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nyheder2019november21

The First Impeachment Witness to Go After Republicans

Updated at 3:19 p.m. ET on November 21, 2019. Through four long days of impeachment hearings, witness after witness sat passively by as Republican lawmakers responded to their detailed testimony by arguing that President Donald Trump had a legitimate reason to be suspicious of Ukraine, because he believed that the country "tried to take me down" in 2016. That silence from the witness table ended

5h

Universality and diversity in human song

What is universal about music, and what varies? We built a corpus of ethnographic text on musical behavior from a representative sample of the world's societies, as well as a discography of audio recordings. The ethnographic corpus reveals that music (including songs with words) appears in every society observed; that music varies along three dimensions (formality, arousal, religiosity), more wit

3h

Vi bevæger os væk fra klimamål: Verden på vej mod mere olie og gas

Olieproducerende lande har planer om at producere endnu mere olie og gas frem mod 2030. Det betyder, at de bindende klimamål fra Paris-aftalen bliver stadigt sværere at nå, viser ny FN-rapport.

7h

LATEST

Keto Diet Helps Fight the Flu in Mice, Study Shows

A new study suggests that mice fed a low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet were protected from influenza infection.

now

The perfect fitness tracker for you is out there. Go get it.

If you can already lift that, we'd be surprised if you didn't have a fitness tracker already. (John Arano via Unsplash/) Congratulations! You've decided you want to live a better, healthier life, and use the power of wearable technology to help go about it. The next step is finding one that works for you, but the market is so crowded—each one with its own specs, apps, and specific features—it's e

3min

Wound healing in mucous tissues could ward off AIDS

Wound healing in mucous tissues during early infection by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus guards some primate species against developing AIDS, Both HIV and SIV provoke an immune response that injures tissues surrounding the intestine, African green monkeys with SIV quickly repair their mucous tissues. This interrupts the disease course and avoids AIDS onset. Stimulating this response might be a way

3min

Science underestimated dangerous effects of sleep deprivation

One of the largest sleep studies dubunks theory that suggests attention is the only cognitive function affected by sleep deprivation.

3min

Patologien er mest trængt på Riget og Aarhus Universitetshospital

Rigshospitalet er langtfra det eneste universitetshospital, hvis patologiafdeling lider under et massivt arbejdspres. Flere andre enheder er trængte. Det gælder f.eks. afdelingen på Aarhus Universitetshospital, hvis råb om hjælp dog i højere grad er blevet hørt.

15min

Data fra almen praksis skal løfte samarbejde om KOL-patienter

Data fra praktiserende læger bliver fra næste år en del af den landsdækkende database for kvalitet af KOL-behandling. Det skal give praktiserende læger og hospitalslæger fælles referencer for behandlingen.

15min

For få astmapatienter får målt lungefunktion

Patienter får ikke i tilstrækkeligt omfang målt deres lungefunktion. Allergitest og registrering af rygestatus sker også for sjældent, fremgår det af den seneste årsrapport for Astma Databasen.

15min

Vejle har ambitioner om at give KOL-patienter højere status

Mere specialisering i ambulatorierne og aktiv brug af forskningsprojekter i det daglige kliniske arbejde er blandt de redskaber, som bringer Vejle Sygehus i front på det lungemedicinske område.

15min

Sådan finder vi de bedste til behandling af lungesygdomme

Ranglisten over Danmarks bedste hospitaler til behandling af astma og KOL er baseret på data fra kliniske kvalitetsdatabaser, og speciallæger i lungesygdomme har vægtet betydningen af kvalitetsindikatorerne.

15min

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Reply to Friedman and Banich: Right measures for the research question [Letters (Online Only)]

In their Letter to the Editor, Friedman and Banich (1) suggest we (2) "overstate" the higher suitability of dependent variables (DVs) derived from surveys for individual difference analyses. We appreciate this opportunity for a continued discussion regarding the measurement of self-regulation. However, their critiques (1) do not provide evidence against…

16min

Inhibition of dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 2 perturbs 26S proteasome-addicted neoplastic progression [Pharmacology]

Dependence on the 26S proteasome is an Achilles' heel for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and multiple myeloma (MM). The therapeutic proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, successfully targets MM but often leads to drug-resistant disease relapse and fails in breast cancer. Here we show that a 26S proteasome-regulating kinase, DYRK2, is a therapeutic…

16min

Systematic phenomics analysis of autism-associated genes reveals parallel networks underlying reversible impairments in habituation [Neuroscience]

A major challenge facing the genetics of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is the large and growing number of candidate risk genes and gene variants of unknown functional significance. Here, we used Caenorhabditis elegans to systematically functionally characterize ASD-associated genes in vivo. Using our custom machine vision system, we quantified 26…

16min

The conserved structure of plant telomerase RNA provides the missing link for an evolutionary pathway from ciliates to humans [Biochemistry]

Telomerase is essential for maintaining telomere integrity. Although telomerase function is widely conserved, the integral telomerase RNA (TR) that provides a template for telomeric DNA synthesis has diverged dramatically. Nevertheless, TR molecules retain 2 highly conserved structural domains critical for catalysis: a template-proximal pseudoknot (PK) structure and a downstream stem-loop…

16min

ITPK1 mediates the lipid-independent synthesis of inositol phosphates controlled by metabolism [Biochemistry]

Inositol phosphates (IPs) comprise a network of phosphorylated molecules that play multiple signaling roles in eukaryotes. IPs synthesis is believed to originate with IP3 generated from PIP2 by phospholipase C (PLC). Here, we report that in mammalian cells PLC-generated IPs are rapidly recycled to inositol, and uncover the enzymology behind…

16min

Retraction for Cifuentes-Rojas et al., Two RNA subunits and POT1a are components of Arabidopsis telomerase [Retractions]

BIOCHEMISTRY Retraction for "Two RNA subunits and POT1a are components of Arabidopsis telomerase," by Catherine Cifuentes-Rojas, Kalpana Kannan, Lin Tseng, and Dorothy E. Shippen, which was first published December 16, 2010; 10.1073/pnas.1013021107 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108, 73–78). The authors wish to note the following: "It has come to…

16min

Differentiation of leukemic blasts is not completely blocked in acute myeloid leukemia [Cell Biology]

Hematopoiesis, the formation of blood cells, involves the hierarchical differentiation of immature blast cells into mature, functional cell types and lineages of the immune system. Hematopoietic stem cells precisely regulate self-renewal versus differentiation to balance the production of blood cells and maintenance of the stem cell pool. The canonical view…

16min

Evolutionary regain of lost gene circuit function [Applied Mathematics]

Evolutionary reversibility—the ability to regain a lost function—is an important problem both in evolutionary and synthetic biology, where repairing natural or synthetic systems broken by evolutionary processes may be valuable. Here, we use a synthetic positive-feedback (PF) gene circuit integrated into haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to test if the population…

16min

Neogenin-1 distinguishes between myeloid-biased and balanced Hoxb5+ mouse long-term hematopoietic stem cells [Cell Biology]

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) self-renew and generate all blood cells. Recent studies with single cell transplants and lineage tracing suggest that adult HSCs are diverse in their reconstitution and lineage potentials. However, prospective isolation of these subpopulations has remained challenging. Here, we identify Neogenin-1 (NEO1) as a unique surface marker…

16min

Integration of thermochemical water splitting with CO2 direct air capture [Engineering]

Renewable production of fuels and chemicals from direct air capture (DAC) of CO2 is a highly desired goal. Here, we report the integration of the DAC of CO2 with the thermochemical splitting of water to produce CO2, H2, O2, and electricity. The produced CO2 and H2 can be converted to…

16min

Migrating bison engineer the green wave [Ecology]

Newly emerging plants provide the best forage for herbivores. To exploit this fleeting resource, migrating herbivores align their movements to surf the wave of spring green-up. With new technology to track migrating animals, the Green Wave Hypothesis has steadily gained empirical support across a diversity of migratory taxa. This hypothesis…

16min

Cardiovascular risks impact human brain N-acetylaspartate in regionally specific patterns [Medical Sciences]

Cardiovascular risk factors such as dyslipidemia and hypertension increase the risk for white matter pathology and cognitive decline. We hypothesize that white matter levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a chemical involved in the metabolic pathway for myelin lipid synthesis, could serve as a biomarker that tracks the influence of cardiovascular risk…

16min

Increased Muscleblind levels by chloroquine treatment improve myotonic dystrophy type 1 phenotypes in in vitro and in vivo models [Genetics]

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a life-threatening and chronically debilitating neuromuscular disease caused by the expansion of a CTG trinucleotide repeat in the 3′ UTR of the DMPK gene. The mutant RNA forms insoluble structures capable of sequestering RNA binding proteins of the Muscleblind-like (MBNL) family, which ultimately leads…

16min

The proteasome regulator PI31 is required for protein homeostasis, synapse maintenance, and neuronal survival in mice [Developmental Biology]

Proteasome-mediated degradation of intracellular proteins is essential for cell function and survival. The proteasome-binding protein PI31 (Proteasomal Inhibitor of 31kD) promotes 26S assembly and functions as an adapter for proteasome transport in axons. As localized protein synthesis and degradation is especially critical in neurons, we generated a conditional loss of…

16min

Transcriptomic, epigenetic, and functional analyses implicate neutrophil diversity in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus [Immunology and Inflammation]

Neutrophil dysregulation is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is characterized by elevated levels of a pathogenic neutrophil subset known as low-density granulocytes (LDGs). The origin and phenotypic, functional, and pathogenic heterogeneity of LDGs remain to be systematically determined. Transcriptomics and epigenetic assessment of lupus LDGs,…

16min

Ecological origins of perceptual grouping principles in the auditory system [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Events and objects in the world must be inferred from sensory signals to support behavior. Because sensory measurements are temporally and spatially local, the estimation of an object or event can be viewed as the grouping of these measurements into representations of their common causes. Perceptual grouping is believed to…

16min

Mammalian germ cells are determined after PGC colonization of the nascent gonad [Developmental Biology]

Mammalian primordial germ cells (PGCs) are induced in the embryonic epiblast, before migrating to the nascent gonads. In fish, frogs, and birds, the germline segregates even earlier, through the action of maternally inherited germ plasm. Across vertebrates, migrating PGCs retain a broad developmental potential, regardless of whether they were induced…

16min

Assessing the sustainability of post-Green Revolution cereals in India [Sustainability Science]

Sustainable food systems aim to provide sufficient and nutritious food, while maximizing climate resilience and minimizing resource demands as well as negative environmental impacts. Historical practices, notably the Green Revolution, prioritized the single objective to maximize production over other nutritional and environmental dimensions. We quantitatively assess outcomes of alternative product

16min

Magnetic handshake materials as a scale-invariant platform for programmed self-assembly [Applied Physical Sciences]

Programmable self-assembly of smart, digital, and structurally complex materials from simple components at size scales from the macro to the nano remains a long-standing goal of material science. Here, we introduce a platform based on magnetic encoding of information to drive programmable self-assembly that works across length scales. Our building…

16min

Geometrical reorganization of Dectin-1 and TLR2 on single phagosomes alters their synergistic immune signaling [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Receptors of innate immune cells function synergistically to detect pathogens and elicit appropriate immune responses. Many receptor pairs also appear "colocalized" on the membranes of phagosomes, the intracellular compartments for pathogen ingestion. However, the nature of the seemingly receptor colocalization and the role it plays in immune regulation are unclear,…

16min

Niobium used as catalyst in fuel cell

Glycerol fuel cell can replace batteries in cell phones and laptops, and could be used in future to run electric cars and supply power to homes.

17min

Postpartum women are getting prescribed more opioids than needed

New University of Minnesota Medical School research finds postpartum women are generally getting prescribed more narcotics than they need.

17min

Study: Wildfires in Oregon's blue mountains to become more frequent, severe due to climate change

Under a warming climate, wildfires in Oregon's southern Blue Mountains will become more frequent, more extensive and more severe, according to a new Portland State University-led study.

17min

Cancer linked with a more than doubled risk of dying from stroke

People living with or beyond cancer are more likely to die from stroke than the general public, according to new Penn State research, and certain types of cancer may boost the risk even more.

17min

Sensory processing difficulties adversely affect functional behavior in multiple sclerosis

'This study underscores the influence of sensory processing in MS, and the importance of screening patients for these disorders,' said Dr. Goverover. 'Further research is needed to explore whether sensory processing difficulties could be of predictive value for disease severity and cognitive decline,' she continued. 'This approach may lead to interventions that improve function and support the ful

17min

Survey: Most teenagers in legalized states see marijuana marketing on social media

Despite restrictions on paid advertising cannabis on social media, most teenagers reported seeing marijuana marketing on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, according to a public health study authored by University of Massachusetts Amherst injury prevention researcher Jennifer Whitehill.

17min

Terraforming Mars Is an Addictive Board Game That Lets You Transform the Red Planet

If you've ever spent more than three minutes on Facebook, chances are you saw at least one thing that made you want to flee to another part of the solar system. And as you probably know, Mars is the closest option. Unfortunately, before we can start moving to Mars en masse, we're gonna have to do some work on the Martian atmosphere to create an environment that's livable for human beings. The pro

18min

Are You an Aspirational Recycler? Here's 9 Things You Actually Can't Recycle

Common misconceptions about what can be recycled leave some of our goods destined for the trash heap.

24min

Nature's secret recipe for making leaves

The secret recipe nature uses to make the diverse leaf shapes we see everywhere around us has been revealed in research.

24min

A Rare Meteor Shower May Grace The Skies Tonight

Some scientists predict the Alpha Monocerotids meteor shower will be visible at 11:50 p.m. ET. However, one NASA expert is skeptical of the forecast. (Image credit: Peter Komka/AP)

35min

Selecting Embryos for IQ, Height Not Currently Practical: Study

Building simulations based on real genetic data, researchers conclude Gattaca-like tactics to choose the traits of future offspring would yield little payoff.

37min

From chaos to order: 'microswimmers' form a swarm

Nature, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03575-4 Researchers wrangle tiny plastic spheres into imitating the synchronized swimming of a group of microbes.

38min

Vast musical database reveals common threads in songs around the world

Nature, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03567-4 Human tunes from every culture fall into four categories with well-defined features.

38min

Scientists identify underlying molecular mechanisms of Alexander disease

UNC School of Medicine researchers are learning about the differences in the underlying biology of patients with severe and milder forms of Alexander disease, a rare neurodegenerative condition that is often fatal to young children. Led by Natasha Snider, PhD, assistant professor of cell biology, an international group of scientists has discovered that the mutant form of GFAP undergoes different c

38min

What leads to compulsive alcohol use? New experiments into binge drinking provide answers

New study from neuroscientists at Vanderbilt provides initial answers to long-standing scientific questions on what causes the transition from moderate to compulsive alcohol consumption – and what makes some drinkers particularly vulnerable to developing alcohol use disorders.

38min

New antenna tech to equip ceramic coatings with heat radiation control

Researchers have developed a way for ceramic coatings to control heat radiation, a feature that could increase the performance of aircraft engines operating at high temperatures.

38min

How an AI solution can design new tuberculosis drug regimens

With a shortage of new tuberculosis drugs in the pipeline, a software tool from the University of Michigan can predict how current drugs–including unlikely candidates — can be combined in new ways to create more effective treatments.

38min

NATO Boss: Space Is Now a Military "Operational Domain"

Plead the Fifth Prior to this week, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) — a military alliance between 29 European and North American nations — operated in four domains: air, land, sea, and cyberspace. But on Wednesday, Jens Stoltenberg, NATO's secretary general, announced the organization's intention to add a fifth "operational domain" to its purview: space. Case for Space During a meet

39min

'It's Going To Get Worse': How U.S. Countertop Workers Started Getting Sick

The story of the first worker in the U.S. to suffer lung damage after cutting a new kind of countertop material shows the way a workplace hazard emerged in this country. (Image credit: Catie Dull/NPR)

42min

Theorists probe the relationship between 'strange metals' and high-temperature superconductors

Strange metals make interesting bedfellows for a phenomenon known as high-temperature superconductivity, which allows materials to carry electricity with zero loss.

45min

Financial therapy can aid well-being, stability

Financial therapy—a relatively new field that combines the emotional support of a marriage counselor with the money mindset of a financial planner—could help couples navigate disagreements, money concerns and financial conflicts before these issues tear relationships apart.

45min

A one-of-a-kind electric racing plane just debuted in Dubai

Condor Aviation's Director of Engineering Dean Speight with the team's electric racing airplane. (Condor Aviation/) This story originally featured on Flying Magazine As race teams ramp up design and innovation ahead of the inaugural Air Race E all-electric air race series to debut in 2020, Condor Aviation of North Yorkshire, England, unveiled their "White Lightning" race plane, the world's first

45min

NASA tracks a weaker tropical storm Fung-Wong

NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong as it continued weakening in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

51min

The landscape market has a category for any activity level

A new study produced as a collaboration between Michigan State and Texas A&M universities assessed the overall market condition for landscape plants using consumers' activity level as rated with the use of an active/passive continuum.

51min

Pollinator friendliness can extend beyond early spring

A study out of the University of Arkansas investigated whether bulbs can flower and persist in warm-season lawns while providing nutrition for pollinating insects.

51min

Pollinator friendliness can extend beyond early spring

A study out of the University of Arkansas investigated whether bulbs can flower and persist in warm-season lawns while providing nutrition for pollinating insects.

57min

Simple model explains why different four-legged animals adopt similar gaits

Most mammals walk at slow speeds and run or trot at intermediate speeds because these movement strategies are energetically optimal, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology by Delyle Polet and John Bertram of the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada.

57min

In the war on emerging crop diseases, scientists develop new 'War Room' simulations

Farmers rely on seed systems for access to high-quality, disease-free planting material at the start of the season. Good seed systems ensure access to seed for a variety of crops that are affordable and fully available at the start of the season. Unfortunately, this is not a reality for many smallholder farmers in developing countries, where seed systems often serve as conduits for the spread of c

57min

Simple model explains why different four-legged animals adopt similar gaits

Most mammals walk at slow speeds and run or trot at intermediate speeds because these movement strategies are energetically optimal, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology by Delyle Polet and John Bertram of the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada.

57min

Breaking (and restoring) graphene's symmetry in a twistable electronics device

A recent study from the labs of James Hone (mechanical engineering) and Cory Dean (physics) demonstrates a new way to tune the properties of two-dimensional (2-D) materials simply by adjusting the twist angle between them. The researchers built devices consisting of monolayer graphene encapsulated between two crystals of boron nitride and, by adjusting the relative twist angle between the layers,

57min

In the war on emerging crop diseases, scientists develop new 'War Room' simulations

Farmers rely on seed systems for access to high-quality, disease-free planting material at the start of the season. Good seed systems ensure access to seed for a variety of crops that are affordable and fully available at the start of the season. Unfortunately, this is not a reality for many smallholder farmers in developing countries, where seed systems often serve as conduits for the spread of c

57min

Daily briefing: 'Magic' mathematics hints at solution to the black hole information paradox

Nature, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03612-2 Holography reveals a possible escape hatch for information to get out. Plus: the origins of the sense of direction and how China caught US science agencies off guard.

59min

Fighting opioids with an unlikely supplemental painkiller: Anti-itch medicine

West Virginia University researcher Shane Kaski is investigating whether an anti-itch medication that targets a specific part of our nerve cells can make morphine — which targets a different part–more effective. His findings suggest it can.

1h

Scientists help soldiers figure out what robots know

An Army-led research team developed new algorithms and filled in knowledge gaps about how robots contribute to teams and what robots know about their environment and teammates.

1h

Diet pills, laxatives used for weight control linked with later eating disorder diagnosis

Among young women without an eating disorder diagnosis, those who use diet pills and laxatives for weight control had higher odds of receiving a subsequent first eating disorder diagnosis within one to three years than those who did not report using these products.

1h

Dengue infections dive where Wolbachia established in mosquitoes in parts of Asia, Australia, and Brazil

Amid a global surge of infections with dengue and fears climate change will make it worse, an international alliance of researchers presented new evidence today showing reports that the disease fell dramatically in communities in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil and Australia. The reduction in dengue cases occurred in communities where they had released lab-grown mosquitoes carrying Wolbachia, a natural

1h

Will Hurd Isn't Sold

If there's one Republican on the House Intelligence Committee who Democrats could reasonably hope would vote to impeach President Donald Trump, it's Representative Will Hurd of Texas. But even he isn't sold yet. Hurd, a moderate former CIA analyst who announced this summer that he would not seek reelection next year, joined every other House Republican in voting against a package of rules for the

1h

Financial therapy can aid well-being, stability

Financial therapy could help couples navigate disagreements, money concerns and financial conflicts before these issues tear relationships apart.

1h

Music May Really Be a Universal Language

Features common to the world's music may underlie a universal musical grammar, according to a controversial new study. Music_topNteaser.jpg nayef hammouri/Shutterstock Culture Thursday, November 21, 2019 – 15:45 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) — Whether songs of love or dance, sung by Beyoncé or the Guarani people in Paraguay, nearly every society makes music of some kind. Music, many

1h

The 'X17' particle: Scientists may have discovered the fifth force of nature

In 2016, observations from Hungarian researchers suggested the existence of an unknown type of subatomic particle. Subsequent analyses suggested that this particle was a new type of boson, the existence of which could help explain dark matter and other phenomena in the universe. A new paper from the same team of researchers is currently awaiting peer review. None Physicists have long known of fou

1h

Pollinator friendliness can extend beyond early spring

A study out of the University of Arkansas investigated whether bulbs can flower and persist in warm-season lawns while providing nutrition for pollinating insects.

1h

Interviews reveal 5 causes of older women's low libido

Women in their 60s report a number of causes for their low libido, researchers report. The qualitative study in the journal Menopause distills interviews with dozens of women about their lack of desire for sex into several major themes—including sexual dysfunction in their partners. "If a woman is having sexual problems, what's going on with her partner may be contributing. Sex doesn't occur in a

1h

What Makes a Song? It's the Same Recipe in Every Culture

Humans everywhere bring together pitch, tempo and the like in a similar fashion — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

These switches could make self-driving cars smarter

A smaller, faster electro-opto-mechanical switch for light beams could find use in self-driving cars and optical quantum technologies. The need of self-driving cars to assess their surroundings at lightning speed and to recognize people and obstacles takes current technologies to their limits. The new switch might be able to elegantly solve both problems in the future. The new work hinges on plas

1h

An Electric Tesla Cybertruck, the 8-Hour Workday Lie, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

1h

Theory of pore-scale transport to enable improved flow batteries

Redox flow batteries are an emerging technology for electrochemical energy storage that could help enhance the use of power produced by renewable energy resources. Scientists have addressed some of its challenges with a new theory to predict how fluid flow affects the ability of molecules in a flow battery to react at the surfaces of porous electrodes.

1h

Trump nominee to lead NOAA withdraws, citing medical issues

Nomination of Barry Myers had languished in Senate

1h

Natural gas extraction is booming—and so are harmful methane leaks

Pipelines aren't the only places that natural gas can leak out (Deposit Photos/) With new drilling technologies, natural gas extraction has boomed in recent years. In British Columbia, hydraulic fracturing (a.k.a. "fracking") in previously hard-to-reach deposits enabled natural gas production to double between 2006 and 2017 . Though natural gas burns cleaner than coal, it's no climate savior. And

1h

Watch NASA's Truck-Mounted Cannon Shoot Drones Into the Sky

Bam A team of researchers from Caltech and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory designed a drone that can be shot into the sky using a special vehicle-mounted cannon, The Verge reports . The goal is to launch drones when it's otherwise too dangerous or windy — or in emergency situations where the usual method is simply too slow. The Streamlined Quick Unfolding Investigation Drone (SQUID) is a footbal

1h

Urban Heat Islands Mean Warming Will Be Worse in Cities

The effect needs to be factored into adaptation strategies, which will differ from city to city — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Could Bill Gates' Secret Startup Kill Fossil Fuels?

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The Fermi Paradox: Late Filters

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Eliminating cracks in 3D-printed metal components

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NASA's Curiosity Rover Finds Unexplained Oxygen on Mars

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Wisconsin may be center of (nuclear) fusion universe

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The Death and Afterlife of the Mall

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Thorium and the Future of Energy

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Distant cosmic body renamed over Nazi backlash

When the New Horizons probe originally visited Arrokoth, the most distant celestial body to have ever been visited by a spacecraft, NASA researchers nicknamed the body "Ultima Thule." Thule refers to a distant mythological civilization. Although it originated in ancient Greek and Roman literature, the Nazis co-opted the term to refer to a mythological homeland of the Aryan people. The new name, A

1h

Germ-free lungs of newborn mice are partially protected against hyperoxia

Researchers have used a novel and first-of-its-kind newborn mouse model to study the effect of high oxygen concentrations, or hyperoxia, on lung development of newborn mice that are germ-free — meaning no microbes colonizing their lungs. Their goal is to learn how differences in the types of microbes that already colonize human lungs at birth — including extremely premature infants — can protec

1h

NASA tracks a weaker tropical storm Fung-Wong

NASA's Terra satellite captured an image of Tropical Storm Fung-Wong as it continued weakening in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

1h

Neighborhood matters for fentanyl-involved overdose deaths

Fentanyl overdoses cluster geographically more than non-fentanyl overdoses, according to a Columbia study, and are concentrated in resource deprived neighborhoods over and above what data show for opioid and polydrug overdoses. This is one of few studies to examine the local geographic distribution of drug overdoses and associated neighborhood-level risk factors. The researchers examined geographi

1h

Bone breakthrough may lead to more durable airplane wings

Researchers have made a new discovery about how seemingly minor aspects of the internal structure of bone can be strengthened to withstand repeated wear and tear, a finding that could help treat patients suffering from osteoporosis. It could also lead to the creation of more durable, lightweight materials for the aerospace industry.

1h

Germ-free lungs of newborn mice are partially protected against hyperoxia

Researchers have used a novel and first-of-its-kind newborn mouse model to study the effect of high oxygen concentrations, or hyperoxia, on lung development of newborn mice that are germ-free — meaning no microbes colonizing their lungs. Their goal is to learn how differences in the types of microbes that already colonize human lungs at birth — including extremely premature infants — can protec

1h

Who is left behind in Mass Drug Administration?

Ensuring equity in the prevention of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is critical to reach NTD elimination goals as well as to inform Universal Health Coverage (UHC). Now, researchers have unmasked inequities in the delivery of Mass Drug Administration (MDA) programs that leave vulnerable populations underserved.

1h

Online reviews reveal need for specialized drug treatment facility assessments

With no national standard to measure drug treatment facilities, new research reveals opportunities to learn from patients to help create metrics.

1h

Rise of the bots: Team completes first census of Wikipedia bots

Researchers have completed the first analysis of all 1,601 of Wikipedia's bots, using computer algorithms to classify them by function and shed light on the ways that machine intelligences and human users work together to improve and expand the world's largest digital encyclopedia.

1h

Life under extreme conditions at hot springs in the ocean

Marine researchers decipher adaptation mechanisms of biological communities to an active volcano in Taiwan.

1h

Paired Images of Melting Glaciers and Flooding Wetlands Tell the Story of Global Climate Change

Photographer Tina Freeman's exhibition 'Lamentations' at the New Orleans Museum of Art juxtaposes two different environments

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What Makes a Song? It's the Same Recipe in Every Culture

Humans everywhere bring together pitch, tempo and the like in a similar fashion — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

What Makes a Song? It's the Same Recipe in Every Culture

Humans everywhere bring together pitch, tempo and the like in a similar fashion — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

The 'Father of Cannabis Research' on the Untapped Potential of Marijuana as Medicine

Raphael Mechoulam discovered THC over 50 years ago. Decades later, he's still convinced cannabis could help millions.

2h

Fate of Male Birth Control Injection Now in Government's Hands

Women have a number of options for contraception, from pills to implants to injections. But aside from condoms, men have just one: sterilization, which isn't always ideal given that it involves surgery and can be difficult to reverse. That could soon change, though, as researchers in India have completed testing on a male birth control injection — and the only thing now standing in its way is reg

2h

Non-coding DNA located outside chromosomes may help drive glioblastoma

According to a new study, extra DNA scooped up and copied alongside cancer-causing genes helps keep tumors going — elements that could represent new drug targets for brain tumors and other cancers notoriously difficult to treat.

2h

Almost a third of tropical Africa's flora faces extinction

31.7% of tropical Africa's vascular plant species could be threatened with extinction, reveals an international study. Using a new approach based on the key elements of the assessment process used by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), for the first time researchers have been able to assess the potential conservation status of tropical flora on the scale of a continent.

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Simulations suggest embryo selection based on traits like height or IQ is still far off

The recent live births resulting from human embryonic CRISPR editing have heightened global concerns regarding 'designer babies.' Currently, the most practical approach to genetic 'enhancement' is preimplantation genetic screening of IVF embryos. The ability to select for traits that are brought about by multiple genes — rather than genetic diseases caused by a single mutation — is more far off

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Theory of pore-scale transport to enable improved flow batteries

Redox flow batteries are an emerging technology for electrochemical energy storage that could help enhance the use of power produced by renewable energy resources. Scientists have addressed some of its challenges with a new theory to predict how fluid flow affects the ability of molecules in a flow battery to react at the surfaces of porous electrodes.

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Study probes relationship between strange metals and high-temperature superconductors

SLAC theorists have observed strange metallicity in a well-known model for simulating the behavior of materials with strongly correlated electrons, which join forces to produce unexpected phenomena rather than acting independently. Their work provides a foundation for connecting theories of strange metals to models of superconductors and other strongly correlated materials.

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Bone breakthrough may lead to more durable airplane wings

Cornell researchers have made a new discovery about how seemingly minor aspects of the internal structure of bone can be strengthened to withstand repeated wear and tear, a finding that could help treat patients suffering from osteoporosis. It could also lead to the creation of more durable, lightweight materials for the aerospace industry.

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Army project may improve military communications by boosting 5G technology

An Army-funded project may boost 5G and mm-Wave technologies, improving military communications and sensing equipment.

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Doctors Test if Rapid Chilling Can Save Trauma Patients' Lives

A clinical trial is underway to see if suspended animation, in which the body is cooled to 10–15 °Celsius, could slow patients' decline and give doctors time to operate.

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Grid reliability under climate change may require more power generation capacity

Researchers applied a new modeling approach for long-term planning of the U.S. power grid under future climate and water resource conditions. The new approach shows the grid may need an additional 5.3% to 12% of power-generating capacity to meet demand and reliability requirements. The changes would lower water use and carbon emissions, potentially helping mitigate future climate changes.

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A new antibiotic to combat drug-resistant bacteria is in sight

Researchers have discovered a new active substance effective against gram negative bacteria that targets a previously unknown site of action: 'Darobactin'.

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Study offers first large-sample evidence of the effect of ethics training on financial sector

New research from Notre Dame offers the first large-sample study on how rules and ethics training affects behavior and employment decisions in the financial sector.

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Exposing office distractions and effects on worker productivity

Scientists have conducted an experiment using thermal imaging and wearable sensors to better understand the stress and performance patterns of so-called knowledge workers.

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Wolfe Creek Crater younger than previously thought

Wolfe Creek Crater, one of the world's largest meteorite craters, is much younger than previously thought.

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Why a digital dollar isn't coming anytime soon (or so the Fed says)

While central bank digital currencies may address problems in other countries, the US doesn't have those problems, according to Fed chair Jerome Powell.

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Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2019

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ny, unik bog om Danmarks første kvindelige læge og akademiker

I 1885 bliver Nielsine Nielsen Danmarks første læge, og en ny bog om kvinden – baseret på en nyligt fundet dagbog – er en perle skrevet om en af kronjuvelerne blandt danske læger, skriver Liselotte Højgaard, professor og klinikchef på Rigshospitalet.

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Arbejdspresset på Rigets patologiafdeling truer lægernes helbred

Rigshospitalets patologiafdeling har længe ligget underdrejet i et hav af prøver med en udtjent maskinpark og for få patologer. Arbejdspresset er så stort, at det truer personalets helbred, advarer Arbejdstilsynet. Det tager mindst et årti, før afdelingen er på fode igen, siger klinikchefen, der nåede at vise Dagens Medicin rundt, før hun sagde op.

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Americans' need for a perfect lawn comes down to neighborhood peer pressure

Good old peer pressure may be why Americans go to such great lengths to keep their yards looking sharp. (Jim Pruitt/) Lawns are the epitome of Americana. Covering nearly four times the land area of corn, the yard's characteristic green grass is the United States' most irrigated crop. Maintaining these environments is both resource intensive—homeowners routinely apply fertilizers, spray pesticides

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New hybrid device can both capture and store solar energy

Researchers have reported a new device that can both efficiently capture solar energy and store it until it is needed, offering promise for applications ranging from power generation to distillation and desalination.

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Tesla's Cybertruck Is Coming—Here's How to Watch the New Pickup's Announcement

Eager to challenge the dominance of Ford's F-150, Elon Musk and company plan to unveil a pickup truck Thursday at 8 pm PT.

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Breaking (and restoring) graphene's symmetry in a twistable electronics device

A recent study demonstrates a new way to tune the properties of 2D materials simply by adjusting the twist angle between them. The researchers built devices consisting of monolayer graphene encapsulated between two crystals of boron nitride and, by adjusting the relative twist angle between the layers, they were able to create multiple moiré pattern–"the first time anyone has seen the full rotat

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Humans across cultures may share the same universal musical grammar

Music appears to be made from the same simple building blocks of pitches and chords around the world, upending the prevailing view that universals don't exist

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Adobe explains how it plans to improve Photoshop on iPad

Earlier this month, Adobe finally released its iPad version of Photoshop. Users were excited to be able to create illustrations and designs on the go, but many were left underwhelmed …

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Humans across cultures may share the same universal musical grammar

Music appears to be made from the same simple building blocks of pitches and chords around the world, upending the prevailing view that universals don’t exist

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Grid reliability under climate change may require more power generation capacity

Researchers applied a new modeling approach for long-term planning of the U.S. power grid under future climate and water resource conditions. The new approach shows the grid may need an additional 5.3% to 12% of power-generating capacity to meet demand and reliability requirements. The changes would lower water use and carbon emissions, potentially helping mitigate future climate changes.

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How to design and control robots with stretchy, flexible bodies

MIT researchers have invented a way to efficiently optimize the control and design of soft robots for target tasks, which has traditionally been a monumental undertaking in computation.

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Breaking (and restoring) graphene's symmetry in a twistable electronics device

A recent Columbia Engineering study demonstrates a new way to tune the properties of 2D materials simply by adjusting the twist angle between them. The researchers built devices consisting of monolayer graphene encapsulated between two crystals of boron nitride and, by adjusting the relative twist angle between the layers, they were able to create multiple moiré pattern–"the first time anyone has

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Simple model explains why different four-legged animals adopt similar gaits

Most mammals walk at slow speeds and run or trot at intermediate speeds because these movement strategies are energetically optimal, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology by Delyle Polet and John Bertram of the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada.

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Nature's secret recipe for making leaves

The secret recipe nature uses to make the diverse leaf shapes we see everywhere around us has been revealed in research.

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Magnesium deprivation stops pathogen growth

When pathogens invade the cells, our body combats them using various methods. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now been able to show how a cellular pump keeps such invading pathogens in check. As the researchers report in "Science", this pump causes a magnesium shortage, which in turn restricts bacterial growth.

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New machine learning algorithms offer safety and fairness guarantees

Writing in Science, Thomas and his colleagues Yuriy Brun, Andrew Barto and graduate student Stephen Giguere at UMass Amherst, Bruno Castro da Silva at the Federal University of Rio Grande del Sol, Brazil, and Emma Brunskill at Stanford University this week introduce a new framework for designing machine learning algorithms that make it easier for users of the algorithm to specify safety and fairne

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Big plans to save the planet depend on nanoscopic materials improving energy storage

In the latest edition of Science, an international team of researchers, led by Drexel University professors Yury Gogotsi, PhD, and Ekaterina Pomerantseva, PhD, present a comprehensive analysis of two decades of energy storage research involving nanomaterials. The authors lay out a roadmap for how this technology can enable the world's urgent shift toward better energy storage devices and sustainab

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New algorithms train AI to avoid specific bad behaviors

Robots, self-driving cars and other intelligent machines could become better-behaved if machine-learning designers adopt a new framework for building AI with safeguards against specific undesirable outcomes. The researchers dub their approach 'Seldonian algorithms' — a reference to the Hari Seldon character of sci-fi author Isaac Asimov, who coined the laws of robotics starting with: 'A robot may

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Competing signals shrink or grow liver tumor at the margins

Activating the Hippo molecular signaling pathway in liver tumor cells drives tumor growth — but activating the same pathway in healthy cells surrounding the tumor suppresses tumor growth.

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Algorithm for preventing 'undesirable behavior' works in gender fairness and health tests

A new framework for designing machine learning algorithms helps to prevent intelligent machines from exhibiting undesirable behavior, researchers report.

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Human songs share universal patterns across world's cultures

From love songs to lullabies, songs from cultures spanning the globe — despite their diversity — exhibit universal patterns, according to a new study.

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Brain biomarker predicts compulsive drinking in mice

A neural circuit in the brains of mice controls the development of compulsive drinking disorders, according to a new study.

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Music is universal

Exactly what about music is universal, and what varies? Harvard researchers have demonstrated that across cultures, people share psychological mechanisms that make certain songs sound 'right' in specific social and emotional contexts.

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Dung beetle discovery revises biologists' understanding of how nature innovates

The discovery that thoracic horns in dung beetles emerge from the same gene network as wings could revise how biologists understand 'innovation' in nature.

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Brain biomarker predicts compulsive drinking

Although alcohol use is ubiquitous in modern society, only a portion of individuals develop alcohol use disorders or addiction. Yet, scientists have not understood why some individuals are prone to develop drinking problems, while others are not. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discovered a brain circuit that controls alcohol drinking behavior in mice, and can be used as a biomarker for predi

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Who is left behind in Mass Drug Administration?

Ensuring equity in the prevention of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) is critical to reach NTD elimination goals as well as to inform Universal Health Coverage (UHC). Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have unmasked inequities in the delivery of Mass Drug Administration (MDA) programs that leave vulnerable populations underserved.

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Genetic studies reveal how rat lungworm evolves

Rat lungworm is a parasitic disease, spread through contaminated food, which affects the brain and spinal cord. Now, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases that a detail analysis of the genetics of the rat lungworm parasite — Angiostrongylus cantonensis — reveal signatures of adaptive evolution that have let the parasite survive and may serve as future drug targets.

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Predicting metastasis from primary tumor size

A new mathematical model uses the size of a cancer patient's initial, primary tumor to predict whether undetectable secondary tumors are already present. Stefano Avanzini and Tibor Antal of the University of Edinburgh, UK, present the model in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Deep learning to analyze neurological problems

Getting to the doctor's office for a check-up can be challenging for someone with a neurological disorder that impairs their movement, such as a stroke. But what if the patient could just take a video clip of their movements with a smart phone and forward the results to their doctor? Work by Dr. Hardeep Ryait and colleagues at CCBN-University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada, publishing Nov. 21 in

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Animal study finds link between MAP2 mutation and hereditary hair diseases

The genetic mechanism of hereditary human hair diseases, such as alopecia and thinning hair, has drawn much attention in human genetics research, yet many questions around this mechanism persist. A recent animal study in The FASEB Journal revealed that a mutation in the gene that encodes a protein called MAP2 (for 'microtubule-associated protein 2') may be an essential component of the hairless ph

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Police Reports: Meth, Heroin, Cocaine Found at Tesla Factory

Giggedy Enigmatic entrepreneur Elon Musk apologized to SpaceX employees after he puffed a joint on-air with Joe Rogan, claiming in a mass email that "SpaceX maintains a drug free workplace ." But according to a cache of police reports obtained by government transparency group PlainSite, the Nevada "Gigafactory" operated by Tesla — Musk's other venture — is anything but drug-free. Tesla Drugs The

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Technical Bias Widespread in RNA-Seq Datasets

Genes that are exceptionally long or short are overrepresented in some published reports, which can lead to misinterpreted results.

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Upper GI bleed guidelines could prevent ER visits

New guidelines for the management of patients with upper GI bleeds suggest, among other findings, that doctors can send such patients home safely. The work could help reduce pressures in busy emergency departments. Upper GI bleeding is an acute internal bleeding condition which predominantly affects those over 50. Ulcer most often cause the common condition. "Sending patients home was a sensitive

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Investigational drug for people with treatment-resistant epilepsy

Imagine not being able to drive, shower alone or even work because you are never quite sure when the next seizure will leave you incapacitated. Hope may be on the horizon for epilepsy patients who have had limited success with seizure drugs.

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New hybrid device can both capture and store solar energy

Researchers have reported a new device that can both efficiently capture solar energy and store it until it is needed, offering promise for applications ranging from power generation to distillation and desalination.

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Researchers uncover new molecular drivers of Parkinson's disease

Scientists have uncovered new molecular drivers of Parkinson's disease using a sophisticated statistical technique called multiscale gene network analysis (MGNA). The team was also able to determine how these molecular drivers impact the functions of genes involved in the disease. The results may point to potential new treatments.

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'One among millions': DNA is not the only genetic molecule

The central dogma of biology states that genetic information flows from DNA to RNA to proteins, but new research suggests that this may not be the only way for life to work. A sophisticated computer analysis revealed that millions of other molecules could be used to function in place of the two nucleic acids, DNA and RNA. The results have important implications for developing new drugs, the origi

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Stacking control

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Sense and respond

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Dung beetles borrowed wing genes to grow their horns

The beetle horn should no longer be considered a "novel" structure, study suggests

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Investigation reveals widespread double dipping in NIH program to pay off school debt

Program aims to keep young scientists from moving to pharma, but many take industry money anyway

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MilliporeSigma: Dialfiltration vs. Dialysis

Diafiltration and dialysis can be used to exchange buffer in different ways. Learn more about when to use each in the video below.

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Brain Circuit Involved in Compulsive Drinking Identified in Mice

Activity in this circuit predicted which animals would keep drinking despite negative consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers Want Guardrails to Help Prevent Bias in AI

Researchers suggest limiting the possible results from an algorithm, particularly when non-experts are at the controls.

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Taking cues from binge drinking mice

Research identifies biomarker for compulsive consumption.

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News at a glance

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Double dip

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The world in a song

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Excavating Uruk

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Of crows and tools

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Impact acidification

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Structural mechanism of a Rag GTPase activation checkpoint by the lysosomal folliculin complex

The tumor suppressor folliculin (FLCN) enables nutrient-dependent activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) protein kinase via its guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) activating protein (GAP) activity toward the GTPase RagC. Concomitant with mTORC1 inactivation by starvation, FLCN relocalizes from the cytosol to lysosomes. To determine the lysosomal function of FLCN, we r

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Exceptional continental record of biotic recovery after the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction

We report a time-calibrated stratigraphic section in Colorado that contains unusually complete fossils of mammals, reptiles, and plants and elucidates the drivers and tempo of biotic recovery during the poorly known first million years after the Cretaceous–Paleogene mass extinction (KPgE). Within ~100 thousand years (ka) post-KPgE, mammalian taxonomic richness doubled, and maximum mammalian body

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Direct observation of van der Waals stacking-dependent interlayer magnetism

Controlling the crystal structure is a powerful approach for manipulating the fundamental properties of solids. In van der Waals materials, this control can be achieved by modifying the stacking order through rotation and translation between the layers. Here, we observed stacking-dependent interlayer magnetism in the two-dimensional (2D) magnetic semiconductor chromium tribromide (CrBr 3 ), which

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Strange metallicity in the doped Hubbard model

Strange or bad metallic transport, defined by incompatibility with the conventional quasiparticle picture, is a theme common to many strongly correlated materials, including high-temperature superconductors. The Hubbard model represents a minimal starting point for modeling strongly correlated systems. Here we demonstrate strange metallic transport in the doped two-dimensional Hubbard model using

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Highly enantioselective carbene insertion into N-H bonds of aliphatic amines

Aliphatic amines strongly coordinate, and therefore easily inhibit, the activity of transition-metal catalysts, posing a marked challenge to nitrogen-hydrogen (N–H) insertion reactions. Here, we report highly enantioselective carbene insertion into N–H bonds of aliphatic amines using two catalysts in tandem: an achiral copper complex and chiral amino-thiourea. Coordination by a homoscorpionate li

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Host resistance factor SLC11A1 restricts Salmonella growth through magnesium deprivation

The pleiotropic host resistance factor SLC11A1 (NRAMP1) defends against diverse intracellular pathogens in mammals by yet-unknown mechanisms. We compared Salmonella infection of coisogenic mice with different SLC11A1 alleles. SLC11A1 reduced Salmonella replication and triggered up-regulation of uptake systems for divalent metal cations but no other stress responses. SLC11A1 modestly diminished ir

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Preventing undesirable behavior of intelligent machines

Intelligent machines using machine learning algorithms are ubiquitous, ranging from simple data analysis and pattern recognition tools to complex systems that achieve superhuman performance on various tasks. Ensuring that they do not exhibit undesirable behavior—that they do not, for example, cause harm to humans—is therefore a pressing problem. We propose a general and flexible framework for des

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Beetle horns evolved from wing serial homologs

Understanding how novel complex traits originate is a foundational challenge in evolutionary biology. We investigated the origin of prothoracic horns in scarabaeine beetles, one of the most pronounced examples of secondary sexual traits in the animal kingdom. We show that prothoracic horns derive from bilateral source tissues; that diverse wing genes are functionally required for instructing this

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A cortical-brainstem circuit predicts and governs compulsive alcohol drinking

What individual differences in neural activity predict the future escalation of alcohol drinking from casual to compulsive? The neurobiological mechanisms that gate the transition from moderate to compulsive drinking remain poorly understood. We longitudinally tracked the development of compulsive drinking across a binge-drinking experience in male mice. Binge drinking unmasked individual differe

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Glutamine blockade induces divergent metabolic programs to overcome tumor immune evasion

The metabolic characteristics of tumors present considerable hurdles to immune cell function and cancer immunotherapy. Using a glutamine antagonist, we metabolically dismantled the immunosuppressive microenvironment of tumors. We demonstrate that glutamine blockade in tumor-bearing mice suppresses oxidative and glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells, leading to decreased hypoxia, acidosis, and nut

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A shared gene drives lateral root development and root nodule symbiosis pathways in Lotus

Legumes develop root nodules in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Rhizobia evoke cell division of differentiated cortical cells into root nodule primordia for accommodating bacterial symbionts. In this study, we show that NODULE INCEPTION (NIN), a transcription factor in Lotus japonicus that is essential for initiating cortical cell divisions during nodulation, regulates the gene

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Computational design of a modular protein sense-response system

Sensing and responding to signals is a fundamental ability of living systems, but despite substantial progress in the computational design of new protein structures, there is no general approach for engineering arbitrary new protein sensors. Here, we describe a generalizable computational strategy for designing sensor-actuator proteins by building binding sites de novo into heterodimeric protein-

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Peritumoral activation of the Hippo pathway effectors YAP and TAZ suppresses liver cancer in mice

The Hippo signaling pathway and its two downstream effectors, the YAP and TAZ transcriptional coactivators, are drivers of tumor growth in experimental models. Studying mouse models, we show that YAP and TAZ can also exert a tumor-suppressive function. We found that normal hepatocytes surrounding liver tumors displayed activation of YAP and TAZ and that deletion of Yap and Taz in these peritumora

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New Products

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Energy storage: The future enabled by nanomaterials

Lithium-ion batteries, which power portable electronics, electric vehicles, and stationary storage, have been recognized with the 2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry. The development of nanomaterials and their related processing into electrodes and devices can improve the performance and/or development of the existing energy storage systems. We provide a perspective on recent progress in the applicatio

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Deep learning to analyze neurological problems

Getting to the doctor's office for a check-up can be challenging for someone with a neurological disorder that impairs their movement, such as a stroke. But what if the patient could just take a video clip of their movements with a smart phone and forward the results to their doctor? Work by Dr. Hardeep Ryait and colleagues at CCBN-University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada, publishing November 2

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Nature's secret recipe for making leaves

The secret recipe nature uses to make the diverse leaf shapes we see everywhere around us has been revealed in research.

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Magnesium deprivation stops pathogen growth

When pathogens invade cells, our body combats them using various methods. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now been able to show how a cellular pump keeps such invading pathogens in check. As the researchers report in Science, this pump causes a magnesium shortage, which in turn restricts bacterial growth.

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Dung beetle discovery revises biologists' understanding of how nature innovates

When studying how organisms evolve, biologists consider most traits, or features, as derived from some earlier version already present in their ancestors. Few traits are regarded as truly "novel."

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Study establishes how some songs sound 'right' in different social contexts, all over the world

Nearly 200 years ago, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow asserted "Music is the universal language of mankind." Today, scientists at Harvard have published the most comprehensive scientific study to determine if the American poet's words were mere cliché, or cultural truism.

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Deep learning to analyze neurological problems

Getting to the doctor's office for a check-up can be challenging for someone with a neurological disorder that impairs their movement, such as a stroke. But what if the patient could just take a video clip of their movements with a smart phone and forward the results to their doctor? Work by Dr. Hardeep Ryait and colleagues at CCBN-University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada, publishing November 2

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Nature's secret recipe for making leaves

The secret recipe nature uses to make the diverse leaf shapes we see everywhere around us has been revealed in research.

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Magnesium deprivation stops pathogen growth

When pathogens invade cells, our body combats them using various methods. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now been able to show how a cellular pump keeps such invading pathogens in check. As the researchers report in Science, this pump causes a magnesium shortage, which in turn restricts bacterial growth.

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Dung beetle discovery revises biologists' understanding of how nature innovates

When studying how organisms evolve, biologists consider most traits, or features, as derived from some earlier version already present in their ancestors. Few traits are regarded as truly "novel."

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Brain Circuit Involved in Compulsive Drinking Identified in Mice

Activity in this circuit predicted which animals would keep drinking despite negative consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brain Circuit Involved in Compulsive Drinking Identified in Mice

Activity in this circuit predicted which animals would keep drinking despite negative consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In the war on emerging crop diseases, scientists develop new 'War Room' simulations

This research evaluated the important sellers and villages in the Gulu region of Uganda, analyzing their potential role for spreading disease and distributing improved varieties of seed. The researchers used this data for 'War Room' style simulation analyses that highlighted the potential paths that a pathogen could take in advance of its spread.

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'Ice fossils' from the desert

Algerian meteorite offers new insights into early asteroid formation.

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Bacteria keeping up the fight against dengue

New Wolbachia strain nearly halved cases in Malaysia.

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An in-depth look at the Devil Worm

First genome sequencing of a subterrestrial animal hints at how it survives.

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Concrete, clean thyself

Scientists say their new version does just that.

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A new view of our Milky Way

Outback telescope captures low-frequency radio emission.

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SpaceX Starship Prototype Bursts During Pressure Testing

SpaceX has been working on its Starship prototype in Boca Chica, Texas for the last several months. It even invited reporters to check out the shiny sci-fi rocket a few weeks back. At the time, CEO Elon Musk said the Starship prototype would make a high-altitude test flight by the end of the year, but that won't be happening now. The rocket blew itself wide open during a pressure test Wednesday a

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Best Cars of the 2019 LA Auto Show

he Volkswagen ID. Space Vizzion Concept (with a period in the name) is a station wagon able to go 300 miles, driven by a 275-hp rear electric motor, with an optional front motor for a 355-hp AWD wagon. The concept lowers wind resistance by replacing door handles with touch surfaces. Inside, rhere's a floatng 15.6-inch touchscreen. A production version will be sold in the US as well as Europe, VW

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Science film festival announces new award categories

SCINEMA, Australia's largest science film festival, is calling for entries.

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NASA Is Testing an Alien-Hunting Submarine in Antarctica

Next Best Thing The icy oceans of far-off moons are a promising lead in the hunt for extraterrestrial life . But before NASA sends an in-development rover to dive into the chilly waters of Europa or Enceladus , the agency wants to know it's up to the task — so it's sending the bot to Antarctica for an extended swim. Building Endurance On Monday, NASA released a statement revealing that the Buoyan

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A Reminder: Donald Trump Has Been Credibly Accused of Rape

To watch the public impeachment hearings of Donald Trump is to experience a very particular form of whiplash. The House inquiry has featured a series of collisions, between Democrats and Republicans, yes, but also between accountability and its opposite. Here is a proceeding led in part by lawmakers who have, when it comes to the president, repeatedly prioritized fealty over facts. And here is th

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A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood Is More Than a Feel-Good Movie

The public's reverence for the children's entertainer Fred Rogers has only increased since the release of the documentary Won't You Be My Neighbor? last year, and yet the many tributes to his saintliness leave something out. That's not to argue that Mister Rogers had some hidden dark side—he was simply human like the rest of us, fallible, subject to mood swings. He didn't magically exude decency;

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Unusual PhD Thesis: Let's Use Bacteria to Colonize Mars

Bacterial Colony A Ph.D. student has an unusual idea for terraforming and colonizing Mars : send spacecrafts, loaded up with bacteria, and let them do the bulk of the work. By sending specific microbes to Mars, Delft University of Technology doctoral candidate Benjamin Lehner argues that humans who make the journey years later will arrive at a planet full of raw materials that could be used to bu

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Runaway inflammation may trigger depression in pregnancy

A runaway, inflammatory immune response may be responsible for triggering severe depression during and after pregnancy, according to a new study. Not to be mistaken with the rapidly passing "baby blues," which is common right after delivery, pregnancy-related depression is a serious medical condition that can escalate in severity and may even require hospitalization. One in five new mothers exper

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Trump's pick to lead US oceans agency withdraws

Nature, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03615-z Former AccuWeather chief Barry Myers cited health concerns, after waiting more than two years for Senate approval.

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Study offers first large-sample evidence of the effect of ethics training on financial sector

New research from Notre Dame offers the first large-sample study on how rules and ethics training affects behavior and employment decisions in the financial sector.

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SpaceX Loses First Starship Prototype During Testing

The aerospace company has plans to move forward with building and testing their other upcoming prototypes for the rocket.

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Tiny Parasitic Wasp Named After Idris Elba Hijacks Stink Bug Eggs

The wasp genus Idris had only been known to infest spider eggs, until now

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The Pediatrician Who Woke America Up to the Lead Crisis

Thanks to one man's perseverance, we know even small doses of lead can permanently harm growing kids.

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Google's Android bug bounty program will now pay out $1.5 million – CNET

Hacking the Pixel's Titan M chip and finding exploits in the developer preview versions of Android will earn you the big bucks.

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Red tide grew drastically along Florida's west coast in less than a month

In a little less than three weeks, red tide bloom intensified greatly along Florida's west coast, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's Wednesday report.

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Alphabet's Dream of an 'Everyday Robot' Is Just Out of Reach

Google's parent is infusing robots with artificial intelligence so they can help with tasks like lending a supporting arm to the elderly, or sorting trash.

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Billions of fake accounts: Who's messaging you on Facebook?

Facebook's recent transparency report revealed that it took down 5.4 billion accounts in 2019 thus far, a huge jump from 2018's 3.3 billion removals. Facebook claims that this jump in take-downs is due to improved methods for identifying fake accounts, but it has to be assumed that some are still slipping through the cracks. What are the primary activities of these fake accounts? None Recently, F

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Bitcoins bruger lige så meget el som Danmark

PLUS. Aalborg-forskere står bag et nyt og gennemarbejdet estimat for energiforbrug og CO2-udledning for bitcoin-systemet.

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A new antibiotic to combat drug-resistant bacteria is in sight

An international team of researchers, with the participation of Giessen University and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), discovered a new active substance effective against gram negative bacteria that targets a previously unknown site of action: 'Darobactin'.

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Suspended animation for emergency medicine: your questions answered

Yesterday, New Scientist broke the news that suspended animation has been tried on humans for the first time. Helen Thomson answers all your questions on this new procedure

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Convert your dog's age into human years using this new formula

Conventional wisdom says that one human year is the equivalent of seven dog years, but a new analysis suggests we've been getting this all wrong

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Världens äldsta bevis för insektspollinering hittat i bärnsten

En 99 miljoner år gammal skalbagge och flertal pollenkorn har hittats inkapslade i en bärnsten. Fyndet är det äldsta beviset någonsin på hur insekter och blommor gynnat varandras överlevnad.

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Building better bacteriophage to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Researchers are pursuing engineered bacteriophage as alternatives to antibiotics to infect and kill multi-drug resistant bacteria. The potential for an innovative synthetic biology approach to enhance phage therapeutics and the role a biofoundry can play in making this approach feasible and effective is discussed in an article in PHAGE: Therapy, Applications, and Research.

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NASA found Atlantic's Sebastien was fighting wind shear

NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Sebastien that showed wind shear had pushed the bulk of its clouds and showers to the southeast of the center.

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Building better bacteriophage to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Researchers are pursuing engineered bacteriophage as alternatives to antibiotics to infect and kill multi-drug resistant bacteria. The potential for an innovative synthetic biology approach to enhance phage therapeutics and the role a biofoundry can play in making this approach feasible and effective is discussed in an article in PHAGE: Therapy, Applications, and Research.

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Mathematician develops model to control spread of aquatic invasive species

Adjusting the water flow rate in a river can prevent invasive species from moving upstream and expanding their range. An applied mathematician at UT has developed a partial differential equation model to find the desired flow rate to reduce invasive populations.

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Exposing office distractions and effects on worker productivity

With seemingly endless emails, phone calls and meetings, it's no secret that working in an office environment can be quite stressful. Understanding how stress manifests by exposing the effects of distractions can help unlock an office workers' full potential, according to new data collected by researchers from three university laboratories.

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Soft skin-like robots you can put in your pocket

Stretchable skin-like robots that can be rolled up and put in your pocket have been developed by a team using a new way of embedding artificial muscles and electrical adhesion into soft materials.

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Life under extreme conditions at hot springs in the ocean

The volcanic island of Kueishantao in northeastern Taiwan is an extreme habitat for marine organisms. With an active volcano, the coastal area has a unique hydrothermal field with a multitude of hot springs and volcanic gases. The acidity of the study area was among the highest in the world. The easily accessible shallow water around the volcanic island therefore represents an ideal research envir

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Using controlled environment food production to solve food shortages

A review of the literature led by researchers from the University of Florida attempts to provide clarification and analysis on various aspects of what a controlled environment system entails and the extent to which differing food production approaches can be applied to the many current and hopeful endeavors of Urban Agriculture.

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'Dream team' to study ice loss on Greenland glacier to better forecast rising oceans

Last month a new projection of sea-level rise by the year 2050 spurred headlines showing more coastal cities around the world will be submerged than earlier models have predicted. Just how fast and how high sea levels rise globally will be determined by the melting of ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica. However, the acceleration, retreat and thinning of glaciers where they meet ocean water are

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Bold space mission to bring back rocks from Mars takes shape

NASA and Europe settle on suite of missions to bring back rocks from the Red Planet

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NASA found Atlantic's Sebastien was fighting wind shear

NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Sebastien that showed wind shear had pushed the bulk of its clouds and showers to the southeast of the center.

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Using controlled environment food production to solve food shortages

Before land and labor shortages prompted by the Industrial Revolution forced food production to move away from cities, agriculture was central to urban environments and their planning. Now, certain shifts in consumption habits and preferences are allowing urban agriculture to make a comeback to address sustainability issues in our food system and promote social and environmental cohesion by reduci

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Uber Is Going to Start Recording Audio During Rides

Soon, both Uber drivers and passengers will have the option of recording audio during their rides. According to internal Uber communications viewed by The Washington Post , the goal of the new feature is to increase safety — but it's easy to see how the move could be less about Uber looking out for its users and more about the company protecting its own interests. Uber will launch the new feature

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Back on all fours—Ronda the dog's pioneering prosthetic surgery

Ronda seemed doomed. The six-year-old French mastiff had developed a tumour on her paw that required amputation and the fitting of a prosthetic leg—a rare and complex operation.

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New twist in quest to develop understanding of time crystalline behavior

The quest to develop the understanding for time crystalline behaviour in quantum systems has taken a new, exciting twist.

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Back on all fours—Ronda the dog's pioneering prosthetic surgery

Ronda seemed doomed. The six-year-old French mastiff had developed a tumour on her paw that required amputation and the fitting of a prosthetic leg—a rare and complex operation.

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Master the art of sleeping on planes

Ah, a window seat. You've been blessed by the plane gods. Now, don't be a jerk—pull that shade down. (jopstock via Deposit Photos/) Sleeping on planes is hard, but you can make it easier by bringing the right gear, preparing in advance, and knowing how to get comfortable. Nodding off at 30,000 feet is my jam—I've gotten to the point where I can sleep (or at least doze) in the middle seat on a sho

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NASA imagery indicates a dissipating Kalmaegi

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression Kalmaegi in the South China Sea as it was dissipating.

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Huge Earth-like worlds could host reservoirs of water deep underground

Minerals containing water can exist at much higher pressures than we knew, so they could be hiding oceans' worth of water deep within giant planets

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Building better bacteriophage to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Researchers are pursuing engineered bacteriophage as alternatives to antibiotics to infect and kill multi-drug resistant bacteria.

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UT mathematician develops model to control spread of aquatic invasive species

Adjusting the water flow rate in a river can prevent invasive species from moving upstream and expanding their range. An applied mathematician at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, has developed a partial differential equation model to find the desired flow rate to reduce invasive populations.

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Exposing office distractions and effects on worker productivity

Ioannis Pavlidis, director of the Computational Physiology Laboratory at the University of Houston, along with Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna from Texas A&M University and Gloria Mark from the University of California Irvine, conducted an experiment using thermal imaging and wearable sensors to better understand the stress and performance patterns of so-called knowledge workers.

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Two million-year-old ice cores provide first direct observations of an ancient climate

Princeton University-led researchers have extracted 2 million-year-old ice cores from Antarctica — the oldest yet recovered — that provide the first direct observations of prehistoric atmospheric conditions and temperatures. They used data from the ice cores to answer long-held questions about how our current colder, longer glacial cycle emerged.

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NASA imagery indicates a dissipating Kalmaegi

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Tropical Depression Kalmaegi in the South China Sea as it was dissipating.

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Life under extreme conditions at hot springs in the ocean

Marine researchers at Kiel University decipher adaptation mechanisms of biological communities to an active volcano in Taiwan.

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Study finds increase in US adults who perceive E-cigarettes more harmful than cigarettes

The number of U.S. adults who perceive e-cigarettes to be at as harmful as, or more harmful than, cigarettes has increased between 2017 and 2018, even prior to the national outbreak of vaping-related lung disease and deaths

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Researchers visualize bacteria motor in first step toward human-produced electrical energy

Humans, one day, may be able to produce their own electrical energy in the same way electric eels do, according to a research team based in Japan. It's the ultimate goal that begins with understanding precisely how tiny "motors" inside bacteria maintain biological balance.

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Researchers visualize bacteria motor in first step toward human-produced electrical energy

Humans, one day, may be able to produce their own electrical energy in the same way electric eels do, according to a research team based in Japan. It's the ultimate goal that begins with understanding precisely how tiny "motors" inside bacteria maintain biological balance.

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The Downside of Tech Hype

It makes it harder for scientists, engineers and policy makers to understand how technology is changing and make good decisions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'We're all Earthlings': the scientists using art to explore the cosmos

Can art advance science? Researchers on the hunt for extraterrestrial intelligence are using videos, music and more to go beyond the final frontier Since 1984, the scientific research institute SETI has worked with some of the brightest minds on our planet: astronomers, solar system dynamics experts, exoplanet detection specialists, astrochemists. All of them are on a mission to decode the univer

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Illinois researcher's theory of pore-scale transport to enable improved flow batteries

Redox flow batteries are an emerging technology for electrochemical energy storage that could help enhance the use of power produced by renewable energy resources. These power resources are inherently irregular in their supply, which doesn't typically align with demand on the power grid. In principle, redox flow batteries can be designed to have an energy-storage capacity that is independent of it

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Meet the Elite Shot Putter Chasing a World Record

Ryan Crouser is one of the best shot put throwers in history. In this WIRED video, he talks about the limits of his sport—and how to break them.

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Dog bones could help patch broken bird wings

The technique may help injured birds fly again

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The Downside of Tech Hype

It makes it harder for scientists, engineers and policy makers to understand how technology is changing and make good decisions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Chemists create new route to PHAs: naturally degradable bioplastics

Eugene Chen, professor in the Colorado State University Department of Chemistry, has led a new study demonstrating a chemical catalysis path for making an existing class of biomaterials called PHAs — already gaining momentum in industrial settings — even more commercially viable and structurally diverse.

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New twist in quest to develop understanding of time crystalline behavior

The quest to develop the understanding for time crystalline behaviour in quantum systems has taken a new, exciting twist.

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Regenstrief, IU study finds assigning hospitalists by unit has both pros and cons

Hospital medicine is the fastest growing medical specialty. Researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine have conducted the first time-motion study in over a decade to assess the impact of geographic cohorting of hospitalists. They report that assigning hospitalists by unit has both pros and cons.

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Growing length of manifestos casts new light on electioneering history

From a modest 150 words to the length of a children's book—the number of words used by politicians in their election manifestos has grown substantially in the past century, new research shows.

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Escher's angels and demons woodcut predicts how matter deforms

Dutch artist M.C. Escher's most famous drawing, "Circle Limit IV (Heaven and Hell)", shows angels and demons in a tessellation that fills a circle without empty spaces. This masterful woodcut inspired an international partnership of researchers including Politecnico di Milano Physics Department to author the cover-story article published in Physical Review Letters.

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Researchers uncover critical metabolic switch for inflammatory diseases

A research team in Trinity College Dublin has uncovered a critical role for a protein called 'PKM2' in the regulation of immune cell types at the heart of multiple inflammatory diseases.

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Eastern equine encephalitis virus poses emergent threat

2019 has been a particularly deadly year in the U.S. for eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), a mosquito-borne illness. As of November 12, 36 confirmed cases of EEE had been reported by eight states; 13 of these cases were fatal.

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Researchers uncover critical metabolic switch for inflammatory diseases

A research team in Trinity College Dublin has uncovered a critical role for a protein called 'PKM2' in the regulation of immune cell types at the heart of multiple inflammatory diseases.

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This App Takes a Picture of You From a Satellite

"Spelfie" If you've ever wondered what you look like from orbit, a new app called Spelfie may be able to help. The premise is simple, according to Space.com : go to a big event — there aren't enough satellites to go around otherwise — and sign in, and an Airbus satellite will snap a picture of your coordinates from space. You won't be able to spot yourself , but it is a neat way to interact with

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New antitumoral drug release strategy created for breast cancer treatment

Researchers from the CIBER-BBN and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona use bioengineering to design non-toxic drug-release granules to be administered locally and with prolonged therapeutic effects.

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Rise of the bots: Stevens team completes first census of Wikipedia bots

Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology, in Hoboken, N.J., have completed the first analysis of all 1,601 of Wikipedia's bots, using computer algorithms to classify them by function and shed light on the ways that machine intelligences and human users work together to improve and expand the world's largest digital encyclopedia.

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Growing length of manifestos casts new light on electioneering history

From a modest 150 words to the length of a children's book — the number of words used by politicians in their election manifestos has grown substantially in the past century, new research shows.

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Illinois researcher's theory of pore-scale transport to enable improved flow batteries

Redox flow batteries are an emerging technology for electrochemical energy storage that could help enhance the use of power produced by renewable energy resources. In a new paper, Kyle Smith, assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering, addressed some of its challenges with a new theory to predict how fluid flow affects the ability of molecules in a flow battery to react at the surfa

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Transplanting human nerve cells into a mouse brain reveals how they wire into brain circuits

A team of researchers led by Pierre Vanderhaeghen and Vincent Bonin (VIB-KU Leuven, Université libre de Bruxelles and NERF) showed how human nerve cells can develop at their own pace, and form highly precise connections with the surrounding mouse brain cells. These findings shed new light on the unique features of the human brain and open new perspectives for brain repair and the study of brain di

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Does frailty affect outcomes after traumatic spinal cord injury?

A new study has shown that frailty is an important predictor of worse outcome after traumatic spinal cord injury in patients less than 75 years of age.

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A large part of the school buildings in Andalusia does not have adequate air quality

A high percentage of schools buildings in Andalusia does not have the necessary mechanical ventilation equipment or filtration systems in place, so air has to be renewed by means of infiltrations or opening the windows. Different tests were carried out in 42 classrooms in 8 education centres, spread across the different climatic zones that are typical of Andalusia.

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The Stunning Rise of Single-Payer Health Care

If you want to understand why Rebecca Wood supports Medicare for All, you have to understand the story of her mouth. In 2015, Wood cracked a tooth. Around the same time, her daughter, Charlie, began to speak. Charlie was already 3 years old, but her premature birth had left her with delayed speech and in need of extensive therapies. When a payment for Charlie's speech therapy came due, Wood, who

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What We're Talking About When We Talk About Military Aid to Ukraine

When Adam Schiff asked Bill Taylor, the first witness in the House's public impeachment hearings, to explain to Americans why U.S. security assistance to Ukraine matters for their own security, America's top diplomat in Kyiv went big. Really big. "It affects the world that we live in, that our children will grow up in and our grandchildren," Taylor declared. "Ukraine is on the front line" of a st

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What Joe Biden Can't Bring Himself to Say

H is eyes fall to the floor when I ask him to describe it. We've been tiptoeing toward it for 45 minutes, and so far, every time he seems close, he backs away, or leads us in a new direction. There are competing theories in the press, but Joe Biden has kept mum on the subject. I want to hear him explain it. I ask him to walk me through the night he appeared to lose control of his words onstage. "

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This is what a lethal fire tornado looks like

Fire tornadoes are extremely destructive and often deadly. They're rare, but as wildfires grow bigger and more frequent they may become more common. Thankfully, scientists are getting closer to predicting when and where these lethal vortices will appear. Read the full story this hellish phenomenon: http://bit.ly/2O4xJIK From: Scientific American

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Fans May or May Not Get a Joker Sequel

Meanwhile, 2019's freshman class won this year's Grammy nominations.

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Are Saturn's Rings Really as Young as the Dinosaurs?

The Cassini spacecraft perished in a literal blaze of glory on September 15, 2017, when it ended its 13-year study of Saturn by intentionally plunging into the gas giant's swirling atmosphere. The crash came after a last few months of furious study, during which Cassini performed the Grand Finale — a sensational, death-defying dance that saw the spacecraft dive between the planet and its rings 22

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A Dance That Stops 2 of Neptune's Moons From Colliding

Astronomers detected an orbital resonance between the two innermost satellites of the mysterious ice giant planet.

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Genetic screening of IVF embryos is unlikely to lead to smarter babies

Can DNA analysis help prospective parents choose IVF embryos on the basis of future intelligence? A study suggests this approach would have little, if any, effect

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Twitter lets users 'hide' off-course replies to tweets

Twitter on Thursday began letting users "hide" tweeted replies that could be seen as abusive or harassing in the latest effort by the online platform to create a more welcoming environment.

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When snakes had legs

Fossil analysis adds more pieces to the evolutionary puzzle.

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Researchers discover how lungs cells respond to bacteria

Researchers have discovered that TRM cells tell surrounding lung cells to send out a signal to recruit bacteria killers called neutrophils. These finding show that immunity within the lung tissue is what provides the most protection for preventing pneumonia.

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Turning to old remedies for new health challenges

The last thing anyone wants during a stay in the hospital is a hospital-acquired infection. Nosocomial infections, as they are called, are on the rise as more pathogens become resistant to drugs currently available. Kumar Venkitanarayanan, and his team recently published research in the journal Wound Medicine detailing how they are working to change that.

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Escher's angels and demons woodcut predicts how matter deforms

Dutch artist M.C. Escher's most famous drawing, 'Circle Limit IV (Heaven and Hell)', shows angels and demons in a tessellation that fills a circle without empty spaces. This masterful woodcut inspired an international partnership of researchers including Politecnico di Milano Physics Department to author the cover-story article published in Physical Review Letters (*).

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Study shows lower mortality from induction of labor at 41 weeks

Inducing labor after 41 instead of 42 full weeks' pregnancy appears to be safer in terms of perinatal survival, new Swedish research shows. The current study is expected to provide a key piece of evidence for upcoming decisions in maternity care.

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BU finds some child development milestones may be set too early

A new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study published in the journal Pediatrics provides more specific data on what ages young children reach different developmental milestones. Guidelines from the CDC say 'most children' reach each milestone by a certain age, but do not define 'most' and do not say how often or well a child should be demonstrating an ability.

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Researchers uncover critical metabolic switch for inflammatory diseases

A research team in Trinity College Dublin has uncovered a critical role for a protein called 'PKM2' in the regulation of immune cell types at the heart of multiple inflammatory diseases.

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Trials promise good news for countries with dengue and Zika virus

Scientists from the University of Melbourne and Glasgow and the Institute for Medical Research in Malaysia have found an effective and environmentally sustainable way to block the transmission of mosquito-borne dengue virus, in trials carried out in Malaysia.

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Omega-3 fatty acids' health benefit linked to stem cell control, researchers find

For years, researchers have known that defects in an ancient cellular antenna called the primary cilium are linked with obesity and insulin resistance. Now, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered that the strange little cellular appendage is sensing omega-3 fatty acids in the diet, and that this signal is directly affecting how stem cells in fat tissue divide and

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Self-restrained genes enable evolutionary novelty

Evolution can promote novelty by keeping gene expression in check.

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Unraveling gene expression

EPFL chemists have uncovered the first steps in the process of gene expression by showing how the protein Rap1 pries open the tightly wound, compacted structure of DNA in the cell to gain access to specific genes.

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Estimating how self-reported hearing trouble varied among older adults

Researchers used nationally representative survey data from adults 60 or older to estimate how self-reported hearing trouble varied across sociodemographic characteristics and by actual hearing loss.

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Non-coding DNA located outside chromosomes may help drive glioblastoma

According to a new Cell study, extra DNA scooped up and copied alongside cancer-causing genes helps keep tumors going — elements that could represent new drug targets for brain tumors and other cancers notoriously difficult to treat.

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Online reviews reveal need for specialized drug treatment facility assessments

With no national standard to measure drug treatment facilities, new research reveals opportunities to learn from patients to help create metrics.

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Multifunctional small brains

Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience in Amsterdam, discovered that not only the cerebral cortex is responsible for higher perceptual abilities but that the cerebellum also plays a role. This discovery can help understand the consequences of damage to the small brain, since not only motoric impairment will appear, but also social cognition can be altered. The study was publis

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Simulations suggest embryo selection based on traits like height or IQ is still far off

The recent live births resulting from human embryonic CRISPR editing have heightened global concerns regarding 'designer babies.' Currently, the most practical approach to genetic 'enhancement' is preimplantation genetic screening of IVF embryos. According to a study publishing Nov. 21 in the journal Cell, the ability to select for traits that are brought about by multiple genes — rather than gen

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Tekniske eksperter enige: Højst 15 pct. af Viking Link-master kan lægges i jorden

PLUS. Teknisk høring om kabler kontra luftledninger viste enighed blandt de indkaldte eksperter. Andre kritiserede grundlaget for debatten og en vestjyde kaldte mødet for »et holdkæft-bolsje«

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Diamond-Based Qubits Set New Coherence Record

Researchers create a 10-qubit register that can hold its quantum state for more than a minute. diamondmemories8.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics Physics Thursday, November 21, 2019 – 10:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Researchers have created a diamond-based quantum memory device that can retain a quant

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How to save a language from extinction | Daniel Bögre Udell

As many as 3,000 languages could disappear within the next 80 years, all but silencing entire cultures. In this quick talk, language activist Daniel Bögre Udell shows how people around the world are finding new ways to revive ancestral languages and rebuild their traditions — and encourages us all to investigate the tongues of our ancestors. "Reclaiming your language and embracing your culture is

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Doctors placed gunshot victims in 'suspended animation' for the first time

Cold saline is the key to the cutting-edge method. (DepositPhotos/) For the first time, doctors have induced suspended animation in humans. New Scientist reported very preliminary results of a groundbreaking trial on Monday after a related discussion at a meeting of The New York Academy of Sciences. Although doctors are still far from being able to say anything definitive, the news could someday

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Nematode parasites kill a lot of sheep

Breeding better animals might stop this

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New ways to make molybdenum-99

A crucial short-lived isotope is in short supply

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Solar-powered trains could make rail transport greener

Solar panels are connected directly to the line

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Self-restrained genes enable evolutionary novelty

Changes in the genes that control development can potentially make large contributions to evolution by generating new morphologies in plants and animals. However, because developmental genes frequently influence many different processes, changes to their expression carry a risk of "collateral damage." Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne and collaborators h

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Unraveling gene expression

The DNA of a single cell is two to three meters long end-to-end. To fit in the nucleus and function correctly, DNA is packaged around specialized proteins. These DNA-protein complexes are called nucleosomes, and they are a small part of a larger structure called chromatin. Nucleosomes can be thought of as the cell's DNA storage and protection unit.

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Self-restrained genes enable evolutionary novelty

Changes in the genes that control development can potentially make large contributions to evolution by generating new morphologies in plants and animals. However, because developmental genes frequently influence many different processes, changes to their expression carry a risk of "collateral damage." Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne and collaborators h

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Unraveling gene expression

The DNA of a single cell is two to three meters long end-to-end. To fit in the nucleus and function correctly, DNA is packaged around specialized proteins. These DNA-protein complexes are called nucleosomes, and they are a small part of a larger structure called chromatin. Nucleosomes can be thought of as the cell's DNA storage and protection unit.

6h

The simultaneous merging of giant galaxies

An international research team led by scientists from Göttingen and Potsdam proved for the first time that the galaxy NGC 6240 contains three supermassive black holes. The unique observations, published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, show the black holes close to each other in the core of the galaxy. The study points to simultaneous merging processes during the formation of the largest g

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Extremely energetic particles coupled with the violent death of a star for the first time

Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen and DTU Space have determined the emission of extremely energetic light particles during the death of a very heavy star for the first time, using the telescope MAGIC. The scientific perspective — the source detection of the emission of particles – is to gain basic insights into the extreme physical processes in the death of the hea

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Structures near airports increase risk of airplane-goose collisions

From mid-November 2015 through February 2016, scientists used GPS transmitters to track the movements of Canada geese near Midway International Airport in Chicago. They discovered that — in the colder months, at least — some geese are hanging out on rooftops, in a rail yard and in a canal close to Midway's runways. This behavior increases the danger of collisions between geese and airplanes, the

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Scientists discover the origin of a microbial infection with lethal effects

When the bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila penetrates the organism through a tissue it gives rise to necrotizing fasciitis, a serious infection that attacks the tissues and in a few hours can even lead to the death of the patient. URV researchers have discovered why it can have lethal consequences, which makes it possible to find effective treatments to attack the infection.

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Detecting mental and physical stress via smartphone

The team led by Professor Enrico Caiani of the Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering at Politecnico di Milano, Italy, has shown that it is possible to use our smartphones without any other peripherals or wearables to accurately extract vital parameters, such as heart beat rate and stress level.

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US Army looks for autonomous medevac vehicles, including UAVs

submitted by /u/OliverSparrow [link] [comments]

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3 million people move to urban areas every week. How will we meet the challenge?

Globally we are adding about 3 million people to urban areas each week. Over the course of the year, this number can be equated to roughly 50 Chicagos. This influx of people could make everyday life in urban areas more chaotic than ever. We will need a new playbook for how cities can better handle this massive influx of people. With such population surges, we can use citizen-centric data—computat

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Metoden som ska minska skjutningarna i Malmö

Skotten i Malmö upprör. Hur får man stopp på skjutningarna? Vad säger forskningen? Socialantropologen Anna Hedlund gör fältarbete om brottförebyggande åtgärder i Malmö och intervjuar nyckelpersoner inom socialtjänst, polis, kriminalvård och civilsamhälle. I Malmö försöker man komma till rätta med skjutningarna bland annat genom ett projekt som heter "Sluta skjut", en metodik som fungerat framgång

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Region Syddanmark afsætter millioner til forbedring af cybersikkerhed på sygehuse

Der er afsat 20 millioner kroner på budgettet i Region Syddanmark til at forbedre it-sikkerheden på sygehuse.

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A review of single molecule-based electronic devices

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, a group of researchers from the Shenyang Jianzhu University in China provide an overview of single molecule electronic devices, including molecular electronic devices and electrode types. Future challenges are described in the hopes of attracting more experts from different fields to participate in this research.

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Unable to reject increased suicide risk associated with use of anti-epileptic drugs

Three of the most common forms of anti-epileptic drugs in Denmark is associated with increase in patients' risk of suicide. However, the risk is low and should be seen in conjunction with the many beneficial effects of the medicines. This is the conclusion of a new study carried out by researchers from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital.

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Belgian-American research team uncovers a new mechanism of neurodegeneration

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is an inherited neurodegenerative condition that affects 1 in 2500 individuals. Currently, however, it is still lacking effective treatment options. New research has demonstrated that a class of cytoplasmic enzymes called tRNA synthetases can cause CMT by interfering with the gene transcription in the nucleus. This breakthrough is the result of an international ac

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Almost a third of tropical Africa's flora faces extinction

31.7% of tropical Africa's vascular plant species could be threatened with extinction, reveals an international study coordinated by an IRD researcher, published in the journal Science Advances on 20 November 2019. Using a new approach based on the key elements of the assessment process used by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), for the first time researchers have been able

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Wolfe Creek Crater younger than previously thought

Wolfe Creek Crater, one of the world's largest meteorite craters, is much younger than previously thought.

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The simultaneous merging of giant galaxies

An international research team led by scientists from Göttingen and Potsdam proved for the first time that the galaxy NGC 6240 contains three supermassive black holes. The unique observations, published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, show the black holes close to each other in the core of the galaxy. The study points to simultaneous merging processes during the formation of the largest g

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Air pollution from power plants is killing people

Air pollution from electricity generation emissions in 2014 led to about 16,000 premature deaths in the continental US, according to new research. In many states, the majority of the health impacts came from emissions originating in other states. The team also found that exposures were higher for black and white non-Latino Americans than for other groups, and that this disparity held even after a

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Magnetic wave flows under better control from now on

Even faster processors with even smaller dimensions? Wherever neither electronics nor spintronics can cope with performance or miniaturization, magnonics comes to the rescue. But before that happens, scientists must learn how to accurately simulate the flow of magnetic waves through magnonic crystals. At the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow an important step

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Fractured ice sheets on Mars

Where the two hemispheres of Mars meet, the planet is covered in broken-up terrain: a sign that slow-but-steady flows of icy material once forged their way through the landscape, carving out a fractured web of valleys, cliffs and isolated mounds of rock.

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Ants trapped for years in old Soviet nuclear bunker became cannibals

A colony of ants survived for years in an old nuclear bunker despite having no obvious food source – probably because the ants began eating one another

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Eliminating cracks in 3-D-printed metal components

Researchers at EPFL have developed a new laser 3-D-printing technique to manufacture metal components with unprecedented resistance to high temperature, damage and corrosion. The method has applications in fields ranging from aerospace to power-generating turbines.

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Fish in California estuaries are evolving as climate change alters their habitat

The threespine stickleback, a small fish found throughout the coastal areas of the Northern Hemisphere, is famously variable in appearance from one location to another, making it an ideal subject for studying how species adapt to different environments. A new study shows that stickleback populations in estuaries along the coast of California have evolved over the past 40 years as climate change ha

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Unlocking the power of sulfur in future drug design

Organosulfur compounds are widely present in our bodies and the natural environment. They are found in onions, shallots and even cauliflower. Medical research finds that when consumed, they can protect against cancer, heart disease and even diabetes. There is also evidence of these compounds' antiviral and antibacterial uses. About a quarter of all pharmaceutical drugs currently use OSCs.

6h

Watch SpaceX Starship Rocket Burst, Crumple During Test

Poof A prototype of SpaceX's massive Starship rocket partially burst apart during a ground test on Wednesday at the company's test site in Boca Chica, Texas, The Verge reports . A livestream of the incident shows the massive stainless steel cylinder burst into a thick white cloud, showing large creases and dents at the top afterwards. SpaceX is playing down the failure. "The purpose of today's te

6h

The Higher States of Bromine

Chemists have a familiarity with many elements and many compounds, from having worked with them or studied them in the literature. You get a feel for what's "normal" and for what's unusual, and there are quite a few degrees of the latter. Take compounds of bromine, for example. Most any working chemist will immediately recognize bromine ( there are exceptions ) because we don't commonly encounter

6h

Protection for pacemakers

A protective membrane for cardiac pacemakers developed at ETH Zurich has proved successful in animal trials in reducing the undesirable build-up of fibrotic tissue around the implant. The next step is to test the protective membrane in patients.

6h

Women raised in poor neighborhoods face an increased risk of intimate partner violence

Women who spend longer periods of their early lives in less affluent neighbourhoods are at greater risk of experiencing violence during their early adulthoods at the hands of their intimate partners, finds a new study published in Epidemiology.

6h

Traditional Chinese medical herb may offer new anti-obesity strategy

Overweight and obesity have become a severe public health problem around the world. Chinese scientists from the Institute of Zoology suggest in a new study that burning energy by activation of brown adipose tissue (BAT) might be an alternative strategy for combating obesity.

6h

Pancreatic cancer tumor classification could optimize treatment choices

Researchers from the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed data from pancreatic cancer clinical trials to understand how treatment responses and drug resistance linked to tumor subtypes.

6h

Researchers substantially boost sensitivity of terahertz gas analysis

A new advance promises to increase the sensitivity of high-resolution spectrometers that perform chemical analysis using terahertz wavelengths. This higher sensitivity could benefit many applications, such as analysis of the complex gas mixtures found in industrial emissions and detection of biomarkers of disease in the breath of patients. It could also lead to new ways to detect food spoilage thr

6h

New chemical treatment for bed nets could prevent more infections by overcoming mosquito resistance

With insecticide resistance eroding the life-saving power of bed nets — a major malaria-fighting tool — researchers reported today that in a clinical trial that involved distributing millions of treated nets to households across Uganda, far fewer children showed evidence of malaria parasites after sleeping under nets newly formulated to disarm a mosquito's key resistance mechanisms.

6h

Researchers visualize bacteria motor in first step toward human-produced electrical energy

Humans, one day, may be able to produce their own electrical energy in the same way electric eels do, according to a research team based in Japan. It's the ultimate goal that begins with understanding precisely how tiny 'motors' inside bacteria maintain biological balance.

6h

Kommuner: Ny kompensation til VE-naboer er langt fra nok

PLUS. Hvis der skal anlægges mange flere solcelle- og biogasanlæg og opføres store vindmøller, er den nabokompensationspakke, som et folketingsflertal har besluttet slet ikke nok. Staten er nødt til at organisere en stor omfordeling af jord, mener KL.

6h

Amazon’s Dash Smart Shelf can automatically order new office supplies when they run out

Amazon has announced the Dash Smart Shelf, a Wi-Fi-connected smart scale that connects to Amazon’s shopping services and can automatically reorder supplies when they run low. It’s …

7h

The US Military Needs Right-to-Repair Legislation to Fix Its Own Broken Equipment

JLTV CRTC BOLIO OSHKOSH CHAINS TIRES X-COUNTRY DEC 14 2016 SCENIC TWIN LAKES TRAIL WINDY RIDGE We've discussed the importance of right-to-repair legislation and the need to protect the right of consumers to modify and fix their own equipment a number of times at ET, but we've always tackled the topic from a civilian consumer perspective. According to a recent op/ed by Captain Elle Ekman, a logist

7h

Startup backed by billionaires creates superhot solar power

Heliogen, a startup backed by Bill Gates and Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, announces a solar energy breakthrough. The company's array of mirrors generated heat of 1,000 degrees Celsius, nearly twice as much as before. The startup aims to utilize the technology in industrial processes, significantly reducing gas emissions. None Heliogen, a solar-energy company backed by the the world's richest man, Bil

7h

Fish in California estuaries are evolving as climate change alters their habitat

The threespine stickleback, a small fish found throughout the coastal areas of the Northern Hemisphere, is famously variable in appearance from one location to another, making it an ideal subject for studying how species adapt to different environments. A new study shows that stickleback populations in estuaries along the coast of California have evolved over the past 40 years as climate change ha

7h

Structures near airports increase risk of airplane-goose collisions

From mid-November 2015 through February 2016, scientists used GPS transmitters to track the movements of Canada geese near Midway International Airport in Chicago. They discovered that—in the colder months, at least—some geese are hanging out on rooftops, in a rail yard and in a canal close to Midway's runways. This behavior increases the danger of collisions between geese and airplanes, the resea

7h

How to fight illegal cocoa farms in Ivory Coast

The world's love for chocolate has helped decimate protected forests in western Africa as some residents have turned protected areas into illegal cocoa farms and hunting grounds.

7h

Scientists develop new method to estimate seal breeding frequency

New research, led by the Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU) at the University of St Andrews, develops method to better record breeding histories of seals, allowing for improved fecundity calculations.

7h

Structures near airports increase risk of airplane-goose collisions

From mid-November 2015 through February 2016, scientists used GPS transmitters to track the movements of Canada geese near Midway International Airport in Chicago. They discovered that—in the colder months, at least—some geese are hanging out on rooftops, in a rail yard and in a canal close to Midway's runways. This behavior increases the danger of collisions between geese and airplanes, the resea

7h

Mapping the benefits of the world's largest lakes

Fresh water is the most important substance on Earth, but it isn't equally distributed across the plant.

7h

How to fight illegal cocoa farms in Ivory Coast

The world's love for chocolate has helped decimate protected forests in western Africa as some residents have turned protected areas into illegal cocoa farms and hunting grounds.

7h

Scientists develop new method to estimate seal breeding frequency

New research, led by the Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU) at the University of St Andrews, develops method to better record breeding histories of seals, allowing for improved fecundity calculations.

7h

Higher financial incentives for crowdsourced delivery workers can improve service

A new paper co-written by a University of Illinois expert who studies operations management says higher financial incentives can boost a host of metrics for crowdsourced delivery workers who act as the final link in the supply chain between retailer and consumer.

7h

The Death and Afterlife of the Mall

The shopping mall has had a dramatic fall from grace. Once the veritable town square and a cornerstone of American consumerism, malls have aged into oblivion, replaced by cheaper and more convenient alternatives. Today, these sprawling complexes are mostly ghost towns—dilapidated vestiges of their former selves. In a new episode of The Idea File , staff writers Jim and Deb Fallows explore the phe

7h

This Isn't Just Another Buttigieg Bump

Listening to the radio on her drive home from work back in January, 48-year-old Brooke Clagett caught the tail end of an interview with a man she couldn't identify. "I was just stunned by how, on every subject that he discussed, he sounded reasonable and thoughtful," Clagett told me last night. She pulled up in front of her house, but she didn't go inside: "It was one of those classic driveway mo

7h

Russia's 'Sandworm' Hackers Also Targeted Android Phones

The Kremlin's uniquely dangerous hacker group has been trying new tricks.

7h

Startup backed by billionaires generates superhot solar power

Heliogen, a startup backed by Bill Gates and Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, announces a solar energy breakthrough. The company's array of mirrors generated heat of 1,000 degrees Celsius, nearly twice as much as before. The startup aims to utilize the technology in industrial processes, significantly reducing gas emissions. None Heliogen, a solar-energy company backed by the the world's richest man, Bil

7h

First evidence of bio-essential sugars in meteorites

A new study has discovered meteorites containing RNA sugar, ribose, and other bio-important sugars; the first direct evidence of bio-essential sugars' delivery from space to the Earth.

7h

Can You Hack Your Sleep in 28 Days?

Sleep has become the latest frontier in the life-hackers' battle for self-improvement. B ut how easy is to to rewire how you spend a third of your life? I took a 28-day crash course to find out. For a long time, self-improvement was synonymous with a workaholic business culture that sought to constantly do more with less. That led to a culture of sleep-hacking that celebrated public figures who s

7h

Magnetic wave flows under better control from now on

Even faster processors with even smaller dimensions? Wherever neither electronics nor spintronics can cope with performance or miniaturization, magnonics comes to the rescue. But before that happens, scientists must learn how to accurately simulate the flow of magnetic waves through magnonic crystals. At the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow an important step

7h

Mental health program helps teens recognise and support peers at risk

A novel mental health program improves teenagers' ability to recognise and support friends who might be at risk of suicide, according to new research.

7h

New research finds signal of decreased early post transplant survival in new heart transplant system

In an analysis of the new heart organ allocation system for transplant patients in the US, researchers have identified a signal of a decrease in heart transplant survival rates. The study, 'An Early Investigation of Outcomes with the 2018 Donor Heart Allocation System in the United States,' is published as a rapid communication in the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation.

7h

Fish in California estuaries are evolving as climate change alters their habitat

The threespine stickleback, a small fish found throughout the coastal areas of the Northern Hemisphere, is famously variable in appearance from one location to another, making it an ideal subject for studying how species adapt to different environments. A new study shows that stickleback populations in estuaries along the coast of California have evolved over the past 40 years as climate change ha

7h

Cleveland's brown water: The source lies at the bottom of Lake Erie

Since moving to the Cleveland area seven years ago, Malina Cano Rauschenfels has become accustomed to discolored water flowing from her faucet, although she has never fully understood the reason behind the yellow or brownish tinge.

7h

Part of a vital Antarctic glacier has unexpectedly stopped thinning

A UK team was surprised to find that, in the past six years, a glacier in the Antarctic has virtually paused thinning at its end, but a neighbouring glacier hasn't

7h

Hyperpalatable foods are a modern bogeyman. But what even are they?

The idea that super-addictive foods are being engineered by corporate giants is a pervasive one. But trying to find science on this isn't straightforward, says James Wong

7h

Förmoderna tider på Island under lupp

Med hjälp av digitala metoder och modeller kan man undersöka hur landskap brukats i det förmoderna Island. Modellerna kan också ligga till grund för olika perspektiv på det förmoderna livet på Island. Det visar en ny doktorsavhandling från Umeå universitet. – I detta projekt syftar jag till att tillgängliggöra det mest detaljerade historiska dokument som beskriver hur mark brukades, i det senmede

7h

Horrible Christian App Narcs to Your Mom If You Watch Porn

Safesearch On Evangelical Christians are enlisting AI in the holy war against pornography. Religious apps like Covenant Eyes act as a sort of AI-powered filter that not only blocks people from sneaking a quick glimpse at porn, but also shames them by flagging their activity in a report to their family or friends, according to CQ Roll Call . The app is clearly built to further evangelical morals,

7h

Sugar delivered to Earth from space

A new study has discovered meteorites containing RNA sugar, ribose, and other bio-important sugars; the first direct evidence of bio-essential sugars' delivery from space to the Earth.

7h

Decoding the fundamental mechanisms of human salivary lubrication

A team of scientists led by the University of Leeds have uncovered the fundamental mechanism by which human saliva lubricates our mouth. Their multi-scale study opens the door to advancing dry mouth therapies and saliva substitutes – potentially bringing relief to people who suffer from dry mouth, which can affect swallowing, speech, nutritional intake and quality of life.

7h

'Combo' nanoplatforms for chemotherapy

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from Harbin Institute of Technology, China have systematically discussed the recent progresses, current challenges and future perspectives of smart graphene-based nanoplatforms for synergistic tumor therapy and bio-imaging.

7h

A bit more sleep cuts college student blood pressure

Just one extra hour of sleep a night can also have significant health benefits for college students, new research suggests. Researchers found that when they asked college students to extend their sleep, the students were able to get an additional 43 minutes of sleep per night on average. They also experienced less sleepiness during the day and had lower blood pressure. The findings suggest that g

7h

Pacemaker membrane could simplify replacement surgeries

A protective membrane for pacemakers reduces the build-up of fibrotic tissue around the implant, animal trials demonstrate. The next step is to test the cellulose-based protective membrane in patients. The work, which appears in the journal Biomaterials , could greatly simplify surgical procedures for patients with cardiac pacemakers. "Every pacemaker has to be replaced at some point. When this t

7h

Digital inclusion and wellbeing in New Zealand

New research using four large-scale surveys of New Zealanders shows those in social housing and people with disabilities appear to be particularly disadvantaged with respect to internet access.

7h

Parents Are Letting DNA Testing Dictate How They Raise Their Kids

Chinese parents are choosing to have their children's DNA tested to predict future aptitudes and traits, Bloomberg reports — and some are even using the information to determine the ideal profession for their child before they're even out of diapers. Chris Jung is the CEO of Good Union Corp., a Hong Kong-based aesthetic medical equipment company. His company owns Gene Discovery, one of countless

7h

Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer measurements unveil properties of cosmic helium

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) collaboration, a large group of researchers from CERN and other institutes worldwide, has recently presented a series of precision measurements of the properties of cosmic Helium isotopes 3He and 4He. These measurements were collected by the AMS, a spectrometer located on the International Space Station (ISS).

7h

Building a Mars base with bacteria

How do you make a base on Mars? Simple: you send some bacteria to the red planet and let them mine iron. After a couple of years, you send in human settlers who use the iron to construct a base. That, in a nutshell, is the proposal of Ph.D. candidate Benjamin Lehner of Delft University of Technology. Together with Delft colleagues and researchers from the space agencies ESA and NASA, Lehner has wo

7h

From anomalure to zebra duiker: Spotlight on West Africa's mammals

If you thought zebra duiker and otter shrew were four different animals, think again. These are just two of the elusive creatures that Fauna & Flora International (FFI) and partners were hoping to track down during recent surveys of large and small mammals in one of West Africa's most important rainforests.

7h

Bringing faster 3-D imaging for biomedical researches

By combining a compressive sensing algorithm with a digital holographic microscope, Prof. Shih-Chi Chen of the Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) and his research team have developed a high-speed imaging method. The new approach is able to produce two-photon microscopy images of a 3-D sample in one second, which i

7h

From anomalure to zebra duiker: Spotlight on West Africa's mammals

If you thought zebra duiker and otter shrew were four different animals, think again. These are just two of the elusive creatures that Fauna & Flora International (FFI) and partners were hoping to track down during recent surveys of large and small mammals in one of West Africa's most important rainforests.

7h

Illegal logging on steep slopes putting lives at risk

The Victorian Government is in breach of its own forest laws, allowing logging on steep slopes and putting lives at risk, according to researchers from The ANU.

7h

Investigational drug for people with treatment-resistant epilepsy

Imagine not being able to drive, shower alone or even work because you are never quite sure when the next seizure will leave you incapacitated. Hope may be on the horizon for epilepsy patients who have had limited success with seizure drugs.

7h

Forskare ska motverka föräldrars våld mot barn

Att föräldrar och andra vårdnadshavare slår sina barn är fortfarande vanligt världen över. Endast 58 av världens länder har beslutat om att förbjuda föräldrars våld mot barn, och UNICEF beräknar att vartannat barn i världen är utsatt för våld. I till exempel Filippinerna slår sex av tio föräldrar sina barn. Nu ska två forskare från Sverige resa dit för att med en utbildningsmodell minska våldet m

8h

Working Scientist podcast: It's time to fix the "one size fits all" PhD

Nature, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03604-2 Julie Gould asks six higher education experts if it's now time to go back to the drawing board and redesign graduate programmes from scratch.

8h

Opinion: Blocking the Disabled on the Web Means Blocking Innovation

Disabled folks like Vint Cerf and Joybubbles helped birth today's digital world. But a lack of ADA compliance thwarts the innovators of tomorrow.

8h

Our Solar System Is Blanketed in a Giant Wall of Fire

Literal Firewall At the outermost edges of our solar system lies a barrier of super-hot plasma — a giant wall of fire from the Sun that defines the edge of interstellar space. As Voyager 2 began its journey into interstellar space in late 2018, it recorded temperatures as high as 49,427 degrees Celsius (89,000 degrees Fahrenheit), according to Nerdist . And while the space probe seems to be fine,

8h

Eastern equine encephalitis virus poses emergent threat, say NIAID officials

2019 has been a particularly deadly year in the U.S. for eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), a mosquito-borne illness. As of November 12, 36 confirmed cases of EEE had been reported by eight states; 13 of these cases were fatal. In new commentary, NIAID officials describe the eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), current research efforts, and the need for a national strategy to address the grow

8h

Researchers carry out simulation of a hospital outbreak

Researchers carried out a simulation of a hospital outbreak investigation using advanced genomic analysis technologies.

8h

New 'warm Jupiter' exoplanet discovered

An international team of astronomers reports the discovery of a new "warm Jupiter" alien world transiting a main sequence late F-type star on an eccentric orbit. The newfound exoplanet, designated TOI-677 b, is about 20 percent bigger and more massive than Jupiter. The finding is detailed in a paper published November 13 on arXiv.org.

8h

Photo Gallery: The Universe through X-ray Eyes

After two decades in space, the world's leading x-ray telescope is still revealing new secrets of the cosmos — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Telescopes and satellites combine to map entire planet's ground movement

Curtin University research has revealed how pairing satellite images with an existing global network of radio telescopes can be used to paint a previously unseen whole-of-planet picture of the geological processes that shape the Earth's crust.

8h

What we learn from noisy signals from deep space

Isolated in the Mojave Desert, the 21-story DSS-14 dish can hear calls from space probes in —and beyond—the solar system. (NASA/) Look up. Somewhere beyond our solar system, where it's well below zero, ­pitch-dark, and the next-nearest star is a 400-century ride away, an electrical charge sparks a radio signal. The blip is faint, some 22 watts, no more power than a typical refrigerator bulb needs

8h

Extinction of ice age giants likely drove surviving animals apart

As the world grapples with an extinction crisis, our large mammals are among the most endangered. These threatened species—rhinos, pandas, tigers, polar bears and the like—greatly influence their ecosystems. So what will happen to the smaller animals left behind?

8h

Math reveals how diseases progress and bacteria develop drug resistance

Scientists from Imperial and the University of Bergen have found a new way to predict how a disease will likely progress in individual patients.

8h

Math reveals how diseases progress and bacteria develop drug resistance

Scientists from Imperial and the University of Bergen have found a new way to predict how a disease will likely progress in individual patients.

8h

How to fight illegal cocoa farms in Ivory Coast

The world's love for chocolate has helped decimate protected forests in western Africa as some residents have turned protected areas into illegal cocoa farms and hunting grounds. But an international group of researchers has found that simply patrolling the grounds of two forest reserves in Ivory Coast has helped reduce illegal activity by well more than half between 2012 and 2016.

8h

American children and teens are consuming significantly fewer sugary drinks

According to a new study, the share of children and adolescents consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and the calories they consume from SSBs declined significantly between 2003 and 2014.

8h

Peptide in male fruit fly semen found to enhance memory in females after mating

A quartet of researchers with PSL Research University, CNRS, has found that a peptide in male fruit fly semen somehow makes its way to the female fruit fly brain after copulation, resulting in improvements in long-term memory. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, L. Scheunemann, A. Lampin-Saint-Amaux, J. Schor and T. Preat describe their study of memory in fruit flies and what

8h

Peptide in male fruit fly semen found to enhance memory in females after mating

A quartet of researchers with PSL Research University, CNRS, has found that a peptide in male fruit fly semen somehow makes its way to the female fruit fly brain after copulation, resulting in improvements in long-term memory. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, L. Scheunemann, A. Lampin-Saint-Amaux, J. Schor and T. Preat describe their study of memory in fruit flies and what

8h

Students who are born earlier in the year have fewer friends

Were you among the youngest students in your class? If the answer is yes, you might have felt at a disadvantage compared to your older classmates, and a host of scientific studies has shown that you were right feeling that way.

8h

Tropical fish shredding kelp forests in temperate zones

Climate change is causing previously temperate oceans to become more tropical with coral reef fish moving south, settling in and changing how things work in their new temperate neighborhood, according to a study by The University of Western Australia and international researchers.

8h

Cells lose their ability to share resources as we get older

A research team led by The University of Western Australia has found that our cells deteriorate and share fewer resources as we age, which can lead to the onset of diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, cardiovascular disease and cancers.

8h

Protective membrane for pacemakers prevents buildup of fibrotic tissue

A protective membrane for cardiac pacemakers developed at ETH Zurich has proved successful in animal trials in reducing the undesirable build-up of fibrotic tissue around the implant. The next step is to test the protective membrane in patients.

8h

For Chesapeake oysters, the way forward leads back—through the fossil record

Oysters once dominated the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay, and it would be difficult, if not impossible, for the Bay to return to full ecological health without restoring Crassotrea virginica to its glory days of the Chesapeake's apex filterer.

8h

Attacks on scholars worldwide raise concern

Nature, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03582-5 Report details hundreds of violent attacks, sackings and imprisonments of academics and students in the past year.

8h

Tropical fish shredding kelp forests in temperate zones

Climate change is causing previously temperate oceans to become more tropical with coral reef fish moving south, settling in and changing how things work in their new temperate neighborhood, according to a study by The University of Western Australia and international researchers.

8h

Cells lose their ability to share resources as we get older

A research team led by The University of Western Australia has found that our cells deteriorate and share fewer resources as we age, which can lead to the onset of diseases such as osteoporosis, arthritis, cardiovascular disease and cancers.

8h

For Chesapeake oysters, the way forward leads back—through the fossil record

Oysters once dominated the ecosystem of the Chesapeake Bay, and it would be difficult, if not impossible, for the Bay to return to full ecological health without restoring Crassotrea virginica to its glory days of the Chesapeake's apex filterer.

8h

Study offers first large-sample evidence of the effect of ethics training on financial sector behavior

Can ethics be taught? New research suggests yes, offering the first large-sample study on how rules and ethics training affects behavior and employment decisions in the financial sector.

8h

A new antibiotic has been hiding in the gut of a tiny worm. It may be our best weapon against drug-resistant bacteria.

Researchers at Northeastern have discovered a new antibiotic that could treat infections caused by some of the nastiest superbugs humanity is facing in the antibiotic resistance crisis.

8h

Decoding the fundamental mechanisms of human salivary lubrication

An interdisciplinary team of scientists led by the University of Leeds have uncovered the fundamental mechanism by which human saliva lubricates our mouth. Their multi-scale study opens the door to advancing dry mouth therapies and saliva substitutes—potentially bringing relief to people who suffer from dry mouth, which can affect swallowing, speech, nutritional intake and quality of life.

8h

A new antibiotic has been hiding in the gut of a tiny worm. It may be our best weapon against drug-resistant bacteria.

Researchers at Northeastern have discovered a new antibiotic that could treat infections caused by some of the nastiest superbugs humanity is facing in the antibiotic resistance crisis.

9h

Decoding the fundamental mechanisms of human salivary lubrication

An interdisciplinary team of scientists led by the University of Leeds have uncovered the fundamental mechanism by which human saliva lubricates our mouth. Their multi-scale study opens the door to advancing dry mouth therapies and saliva substitutes—potentially bringing relief to people who suffer from dry mouth, which can affect swallowing, speech, nutritional intake and quality of life.

9h

Are hiring algorithms fair? They're too opaque to tell, study finds

New research raises questions about hiring algorithms and the tech companies who develop and use them: How unbiased is the automated screening process? How are the algorithms built? And by whom, toward what end, and with what data?

9h

Innovative study produces first experimental evidence linking math anxiety, math avoidance

Math anxiety is far from uncommon, but too often, those who dread the subject simply avoid it. Research from the University of Chicago offers new evidence for the link between math anxiety and avoidance—as well as possible paths toward breaking that connection.

9h

The antibiotic arms race moves at high speed

Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen that creates serious problems in hospitals throughout the world. It causes opportunistic infections in the bloodstream, urinary tract, and other soft tissues, accounting for as much as 20 percent of infections spread in Intensive Care Units. As one of the pathogens involved in many multidrug-resistant infections caught in hospitals, it was top of the highest p

9h

New Earth mission will track rising oceans into 2030

Earth's climate is changing, and the study of oceans is vital to understanding the effects of those changes on our future. For the first time, U.S and European agencies are preparing to launch a 10-year satellite mission to continue to study the clearest sign of global warming—rising sea levels. The Sentinel-6/Jason-CS mission (short for Jason-Continuity of Service), will be the longest-running mi

9h

Apple cancels the theatrical premier of its first Oscar hopeful, The Banker

Sexual assault allegations surface against a co-producer/son of one of the main characters.

9h

Microscope teaches itself to shine light on the vital stuff

A new microscope can adapt its lighting angles, colors, and patterns while teaching itself the optimal settings needed to complete a given diagnostic task. In the initial proof-of-concept study, the microscope simultaneously developed a lighting pattern and classification system that allowed it to quickly identify red blood cells infected by the malaria parasite more accurately than trained physi

9h

The antibiotic arms race moves at high speed

Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen that creates serious problems in hospitals throughout the world. It causes opportunistic infections in the bloodstream, urinary tract, and other soft tissues, accounting for as much as 20 percent of infections spread in Intensive Care Units. As one of the pathogens involved in many multidrug-resistant infections caught in hospitals, it was top of the highest p

9h

Virtual Education

When I was in high school in the 1970s, computers were just entering the school environment. We had a small computer lab with embarrassingly primitive computers by today's standards, but at the time they were cool. I remember using one very simple DOS-based program that taught the user how to use chemical nomenclature. It was a simple game where you get asked to solve a problem and then are given

9h

An Alarming Discovery in an Astronaut's Bloodstream

Astronauts are more than cosmic travelers. They're also research subjects in the careful study of what exactly outer space does to the human body. On the ground, researchers measure vitals, draw blood, swab cheeks, and more. In orbit around the Earth, the astronauts do the work themselves. That's how they found the blood clot. An astronaut was carrying out an ultrasound on their own body as part

9h

Scientists come up with new rule for comparing age of dogs and humans

Conventional wisdom says that one human year is the equivalent of seven dog years, but a new analysis suggests we've been getting this all wrong

9h

Buy less, be happier and build a healthy planet

You may feel like you can't do anything to stop climate change. But climate activists who joined in grassroots movements managed to cut their carbon footprints and were still happier than their non-activist peers, new research shows.

9h

Not so selfish after all: Key role of transposable elements in mammalian evolution

The human genome contains 4.5 million copies of transposable elements (TEs), so-called selfish DNA sequences capable of moving around the genome through cut-and-paste or copy-and-paste mechanisms. Accounting for 30-50 percent of all of the DNA in the average mammalian genome, these TEs have conventionally been viewed as genetic freeloaders, hitchhiking along in the genome without providing any ben

9h

Not so selfish after all: Key role of transposable elements in mammalian evolution

The human genome contains 4.5 million copies of transposable elements (TEs), so-called selfish DNA sequences capable of moving around the genome through cut-and-paste or copy-and-paste mechanisms. Accounting for 30-50 percent of all of the DNA in the average mammalian genome, these TEs have conventionally been viewed as genetic freeloaders, hitchhiking along in the genome without providing any ben

9h

LG G8X ThinQ Review: Two Screens Come at a Cost

LG's latest phone comes bundled with a screen case, bridging the gap between a smartphone and a foldable.

9h

Image of the Day: Melting Ice

Warming temperatures threaten reindeer herding and the preservation of cultural artifacts in Mongolia.

9h

Some women feel fetal kicks years after they've given birth

Around 40 per cent of women in a survey experienced phantom fetal kicks, which is the feeling of a kicking fetus years after giving birth

9h

How to fight illegal cocoa farms in Ivory Coast

The world's love for chocolate has helped decimate protected forests in western Africa as some residents have turned protected areas into illegal cocoa farms and hunting grounds. But an international group of researchers has found that simply patrolling the grounds of two forest reserves in Ivory Coast has helped reduce illegal activity by well more than half between 2012 and 2016.

10h

Russia opens new fraud cases over cosmodrome

Russian investigators said Thursday they had opened two new fraud probes over the construction of a corruption-tainted space centre in the country's Far East.

10h

Mark Zuckerberg had a quiet dinner with Trump at White House in October – CNET

The Facebook boss was in Washington to testify about Libra and get questioned about letting politicians spread misinformation in ads.

10h

China 'medicine' demand threatens world donkey population: report

China's demand for donkey skins to make a traditional medicine could wipe out more than half the world's donkey population in the next five years, researchers said Thursday.

10h

Minskad risk för barnet om förlossningen sätts igång tidigare

I Sverige är risken generellt mycket låg för att ett barn dör i samband med förlossning eller som nyfödd, så kallad perinatal död. Men man vet att det sker en viss riskökning, från en alltså låg nivå, ju längre en graviditet pågår efter vecka 40.

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Why Elizabeth Warren's Foreign Policy Worries America's Allies

In the midst of a presidential campaign, it is difficult to gauge how the candidates would conduct themselves on the international stage. Sometimes what they say is designed to win a news cycle or appeal to an interest group. It is cheap talk. But sometimes the candidates reveal their true colors unintentionally. Elizabeth Warren recently tipped her hand in the form of a campaign health-care-budg

10h

What's Lost When Black Children Are Socialized Into a White World

Jessica Black is a Pittsburg, California, mother of two black teenagers, both of whom have been disciplined multiple times at their middle and high schools. Her daughter has been suspended more than once, and teachers often deem her son's behavior out of line, reprimanding him for not taking off his hoodie in class and for raising his voice. In observing her own family and others, Black has notic

10h

Innateness of Body Maps

Is there an inborn map of the body in the brain?

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How Video Games Can Teach Us to Play Well with Others

What I learned from a game that brings the phenomenon of implicit bias vividly to life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Wearable artificial kidney works well in first tests in people

A portable artificial kidney set has been used successfully by 15 people, and could free them from regular haemodialysis sessions

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China 'medicine' demand threatens world donkey population: report

China's demand for donkey skins to make a traditional medicine could wipe out more than half the world's donkey population in the next five years, researchers said Thursday.

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How Video Games Can Teach Us to Play Well with Others

What I learned from a game that brings the phenomenon of implicit bias vividly to life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The 8-Hour Workday Is a Counterproductive Lie

What was once a socialist dream has become every knowledge worker's nightmare. It's time to unmake the modern myth of productivity.

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Hey Surgeon, Is That a HoloLens on Your Head?

Mixed reality displays are entering the operating room, first as surgical planning tools and soon as real-time guides to help doctors zap tumors.

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20 Best Pre-Black Friday Outdoors Deals: REI, Huckberry, MooseJaw, Etc

Consumerism can be wasteful, but getting outside is great. Take a hike with our favorite pre-Black Friday outdoor deals.

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More Powerful Batteries Make This a True Electric Car Race

Drivers in the 2019-2020 Formula E series now have enough juice to avoid swapping cars midway through a race.

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Where to See the Real Living Dead – Facts So Romantic

Everyone knows forests are alive, but Suzanne Simard, who studies complex, symbiotic networks, helps us see that life anew. Even dying, for a tree, is not what it seems. Photograph by Tomasz Wrzesien / Shutterstock Talk of "Mother Trees," from a scientist studying plant life, can sound fanciful, like something out of a fairy tale. Suzanne Simard is here to tell you that it's not. For the past two

10h

Are Neural Networks About to Reinvent Physics? – Issue 78: Atmospheres

Can AI teach itself the laws of physics? Will classical computers soon be replaced by deep neural networks? Sure looks like it, if you've been following the news, which lately has been filled with headlines like, " A neural net solves the three-body problem 100 million times faster : Machine learning provides an entirely new way to tackle one of the classic problems of applied mathematics," and "

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How to Predict Extreme Weather – Issue 78: Atmospheres

Thanks to advances in machine learning over the last two decades, it's no longer in question whether humans can beat computers at games like chess; we'd have about as much chance winning a bench-press contest against a forklift. But ask the current computer champion, Google's AlphaZero, for advice on chess theory , like whether a bishop or a knight is more valuable in the Ruy Lopez opening, and a

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A Lexicon of Light – Issue 78: Atmospheres

The 20 words defined in this lexicon reflect the ways in which light irradiates the atmosphere, the universe, and our perception of the world. Because no single system—scientific, religious, philosophical, or cultural—can possibly encompass every meaning of light, this lexicon is systematically unsystematic, exploring each of these realms through words that serve as synecdoches for ways in which

10h

Danskernes ressource-fodaftryk er langt højere end den gennemsnitlige EU-borgers

Danmarks Statistik har for første gang regnet på, hvor mange ressourcer vores aktiviteter koster: Det er 22 tons råstoffer per person mod et EU-gennemsnit på 14 tons

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How Video Games Can Teach Us to Play Well with Others

What I learned from a game that brings the phenomenon of implicit bias vividly to life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Office Workers May Be Breathing Potentially Harmful Compounds in Cosmetics

Some cosmetics and deodorants contain chemicals that, when released into the air, may pose a risk to human health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Office Workers May Be Breathing Potentially Harmful Compounds in Cosmetics

Some cosmetics and deodorants contain chemicals that, when released into the air, may pose a risk to human health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Research: DMT's effects on brainwaves could explain consciousness

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Rigspolitichef blev advaret om fejl i teledata i 2010

Den øverste chef i politiet kendte til problemer med telecentret og Rigspolitiets håndtering af teledata allerede i 2010 – ni år inden teledataskandalen begyndte at rulle.

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Poet laureate Simon Armitage launches award for nature poems

Simon Armitage hopes the Laurel Prize will promote discussion about "our environmental predicament".

11h

Trump's Attack on Science Is an Attack on Public Health

The Trump administration has suggested revisions to a rule proposed last year that would restrict the science that can inform Environmental Protection Agency decisions. If finalized, the rule could exclude robust public health-related work that I and hundreds of other researchers have produced.

11h

Tonläget varierar när celler kommunicerar

För att vi ska överleva behöver våra celler kunna kommunicera med varandra. Ett sätt som de använder är att skicka en kemisk signal genom att utsöndra molekyler. När den mottagande cellen tolkat meddelandet kan den anpassa sig beroende på innebörden i signalen. Själva kommunikationsprocessen sker genom att en del av cellen, en del som är välfylld med "signalmolekyler", smälter samman med cellens

11h

Bribery Is Right There in the Constitution

The word bribery is suddenly at the center of the House's impeachment inquiry. Last week, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi accused President Donald Trump of bribery when he offered "to grant or withhold military assistance" in exchange for a public statement by Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky about pursuing investigations related to the 2016 election and to Hunter Biden. At the hearing of

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Lægestafetten: Man skal ikke blive syg af at gå på arbejde

Arbejdsmediciner Iben Brock Jacobsen kalder det et privilegium, når hun kan bruge halvanden time med en patient, og hun elsker tillidsbåndet mellem hende og hendes patienter. Hvis hun ikke skulle være læge, ville hun være psykolog. Eller klassisk pianist.

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Food poisoning researcher up to four spoiled papers

The Journal of Food Safety has retracted two papers by a group from Iran over concerns that the work was tainted by problems with peer review and bad data. The articles, both of which appeared in 2018, came from the lab of Ebrahim Rahimi, of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Tehran. … Continue reading

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Aalborg Universitet får nyt innovations-center til 247 mio. kroner

PLUS. 8.600 nye kvadratmeter på Aalborg Universitet bliver afsat til videnskab og innovation. Pris: Knap en kvart mia. kroner.

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Coldplay to pause touring until concerts are 'environmentally beneficial'

The band won't go on a world tour until they can make their concerts "environmentally beneficial".

11h

A Wet Year Causes Farm Woes Far Beyond the Floodplains

Last year was the wettest on record for the United States and flooded towns got much attention in the spring, but farm statistics show longer-lasting effects.

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Excellent mental health for 2/3 of Indigenous people off reserve

Two-thirds of Indigenous people living off reserve in Canada have excellent mental health, according to a nationally representative study conducted by the University of Toronto and Algoma University. These findings show that, despite stark economic inequalities and a history of residential schools, the majority of Indigenous people are free of addictions, suicidal thoughts and mental illness.

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American University researchers sequence genome of the 'devil worm'

American University researchers, reporting in Nature Communications, have sequenced the genome of a unique microscopic worm found one mile underground and called the 'Devil Worm' for its ability to survive in harsh, subsurface conditions.

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Scientists first to develop rapid cell division in marine sponges

Despite efforts over multiple decades, there are still no cell lines for marine invertebrates. For the first time, scientists have developed a breakthrough in marine invertebrate (sponge) cell culture, demonstrating exceptionally fast cell division and the ability to subculture the cells. This groundbreaking discovery forms the basis for developing marine invertebrate cell models to better underst

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Tidigare igångsättning minskar risken för att barnet dör

Att sätta igång en förlossning vid 41 fullgångna graviditetsveckor istället för vid 42 tycks vara säkrare för barnets överlevnad, visar ny svensk forskning. Den aktuella studien kan leda till ändrade rutiner vid förlossningsvård efter graviditetsvecka 40. I Sverige är risken generellt mycket låg för att ett barn dör före eller under förlossningen, eller som nyfödd, så kallad perinatal död. Man ve

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Specific metallo-protein interactions and antimicrobial activity in Histatin-5, an intrinsically disordered salivary peptide

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-52676-7

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Iron deficiency and anemia in adolescent girls consuming predominantly plant-based diets in rural Ethiopia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53836-5

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Tidal Volume Estimation during Helmet Noninvasive Ventilation: an Experimental Feasibility Study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54020-5

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Functional interactions between nitrite reductase and nitric oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53553-z

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Methodological aspects of testing vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in infants at universal hearing screening program

Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53143-z

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Google, Facebook business models threat to rights: Amnesty report

The data-collection business model fueling Facebook and Google represents a threat to human rights around the world, Amnesty International said in a report Wednesday.

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Microsoft Is Testing Gmail Integration With Outlook

In this day and age, there is a good chance that many of us own multiple email accounts. There could be an email account for work, one for personal, one for business, and so on. It also means …

12h

MHI Vestas leverer verdens største møller til flydende havmølleprojekt

Projektet forventes at stå færdigt i 2022, og det er første gang, at MHI Vestas' rekordstore 10 MW-møller installeres.

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Trump's War on Expertise Is Only Intensifying

In the fierce struggle over impeachment, Donald Trump and his Republican defenders are escalating their war on expertise. As an array of career diplomatic and military officials offer damning testimony against Trump—a procession that will continue today with the appearance of former National Security Council adviser Fiona Hill—the GOP is reprising arguments from 20th-century conservative populist

12h

The Real Story Behind the Steele Dossier

For a reporter, it's a heart-stopping moment. You're in an interview and suddenly a source offers up something you never expected anyone to unearth: video evidence of the president's perverse pleasures. "You were going to ask about the pee tape?" Glenn Simpson, the co-founder of the research firm Fusion GPS, which commissioned the infamous Steele dossier, asks me. "We're going to screen it for yo

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Symmetry of molecular Rydberg states revealed by XUV transient absorption spectroscopy

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13251-w Transient absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the structural characteristics of the atoms and molecules. Here the authors used extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy to identify the Rydberg state symmetry of aligned molecules.

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Asian monsoon rainfall variation during the Pliocene forced by global temperature change

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13338-4 Asian summer monsoons and their links to global temperature changes have been the subject of intense debate. Here the authors reconstruct the Asian monsoon climate since the late Miocene, using plant silica records of C4 and C3 grasses in central China, and find that global cooling caused Asian monsoon rainf

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Personalised analytics for rare disease diagnostics

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13345-5 Genome sequencing is being widely adopted for diagnosis of genetic diseases, but identifying the causal variants remains challenging. Here, the authors introduce a tool that incorporates tissue-specific gene expression data into predicting variant pathogenicity, improving accuracy.

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An efficient and stable photoelectrochemical system with 9% solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency via InGaP/GaAs double junction

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12977-x Photoelectrochemical water-splitting devices with III-V semiconductors are efficient for solar-to-hydrogen conversion, but high costs and poor stability limit applications. Here, authors decouple light harvesting from electrolysis to enhance stability without compromising the efficiency.

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In situ mapping of activity distribution and oxygen evolution reaction in vanadium flow batteries

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13147-9 Redox flow batteries are attractive for large-scale energy storage, but electrode activity should be better understood to improve electrochemical performance. Here the authors map the surface activity distribution of a vanadium redox flow battery electrode with spatial resolution of a single fiber.

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Global geochemical fingerprinting of plume intensity suggests coupling with the supercontinent cycle

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13300-4 The links between plate tectonics and deep mantle structure remain unclear. Here, the authors demonstrate that transition elements (Ni, Cr, and Fe/Mn) in basaltic rocks can be used as a tool to trace plume-related magmatism through Earth history, and their results indicate the presence of a direct relationsh

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Neural computations underlying strategic social decision-making in groups

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12937-5 The brain mechanisms underlying cooperation within groups, while balancing individual and collective interests, are poorly understood. Here, the authors identify the neurocomputations engaged in social dilemmas requiring strategic decisions during repeated social interactions in groups.

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Femtosecond X-ray induced changes of the electronic and magnetic response of solids from electron redistribution

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13272-5 X-ray free electron lasers allow for studying the interaction of magnetic materials with intense X-rays beyond a linear response regime. Here, the authors demonstrate the onset of X-ray induced ultrafast demagnetization in Co/Pd multilayers via a redistribution of valence electrons on timescales shorter than

12h

Researchers sequence genome of the 'devil worm'

When scientists discovered a worm deep in an aquifer nearly one mile underground, they hailed it as the discovery of the deepest-living animal ever found. Now American University researchers, reporting in Nature Communications, have sequenced the genome of the unique animal, referred to as the 'Devil Worm' for its ability to survive in harsh, subsurface conditions. The Devil Worm's genome provides

12h

Scientists first to develop rapid cell division in marine sponges

Vertebrate, insect, and plant cell lines are important tools for research in many disciplines, including human health, evolutionary and developmental biology, agriculture and toxicology. Cell lines have been established for many organisms, including freshwater and terrestrial invertebrates.

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Researchers sequence genome of the 'devil worm'

When scientists discovered a worm deep in an aquifer nearly one mile underground, they hailed it as the discovery of the deepest-living animal ever found. Now American University researchers, reporting in Nature Communications, have sequenced the genome of the unique animal, referred to as the 'Devil Worm' for its ability to survive in harsh, subsurface conditions. The Devil Worm's genome provides

12h

Scientists first to develop rapid cell division in marine sponges

Vertebrate, insect, and plant cell lines are important tools for research in many disciplines, including human health, evolutionary and developmental biology, agriculture and toxicology. Cell lines have been established for many organisms, including freshwater and terrestrial invertebrates.

12h

Brown bear attacks: Deaths spark fear in Romania

Three men die in little over a month in Romania, home to Europe's biggest brown bear population.

12h

Can photonic chips save Bitcoin?

Cryptocurrencies are famously energy hungry. So some researchers say the answer is a more energy-efficient form of computing.

12h

SpaceX Starship prototype blows its top

The US company's new rocket prototype experiences a major failure during pressurisation testing.

12h

Fysikeren Pernille læser MBA: »Det er motiverende at blive dygtigere«

PLUS. Pernille Harris blev opfordret af sin chef til at søge ind på lederuddannelsen.

12h

Google Duplex Hits The Web Enabling Chrome To Book Movie Tickets

Google Assistant has gained a new capability that movie fans will appreciate courtesy of Google Duplex technology. On Android phones, Google Assistant can now help users to buy movie tickets …

13h

Unge homo- og biseksuelle har langt større risiko for at have symptomer på depression

Den britiske undersøgelse viser, hvor slemt det står til, siger dansk ekspert.

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New tech puts virtual sense of touch at our fingertips

Garrett Anderson has never known the pleasure of holding hands with both his children at the same time.

13h

Sampling Kilauea's Infant Crater Lake

Wherein we get our first look at what Kilauea's new crater lake is made of. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Bei Bei arrives at giant panda base in China's Sichuan

After a transcontinental flight on the "Panda Express," a furry American darling arrived early Thursday in his new Chinese home.

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Bei Bei arrives at giant panda base in China's Sichuan

After a transcontinental flight on the "Panda Express," a furry American darling arrived early Thursday in his new Chinese home.

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Stora katter drabbas oftare av höftledsdysplasi

Höftledsdysplasi är ärftligt och vanligare hos större katter, konstaterar forskare från SLU. Det gör att raser som avlas på storlek, som rasen maine coon, har en ökad risk för höftproblem. Studien visar också att avelsarbetet inom det svenska hälsoprogrammet effektivt minskar förekomsten av höftledsdysplasi inom rasen. Maine coon beskrivs ibland som "den vänliga jätten", men studien gör det tydli

14h

Ja, vi blir fler på jorden – men takten minskar

Vi är nu drygt 7,7 miljarder människor på jorden. Det är dubbelt så många som år 1972 – men då var befolkningstillväxten som allra störst med drygt 2 procents årlig tillväxt. Sedan dess har tillväxttakten halverats till 1 procent. Faktum är att detta är den lägsta tillväxttakten sedan FN började samla data i frågan på 1950-talet. Även i absoluta tal var befolkningstillväxten som störst för flera d

14h

Medicinare och tekniker samarbetar i nytt bröstcancerprojekt

Forskare vid Lunds universitet vill genom en speciell metod försöka separera olika typer av celler – utifrån storlek, täthet och styvhet – ur tumörvävnad från bröstcancerpatienter. Förhoppningen är att mer kunskap om cellernas olika egenskaper ska bidra till bättre målstyrda behandlingar.

14h

LGBTQ beauty vloggers draw on queer culture to stand out

"Yo! What's up? Welcome back to my channel," Patrick Starrr says in a deep voice, hair wrapped in his signature turban and face in full, elaborate makeup.

14h

The cause of chewy chicken meat

University of Delaware researchers have discovered that lipoprotein lipase, an enzyme crucial for fat metabolism, may be contributing to wooden breast syndrome in broiler chickens.

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The cause of chewy chicken meat

University of Delaware researchers have discovered that lipoprotein lipase, an enzyme crucial for fat metabolism, may be contributing to wooden breast syndrome in broiler chickens.

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Cybershoppers make better buying decisions on PCs than phones: study

This holiday shopping season, consumers may make better shopping decisions using their PCs rather than smart phones or other mobile devices, according to new research from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev.

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NASA's Fermi, swift missions enable a new era in gamma-ray science

A pair of distant explosions discovered by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory have produced the highest-energy light yet seen from these events, called gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The record-setting detections, made by two different ground-based observatories, provide new insights into the mechanisms driving gamma-ray bursts.

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Canadisk firma har opfundet usynlighedsteknologi

Opfindelsen skal i første omgang bruges af militæret.

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Lithium Ion Battery inventor says his team has created Solid State Batteries

submitted by /u/its_just_a_meme_bro [link] [comments]

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What Is The Future of Food? | Ever Wondered | Spark

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Glass half-full: how I learned to be an optimist in a week

Optimists have fewer strokes, sleep better and live longer than pessimists. But how do you change your outlook? By embracing your Best Possible Self, keeping a gratitude journal – and changing your narrative I've been called many things in my life, but never an optimist. That was fine by me. I believed pessimists lived in a constant state of pleasant surprise: if you always expected the worst, th

16h

Ayurvedic practitioners push for licensing in Colorado

Ayurvedic practitioners' attempt to become licensed health care professionals in Colorado failed an initial review but that is unlikely to stop them from pursuing their goal. Ayurveda is pseudoscience and its practices can be dangerous. Unfortunately, that is no barrier to state licensing.

16h

A Warning to the Democratic Party About Black Voters

The Democratic Party knows it needs the energetic support of black voters to win the 2020 presidential election. Near the end of last night's debate in Atlanta, the question that arose—indirectly but unmistakably—was whether it needs a black candidate to turn them out. The candidate who has surged into the lead in recent polls of Iowa and New Hampshire, Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Indiana

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