligt ljus.

19min

Doctors Are Testing Human Suspended Animation for the First Time

The stasis/suspended animation chambers, in Alien Science fiction is full of examples of people entering suspended animation or hibernation during a long space journey, but that might not be fiction for much longer. Doctors at the University of Maryland Medical Center are putting people in suspended animation for the first time. There's no spaceflight involved, though. Their use case is much more

19min

A third of Africa's tropical flora threatened with extinction: study

A third of the species of tropical plants in Africa are potentially threatened with extinction, according to a preliminary estimate published Wednesday by the journal Science Advances.

20min

Smart buildings face challenges but have plenty of potential

Mohamed Ouf and his co-authors examine the concepts of occupant-centric control in the burgeoning field of smart buildings. They propose future directions for OCC research by providing recommendations to address these challenges and to standardize OCC implementations.

29min

Clay as a feed supplement in dairy cattle has multiple benefits

Dairy producers frequently add clay as a feed supplement to reduce the symptoms of aflatoxin and subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA) in lactating cows. In a new study from the University of Illinois, researchers show that clay can also improve the degradability of feedstuffs.

29min

The evolution of neuroscience as a research

When the first issue of the JDR was published, the field of neuroscience did not exist but over subsequent decades neuroscience has emerged as a scientific field that has particular relevance to dentistry. The JDR Centennial article 'The Evolution of Neuroscience as a Research Field Relevant to Dentistry' reviews many of the novel insights that have been gained through neuroscience research into t

29min

IADR's Women Pioneers: Celebrating a Century of Achievement published in Advances in Dental Research

The latest issue of Advances in Dental Research, an e-Supplement to the Journal of Dental Research (JDR), 'IADR's Women Pioneers: Celebrating a Century of Achievement' highlights the history of the tremendous advancements in dental research made by women, while also identifying areas where the profession needs to continue to grow to be more inclusive in the promotion of women scientific innovators

29min

Legumes boost heart health, according to new review study

Consuming beans, lentils, peas, and other legumes reduces the risk for cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and high blood pressure, according to a review published in Advances in Nutrition.

29min

NASA observes tropical storm Fung-Wong organize

As Tropical Depression 28W continued organizing and developing into Tropical Storm Fung-Wong in the Philippine Sea, NASA's Aqua satellite provided data on the storm to forecasters. In the Philippines, Fung-Wong is known as Sarah.

29min

Melanin-producing Streptomyces are more likely to colonize plants

Plant growth-promoting Streptomyces assemble into the internal, root endophytic compartments of a wide variety of plants around the world. These bacteria are well-known for their ability to produce a huge array of secondary metabolites and also protect against pests.

29min

NASA estimates tropical storm Sebastien's rainfall rates

NASA found moderate rainfall occurring over a large area in Tropical Storm Sebastien, as it moves through the Atlantic Ocean.

29min

Melanin-producing Streptomyces are more likely to colonize plants

Plant growth-promoting Streptomyces assemble into the internal, root endophytic compartments of a wide variety of plants around the world. These bacteria are well-known for their ability to produce a huge array of secondary metabolites and also protect against pests.

32min

Companies without climate plans will be banned from London Stock Exchange, Labour Party says

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell didn't provide specific requirements companies would have to meet, but said climate would be the Labour Party's "overriding priority" if it wins the election. The center-left Labour Party hopes to bring the U.K.'s greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2050. The London Stock Exchange currently lists some of the world's largest oil and gas companies. None Companies th

35min

Bangladesh could be the first to cultivate golden rice, genetically altered to fight blindness

Approval expected for the rice, long a flashpoint in debates over GM crops

40min

The Likely Reason Disney\+ Accounts Are Getting 'Hacked'

Credential stuffing, where names and passwords leaked in previous breaches are reused, strikes again.

44min

When grown right, palm oil can be sustainable

Turning an abandoned pasture into a palm tree plantation can be carbon neutral, according to a new study. These findings, based on measurements of 56-year-old palm tree plantations in Colombia, suggest we may be able to find sustainable alternatives to deforestation for the production of palm oil — a practice currently under fire by environmentalists.

45min

War of words: Why should we protect civil discourse?

Universities are places where there academic freedom thrives. Such open exchange of ideas creates an environments conducive to civil discourse — dialog with one another with the goal of reaching the truth. Philanthropists should, ideally, provide resources to institutions that promote scholarly work. The reason for this is because such work benefits society at large. When you engage with people w

46min

NASA tracks typhoon Kalmaegi affecting northern Philippines

NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Typhoon Kalmaegi as it moved into the Luzon Strait and continued to affect the northern Philippines.

51min

Melanin-producing Streptomyces are more likely to colonize plants

Recent research published in Phytobiomes Journal demonstrates that melanin-producing Streptomyces are more likely to colonize plants, which has been shown to be protective for many different organisms.

51min

Satellite Mission Will Investigate Whether Reality Is Pixelated

Chunky Or Smooth? A team of astronomers has a plan to launch a massive swarm of tiny spacecraft and investigate the fabric of our reality. The mission, GrailQuest, aims to settle a longstanding debate among physicists, according to Live Science : whether spacetime is the continuous fabric described by general relativity or the chunky, pixelated jumble of discrete objects described by quantum mech

55min

A 'bilingual' molecule speaks both DNA and protein

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03589-y One massive molecule draws on two types of coding found throughout living organisms.

59min

'Epidermal VR' gives technology a human touch

Researchers have developed a new thin, wireless system that adds a sense of touch to any virtual reality (VR) experience. Not only does this platform potentially add new dimensions to our long-distance relationships and entertainment, the technology also provides prosthetics with sensory feedback and imparts telemedicine with a human touch.

59min

Apple Launches iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro Smart Battery Cases With Dedicated Camera Button

When Apple launched its new iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro smartphones back in September, the company impressed with its blazing fast A13 Bionic SoC, incredibly bright display, and top-notch image …

1h

Mercedes debuts pricing for the electric 2020 EQC 400 4MATIC SUV in LA – Roadshow

Mercedes' first fully electric SUV is getting ever closer to dealer showrooms, and now we know how much it'll cost.

1h

Apple will build a $1 billion campus in Austin, Texas

Today, Apple announced it will start construction on a new campus in Austin, Texas, as the company is looking to expand its presence in the region. The company is committing $1 billion to the …

1h

Archaeologists Race to Preserve Artifacts as the Ice Melts in Mongolia

Disappearing patches of ice unleash new artifacts for discovery, but many could quickly degrade exposed to the elements

1h

NASA estimates tropical storm Sebastien's rainfall rates

NASA found moderate rainfall occurring over a large area in Tropical Storm Sebastien, as it moves through the Atlantic Ocean.

1h

How the Democratic Frontrunners Want to Decarbonize U.S. Transportation

The Presidential candidates have varying plans to promote electric vehicles and public transportation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Astronomers discover most energetic gamma-ray burst ever

Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic phenomenon known to humankind. Although short-lived, they outshine stars and even galactic quasars. They usually display energies in the region of tens of giga-electron-volts, but for the first time, researchers discovered a gamma-ray burst in the region of a tera-electron-volt. This level of energy has long been theorized, and this study demonstrates these

1h

A super-fast 'light switch' for future cars and computers

Switching light beams quickly is important in many technological applications. Researchers have now developed an 'electro-opto-mechanical' switch for light beams that is considerably smaller and faster than current models. This is relevant for applications such as self-driving cars and optical quantum technologies.

1h

Turning up the heat to create new nanostructured metals

The metallic thin films with 3-D interlocking nanostructures could be used in catalysis, energy storage, and biomedical sensing.

1h

Beauty in the biased eye of the beholder

When looking at paintings, we don't assess each one on its own merits. Instead, we carry a bias, according to a new study.

1h

Bursting the bubble: Revealing tasty genetic secrets of gigantic single-celled creatures

Researchers recently unveiled key information about gene expression in sea grapes, which could help shed light on the evolution of sea grape morphology and help farmers improve cultivation of umi-budo.

1h

Bot can beat humans in multiplayer hidden-role games

Mesearchers have developed a bot equipped with artificial intelligence that can beat human players in tricky online multiplayer games where player roles and motives are kept secret.

1h

Highest-energy light from a gamma-ray burst ever

Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions in the cosmos. These explosive events last a fraction of a second to several minutes and emit the same amount of gamma rays as all the stars in the universe combined. Such extreme amounts of energy can only be released during catastrophic events like the death of a very massive star, or the merging of two compact stars, and are accompanied by an af

1h

The complicated truth about testosterone's effect on athletic performance

Caster Semenya, champion South African sprinter, who's still fighting for her right to compete as a woman (Jon Connell/Flickr/) If you give a person testosterone, society considers it a performance enhancer. If you naturally have lots of the hormone, though, it's a competitive advantage—if you're a man. But if you're a woman, at least according to some of the biggest sports associations in the wo

1h

Photos of Australia's 'Catastrophic' Bushfires

Southeastern Australia has been swept by devastating bushfires for the past month—the state of New South Wales currently has more than 50 fires burning, and blames the blazes for the loss of four lives and more than 500 homes. NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian declared a state of emergency on November 11, and residents have been warned of "catastrophic" fire conditions, as extreme high temperatures

1h

Ride-Hailing Apps Linked to an Increase in Binge Drinking

Ride hailing apps like Uber and Lyft are clogging up streets and don't provide their drivers with a living wage. But, some argue , at least they might be stopping people from driving while drunk. But the relationship between binge drinking and ride-sharing apps may be more complicated than that. If you know you can get a safe ride home from the bar, the thinking goes, maybe you'll stay for an ext

1h

Penn State's SETI Center Could Legitimize Alien Research

Money, Please The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) is stuck in something of a catch-22. Researchers often have trouble funding their SETI efforts because the lack of discovered aliens makes the hunt seem pointless . But we need more scientists looking for aliens to improve our chances of finding them. Now, a new Scientific American story details how an in-development center at Penn

1h

New Virtual Reality Interface Enables "Touch" Across Long Distances

Lightweight, flexible patch conveys a tactile sensation directly to the skin — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Hubble studies gamma-ray burst with highest energy ever seen

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has given astronomers a peek at the location of the most energetic outburst ever seen in the universe — a blast of gamma-rays a trillion times more powerful than visible light. That's because in a few seconds the gamma-ray burst (GRB) emitted more energy than the Sun will provide over its entire 10-billion year life.

1h

Scientists find promising drug combination against lethal childhood brain cancers

Researchers have devised a new, promising plan of attack against deadly childhood brain cancers called diffuse midline gliomas (DMG). NCATS and Stanford University scientists and their colleagues showed that combining two drugs killed DMG patient cells grown in the laboratory and in animal models. The drugs countered the effects of a genetic mutation that causes the diseases. Their studies also un

1h

Would people be willing to give their personal data for research?

New research led by the University of Bristol has found that over half of people would be willing to donate their personal data for research to benefit the wider general public.

1h

New fossils shed light on how snakes got their bite and lost their legs

New fossils of an ancient legged snake, called Najash, shed light on the origin of the slithering reptiles. The fossil discoveries published in Science Advances have revealed they possessed hind legs during the first 70 million years of their evolution.They also provide details about how the flexible skull of snakes evolved from their lizard ancestors.

1h

WSU genetic discovery holds implications for better immunity, longer life

Wrinkles on the skin of a microscopic worm might provide the key to a longer, healthier life for humans. Working with Caenorhabditis elegans, a transparent nematode found in soil, researchers at Washington State University's Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine were the first to find that the nervous system controls the tiny worm's cuticle, a skin-like exterior barrier, in response to bacterial infe

1h

How the brain detects the rhythms of speech

Neuroscientists at UC San Francisco have discovered how the listening brain scans speech to break it down into syllables. The findings provide for the first time a neural basis for the fundamental atoms of language and insights into our perception of the rhythmic poetry of speech.

1h

Unruly T cells complicate the intended benefits of HIV vaccines

Inducing strong responses from T helper (TH) cells — long seen as a desirable goal for HIV vaccines — and using multiple antigens can hamper the effectiveness of vaccine candidates for HIV, according to an analysis of macaque experiments and a multicenter, phase 1 trial.

1h

When grown right, palm oil can be sustainable

Turning an abandoned pasture into a palm tree plantation can be carbon neutral, according to a new study by EPFL and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL). These findings, based on measurements of 56-year-old palm tree plantations in Colombia, suggest we may be able to find sustainable alternatives to deforestation for the production of palm oil — a practice cu

1h

Best of the best: Who makes the most accurate decisions in expert groups?

New method predicts accuracy on the basis of similarity.

1h

Vanishing ice puts reindeer herders at risk

Mongolia's Tsaatan reindeer herders depend on munkh mus, or eternal ice, for their livelihoods. Now, soaring global temperatures may threaten that existence.

1h

Planting on pasture land may provide sustainable alternative for oil palm plantations

Converting already-degraded pasture to oil palm plantations avoids the large loss of stored carbon associated with clearing rainforests to make way for these plantations, according to a long-term, Colombia-based study. The study, which shows that the pasture-based approach is close to carbon neutral in Colombia, provides the first field-based evidence of the effects of oil.

1h

Underwater robotic gliders provide key tool to measure ocean sound levels

At a time when ocean noise is receiving increased global attention, researchers at Oregon State University have developed an effective method to use an underwater robotic glider to measure sound levels over broad areas of the sea.

1h

An ancient snake's cheekbone sheds light on evolution of modern snake skulls

New research from a collaboration between Argentinian and University of Alberta palaeontologists adds a new piece to the puzzle of snake evolution.

1h

Creating viral targets can weaken HIV vaccination

Vaccination against HIV/SIV can backfire if the vaccine induces the wrong kind of immune response. Scientists at Emory University's Yerkes National Primate Research Center have evidence that creating too many soft targets can weaken vaccination that would otherwise provide protection against SIV infection.

1h

Predicting treatment outcome for leishmaniasis

The current first-line treatment for leishmaniasis, a skin disease that can cause disfiguring ulcers, is grueling and frequently fails. A new study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers pinpoints genetic factors that predict whether a patient will respond well to treatment. The work could inform the creation of prognostic tests that could help clinicians personalize therapies for individua

1h

New Virtual Reality Interface Enables "Touch" Across Long Distances

Lightweight, flexible patch conveys a tactile sensation directly to the skin — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Why is Same-Sex Sexual Behavior So Common in Animals?

It's long been considered an evolutionary puzzle, but new research suggests this may be the wrong way to think about it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Are we alone in the universe? This generation could finally find out

Since the beginning of human history, we've looked up at the stars and wondered: Are we alone? No other generation has been able to find an answer, but David Charbonneau, an astronomer at Harvard University and a recipient of an honorary degree from the University of Chicago this year, thinks we may be the first. Charbonneau, an astronomer at Harvard University and a recipient of an honorary degr

1h

Semen seems to help female fruit flies remember things better

A molecule in male fruit fly semen boosts females' long-term memory – the first example of mating playing a role in cognition

1h

Palm oil from Colombia is more climate and wildlife friendly

Most oil palms in Colombia are planted on land previously used for grazing cattle, rather than land cleared of rainforests, making it a greener choice

1h

Human activities could make a third of tropical African plants extinct

A third of plant species in tropical Africa are potentially threatened with becoming extinct, which would put a huge strain on local populations

1h

Devin Nunes Is Living in a Fantasyland

Devin Nunes, the ranking Republican on the Intelligence Committee, opened today with a statement attacking media reporting on the Trump administration. He singled out six stories for attack. One of them was retracted by its publisher, CNN—a form of corporate responsibility never seen from a White House notorious for emitting six false statements in a single morning. Another was an opinion piece i

1h

Skipping breakfast linked to lower GCSE grades

Students who rarely ate breakfast on school days achieved lower GCSE grades than those who ate breakfast frequently, according to a new study.

1h

To navigate, flies make flexible mental maps of the world

Flies use visual cues to finesse their mental maps of the environment. Two new studies use virtual reality to show how.

1h

Slowing down — Is aging caused by decreased cellular metabolism?

Researchers have uncovered new information regarding the effects of impaired expression of the gene SHMT2 in genetically modified mice. They found that suppression of SHMT2 expression of SHMT2 altered activity in metabolic pathways, which in turn inhibited growth and impaired mitochondrial respiration, which is a critical cellular function that has been linked to human aging and age-related illnes

1h

How plants handle stress

Plants get stressed too. Drought or too much salt disrupt their physiology. An international research team investigated how evolutionary changes in receptor proteins led to their ability to sense the hormone abscisic acid (ABA). This enabled them to develop mechanisms that aided their colonization of dry land and their response to stress.

1h

Fossils Provide Clues to When Snakes Still Had Use for a Pair of Legs

The discovery in Argentina will help to resolve mysteries over when snakes began their transition to their modern form.

1h

Rational discovery of antimetastatic agents targeting the intrinsically disordered region of MBD2

Although intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs) are commonly engaged in promiscuous protein-protein interactions (PPIs), using them as drug targets is challenging due to their extreme structural flexibility. We report a rational discovery of inhibitors targeting an IDPR of MBD2 that undergoes disorder-to-order transition upon PPI and is critical for the regulation of the Mi-2/NuRD chrom

1h

Carbon neutral expansion of oil palm plantations in the Neotropics

Alternatives to ecologically devastating deforestation land use change trajectories are needed to reduce the carbon footprint of oil palm (OP) plantations in the tropics. Although various land use change options have been proposed, so far, there are no empirical data on their long-term ecosystem carbon pools effects. Our results demonstrate that pasture-to-OP conversion in savanna regions does no

1h

Neuronal GPCR NPR-8 regulates C. elegans defense against pathogen infection

Increasing evidence indicates that infection-triggered host defenses are regulated by the nervous system. However, the precise mechanisms of this regulation are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that neuronal G protein-coupled receptor NPR-8 negatively regulates Caenorhabditis elegans defense against pathogen infection by suppressing cuticular collagen expression. NPR-8 controls the dynam

1h

Endoplasmic reticulum mediates mitochondrial transfer within the osteocyte dendritic network

Mitochondrial transfer plays a crucial role in the regulation of tissue homeostasis and resistance to cancer chemotherapy. Osteocytes have interconnecting dendritic networks and are a model to investigate its mechanism. We have demonstrated, in primary murine osteocytes with photoactivatable mitochondria (PhAM) floxed and in MLO-Y4 cells, mitochondrial transfer in the dendritic networks visualize

1h

How to detect high-performing individuals and groups: Decision similarity predicts accuracy

Distinguishing between high- and low-performing individuals and groups is of prime importance in a wide range of high-stakes contexts. While this is straightforward when accurate records of past performance exist, these records are unavailable in most real-world contexts. Focusing on the class of binary decision problems, we use a combined theoretical and empirical approach to develop and test a

1h

A sperm peptide enhances long-term memory in female Drosophila

Can mating influence cognitive functions such as learning and memory in a permanent way? We have addressed this question using a combined behavioral and in vivo imaging approach, finding that aversive long-term memory performance strongly increases in Drosophila females in response to sperm transfer following mating. A peptide in the male sperm, the sex peptide, is known to cause marked changes i

1h

TRIM8 is required for virus-induced IFN response in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells

Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play a crucial role in antiviral innate immunity through their unique capacity to produce large amounts of type I interferons (IFNs) upon viral detection. Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins have recently come forth as important modulators of innate signaling, but their involvement in pDCs has not been investigated. Here, we performed a rationally streamlined smal

1h

Discovery of fossil asteroidal ice in primitive meteorite Acfer 094

Carbonaceous chondrites are meteorites believed to preserve our planet's source materials, but the precise nature of these materials still remains uncertain. To uncover pristine planetary materials, we performed synchrotron radiation–based x-ray computed nanotomography of a primitive carbonaceous chondrite, Acfer 094, and found ultraporous lithology (UPL) widely distributed in a fine-grained matr

1h

New skulls and skeletons of the Cretaceous legged snake Najash, and the evolution of the modern snake body plan

Snakes represent one of the most dramatic examples of the evolutionary versatility of the vertebrate body plan, including body elongation, limb loss, and skull kinesis. However, understanding the earliest steps toward the acquisition of these remarkable adaptations is hampered by the very limited fossil record of early snakes. Here, we shed light on the acquisition of the snake body plan using mi

1h

Agreement between reconstructed and modeled boreal precipitation of the Last Interglacial

The last extended time period when climate may have been warmer than today was during the Last Interglacial (LIG; ca. 129 to 120 thousand years ago). However, a global view of LIG precipitation is lacking. Here, seven new LIG climate models are compared to the first global database of proxies for LIG precipitation. In this way, models are assessed in their ability to capture important hydroclimat

1h

Brain-targeted enzyme-loaded nanoparticles: A breach through the blood-brain barrier for enzyme replacement therapy in Krabbe disease

Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) result from an enzyme deficiency within lysosomes. The systemic administration of the missing enzyme, however, is not effective in the case of LSDs with central nervous system (CNS)-involvement. Here, an enzyme delivery system based on the encapsulation of cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEAs) into poly-(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) function

1h

Mechanisms of nuclear content loading to exosomes

Exosome cargoes are highly varied and include proteins, small RNAs, and genomic DNA (gDNA). The presence of gDNA suggests that different intracellular compartments contribute to exosome loading, resulting in distinct exosome subpopulations. However, the loading of gDNA and other nuclear contents into exosomes (nExo) remains poorly understood. Here, we identify the relationship between cancer cell

1h

A third of the tropical African flora is potentially threatened with extinction

Preserving tropical biodiversity is an urgent challenge when faced with the growing needs of countries. Despite their crucial importance for terrestrial ecosystems, most tropical plant species lack extinction risk assessments, limiting our ability to identify conservation priorities. Using a novel approach aligned with IUCN Red List criteria, we conducted a continental-scale preliminary conservat

1h

Calculated avoidance: Math anxiety predicts math avoidance in effort-based decision-making

Math anxiety—negative feelings toward math—is hypothesized to be associated with the avoidance of math-related activities such as taking math courses and pursuing STEM careers. However, there is little experimental evidence for the math anxiety-avoidance link. Such evidence is important for formulating how to break this relationship. We hypothesize that math avoidance emerges when one perceives t

1h

A speech envelope landmark for syllable encoding in human superior temporal gyrus

The most salient acoustic features in speech are the modulations in its intensity, captured by the amplitude envelope. Perceptually, the envelope is necessary for speech comprehension. Yet, the neural computations that represent the envelope and their linguistic implications are heavily debated. We used high-density intracranial recordings, while participants listened to speech, to determine how

1h

Is DDT a cause of Indian immigrant diabetes risk?

Past exposure to the insecticide and pollutant DDT may contribute to diabetes risk among Indian immigrants to the United States, research finds. The study in the journal Environmental Science & Technology links high levels of DDT, or dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, in Indian immigrants with risk factors for metabolic disease. "Our findings evoke a new interpretation of Rachel Carson's famous boo

1h

System uses video from 3 phones to find shooters

A new system can accurately locate shooters based on video recordings from as few as three smartphones, researchers report. When researchers demonstrated the system using three video recordings from the 2017 mass shooting in Las Vegas that left 58 people dead and hundreds wounded, the system correctly estimated the shooter's actual location—the north wing of the Mandalay Bay hotel. The estimate w

1h

Many African plant species face extinction threat

Analysis speeds up risk assessment – and could aid conservation.

1h

When snakes had legs

Fossil analysis adds more pieces to the evolutionary puzzle.

1h

Sex Promotes Lasting Memories in Female Flies

A protein present in the ejaculate of male fruit flies activates long-term memory formation in the brains of their female partners.

1h

Nato leader identifies space as the next 'operational domain'

Military alliance 'will not put weapons in orbit but has to protect interests of west' Nato is to turn its attention to space as an "operational domain" over concern that enemies of the western military alliance could cause chaos by jamming satellites. Jens Stoltenberg, Nato's secretary general, said there was no question of weapons being deployed but that the alliance had to protect civilian and

1h

Would people be willing to give their personal data for research?

New research led by the University of Bristol has found that over half of people would be willing to donate their personal data for research to benefit the wider general public.

1h

Best of the best: Who makes the most accurate decisions in expert groups?

Experts don't always agree with one another when making predictions or diagnoses. So how can we find out which expert in a group makes the best and most accurate decisions? An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries has developed a simple method for identifying the most accurate exp

1h

New fossils shed light on how snakes got their bite and lost their legs

New fossils of an ancient legged snake, called Najash, shed light on the origin of the slithering reptiles.

1h

Underwater robotic gliders provide key tool to measure ocean sound levels

At a time when ocean noise is receiving increased global attention, researchers at Oregon State University and NOAA have developed an effective method to use an underwater robotic glider to measure sound levels over broad areas of the sea.

1h

When grown right, palm oil can be sustainable

Turning an abandoned pasture into a palm tree plantation can be carbon neutral, according to a new study by EPFL and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL). These findings, based on measurements of 56-year-old palm tree plantations in Colombia, suggest we may be able to find sustainable alternatives to deforestation for the production of palm oil—a practice curre

1h

Vanishing ice puts reindeer herders at risk

Deep in the Sayan Mountains of northern Mongolia, patches of ice rest year-round in the crooks between hills.

1h

Genetic discovery holds implications for better immunity, longer life

Wrinkles on the skin of a microscopic worm might provide the key to a longer, healthier life for humans.

1h

Hubble studies gamma-ray burst with the highest energy ever seen

New observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have investigated the nature of the gamma-ray burst GRB 190114C.

1h

How to make the most of the iPhone 11's ultra-wide camera lens

This shot wasn't possible with the regular iPhone lens, but the extra-wide view lets everything fit in the frame. (Stan Horazek/) For photographers, it's easy to get too excited about a new piece of gear. Once you shell out cash for a fancy new lens, you want to use it all the time, whether it's appropriate or not. Recently, Apple attached a new super-wide-angle lens to its iPhone 11 and iPhone 1

1h

New fossils shed light on how snakes got their bite and lost their legs

New fossils of an ancient legged snake, called Najash, shed light on the origin of the slithering reptiles.

1h

Genetic discovery holds implications for better immunity, longer life

Wrinkles on the skin of a microscopic worm might provide the key to a longer, healthier life for humans.

1h

Why is Same-Sex Sexual Behavior So Common in Animals?

It's long been considered an evolutionary puzzle, but new research suggests this may be the wrong way to think about it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Hubble studies gamma-ray burst with the highest energy ever seen

New observations from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have investigated the nature of the gamma-ray burst GRB 190114C.

1h

AI helps cells pull themselves together

Novel approach could streamline the creation of mini-organs.

1h

The brightest light in the Universe

Telescopes pick up the afterglow of a violent explosion.

1h

DDT may increase diabetes risk for Indian immigrants

Study highlights ongoing threat of prior exposure.

1h

The other use for feathers

Research reveals they make pretty useful armour.

1h

Dr Karl wins prestigious Kalinga Prize

He's been popularising science for almost 40 years.

1h

What happens to the brain when jazz musicians improvise?

Researchers are investigating what happens inside jazz musicians' brains as they improvise music. Although musical improvisation—composing new passages on the spot—is not unique to jazz, it's perhaps the genre's most defining element. While improvised jazz solos are spontaneous, there are rules, says Martin Norgaard, associate professor of music education at Georgia State University. "In tonal ja

2h

Gordon Sondland's Damning—But Delayed—Testimony

Gordon Sondland this morning delivered the most damning congressional testimony against President Donald Trump since that of James Comey, the former FBI director whose firing led to a two-year investigation that consumed Trump's presidency. But Sondland, Trump's ambassador to the European Union, is no Comey, whose seemingly photographic memory and extensive contemporaneous note-taking provided ke

2h

How the Brain Can Rewire Itself After Half of It Is Removed

New scans showed how the brains of people who had a hemisphere removed in childhood continue to function.

2h

Astronomers Detect Record-Breaking Gamma Ray Bursts From Colossal Explosion in Space

A powerful outburst in a distant galaxy produced photons with high enough energies to be detected by ground-based telescopes for the first time

2h

Researchers design an improved pathway to carbon-neutral plastics

Researchers have designed a new and improved system for efficiently converting CO2, water, and renewable energy into ethylene — the precursor to a wide range of plastic products — under neutral conditions.

2h

Emissions from electricity generation lead to premature deaths for some racial groups

Researchers have found that air pollution from electricity generation emissions in 2014 led to about 16,000 premature deaths in the continental US.

2h

DDT linked to higher risk of diabetes among Asian Indian immigrants to US

Previous exposure to the pollutant DDT may contribute to the risk of diabetes among Asian Indian immigrants to the United States, according to a new study.

2h

'Haptic skin' creates virtual sense of touch

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03596-z Researchers design flexible membrane to make virtual reality more tactile.

2h

Geochemical evidence for high volatile fluxes from the mantle at the end of the Archaean

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1745-7 Depletion of Archaean atmospheric xenon in 129Xe relative to the modern atmosphere might indicate that a short burst of mantle activity took place around 2.6 to 2.2 billion years ago.

2h

How a fly's neural compass adapts to an ever-changing world

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03443-1 Two studies in flies reveal the mechanism by which the brain's directional system learns to align information about self-orientation with environmental landmarks — a process crucial for accurate navigation.

2h

NLRP3 inflammasome activation drives tau pathology

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1769-z The authors show that NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in microglia of patients with fronto-temporal dementia and in a mouse model of tau pathology, and that the loss of NLRP3 inflammasome function decreases tau pathology and improves cognition in mice.

2h

Generation of stable heading representations in diverse visual scenes

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1767-1 Two-photon calcium imaging and optogenetic experiments in tethered flying flies, combined with modelling, demonstrate how the correlation of compass and visual neurons underpins plasticity that enables the transformation of visual cues into stable heading representations.

2h

Skin-integrated wireless haptic interfaces for virtual and augmented reality

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1687-0 Interfaces for epidermal virtual reality technology are demonstrated that can communicate by programmable patterns of localized mechanical vibrations.

2h

PGRMC2 is an intracellular haem chaperone critical for adipocyte function

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1774-2 Progesterone receptor membrane component 2 is required to transport haem from the mitochondria to the nucleus, where, in adipose tissue, it has roles in regulation of thermogenesis and glucose metabolism.

2h

A very-high-energy component deep in the γ-ray burst afterglow

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1743-9 Very-high-energy γ-rays observed ten hours after the prompt emission of the γ-ray burst 180720B can be attributed to either an inverse Compton or an extreme synchrotron process.

2h

Genetic predisposition to mosaic Y chromosome loss in blood

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1765-3 A genome-wide association study of mosaic loss of chromosome Y (LOY) in UK Biobank participants identifies 156 genetic determinants of LOY, showing that LOY is associated with cancer and non-haematological health outcomes.

2h

Sensorimotor experience remaps visual input to a heading-direction network

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1772-4 Visual inputs to compass neurons can reorganize over minutes as a fly explores an altered virtual-reality environment.

2h

A new antibiotic selectively kills Gram-negative pathogens

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1791-1

2h

Mechanism of head-to-head MCM double-hexamer formation revealed by cryo-EM

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1768-0 Time-resolved electron microscopy reveals the mechanism by which the origin recognition complex loads pairs of MCM helicases around DNA prior to bidirectional replication.

2h

Podcast: A new antibiotic from nematode guts, grant funding 'lotteries', and butterfly genomes

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03588-z Benjamin Thompson brings you the latest science news.

2h

Longitudinal molecular trajectories of diffuse glioma in adults

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1775-1 The GLASS Consortium studies the evolutionary trajectories of 222 patients with a diffuse glioma to aid in our understanding of tumour progression and treatment failure

2h

Extreme emission seen from γ-ray bursts

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03503-6 Cosmic explosions called γ-ray bursts are the most energetic bursting events in the Universe. Observations of extremely high-energy emission from two γ-ray bursts provide a new way to study these gigantic explosions.

2h

Circular ecDNA promotes accessible chromatin and high oncogene expression

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1763-5 Imaging and sequencing approaches are combined to show that extrachromosomal DNA (ecDNA) in cancer is circular and has unique chromatin structure that amplifies oncogene output.

2h

Molecular tuning of CO2-to-ethylene conversion

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1782-2 Molecular tuning of CO 2 -to-ethylene conversion

2h

Teraelectronvolt emission from the γ-ray burst GRB 190114C

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1750-x Observations of teraelectronvolt-energy γ-rays starting about one minute after the γ-ray burst GRB 190114C reveal a distinct component of the afterglow emission with power comparable to the synchrotron emission.

2h

Caspase-8 is the molecular switch for apoptosis, necroptosis and pyroptosis

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1770-6 The enzymatic activity of caspase-8 controls apoptosis, necroptosis and pyroptosis, and prevents tissue damage during embryonic development and adulthood in mice.

2h

Virtual and augmented reality enhanced by touch

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03506-3 Conventional technologies for virtual and augmented reality simulate interactive experiences through visual and auditory stimuli. A technology that adds sensations of touch could find uses in areas from gaming to prosthetic feedback.

2h

Observation of inverse Compton emission from a long γ-ray burst

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1754-6 A multi-frequency observing campaign of the γ-ray burst GRB 190114C reveals a broadband double-peaked spectral energy distribution, and the teraelectronvolt emission could be attributed to inverse Compton scattering.

2h

Gene expression cartography

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1773-3 A new computational framework, novoSpaRc, leverages single-cell data to reconstruct spatial context for cells and spatial expression across tissues and organisms, on the basis of an organization principle for gene expression.

2h

Artificial skin could be used to make video games more realistic

A synthetic skin could help add the sensation of touch to prosthetic hands or give video games a more realistic feel

2h

Approval of golden rice could finally end vitamin A deficiency deaths

Genetically modified golden rice finally seems set for approval where it is needed to address vitamin A deficiency, but anti-scientific misinformation campaigns continue, says Michael Le Page

2h

Pirelli Designs 5G 'Cyber Tire' That Reports on Road Conditions

Carriers around the world are working to roll out 5G networks, and they hope to connect not just phones but also smart home devices, wearables, and cars. Your next car might have its own 5G connection, and tire-maker Pirelli wants to take advantage of that to make roads safer. It has developed a new sensor-studded tire that reports on road conditions and shares that data with other cars over 5G.

2h

Not so selfish after all — Key role of transposable elements in mammalian evolution

A scientist has revealed a key role for 'selfish' transposable elements in the evolution of the mammary gland, a defining feature of all mammals.

2h

Yeasts in nectar can stimulate the growth of bee colonies

Researchers have found that the presence of yeasts can alter the chemical composition and thus the nutritional value of nectar for pollinators such as bees. Moreover, the study found that yeasts can even boost bee health and colony fitness.

2h

Yellowstone's migrating bison manipulate springtime green-up

In effect, the bison graze with such intensity that they turn back the clock on forage green-up, hitting reset on springtime.

2h

2h

2h

Africa is Splitting in Two, Creating Dozens of Volcanoes

The process of rifting in Africa means that the continent is slowly breaking apart and with that comes lots of volcanoes, some with the potential for massive explosive eruptions.

2h

Astronomers Catch Water Erupting from Plumes on Jupiter's Icy Moon Europa

Astronomers made the first direct measurement of water vapor in Europa's atmosphere. It's the best evidence yet for water plumes erupting from the icy moon.

2h

New Study Estimates How Many Children in Europe Were Born From Adultery

The rates of extra-marital birth are low overall, the study authors find. But they also depend on where you live.

2h

2h

2h

What is Dark Matter Made Of? These Are the Top Candidates

Decades out of the gate, scientists still don't know what makes up the bulk of the universe's matter. But they have some strong contenders.

2h

2h

NASA Instrument Spots Its Brightest X-Ray Burst Ever

A Type I X-ray burst from a star generated a burst of X-rays more extreme than astronomers had ever seen before.

2h

A New, Prehistoric Fossil Sheds Light on How Birds Took to the Skies

The bird's fossil was found with its 3D structure intact — a rare find that helped paleontologists glean insights into the development of flight.

2h

Zoonoses: The Diseases Our Cats and Dogs Give Us

Zoonotic diseases can jump from animals to humans. While it's rare to get infected by our pets, there are a host of pathogens to watch out for.

2h

With a Floating Bead, This Device Makes Truly 3D Holographs

Inspired by old-school TV's, the machine uses ultrasound to move a bead quickly enough to create seamless images.

2h

Ancient Egyptians Didn't Farm Ibises, They Just Mummified Them

The Egyptians mummified millions of ibises as offerings to the god Thoth. Now, scientists look at where all those birds came from.

2h

2h

20 Things You Didn't Know About the Amazon

A forest, a company, a mighty river.

2h

The Pediatrician Who Woke America Up to the Lead Crisis

Thanks to one man's perseverance, we know even small doses of lead can permanently harm growing kids.

2h

How Scientists Are Planning to Grow Food on Other Planets

Growing plants off-world is an essential, and increasingly likely, part of exploring the cosmos.

2h

I Tried to Find What Truth and Beauty Looked Like in My Brain

Advances in brain imaging technology are getting closer to revealing the shape of our thoughts.

2h

Respect Your Elders: How These Plants and Animals Rely On Their Parents

From dolphins to redwoods, species learn from — and rely on — their parents.

2h

Why Babies Are So Cute — And Why We React the Way We Do

Cute kittens, lambs and more stir emotions rooted in our evolutionary history.

2h

Icebergs as a source of nutrients

The importance of icebergs as an important source of nutrients in the polar regions has long been discussed. An international research team has investigated ice samples worldwide. A key result is that only a small part of the glacier ice contaminated with sediment contains large amounts of iron, while the vast majority of clean ice contains very little iron.

2h

Wind more effective than cold air at cooling rooms naturally

The effectiveness of non-mechanical, low-energy methods for moderating temperature and humidity has been evaluated in a series of experiments.

2h

People With Half Their Brain Removed Are Doing Surprisingly Well

One of the greatest marvels of the human brain is neuroplasticity — the ability to restructure itself and adapt if chunks get damaged or removed. Now, a new study reveals that neuroplasticity is more powerful than previously believed. In some cases, adults who had half of their brain taken out as children, in a procedure called a hemispherectomy, are living regular lives — and can have stronger n

2h

Not so selfish after all–Key role of transposable elements in mammalian evolution

A scientist at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has revealed a key role for 'selfish' transposable elements in the evolution of the mammary gland, a defining feature of all mammals.

2h

Researchers discover highest-energy light from a gamma-ray burst

An international team of researchers has observed a gamma-ray burst with an afterglow that featured the highest energy photons — a trillion times more energetic than visible light — ever detected in a burst.

2h

A wirelessly-controlled and wearable skin-integrated haptic VR device

Sensing a hug from your friend through a video call with him/her may become a reality soon. A joint-research team consisted of scientists and engineers from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and Northwestern University in the United States has developed a skin-integrated virtual reality (VR) system, which can be controlled and powered wirelessly. The innovation has great application potential i

2h

3D maps of gene activity

A three-dimensional computer model enables scientists to quickly determine which genes are active in which cells, and their precise location within an organ. A team led by Nikolaus Rajewsky, Berlin, and Nir Friedman, Jerusalem, has published the new method and their insights gained from this in Nature.

2h

Inflammatory processes drive progression of Alzheimer's and other brain diseases

Inflammation drives the progression of neurodegenerative brain diseases and plays a major role in the accumulation of tau proteins within neurons. An international research team led by the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University of Bonn comes to this conclusion in the journal Nature. The results indicate that inflammatory processes represent a potential target for fu

2h

The tera from outer space

Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic phenomenon known to humankind. Although short-lived, they outshine stars and even galactic quasars. They usually display energies in the region of tens of giga-electron-volts, but for the first time, researchers discovered a gamma-ray burst in the region of a tera-electron-volt. This level of energy has long been theorized, and this study demonstrates these

2h

First detection of gamma-ray burst afterglow in very-high-energy gamma light

An international team of researchers observe a gamma-ray burst, an extremely energetic flash following a cosmological cataclysm, emitting very-high-energy gamma-rays long after the initial explosion.

2h

Gamma-ray bursts with record energy

The strongest explosions in the universe produce even more energetic radiation than previously known: Using specialised telescopes, two international teams have registered the highest energy gamma rays ever measured from so-called gamma-ray bursts, reaching about 100 billion times as much energy as visible light. The scientists of the H.E.S.S. and MAGIC telescopes present their observations in ind

2h

'Epidermal VR' gives technology a human touch

Northwestern University researchers have developed a new thin, wireless system that adds a sense of touch to any virtual reality (VR) experience. Not only does this platform potentially add new dimensions to our long-distance relationships and entertainment, the technology also provides prosthetics with sensory feedback and imparts telemedicine with a human touch.

2h

Vicious circles: Ring-shaped DNA provides cancer cells with a malignant twist

UC San Diego researchers describe how circular extrachromosomal DNA in cancer cells boosts aggressiveness and resistance to therapies.

2h

To navigate, flies make flexible mental maps of the world

Flies use visual cues to finesse their mental maps of the environment. Two new studies use virtual reality to show how.

2h

Breaking the limits: Discovery of the highest-energy photons from a gamma-ray burst

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are brief and extremely powerful cosmic explosions, suddenly appearing in the sky, about once per day. They are thought to result from the collapse of massive stars or the merging of neutron stars in distant galaxies. The first GRB detected by the MAGIC telescopes, known as GRB 190114C, reveals for the first time the highest energy photons measured from these objects.

2h

Researchers design an improved pathway to carbon-neutral plastics

Researchers from University of Toronto Engineering and Caltech have designed a new and improved system for efficiently converting CO2, water, and renewable energy into ethylene — the precursor to a wide range of plastic products — under neutral conditions.

2h

Scientists Are Just Beginning to Understand Mysterious DNA Circles Common in Cancer Cells

For years, researchers weren't exactly sure what to make of these extra loops of genetic material . That's quickly changing.

2h

Artificial skin could be used to make video games more realistic

A synthetic skin could help add the sensation of touch to prosthetic hands or give video games a more realistic feel

2h

Hormone clue to snail shells' spiral

An enzyme that makes the male sex hormones has unravelled a fresh clue about how snail shells come to be curly.

2h

Possible meteor outburst this week worth a look up

Scientists are predicting a rare meteor outburst this week that may be brief but incredibly intense.

2h

Astronomers Just Found the Wreckage Cloud From a 1987 Supernova

Stargazing Scientists finally found the cosmic wreckage of a famous supernova that detonated 32 years ago. The remains — from a neutron star that collapsed on itself after exploding — was hidden away in a thick cloud of space dust that Cardiff University astronomers only just pierced with the extremely sensitive ALMA telescope in Chile, according to research published Tuesday in The Astrophysical

2h

Hormone clue to snail shells' spiral

An enzyme that makes the male sex hormones has unravelled a fresh clue about how snail shells come to be curly.

2h

How to Watch the November Democratic Debate

Ten of the top Democratic candidates will be taking the stage in Atlanta at 9 pm Eastern.

2h

New Skin-Like Device Could Bring Touch to Virtual Reality

The lightweight sheets could combine hundreds of vibrating components to create tactile sensations. Layers-of-VR-Skin.jpg The layers of the lightweight device designed to add touch to virtual reality experiences. Image credits: Northwestern University Technology Wednesday, November 20, 2019 – 13:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Imagine a virtual reality system in which you don

2h

Research: DMT's Effects on Brainwaves Could Explain Consciousness

In April, Imperial College London launched the Centre for Psychedelic Research , a first-of-its-kind facility focused on the study of mind-altering substances. While much of that research has centered on psilocybin and LSD, one team out of the Centre recently published a study focused dimethyltryptamine (DMT) , the ingredient that makes the psychoactive brew ayahuasca cause hallucinations — and t

2h

Virtual and mixed reality inferior to traditional learning in anatomy education

A study from McMaster University has shown that traditional ways of learning anatomy remain superior to those that rely on digital media.

2h

3-D maps of gene activity

A three-dimensional computer model enables scientists to quickly determine which genes are active in which cells, and their precise location within an organ. A team led by Nikolaus Rajewsky, Berlin, and Nir Friedman, Jerusalem, has published the new method and their insights gained from this in Nature.

2h

Researchers design an improved pathway to carbon-neutral plastics

Researchers from U of T Engineering and Caltech have designed a new and improved system for efficiently converting CO2, water, and renewable energy into ethylene—the precursor to a wide range of plastic products, from medical devices to synthetic fabrics—under neutral conditions. The device has the potential to offer a carbon-neutral pathway to a commonly used chemical while enhancing storage of w

2h

First detection of the cosmic monster explosions with ground-based gamma-ray telescopes

The strongest explosions in the universe produce even more energetic radiation than previously known: Using specialized telescopes, two international teams have registered the highest energy gamma rays ever measured from so-called gamma-ray bursts, reaching about 100 billion times as much energy as visible light. The scientists of the H.E.S.S. and MAGIC telescopes present their observations in ind

2h

Breaking the limits: Discovery of the highest-energy photons from a gamma-ray burst

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are brief and extremely powerful cosmic explosions, suddenly appearing in the sky, about once per day. They are thought to result from the collapse of massive stars or the merging of neutron stars in distant galaxies. They commence with an initial, very bright flash, called the prompt emission, with a duration ranging from a fraction of a second to hundreds of seconds. The

2h

To navigate, flies make flexible mental maps of the world

In a circular arena, a fruit fly navigates a virtual landscape illuminated by black and blue lights. The fly is tethered in place, able to flap its wings but not move its head. Images on the wall rotate to give the illusion of movement.

2h

Record-Breaking Gamma Rays Reveal Secrets of the Universe's Most Powerful Explosions

Two teams of astronomers using ground-based telescopes to study gamma-ray bursts have detected the highest-energy light ever seen from celestial sources — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Machine learning microscope adapts lighting to improve diagnosis

Engineers have developed a microscope that adapts its lighting angles, colors and patterns while teaching itself the optimal settings needed to complete a given diagnostic task. In the initial proof-of-concept study, the microscope simultaneously developed a lighting pattern and classification system that allowed it to quickly identify red blood cells infected by the malaria parasite more accurate

2h

Icebergs as a source of nutrients

The importance of icebergs as an important source of nutrients in the polar regions has long been discussed. An international research team has investigated ice samples worldwide. A key result is that only a small part of the glacier ice contaminated with sediment contains large amounts of iron, while the vast majority of clean ice contains very little iron.

2h

This humidity digester breathes in atmospheric water and exhales energy

Integrating a super moisture-absorbent gel with light-active materials, researchers have developed a humidity digester to dry the ambient air while generating energy. The method is a green alternative to air conditioners with a trick — pulling water out of thin air.

2h

Walking changes vision

When people walk around, they process visual information differently than at rest: the peripheral visual field shows enhanced processing.

2h

Asking if behavior can be changed on climate crisis

One of the more complex problems facing social psychologists today is whether any intervention can move people to change their behavior about climate change and protecting the environment for the sake of future generations. Now researchers report that an intergenerational reciprocity approach, asking people to reflect on sacrifices made in the past by others for their benefit today, may generate a

2h

Wind more effective than cold air at cooling rooms naturally

The effectiveness of non-mechanical, low-energy methods for moderating temperature and humidity has been evaluated in a series of experiments.

2h

Dog and sheep bones help injured pigeons fly again

Sheep and dog bones can be whittled into orthopedic pins that stabilize pigeons' fractured wings, helping the fractures to heal properly without follow-up surgery. Researchers describe the treatment, which is cheaper and more efficient than using metal pins for pigeon rehabilitative surgeries.

2h

A decade after the predators have gone, Galapagos Island finches are still being spooked

On some of the Galapagos Islands where human-introduced predators of Darwin's finches were eradicated over a decade ago, the finches are still acting as though they are in danger, according to research.

2h

Big star energy: record-breaking explosion recorded

Astronomers note record-breaking observation of highest energy ever measured from gamma ray bursts When gigantic stars run out of fuel they collapse under their own gravity and, in a last hurrah, send out a blast of light and matter in the most violent known explosions in the universe. Now astronomers have discovered that these cataclysmic events, known as gamma ray bursts, release roughly twice

2h

We've detected the most powerful gamma-ray bursts on record

A new pair of gamma-ray bursts includes one that was 1 trillion times more powerful than visible light.

2h

2h

3-D maps of gene activity

A three-dimensional computer model enables scientists to quickly determine which genes are active in which cells, and their precise location within an organ. A team led by Nikolaus Rajewsky, Berlin, and Nir Friedman, Jerusalem, has published the new method and their insights gained from this in Nature.

2h

To navigate, flies make flexible mental maps of the world

In a circular arena, a fruit fly navigates a virtual landscape illuminated by black and blue lights. The fly is tethered in place, able to flap its wings but not move its head. Images on the wall rotate to give the illusion of movement.

2h

Esports Gamers Experience the Same Stress as Pro Athletes

In the first study of its kind, researchers interviewed seven elite players of *Counter-Strike: Global Offensive*.

2h

Missing Brain Hemisphere Tied to Fortified Neural Networks

A small study finds that patients who had half their brains removed to treat epilepsy have stronger neural networks than controls, perhaps explaining how they can retain language and cognition skills.

2h

Record-Breaking Gamma Rays Reveal Secrets of the Universe's Most Powerful Explosions

Two teams of astronomers using ground-based telescopes to study gamma-ray bursts have detected the highest-energy light ever seen from celestial sources — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Researchers identify a molecular mechanism involved in Huntington's disease

Researchers from the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UBNeuro) and the August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS) described a mechanism, the increase of proteinaceous synthesis, which takes part in the degeneration of the type of neurons that are affected in Huntington's disease, a genetic neurodegenerative disease.

2h

Probing the role of an inflammation resolution sensor in obesity and heart failure

After heart attack injury, ALX/FPR2 is activated by resolvin D1 in immune cells in the spleen and in immune cells at the heart attack site. This speeds expedited resolution of the heart attack injury. Researchers now have used mice that completely lack ALX/FPR2 to learn more about the pathways this resolution sensor uses to target inflammation. Such knowledge will help in finding treatments to del

2h

Marie Kondo Goes Full Goop

Marie Kondo has had a few bouts of American fame. Around 2015, the Japanese cleaning guru's best-selling book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up inspired untold closet clean-outs and garage declutterings. In 2019, her Netflix series, Tidying Up With Marie Kondo , performed a similar trick, emptying overstuffed American homes by teaching their harried owners her joy-prioritizing "KonMari" metho

2h

Pompeo Can't Escape

This article was updated at 2 p.m. Mike Pompeo tried to stay out of it. He tried to block certain State Department officials from testifying in the House impeachment inquiry. He didn't admit for days that he had listened in on the phone call at the heart of that inquiry, in which President Donald Trump asked Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate a domestic political rival. He's re

2h

2h

Aquatic Rover Goes for a Drive Under the Ice

submitted by /u/Galileos_grandson [link] [comments]

2h

The Future of Work: A VICE Special Report (Full Episode)

submitted by /u/2noame [link] [comments]

2h

The Future Of Work.

submitted by /u/onlyartist6 [link] [comments]

2h

2h

How Scientists Grew Perfect New Lungs in Mouse Embryos

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

2h

Dear Fossil Fuels: It's Over

submitted by /u/patriceac [link] [comments]

2h

2h

2h

Can A.I. ever replace human doctors? Health tech experts weigh in

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

2h

2h

2h

'Designer babies' could be just two years away, expert claims

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

2h

2h

Genomes Sequenced for Every US and Canada Butterfly

Researchers analyzed more than 800 species.

2h

Outback telescope captures Milky Way center, discovers remnants of dead stars

A radio telescope in the Western Australian outback has captured a spectacular new view of the center of the galaxy in which we live, the Milky Way. The image from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) telescope shows what our galaxy would look like if human eyes could see radio waves.

3h

Brain scans reveal how the human brain compensates when one hemisphere is removed

Researchers studying six adults who had one of their brain hemispheres removed during childhood to reduce epileptic seizures found that the remaining half of the brain formed unusually strong connections between different functional brain networks, which potentially help the body to function as if the brain were intact.

3h

Malaria discovery could lead to better HIV and lupus treatments

A discovery about how the immune system responds to malaria infection could lead to better treatments for hepatitis C, HIV and lupus, say researchers. The research team showed, in laboratory models, that strong inflammatory signals caused by malaria infection activate molecules that trigger the production of highly potent antibodies to fight the disease.

3h

Pediatric behavioral health care integration shows promise

A new study finds that, in the first year and a half of the program, children with mental health diagnoses who were served by the TEAM UP sites went for more primary care visits than similar children served by nearby non-participating community health centers.

3h

The good side of carbon monoxide

Most people think of carbon monoxide as harmful, and with good reason—the colorless, odorless gas sends 50,000 people in the U.S. to hospitals each year when their furnaces malfunction or car engines run in poorly ventilated spaces. But at low concentrations, carbon monoxide has a beneficial side that scientists are trying to harness to treat diseases, according to an article in Chemical & Enginee

3h

Virtual and mixed reality inferior to traditional learning in anatomy education

The McMaster study compared an MR model (Microsoft HoloLens) and a VR model (HTC VIVE) derived from a physical model to the actual model. The researchers focused on overall learning performance and the effects of stereopsis by using a strategy where the non-dominant eye was covered in one test condition.

3h

BrainStorm Cell Tx publishes NurOwn ALS Phase 2 randomized trial data in neurology

Results from Brainstorm Cell Therapeutic's NurOwn randomized Phase 2 clinical trial were published in Neurology. The study demonstrated a single transplantation of MSC-NTF cells (NurOwn®) in ALS clinical trial participants met the primary safety endpoint and demonstrated promising stabilization of ALS disease progression of up to 12-16 weeks in a pre-specified subgroup of ALS rapid progressors. Ce

3h

Bot can beat humans in multiplayer hidden-role games

MIT researchers have developed a bot equipped with artificial intelligence that can beat human players in tricky online multiplayer games where player roles and motives are kept secret.

3h

70% of teens surveyed engaged with food and beverage brands on social media in 2017

70% of teens surveyed report engaging with food and beverage brands on social media and 35 percent engaged with at least five brands, according to a new study from the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity. The study found that 93% of the brands that teens reported engaging with on social media were fast food, unhealthy snack foods, candy, and sugary drinks, which are primarily the brands

3h

A giant, superfast AI chip is being used to find better cancer drugs

A new generation of specialized hardware could make drug development and material discovery orders of magnitude faster.

3h

Turning up the heat to create new nanostructured metals

Scientists have developed a new approach for making metal-metal composites and porous metals with a 3-D interconnected "bicontinuous" structure in thin films at size scales ranging from tens of nanometers to microns. Metallic materials with this sponge-like morphology—characterized by two coexisting phases that form interpenetrating networks continuing over space—could be useful in catalysis, ener

3h

Steep momentum gradients play a major role in coastal precipitation

Steep gradients of wind stress and potential temperature enable sustainable nearshore precipitation systems along the western coastal region of Korea, according to Prof. Dong-In Lee, lead scientist at the Group of Environmental Atmospheric Research (GEAR), Pukyong National University, and one of the authors of a recently published study.

3h

Machine learning microscope adapts lighting to improve diagnosis

Engineers at Duke University have developed a microscope that adapts its lighting angles, colors and patterns while teaching itself the optimal settings needed to complete a given diagnostic task.

3h

Non-invasive microscopy detects activation state and distinguishes between cell types

Most analytical methods in biology require invasive procedures to analyze samples, which leads to irreversible changes or even their destruction. Furthermore, the sensitivity of such approaches often stems from the averaging of signals generated by a large number of cells, making it impossible to study the underlying heterogeneity of responses.

3h

Kids are healthier after green school bus makeovers

Relatively inexpensive engine retrofits for school buses can improve not only students' health but also their academic performance, according to new research. Every year, car manufacturers roll out new models with sleek styling, improved safety features, and better fuel economy. Yet there's one vehicle on the road that has remained almost unchanged since the 1970s: the yellow school bus. "…school

3h

To Make Robots Perform Better, Make Them Constantly Fear Death

Introducing Consequences For too long, robots have had it too easy, and it's starting to show. To get these freeloading bots back to work, neuroscientists from University of Southern California suggest programming them to fear death. By forcing robots to operate in terms of self-preservation — in addition to whatever other tasks they were assigned — the scientists suggest that they'll make better

3h

European data law is impeding studies on diabetes and Alzheimer's, researchers warn

Researchers share frustrations with GDPR privacy regulations at seminar in Brussels

3h

Daily briefing: Why some research agencies are awarding grants by lottery

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03590-5 Science funders gamble on good ideas, researchers sequence a "complete butterfly continent" and how the first two objects from interstellar space are upending astronomy.

3h

Trump's Justice Department Wants to Change the Movie Industry

One of the most pivotal moments in Hollywood history came in 1948, not on a soundstage or in a cinema, but at the Supreme Court, via a case known as United States v. Paramount Pictures, Inc . In a 7–1 decision, the Court ruled that film studios couldn't legally own their own theaters, disrupting a system by which major distributors had controlled every level of the moviegoing experience. That ver

3h

Researchers shed light on modulation of thermal bleaching of coral reefs by internal waves

Coral reefs around the world are threatened by pan-tropical bleaching events that occur when the surrounding sea water temperatures increase due to ongoing climate change and extreme conditions like El Niño. However, patterns of bleaching occurrence can be very difficult to predict, especially across water depths. Currently, most coral bleaching predictions are based on surface estimates of seawat

3h

Turning up the heat to create new nanostructured metals

The metallic thin films with 3-D interlocking nanostructures could be used in catalysis, energy storage, and biomedical sensing.

3h

New hybrid device can both capture and store solar energy

Researchers have reported a new device that can both efficiently capture solar energy and store it until it is needed, offering promise for applications ranging from power generation to distillation and desalination.

3h

A new link between migraines, opioid overuse may be key to treating pain

Researchers have discovered that a peptide links together migraine pain and pain induced by opioid overuse.

3h

AmpliFi Alien Wi-Fi 6 Router Beams To Earth With Touch Screen Display

It seems as though mesh Wi-Fi routers are all the rage these days, but AmpliFi is going a taking a slightly different approach with its new Alien router. At first glance, you can tell that …

3h

The Media's Coverage of AI is Bogus

Claims that machine learning can predict sexuality, psychosis and more are greatly overblown — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Professor Claims to Have Discovered Insect-Like Life on Mars

On Tuesday, insect experts from across the United States gathered in St. Louis, Missouri, for the Entomological Society of America's annual meeting — and when Ohio University Professor Emeritus William Romoser got a chance to address his peers, he made a shocking claim. "There has been and still is life on Mars," Romoser said in a press release about his presentation. The only problem: his eviden

3h

3h

An Origami Artist Shows How to Fold Ultra-Realistic Creatures

Robert Lang ditched a career as a physicist to pursue origami full time. In WIRED's latest video, he reveals the tricks to folding complex shapes.

3h

Academics call for targeted healthcare for pregnant women and new mums with depression

Pregnant women and new mothers who experience depression need improved healthcare say academics.

3h

Addressing challenges in inter-rater reliability in traditional chinese medicine

Diagnostic agreement between practitioners is an ongoing challenge in the evaluation of Traditional Chinese Medicine and other healthcare systems that rely on constitutional types.

3h

Researchers identify new gene mutation in familial thyroid cancers

Researchers from Penn State College of Medicine identified a new gene mutation that may cause a type of familial thyroid cancer. Dr. Darrin Bann, an otolaryngology resident at the College of Medicine and lead author of the study, said that this mutation is the first and only mutation associated with familial thyroid cancer to be identified in a gene that is primarily expressed in the thyroid gland

3h

The Media's Coverage of AI is Bogus

Claims that machine learning can predict sexuality, psychosis and more are greatly overblown — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

The Architect of Modern Algorithms

Good code has both substance and style. It provides all necessary information, without extraneous details. It bypasses inefficiencies and bugs. It is accurate, succinct and eloquent enough to be read and understood by humans. But by the late 1960s, advances in computing power had outpaced the abilities of programmers. Many computer scientists created programs without thought for design. They wrot

3h

NASA Will Test Beautiful Spaceship That Looks Like Space Shuttle

Dream Chaser Space company Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) is developing the "Dream Chaser," a sleek reusable spacecraft that's meant to shuttle cargo to and from the International Space Station and beyond — and it looks like a sleek version of the space agency's classic Space Shuttle. A test version of the spacecraft's 15-foot cargo module, called "Shooting Star," is already on its way to NASA's

3h

Pigeons with broken wings get patched up with dog and sheep bones

Pigeons with broken wing bones could take to the skies again once their fracture was set using lightweight splints made from dog or sheep bones

3h

Machine learning microscope adapts lighting to improve diagnosis

Engineers at Duke University have developed a microscope that adapts its lighting angles, colors and patterns while teaching itself the optimal settings needed to complete a given diagnostic task. In the initial proof-of-concept study, the microscope simultaneously developed a lighting pattern and classification system that allowed it to quickly identify red blood cells infected by the malaria par

4h

R.I. researchers, policymakers outline new framework for opioid use disorder treatment

Aiming to reduce treatment gaps and guide state policy, a diverse set of voices from Brown University and the State of Rhode Island developed a cascade of care model for opioid use disorder.

4h

Chinese infiltration of US labs caught science agencies off guard

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03584-3 China has diverted US government funds to bolster its military and economic aims, a US Senate panel says.

4h

Pigeons with broken wings get patched up with dog and sheep bones

Pigeons with broken wing bones could take to the skies again once their fracture was set using lightweight splints made from dog or sheep bones

4h

Gordon Sondland Is Aiming Right at Trump's Achilles' Heel

Nothing about Gordon Sondland's handling of the Ukraine affair—either as the ambassador to the European Union or as a witness in the impeachment inquiry—has appeared methodical or subtle. But in his testimony today , Sondland seems to have found his sense of care. Systematically but consistently, he is undermining all of the pillars of President Donald Trump's defense that he did not extort polit

4h

The Best Parenting Advice Is to Go Live in Europe

Pity the American children: No one is writing books about how great they are. Instead, praise has lately been reserved for kids overseas, who—according to a profusion of books and articles in the past decade—possess deep stores of resourcefulness and resilience, those sought-after traits that allegedly set kids up for a lifetime of contentment, or at least success. These thriving children develop

4h

Yeasts in nectar can stimulate the growth of bee colonies

Researchers from KU Leuven have found that the presence of yeasts can alter the chemical composition and thus the nutritional value of nectar for pollinators such as bees. Moreover, the study found that yeasts can even boost bee health and colony fitness. "Research into the role of microbes in our ecosystem is of vital importance to safeguard bees."

4h

Innovative hearing protection may protect military working dogs

Military working dogs played a vital role in the recent raid and death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi; however, temporary and permanent hearing loss due to high-decibel noise in training, transport and operations put these animals at risk. Now, thanks to an Army small business innovation program, canines may have new gear to protect their ears.

4h

New take on same-sex behavior in animals asks 'why not?'

It's time to reframe the question from "why do animals engage in same-sex behavior" to "why not?" researchers argue in a new article. Over the years, scientists have recorded same-sex sexual behavior in more than 1,500 animal species, from snow geese to common toads. And for just as long evolutionary biologists studying these behaviors have grappled with what has come to be known as a "Darwinian

4h

Mexican 'smart city' would be 100% energy efficient, self-sustaining

An Italian architecture firm has proposed a sustainable city for Mexico. The plans call for a 100 percent self-sufficient metropolis, with renewable energy, Venetian canals, and endless green space. This design is one of many "smart city" proposals as of late that point to a new form of urbanism. Imagine a city that manages to combine nature and technology harmoniously, a self-sustaining metropol

4h

Study examines Appalachian Kentucky's breast cancer care disparities

Despite the benefits of breast reconstruction, women from Appalachia are less likely to have the surgery than non-Appalachian Kentuckians, according to a new study by the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center.

4h

Wind more effective than cold air at cooling rooms naturally

The effectiveness of non-mechanical, low-energy methods for moderating temperature and humidity has been evaluated in a series of experiments by researchers from the University of Cambridge.

4h

Pregnant women with eating disorders and their children run higher risk of complications

Pregnant women with eating disorders should undergo extended pregnancy screenings considering their increased risk of complications. That is the conclusion from a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. The researchers were, for example, able to show that children to mothers with eating disorders had an increased risk of premature birth and

4h

Gunshot survivors report long-term physical, mental consequences

Survivors of gunshot wounds reported negative outcomes years after being shot in this observational study. The study included about 180 gunshot wound survivors who were patients at an urban trauma center and who were surveyed by telephone up to 10 years following injury.

4h

Dog and sheep bones help injured pigeons fly again

Sheep and dog bones can be whittled into orthopedic pins that stabilize pigeons' fractured wings, helping the fractures to heal properly without follow-up surgery. Researchers describe the treatment, which is cheaper and more efficient than using metal pins for pigeon rehabilitative surgeries, Nov. 20, 2019 in the journal Heliyon.

4h

This humidity digester breathes in atmospheric water and exhales energy

Integrating a super moisture-absorbent gel with light-active materials, researchers in Singapore have developed a humidity digester to dry the ambient air while generating energy. The method, presented Nov. 20 in the journal Joule, is a green alternative to air conditioners with a trick — pulling water out of thin air.

4h

Machine, meet stem cells

Scientists at Gladstone Institutes, in collaboration with researchers at Boston University, have used a computational model to learn how to coax stem cells into forming new arrangements, including those that might eventually be useful in generating personalized organs.

4h

Yeasts in nectar can stimulate the growth of bee colonies

Researchers from KU Leuven have found that the presence of yeasts can alter the chemical composition and thus the nutritional value of nectar for pollinators such as bees. Moreover, the study found that yeasts can even boost bee health and colony fitness. "Research into the role of microbes in our ecosystem is of vital importance to safeguard bees."

4h

Innovative hearing protection may protect military working dogs

Military working dogs played a vital role in the recent raid and death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi; however, temporary and permanent hearing loss due to high-decibel noise in training, transport and operations put these animals at risk. Now, thanks to an Army small business innovation program, canines may have new gear to protect their ears.

4h

Motorized bikes are set to hit national forests

Trails on public lands have so far been a safe haven from motorized bikes. But that's poised to change now. (Galen Crout/Unspla/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life The national forests around California's Lake Tahoe are the latest flashpoint in the debate over how land and wildlife managers treat electric bikes, also called "e-bikes," on public land. Historically, e-bikes were consid

4h

Government integrity holds key to tackling corporate corruption—study

Government leaders must set a good example to the business community if they want to eliminate corporate corruption, a new study reveals.

4h

Want more women and minorities in STEM? Address social oppression in the classroom, says new research

Ninety-nine percent of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) jobs in the U.S. require some form of postsecondary education. Yet, degree holders in science and engineering fields remain predominantly White and male. This results in the exclusion of a large portion of the U.S. workforce which consists of 29% underrepresented minorities, 46.9% women and 16.9% immigrants—from participating

4h

"Like Horoscope Readings!": The Scammy World of DNA Test Startups

In the spring of 2017, a college student named Mary spit into a tube and sent it to the DNA testing company Ancestry, which analyzed it and sent back a breakdown of her family history. But Mary wanted to know more. The human genome contains, in theory, an extraordinary wealth of pre-programmed information about who we are and who we might become: whether she was at risk for the same types of canc

4h

Here's What Should Disqualify Michael Bloomberg

Michael Bloomberg says he is sorry. On Sunday, amid preparations for a presidential bid, the billionaire appeared at a black church in Brooklyn and apologized for stop-and-frisk, a method of policing that he championed as mayor of New York City, a method he defended even as evidence emerged that it intruded on and inconvenienced millions of innocent people, humiliating many. "The police are stopp

4h

Britain's Meh Election

It is the most important vote of our lives , the host of the first live TV debate of Britain's general campaign said last night. And for once, it wasn't pure hyperbole. There is little doubt that Britain is facing a seismic choice over its future in the December 12 poll—not just whether and how to leave the European Union, but also on the even more fundamental question of what type of country it

4h

PM2.5 Air Pollution Is Still Killing Thousands of People in the US

Particulate matter steals lives through dementia, kidney disease, and hypertension—even when the air quality is within the permitted levels.

4h

Successful study of Swedish vaccine candidate against diarrhea

University of Gothenburg reports first successful results of the oral, inactivated vaccine candidate ETVAX against enterotoxigenic E. coli diarrhea in a placebo-controlled phase I/II study in infants and children from 6 months to 5 years of age in Bangladesh.

4h

A creative solution for the water crisis in Flint, Michigan | LaToya Ruby Frazier

Artist LaToya Ruby Frazier spent five months living in Flint, Michigan, documenting the lives of those affected by the city's water crisis for her photo essay "Flint is Family." As the crisis dragged on, she realized it was going to take more than a series of photos to bring relief. In this inspiring, surprising talk, she shares the creative lengths she went to in order to bring free, clean water

4h

Machine-learning approach helps discover new ways of controlling spatial organization of induced pluripotent stem cells

Model organs grown from patients' own cells may one day revolutionize how diseases are treated. A person's cells, coaxed into heart, lung, liver, or kidney in the lab, could be used to better understand their disease or test whether drugs are likely to help them. But this future relies on scientists' ability to form complex tissues from stem cells, a challenging undertaking.

4h

Dog and sheep bones help injured pigeons fly again

Sheep and dog bones can be whittled into orthopedic pins that stabilize pigeons' fractured wings, helping the fractures to heal properly without follow-up surgery. Researchers describe the treatment, which is cheaper and more efficient than using metal pins for pigeon rehabilitative surgeries, November 20th in the journal Heliyon.

4h

Machine-learning approach helps discover new ways of controlling spatial organization of induced pluripotent stem cells

Model organs grown from patients' own cells may one day revolutionize how diseases are treated. A person's cells, coaxed into heart, lung, liver, or kidney in the lab, could be used to better understand their disease or test whether drugs are likely to help them. But this future relies on scientists' ability to form complex tissues from stem cells, a challenging undertaking.

4h

Dog and sheep bones help injured pigeons fly again

Sheep and dog bones can be whittled into orthopedic pins that stabilize pigeons' fractured wings, helping the fractures to heal properly without follow-up surgery. Researchers describe the treatment, which is cheaper and more efficient than using metal pins for pigeon rehabilitative surgeries, November 20th in the journal Heliyon.

4h

Scientists Place Humans in "Suspended Animation" for First Time

A team of doctors at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have placed humans in "suspended animation" for the first time as part of a trial that could enable health professionals to fix traumatic injuries such as a gunshot or stab wound that would otherwise end in death, according to a New Scientist exclusive . Suspended animation — or "emergency preservation resuscitation," in medical p

4h

A massive experiment in Taiwan aims to reveal landslides' surprising effect on the climate

Landslides are reactors for chemical weathering that can both draw down and emit carbon

4h

Icebergs as a source of nutrients

Sea creatures, whether large or small, need nutrients. The supply mechanism delivering these nutrients is very different in different parts of the ocean, there are nutrient-rich coastal areas, but also very nutrient-poor regions in the open ocean. In some areas, the lack of iron in seawater limits plankton growth. These include much of the polar oceans. Here, icebergs appear to be an important sou

4h

Uber to let users record audio of rides in Brazil, Mexico

Uber will let passengers and drivers record audio of their rides in an attempt to improve its safety record.

5h

5h

Vandselskab: Urenset drikkevand er »en Morten Korch-forestilling om Danmark«

PLUS. Hvorfor dog ikke tillade alle at rense drikkevand med f.eks. aktivt kul, spørger Hjørring Vandselskab. Det har selskabet spurgt om før, men i takt med de flere pesticidfund kan det i stadigt højere grad betale sig. En professor bakker op, men Danva er imod.

5h

'Self-cleaning' concrete could keep buildings looking new

Building materials that clean themselves could save immense time and labor in homes and businesses, as well as reduce disease risk in settings such as hospitals. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a new type of concrete that is strong, heat-insulating and soundproof—and best of all, liquids like milk and coffee bounce right off of it, taking dust particles w

5h

Soft skin-like robots you can put in your pocket

Stretchable skin-like robots that can be rolled up and put in your pocket have been developed by a University of Bristol team using a new way of embedding artificial muscles and electrical adhesion into soft materials.

5h

College students may get health benefits from less than one extra hour of sleep

In a study led by Penn State, researchers found that when asked to extend their sleep, college students were able to get an additional 43 minutes of sleep per night on average. They also experienced less sleepiness during the day and had lower blood pressure.

5h

Government integrity holds key to tackling corporate corruption — study

Government leaders must set a good example to the business community if they want to eliminate corporate corruption, a new study reveals.

5h

New report: The impact of energy booms on local workers

A new IZA World of Labor report publishing today finds energy booms create a broad set of benefits for local workers in the short term including lower unemployment and higher wages. But there are externalities to consider and the long term picture is less clear.

5h

Asking if behavior can be changed on climate crisis

One of the more complex problems facing social psychologists today is whether any intervention can move people to change their behavior about climate change and protecting the environment for the sake of future generations. Now Hanne Melgård Watkins at UMass Amherst and Geoffrey Goodwin at the UPenn report that an intergenerational reciprocity approach, asking people to reflect on sacrifices made

5h

Suicides reduced by 17 per cent in new collaborative prevention programme

A new suicide prevention programme which includes swift access to specialist care and 12 months of telephone follow-ups has shown to reduce deaths by 17 per cent. The programme, called Suicide Prevention by Monitoring and Collaborative Care (SUPREMOCOL) brought together care services and key community agencies to create a cohesive network who worked together with the aim of diminishing preventable

5h

Researchers find long-term benefits of nurse home visits for new mothers and infants

Home visits by nurses to check on infants and first-time mothers offer learning benefits for the children and savings in the cost of public welfare programs, according to new research published in December 2019 issue of the journal Pediatrics. The studies follow up on families 18 years after they participated in the nurse-visit program and they compare outcomes for those families with control grou

5h

Slowing down: Is aging caused by decreased cellular metabolism?

Throughout history, humans have been obsessed with finding a way to prevent aging and prolong life. Although the mechanisms have long eluded us, modern science is revealing more and more about the aging process. Now, researchers from Japan have uncovered new information about the genetic processes that may trigger age-related disorders, including low energy production and low cellular growth.

5h

The Most Useful App is Find My Friends

Updated at 11:00 a.m. ET on November 20, 2019. You simply can't get around New York without GPS. I know this is not literally true because generations of people did it, but it is true for me: I bought my first smartphone in 2014, my first summer in the city, solely for Google Maps. And a year ago, I convinced my friends to share their locations with me " indefinitely " in Apple's Find My Friends

5h

Slowing down: Is aging caused by decreased cellular metabolism?

Throughout history, humans have been obsessed with finding a way to prevent aging and prolong life. Although the mechanisms have long eluded us, modern science is revealing more and more about the aging process. Now, researchers from Japan have uncovered new information about the genetic processes that may trigger age-related disorders, including low energy production and low cellular growth.

5h

Humans put into suspended animation for first time

Groundbreaking trial in US rapidly cools trauma victims with catastrophic injury to buy more time for surgery Doctors have put humans into a state of suspended animation for the first time in a groundbreaking trial that aims to buy more time for surgeons to save seriously injured patients. The process involves rapidly cooling the brain to less than 10C by replacing the patient's blood with ice-co

5h

Mental Illness Behind Bars: The Hard Lessons of Orleans Parish

Colby Crawford's death in jail in 2016 shows what can happen to inmates with mental illness who rattle around in a broken system. And there are many. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, every year in the United States 2 million people with serious mental illness are booked into jails.

5h

Want more women & minorities in STEM? Address social oppression in the classroom, says new research

Study shows a community college program that integrates students' experiences of social oppression into the class as students' develop social entrepreneurship ventures was effective at strengthening entrepreneurial and STEM skills of the students?largely women, minorities and immigrants

5h

Icebergs as a source of nutrients

The importance of icebergs as an important source of nutrients in the polar regions has long been discussed. An international research team led by GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel has investigated ice samples worldwide. A key result is that only a small part of the glacier ice contaminated with sediment contains large amounts of iron, while the vast majority of clean ice contains ve

5h

Designer lens helps see the big picture

An innovative optical component and a reconstruction algorithm provide more detailed images.

5h

Researchers develop new database of druggable fusion targets

By analyzing over a million nucleic acid sequences from publicly available data, a team of researchers has identified 111,582 fusions in eight species (human, mouse, rat, fruit-fly, wild boar, zebrafish, yeast and cattle). The latest and most up-to-date version of their database, known as ChiTaRS, will be extremely useful to clinicians specializing in complex diseases, particularly, cancers, Alzhe

5h

Ensembling improves machine learning model performance

Ensembles created using models submitted to the RSNA Pediatric Bone Age Machine Learning Challenge convincingly outperformed single-model prediction of bone age, according to a study.

5h

Volkswagen is putting this cool electric station wagon into production

It is the latest concept to show off the VW's modular electric platform.

5h

The Two Most Important Sentences of the Impeachment Hearings

"Everyone was in the loop. It was no secret." Those are the two most important sentences in today's opening statement by Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union. Sondland's public testimony was the most hotly anticipated of the impeachment inquiry, and even before Sondland uttered a word this morning, he'd lived up to his billing. In a blistering statement, Sondland testified t

5h

Ny fejl tillader Android-apps at tage billeder og filme uden tilladelse

I værste tilfælde kan apps tage billeder og filme fra brugerens Android-enhed, trække GPS-koordinater fra filerne og overføre allerede eksisterende billeder og video fra enhedens SD-kort til appens ejere. Alt sammen uden at telefonens ejer har givet tilladelse til det eller ved, at det foregår.

5h

5h

Lake Erie provides drinking water for more people than any other, but algae blooms are making it toxic

Every year, an explosion of microscopic life reigns over western Lake Erie, forming a green slick of algae and bacteria so massive and vibrant that it can be seen from space.

5h

In the Great Lakes' most productive fishing grounds, dead zones are eroding livelihoods

From his lakefront dock in Crystal Rock, 70 miles west of Cleveland, Dean Koch still gleefully reminisces on his career as a commercial fisherman in the heyday.

5h

Italy's plan to create €300-million research agency draws fire

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03561-w Scientists say they haven't been consulted on a proposal to create another national research organization.

5h

In the Great Lakes' most productive fishing grounds, dead zones are eroding livelihoods

From his lakefront dock in Crystal Rock, 70 miles west of Cleveland, Dean Koch still gleefully reminisces on his career as a commercial fisherman in the heyday.

5h

Why Good Teachers Are Like Pokémon

A science professor's journey through the three levels of pedagogical wisdom.

5h

Starlings Fly in Flocks So Dense They Look Like Sculptures

Photographer Xavi Bou condenses several seconds of movement into a single frame, showing the birds' flight—and fight.

5h

How Scientists Grew Perfect New Lungs in Mouse Embryos

Unless you or a loved one are a smoker, lung health probably never got on your radar. But the recent spike in deadly vaping-related lung diseases—some requiring lung transplants—make it clear: as a society, we're woefully ill-equipped to handle any sort of outbreak that damages our lungs. Unfortunately, the health crisis isn't going away. Vaping aside, as dangerous air quality becomes increasingl

5h

Slår ur gener i jakten på bättre malariamedicin

Malaria sprids via myggbett då parasiter överförs med myggans blodmål från en smittad person till en frisk. Sjukdomen är en stor dräpare, och årligen avlider mer än 400 000 människor i malaria. För första gången har nu forskare på ett systematiskt vis analyserat malariaparasiten Plasmodiums olika livsfaser. – Det vi har gjort är att slå ut olika gener för att förstå vad de har för betydelse, säger

5h

Walking changes vision

When people walk around, they process visual information differently than at rest: the peripheral visual field shows enhanced processing. This is what neuroscientists in Würzburg have discovered.

5h

Artyom Yurov, IKBFU physicist: 'Can quantum effects occur at mega-scale?'

Quantum physics is, perhaps, the most amazing phenomenon known to people. When scientists started studying atoms for the first time, they noticed that everything works 'upside down' in the microcosm.

5h

'Self-cleaning' concrete could keep buildings looking new (video)

Building materials that clean themselves could save immense time and labor in homes and businesses, as well as reduce disease risk in settings such as hospitals. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have made a new type of concrete that is strong, heat-insulating and soundproof — and best of all, liquids like milk and coffee bounce right off of it, taking dust particle

5h

Photoinitiators detected in human breast milk

Photoinitators (PIs) are compounds used in the ink of many types of food packaging. The substances have been shown to migrate into food and, when consumed, show up in human blood serum. Now, for the first time, researchers report they have detected PIs in human breast milk, although they say the levels consumed by breastfeeding infants are unlikely to be a health concern. The report appears in ACS

5h

Slowing down — Is aging caused by decreased cellular metabolism?

University of Tsukuba researchers have uncovered new information regarding the effects of impaired expression of the gene SHMT2 in genetically modified mice. They found that suppression of SHMT2 expression of SHMT2 altered activity in metabolic pathways, which in turn inhibited growth and impaired mitochondrial respiration, which is a critical cellular function that has been linked to human aging

5h

Scientists developed a method for studying the structure of self-organizing materials

An international group of scientists with IKBFU professor Anatoliy Snigirev among them has published an article that proposes a new method for studying the structure of complexly organized materials of both artificial and natural origin.

5h

New IOF-ESCEO position paper offers practical guidance for osteoporosis management

The position paper summarizes the 2018 'European guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women' in an international setting, with a focus on the categorisation of risk as a strategy to target therapeutic interventions. Algorithms illustrate possible decision pathways for the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, based on the absolute risk of fracture (FRAX®

5h

Loyola researchers recommend increased medical sideline coverage for HS football

Researchers at Loyola Medicine recently completed a follow-up study to reassess the state of medical sideline coverage during football games and practices at the 99 Chicago public high schools. The team is led by Nathaniel Jones, MD, sports medicine specialist, who collaborated with Pietro Tonino, MD, Chief of Sports Medicine, who published a similar study in 2003.

5h

Cell-tracking pipeline reveals how motor circuits are built

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03492-6 A sophisticated imaging pipeline has been developed to track neurons in early-stage zebrafish embryos over time and space. It reveals how newborn neurons come together to build a spinal cord capable of locomotion.

5h

How To Deal With Machine Learning Papers

Here's a very useful article in JAMA on how to read an article that uses machine learning to propose a diagnostic model. It's especially good for that topic, but it's also worth going over for the rest of us who may not be diagnosing patients but who would like to evaluate new papers that claim an interesting machine-learning result. I would definitely recommend reading it, and also this one on a

5h

Coating lets toilets clean themselves and save water

A new coating effectively makes self-cleaning toilets while also cutting the amount of water in each flush, researchers report. Every day, more than 141 billion liters of water are used just to flush toilets. The new method dramatically reduces the amount of water needed to flush a conventional toilet, which usually requires six liters. "Our team has developed a robust bio-inspired, liquid, sludg

5h

A Team Approach to Tackling the Psychology Replication Crisis

A study on facial judgment is the first conducted through the Psychological Science Accelerator, a global network of more than 500 labs across about 70 countries. The accelerator, which launched in 2017, aims to re-do older psychology experiments, but on a mass-scale and in several different settings.

5h

Drones, lasers to help unravel the mysteries of a Mediterranean island

A quarry, a prison site or a religious location? Purdue University engineering and liberal arts researchers are using drones to help answer the question about the past use of an island of Turkey.

5h

Hong Kong's Protesters Break Their Core Principle

In a darkened classroom at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, a half-dozen people peeked through the blinds to watch the sight of true desperation: People dressed in black raced up a highway ramp in a frantic chase for freedom. "Like ants," remarked one young man who watched with me as we sat in the room. He asked that he be identified only by his last name, Tsang, for fear of arrest. Some others

6h

Baby Black Holes May be Orbiting Supermassive Black Holes

Pac-Man Holes In July 2017, a team of astronomers spotted signs of two black holes merging, a type of event that's only been identified ten times so far. One of the black holes involved in the merger was seemingly larger than 50 solar masses, puzzling astronomers — how did it get so huge? Now, according to Astronomy , a group of scientists are suggesting that supermassive black holes at the cente

6h

The Paris Aquarium Is Giving Unwanted Goldfish a Second Chance

The sanctuary is home to 1,000 fish and counting

6h

Two things seem to ease catatonia in Down syndrome

New research suggests the most effective treatments for catatonia in people with Down syndrome. Only recently has catatonia, a behavioral condition marked by new onset immobility, mutism, withdrawal and other behavioral abnormalities, been recognized in Down syndrome. Down syndrome, due to an extra chromosome 21, occurs in 250,000 children and adults in the United States, making it the country's

6h

Rising sea levels are swallowing Outer Banks beaches, new report says

Hurricanes aren't the only hazard lapping at the shores of the Outer Banks, according to a report examining the threat of climate change on some of the country's most beloved natural landscapes.

6h

Researchers substantially boost sensitivity of terahertz gas analysis

A new advance promises to increase the sensitivity of high-resolution spectrometers that perform chemical analysis using terahertz wavelengths. This higher sensitivity could benefit many applications, such as analysis of the complex gas mixtures found in industrial emissions and detection of biomarkers of disease in the breath of patients. It could also lead to new ways to detect food spoilage thr

6h

How plants handle stress

Plants get stressed too. Drought or too much salt disrupt their physiology. An international research team led by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem with the participation of the University of Göttingen investigated how evolutionary changes in receptor proteins led to their ability to sense the hormone abscisic acid (ABA). This enabled them to develop mechanisms that aided their colonization of dr

6h

HKUST researchers shed light on modulation of thermal bleaching of coral reefs by internal waves

An international research team led by an ocean scientist from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) has demonstrated in a recent research paper the cooling impact of internal waves across depths on coral reefs, which has the potential to create thermal refuges for corals and is important for making more accurate predictions of coral bleaching.

6h

Yeasts in nectar can stimulate the growth of bee colonies

Researchers from KU Leuven have found that the presence of yeasts can alter the chemical composition and thus the nutritional value of nectar for pollinators such as bees. Moreover, the study found that yeasts can even boost bee health and colony fitness. 'Research into the role of microbes in our ecosystem is of vital importance to safeguard bees.'

6h

Li-ion battery components to be printed on an inkjet printer

Scientists from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) are developing a technology for printing the electrodes for miniature li-ion batteries by an inkjet printer. The ongoing research may help to create power supplies for biosensors, wearable electronics, and other miniature devices. The results of the study are published in one of the leading scientific journals Energy Tec

6h

Energy research — Economizing on iridium

Iridium is an ideal catalyst for the electrolytic production of hydrogen from water — but it is extremely expensive. But now a new kind of electrode made of highly porous material does an excellent job with just a hint of iridium.

6h

A super-fast 'light switch' for future cars and computers

Switching light beams quickly is important in many technological applications. Researchers at ETH have now developed an 'electro-opto-mechanical' switch for light beams that is considerably smaller and faster than current models. This is relevant for applications such as self-driving cars and optical quantum technologies.

6h

Harvesting energy from walking human body Lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester develop

A research team led by Professor Wei-Hsin Liao from the Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has developed a lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester for scavenging energy from human motion, generating inexhaustible and sustainable power supply just from walking.

6h

Non-invasive microscopy detects activation state and distinguishes between cell types

Most analytical methods in biology require invasive procedures to analyze samples, which leads to irreversible changes or even their destruction. Here, researchers from Osaka University develop a non-invasive, label-free optical approach along with statistical tools to reveal immune cell type, cell activation state, and single cell heterogeneity.

6h

From Mouser Electronics: Why crowdfunding is a critical stage for concepts

For the four-part Engineering Big Ideas series presented by Mouser, electrical engineer and television host Grant Imahara has traveled around the world to see what really happens on the road to innovation. Going into the design for manufacture phase, he takes a closer look at how to get an idea off the ground—or even into space. In Portland, Oregon, he chats with Josh Lifton, co-founder and presi

6h

New geologic modeling method explains collapse of ancient mountains in American West

By using the latest computer numerical modeling technologies, combined with geologic compilations and seismic data, researchers in the Department of Geosciences at Stony Brook University have developed a complete geodynamic model that explains the forces behind the remarkable collapse of what were lofty mountains some 30 million years ago in what is now part of the American West.

6h

A ligand-independent origin of abscisic acid perception

Necessity is the mother of all invention, the saying goes, and that includes the process of evolution.

6h

Hip dysplasia in cats is hereditary and more common in bigger individuals

Millions of cats in the world likely suffer from hip dysplasia, but this cat health problem has rarely been studied. In a newly published study with a focus on the "gentle giant" Maine Coon breed, SLU researchers conclude that the condition is heritable and is more common in large cats. The study also showed that the Swedish health program has been effective in reducing the incidence of hip dyspla

6h

A ligand-independent origin of abscisic acid perception

Necessity is the mother of all invention, the saying goes, and that includes the process of evolution.

6h

Hip dysplasia in cats is hereditary and more common in bigger individuals

Millions of cats in the world likely suffer from hip dysplasia, but this cat health problem has rarely been studied. In a newly published study with a focus on the "gentle giant" Maine Coon breed, SLU researchers conclude that the condition is heritable and is more common in large cats. The study also showed that the Swedish health program has been effective in reducing the incidence of hip dyspla

6h

Hun er en af de få kvinder på MBA-uddannelsen: »Det er ingen hemmelighed, at jeg er ambitiøs«

PLUS. Ingrid Marie Vincent Andersen fik sine chefers fulde opbakning, da hun var klar til at supplere sin tekniske uddannelse med en MBA.

6h

A technique to measure mechanical motion beyond the quantum limit

Researchers at the University of Colorado have recently developed a new technique to measure mechanical motion using simultaneous electromechanical amplification and cooling processes. Their method, presented in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, allowed them to perform a nearly noiseless measurement of the position of a mechanical oscillator, which has so far proved to be difficult usi

6h

How people trick themselves into thinking something is heavier than it really is

In a recent study published in PLOS One researchers from Hiroshima University and Nagoya Institute of Technology found that if you hold your car steering wheel at certain angles (1, 4, or 5 on the clock) then it's likely you're over or underestimating how much force you need to use to steer the car.

6h

Researchers discover molecular light switch in photoreceptor cells

Transducin, a protein found inside photoreceptor cells in vertebrate eyes, alters its cellular location in response to changes in light intensity, allowing our eyes to adapt to the changes. Researchers from Osaka University have now identified a protein, Cul3-Klhl18 ubiquitin ligase, that regulates the movement of transducin inside rod photoreceptor cells, thereby controlling photosensitivity. The

6h

Living in ethnic enclaves may improve pregnancy outcomes for Asian/Pacific islanders

Among Asian/Pacific Islander women living in the United States, those who reside in ethnic enclaves–areas with a high concentration of residents of a similar ancestry–are less likely to have pregnancy or birth complications than those living in other areas, suggests a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.

6h

Faith community events for children: Good for the soul but lack nutrition

Most faith-based and private schools and associated afterschool programs operate independently without dietary requirements. A pilot study is the first to examine foods served within faith community settings related to child health. Results showed that pizza and pasta made up 71 percent of the main dishes; cheese was the main source of dairy products; high fat desserts were served at 75 percent of

6h

UBCO researcher examines traumatic brain injury in survivors of intimate partner violence

While the diagnoses and treatment of sport-related concussion have well-established guidelines and protocols, a new study from UBC's Okanagan campus is looking at what has previously been an understudied group — women survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). Their hope is to develop a simple screening tool to help front-line services, like women's shelters, identify traumatic brain injury (T

6h

Computer model described the dynamic instability of microtubules

Researchers of Sechenov University together with their colleagues from several Russian institutes studied the dynamics of microtubules that form the basis of the cytoskeleton and take part in the transfer of particles within a cell and its division. The computer model they developed describes the mechanical properties of protofilaments (longitudinal fibers that compose microtubules) and suggests h

6h

Bursting the bubble: Revealing tasty genetic secrets of gigantic single-celled creatures

Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) recently unveiled key information about gene expression in sea grapes, which could help shed light on the evolution of sea grape morphology and help Okinawan farmers improve cultivation of umi-budo.

6h

Anyone can now create maps and stories on Google Earth

Google Earth is making a significant change to its product, with the addition of content creation tools that allow anyone to create maps and stories for its platform. The feature is an expansion …

6h

How to manage a multi-author megapaper

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03544-x Large teams can produce more impactful work, but organizing a paper produced by many can be a major challenge.

6h

Physics, life sciences, genetics: three big players and their top partners

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03542-z Research is a global game, yet even for top collaborators, the closest partners are mainly local.

6h

Despite political turmoil, global scientific collaboration continues to flourish

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03540-1 Connections prove resilient as researchers circumvent geopolitical obstacles.

6h

Researchers must unite against US environment agency's attack on scientific evidence

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03526-z The Environmental Protection Agency must desist from a course that could harm both human and planetary health.

6h

A guide to the Nature Index

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03545-w A description of the terminology and methodology used in this supplement, and a guide to the functionality available free online at natureindex.com.

6h

Brexit shadow hangs over EU partnerships

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03543-y Uncertainty about the United Kingdom's role in EU science is damaging research networks.

6h

US-China science weathers political ill wind

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03541-0 Despite government tensions, collaboration between the United States and China remains strong.

6h

Mapping the right fit for knowledge sharing

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03558-5 Practical tips for effective interdisciplinary collaborations.

6h

Geneticists are writing the rule book for creating gene-edited babies

A year after the world learned that the first-ever gene-edited children had been born in China, doctors and ethicists are looking at how to proceed safely and responsibly

6h

Astronomers investigate stellar content of the open cluster NGC 330

Using the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, astronomers have conducted a spectroscopic study of the young open cluster NGC 330. Results of the research, published on arXiv.org, provide more details about the cluster's stellar content.

6h

Opinion: Workers Deserve a Say in Automation

The Workers Right to Training Act allows employees to evolve as their employers adopt new tech.

6h

Shark IQ Robot Review: Convenience Makes Up for a Low IQ

Shark's first robot vacuum has a self-emptying bin, but it struggles to make a map.

6h

Many patients with anorexia nervosa get better, but complete recovery elusive to most

Three in four patients with anorexia nervosa — including many with challenging illness — make a partial recovery. But just 21 percent make a full recovery, a milestone that is most likely to signal permanent remission.

6h

Steep momentum gradients play a major role in coastal precipitation

Steep gradients of wind stress and potential temperature enable sustainable nearshore precipitation systems along the western coastal region of Korea.

6h

Beauty in the biased eye of the beholder

When looking at paintings, we don't assess each one on its own merits. Instead, we carry a bias, according to a new study in Psychology at University of Sydney.

6h

Inside the World's First Underground Gravitational-Wave Detector

Japan's KAGRA observatory set to begin operations by the end of 2019 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Can Scientists Predict Fire Tornadoes?

Inside the effort to understand wildfire season's scariest phenomena — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Designer lens helps see the big picture

Microscopes have been at the center of many of the most important advances in biology for many centuries. Now, KAUST researchers have shown how a standard microscope can be adapted to provide even more information.

6h

Historic climate change on Mars might be detectable

Historical instances of extreme climate change on Mars could be detected through the measurement of subsurface temperatures, according to a new University of Stirling study.

6h

Estimating the environmental impact of Bitcoin mining

As an alternative to government-issued money, the cryptocurrency Bitcoin offers relative anonymity, no sales tax and freedom from bank and government interference. But some people argue that these benefits have an enormous environmental impact, particularly with regard to Bitcoin mining—the process used to secure the cryptocurrency. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Techno

6h

Making tiny antennas for wearable electronics

When it comes to electronics, bigger usually isn't better. This is especially true for a new generation of wearable communication systems that promise to connect people, machines and other objects in a wireless "internet of things." To make the devices small and comfortable enough to wear, scientists need to miniaturize their components. Now, researchers in ACS Nano have made the tiniest radio-fre

6h

Ancient komodo dragon-like animals had heads proportionally larger than dinosaurs

An international team of researchers has found evidence showing that the ancient meat-eating creature Vjushkovia triplicostata had a proportionally larger head than any known dinosaur. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their reexamination of V. triplicostata and what they learned about the large Komodo dragon-like creature.

6h

4-D imaging with liquid crystal microlenses

Most images captured by a camera lens are flat and two dimensional. Increasingly, 3-D imaging technologies are providing the crucial context of depth for scientific and medical applications. 4-D imaging, which adds information on light polarization, could open up even more possibilities, but usually the equipment is bulky, expensive and complicated. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have deve

6h

Estimating the environmental impact of Bitcoin mining

As an alternative to government-issued money, the cryptocurrency Bitcoin offers relative anonymity, no sales tax and freedom from bank and government interference. But some people argue that …

7h

Emissions from electricity generation lead to premature deaths for some racial groups

Air pollution doesn't just come from cars on the road, generating electricity from fossil fuels also releases fine particulate matter into the air.

7h

Spørg Fagfolket: Må man stå i midten af en rundkørsel?

En læser har gang i en diskussion med konen om, hvorvidt man må stå i midten af en rundkørsel. Politiet afgør sagen.

7h

Manta rays and whale sharks consuming massive amounts of plastics near Indonesia

A team of researchers from Australia, the U.S., Indonesia and New Zealand has measured the amount of plastics that manta rays and whale sharks are ingesting off the coast of Indonesia. In their paper published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science, the group describes how they measured the ingestion of plastics by the marine animals.

7h

NASA applying AI technologies to problems in space science

Could the same computer algorithms that teach autonomous cars to drive safely help identify nearby asteroids or discover life in the universe? NASA scientists are trying to figure that out by partnering with pioneers in artificial intelligence (AI)—companies such as Intel, IBM and Google—to apply advanced computer algorithms to problems in space science.

7h

NASA soil data joins the Air Force

Getting stuck on a muddy road is a hassle for anyone, but for the U.S. Army it could be far more serious—a matter of life and death in some parts of the world. That's one of the reasons the U.S. Air Force HQ 557th Weather Wing is now using data about soil moisture from a NASA satellite in the weather forecasts, warnings and advisories that it issues for the Army and the Air Force.

7h

Water watchdog: Using the Internet of Things for water security

A cluster of internet-enabled devices, including a water-flow sensor, pH sensor, ultrasonic sensor and "PIC" microcontroller, can be used together as a watchdog system for water quality, thanks to work by a team in India who describe details of the system in the International Journal of Environment and Waste Management.

7h

Chemists create new route to PHAs: naturally degradable bioplastics

A tide of public momentum is swelling against the crisis of petroleum-based plastics, which are sitting in our landfills, floating in our oceans, and showing up in our air and even our food.

7h

Algodling på västkusten- ett miljövänligt vattenbruk

De negativa miljöeffekterna från algodling är mycket begränsade, särskilt jämfört med andra typer av vattenbruk. Det visar studier från försök i en två hektar stor testodling i Kosterhavet. Det finns ett växande intresse för vattenbruk och odling av makroalger. I en avhandling av Wouter Visch, Göteborgs universitet, undersöks de bästa förhållanden för att hållbart kunna odla brunalgen sockertare,

7h

Manta rays and whale sharks consuming massive amounts of plastics near Indonesia

A team of researchers from Australia, the U.S., Indonesia and New Zealand has measured the amount of plastics that manta rays and whale sharks are ingesting off the coast of Indonesia. In their paper published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science, the group describes how they measured the ingestion of plastics by the marine animals.

7h

Did a Swedish king really try to ban coffee with a deadly scientific experiment?

A dark historical tale that may or may not be true. What's the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you'll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci's hit podcast . The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week hits Apple , Anchor , and everywhere else you listen to podcasts every Wednesday morning. It's your new favorite source for the strangest science-adjac

7h

Hand-building dry toilets in Papua New Guinea's coastal villages to fight climate change impacts

An innovative Australian government funded development program, operating in the borderlands between Australia and Papua New Guinea, has established a local toilet manufacturing business that is both improving sanitation and increasing the self-sufficiency of local communities in the face of climate change impacts.

7h

Hong Kong violence, deadly bushfires and an asteroid farewell

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03528-x The latest science news, in brief.

7h

Ricochet-T-T-T-T-T-T

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03538-9 Love is the drug.

7h

Human germline editing needs one message

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03525-0 Science academies and the World Health Organization must act in unison.

7h

Bitcoin's climate change impact may be much smaller than we thought

Bitcoin mining may have released 17 megatonnes of CO2 in 2018, similar to the annual emissions from Estonia and just one-third of an earlier emission estimate

7h

The ever-changing brain: Shining a light on synaptic plasticity

Researchers have found that AMPA receptors form and disintegrate continually, within a fraction of a second, rather than existing as stable entities. The scientists' findings may help clarify early stages of synaptic plasticity: neural activity that is key for learning and memory. The research may also have pharmacological applications in the treatment of epilepsy.

7h

Leadership's in the blood for tiny fish

Leadership during cooperation runs in the family for tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies, new research shows.

7h

Caught in the act: MeerKAT telescope spies stellar flare

The MeerKAT radio telescope in the Northern Cape of South Africa has discovered an object which rapidly brightened by more than a factor of three over a period of three weeks. This is the first new transient source discovered with MeerKAT and scientists hope it is the tip of an iceberg of transient events to be discovered with the telescope.

7h

Spain has permits to build giant telescope blocked in Hawaii

The director of a Spanish research center said Wednesday that a giant telescope, costing $1.4 billion, is one step nearer to being built on the Canary Islands in the event an international consortium gives up its plans to build it in Hawaii.

7h

Beavers brought in to beat flooding in Britain

Beavers are to be reintroduced in two parts of Britain as part of plans to help control flooding, the National Trust announced on Wednesday.

7h

Beavers brought in to beat flooding in Britain

Beavers are to be reintroduced in two parts of Britain as part of plans to help control flooding, the National Trust announced on Wednesday.

7h

DDT linked to higher risk of diabetes among Asian Indian immigrants to US

Previous exposure to the pollutant DDT may contribute to the risk of diabetes among Asian Indian immigrants to the United States, according to a UC Davis study.

7h

Emissions from electricity generation lead to premature deaths for some racial groups

University of Washington researchers have found that air pollution from electricity generation emissions in 2014 led to about 16,000 premature deaths in the continental US.

7h

Prior exposure to pollutants could underlie increased diabetes risk of Indian immigrants

In 2004, the United Nations Stockholm Convention banned the production and use of many persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). However, POP production and use continue in some nations that did not ratify the treaty, including India and other South Asian countries. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Scie

7h

Exposure to air pollutants from power plants varies by race, income and geography

Many people take electricity for granted — the power to turn on light with the flip of a switch, or keep food from spoiling with refrigeration. But generating electricity from fossil fuels exacts a toll on health and the environment. Scientists estimate that these power plant emissions cause tens of thousands of premature deaths in the US each year. Now, researchers report in ACS' Environmental S

7h

Estimating the environmental impact of Bitcoin mining

As an alternative to government-issued money, the cryptocurrency Bitcoin offers relative anonymity, no sales tax and freedom from bank and government interference. But some people argue that these benefits have an enormous environmental impact, particularly with regard to Bitcoin mining — the process used to secure the cryptocurrency. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Tec

7h

Making tiny antennas for wearable electronics

When it comes to electronics, bigger usually isn't better. This is especially true for a new generation of wearable communication systems that promise to connect people, machines and other objects in a wireless 'internet of things.' To make the devices small and comfortable enough to wear, scientists need to miniaturize their components. Now, researchers in ACS Nano have made the tiniest radio-fre

7h

4D imaging with liquid crystal microlenses

Most images captured by a camera lens are flat and two dimensional. Increasingly, 3D imaging technologies are providing the crucial context of depth for scientific and medical applications. 4D imaging, which adds information on light polarization, could open up even more possibilities, but usually the equipment is bulky, expensive and complicated. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have develo

7h

The Best Part of Queen & Slim Is the Soundtrack

It happens in a matter of seconds: A white cop points his gun and fires. The bullet grazes a young black woman's leg, and her partner turns to the officer in shock. Amid the confusion, the gun changes hands, and a familiar script is upended as the uniformed man falls to the pavement. So begins the dramatic arc of Queen & Slim , the first feature film from the director Melina Matsoukas . The movie

7h

Koala rescued from fire in Australia

Bushfires are spreading across Australia's east coast, ravaging the marsupial's main habitat.

7h

Musicians 'have to be proactive' on climate change

Emma Banks puts on tours for some of the world's biggest musicians – but says they need to change.

7h

Image of the Day: Brittle Star

This marine animal looks like a sea star, but don't be fooled.

7h

Putting homes in high-risk areas is asking too much of firefighters

The impacts of the bushfires that are overwhelming emergency services in New South Wales and Queensland suggest houses are being built in areas where the risks are high. We rely heavily on emergency services to protect people and property, but strategic land-use planning can improve resilience and so help reduce the risk in the first place. This would mean giving more weight to considering bushfir

7h

Scientists suggest binding goals to rescue Amazon

As thousands of wildfires and deforestation escalate in the Amazon rainforest, a team of international scientists has called for governments to enact six key goals to protect the vital wilderness.

7h

What impacts will quantum fintech have on mainstream finance?

The evolution of modern finance was closely linked to the evolution of computers, communications, and financial mathematics. Two main changes happened in the 1970s with the beginning of derivative trading and after the crisis of 2007 with the massive introduction of fintech.

7h

New study of Sebastian Inlet confirms link between sea level, sand volume

A new report that synthesizes decades of data on the hydrodynamic and meteorological forces at work at the Sebastian Inlet has linked seasonal and inter-annual sea level changes to changes in the sand volume contained in the adjacent beaches and nearshore littoral system. This finding could help enhance shoreline stabilization efforts and guide future development along Florida's East Coast with an

7h

'Dream Chaser' Space Plane Features Fancy Space Trash Can

All the current launch platforms certified to make supply runs to the International Space Station (ISS) use a parachute to return to Earth after each mission. Although, SpaceX has designs on propulsive landings with its Dragon capsule. Sierra Nevada Corporation has something else in mind with its uncrewed Dream Chaser spacecraft. The Dream Chaser is a fully reusable space plane that can carry a s

7h

Klinikchef siger op, efter at læger ville udtrykke mistillid til hende

Klinikchefen på Rigshospitalets patologiafdeling har netop sagt sit job op. Det kommer mens tillidsrepræsentanter via Dagens Medicin var i gang med at udtrykke lægernes mistillid til hende i forhold til at rette op på det dårlige arbejdsmiljø, som Arbejdstilsynet har givet påbud for.

7h

Stabilizing a cliff using biomineral binders

EPFL spin-off Medusoil has successfully tested its ground-stabilization process on cliffs subject to surface erosion. The company's biomineral-based solution can be used to stabilize sandy and gravelly subsoils to safeguard surrounding infrastructure. It is a long-lasting and easy-to-use alternative to industrial fluids—the production and use of which can be harmful to the environment. The startup

7h

Researchers discover molecular light switch in photoreceptor cells

How our eyes detect and respond to changes in light intensity is determined by specialized cells in the eye called photoreceptors. In addition to converting light into electrical signals, effectively allowing us to see, rod-shaped photoreceptors adapt to changes in light intensity to protect the eye from damage caused by excessive light exposure. However, in conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa

7h

Bursting the bubble: Revealing tasty genetic secrets of gigantic single-celled creatures

Okinawan cuisine is known for its many delicacies—from squid ink soup to rafute pork belly. But one of the most famous delicacies served in restaurants across Okinawa is a type of seaweed, which is renowned for its pleasing texture and taste. Instead of leaves, this seaweed has bundles of little green bubbles that burst in the mouth, releasing the salty-sweet flavor of the ocean.

7h

Canada falling short of UN's Sustainable Development Goals

Canada could lead the world in helping to achieve water sustainability but is falling short of reaching the goals set out by the United Nations (UN), according to a new report from scientists with the University of Saskatchewan-led Global Water Futures (GWF) program.

8h

Researchers create the first straws using polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) plastic

The Polymers and Advanced Materials Group of the Universitat Jaume I in collaboration with the Laboratory of New Materials and Nanotechnology of the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology of the Spanish Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (IATA-CSIC) have developed, together with the company Ocenic Resins, S.L. a plastic formulation suitable for making straws that are 100 percent biode

8h

Researchers discover molecular light switch in photoreceptor cells

How our eyes detect and respond to changes in light intensity is determined by specialized cells in the eye called photoreceptors. In addition to converting light into electrical signals, effectively allowing us to see, rod-shaped photoreceptors adapt to changes in light intensity to protect the eye from damage caused by excessive light exposure. However, in conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa

8h

Bursting the bubble: Revealing tasty genetic secrets of gigantic single-celled creatures

Okinawan cuisine is known for its many delicacies—from squid ink soup to rafute pork belly. But one of the most famous delicacies served in restaurants across Okinawa is a type of seaweed, which is renowned for its pleasing texture and taste. Instead of leaves, this seaweed has bundles of little green bubbles that burst in the mouth, releasing the salty-sweet flavor of the ocean.

8h

Stabilizing a cliff using biomineral binders

EPFL spin-off Medusoil has successfully tested its ground-stabilization process on cliffs subject to surface erosion. The company's biomineral-based solution can be used to stabilize sandy and gravelly subsoils to safeguard surrounding infrastructure. It is a long-lasting and easy-to-use alternative to industrial fluids—the production and use of which can be harmful to the environment. The startup

8h

The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope could find more of Earth's transient moons

It is a well-known astronomical convention that Earth has only one natural satellite, which is known (somewhat uncreatively) as "the moon." However, astronomers have known for a little over a decade that Earth also has a population of what are known as "transient moons." These are a subset of near-Earth objects (NEOs) that are temporarily scooped up by Earth's gravity and assume orbits around our

8h

Climate change: China coal surge threatens Paris targets

China is adding coal power equivalent to the EU's entire generating capacity.

8h

Herbal Products and Cancer Treatment

Oncologists increasingly are warning their patients away from alternative herbal treatments, and with good reason.

8h

New water-based optical device revolutionizes the field of optics research

Light is versatile in nature. In other words, it shows different characteristics when traveling through different types of materials. This property has been explored with various technologies, but the way in which light interacts with materials needs to be manipulated to get the desired effect. This is done using special devices called light modulators, which have the ability to modify the propert

8h

Black carbon found in the Amazon River reveals recent forest burnings

Besides swathes of destroyed vegetation, forest fires in Amazonia leave their imprint on the Amazon River and its tributaries. Incomplete burning of trees results in the production of black carbon, solid particles that enter the waters of the Amazon in the form of charcoal and soot and are transported to the Atlantic Ocean as dissolved organic carbon.

8h

Outback telescope captures Milky Way center, discovers remnants of dead stars

A radio telescope in the Western Australian outback has captured a spectacular new view of the center of the Milky Way galaxy. The image from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) telescope shows what our galaxy would look like if human eyes could see radio waves.

8h

8h

8h

8h

Screen of traditional soup broths to treat fevers, passed down by family traditions, discovers potential antimalarials, finds a new double-blind study of the recipes. Five of the broths inhibited growth of the parasite by >50%. Two were comparable to a leading antimalarial drug, dihydroartemisinin.

50%. Two were comparable to a leading antimalarial drug, dihydroartemisinin." title="" src="https://a.thumbs.redditmedia.com/2pIlmXKHDoEOdp3l11L1bYjwINBpZG0vyRy5-9ynkz4.jpg"> submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

8h

8h

Disaster-zone research needs a code of conduct

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03534-z Study the effects of earthquakes, floods and other natural hazards with sensitivity to ethical dilemmas and power imbalances.

8h

Married heterosexual men happiest earning 50 per cent more than wives

Married heterosexual men may be happiest if they earn 60 per cent of their households' total income and their wives earn 40 per cent, data from the US suggests

8h

»Jeg satte mig i min klinikstol og vidste, at jeg ikke kunne arbejde mere«

For et år siden gik praktiserende læge Hanne ned med alvorlig stress. 10 måneder efter kæmpede hun sig tilbage til sin praksis. Undersøgelse fra 2016 påviste et højt stressniveau blandt praktiserende læger.

8h

Climate change: China coal surge threatens Paris targets

China is adding coal power equivalent to the EU's entire generating capacity.

8h

The "Hobbit" at 15

A shocking discovery made a decade and a half ago is changing our understanding of human evolution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

A Hint About the Affliction That Kept Marat in the Bathtub

The radical French revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat died, famously, in a bathtub. He was soaking in one when his assassin, Charlotte Corday, plunged a kitchen knife into his chest in 1793. And he was soaking in a bath because of a mysterious condition that left his skin intensely itchy and blistered. The bath was his only relief, and the bath was where he died. In the centuries since, people have sp

8h

Vi stopper vindmøller som aldrig før – men er det nødvendigvis skidt?

PLUS. Producenterne tjener penge på specialregulering, og derfor er det ikke noget problem at standse vindmøller, siger energiselskabernes brancheforening. Vindmøllebranchen mener, at vindkraften kunne gøre større nytte andre steder.

8h

Her er verdens kraftigste supercomputere

Masser af overraskelser på listen over verdens kraftigste supercomputere, men førstepladsen er uændret.

8h

Iran's APT33 Hackers Are Targeting Industrial Control Systems

The recent focus on ICS raises the possibility that Iran's APT33 is exploring physically disruptive cyberattacks.

8h

Black Friday 2019: Our Tips for Finding the Best Deals

The biggest shopping day of the year can be intimidating. This is how to make the most of it.

8h

The "Hobbit" at 15

A shocking discovery made a decade and a half ago is changing our understanding of human evolution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Journaler strandet efter konkurs hos praktiserende læge

I næsten to måneder har op mod 2.200 borgere i Nordsjælland ikke haft adgang til egne lægejournaler. De er strandet i et konkursbo i Humlebæk.

8h

The Weird Scenario That Pits President Pelosi Against Citizen Trump in 2020

Assume that President Donald Trump is impeached and removed from office. At that point, Mike Pence would become president. The position of vice president would remain vacant until Congress confirmed a replacement, nominated by the president. This shift in positions could result in a very unlikely possibility: If, prior to the confirmation of a new vice president, President Pence were to become un

8h

FactcheckUK: How Twitter's rules let Tories convincingly rebrand as fact checkers

The Conservatives have been attacked over a trick that saw them rebrand as supposed fact-checkers on Twitter and then use that account to post anti-Labour propaganda.

9h

Google Assistant to be 'news host' on devices

Google said Wednesday its digital assistant will serve as a "news host" on its connected devices to deliver stories from a variety of its media partners.

9h

NASA's Curiosity Rover Finds Unexplained Oxygen on Mars

Fluctuating levels of the atmospheric gas, a potential tracer of alien life, have left researchers mystified — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

NASA's Curiosity Rover Finds Unexplained Oxygen on Mars

Fluctuating levels of the atmospheric gas, a potential tracer of alien life, have left researchers mystified — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

1.000 grader varm solovn: Computerstyrede spejle skal producere cement og stål

En amerikansk virksomhed har kombineret sollys, spejle og kunstig intelligens og skabt temperaturer over 1000 grader. Det betyder, at sollys fremover kan bruges i varmekrævende industrielle processer, lyder det fra virksomhedens direktør.

9h

Leder af akutteam: Tværsektoriel aftale i hovedstaden vil virke

Ny aftale i hovedstaden om øget samarbejde mellem akutteam og praktiserende læger vil sænke antallet af indlæggelser, vurderer leder af akutteam, som allerede har en aftale med de praktiserende læger.

9h

Praktiserende læger overser knoglemarvskræft

Mange patienter med knoglemarvskræft får først stillet diagnosen et helt år efter, at de har mærket de første symptomer på sygdommen, viser ny undersøgelse.

9h

How two intruders from interstellar space are upending astronomy

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03530-3 Researchers grapple with the meaning of the first objects entering our Solar System from distant regions.

9h

If We Adjust to Trumpism, the Republic Is Lost

In a speech last Friday, Attorney General William Barr attacked opponents of President Trump who think of themselves as engaged in "resistance." The language of resistance, Barr said, suggests that the current administration is a military occupation rather than a democratically elected government. And people who think of themselves as members of a resistance will prosecute their "scorched earth,

9h

The Democratic Debates Are a Fantasy World

The next Democratic presidential debate happens tonight in Atlanta. Other than a slightly altered roster of candidates and an all-female slate of moderators, we have no reason to believe that it will be substantially different from the other debates. We can expect yet more questions about single-payer health coverage versus a public option. Elizabeth Warren's rivals may be asked to dissect her ve

9h

The Long-Forgotten Flight That Sent Boeing Off Course

The flight that put the Boeing Company on course for disaster lifted off a few hours after sunrise. It was good flying weather—temperatures in the mid-40s with a slight breeze out of the southeast—but oddly, no one knew where the 737 jetliner was headed. The crew had prepared three flight plans: one to Denver. One to Dallas. And one to Chicago. In the plane's trailing vortices was greater Seattle

9h

'I Felt I Didn't Deserve to Be Unapologetically Joyous'

Put on your glitter eyeshadow and break out your DVDs, because the early 2010s may be up for a comeback. At least, that's how Kesha's forthcoming album, High Road , makes it seem. It was a decade ago that the Tennessee-raised Kesha Rose Sebert, in her smash "TiK ToK," reported waking up in the morning "feelin' like P. Diddy." Now one thundering, yet-to-be-released song, "My Own Dance," opens with

9h

War of words: Why should we protect civil discourse?

Universities are places where there academic freedom thrives. Such open exchange of ideas creates an environments conducive to civil discourse — dialog with one another with the goal of reaching the truth. Philanthropists should, ideally, provide resources to institutions that promote scholarly work. The reason for this is because such work benefits society at large. When you engage with people w

9h

Framgångsrik studie i Bangladesh av svensk diarrévaccinkandidat

Spädbarn och små barn som fått Etvax, en svensk vaccinkandidat i drickform, har visat oväntat starkt immunsvar mot etec-bakterier. Etec, enterotoxinbildande E. coli, är en mycket vanlig orsak till diarré hos barn. – Detta överträffade våra förväntningar. Vi hittade starka immunsvar i tarmen hos majoriteten av barnen, även de allra yngsta, som också är de mest utsatta för etec-diarré, säger Ann-Ma

9h

Death, retirement, and inability to contact authors leads to retraction of paper first flagged five years ago

More than five years after comments appeared on PubPeer about a 2012 paper in PLoS ONE with a raft of problematic images — and a deceased member of the group whom the corresponding author suggests might have been able to support the validity of the data — the journal has retracted the article. The article, … Continue reading

9h

Därför föreslås radikalt sänkta gränsvärden för kemikalier

Utredningen föreslår bland annat att alla gränsvärden sänks till en tiondel av dagens nivåer, varför då? − I dag är varje ämne tillåtet upp till en nivå som anses säker för människor och miljö. Men det är lite som att anta att vi bara har en kemikalie i världen. I verkligheten utsätts vi för blandningar av massor av ämnen, som verkar tillsammans och ger en så kallad cocktaileffekt.

9h

Bombetrusler udsendt via skolernes nye intranet Aula

I går meddelte politiet, at der var blevet udsendt en bombetrussel mod en skole i Thisted. I dag oplyser politiet, at der er udsendt en trussel mod Juelsminde skole i Sydøstjyllands Politikreds.

10h

10h

DeepIso: A Deep Learning Model for Peptide Feature Detection from LC-MS map

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52954-4

10h

10h

10h

Rapidly and exactly determining postharvest dry soybean seed quality based on machine vision technology

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53796-w

10h

Transcriptional Activation of Arabidopsis Zygotes Is Required for Initial Cell Divisions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53704-2

10h

Self-replenishment cycles generate a threshold response

Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53589-1

10h

Kortare fasta för barn inför operation

Alla barn som ska sövas behöver fasta före operation, för att minska risken för farlig kräkning under narkosen. Reglerna för barns fasta kan vara mer tillåtande, visar forskning vid Akademiska sjukhuset/Uppsala universitet. Studier tyder på att fritt intag av vatten, saft och andra klara drycker fram till operation inte ökar risken för komplikationer under narkos. – Resultaten av studierna styrke

10h

The final selfie frontier: app takes pictures from 36,000km up in space

Cameras mounted on a satellite allow users to take 'selfies from space' – on a beach, at a festival or sports event and eventually from anywhere you fancy – if the skies are clear A growing number of authorities around the world may be banning selfies – most recently the Japanese city of Kyoto put the kibosh on the taking of photos in its geisha neighbourhood – but one company is hoping to cash i

10h

Pludseligt fald: Nu er kun hver syvende MBA-studerende en kvinde

PLUS. Andelen af kvinder er faldende eller stagnerende på det toårige ledelsesstudium MBA. Skru op for fleksibiliteten, lyder et bud.

10h

Leadership's in the blood for tiny fish

Leadership during cooperation runs in the family for tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies, new research shows.

10h

The ever-changing brain: Shining a light on synaptic plasticity

Researchers in the Membrane Cooperativity Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) in Japan, in collaboration with researchers from universities across Japan, have found that AMPA receptors form and disintegrate continually, within a fraction of a second, rather than existing as stable entities. The scientists' findings, published in Nature Communications,

10h

Mount Sinai researchers uncover new molecular drivers of Parkinson's disease

Scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have uncovered new molecular drivers of Parkinson's disease using a sophisticated statistical technique called multiscale gene network analysis (MGNA). The team was also able to determine how these molecular drivers impact the functions of genes involved in the disease. The results, which may point to potential new treatments, were publishe

10h

Science funders gamble on grant lotteries

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03572-7 A growing number of research agencies are assigning money randomly.

10h

A message for mentors from dissatisfied graduate students

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03535-y In this second article to mark Nature's 2019 graduate survey, respondents call for more one-to-one support and better career guidance.

10h

Daily briefing: Base editors fix genomes one nucleotide at a time

Nature, Published online: 19 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03577-2 A new class of CRISPR-based tools, an environmental DNA milestone and the integrity inspectors.

10h

Caught in the act: MeerKAT telescope spies stellar flare

Scientists using the MeerKAT radio telescope have discovered a unique and previously-unseen flare of radio emission from a binary star in our galaxy.

10h

Leadership's in the blood for tiny fish

Leadership during cooperation runs in the family for tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies, new research shows.

10h

Leadership's in the blood for tiny fish

Leadership during cooperation runs in the family for tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies, new research shows.

10h

The dualism between adatom- and vacancy-based single crystal growth models

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13188-0 In homoepitaxial crystal growth, four established modes describe atom deposition on a single crystal surface. Here the authors present a model that shows that, for each adatom growth mode, there exists an analogous but inverse version for vacancy growth. This also applies to combined growth.

10h

Pathways to cellular supremacy in biocomputing

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13232-z Synthetic biology uses cells as its computing substrate, often based on the genetic circuit concept. In this Perspective, the authors argue that existing synthetic biology approaches based on classical models of computation limit the potential of biocomputing, and propose that living organisms have under-exp

10h

Author Correction: Possible role of L-form switching in recurrent urinary tract infection

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13256-5

10h

Competing rhythmic neural representations of orientations during concurrent attention to multiple orientation features

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13282-3 The neural mechanisms for concurrently attending to multiple features in the visual stimuli are not well understood. Here, the authors show that the neural representations for two overlapping stimulus features alternate with each other at a ~4 Hz rhythm that was also observed in fluctuations in the task perf

10h

The genomic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancers reveals multiple distinct genotypes with potential clinical impact

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13084-7 Detecting genomic abnormalities in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) may impact clinical treatment. Here, the authors present whole-genome sequencing of metastatic biopsies from 197 mCRPC patients, highlighting the landscape of microsatellite stability, homologous repair deficiency, and

10h

Mapping optogenetically-driven single-vessel fMRI with concurrent neuronal calcium recordings in the rat hippocampus

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12850-x Detailed characterization of large-scale hemodynamic responses linked to specific neural activity remains to be elucidated at the single-vessel level across the subcentimeter scale hippocampal vasculature in vivo. Here, authors use a novel multi-modal fMRI platform to characterize distinct spatiotemporal pat

10h

Interface-induced magnetic polar metal phase in complex oxides

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13270-7 Polar metals—metals with polar structural distortions—are known not to be magnetic. Here, the authors demonstrate a magnetic polar metal phase in a BaTiO3/SrRuO3/BaTiO3 heterostructure displaying high conductivity and ferromagnetic ordering with high saturation moment.

10h

Unsupervised discovery of solid-state lithium ion conductors

Nature Communications, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13214-1 Predictions of new solid-state Li-ion conductors are challenging due to the diverse chemistries and compositions involved. Here the authors combine unsupervised learning techniques and molecular dynamics simulations to discover new compounds with high Li-ion conductivity.

10h

VIDEO: Elon Musk's Next Quest Is A Mind-Machine Meld. Let's Consider The Implications

The tech entrepreneur recently said he is making implants that connect our brains to our devices. So let's explore the ethics of human upgrading — and what technology has already done to us.

10h

New study reveals secrets of Wolfe Creek Crater

A study by an international research team led by Professor Tim Barrows from the University of Wollongong has thrown new light on how frequently large meteorites strike the Earth.

10h

Social behavior for autonomous vehicles

submitted by /u/danclimpertec [link] [comments]

11h

11h

11h

11h

Projektudviklere jubler over kontanter til vindmøllenaboer

Nye ordninger pålægger de private projektudviklere af vindmølleparker og solcelleanlæg at betale millioner i kontanter til både borgere og kommuner i lokalområdet. Men hvis det kan mindske modstanden, er det kun positivt, lyder det fra to af selskaberne.

11h

Caught in the act: MeerKAT telescope spies stellar flare

The MeerKAT radio telescope in the Northern Cape of South Africa has discovered an object which rapidly brightened by more than a factor of three over a period of three weeks. This is the first new transient source discovered with MeerKAT and scientists hope it is the tip of an iceberg of transient events to be discovered with the telescope.

11h

The art of rest, hive minds, and traversing Canada: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 20 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03533-0 Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week's best science picks.

11h

The climate science is clear: it's now or never to avert catastrophe | Bill McKibben

Disastrous global heating will soon become irrevocable – but despite politicians' inaction millions are taking to the streets to fight the planet's fever Help us cover the critical issues of 2020. Make a contribution The one thing never to forget about global warming is that it's a timed test. It's ignoble and dangerous to delay progress on any important issue, of course – if, in 2020, America co

11h

Ny metod analyserar cellförlopp genom genetiska bibliotek

Nu kan forskare undersöka dynamiska förlopp i stora genetiska bibliotek. Genom att använda metoden på mekanismer vid bland annat celldelningen, kan man få en tydligare bild av den gäckande kontrollmekanismen. Modern genteknologi gör det möjligt att snabbt och billigt introducera tusentals olika DNA-förändringar i mänskliga celler eller i bakterier. På så vis går det att skapa hela bibliotek av ge

11h

Airlines' fuel practices feed doubts over climate commitment

Airlines have taken steps to reduce their carbon footprints under the gaze of public opinion, but the pressure of the bottom line means some fly with extra fuel, boosting emissions of climate-changing greenhouse gases.

11h

Planned fossil fuel output swamps Paris climate goals

Oil, gas and coal output already planned or in the pipeline will overwhelm efforts to cap global warming at levels consistent with a liveable planet, the UN and leading research groups warned Wednesday.

11h

Apple sleuths hunt Northwest for varieties believed extinct

The apple tree stands alone near the top of a steep hill, wind whipping through its branches as a perfect sunset paints its leaves a vibrant gold.

12h

China adds coal power despite climate pledge: report

China plans to add new coal power plants equivalent to all of the EU's current generating capacity, putting the world's biggest emitter out of sync with its commitments to combat climate change, researchers said Wednesday.

12h

Climate impacts 'to cost world $7.9 trillion' by 2050

Climate change could directly cost the world economy $7.9 trillion by mid-century as increased drought, flooding and crop failures hamper growth and threaten infrastructure, new analysis showed Wednesday.

12h

Apple sleuths hunt Northwest for varieties believed extinct

The apple tree stands alone near the top of a steep hill, wind whipping through its branches as a perfect sunset paints its leaves a vibrant gold.

12h

Manmade noise a 'major global pollutant': study

It is well known that human hubbub can have a negative impact on some animals, but a new study Wednesday says the noise we make should be treated as a "major global pollutant".

12h

Manmade noise a 'major global pollutant': study

It is well known that human hubbub can have a negative impact on some animals, but a new study Wednesday says the noise we make should be treated as a "major global pollutant".

12h

A decade after the predators have gone, Galapagos Island finches are still being spooked

On some of the Galapagos Islands where human-introduced predators of Darwin's finches were eradicated over a decade ago, the finches are still acting as though they are in danger, according to research published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology.

12h

A decade after the predators have gone, Galapagos Island finches are still being spooked

On some of the Galapagos Islands where human-introduced predators of Darwin's finches were eradicated over a decade ago, the finches are still acting as though they are in danger, according to research published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology.

12h

Exclusive: Humans placed in suspended animation for the first time

At least one person has been placed in a form of suspended animation during a trial that aims to help people survive traumatic injuries like a gunshot or stab wound

12h

Breast cancer recurrence score has different implications for men

A new study by Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center (VICC) researchers published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, indicates that a lower threshold is needed for male patients to predict mortality using the genetic assay, Oncotype DX®, a commercial diagnostic test.

12h

Obesity embargo alert for December 2019 issue

All print, broadcast and online journalists who receive the Obesity embargo alert agree to abide by the embargo and may not publish, post, broadcast or distribute embargoed press releases or details of the embargoed studies before the embargo date and time.

12h

TESS helps astronomers study red-giant stars, examine a too-close planet

NASA's planet-hunting TESS Mission keeps giving astronomers new realities to examine and explain.

12h

8 ud af 10 danskere vil ikke helt undvære kød på tallerkenen

Langt de fleste danskere vil gerne have et måltid med både kød og grøntsager, men…

12h

Uri Hasson (Princeton) 2: Storytelling and Memories: How the Act of Storytelling Shapes our Minds

https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/storytelling-and-memories Uri Hasson explores how brain activity is shared between listeners of the same story, and how those shared neural responses are coupled to and shaped by the neural activity in the storyteller's brain. How does your brain change with each story that you hear? How can storytelling shape your memories? In this talk, Dr. Uri Hasson explo

13h

Uri Hasson (Princeton) 1: How we communicate information across brains

https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/storytelling-and-memories Uri Hasson explores how brain activity is shared between listeners of the same story, and how those shared neural responses are coupled to and shaped by the neural activity in the storyteller's brain. How does your brain change with each story that you hear? How can storytelling shape your memories? In this talk, Dr. Uri Hasson explo

13h

Physicists Claim They've Found Even More Evidence of a New Force of Nature

X17 could be the elusive fifth force we've been looking for.

14h

Fri rörlighet i EU är inte för alla

Inom EU är den fria rörligheten värnad. Men utsatta gruppers fria rörlighet inskränks indirekt, visar ny forskning. Rivningen av Sorgenfri-lägret i Malmö 2015 är ett exempel, och visar på ett långvarigt förtryck av romer. – Principen om den fria rörligheten lämnas intakt som princip, men fattiga gruppers rörlighet inskränks i praktiken genom indirekta metoder som begränsar deras tillgång till väl

14h

14h

14h

14h

Klimaforandringer fik (måske) verdens første supermagt til at kollapse

Geologiske undersøgelser tyder på, at ekstrem tørke var med til at drive det assyriske rige mod undergangen.

14h

How climate change could kill the red apple

submitted by /u/chicompj [link] [comments]

14h

Secretive energy startup backed by Bill Gates achieves solar breakthrough

submitted by /u/1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-2 [link] [comments]

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

14h

Country diary: pockets of stardust in the November gloom

Hollingside wood, Durham City: Earthstar toadstools puff out spores as cyclamen create floral fireworks Apart from the screech of a jay, all is quiet. So quiet that the rustle of each falling leaf, adding to the bronze carpet of beech foliage that smothers the floor of this bluebell wood , is audible. The woodland is settling into winter dormancy, but on the edge of the lane that runs through it

15h

Outback telescope captures Milky Way center, discovers remnants of dead stars

A radio telescope in the Western Australian outback has captured a spectacular new view of the centre of the galaxy in which we live, the Milky Way.The image from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) telescope shows what our galaxy would look like if human eyes could see radio waves.

15h

Carnegie Mellon system locates shooters using smartphone video

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a system that can accurately locate a shooter based on video recordings from as few as three smartphones.

15h

Black carbon found in the Amazon River reveals recent forest burnings

International study quantified and characterized charcoal and soot produced by incomplete burning of trees and transported by river to the Atlantic.

15h

New water-based optical device revolutionizes the field of optics research

Using the optical properties of a material to manipulate light signals is called light modulation, a method widely used in optical communication. In a groundbreaking study, a group of scientists at the Tokyo University of Science has come up with a novel method of modulating light, using water as a medium. This method is inexpensive and more efficient than existing ones, paving the way for new, im

15h

A decade after the predators have gone, Galapagos Island finches are still being spooked

On some of the Galapagos Islands where human-introduced predators of Darwin's finches were eradicated over a decade ago, the finches are still acting as though they are in danger, according to research published today in the Journal of Animal Ecology.

15h

Skipping breakfast linked to lower GCSE grades

Students who rarely ate breakfast on school days achieved lower GCSE grades than those who ate breakfast frequently, according to a new study in Yorkshire.

15h

UK Study: Lack of economic support hinders cognitive abilities of children of single mothers

A new study examined how the impact of single motherhood on children's verbal cognitive abilities has changed and how the age of children when their parents separate affects those abilities. The study concluded that children who lived with a single mother before age 11 had lower verbal cognitive ability even after considering mothers' education and their age at the time of the child's birth.

15h

Study: Young children can learn math skills from intelligent virtual characters

A new study examined whether young children's verbal engagement with an onscreen interactive media character could boost their math skills. The study concluded that children's parasocial (that is, one-sided) emotional relationships with the intelligent character and their parasocial interactions (in this case, talking about math with the character) led to quicker, more accurate math responses duri

15h

Study finds associations between rheumatoid arthritis, other diseases before and after diagnosis

A Mayo Clinic-led study involving 3,276 patients has found that people with inflammatory bowel disease, Type 1 diabetes or blood clots may be at increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. The study, published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, also found that people who have rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of developing heart disease, blood clots and sleep apnea.

15h

Menopause isn't the only reason for low libido in older women

A qualitative study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine found that women in their 60s report various reasons behind why they lack libido — including sexual dysfunction in their partners.

15h

Dogs Like Motion That Matches Sound

Pet dogs appeared more interested in videos of a bouncing ball when the motion of the ball matched a rising and falling tone. Christopher Intagliata reports.

16h

Dataetisk Råd er på jagt efter input for at danne holdninger

Formanden for Dataetisk Råd ønsker input til at udvikle standpunkter til dataetiske problemstillinger.

16h

The $189,000 DBX SUV Is Here to Save Aston Martin

The esteemed brand is following the luxury SUV trend in a bid to expand and diversify its customer base.

16h

Dogs Like Motion That Matches Sound

Pet dogs appeared more interested in videos of a bouncing ball when the motion of the ball matched a rising and falling tone. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

Dogs Like Motion That Matches Sound

Pet dogs appeared more interested in videos of a bouncing ball when the motion of the ball matched a rising and falling tone. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Dogs Like Motion That Matches Sound

Pet dogs appeared more interested in videos of a bouncing ball when the motion of the ball matched a rising and falling tone. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

2020 Audi E-Tron Sportback debuts slick new roofline, a bit more range – Roadshow

The E-Tron Sportback model debuts at the 2019 LA Auto Show, trading a bit of interior volume for a modest gain in electric range per charge.

18h

US probe faults Uber, human error in self-driving car crash

A US investigation into the death of a pedestrian struck by a self-driving Uber car faulted driver inattention along with "inadequate" safety measures implemented by the company.

18h

18h