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nyheder2019november22

47min

Google Employees Protest to Fight for the 'Future of Tech'

A group of 200 Googlers gathered outside the company's San Francisco office Friday as tensions between management and employee activists show no sign of letting up.

1h

In a first for cell biology, scientists observe ribosome assembly in real time

A team of scientists has recorded in real time a key step in the assembly of ribosomes — the complex and evolutionarily ancient 'molecular machines' that make proteins in cells and are essential for all life forms. They reveal in unprecedented detail how strands of RNA are 'chaperoned' by ribosomal proteins into folding properly; the findings overturn the longstanding belief that ribosomes are as

1h

T-Mobile confirms customers' personal data accessed in hack

It's been a rough month for customers who care about their privacy, with data breaches affecting businesses as diverse as high-end department stores, camgirl websites and online …

34min

Dinosaurs: Restoring Mongolia's fossil heritage

The Gobi Desert produces stunning fossils but many Mongolians never get the chance to see them.

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Scientists hit 21.6% perovskite cell efficiency using concentrator PV

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Man Invents Electric Vehicle Cell Capable of 1,500 Miles of Range

submitted by /u/ShengjiYay [link] [comments]

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Tesla Cybertruck first ride: inside the electric pickup

submitted by /u/wewewawa [link] [comments]

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Tories promise £500m fund to boost access to cutting-edge drugs

Election plan to give extra cash to prescribing innovative medicines

1h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Family Matters

It's Friday, November 22. In today's newsletter: what are the Democratic voters who made the trek to Capitol Hill for impeachment hearings thinking? Plus, the Medicare for All rallying cry. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » People wait in line to get into the hearing room ahead of former Ukraine Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch's testimony last week. (JACQUELYN MARTIN / AP) It's an unavoidable reality for Demo

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Author Correction: Chimeric peptidomimetic antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria

Nature, Published online: 23 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1810-2

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Dissension grows as Google workers stage San Francisco rally over employee suspensions

Google workers in San Francisco held a protest over the suspension of two employees, the latest sign of growing tensions at the search giant.

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These animal photos are way funnier than anything humans did this year

Sure, humans can crack a good joke—but when it comes to situational irony, animals have us beat. The wacky things they do outside our purview look even wackier when snapped out of context. Such is the foundation for the The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards , founded by two Tanzania-based conservationists. The annual contest aims to save wildlife through humor, and sometimes, a little too much e

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Trump Holds White House Meeting On Vaping And E-Cigarettes

President Trump held a "listening session" on youth e-cigarette use on Friday. It remains unclear if a ban on vaping flavorings is near or off the table entirely.

2h

A Tesla Cybertruck Mishap, a Massive Data Leak, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

2h

'Half-Life' Is Coming Back—in Virtual Reality

This is easily the biggest videogame news of the week. Also, the CEO of Activision thinks games shouldn't be political.

3h

Mix things up by making a color-changing storm glass

A storm glass may not be able to actually forecast the weather, but it'll sure look nice. (Lucy Rogers/) Some "inventions" of the past do not have scientific credibility, but are still delightful to behold. One of those is the storm glass—a sealed clear glass vessel that contains chemicals that crystalize in different ways. People in the mid-1800s believed the shape of the crystals could foretell

3h

By Next Year, NASA Astronauts May Not Have a Ride to the Space Station

Due to delays in the Commercial Crew Program, NASA may soon be left without a ride to space.

3h

Google Decides to Stop Training AI on Homeless People's Faces

Fixing AI Google has announced that it's ending a controversial program that targeted homeless black people and scanned their faces to create AI training data in exchange for measly $5 gift cards. After an internal investigation prompted by news reports about the practice, Google says it's no longer sending third-party contractors out to gather face scans, according to New York Daily News . Inste

3h

2019 Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

A baby chimp that knows how to do "laid back." (Tom Mangelsen/The Comedy /) A "family disagreement" between bee-eaters. (Vlado-Pirsa/The Comedy Wildlife Photog/) An "oh my!" otter. (Harry Walker/The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards /) A rhino giving a cattle egret a "warning!" sign. (Tilakraj Nagaraj/The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards/) A male "deer, what deer?" (Mike Rowe/The Comedy Wildli

3h

Twitter lets users enable two-factor authentication without linking a phone number

Twitter has updated its security settings allowing users to enable two-factor authentication without linking their phone numbers, as SMS is known to be vulnerable to hackers.

3h

Small, fast, and highly energy-efficient memory device inspired by lithium-ion batteries

Scientists have developed a new three-valued memory device inspired by solid lithium-ion batteries. The proposed device, which has an extremely low energy consumption, may be key for the development of more energy-efficient and faster random-access memories (RAMs), which are ubiquitous in modern computers.

3h

El Nino swings more violently in the industrial age, compelling hard evidence says

El Ninos, La Ninas, and the climate phenomenon that drives them have become more extreme in the times of human-induced climate change, says hard physical evidence spanning millennia that has recently come together.

3h

New material captures and converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical

A team led by the University of Manchester has developed a metal-organic framework material providing a selective, reversible and repeatable capability to capture a toxic air pollutant, nitrogen dioxide, which is produced by combusting fossil fuels. The material then requires only water and air to convert the captured gas into nitric acid for industrial use. The gas uptake mechanism was characteri

3h

Brazil's deforestation is exploding—and 2020 will be worse

The Brazilian government acknowledges the spike but says it's the continuation of a 7-year trend

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5 Days in Jail

Chasity Hunter was on a Tinder date when she was pulled over for a routine traffic stop. The police ran her ID and found an outstanding warrant. "I didn't know at the time that there were warrants out for me—I just had school tomorrow," Hunter says. Later, she discovered that her aunt had falsely accused her of stealing a laptop. In Kira Akerman 's powerful short documentary The Arrest , Hunter r

3h

Samoa climate change resilience challenges Western perceptions

The resilience of Samoan communities in the face of climate change is providing a blueprint for other nations to follow, according to researchers.

3h

Small, fast, and highly energy-efficient memory device inspired by lithium-ion batteries

Scientists have developed a new three-valued memory device inspired by solid lithium-ion batteries. The proposed device, which has an extremely low energy consumption, may be key for the development of more energy-efficient and faster random-access memories (RAMs), which are ubiquitous in modern computers.

3h

Bacteria-infecting viruses bind mucosal surface and protect from disease

Bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, have been shown to preferentially bind to mucosal surfaces. This has been suggested to provide an extra level of immunity against bacterial infections. Researchers tested this idea using fish, phages (viruses) and a fish-infecting bacteria. Phages were confirmed to bind to the mucosal surface, staying there for days and give protection from subsequent

3h

Study: Trash-Talking Robots Can Hurt Your Delicate Feelings

Smack Talk Not only can robots beat humans at games , it turns out they can effectively trash talk us during them, too. For a new yet-to-be-peer-reviewed study , researchers at Carnegie Mellon University programmed humanoid robot Pepper to talk smack to humans while playing a strategy game against them — and despite the relatively tame nature of the bot's insults, it was still able to get into it

4h

In a first for cell biology, scientists observe ribosome assembly in real time

A team of scientists from Scripps Research and Stanford University has recorded in real time a key step in the assembly of ribosomes—the complex and evolutionarily ancient "molecular machines" that make proteins in cells and are essential for all life forms.

4h

In a first for cell biology, scientists observe ribosome assembly in real time

A team of scientists from Scripps Research and Stanford University has recorded in real time a key step in the assembly of ribosomes—the complex and evolutionarily ancient "molecular machines" that make proteins in cells and are essential for all life forms.

4h

Elon Musk Wants to Add "Fold Out Solar Wings" to Cybertruck

Cyber Goes Solar During a Thursday evening event near SpaceX's headquarters in Hawthorne, Calf., Tesla CEO Elon Musk finally showed off the company's long-awaited "Cybertruck." And while we're all still trying to digest its extremely polarizing design , Musk's mind is already racing far ahead — imagining a bright, renewable energy-fueled future with his much-beloved truck in the middle of it. Ext

4h

Taking Ayahuasca Is Like Being Awake and Asleep at the Same Time

A study of people's minds as they take DMT reveals a curious commingling of brain patterns.

4h

NASA Just Invented a Paint That Blocks Moon Dust From Sticking to Everything

Moon dust is a major problem for astronauts, but a simple coating could ward off damage.

4h

In a first for cell biology, scientists observe ribosome assembly in real time

A team of scientists from Scripps Research and Stanford University has recorded in real time a key step in the assembly of ribosomes — the complex and evolutionarily ancient 'molecular machines' that make proteins in cells and are essential for all life forms. They reveal in unprecedented detail how strands of RNA are 'chaperoned' by ribosomal proteins into folding properly; the findings overturn

4h

Financial Aid Recipients Breaking Funding Rules: Investigation

Many early-career clinical scientists receiving support through the NIH's Loan Repayment Program have accepted disallowed industry funding, Science reveals.

4h

Essential gear to start your own podcast studio

In 2019, 62 million Americans tuned in to podcasts weekly, a number that's growing. You too can capture some of those ears. But no matter how good your banter is, audiences won't subscribe if your audio is full of static or your voice echoes like you're broadcasting from deep in a cavernous warehouse. No need to build a professional-grade studio to get smooth sound—just grab these basics. Blue's

4h

Samoa climate change resilience challenges Western perceptions

The resilience of Samoan communities in the face of climate change is providing a blueprint for other nations to follow, according to Samoa and Otago researchers.

4h

NASA examines tropical storm Fung-Wong's rainfall

NASA analyzed Tropical Storm Fung-Wong's rainfall and found two small areas of moderate to heavy rainfall, despite being battered by strong wind shear.

4h

Metal Wants to Float, Once It's Etched With a Fricking Laser

An absurdly powerful laser can trap an air bubble in a layer of metal, so that it'll float no matter what.

4h

Marijuana addiction has risen in places where it's legal

A new study finds that rates of marijuana use and addiction have gone up in states that have recently legalized the drug. The problem was most severe for those over age of 26, with cases of addiction rising by a third. The findings complicate the debate around legalization. In a complicating bit of news for proponents of legalization, a new study shows that the rates of Cannabis use disorder have

4h

Why Sleepwalking Still Mystifies Scientists

The tendency to wander while slumbering might be tied to ancient mechanisms that kept us safe from predators.

5h

Mosquitoes armed with bacteria beat back dengue virus

Field trials suggest public health benefit to spreading Wolbachia

5h

Physicists Finally Find a Way to Tell Certain Black Holes Apart

In the 1960s and '70s, physicists Jacob Bekenstein and John Wheeler did a bit of math and determined that black holes "have no hair." That seemingly bizarre statement might have left some wondering whether the scientists were partaking in the drugs synonymous with the era, but they weren't talking about hair in the traditional, stuff-on-top-of-your-head sense. Or, well, just let us explain. Hair

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Trump plan to push seafloor mapping wins warm reception

White House orders agencies to come up with plan to accelerate efforts

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Marijuana legalization bill passes historic House committee vote

The bill aims to decriminalize marijuana and expunge federal convictions, among other provisions. To become law, it still has to pass through the Republican-controlled Senate. A majority of Americans support legalizing recreational marijuana, according to a recent Pew survey. None A bill that would decriminalize and deschedule marijuana at the federal level passed 24 to 10 in the House Judiciary

5h

Boeing CST-100 Starliner Heads to Launch Site Ahead of Maiden Voyage

Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft passes by the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 21, 2019, making its way to the Space Launch Complex 41 Vertical Integration Facility at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. At the pad, Starliner will be secured atop a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket in preparation for Boeing's uncrewed Orbital Flight Test to the I

5h

NASA examines tropical storm Fung-Wong's rainfall

NASA analyzed Tropical Storm Fung-Wong's rainfall and found two small areas of moderate to heavy rainfall, despite being battered by strong wind shear.

5h

Bacteria-infecting viruses bind mucosal surface and protect from disease

Bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, have been shown to preferentially bind to mucosal surfaces. This has been suggested to provide an extra level of immunity against bacterial infections. Researchers at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland tested this idea using fish, phages (viruses) and a fish-infecting bacteria. Phages were confirmed to bind to the mucosal surface, staying there for d

5h

Is Tesla's Cybertruck for Real? The Jury's Out

Elon Musk showed off a new vehicle. But the presentation lacked familiar Musk flourishes.

5h

Astronomers Look Inside Meteorites and Find the Sugars Needed for Life

The discovery shows that the organic compounds needed for life can form in lifeless environments, like on asteroids and the early Earth.

5h

Google Kills Google Cloud Print

Another day, another Google service lost. Cloud Print will shut down on December 31, 2020. The post appeared first on ExtremeTech.

5h

Top Chinese researcher faces questions about image manipulation

Case seen as test of China's efforts to crack down on misconduct

5h

Multifunctional small brains

Researchers discovered that not only the cerebral cortex is responsible for higher perceptual abilities but that the cerebellum also plays a role. This discovery can help understand the consequences of damage to the small brain, since not only motoric impairment will appear, but also social cognition can be altered.

5h

Trials promise good news for countries with dengue and Zika virus

Scientists have found an effective and environmentally sustainable way to block the transmission of mosquito-borne dengue virus, in trials carried out in Malaysia.

5h

New mechanism of neurodegeneration

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is an inherited neurodegenerative condition that affects 1 in 2500 individuals. Currently, however, it is still lacking effective treatment options. New research has demonstrated that a class of cytoplasmic enzymes called tRNA synthetases can cause CMT by interfering with the gene transcription in the nucleus.

5h

A Chilling True Story of Corporate Indifference

The pensive legal movie was once a Hollywood standby, reliably delivering courtroom tension, grandstanding performances, and a satisfying assurance of justice that was only enhanced when the story behind the script turned out to be true. Todd Haynes's new film, Dark Waters , fits that bill: It chronicles the Cincinnati attorney Robert Bilott's ongoing efforts, beginning in the '90s, to expose how

5h

When should we issue earthquake warnings? It's complicated.

Damaged buildings in Inglewood from a June 1920 earthquake (Wikimedia Commons/) When back-to-back earthquakes shook Southern California in July, residents of Los Angeles were frustrated; Many felt the earthquakes, which originated over 100 miles away in Ridgecrest, but received no alert through their ShakeAlertLA phone apps. But the app didn't err—it was designed to alert users when shaking was e

5h

Scientists identify underlying molecular mechanisms of Alexander disease

Researchers are learning about the differences in the underlying biology of patients with severe and milder forms of Alexander disease, a rare neurodegenerative condition that is often fatal to young children.

5h

NASA space data can cut disaster response times, costs

According to a new study, emergency responders could cut costs and save time by using near-real-time satellite data along with other decision-making tools after a flooding disaster.

5h

Assessing different HPV vaccines and vaccine schedules in adolescent girls and boys

New evidence provides further information on the benefits and harms of different human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and vaccine schedules in young women and men.

5h

Efficient bottom-up synthesis of new perovskite material for the production of ammonia

Scientists found a way to synthesize a special type of perovskite that promotes the production of ammonia, which has key applications in fertilizer production and hydrogen energy. This new synthesis process can be carried out at temperatures immensely lower than that of traditional methods for the synthesis of perovskite-oxide materials and in much less time, and the produced perovskite outperform

5h

Protection for pacemakers

A protective membrane for cardiac pacemakers has proved successful in animal trials in reducing the undesirable build-up of fibrotic tissue around the implant. The next step is to test the protective membrane in patients.

5h

The simultaneous merging of giant galaxies

Scientists proved for the first time that the galaxy NGC 6240 contains three supermassive black holes. The unique observations show the black holes close to each other in the core of the galaxy. The study points to simultaneous merging processes during the formation of the largest galaxies in the universe.

5h

Clear, conductive coating could protect advanced solar cells, touch screens

MIT researchers have improved on a transparent, conductive coating material, producing a tenfold gain in its electrical conductivity. When incorporated into a type of high-efficiency solar cell, the material increased the cell's efficiency and stability.

5h

Firearm violence impacts young people disproportionately

Although the magnitude of firearm deaths has remained constant since 2001, a new study has found that deaths have increased since 2014.

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You're more likely to mess things up without enough sleep

Sleep deprivation affects us much more than prior theories have suggested, according to new research. The research is not only one of the largest studies on sleep, but also the first to assess how sleep deprivation affects placekeeping—or, the ability to complete a series of steps without losing one's place, despite potential interruptions. "Our research showed that sleep deprivation doubles the

6h

Radio Atlantic: Is Russia Winning the Impeachment Hearings?

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) During an impeachment hearing this week, President Donald Trump's former top Russia adviser accused Republicans of peddling Russian propaganda. Anne Applebaum is a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and historian who will join The Atlantic as a staff writer in January. As one of the world's leading experts on pre-

6h

How better HIV treatment cut drug use and domestic violence

Domestic violence and illicit drug use plummeted among women who realized they could live decades longer than they'd expected because of a new HIV treatment, according to a new study. The introduction of the medical treatment called Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) dramatically improved the health and longevity of HIV-positive women in the study. The women's lives subsequently improv

6h

4 ways to keep your lights from harming insects

Here are four ways to keep light pollution from harming insects. Artificial light at night negatively affects thousands of species: beetles, moths, wasps, and other insects that have evolved to use light levels as cues for courtship, foraging, and navigation. As reported in Biological Conservation , researchers reviewed 229 studies to document the myriad ways that light alters the living environm

6h

The GOP Is Mired in Conspiracies—and It's About to Get Worse

Opinion: If you thought the impeachment hearings were bad, wait until attorney general William Barr's internal investigation comes to light.

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MIT Deepfake Shows Nixon Sadly Saying the Moon Astronauts Died

Rewriting History In the event that Apollo 11 — the NASA mission that sent Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the surface of the Moon — failed, President Nixon had a speech written and ready to go . Because the mission succeeded, Nixon never delivered the speech, but MIT engineers used deepfake technology to create a news broadcast in which a digitally-reconstructed Nixon delivers the bad news, WB

6h

A laser-plasma accelerator driven by two-color relativistic femtosecond laser pulses

A typical laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) is driven by a single, ultrarelativistic laser pulse from terawatt- or petawatt-class lasers. Recently, there has been some theoretical work on the use of copropagating two-color laser pulses (CTLP) for LPA research. Here, we demonstrate the first LPA driven by CTLP where we observed substantial electron energy enhancements. Those results have been further

6h

Fast nonadiabatic dynamics of many-body quantum systems

Modeling many-body quantum systems with strong interactions is one of the core challenges of modern physics. A range of methods has been developed to approach this task, each with its own idiosyncrasies, approximations, and realm of applicability. However, there remain many problems that are intractable for existing methods. In particular, many approaches face a huge computational barrier when mo

6h

The key player problem in complex oscillator networks and electric power grids: Resistance centralities identify local vulnerabilities

Identifying key players in coupled individual systems is a fundamental problem in network theory. We investigate synchronizable network-coupled dynamical systems such as high-voltage electric power grids and coupled oscillators on complex networks. We define key players as nodes that, once perturbed, generate the largest excursion away from synchrony. A spectral decomposition of the coupling matr

6h

Two-dimensional polymers with versatile functionalities via gemini monomers

Two-dimensional synthetic polymers (2DSPs) are sheet-like macromolecules consisting of covalently linked repeat units in two directions. Access to 2DSPs with controlled size and shape and diverse functionality has been limited because of the need for monomers to retain their crystallinity throughout polymerization. Here, we describe a synthetic strategy for 2DSPs that obviates the need for crysta

6h

Self-supported hydrogenolysis of aromatic ethers to arenes

Arenes are widely used chemicals and essential components in liquid fuels, which are currently produced from fossil feedstocks. Here, we proposed the self-supported hydrogenolysis (SSH) of aromatic ethers to produce arenes using the hydrogen source within the reactants, and it was found that RuW alloy nanoparticles were very efficient catalyst for the reactions. This route is very attractive and

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Fast surface dynamics enabled cold joining of metallic glasses

Design of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with excellent properties has been a long-sought goal in materials science and engineering. The grand challenge has been scaling up the size and improving the properties of metallic glasses of technological importance. In this work, we demonstrate a facile, flexible route to synthesize BMGs and metallic glass-glass composites out of metallic-glass ribbons. B

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Enhancing monolayer photoluminescence on optical micro/nanofibers for low-threshold lasing

Although monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have direct bandgaps, the low room-temperature photoluminescence quantum yields (QYs), especially under high pump intensity, limit their practical applications. Here, we use a simple photoactivation method to enhance the room-temperature QYs of monolayer MoS 2 grown on to silica micro/nanofibers by more than two orders of magnitude in a w

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Valence self-regulation of sulfur in nanoclusters

The valence self-regulation of sulfur from the "–2" valence state in thiols to the "–1" valence state in hydroxylated thiolates has been accomplished using the Pt 1 Ag 28 nanocluster as a platform—the first time that the "–1" valent sulfur has been detected as S –1 . Two previously unknown nanoclusters, Pt 1 Ag 28 (SR) 20 and Pt 1 Ag 28 (SR) 18 (HO-SR) 2 (where SR represents 2-adamantanethiol), h

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A skin-like two-dimensionally pixelized full-color quantum dot photodetector

Direct full-color photodetectors without sophisticated color filters and interferometric optics have attracted considerable attention for widespread applications. However, difficulties of combining various multispectral semiconductors and improving photon transfer efficiency for high-performance optoelectronic devices have impeded the translation of these platforms into practical realization. Her

6h

Observation of exceptional points in magnonic parity-time symmetry devices

Non-Hermitian Hamiltonians may still have real eigenvalues, provided that a combined parity-time (Ʈ) symmetry exists. The prospect of Ʈ symmetry has been explored in several physical systems such as photonics, acoustics, and electronics. The eigenvalues in these systems undergo a transition from real to complex at exceptional points (EPs), where the Ʈ symmetry is broken. Here, we demonstrate the

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Tuning, optimization, and perovskite solar cell device integration of ultrathin poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) films via a single-step all-dry process

For semicrystalline poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT), oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) enables systematic control over the b -axis lattice parameter (- stacking distance). Decreasing the b -axis lattice parameter increases the charge transfer integral, thus enhancing intracrystallite mobility. To reduce the barrier to intercrystallite transport, oCVD conditions were tailored to

6h

Electrically driven optical interferometry with spins in silicon carbide

Interfacing solid-state defect electron spins to other quantum systems is an ongoing challenge. The ground-state spin's weak coupling to its environment not only bestows excellent coherence properties but also limits desired drive fields. The excited-state orbitals of these electrons, however, can exhibit stronger coupling to phononic and electric fields. Here, we demonstrate electrically driven

6h

Monolithic shape-programmable dielectric liquid crystal elastomer actuators

Soft robotics may enable many new technologies in which humans and robots physically interact, yet the necessary high-performance soft actuators still do not exist. The optimal soft actuators need to be fast and forceful and have programmable shape changes. Furthermore, they should be energy efficient for untethered applications and easy to fabricate. Here, we combine desirable characteristics fr

6h

Samoa climate change resilience challenges Western perceptions

The resilience of Samoan communities in the face of climate change is providing a blueprint for other nations to follow, according to Samoa and Otago researchers.

6h

Dengue Cases Drop After Bacteria-Infected Mosquitoes Released

Aedes aegypti infected with Wolbachia—which inhibit transmission of the dengue virus from insect to human—were deployed in Indonesia, Vietnam, Brazil, and Australia.

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Research Interrupted in Hong Kong Amid Protests

While short-term disruptions are manageable, scientists says, they are still concerned the unrest–and possible political ramifications–will affect the country's research programs long-term.

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Clear, conductive coating could protect advanced solar cells, touch screens

MIT researchers have improved on a transparent, conductive coating material, producing a tenfold gain in its electrical conductivity. When incorporated into a type of high-efficiency solar cell, the material increased the cell's efficiency and stability.

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Old newspapers can be used to grow carbon nanotubes

New research has found that old newspaper provide a cheap and green solution for the bulk production of single walled carbon nanotubes.

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Researchers visualize bacteria motor in first step toward human-produced electrical energy

Humans, one day, may be able to produce their own electrical energy in the same way electric eels do, according to a research team. It's the ultimate goal that begins with understanding precisely how tiny 'motors' inside bacteria maintain biological balance.

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NASA's infrared analysis of Tropical Storm Sebastien sees wind shear

Tropical Storm Sebastian continued to move in a northeasterly direction through the North Atlantic Ocean as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. Infrared imagery from an instrument aboard Aqua revealed very high, powerful storms with very cold cloud top temperatures in the southwestern quadrant of the storm. It also revealed that the storm was being sheared apart by outside winds.

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Where do rattlesnakes hide out in the winter?

When snakes hibernate during the cold-weather season, they are far from inactive, at least metabolically speaking. Instead, they're shutting down their systems, conserving energy, and revving up for reproduction, according to rattlesnake expert Matt Goode, assistant research scientist in the School of Natural Resources and the Environment at the University of Arizona and an investigator in the Ve

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California ditched coal—is gas next?

Every day, millions of Californians burn a planet-warming fossil fuel to cook dinner, stay warm or take a hot shower.

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Tiny devices made of DNA detect cancer with fewer false alarms

A new cancer-detecting tool uses tiny circuits made of DNA to identify cancer cells by the molecular signature on their surface. The circuits work by attaching to the outside of a cell and analyzing it for proteins that are more abundant on some cell types than others. The devices distinguish cell types with higher specificity than previous methods, giving researchers hope their work could improve

6h

Spiral Formations on the Moon Appear to Deflect Cosmic Rays

Surface Anomalies The surface of the Moon is pockmarked by bizarre formations called lunar swirls: brightly-colored spirals of rocks and dust, tens of miles across, that have astronomers utterly puzzled. Many questions remain about how and when the swirls formed, but they may have stemmed from internal magnetic fields or from meteor impacts, according to Space.com . Because the magnetic fields of

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Watch archaeologists reflect on unearthing the lives of enslaved Africans

Excavations on St. Croix fill in history's blanks

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Oaks instead of palm trees? Florida's iconic palms don't cut it with climate change

South Florida's palm trees are postcard promises of sighing sea breezes and sandy beaches, but the icon of the tropics may be an impractical adornment in an era of climate change.

6h

BlueMail Creators to Apple: Let Us Back Into the Mac App Store

The creators of BlueMail, who are suing Apple, take their case directly to Tim Cook in the name of "fairness and empathy."

6h

New 5G Wireless Deal Threatens Accurate Weather Forecasts

Meteorologists say international standards for wireless technology could degrade crucial satellite measurements of water vapor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tiny devices made of DNA detect cancer with fewer false alarms

A new cancer-detecting tool uses tiny circuits made of DNA to identify cancer cells by the molecular signature on their surface. The circuits work by attaching to the outside of a cell and analyzing it for proteins that are more abundant on some cell types than others. The devices distinguish cell types with higher specificity than previous methods, giving researchers hope their work could improve

6h

Do obesity and smoking impact healing after wrist fracture surgery?

Both obesity and smoking can have negative effects on bone health. A recent study examined whether they also impact healing in patients who have undergone surgery for fractures of the wrist, or the distal radius, which are among the most common bone fractures.

6h

Lack of sleep may explain why poor people get more heart disease

Insufficient sleep is one reason why disadvantaged groups have more heart disease.

6h

Structures near airports increase risk of airplane-goose collisions

From mid-November 2015 through February 2016, scientists used GPS transmitters to track the movements of Canada geese near Midway International Airport in Chicago. They discovered that — in the colder months, at least — some geese are hanging out on rooftops, in a rail yard and in a canal close to Midway's runways. This behavior increases the danger of collisions between geese and airplanes, the

6h

Tiny devices made of DNA detect cancer with fewer false alarms

A new cancer-detecting tool uses tiny circuits made of DNA to identify cancer cells by the molecular signatures on their surface.

6h

Interaction with fungus containing nitrogen-fixing endobacteria improves rice nitrogen nutrition

Researchers Karnelia Paul of the University of Calcutta (India), Chinmay Saha of the University of Kalyani (India), and Anindita Seal of the University of Calcutta (India) designed research to study nitrogen nutrition in rice. Nitrogen supply limits crop yields, but application of excess nitrogen fertilizer can pollute water and is expensive. Therefore, scientists are looking for beneficial microb

6h

Controversial DNA screening technique used for at least one pregnancy

A company says at least one woman is pregnant after using a controversial DNA screening technique to analyse thousands of DNA variants in developing embryos

6h

Interaction with fungus containing nitrogen-fixing endobacteria improves rice nitrogen nutrition

Researchers Karnelia Paul of the University of Calcutta (India), Chinmay Saha of the University of Kalyani (India), and Anindita Seal of the University of Calcutta (India) designed research to study nitrogen nutrition in rice. Nitrogen supply limits crop yields, but application of excess nitrogen fertilizer can pollute water and is expensive. Therefore, scientists are looking for beneficial microb

6h

Tiny devices made of DNA detect cancer with fewer false alarms

A new cancer-detecting tool uses tiny circuits made of DNA to identify cancer cells by the molecular signatures on their surface.

6h

New model for predicting kidney injury after common heart procedure

A Yale-led group of doctors has developed a new mathematical model that can predict the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients undergoing a common heart procedure.

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Small, fast, and highly energy-efficient memory device inspired by lithium-ion batteries

Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and the University of Tokyo (UTokyo) developed a new three-valued memory device inspired by solid lithium-ion batteries. The proposed device, which has an extremely low energy consumption, may be key for the development of more energy-efficient and faster random-access memories (RAMs), which are ubiquitous in modern computers.

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More people want a green burial, but cemetery law hasn't caught up

Visitors to the White Eagle Memorial Preserve in southern Washington won't find rows of headstones, manicured lawns or pathways to a loved one's final resting place. Instead, they stroll through an oak and ponderosa forest set within more than a thousand acres of wilderness.

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Twitter's 'Hide Replies' Option Gives Users More Control

The option, now available everywhere, is supposed to help nudge Twitter in a less toxic direction.

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New technology developed to improve forecasting of Earthquakes, Tsunamis

Geoscientists have successfully developed and tested a new high-tech shallow water buoy that can detect the small movements and changes in the Earth's seafloor that are often a precursor to deadly natural hazards.

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The Modern Life of Origami, an Art as Old as Paper

Precision is key, whether folding a humble crane or an interlocking modular structure. So is enthusiasm.

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Nov. journal highlights: First MCI prevalence estimates in US Latino populations

First mild cognitive impairment prevalence estimates in diverse U.S. Latino populations. Significant gaps in scientific knowledge demand new framework for advancing Alzheimer's disease and dementia research in growing U.S. Latino populations. Tribal health care services increase dramatically for Alaska Native and American Indian individuals after diagnosis of Alzheimer's or other dementia. New cas

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Predicting vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease and delirium

A paper published today in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) shed new light on a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease that may indirectly influence patients' risk of postoperative delirium.

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Planned Fossil Fuel Extraction Would Blow Past Warming Limits

As governments discuss how to keep warming below 2 degree Celsius, they continue to plan for coal, oil and natural gas production — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Strange Galaxy Cluster Ignores Massive Black Hole, Forms Stars

Astronomers question why a supermassive black hole in the Phoenix Cluster doesn't disrupt star formation like its peers do.

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New electrodes could increase efficiency of electric vehicles and aircraft

The rise in popularity of electric vehicles and aircraft presents the possibility of moving away from fossil fuels toward a more sustainable future. While significant technological advancements have dramatically increased the efficiency of these vehicles, there are still several issues standing in the way of widespread adoption.

7h

New technology developed to improve forecasting of Earthquakes, Tsunamis

Geoscientists have successfully developed and tested a new high-tech shallow water buoy that can detect the small movements and changes in the Earth's seafloor that are often a precursor to deadly natural hazards.

7h

New method for using spin waves in magnetic materials

In order to miniaturize individual components of mobile phones or computers, for example, magnetic waves are currently regarded as promising alternatives to conventional data transmission functioning by means of electric currents. The physical basis for this is the spin of electrons in magnetic materials, which can be simplified as a rotation of electrons around their own axis. Physicists have dev

7h

Clean air research converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical

A toxic pollutant produced by burning fossil fuels can be captured from the exhaust gas stream and converted into useful industrial chemicals using only water and air thanks to a new advanced material.

7h

Universal features of music around the world

New research supports the idea that music all around the globe shares important commonalities, despite many differences.

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DNA repeats — the genome's dark matter

First direct analysis of pathogenic sequence repeats in the human genome.

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Wound healing in mucous tissues could ward off AIDS

Wound healing in mucous tissues during early infection by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus guards some primate species against developing AIDS. Both HIV and SIV provoke an immune response that injures tissues surrounding the intestine; African green monkeys with SIV quickly repair their mucous tissues. This interrupts the disease course and avoids AIDS onset. Stimulating this response might be a way

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Russia cracks down on spaceport mega-project mired in corruption

Vostochny cosmodrome at heart of claims of £132m worth of theft and illegal enrichment The Kremlin has launched a crackdown over a spaceport project that was supposed to be the jewel of Russia's space programme but has become mired in corruption costing more than $170m (£132m), with investigations alleging blatant theft and illegal enrichment by officials and contractors. As state investigators h

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Expand your horizons by adding a second screen to your computer

More screen, more space, more windows, more, more, more. (Alexandru Acea via Unsplash/) In terms of boosting productivity, one of the best upgrades you can give your laptop or desktop computer is not a faster processor, more RAM, or extra storage space—but adding a second screen to your setup. Having double the screen space might not immediately seem like it could revolutionize how quickly you ge

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NASA's infrared analysis of Tropical Storm Sebastien sees wind shear

Tropical Storm Sebastian continued to move in a northeasterly direction through the North Atlantic Ocean as NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead. Infrared imagery from an instrument aboard Aqua revealed very high, powerful storms with very cold cloud top temperatures in the southwestern quadrant of the storm. It also revealed that the storm was being sheared apart by outside winds.

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How does the prion protein clump? DNA-modulated liquid droplets may explain

Researchers at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), in Brazil, have found that the prion protein (PrP) suffers liquid-liquid phase separation, and that this mechanism is finely controlled by some DNA sequences. This could explain the formation of irreversible clumping of PrP, structure responsible for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

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Peer Into the Rainforest's Stunning Biodiversity

Wildlife photographer Andreas Kay took almost 30,000 images of Ecuador's insects and amphibians during his life.

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NIH to lift Duke sanctions stemming from misconduct

The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) plans to lift sanctions it placed on Duke University more than 1.5 years ago following concerns about how the school responded to recent cases of misconduct. In a memo today to faculty and staff obtained by Retraction Watch, Lawrence Carin, Duke vice president for research wrote: Yesterday the … Continue reading

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Tesla's Cybertruck Is a Killer Deal and Nobody Is Talking About It

Look. We all knew that Tesla's Cybertruck was going to be a monstrosity straight out of "Blade Runner" — Tesla CEO Elon Musk has been saying so himself for years. What's more notable, in the sober light of day, is that its starting price of $39,900 is an absolutely killer deal — there's literally nothing else like it on the market. In 2012, Musk tweeted that he "would love to make a Tesla supertr

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Global 5G wireless deal threatens weather forecasts

Nature, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03609-x Meteorologists say international standards for wireless technology could degrade crucial satellite measurements of water vapour.

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Banning Micro-Targeted Political Ads Won't End the Practice

Google has put a stop to narrowcasted political advertising. Facebook seems ready to do the same. So what?

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Do obesity and smoking impact healing after wrist fracture surgery?

Both obesity and smoking can have negative effects on bone health. A recent study led by a team at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) examined whether they also impact healing in patients who have undergone surgery for fractures of the wrist, or the distal radius, which are among the most common bone fractures.

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Tiny devices made of DNA detect cancer with fewer false alarms

A new cancer-detecting tool uses tiny circuits made of DNA to identify cancer cells by the molecular signature on their surface. The circuits work by attaching to the outside of a cell and analyzing it for proteins that are more abundant on some cell types than others. The devices distinguish cell types with higher specificity than previous methods, giving Duke University researchers hope their wo

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New electrodes could increase efficiency of electric vehicles and aircraft

The rise in popularity of electric vehicles and aircraft presents the possibility of moving away from fossil fuels toward a more sustainable future. While significant technological advancements have dramatically increased the efficiency of these vehicles, there are still several issues standing in the way of widespread adoption.

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Interaction with fungus containing N2-fixing endobacteria improves rice nitrogen nutrition

Researchers have investigated the improvement of nitrogen nutrition in rice by interaction with the fungus Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and its N2-fixing endobacteria. These findings are an important step in using soil microbes as 'green fertilizer' for rice and potentially other crops.

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Filaments that structure DNA

Researchers discover how outside stimuli drive the formation and reorganization of the cytoskeleton in the nucleus of mammalian cells.

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Dangerous bacteria communicate to avoid antibiotics

Researchers have found a new survival mechanism for a commonly known type of bacteria. It can send out warning signals and thus make sure that other bacteria escape 'dangers' such as antibiotics. The researchers hope that the new knowledge can be utilized to make antibiotic treatment more effective.

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US FCC blocks China's Huawei, ZTE from subsidy program

American regulators on Friday unanimously branded Chinese telecoms firms ZTE and Huawei as threats to national security and blocked them from accessing $8.5 billion in federal funds for services …

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The War on Childhood Obesity Needs a War on Blame

We need to communicate to kids that their health, not a number on the scale, is what's important — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Filaments that structure DNA

Researchers discover how outside stimuli drive the formation and reorganization of the cytoskeleton in the nucleus of mammalian cells.

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Virtual reality 'clinic' brings stroke therapy home

A virtual reality clinic could make it easier for stroke survivors to attend their physical and occupational therapy sessions, researchers say. Results from a proof-of-concept study suggest that the technology—and the social connection it facilitates—are effective at encouraging therapy participation. "Physical and occupational therapy are important parts of stroke recovery, in terms of helping s

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OpenAI's Robot Hand Won't Stop Rotating The Rubik Cube 👋

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Are Solid-State Batteries About To Change The World? | Answers With Joe

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Nikola, Anheuser-Busch make first 'zero-emission' delivery

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Daily briefing: Secretive Iran court sentences cheetah conservationists to prison

Nature, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03619-9 Case has prompted an outcry from the international community. Plus: promising antibiotic discovered in the guts of nematode worms and a global view of collaboration.

8h

Boeing Unveils Spacecraft Built to Carry Astronauts to ISS

Perfect Fit On Thursday, Boeing's Starliner spacecraft left the hangar for the first time en route to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. There, Boeing attached Starliner to the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket that will launch the passenger capsule into space on December 17 — putting the craft one step closer to ferrying astronauts to the International Space Station for NASA . Rosie the Rocke

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How the brain decides to punish or not

Oksana Zinchenko, Research Fellow at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, HSE University, has conducted meta-analysis of 17 articles to find out which areas of the brain are involved decision-making for rendering social punishment. It would appear that in case of both victims of violations as well as witnesses, punishment decisions activate the brain regions responsible for focusing one's atte

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Breast cancer recurrence after lumpectomy & RT is treatable with localized RT without mastectomy

Approximately 10% of breast cancer patients treated with lumpectomy (breast-conserving surgery [BCS]) and whole-breast radiation (WBI) will have a subsequent in-breast local recurrence of cancer (IBTR) when followed long term.

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Virtual reality would make attending therapy easier for stroke survivors

Researchers have created a virtual reality clinic to make it easier for stroke survivors to attend physical and occupational therapy sessions. Results from a proof-of-concept study suggest the technology — and the social connection it facilitates — are effective at encouraging therapy participation.

8h

Dangerous bacteria communicate to avoid antibiotics

A bacterial infection is not just an unpleasant experience—it can also be a major health problem. Some bacteria develop resistance to otherwise effective treatment with antibiotics. Therefore, researchers are trying to develop new types of antibiotics that can fight the bacteria, and at the same time trying to make the current treatment with antibiotics more effective.

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Research shows old newspapers can be used to grow carbon nanotubes

A research collaboration between Rice University and the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University has found that old newspapers can be used as a low cost, eco-friendly material on which to grow single walled carbon nanotubes on a large scale.

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Dangerous bacteria communicate to avoid antibiotics

A bacterial infection is not just an unpleasant experience—it can also be a major health problem. Some bacteria develop resistance to otherwise effective treatment with antibiotics. Therefore, researchers are trying to develop new types of antibiotics that can fight the bacteria, and at the same time trying to make the current treatment with antibiotics more effective.

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Changing experiences of the natural world

Digital innovations have the potential to bring people closer to nature, to help ensure there is the necessary strong public support for conservation measures. Author Professor Les Firbank, from the University of Leeds' School of Biology and Global Food and Environment Institute, said: "Our growing digital connection to wildlife, aided by broadcasters such as David Attenborough, may be crucial to

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The War on Childhood Obesity Needs a War on Blame

We need to communicate to kids that their health, not a number on the scale, is what's important — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Stuck in Arctic Ice, Dodging Polar Bears. All for Science.

An international research team is now adrift about 300 miles from the North Pole. It's for a yearlong expedition to study the Arctic's changing climate.

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Increased use of antibiotics may predispose to Parkinson's disease

Higher exposure to commonly used oral antibiotics is linked to an increased risk of Parkinson's disease according to a recently published study. The strongest associations were found for broad spectrum antibiotics and those that act against against anaerobic bacteria and fungi. The timing of antibiotic exposure also seemed to matter.

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Alzheimer's Plagued Her Family. But a Rare Genetic Mutation Spared This Woman's Mind

Researchers investigated the case of a Colombian woman whose rare genetic mutation helped protect her against Alzheimer's disease.

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How Does the Brain Work With Half of it Removed? Pretty Well, Actually

In a new study, scans of people who had a brain hemisphere removed as children show how the organ adapted.

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Medical Historians Still Struggle to Identify Origin of Disease That Swept Across England 500 Years Ago

The disease disappeared, but Anne Boleyn's ghost still walks the bloody tower. HenryVIII.jpg The painting "An Allegory of the Tudor Succession: The Family of Henry VIII" from about 1590 shows Mary I (1516–1558), Elizabeth I (1533-1603), Edward VI (1537–1553), Henry VIII (1491–1547), and others. Image credits: Public Domain Culture Friday, November 22, 2019 – 10:15 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Insi

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AI Is Learning Quantum Mechanics to Design New Molecules

Extra Help A new machine learning algorithm could probe the quantum behavior of molecules, giving chemists a better ability to design new compounds from scratch. The AI system, with the ridiculous-sounding name "SchNOrb," can look deeper into the structure and behavior of molecules than previous chemist-assisting algorithms, Inverse reports . Though SchNOrb — "SchNet for Orbitals" — hasn't been d

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NASA space data can cut disaster response times, costs

According to a new study, emergency responders could cut costs and save time by using near-real-time satellite data along with other decision-making tools after a flooding disaster.

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Discovery paves the way for blocking malaria transmission in Brazil

Research that will be presented today at FAPESP Week France suggests that bacteria present in the intestine of the Anhopheles darlingi mosquito influence the development of the parasite that causes the disease in the insect's body and the chances of transmission to humans.

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A model will help to understand the solar dynamics

An international group of scientists, in cooperation with a research scientist from Skoltech, has developed a model to describe changes in solar plasma. This will help comprehend solar dynamics and gives some clues to understanding how to predict space weather events. The results have been published in The Astrophysical Journal.

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NASA space data can cut disaster response times, costs

According to a new study, emergency responders could cut costs and save time by using near-real-time satellite data along with other decision-making tools after a flooding disaster.

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The ant-bite video that changed my approach to science communication

Nature, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03555-8 By making videos about the first steps of his research, Adrian Smith has realized the production value of his science.

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Carmelo Anthony's Melancholy NBA Return

Tuesday night, after more than a year away, the 35-year-old 10-time All-Star Carmelo Anthony returned to the NBA. His absence had been due not to injury or suspension but to a belief that he's simply no longer all that useful to have around. During his last full season, with the Oklahoma City Thunder in 2017–18, he proved a poor fit, siphoning shots away from Russell Westbrook and Paul George and

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Kvindelige nat-tek-studerende forventer flere tusinde kroner færre i startløn end mandlige

Studerende har generelt beskedne forventninger til startlønnen, men særligt de kvindelige studerende rammer langt ved siden af. Ærgerligt og ikke godt nok, lyder det fra IDA.

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Solution: 'Randomness From Determinism'

Our last Insights puzzle explored how a smooth, random distribution of objects arises in a classic, deterministic machine called a Galton board or bean machine. We examined the inner workings of this by playing with some puzzles. I also used the Galton board's probabilistic result to suggest that perhaps the probabilistic equations of quantum mechanics spring from underlying deterministic laws th

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New technology developed to improve forecasting of earthquakes, tsunamis

University of South Florida geoscientists have successfully developed and tested a new high-tech shallow water buoy that can detect the small movements and changes in the Earth's seafloor that are often a precursor to deadly natural hazards, like earthquakes, volcanoes and tsunamis.

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DNA repeats—the genome's dark matter

Expansions of DNA repeats are very hard to analyze. A method developed by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin allows for a detailed look at these previously inaccessible regions of the genome. It combines nanopore sequencing, stem cell, and CRISPR-Cas technologies. The method could improve the diagnosis of various congenital diseases and cancers in the future.

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The week in wildlife – in pictures

The pick of the best flora and fauna photos from around the world, including foraging sparrows and a swimming beaver Continue reading…

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DNA repeats—the genome's dark matter

Expansions of DNA repeats are very hard to analyze. A method developed by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin allows for a detailed look at these previously inaccessible regions of the genome. It combines nanopore sequencing, stem cell, and CRISPR-Cas technologies. The method could improve the diagnosis of various congenital diseases and cancers in the future.

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Dogs Can't Help Falling in Love

One researcher argues that a dog's ability to bond has more to do with forming emotional attachments than being smart about what humans want.

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"A DeLorean Mated With a Pontiac": Internet Reacts to Cybertruck

Low-Poly Hummer It's finally here: Tesla CEO Elon Musk's unveiled his passion project "Cybertruck" at a flashy Thursday evening event in Los Angeles. And the reactions to the, uh, polarizing design are coming — mostly in the form of ridicule on Twitter. Seriously it's like a Delorean mated with a Pontiac Aztek. — Tom Giles (@tsgiles) November 22, 2019 Blade Runner We've known for a while that the

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New study provides insight into the mechanisms of blood clots in cancer patients

Researchers have identified a potential new signaling pathway that may help further the understanding of blood clot formation in cancer patients and ultimately help prevent this complication from occurring.

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Increase in cannabis cultivation or residential development could impact water resources

Cannabis cultivation could have a significant effect on groundwater and surface water resources when combined with residential use, evidence from a new study suggests. Researchers in Canada and the US investigated potential reductions in streamflow, caused by groundwater pumping for cannabis irrigation, in the Navarro River in Mendocino County, California, and contextualized it by comparing it wit

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Research shows old newspapers can be used to grow carbon nanotubes

New research has found that old newspaper provide a cheap and green solution for the bulk production of single walled carbon nanotubes.

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Dangerous bacteria communicate to avoid antibiotics

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have found a new survival mechanism for a commonly known type of bacteria. It can send out warning signals and thus make sure that other bacteria escape 'dangers' such as antibiotics. The researchers hope that the new knowledge can be utilised to make antibiotic treatment more effective.

9h

Changing experiences of the natural world

Digital innovations have the potential to bring people closer to nature, to help ensure there is the necessary strong public support for conservation measures.

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Combination of immunotherapy and VEGF inhibitor improves survival in HCC

Combination therapy with the PD-L1 inhibitor atezolizumab and the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab significantly improves overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) compared to standard of care, showed results from a phase 3 study to be reported at the ESMO Asia 2019 Congress.

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Biosimilar for HER2+ breast cancer: Overall response rate matches reference trastuzumab

The trastuzumab biosimilar HLX02 achieved similar overall response rate to reference trastuzumab in women with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) recurrent or previously untreated metastatic breast cancer, according to a large, randomised phase III study reported at the ESMO Asia 2019 Congress.

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Clean air research converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical

A toxic pollutant produced by burning fossil fuels can be captured from the exhaust gas stream and converted into useful industrial chemicals using only water and air thanks to a new advanced material developed by an international team of scientists.

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Association between parents' education level and youth outcomes

Ethnic and racial differences between educational attainment by parents and outcomes among young people related to behavior, academics and health were explored in this observational study. The study included 10,619 adolescents ages 12 to 17 who participated in a nationally representative survey.

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Is parents' use of marijuana associated with greater likelihood of kids' substance use?

Recent and past use of marijuana by parents was associated with increased risk of marijuana, tobacco and alcohol use by adolescent or young adult children living in the same household in this survey study. Researchers examined data for 24,900 parent-child pairs from National Surveys on Drug Use and Health from 2015-2018.

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The filaments that structure DNA

They play a leading role not only in muscle cells: Actin filaments are one of the most abundant proteins in all mammalian cells. The filigree structures form an important part of the cytoskeleton and locomotor system. Cell biologists at the University of Freiburg are now using cell cultures to show how receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of these cells transmit signals from the outside to act

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New method for using spin waves in magnetic materials

Smaller, faster, more energy-efficient—this is the goal that developers of electronic devices have been working towards for years. In order to be able to miniaturize individual components of mobile phones or computers for example, magnetic waves are currently regarded as promising alternatives to conventional data transmission functioning by means of electric currents. The reason: As chips become

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The filaments that structure DNA

They play a leading role not only in muscle cells: Actin filaments are one of the most abundant proteins in all mammalian cells. The filigree structures form an important part of the cytoskeleton and locomotor system. Cell biologists at the University of Freiburg are now using cell cultures to show how receptor proteins in the plasma membrane of these cells transmit signals from the outside to act

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Tesla Unveils the Stoner Truck. Sorry, Cybertruck. It's as Big as an F-150.

The Tesla Cybertruck is unlike anything you've seen before: sharp creases and angles, like something doodled by a (talented) high schooler in that boring history class, or imagined for a science fiction movie. It is also a competitively priced pickup, listed at $40,000 to $70,000 with one to three motors. Speaking of science fiction, CEO Elon Musk said delivery will be in 2021, which is as little

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Caught in afterglow: 1st detection of Inverse Compton emission from dying gamma-ray burst

When a star dies, it emits intense flashes of light called a gamma-ray burst. Most days, the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope detects these. About 20 years ago, scientists predicted that a gargantuan energy level would be detected in the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst. In January, the MAGIC telescopes on the Canary Islands observed light at that energy level for the first time. The theories predict

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New technology developed to improve forecasting of Earthquakes, Tsunamis

Geoscientists have successfully developed and tested a new high-tech shallow water buoy that can detect the small movements and changes in the Earth's seafloor that are often a precursor to deadly natural hazards.

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DNA repeats — the genome's dark matter

First direct analysis of pathogenic sequence repeats in the human genome.

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The search for our solar system's ninth planet | Mike Brown

Could the strange orbits of small, distant objects in our solar system lead us to a big discovery? Planetary astronomer Mike Brown proposes the existence of a new, giant planet lurking in the far reaches of our solar system — and shows us how traces of its presence might already be staring us in the face.

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Meet the man who restores old music to its original glory

"It's a minefield of experimentation. And It's a big part of what we do." —Pete Hutchison (Jon Enoch/) Listening to records was a reverent act in Pete Hutchison's childhood home. Whenever his parents played their beloved Ravel and Debussy works, they enforced one rule: "You weren't allowed to talk," he says. Though Hutchison favored rock and jazz when he started his own collection as a teen in th

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Clean air research converts toxic air pollutant into industrial chemical

A toxic pollutant produced by burning fossil fuels can be captured from the exhaust gas stream and converted into useful industrial chemicals using only water and air thanks to a new advanced material developed by an international team of scientists.

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A countertop oven may seem superfluous, but this one changed my cooking and eating habits

A new way to cook. I love cooking, but squeezing in the time to prepare a meal from scratch can be hard. Cooking aside, the prep and cleaning work cut deeply into time I should spend binge-watching content. Brava's intelligent, app-connected countertop oven promises to free up time to let me cook while leaving enough hours in the day to watch all of Chernobyl in a single night. That promise, howe

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Stabilizing sulfur cathode by single Li-ion channel polymer binder

The growing demands on high-performance energy-storage system for emerging technologies such as electric vehicles and artificial intelligence drive the development of high-performance batteries. As a promising candidate of next-generation batteries, Li-S batteries have been drawn much attention carrying a high specific capacity (1675 mAh g-1) and energy density (2600 Wh kg-1). However, the diffusi

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Image: Hera scans Didymoon

Hera is a candidate ESA mission be presented to ESA's Space19+ meeting next week as part of the Agency's Space Safety programme, where Europe's space ministers will take a final decision on flying it.

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Chemistry in the turbulent interstellar medium

Over 200 molecules have been discovered in space, some (like Buckminsterfullerene) very complex with carbon atoms. Besides being intrinsically interesting, these molecules radiate away heat, helping giant clouds of interstellar material cool and contract to form new stars. Moreover, astronomers use the radiation from these molecules to study the local conditions, for example, as planets form in di

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Image: Seville, Spain from orbit

Ahead of next week's Space19+ Ministerial Council, the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Seville in southern Spain—the destination for this milestone event.

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Industrial scale production of layer materials via intermediate-assisted grinding

A large number of 2-D materials, including graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) like MoS2 and WSe2, metal oxides (MxOy), black phosphorene (b-P), etc, provide a wide range of properties and numerous potential applications, But in order to fully realize their commercial use, the prerequisite is large-scale production.

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Filaments that structure DNA

Researchers discover how outside stimuli drive the formation and reorganization of the cytoskeleton in the nucleus of mammalian cells.

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Increased use of antibiotics may predispose to Parkinson's disease

Higher exposure to commonly used oral antibiotics is linked to an increased risk of Parkinson's disease according to a recently published Finnish study. The strongest associations were found for broad spectrum antibiotics and those that act against against anaerobic bacteria and fungi. The timing of antibiotic exposure also seemed to matter.

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United in musical diversity

Is music really a 'universal language'? Two articles in the most recent issue of Science support the idea that music all around the globe shares important commonalities, despite many differences. Researchers led by Samuel Mehr at Harvard University have undertaken a large-scale analysis of music from cultures around the world. Cognitive biologists Tecumseh Fitch and Tudor Popescu of the University

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New method for using spin waves in magnetic materials

In order to miniaturize individual components of mobile phones or computers, for example, magnetic waves are currently regarded as promising alternatives to conventional data transmission functioning by means of electric currents. The physical basis for this is the spin of electrons in magnetic materials, which can be simplified as a rotation of electrons around their own axis. Physicists at Münst

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Scientists reveal the dominant role of quenched disorder on complex oxide nanowires

At nanometer length scale, novel phenomena are expected to emerge. Compared to the traditional semiconductors used in industrial business, does complex oxides show any interesting and not-before-seen properties at nanometer length scale? A new study published in SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy has shown the unique physical properties of manganite nanowires known as quenched disorder a

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Bridging surface plasmon polaritons and the digital world

Although the concept of digital coding metamaterial has been proposed to link the digital world and physical world, it is still challenging to manipulate the digital signals in confined electromagnetic waves in deep-subwavelength scale. Scientists in China and Singapore reported a breakthrough on digital spoof surface plasmon polariton (SSPP) metamaterial to achieve the combination of tightly conf

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Fast ionic transport interphase for stable Mg metal anodes in conventional electrolyte

Researchers report a simple, safe and effectively method to resolve the irreversibly plating/stripping problem in Mg(TFSI)2/DME electrolyte. The Sn-based compounds provide fast ion transport conduit for Mg2+, which has a higher diffusion coefficient of Mg2+. The insulating halides offer potential gradient to drive Mg2+ electrodeposit under the Sn-based artificial SEI layer and avoid plating on the

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Buy less, be happier and build a healthy planet

You may feel like you can't do anything to stop climate change. But climate activists who joined in grassroots movements managed to cut their carbon footprints and were still happier than their non-activist peers, new research shows.

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Tesla's Cybertruck is the latest lofty promise in the world of electric pickups

Yup, that's the Cybertruck. (Tesla/) The electric pickup truck still seems far away. Last night, Elon Musk took the stage at the Tesla Design Studio in California to finally deliver on a promise he made on Twitter all the way back in 2012 and introduce Tesla's truck. Predictably, the show was elaborate. Unexpectedly, however, the "Cyber Truck" looked considerably different from what anyone was ex

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A near-hopeless childhood cancer succumbs to drug duo

Nature, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03600-6 Mass screening turns up a therapy that holds promise for treating a highly aggressive class of tumours.

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The Books Briefing: Following Food From Field to Market to Plate

The food people eat today is the product of centuries of change and systematization. Not only have contemporary cuisines been defined by historical travel and colonization, but agricultural and economic developments have also shifted how we think about and consume food. The Way We Eat Now , by Bee Wilson, and Pressure Cooker , by Sarah Bowen, Joslyn Brenton, and Sinikka Elliott, both examine how

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Friend or foe? This bundle of brain fibers lets guys know

New research identifies three key components to the brain's rapid processing of emotions. It's what lets us quickly recognize a potential friend or foe, an ability essential to survival. The work may offer insights into disorders such as anxiety and psychosis . Researchers were able to link a bundle of fibers deep within the brain to human social behavior for the first time. The fiber bundle, cal

9h

Using a two-step approach to convert aliphatic amines into unnatural amino acids

A team of chemists at Nankai University has developed a two-step approach to converting aliphatic amines into unnatural amino acids. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their approach, how well it worked, and applications that might benefit from its use. John Ovian and Eric Jacobsen with Harvard University have published a companion piece in the same journal issue

9h

Nyt bioraffinaderi skal sikre græsprotein til kvæg og høns

PLUS. Danmarks første kommercielle anlæg til at bioraffinere økologisk græs til proteinfoder er på plads i 2021. Græsfoderet skal erstatte dele af landbrugets import af sojaprotein fra Sydamerika.

9h

Watch Tesla Accidentally Smash Cybertruck's "Bulletproof" Window

Windows Smashed Tesla finally revealed its outrageous "Blade Runner"-style pickup truck, the "cybertruck," at an event in LA on Thursday evening. But an on-stage demonstration by Tesla CEO Elon Musk seemingly backfired, The Guardian reports : Tesla's chief designer Franz von Holzhausen lobed a hefty metal ball at the window — and smashed it. "Oh my fucking God," Musk muttered, in apparent chagrin

10h

T-shirt generates electricity from temperature difference between body and surroundings

Researchers of the Faculty of Science of the University of Malaga (UMA) have designed a low-cost T-shirt that generates electricity from the temperature difference between the human body and the surroundings. We are talking about the 'e-textile' prototype, developed in collaboration with the Italian Institute of Technology in Genoa (IIT) based on sustainable methods and low-cost materials like tom

10h

Scientists find a place on Earth where there is no life

Living beings, especially microorganisms, have a surprising ability to adapt to the most extreme environments on our planet, but there are still places where they cannot live. European researchers have confirmed the absence of microbial life in hot, saline, hyperacid ponds in the Dallol geothermal field in Ethiopia.

10h

Stabilizing sulfur cathode by single Li-ion channel polymer binder

Lithium-sulfur batteries have great potential for high-performance energy storage devices, yet the severe diffusion of soluble polysulfide in electrolyte greatly limits their practical applications. Scientists based in China design and synthesize a novel polymer binder with single lithium-ions channels allowing fast lithium-ions transport while blocking the unnecessary shuttle of polysulfide anion

10h

Changes at home make it easier for older folks to live alone

Social and physical modifications can make life easer for older adults living at home while also positively affecting cognitive function in those who live alone, according to a new study. "Disabled older individuals living alone were likely to experience a decline in cognitive function over time," says lead author Sojung Park, assistant professor at the study Brown School at Washington University

10h

New equations for estimating stature more precisely based on tibia length

Gonzalo Saco from the Bioenergy and Motion Analysis Laboratory at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) has recently published a paper in the journal Forensic Science International on new equations for estimating stature based on tibial length and stature groups for adult males for application in the field of forensic anthropology.

10h

Scientists discover surprising quantum effect in an exotic superconductor

An international team led by researchers at Princeton University has directly observed a surprising quantum effect in a high-temperature iron-containing superconductor.

10h

Do lockdown drills do any good?

School lockdown drills and exercises are controversial today, due in large part to some troubling examples making headlines.

10h

Image: Hubble eyes an emitting galaxy

For this image, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope turned its powerful eye toward an emission-line galaxy called NGC 3749.

10h

New model will help predict several solar phenomena

An international group of scientists, in cooperation with a research scientist from Skoltech, has developed a model to describe changes in solar plasma. This will help comprehend solar dynamics and gives clues to understanding how to predict space weather events. The results have been published in the Astrophysical Journal.

10h

Study: Increase in cannabis cultivation or residential development could impact water resources

Cannabis cultivation could have a significant effect on groundwater and surface water resources when combined with residential use, evidence from a new study suggests.

10h

Seismologists: Earthquake warning systems need better balance of technical and predictive capabilities

Two seismologists, one with the U.S. Geological Survey, the other with Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, have published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science discussing the tradeoffs that come with earthquake warning systems. In their paper, Elizabeth Cochran and Allen Husker address the decision by officials in Los Angeles recently to lower the warning level f

10h

Physicists determine dripline for fluorine and neon isotopes

An international team of physicists with the BigRIPS experiment taking place at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory in Japan has determined the dripline for fluorine and neon isotopes. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the researchers describe how they found the driplines and where their research is headed next.

10h

A 'simulation booster' for nanoelectronics

Two research groups from ETH Zurich have developed a method that can simulate nanoelectronics devices and their properties realistically, quickly and efficiently. This offers a ray of hope for the industry and data center operators alike, both of which are struggling with the (over)heating that comes with increasingly small and powerful transistors.

10h

Before you write an open letter, make sure it meets this criteria

Open letters are welcome in an academic environment, but they should meet certain criteria to be considered valid. While scholars are always encouraged to share their critique of a published work or body of research, they must engage with the same ethical principles as expected in other scholarly discourse. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles K

10h

NASA's TESS Spacecraft Is Finding Hundreds of Exoplanets—and Is Poised to Find Thousands More

Within just 50 light-years from Earth, there are about 1,560 stars, likely orbited by several thousand planets. About a thousand of these extrasolar planets, known as exoplanets, may be rocky and have a composition similar to Earth's. Some may even harbor life. Over 99 percent of these alien worlds remain undiscovered—but this is about to change. With NASA's new exoplanet-hunter space telescope T

10h

Someday, Robot Artists May Have to Explain Their Creations to Us

Someday, artificial intelligence could become so advanced that it gains the ability to think creatively — and, perhaps, so vastly surpasses humanity's artistic abilities that it would have to explain its creations to our squishy, primitive brains. At least, that's one of the predictions that physicist, philosopher, and creativity scholar Arthur Miller makes in his new book, "The Artist in the Mac

10h

Ethiopia says its 1st satellite will launch next month

Ethiopian officials say the country will launch its first ever satellite next month.

10h

Spacewalking astronauts repairing cosmic ray detector

Spacewalking astronauts ventured out for the second week in a row Friday to repair a cosmic ray detector, this time actually cutting into the $2 billion instrument.

10h

Industrial scale production of layer materials via intermediate-assisted grinding

Scientists from Tsinghua University report an interMediary-Assisted Grinding Exfoliation (iMAEG) technology to massively exfoliate various layer materials into 2D materials. Taking h-BN as an example, ultrathin h-BN nanosheets with an average lateral size of 1.2 μm are obtained. Besides, the production rate (0.3 g h-1) and energy consumption (3.01×106 J g-1) are one to two orders of magnitude bett

10h

A sleeping pill that doesn't make you sway: a new targeted insomnia treatment

University of Tsukuba researchers compared the physical and cognitive side effects of two sleep agents that affect two different kinds of brain receptor. Brotizolam, commonly prescribed for insomnia in Japan, affects GABA receptors, which are present throughout the brain. A newer agent, suvorexant, affects receptors that are specifically involved in wakefulness. Suvorexant was just as effective as

10h

Ronna McDaniel Won't Woo Her Uncle Mitt on Impeachment

Recognizing, perhaps, that he might just need Mitt Romney after all, President Donald Trump invited him to the White House yesterday as the chances that the Senate will ultimately decide Trump's fate grow by the hour. A natural ally in Trump's apparent efforts to woo Romney amid the impeachment drama would seem to be the woman who calls him "Uncle Mitt": Ronna McDaniel, the chairwoman of the Repu

10h

Tesla's "Blade Runner" Cybertruck Is an Absolute Monstrosity

Cybertruck During a Thursday evening event near SpaceX's headquarters in Hawthorne, Calfornia, Tesla CEO Elon Musk finally revealed the company's long-awaited "Cybertruck." It's, uh, a conversation starter. Ultimate Durability The five-seater truck is even stranger looking than we expected. It has an unusual triangular chassis that comes to a point above the driver side's window. The overall desi

10h

Textbooks paint social movements as old news

Textbooks worldwide are more likely to present social movements as historical events than as a form of active citizenship, according to a new study. A study of more than 500 high school civics and history textbooks from around the world finds that discussions of both individual human rights and collective social movements have increased in textbooks since World War II. While human rights have bee

10h

Shell vil bygge nordens største brintfabrik i Danmark

Virksomhederne Shell og Everfuel har indgået et samarbejde om at opføre nordens største power-to-X-anlæg i Fredericia.

10h

New Cochrane Review assesses different HPV vaccines & vaccine schedules in adolescent girls and boys

New evidence published in the Cochrane Library today provides further information on the benefits and harms of different human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and vaccine schedules in young women and men.

10h

Helen Fisher: How Does Love Affect The Brain?

Helen Fisher says love is a biological drive and a survival mechanism. She discusses the science of love and how much control we have over who we love, how we love, and whether that love lasts. (Image credit: Bret Hartman/TED)

10h

Dessa: How Can You Fall Out Of Love?

For years, musician Dessa tried to get over a toxic relationship. But she couldn't figure out how — until she tried something unconventional: using neuroscience to dull her feelings for her ex. (Image credit: Josh Tam)

10h

Guy Winch: How Can We Choose To Move On From Heartbreak?

We don't consider heartbreak to be as serious as physical injury, but emotional pain can stay with us much longer. Psychologist Guy Winch says dealing with heartbreak starts with asserting control. (Image credit: Bret Hartman/TED)

10h

Cyberattack Forces Hospital to Revert to Handwriting Everything

Write and Wrong On Friday, hackers attacked the University Hospital Centre (CHU) in Rouen, France, rendering the facility's computers unusable . But instead of paying the ransom the cyberattackers demanded, staff at the 1,300-bed hospital reverted to using the "good old method of paper and pencil," Remi Heym, CHU's head of communications, told the Agence France-Presse . Waiting Room Heym also tol

10h

A deep learning-based model DeepSpCas9 to predict SpCas9 activity

In a new report on Science Advances, Hui Kwon Kim and interdisciplinary researchers at the departments of Pharmacology, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Medical Sciences, Nanomedicine and Bioinformatics in the Republic of Korea, evaluated the activities of SpCas9; a bacterial RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease variant (a bacterial enzyme that cuts DNA for genome editing) from Streptococcus pyogenes.

10h

A deep learning-based model DeepSpCas9 to predict SpCas9 activity

In a new report on Science Advances, Hui Kwon Kim and interdisciplinary researchers at the departments of Pharmacology, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Medical Sciences, Nanomedicine and Bioinformatics in the Republic of Korea, evaluated the activities of SpCas9; a bacterial RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease variant (a bacterial enzyme that cuts DNA for genome editing) from Streptococcus pyogenes.

10h

Spacewalk excursion to extend the life of a powerful spectrometer

One of the largest human-made permanent magnets in space resides on the International Space Station (ISS), and it's helping scientists better understand the origins of our universe. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is an observatory that is collecting data from measurements of cosmic rays, nuclei from hydrogen up to iron, as well as electrons and positrons that pervade all of our universe.

10h

Princeton scientists discover surprising quantum effect in an exotic superconductor

Superconductors are already in use in various capacities, but newer iron-based superconductors have potential for future use. Researchers led by a Princeton team have studied what happens to the superconducting nature of these materials when impurities are added. The results shed light on how superconductivity behaves in these materials.

10h

Handheld device can check if fish oil supplements have expired

Fish oil capsules are a popular health supplement with many health benefits, but concerns have been raised over the quality because omega-3 fatty acids are very prone to oxidation and deterioration on exposure to heat and light. Plant & Food Research and University of Otago scientists have found a rapid way to analyze the concentrations of these fatty acids throughout the production process, inclu

11h

Lad os sætte fokus på de store patientgrupper

Vi skal hjælpe hinanden med at undgå et uheldigt og ensidigt fokus på specialfunktioner. Lad os i stedet tale hovedfunktionsniveauet op, til gavn for alle, skriver centerchef i Sundhedsstyrelsen.

11h

CDC baby milestones contain surprising wiggle room

CDC guidelines say most children reach a milestone by a certain age, but new data show that "most" may mean over 99% or barely half. The new study in the journal Pediatrics provides more specific data on what ages young children reach different developmental milestones . Guidelines from the CDC say "most children" reach each milestone by a certain age, but do not define "most" and do not say how

11h

Love Baby Yoda, You Must

Internet backlash against the breakout character from 'The Mandalorian' has already begun. Don't take the bait.

11h

Why Robots Should Learn to Build Crappy Ikea Furniture

Researchers built a simulator that teaches robots to deal with everyone's favorite particle-board nightmare—and that's just the beginning.

11h

Starship Mk1 blows its top during testing

SpaceX has been on a roll lately. With the completion of tethered and untethered flight tests with the Starship Hopper, SpaceX founder Elon Musk unveiled the newly completed Starship Mk1 prototype and announced that orbital test flights would commence in a few months. Meanwhile, the Starlink constellation got started with the launch of its first 60 satellites followed by 60 more upgraded versions.

11h

Newborn volcanic island in the Pacific has survived five years

A surtseyan eruption is a volcanic eruption in shallow water. It's named after the island Surtsey, off the coast of Iceland. In 2015, a surtseyan eruption in the Tongan Archipelago created the island Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai. Despite the odds, that island is still there almost five years later.

11h

Researchers develop 'lab on a chip' for personalized drug efficacy monitoring

UCI researchers and collaborators have developed a "lab on a chip" platform to facilitate continuous, inexpensive, rapid and personalized drug screening. The technology is capable of evaluating the effectiveness of treatments on cancer cells without bulky readout equipment or requiring the shipment of samples to labs. The scientists' work is the subject of a new study published in the America Chem

11h

Smoke haze hurts financial markets as well as the environment

Sydney is currently blanketed by smoke haze from severe bushfires that have burned through New South Wales.

11h

Researchers develop 'lab on a chip' for personalized drug efficacy monitoring

UCI researchers and collaborators have developed a "lab on a chip" platform to facilitate continuous, inexpensive, rapid and personalized drug screening. The technology is capable of evaluating the effectiveness of treatments on cancer cells without bulky readout equipment or requiring the shipment of samples to labs. The scientists' work is the subject of a new study published in the America Chem

11h

Conservation after Conflict in Colombia

Seeking a sustainable economy, the country wants to capitalize on its astonishing biodiversity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Scientists find a place on Earth where there is no life

Living beings, especially microorganisms, have a surprising ability to adapt to the most extreme environments on Earth, but there are still places where they cannot live. European researchers have confirmed the absence of microbial life in hot, saline, hyperacid ponds in the Dallol geothermal field in Ethiopia.

11h

Scientists find a place on Earth where there is no life

Living beings, especially microorganisms, have a surprising ability to adapt to the most extreme environments on Earth, but there are still places where they cannot live. European researchers have confirmed the absence of microbial life in hot, saline, hyperacid ponds in the Dallol geothermal field in Ethiopia.

11h

Were other humans the first victims of the sixth mass extinction?

Nine human species walked the Earth 300,000 years ago. Now there is just one. The Neanderthals, Homo neanderthalensis, were stocky hunters adapted to Europe's cold steppes. The related Denisovans inhabited Asia, while the more primitive Homo erectus lived in Indonesia, and Homo rhodesiensis in central Africa.

11h

Russia Moves to Ban Sales of Gadgets Without Russian-Made Software

Smartphones, tablets, smart TVs, and computers that don’t have Russian-made software pre-installed could not be sold in Russia under new legislation that passed Russia’s lower house in parliament …

11h

Skidt uge for Musk: Først eksploderede Starship og så gik bil-fremvisning helt galt…

Video: Elon Musk har haft en vaskeægte 'Tycho Brahe-uge'. Først eksploderede rumskibet MK1 og så viste en fremvisning af hans Cybertruck, at den ikke var helt så uigennemtrængelig som lovet.

11h

Bacteria help make low-calorie sugar

Imagine a sugar that has only 38 percent of the calories of traditional table sugar, is safe for diabetics, and will not cause cavities. Now add that this dream sweetener is not an artificial substitute but a real sugar found in nature and it tastes like, well, sugar. You'd probably want to use that in your next cup of coffee, right?

11h

Bacteria help make low-calorie sugar

Imagine a sugar that has only 38 percent of the calories of traditional table sugar, is safe for diabetics, and will not cause cavities. Now add that this dream sweetener is not an artificial substitute but a real sugar found in nature and it tastes like, well, sugar. You'd probably want to use that in your next cup of coffee, right?

11h

Where do children in affordable housing go to school?

Parents looking to buy a home know the feeling: Do they go for the bigger, nicer and more affordable house in the area not known for having great schools? Or do they go for the smaller, dated and more expensive residence in the neighborhood with great schools?

11h

Expert: Reducing gas flaring will benefit economy and environment

Reducing gas flaring throughout the United States would provide substantial economic and environmental benefits, according to a new issue brief by an expert in the Center for Energy Studies at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

11h

Efficient bottom-up synthesis of new perovskite material for the production of ammonia

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) found a way to synthesize a special type of perovskite that promotes the production of ammonia, which has key applications in fertilizer production and hydrogen energy. This new synthesis process can be carried out at temperatures immensely lower than that of traditional methods for the synthesis of perovskite-oxide materials and in much les

12h

Scientists unravel mysteries of cells' whiplike extensions

Cilia, or flagella—whiplike appendages on cells—perform diverse tasks required to keep the body healthy. When cilia malfunction, the consequences can be devastating, causing a range of problems, from blindness, to lung and kidney diseases, to congenital heart defects. Now, scientists have revealed the first detailed look at the inner structure of cilia.

12h

Scientists unravel mysteries of cells' whiplike extensions

Cilia, or flagella—whiplike appendages on cells—perform diverse tasks required to keep the body healthy. When cilia malfunction, the consequences can be devastating, causing a range of problems, from blindness, to lung and kidney diseases, to congenital heart defects. Now, scientists have revealed the first detailed look at the inner structure of cilia.

12h

Mosquitoes are becoming resistant to our best defenses

Mosquitoes are evolving to evade our protections against them (deposit photos/) Malaria is serious business. This disease, which is transmitted by infected mosquitoes, kills hundreds of thousands of people each year and infects millions, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. Since the turn of the 21st century, advances in disease control have cut the global rate of infection by more than 60 percent. Long

12h

Here's where robots are replacing workers fastest

Robots are displacing younger, less-educated, and minority workers in the Midwest manufacturing industry at the highest rates, a new report shows. However, the findings also show that a strong economic recovery over the past decade has saved many jobs and slowed automation in the United States. The report shows that robots have not yet brought the dire nationwide effects that many have warned abo

12h

How older generations in youth-centered industries extract cultural knowledge from trend-savvy interns

Beyond cups of coffee, what does an office intern really offer? In youth-centered industries, older generations rely on the trend-savvy interns more than they realize or choose to admit.

12h

How primordial germ cells commence sperm and egg production in the embryonic gonad

Early in mammalian embryonic development, long before the organism's ultimate form has taken shape, a precious subset of its cells are set aside for future use in creating offspring. This task bestows on that subset of cells a special kind of immortality. While the majority of the embryo's cells go on to construct the growing body, and their journey begins and ends in that body, the cells that are

12h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Chris Cox on Life After Facebook

The former Facebook executive talks about his 13 years at the company and who he's working with now.

12h

What Makes an Element? The Frankenstein of Sodium Holds Clues

By crafting massive versions of sodium, neon, and other elements, physicists are testing what's possible—and impossible—in nature.

12h

Image of the Day: Painting with Microbes

See this year's winners of the American Society for Microbiology's agar art competition.

12h

Farlige bakterier snakker sammen og undviger antibiotika

Forskere på Københavns Universitet har fundet en ny overlevelsesmekanisme for en almindelig…

12h

How primordial germ cells commence sperm and egg production in the embryonic gonad

Early in mammalian embryonic development, long before the organism's ultimate form has taken shape, a precious subset of its cells are set aside for future use in creating offspring. This task bestows on that subset of cells a special kind of immortality. While the majority of the embryo's cells go on to construct the growing body, and their journey begins and ends in that body, the cells that are

12h

Efficient bottom-up synthesis of new perovskite material for the production of ammonia

Perovskites are a class of synthetic materials that have a crystalline structure similar to that of the naturally occurring mineral calcium titanate. They have been the subject of many studies because they exhibit exciting and unique properties that can be tuned according to their composition. One of their potential applications is as catalysts for the synthesis of ammonia. In other words, specifi

12h

Going Down Under

For the next two weeks I will be traveling to New Zealand and Australia to attend two skeptical conferences: Christchurch, NZ, Nov 29 – Dec 1. Melbourne, Dec 6-8 In addition, tomorrow (Nov 23) we will be debuting our new stage show, the Skeptical Extravaganza 2.0, in Los Angeles (sorry, this is sold out). This show is a lot of fun – it's kind of a skeptical variety show, interactive with the audi

12h

What you might have missed

The brightest light in the Universe, bisexual behaviour of animals and where AI meets ethics – here are some highlights from a week in science.

12h

Motherly poison frogs shed light on maternal brain

For most frogs, motherhood begins and ends with the release of hundreds of eggs into a sizable body of water and then hopping or swimming away.

12h

The mystery of the mass of the neutrino could soon be solved

We have a refined estimate for the mass of the neutrino, the most abundant massive particle in the Universe: its mass is 500,000 times less than an electron

12h

Image: Shimmering skies signal space weather

The Aurora, seen here dancing above Svalbard in Norway, is the most beautiful result of space weather on Earth.

12h

Groundbreaking cohesin study describes the molecular motor that folds the genome

New insights into the process of DNA looping have changed old perspectives about how the genome is organized within cells. Discoveries by IMP researchers have now elucidated a fundamental mechanism of life and settle a decade-long scientific dispute.

12h

A review of single molecule-based electronic devices

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue of Nano, a group of researchers from the Shenyang Jianzhu University in China has provided an overview of single-molecule electronic devices, including molecular electronic devices and electrode types. They also describe future challenges to the development of electronic devices based on single molecules in the hopes of attracting more experts fr

12h

Motherly poison frogs shed light on maternal brain

For most frogs, motherhood begins and ends with the release of hundreds of eggs into a sizable body of water and then hopping or swimming away.

12h

Read Sacha Baron Cohen's scathing attack on Facebook in full: 'greatest propaganda machine in history' | Sacha Baron Cohen

In a speech, the actor argued that Facebook would have run ads by Hitler. Here are his remarks in fullIn a speech last night at the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), the actor and comedian Sacha …

12h

Little Devil frogs feed their babies poison eggs for good reason

Two types of poison frogs feed their hatchlings unfertilized eggs that are also laced with poisons, researchers report. It's likely their way of passing chemical defenses on to the next generation. By comparing the brains of the two frogs with each other and with those of mammals, the researchers also discovered new clues that have bearing on the neural basis of motherhood itself. For most frogs,

12h

Groundbreaking cohesin study describes the molecular motor that folds the genome

New insights into the process of DNA looping have changed old perspectives about how the genome is organized within cells. Discoveries by IMP researchers have now elucidated a fundamental mechanism of life and settle a decade-long scientific dispute.

12h

To boost recycling, reward consumers with discounts, deals and social connections

You finish that last sip of morning coffee and stare at the empty paper cup in your hand. Should it go into the recycling bin, compost, or be landfilled or incinerated?

12h

Niobium used as catalyst in fuel cell

Brazil is the world's largest producer of niobium and holds about 98 percent of the active reserves on the planet. This chemical element is used in metal alloys, especially high-strength steel, and in an almost unlimited array of high-tech applications from cell phones to aircraft engines. Brazil exports most of the niobium it produces in the form of commodities such as ferroniobium.

12h

An AI doctor is analysing heart scans in dozens of hospitals

Doctors are using artificial intelligence in dozens of hospitals to help them make sense of MRI images of the heart

12h

Swarms of golf ball-sized robots could detect leaks in the sewers

Swarms of robots could help map out underground networks and detect leaks as they float through pipes

12h

'We decided to play it safe.' Journal doesn't retract paper even though the authors neglected to mention that they didn't do the experiments themselves.

An eye journal has issued an expression of concern for a paper on glaucoma that, given the litany of problems with the data, could well have been retracted. Not least of the issues: The authors admitted to using an outside firm to conduct experiments they'd tried to pass off as having done themselves. The article, … Continue reading

13h

The Future of Farming

Links between lab and land will be critical — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Amerikansk ambassadør: Uvenligt af Færøerne at købe kinesisk telenet fra Huawei

USA er bekymret over færingenes valg af tele-selskab.

13h

1.2 Billion Records Found Exposed Online in a Single Server

Here's the next jumbo data leak, complete with Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn profiles.

13h

The Tech-Obsessed, Hyper-Experimental Restaurant of the Future

How chef Eric Rivera is upending the traditional restaurant model—and making delicious food while he's at it.

13h

A Solar 'Breakthrough' Won't Solve Cement's Carbon Problem

A Bill Gates–backed startup called Heliogen uses concentrated solar power to produce cement. The carbon-belching industry needs that—and much more.

13h

Minister giver roe-avlere ét år mere: Så er det slut med dispensation til bidræber-pesticid

Miljøministeren forbyder neonikotinoider, som kan skade bier, på golfbaner, i potteplanter og snart også til at bejdse roefrø med. Dermed gør hun op med dispensationerne under sine forgængere.

13h

Flade hjul, bremsefejl og bomme, der ikke går ned: Fejl på fejl rammer letbanen i Aarhus

PLUS. Frost på køreledningerne er bestemt ikke den eneste udfordring, den udskældte bane har at bokse med. Men der er planer for det hele, lover selskabet.

13h

The Future of Farming

Links between lab and land will be critical — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

A Crispr Milestone Hints at a Future of Cures — and Oversight Concerns

Crispr offers remarkable new powers to manipulate living tissue. The question is who gets to decide how to apply those powers — and whether it's even possible to enforce those decisions in a scientific community regulated by dozens of governments, and shaped by billions of dollars of venture capital.

13h

Elon Musk unveils Tesla's 'cybertruck' – an electric pickup truck

Tesla has revealed its latest electric vehicle, which is an electric pickup truck. Whilst showing how tough the windows are, the firm's chief designer accidentally smashed two of them

13h

'Not cool': telescope faces interference from space-bound satellites

Disruption will hamper efforts to unlock secrets of universe, say scientists A flagship observatory that will map the heavens in spectacular detail and search the skies for asteroids on a collision course with Earth faces serious disruption from a new wave of satellites bound for space, the Guardian has learned. Astronomers on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, a state-of-the-art observatory du

13h

Christian group wrote legislation eerily similar to Ohio religious liberty bill

Critics suspect hand of Project Blitz in draft passed by Ohio house which they fear could let students' religious beliefs trump science An Ohio state bill which could allow students' religious beliefs to trump science-based facts is almost identical to model legislation backed by an evangelical, anti-gay Christian group. Related: Trump suggests he wants to be impeached and says 'I want a trial' –

13h

Natural gas, false hope in climate change campaign?

Natural gas is cleaner and produces fewer global warming emissions than other fossil fuels, making it key to our transition to a low-carbon future, but it comes with its own serious drawbacks.

13h

Best books of 2019: Health

Anjana Ahuja selects her must-read titles

13h

Best books of 2019: Science

Clive Cookson selects his must-read titles

13h

Best books of 2019: Technology

John Thornhill selects his must-read titles

13h

Elon Musk unveils Tesla's 'cybertruck' – an electric pickup truck

Tesla has revealed its latest electric vehicle, which is an electric pickup truck. Whilst showing how tough the windows are, the firm's chief designer accidentally smashed two of them

13h

Träden "luktar" sig till kommande angrepp

Växter kan trigga igång sitt försvar mot skadeinsekter tidigare än någon anat. I en ny studie konstaterar forskare för första gången att sexuella doftämnen kan varna tallar redan innan insekterna lagt sina ägg. Växter kan "lukta" sig till ett förestående angrepp av skadeinsekter genom de doftämnen som honan utsöndrar för att locka till sig hanar då hon ska lägga ägg. Doftämnena, sexualferomonerna

13h

Träd kan lukta sig till kommande skadeangrepp

Att växter kan uppfatta dofter från andra växter har varit känt sedan 1980-talet men att de kan känna av insekters dofter redan före ett angrepp har inte visats tidigare, enligt Olle Anderbrant som är professor i biologi vid Lunds universitet och en av författarna till studien som publicerats i tidskriften PNAS.

14h

The World's Most Valuable Troublemakers

This article is adapted from a speech delivered on Thursday night at the annual dinner of the Committee to Protect Journalists in New York Every day, journalists go to press with stories that could endanger them and their families, understanding that the repercussions might be severe, even a matter of life and death. They are the sentries protecting the values of truth, accountability, and justic

14h

When Journalists Don't Trust Their Bosses

Last week, a Google spreadsheet began circulating through the inboxes of the nation's media employees. The spreadsheet—"Real Media Salaries"—listed the self-reported salaries of anonymous editors and journalists, noted along with the outlets where they work, their years of experience, and their race, sex, and gender identity. As of this writing, "Real Media Salaries" includes the self-reported pa

14h

Trump's Crime Against America

Over the past two weeks, a parade of sober and coldly furious civil servants has come forward to testify before Congress about President Donald Trump's decision to withhold congressionally approved aid to Ukraine. Acting U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Bill Taylor emphasized that "the security assistance we provide is crucial to Ukraine's defense," invoking the sacrifice of Ukrainian soldiers fighting

14h

What ISIS Will Become

It was the summer of 2014 when most Americans took notice of the Islamic State, but the group had been around in different forms for about a decade. Many of its fighters were the same people who'd fought U.S. troops under the name of al-Qaeda in Iraq, until a massive U.S. military effort suppressed them. Then the American people and their government decided that the war was done. What came next w

14h

Photos Can Trigger Change in a Town

In 2008, National Geographic photographer Jodi Cobb and photographer and former Second Lady, Tipper Gore, talked about the role of photography at the then Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. The evening was called "How Photos Can Change the World." Eleven years later, their comments (as reported by David Schonauer in Popular Photography ) remain relevant and powerful: Cobb at one point hin

14h

A Guided Tour of AI and the Murky Ethical Issues It Raises

In "Artificial Intelligence: A Guide for Thinking Humans," Melanie Mitchell offers an insightful account of AI's past, present, and future, along with the many ethical issues involved. In the end, she argues that humans tend to overestimate AI advances and underestimate the complexity of our own intelligence.

14h

PODCAST: Skal vi brænde træerne eller lade dem stå og suge CO2?

Danmark har overinvesteret i at brænde biomasse af, mener eksperter. Danske vindmøller står ofte stille i blæsevejr. NemID får snart en smart afløser. Landbrugets sprøjtemidler fører til resistens også mod vigtige lægemidler.

14h

Ny regnefejl opdaget i landbrugets CO2-regnskab – men effekten er formentlig lille

Aarhus Universitet har undervurderet CO2-udledningen fra landbruget markant. Men effekten på Danmarks samlede CO2-regnskab vil formentlig ikke være stor, vurderer forsker. SF vil have alle beregninger af landbrugets emissioner tjekket.

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'Hold jer væk, venner': Se hvordan farlige bakterier advarer hinanden om antibiotika

Video viser, hvordan døende bakterier bruger deres sidste timer på at sikre andre bakteriers overlevelse.

14h

The Brain on Gratitude

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, now is as good a time as any to stop and think about the concept of "gratitude." The general consensus seems to be that gratitude is good for you, being consistently correlated with better physical, psychological, and social health. But for all its supposed benefits, there is still plenty […]

14h

Deletion of intestinal Hdac3 remodels the lipidome of enterocytes and protects mice from diet-induced obesity

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13180-8 Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is a regulator of lipid homeostasis in several tissues, however, its role in intestinal lipid metabolism was not yet known. Here the authors study intestine specific HDAC3 knock out mice and report that these animals have increased fatty acid oxidation and undergo remodeling of

14h

Causative role of PDLIM2 epigenetic repression in lung cancer and therapeutic resistance

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13331-x PDLIM2 is repressed epigenetically in lung cancers, which are frequently resistant to anti-PD-1/PD-L1 and chemotherapy. Here, the authors describe the mechanism through which epigenetic restoration of PDLIM2 synergises with anti-PD-1 and chemotherapy in lung cancers.

14h

Evidence that cyanobacterial Sll1217 functions analogously to PGRL1 in enhancing PGR5-dependent cyclic electron flow

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13223-0 In Arabidopsis, PGR5 and PGRL1 heterodimers enable cyclic electron flow to safeguard photosystem I during high light intensity. Here, the authors provide evidence that cyanobacteria, while lacking an obvious PGRL1 homologue, use an analogous PGRL1-like protein to facilitate cyclic electron flow.

14h

In-cell identification and measurement of RNA-protein interactions

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13235-w RNA-interacting proteome can be identified by RNA affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry. Here the authors developed a different RNA-centric technology that combines high-throughput immunoprecipitation of RNA binding proteins and luciferase-based detection of their interaction with the RNA.

14h

Disentangling the role of Africa in the global spread of H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13287-y The role of Africa in the global spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) is not well understood. Here, using evolutionary analyses, the authors show that Africa mainly acts as ecological sink for HPAI H5, and reveal varying paths of HPAI incursions either through domestic or wild birds.

14h

Dynamic constriction and fission of endoplasmic reticulum membranes by reticulon

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13327-7 The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an intracellular network characterized by highly dynamic behavior whose control mechanisms are unclear. Here, the authors show that the ER-membrane protein Reticulon (Rtnl1) can constrict ER bilayers and lead to ER fission.

14h

SERS discrimination of single DNA bases in single oligonucleotides by electro-plasmonic trapping

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13242-x Sensing DNA bases by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) in plasmonic nanopores has suffered from rapid flow through of molecules. Here, the authors attach DNA molecules to gold nanoparticles which, due to electro-plasmonic trapping, allow for controlled residence times and discrimination of single nu

14h

Poly(A) inclusive RNA isoform sequencing (PAIso−seq) reveals wide-spread non-adenosine residues within RNA poly(A) tails

Nature Communications, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13228-9 The poly(A) tails on mRNA are vital for their function but it is difficult to map full-length sequences of mRNA isoforms with the entire poly(A) tails. Here the authors develop PAIso−seq which can measure isoform specific poly(A) tail length and base composition at single-cell sensitivity.

14h

Goodbye Watson: Novo dropper samarbejde med IBM's kunstige intelligens

PLUS. IBM's kunstige intelligens var udset til at styrke udviklingen i Novo Nordisk, men nu ophører samarbejdet i en tid, hvor kritikken af Watson er svær at overhøre.

15h

First the Worm Gets in the Bug's Head. Then the Bug Drowns Itself.

The mind-controlling parasites are "like a back-seat driver, but a bit more sinister."

15h

His White House Engulfed, Trump Keeps California in the Cross Hairs

Aides describe the president as obsessed with narrow policies that affect California, even as an impeachment inquiry threatens his administration.

15h

Democrats Know Trump Won't Be Removed. They're Still Amped About Impeachment.

The first sound that greeted me, rounding the corner outside the hearing room in the Longworth House Office Building, was the eerie echo of Representative Adam Schiff's voice emanating from the several dozen cellphones blasting live-stream footage of the testimony going on inside. With the public phase of the impeachment inquiry starting last week and continuing into this one, throngs of people—y

15h

Microvolt T-wave alternans at the end of surgery is associated with postoperative mortality in cardiac surgery patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53760-8

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The MUC5B mucin polymer is dominated by repeating structural motifs and its topology is regulated by calcium and pH

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53768-0

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A Novel Needle-Injectable Millimeter scale Wireless Electrochemical Glucose Sensing Platform for Artificial Pancreas Applications

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53680-7

15h

Physiology and proteomic analysis reveals root, stem and leaf responses to potassium deficiency stress in alligator weed

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53916-6

15h

Preoperative CT texture features predict prognosis after curative resection in pancreatic cancer

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53831-w

15h

The detrimental effect of AlGaN barrier quality on carrier dynamics in AlGaN/GaN interface

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53732-y

15h

Behavioural characterisation of chronic unpredictable stress based on ethologically relevant paradigms in rats

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-53624-1

15h

Jobs in future.

What would be some of the average jobs in the future ? submitted by /u/FakeFake35665675 [link] [comments]

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New "smart skin" may let you reach out and virtually touch — anyone

submitted by /u/UndercutRapunzel [link] [comments]

15h

Tesla Cybertruck unveiled

submitted by /u/swannygod [link] [comments]

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Cities That Will Completely Disappear by 2100

submitted by /u/DoubleTFan [link] [comments]

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Microsoft Brings AR to the Operating Room with HoloLens 2 Headset

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Machine learning has revealed exactly how much of a Shakespeare play was written by someone else

Literary analysts have long noticed the hand of another author in Shakespeare's Henry VIII . Now a neural network has identified the specific scenes in question—and who actually wrote them.

15h

Klimaministeren vil skrue ned for dansk træ-afbrænding

PLUS. Regeringen har sat sine embedsmænd til at analysere, hvordan Danmark kan begrænse udbygningen med biomasseanlæg.

16h

People only support carbon taxes if they trust their government

Support for carbon taxes is not linked to a nation's belief in climate change, but rather what they think the government will do with the money

16h

Specialeplanen 2.0

Man kan indimellem få det indtryk, at centraliseringen i højere grad er lægernes ønsker om samling end hensynet til den enkelte patient, skriver lægelig direktør Mads Kock Hansen

16h

Monsanto pleads guilty to using banned pesticide on research crop

Biotech giant Monsanto on Thursday agreed to plead guilty to illegally using a banned and highly toxic pesticide on research crops at one of its facilities on the Hawaiian island of Maui and to pay $10 million in fines.

17h

Monsanto pleads guilty to using banned pesticide on research crop

Biotech giant Monsanto on Thursday agreed to plead guilty to illegally using a banned and highly toxic pesticide on research crops at one of its facilities on the Hawaiian island of Maui and to pay $10 million in fines.

17h

Boeing names space test dummy Rosie after WWII riveter

SpaceX had Ripley. Now Boeing has Rosie.

17h

Tre nye anbefalinger og to lægemiddelrekommandationer fra Medicinrådet

Anbefalinger af lægemidler til behandling af knoglemarvskræft, HIV og sjældne knoglemetaboliske sygdomme på Medicinrådets møde onsdag.

17h

Study: Wildfires in Oregon's blue mountains to become more frequent, severe due to climate change

Under a warming climate, wildfires in Oregon's southern Blue Mountains will become more frequent, more extensive and more severe, according to a new Portland State University-led study.

17h

Upper Cervical Chiropractic: NUCCA─The Legacy of HIO

Upper cervical chiropractors continue to offer an atlas adjustment to treat a variety of health problems, despite lack of credible evidence to support such treatment.

17h

Stjerne-formidler: "En Facebook-tråd blev startskuddet til en af mine bedste forskningsartikler"

Lidt utraditionelt gives SCIENCES formidlingspris 2019 til en forsker, der har stor gennemslagskraft…

17h

Triplet–triplet upconversion enhanced by spin–orbit coupling in organic light-emitting diodes

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13044-1 Though triplet-triplet upconversion is a promising strategy for designing new deep blue-emitting organic materials, maximizing the efficiency of this process remains difficult. Here, the authors report the upconversion efficiency in anthracene derivatives based on a spin-orbit coupling mechanism.

18h

Author Correction: Puma genomes from North and South America provide insights into the genomic consequences of inbreeding

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13096-3

18h

Plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with single-molecule detection sensitivity

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13230-1 Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy enables label-free chemical imaging at high speed, but has been limited by low sensitivity. Here, the authors demonstrate plasmon-enhanced SRS microscopy and achieve single molecule detection sensitivity.

18h

Prefrontal cortical ChAT-VIP interneurons provide local excitation by cholinergic synaptic transmission and control attention

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13244-9 VIP interneurons have been shown to disinhibit pyramidal neurons by inhibiting other interneuron types. Here, the authors report that ChAT-VIP subtype of interneurons directly excite pyramidal neurons in multiple layers via fast cholinergic neurotransmission.

18h

GPCR-induced calcium transients trigger nuclear actin assembly for chromatin dynamics

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13322-y The extracellular cues regulating filamentous actin formation in somatic cell nuclei are unclear. Here, the authors show that activated GPCR signalling initiates transient accumulation of nuclear F-actin/formation in nuclear actin filaments, driven by calcium and requiring the nucleator Formin INF2.

18h

The role of cyclone activity in snow accumulation on Arctic sea ice

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13299-8 Snow cover can affect the Arctic sea-ice system in different ways. Here authors study the relationship between cyclone activity and the seasonal build-up of snow on Arctic sea ice at a multi-decadal and basin-wide scale and find that 44% of the variability in monthly snow accumulation was controlled by cyclo

18h

Leishmania RNA virus exacerbates Leishmaniasis by subverting innate immunity via TLR3-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition

Nature Communications, Published online: 21 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13356-2 NLRP3 activation by Leishmania parasites is critical to the outcome of the disease. Here the authors show that LRV, a virus infecting Leishmania strains associated with more severe human disease, enables the parasite to suppress the inflammasome by activating type 1 interferon through TLR3, which leads to au

18h

FN-rapport: Planlagte investeringer i olie, kul og gas gør det umuligt at overholde klimaløfter

I 2030 producerer verdens lande 150 procent mere kul, end den internationale klimaaftale tillader.

18h

Mer blåst och vindkraft i världen

Sedan 1980-talet har vindarnas hastighet minskat på land. Förklaringen är att den globala uppvärmningen minskar temperaturskillnader som driver vindarna. Samtidigt har skogar och städer vuxit, vilket ger vindarna motstånd.

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Dubai Air Show: The challenges for us all in flying green

Sustainable, renewable and green: environmental goals the aviation industry is now grappling with.

19h

Photos of the Week: Illuminated Boars, Lucid Dancing, Presidential Notes

Supercross in New Zealand, the Latin Grammy Awards in Las Vegas, a wee Canucks fan in Vancouver, Pope Francis in Thailand, protests in Bolivia and Chile, a new skyscraper in Beijing, the 30th anniversary of the Velvet Revolution, a massive dam in Turkey, a cat show in Italy, a cavalry pyramid in Mexico, and much more.

19h

Lack of sleep may explain why poor people get more heart disease

Insufficient sleep is one reason why disadvantaged groups have more heart disease. That's the finding of a study published today in Cardiovascular Research, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

19h

New study shows how cancer survivors develop opioid addictions

Opioids play an important role in how cancer patients manage pain, but the ongoing opioid epidemic has raised concerns about their potential for abuse. A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute reveals that several factors are associated with a risk for persistent opioid use, including younger age, white race, unemployment at the time of cancer diagnosis, lower median income, and

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Up early or lying in: why we need different amounts of sleep – Science Weekly podcast

Requiring minimal amounts of sleep is sometimes seen as a badge of honour. But for many of us, being able to actually function is a different matter altogether. So why is it that some people seem to need more or less sleep? And what are some of the ramifications if we don't get enough? Hannah Devlin speaks to two experts whose work is bringing new understanding to our sleeping behaviours Continue

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Up early or lying in: why we need different amounts of sleep – Science Weekly podcast

Requiring minimal amounts of sleep is sometimes seen as a badge of honour. But for many of us, being able to actually function is a different matter altogether. So why is it that some people seem to need more or less sleep? And what are some of the ramifications if we don't get enough? Hannah Devlin speaks to two experts whose work is bringing new understanding to our sleeping behaviours. Help sup

20h

Det danske programmeringssprog som udfordrede Basic

En drengs tidlige computer-fascination, en seminarielærer i Tønder, selvlærte kodeinteresserede elever samt en sjat øl er ingredienserne til et dansk programmeringssprog, som især dominerede i 1970'erne og 1980'erne.

20h

Tesla Cybertruck: Elon Musk's Pickup Truck Has Arrived

The all-electric Cybertruck will offer up to 500 miles of range and start at less than $50,000.

20h

Forskere i opgør: Gør gamle træer bedst gavn i skoven eller i ovnen?

PLUS. Danmarks forbrug af træ til produktion af el og varme er steget over 60 procent siden 2010. Men er træ til energiformål egentlig CO2-neutralt? Eller skulle vi hellere lade træerne stå og opsuge endnu mere CO2?

21h

Bots Outperform Humans If They Impersonate Us

Bots masquerading as humans in a game outperformed their human opponents—but the their superiority vanished when their machine identity was revealed. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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[Discussion] Should new homes be built with "smart lockers" as the economy shifts to online retail and thieves increasingly take advantage

Imagine if every home had a smart locker, and the delivery guy could get authorization to open them to drop off packages. Basically you authorize Amazon, UPS, Walmart, Best Buy, Target, etc. to deliver packages to your home. The delivery guy uses his phone to scan the package and then scan your smart locker. If it's the right address the locker on your front porch unlocks. If it's the wrong addre

23h

Meet the entrepreneurs turning restaurant delivery into airport food

submitted by /u/smellsquitenice [link] [comments]

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Eight quality mattresses you can buy online

Sleep soundly. Bed in a box. The bed-in-a-box phenomenon has revolutionized how we buy mattresses, but they aren't just convenient to order and set up—they are comfortable and durable as well. This Casper Sleep Essential Mattress is 11-inches thick once out of the box, and uses three layers of memory foam to provide the support you need throughout the night. The foam is also designed for breathab

23h

Wireless headphones you'll want to hear about

True wireless earbud options. (Aaina Sharma s/) Headphone wires are a pain. They bunch up in your pockets, become tangled, and get in the way when you're listening to tunes or talking on the phone. True wireless headphones can make things simpler. Lots of wireless headphones have a long battery life, noise-canceling technology, and brilliant sound quality, so why not step out of the stone-age and

23h

Bots Outperform Humans If They Impersonate Us

Bots masquerading as humans in a game outperformed their human opponents—but the their superiority vanished when their machine identity was revealed. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Europe keen to demonstrate Moon ambitions

Research ministers meet in Seville next week to approve European Space Agency projects and funding.

23h

Long-lasting suitcases for your next adventure

Bags to take on the plane with you. (Bambi Corro via Unsplash/) It's never a good sign when you have to pay attention to your suitcase. That's usually an indicator something's wrong: the handle broke, the wheels are unstable, or the bag ripped. And it's an extra hassle if this happens while you're in transit. No one wants to spend a vacation looking for a replacement suitcase instead of enjoying

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Essential games for the Nintendo Switch

Some of the best Nintendo Switch games you can purchase. (Kelly Sikkema via Unsplash/) While the PlayStation and the Xbox battle for graphical supremacy, Nintendo has been content to stick to clever, cartoony games that favor innovative gameplay over supercharged hardware. The company that Mario built would rather redefine how you play games instead of fussing over the freckles on a photorealisti

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New disease hits corals

The emergence of a new coral disease in Micronesian reefs, termed grey-patch disease, is reported in the open-access journal Microbiome. The disease alters the community of microbes found on the host coral and measuring these changes may be a useful tool for monitoring coral health across reefs.

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Simple model explains why different four-legged animals adopt similar gaits

Most mammals walk at slow speeds and run or trot at intermediate speeds because these movement strategies are energetically optimal, according to a new study.

1d

Genetic studies reveal how rat lungworm evolves

Rat lungworm is a parasitic disease, spread through contaminated food, which affects the brain and spinal cord. Now, researchers report that a detail analysis of the genetics of the rat lungworm parasite — Angiostrongylus cantonensis — reveal signatures of adaptive evolution that have let the parasite survive and may serve as future drug targets.

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Deep learning to analyze neurological problems

Getting to the doctor's office for a check-up can be challenging for someone with a neurological disorder that impairs their movement, such as a stroke. But what if the patient could just take a video clip of their movements with a smart phone and forward the results to their doctor?

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Chemists create new route to PHAs: Naturally degradable bioplastics

A new study demonstrates a chemical catalysis path for making an existing class of biomaterials called PHAs — already gaining momentum in industrial settings — even more commercially viable and structurally diverse.

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Mathematician develops model to control spread of aquatic invasive species

Adjusting the water flow rate in a river can prevent invasive species from moving upstream and expanding their range. An applied mathematician has developed a partial differential equation model to find the desired flow rate to reduce invasive populations.

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: If Democrats Can't Win Over Will Hurd

It's Thursday, November 21. In today's newsletter: What Joe Biden can't bring himself to say. Plus, what about the moderate Republicans? * « SPECIAL PREVIEW » (Mark Peckmezian) Joe Biden's seemingly never-ending series of verbal stumbles—most recently on display at Wednesday night's Democratic debate—have led to breathless punditry that the 77-year-old is losing it. But what if there's another re

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How to pick the right game console for you

What to think about before purchasing your system. (Cláudio Luiz Castro via U/) The "console wars" have slowed in intensity over the past few years as the upgrades and updates to each console have been more incremental than earth-shattering. It's also becoming clearer that each of the "big three"—Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo—have a slightly more focused target in mind for their wares. Deciding b

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New disease hits corals

The emergence of a new coral disease in Micronesian reefs, termed grey-patch disease, is reported in the open access journal Microbiome. The disease alters the community of microbes found on the host coral and measuring these changes may be a useful tool for monitoring coral health across reefs.

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Tænkeboks – Klip snoren ved X = 44 cm

Her får du løsningen på opgaven fra uge 46!

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New disease hits corals

The emergence of a new coral disease in Micronesian reefs, termed grey-patch disease, is reported in the open access journal Microbiome. The disease alters the community of microbes found on the host coral and measuring these changes may be a useful tool for monitoring coral health across reefs.

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New antenna tech to equip ceramic coatings with heat radiation control

Researchers have developed a way for ceramic coatings to control heat radiation, a feature that could increase the performance of aircraft engines operating at high temperatures.

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Birds of a feather flock together, but how do they decide where to go?

Coordinated behavior is common in a variety of biological systems, such as insect swarms, fish schools and bacterial colonies. But the way information is spread and decisions are made in such systems is difficult to understand. A group of researchers studied the synchronized flight of pigeon flocks. They used this as a basis to explain the mechanisms behind coordinated behavior.

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Tesla unveils electric pickup truck, futuristic design ignites controversy

Tesla Inc on Thursday unveiled its first electric pickup truck that looked like a futuristic angular armored vehicle in gunmetal gray, as the California company took aim at the heart of Detroit …

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Climate change reassessment prompts call for a 'more sober' discourse

An international research team has called for a more sober discourse around climate change prospects, following an extensive reassessment of climate change's progress and its mitigation.They argue that climate change models have understated potential warming's speed and runaway potential, while the models that relate climate science to consequences, choices and policies have understated the scope

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How an AI solution can design new tuberculosis drug regimens

With a shortage of new tuberculosis drugs in the pipeline, a software tool can predict how current drugs–including unlikely candidates — can be combined in new ways to create more effective treatments.

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Diet pills, laxatives used for weight control linked with later eating disorder diagnosis

Among young women without an eating disorder diagnosis, those who use diet pills and laxatives for weight control had higher odds of receiving a subsequent first eating disorder diagnosis within one to three years than those who did not report using these products.

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Scientists help soldiers figure out what robots know

A research team developed new algorithms and filled in knowledge gaps about how robots contribute to teams and what robots know about their environment and teammates.

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Climate change reassessment prompts call for a 'more sober' discourse

An international research team has called for a more sober discourse around climate change prospects, following an extensive reassessment of climate change's progress and its mitigation.

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Apple pulls customer reviews from its online store

User reviews and opinions are part and parcel of most consumer items and generally reflect how a product fared in the market. Apple, which is well-known for its transparent approach towards …

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Wildfires in Oregon's blue mountains to become more frequent, severe due to climate change

Under a warming climate, wildfires in Oregon's southern Blue Mountains will become more frequent, more extensive and more severe, according to a new study.

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New antenna tech to equip ceramic coatings with heat radiation control

Researchers have developed a way for ceramic coatings to control heat radiation, a feature that could increase the performance of aircraft engines operating at high temperatures.

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The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: Majority of adolescents worldwide are not sufficiently physically active, putting their current and future health at risk

The first ever global trends for adolescent insufficient physical activity show that urgent action is needed to increase physical activity levels in girls and boys aged 11 to 17 years. The study, published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal and produced by researchers from the World Health Organization (WHO), finds that more than 80% of school-going adolescents globally did not meet c

1d

Air Pollution: An Unclear and Present Danger

Journalist and author Beth Gardiner talks about her new book Choked: Life and Breath in the Age of Air Pollution. And CRISPR pioneer Jennifer Doudna talks about gene editing. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Air Pollution: An Unclear and Present Danger

Journalist and author Beth Gardiner talks about her new book Choked: Life and Breath in the Age of Air Pollution. And CRISPR pioneer Jennifer Doudna talks about gene editing. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Author Correction: Entropy is a Simple Measure of the Antibody Profile and is an Indicator of Health Status: A Proof of Concept

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54235-6

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Publisher Correction: Synaptotagmin-1 enables frequency coding by suppressing asynchronous release in a temperature dependent manner

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54233-8

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Author Correction: Simulation of visual acuity by personalizable neuro-physiological model of the human eye

Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54236-5

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Some hyper-realistic masks more believable than human faces, study suggests

Researchers asked participants to look at pairs of photographs and decide which showed a normal face and which showed a person wearing a mask. Surprisingly, participants made the wrong call in one in five cases.

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Fighting opioids with an unlikely supplemental painkiller: Anti-itch medicine

Researchers are investigating whether an anti-itch medication that targets a specific part of our nerve cells can make morphine — which targets a different part–more effective. The findings suggest it can.

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Boosting 5G technology

A new project may boost 5G and mm-Wave technologies, improving military communications and sensing equipment.

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Fish in California estuaries are evolving as climate change alters their habitat

The threespine stickleback, a small fish found throughout the coastal areas of the Northern Hemisphere, is famously variable in appearance from one location to another, making it an ideal subject for studying how species adapt to different environments. A new study shows that stickleback populations in estuaries along the coast of California have evolved over the past 40 years as climate change ha

1d

Scientists develop rapid cell division in marine sponges

Despite efforts over multiple decades, there are still no cell lines for marine invertebrates. For the first time, scientists have developed a breakthrough in marine invertebrate (sponge) cell culture, demonstrating exceptionally fast cell division and the ability to subculture the cells. This groundbreaking discovery forms the basis for developing marine invertebrate cell models to better underst

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Scientists find promising drug combination against lethal childhood brain cancers

Researchers have devised a new, promising plan of attack against deadly childhood brain cancers called diffuse midline gliomas (DMG). Scientists have shown that combining two drugs killed DMG patient cells grown in the laboratory and in animal models. The drugs countered the effects of a genetic mutation that causes the diseases. Their studies also uncovered an unrecognized vulnerability in the ca

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Underwater robotic gliders provide key tool to measure ocean sound levels

At a time when ocean noise is receiving increased global attention, researchers have developed an effective method to use an underwater robotic glider to measure sound levels over broad areas of the sea.

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Best of the best: Who makes the most accurate decisions in expert groups?

Experts don't always agree with one another when making predictions or diagnoses. So how can we find out which expert in a group makes the best and most accurate decisions? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has developed a simple method for identifying the most accurate experts and tested it successfully in various groups.

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Vanishing ice puts reindeer herders at risk

Mongolia's Tsaatan reindeer herders depend on munkh mus, or eternal ice, for their livelihoods. Now, soaring global temperatures may threaten that existence.

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Would people be willing to give their personal data for research?

New research has found that over half of people would be willing to donate their personal data for research to benefit the wider general public.

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Creating viral targets can weaken HIV vaccination

Vaccination against HIV/SIV can backfire if the vaccine induces the wrong kind of immune response. Scientists have evidence that creating too many soft targets can weaken vaccination that would otherwise provide protection against SIV infection.

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How people trick themselves into thinking something is heavier than it really is

Researchers have found that if you hold your car steering wheel at certain angles (1, 4, or 5 on the clock) then it's likely you're over or underestimating how much force you need to use to steer the car.

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To cut down on bugs, Apple is changing how it develops its software

The company will make problematic features opt-in in test and development builds.

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Author Correction: Light-entrained and brain-tuned circadian circuits regulate ILC3s and gut homeostasis

Nature, Published online: 22 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1757-3

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Why you're powerless to ignore a crying baby

Every wail and wimper of a baby's cry is carefully tuned to spark a reaction from nearby adults. (Jacques Kleynhans/) Most of us can't ignore a baby's cry. We can choose not to respond, but those shattering notes will infiltrate our noggins no matter what. The wail (however irritating it might be) sparks a response that ensures one thing: survival. Data suggests that the noise tips off parents mo

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Questionnaires and task-based measures assess different aspects of self-regulation: Both are needed [Letters (Online Only)]

While Enkavi et al.'s (1) examination of the reliability of self-regulation dependent variables (DVs) from online assessments is an important addition to the field, their conclusion that "survey DVs are more appropriate for individual differences analyses [than behavioral tasks]" (p. 5476) is likely overstated. Existing research indicates that task-based constructs…

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Study probes relationship between strange metals and high-temperature superconductors

Theorists have observed strange metallicity in a well-known model for simulating the behavior of materials with strongly correlated electrons, which join forces to produce unexpected phenomena rather than acting independently. Their work provides a foundation for connecting theories of strange metals to models of superconductors and other strongly correlated materials.

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Brain biomarker predicts compulsive drinking

Although alcohol use is ubiquitous in modern society, only a portion of individuals develop alcohol use disorders or addiction. Yet, scientists have not understood why some individuals are prone to develop drinking problems, while others are not. Now, researchers have discovered a brain circuit that controls alcohol drinking behavior in mice, and can be used as a biomarker for predicting the devel

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Big plans to save the planet depend on nanoscopic materials improving energy storage

Scientists present a comprehensive analysis of two decades of energy storage research involving nanomaterials. The authors lay out a roadmap for how this technology can enable the world's urgent shift toward better energy storage devices and sustainability.

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Magnesium deprivation stops pathogen growth

When pathogens invade the cells, our body combats them using various methods. Researchers have now been able to show how a cellular pump keeps such invading pathogens in check. As the researchers report, this pump causes a magnesium shortage, which in turn restricts bacterial growth.

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New machine learning algorithms offer safety and fairness guarantees

Scientists have introduced a new framework for designing machine learning algorithms that make it easier for users of the algorithm to specify safety and fairness constraints.

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Using controlled environment food production to solve food shortages

Before land and labor shortages prompted by the Industrial Revolution forced food production to move away from cities, agriculture was central to urban environments and their planning. Now, certain shifts in consumption habits and preferences are allowing urban agriculture to make a comeback to address sustainability issues in our food system and promote social and environmental cohesion by reduci

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Microsoft's Surface Earbuds will miss their holiday launch window

If Microsoft’s new Surface Earbuds were on your holiday wish list, you’ll either need to find an alternative solution or play the waiting game.

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University Deletes Press Release Claiming Evidence of Bugs on Mars

Entomologist William Romoser from Ohio University claimed this week to have spotted evidence of insect-like creatures living on the surface of Mars, pointing at blurry photographs. "There has been and still is life on Mars," Romoser said in a press release about his presentation. But after broad backlash , the press release has since been disappeared from Ohio University's site . And on EurekaAle

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