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nyheder2019november27

Weather Experts Are Really Worried About The Current Global 5G Deal. Here's Why

The 24-gigahertz frequency band is getting crowded.

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Modified BCG vaccine could prevent TB in cattle and help end culls

A modified version of the BCG vaccine against tuberculosis could allow cattle around the world to be vaccinated against the disease

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Animals could help humans monitor oceans

Sharks, penguins, turtles and other seagoing species could help humans monitor the oceans by transmitting oceanographic information from electronic tags.

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Hospital visits go up after days with higher levels of air pollution

On days when fine particulate matter in the air increases even a little bit, more people seem to end up in hospital for illnesses such as heart and lung conditions

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Shrewd savannah species choose friends with benefits on the African plains

For species trying to boost their chances of avoiding predation, it could be a classic case of 'it's not what you know, it's who you know that matters,' according to new research.

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Shrewd savannah species choose friends with benefits on the African plains

For species trying to boost their chances of avoiding predation, it could be a classic case of 'it's not what you know, it's who you know that matters,' according to new research.

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Shrewd savannah species choose friends with benefits on the African plains

For species trying to boost their chances of avoiding predation, it could be a classic case of 'it's not what you know, it's who you know that matters,' according to new research.

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Air pollution linked with new causes of hospital admissions

Several diseases have been linked for the first time with exposure to short-term air pollution.The associations between air pollution exposure and hospital admissions for a host of diseases remained consistent even when daily air pollution levels were below the current guideline from the World Health Organization.Air-pollution related illnesses and deaths are linked with substantial economic costs

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Air pollution linked to several new causes of hospital admissions

Short term exposure to fine particulate matter in the air (known as PM2.5) is associated with several newly identified causes of hospital admissions, even at levels below international air quality guidelines, finds a US study published by The BMJ today.

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UK health service 'lagging behind' other high income countries

The UK National Health Service (NHS) shows pockets of good performance, but spending, patient safety, and population health are all below average to average relative to ten other high income countries, according to a study published by The BMJ today.

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Hologram Within a Hologram Hints at Fate of Black Holes – Facts So Romantic

Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine's Abstractions blog . Calculations involving a higher dimension are guiding physicists toward a misstep in Stephen Hawking's legendary black hole analysis. Illustration by Lucy Reading-Ikkanda / Quanta Magazine Like cosmic hard drives, black holes pack troves of data into compact spaces. But ever since Stephen Hawking calculated in 1974 that these de

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Author Correction: Modelling Dunes from Lençóis Maranhenses National Park (Brazil): Largest dune field in South America

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54422-5

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Author Correction: Sex-based Differences in the Association between Body Composition and Incident Fracture Risk in Koreans

Scientific Reports, Published online: 28 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54420-7

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Head-to-head comparison finds three anti-seizure drugs equally effective for severe form of epilepsy

A new clinical trial in the emergency department finds no difference in efficacy or adverse effects of three commonly used treatments for patients with refractory status epilepticus.

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Study finds three anti-seizure drugs equally effective for severe form of epilepsy

There are three treatment options commonly used by doctors in the emergency room to treat patients with refractory status epilepticus, severe seizures that continue even after benzodiazepine medications, which are effective in controlling seizures in more than two-thirds of patients. New findings published in the New England Journal of Medicine reveal that the three drugs, levetiracetam, fosphenyt

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Better way to interpret blood tests to diagnose pulmonary embolism

A study led by Hamilton researchers has found a new way to interpret blood test results in patients who are investigated for blood clots in their lungs, a condition known as pulmonary embolism. This new approach applies to D-dimer blood tests, which are used by physicians to rule out the presence of a blood clot.

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We can still slash emissions and survive climate change, but we're running out of time

A protest in Belgium. (DepositPhotos/) It's still possible to keep the worst effects of climate change at bay, according to a new United Nations (UN) report on the "emissions gap," but only if we make dramatic and immediate cuts to our use of greenhouse gases around the world. Here's what you need to know: What is the emissions gap? The UN has produces its emissions gap report annually ahead of t

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Nine climate tipping points now 'active,' warn scientists

More than half of the climate tipping points identified a decade ago are now 'active,' a group of leading scientists have warned.

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Unique sled dogs helped the inuit thrive in the North American Arctic

The legacy of these Inuit dogs survives today in Arctic sled dogs, making them one of the last remaining descendant populations of indigenous, pre-European dog lineages in the Americas.

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New way to identify, manipulate topological metals for spintronics

A recent study gives researchers an easier way of finding Weyl semimetals and manipulating them for potential spintronic devices.

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Oyster deaths: American slipper limpet is innocent

Researchers have managed to shine some light on the decline in numbers of the European oyster. They have concluded that the occurrence of the invasive American slipper limpet (Crepidula fornicata) is not one of the main causes for the European oyster dying out — unlike previously assumed.

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A new theory for how black holes and neutron stars shine bright

Astrophysicists employed massive super-computer simulations to calculate the mechanisms that accelerate charged particles in extreme environments. They concluded their energization is powered by the interplay of chaotic motion and reconnection of super-strong magnetic fields.

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Turtles and tourists share the same beach on a Tunisian island

Between plastic chairs on a crowded Tunisian tourist beach, a sign indicates where another species shares the sand: a nest is buried below.

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Turtles and tourists share the same beach on a Tunisian island

Between plastic chairs on a crowded Tunisian tourist beach, a sign indicates where another species shares the sand: a nest is buried below.

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Strange quantum effect found in an exotic superconductor

Princeton scientists lead an international team that discovered unusual behavior in iron-based superconductors. The researchers observed how adding cobalt atoms disrupted superconductivity. The experiment demonstrated unexpected quantum behavior. None An international team of researchers observed an unexpected quantum effect in an exotic superconductor. Their discovery can lead to the next genera

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Swimmers Beware of Deep Brain Stimulation

The electronic implants reduced Parkinson's symptoms, but also erased some patients' ability to swim.

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The climate crisis is here, get used to it

When teen climate activist Greta Thunberg, nominated for the Peace Nobel this year, scolded titans of industry in Davos and heads of state at the United Nations, she told them to look at the science.

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Laboratory-evolved bacteria switch to consuming CO2 for growth

Over the course of several months, researchers created Escherichia coli strains that consume CO2 for energy instead of organic compounds. This achievement in synthetic biology highlights the incredible plasticity of bacterial metabolism and could provide the framework for future carbon-neutral bioproduction.

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Inbreeding and population/demographic shifts could have led to Neanderthal extinction

Small populations, inbreeding, and random demographic fluctuations could have been enough to cause Neanderthal extinction, according to a new study.

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Researchers study chickens, ostriches, penguins to learn how flight feathers evolved

If you took a careful look at the feathers on a chicken, you'd find many different forms within the same bird — even within a single feather. The diversity of feather shapes and functions expands vastly when you consider the feathers of birds ranging from ostriches to penguins to hummingbirds. Now, researchers have taken a multidisciplinary approach to understanding how all those feathers get mad

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Stem cell therapy helps broken hearts heal in unexpected way

A study shows stem cell therapy helps hearts recover from a heart attack, although not for the biological reasons originally proposed two decades ago that today are the basis of ongoing clinical trials. The study reports that injecting living or even dead heart stem cells into the injured hearts of mice triggers an acute inflammatory process, which in turn generates a wound healing-like response t

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Ketamine Could Help Cut Alcohol Consumption by Rewiring Memory

Preliminary findings from a clinical trial of heavy drinkers suggest that the drug weakens certain memories tied to the reward of imbibing, although the mechanisms aren't fully clear.

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Don't Wait: Futurism's Favorite Black Friday Deals Are Already Live

Financially speaking, Black Friday is the best time of year to get your holiday shopping done. But if you're a bargain junkie who doesn't love the thrill of the stampede, the whole thing can be a bit overwhelming. And if we're being perfectly honest, the biggest Black Friday deals – a.k.a. the doorbusters – are usually kind of boring, anyway. Luckily, we're here to make Black Friday simple. And m

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Canada needs much higher carbon tax to meet climate target: study

Canada's projected carbon tax must be more than quadrupled over the next 10 years to meet its Paris Agreement commitment to slash CO2 pollution, economists said in a report Wednesday.

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Leaked Ring Document Details Creepy Facial Recognition Neighborhood Watch Feature

Amazon's Ring subsidiary makes some of the most popular home security cameras, and it has leveraged that distinction to push its products with the help of police departments around the US. In return, Ring helps police gather footage from consumer cameras. Now, a newly leaked document reveals Ring's ultimate plans to create "neighborhood watch lists" based on facial recognition. Most companies tha

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Dubai is Adding Tesla Cybertrucks to its Police Car Fleet

Cyber Police The Dubai Police department is officially planning on adding Tesla Cybertrucks to its fleet, Arabian Business reports . The official account of the Dubai Police department tweeted an image of a Cybertruck with its logos on it with the caption "2020" on Tuesday. شرطة دبي – 2020 – Dubai Police #CyberTruck pic.twitter.com/V9rMPLgjS4 — Dubai Policeشرطة دبي (@DubaiPoliceHQ) November 26, 2

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Invasive species set to exploit climate change in Antarctica

In the tiny part of Antarctica where the snow melts in springtime, mosses, lichens and grasses grow alongside flies, mites and colonies of micro-organisms that have fed and reproduced for millions of years.

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European Space Agency seeks funding boost from member states

The European Space Agency is asking its 22 member states for more money to be able to carry out ambitious new missions and keep up with growing competition from the private sector.

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Invasive species set to exploit climate change in Antarctica

In the tiny part of Antarctica where the snow melts in springtime, mosses, lichens and grasses grow alongside flies, mites and colonies of micro-organisms that have fed and reproduced for millions of years.

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Slovakia bans single-use plastics from 2021

Slovakia banned single-use plastics as of 2021 on Wednesday, joining the European Union fight to reduce marine pollution.

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Ostrich eggshell beads reveal 10,000 years of cultural interaction across Africa

Researchers present an expanded analysis of African ostrich eggshell beads, testing the hypothesis that larger beads signal the arrival of herders. The data reveals a more nuanced interpretation that provides greater insight into the history of economic change and cultural contact.

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Humans co-evolved with immune-related diseases — and it's still happening

Some of the same mutations allowing humans to fend off deadly infections also make us more prone to certain inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease. Researchers describe how ancestral origins impact the likelihood that people of African or Eurasian descent might develop immune-related diseases. The authors also share evidence that the human immune system is still evolving.

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The Beets' Golden Discovery | Gold Rush

The Beets discover what could be the motherlode. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://www.instagra

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I'm a Vegetarian—Will I Eat Lab-Grown Meat?

Say my Thanksgiving turkey were cultured from stem cells in a lab. That eliminates some—but not all—of my ethical and environmental concerns.

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The Best Thanksgiving TV Episodes, Black Friday Advice, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Prostate cancer 'super responders' live for 2 years on immunotherapy

Some men with advanced prostate cancer who have exhausted all other treatment options could live for two years or more on immunotherapy, a major clinical trial has shown.Researchers found that a small proportion of men were 'super responders' and were alive and well even after the trial had ended despite having had a very poor prognosis before treatment.

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Beware of swimming if you use deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's

Researchers have identified nine cases of people who lost their ability to swim after having a deep brain stimulation device implanted to control symptoms of Parkinson's disease. The new research is published in the Nov. 27, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. All nine people had been good swimmers even after their Parkinson's disease diagnos

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Seed Probiotics Go Beyond Buzzwords With a Science-Based Approach to Gut Health

As you walk up and down the juice or health-food aisles at your local grocery store, you'll probably see plenty of labels touting the benefits of probiotics for gut health, and the significance of gut health on your overall wellness. But like a lot of worthwhile concepts, probiotics have been twisted and misrepresented by those who are only looking to make a quick buck. Many pseudo-scientific huc

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: What Comes Next

It's Wednesday, November 27. In today's newsletter: We look ahead to unresolved questions reverberating in Washington and beyond. * « TODAY IN POLITICS » (Cliff Owen / AP) What Comes Next The waning days of 2019 will bring a NATO summit, more impeachment hearings, yet another Democratic primary debate, more entanglements with foreign leaders, and an important government spending deadline. And if

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Audi to cut 9,500 jobs to fund electric car push

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World action to combat global warming inadequate, says UNEP

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Higher-paying white collar jobs will be heavily impacted by AI

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Parkinson's Patients are Mysteriously Losing the Ability to Swim After Treatment

Despite good motor skills, deep brain stimulation may be causing Parkinson's patients to sink.

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The Woke Attack on Pete Buttigieg

A beautiful illustration of the difference between Twitter and the real world is the viral status of Michael Harriot's attack on Mayor Pete Buttigieg in The Root as a " lying MF ." Buttigieg's sin was to state, in 2011, that inner-city black kids are hobbled from getting the education they need because they lack role models who attest to the benefits of education. "And there are a lot of kids—esp

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Jupiter's Great Red Spot is doing just fine, thanks for your concern

The Great Red Spot isn't as great as it once was. (NASA/JPL/) The solar system's largest storm has raged on planet Jupiter for at least 200 years, in what many of us know as The Great Red Spot. That tempest, which once could have swallowed roughly three Earths, has looked a little thin these days, moving some to declare its total demise could occur within a couple decades. But some recent slimmin

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Activation of the Immune System Underlies Cardiac Cell Therapies

A study in mice reveals that stem cell transplants, currently in clinical trials, may not actually require the cells.

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Här är hela listan på de kritiska tröskelpunkterna för klimatet

Flera känsliga ekosystem och klimatsystem närmar sig oåterkalleliga brytpunkter, så kallade "tipping points". Forskarna har identifierat nio stycken som är aktiva redan idag. Här är hela listan:

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Johan Rockström: "Starka vetenskapliga bevis för att utlösa planetariskt nödläge"

I en debattartikel i tidskriften Nature varnar Johan Rockström och ett antal andra klimatforskare, för att flera känsliga ekosystem och klimatsystem redan närmar sig oåterkalleliga brytpunkter, så kallade "tipping points".

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US Military Warns of "Augmented Human Beings"

BattleBots The U.S. military has ambitious plans to turn its soldiers into high-tech cyborg warriors by making them stronger, enhancing their senses, and wiring their brains to computers. Pentagon brass thinks these cyborgs will make their way to the battlefield by 2050, Army Times reports . The Department of Defense just declassified a report from October that details its plans for "human/machin

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Sound waves, Robobees and Climate Change

A month's worth of cool science stories summed up. Sound waves, Robobees and Climate Change. Video of Sound waves, Robobees and Climate Change. Technology Wednesday, November 27, 2019 – 15:00 Alistair Jennings, Contributor This is not a hologram – even though it really looks like one. It's actually a tiny polystyrene ball – about a mm wide – suspended by sound waves. An array of speakers underne

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Black Friday Deal: The Best Wireless Earbuds Are Just $70 Right Now

The 1More Stylish are truly wireless and cheaper than ever for Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

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Ford Wants Rematch in Tesla Cybertruck vs. F-150 Tug of War

Stop us if you've heard this before: Tesla sets up a test of skills against a competing car, sets the rules, doesn't use neutral overseers, and – shazam! – Tesla bests the competition. Most recently, Tesla posted video of its brand new Cybertruck pickup in a tug-of-war against the Ford F-150. When both vehicles apply power, the Cybertruck beta pulls the F-150 backwards and up a slight incline. A

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This Psychologist Wants to Create Day Care Centers for Robots

Start Small A developmental psychologist thinks we should let artificially intelligent robots learn like babies and toddlers do — in supervised "day cares." "What you need is kind of a little, helpless, not-very-strong robot that can't break things very much, and it's actually being taken care of by somebody else," Alison Gopnik, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley

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Neanderthals may have died out due to sheer bad luck

Modern humans have long been in the frame for driving our Neanderthal cousins to extinction, but random chance may explain their downfall

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Climate change could trigger huge drops in food production by 2100

Unchecked climate change could mean that by 2100, 90 per cent of the world's population will live in a country where food production is falling

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Treating babies for HIV rapidly after birth reduces signs of the virus

Newborns given HIV treatment quickly after birth had fewer infected cells in their blood and had less damaged immune systems that those given the treatment later.

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Squeaky Curtain divides Europe's mice in East and West

The house mouse diverged into two subspecies depending on which humans they followed The Western and Eastern European house mice can interbreed, but the results are, well, mixed The continent remains divided between Eastern and Western mice except for a narrow contact zone where hybrids eek out a living musculus v. domesticus It's been thirty years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, and the Iron

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Activation of opioid receptor uncovered

Together with colleagues from Shanghai, Brussels, Canada and the USA, researchers from the University of Bonn have uncovered the binding mechanism of an important pain receptor. The results facilitate the development of new active substances. The opioids used today to treat severe pain can be addictive and sometimes have life-threatening side effects. The results are published in the renowned jour

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Barbequed clams on the menu for ancient Puerto Ricans

Scientists have reconstructed the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico by analysing the remains of clams.

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New study shows a carnivorous dinosaur species regrew all its teeth every few months

A meat-eating dinosaur species that lived in Madagascar some 70 million years ago replaced all its teeth every couple of months or so, a new study has found, surprising even the researchers.In fact, Majungasaurus grew new teeth roughly two to 13 times faster than those of other carnivorous dinosaurs, says paper lead author Michael D. D'Emic, an assistant professor of biology at Adelphi University.

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A method with roots in AI uncovers how humans make choices in groups and social media

Using a mathematical framework with roots in artificial intelligence and robotics, UW researchers were able to uncover the process for how a person makes choices in groups. And, they also found they were able to predict a person's choice more often than more traditional descriptive methods.

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Adelphi, OHIO researchers determine dinosaur replaced teeth as fast as sharks

A meat-eating dinosaur species that lived in Madagascar some 70 million years ago replaced all its teeth every couple of months or so, as reported in a new study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

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Molière most likely did write his own plays

Two French researchers from the CNRS and Ecole nationale des chartes disprove the theory according to which Corneille was Molière's ghostwriter — a popular and century-old theory, defended by some academics and writers. According to their forthcoming study in Science Advances, Molière would most likely be the only author of his numerous masterpieces.

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COP25 special collection: Keep climate change impacts under control by making biodiversity a focus

Under a 2°Celsius warming scenario, 80 to 83% of language areas in New Guinea — home to the greatest biological and linguistic diversity of any tropical island on Earth — will experience decreases in the diversity of useful plant species by 2070, according to a new study.

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Early antiretroviral treatment shrinks the HIV reservoir in infected infants

Starting antiretroviral therapy within hours of birth drastically shrinks the reservoir of HIV virus — an important step in efforts to cure infections — and improves antiviral immune responses in newborns with HIV, shows a two-year study of a unique cohort of ten infants in Botswana.

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Nearly 40% of species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change

Almost 40 percent of global flora is categorized as 'exceedingly rare,' and these species are most at risk of extinction by human development and as the climate continues to change, according to new University of Arizona-led research.

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Immediate treatment with antiretroviral therapy helps infants with HIV

As part of an international collaborative effort, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital conducted immunological and virological testing on newborns in Botswana, finding that initiating antiretroviral therapy immediately, rather than waiting a few weeks, provided measurable benefits for infants born with HIV.

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Inbreeding and population/demographic shifts could have led to Neanderthal extinction

Small populations, inbreeding, and random demographic fluctuations could have been enough to cause Neanderthal extinction, according to a study published Nov. 27, 2019, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Krist Vaesen from Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands, and colleagues.

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Beads made from ostrich eggshell track cultural change in ancient Africa

Researchers can track cultural changes across ancient Africa by tracking the sizes of ostrich eggshell beads, according to a study published Nov. 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jennifer Miller of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and Elizabeth Sawchuk of Stony Brook University.

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Ostrich eggshell beads reveal 10,000 years of cultural interaction across Africa

In a new study published in PLOS ONE, researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History's Department of Archaeology present an expanded analysis of African ostrich eggshell beads, testing the hypothesis that larger beads signal the arrival of herders. The data reveals a more nuanced interpretation that provides greater insight into the history of economic change and cultur

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Bad luck may have caused Neanderthals' extinction – study

Homo sapien invasion may not have prompted Neanderthals' demise 40,000 years ago Perhaps it wasn't our fault after all: research into the demise of the Neanderthals has found that rather than being outsmarted by Homo sapiens , our burly, thick-browed cousins may have gone extinct through bad luck alone. The Neanderthal population was so small at the time modern humans arrived in Europe and the Ne

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French playwright Molière did indeed write his own masterpieces, computer science suggests

Linguistic analysis distinguishes Molière's writing from suspected ghostwriter's

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Study: Want to Stop Drinking So Much? Do Ketamine Once.

An experimental study suggests that a single dose of ketamine , a substance often used as a sedative, pain reliever, and party drug, can help heavy drinkers cut their alcohol intake in half — and the treatment could prove effective for other addictions , too. Many people develop drug or alcohol addictions because the substances exploit their brain's reward-learning system, Ravi Das, a psychologis

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Detecting and quantifying causal associations in large nonlinear time series datasets

Identifying causal relationships and quantifying their strength from observational time series data are key problems in disciplines dealing with complex dynamical systems such as the Earth system or the human body. Data-driven causal inference in such systems is challenging since datasets are often high dimensional and nonlinear with limited sample sizes. Here, we introduce a novel method that fl

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Photoferrotrophy, deposition of banded iron formations, and methane production in Archean oceans

Banded iron formation (BIF) deposition was the likely result of oxidation of ferrous iron in seawater by either oxygenic photosynthesis or iron-dependent anoxygenic photosynthesis—photoferrotrophy. BIF deposition, however, remains enigmatic because the photosynthetic biomass produced during iron oxidation is conspicuously absent from BIFs. We have addressed this enigma through experiments with ph

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Massive clonal expansion of medulloblastoma-specific T cells during adoptive cellular therapy

In both human and murine systems, we have developed an adoptive cellular therapy platform against medulloblastoma and glioblastoma that uses dendritic cells pulsed with a tumor RNA transcriptome to expand polyclonal tumor-reactive T cells against a plurality of antigens within heterogeneous brain tumors. We demonstrate that peripheral TCR Vβ repertoire analysis after adoptive cellular therapy rev

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Hierarchical assembly governs TRIM5{alpha} recognition of HIV-1 and retroviral capsids

TRIM5α is a restriction factor that senses incoming retrovirus cores through an unprecedented mechanism of nonself recognition. TRIM5α assembles a hexagonal lattice that avidly binds the capsid shell, which surrounds and protects the virus core. The extent to which the TRIM lattice can cover the capsid and how TRIM5α directly contacts the capsid surface have not been established. Here, we apply c

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Boiled or roasted? Bivalve cooking methods of early Puerto Ricans elucidated using clumped isotopes

Cooking technique reflects a combination of cultural and technological factors; here, we attempt to constrain bivalve cooking temperatures for a pre-Columbian Puerto Rican native population using carbonate clumped isotopes. Analyses of 24 bivalve specimens ( Phacoides pectinatus ) from a shell midden in Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico, suggest that samples were heated up to 200°C, indicating that roasting

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Anchorene is a carotenoid-derived regulatory metabolite required for anchor root formation in Arabidopsis

Anchor roots (ANRs) arise at the root-shoot junction and are the least investigated type of Arabidopsis root. Here, we show that ANRs originate from pericycle cells in an auxin-dependent manner and a carotenogenic signal to emerge. By screening known and assumed carotenoid derivatives, we identified anchorene, a presumed carotenoid-derived dialdehyde (diapocarotenoid), as the specific signal need

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Escaping the perfect storm of simultaneous climate change impacts on agriculture and marine fisheries

Climate change can alter conditions that sustain food production and availability, with cascading consequences for food security and global economies. Here, we evaluate the vulnerability of societies to the simultaneous impacts of climate change on agriculture and marine fisheries at a global scale. Under a "business-as-usual" emission scenario, ~90% of the world's population—most of whom live in

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A multihost bacterial pathogen overcomes continuous population bottlenecks to adapt to new host species

While many bacterial pathogens are restricted to single host species, some have the capacity to undergo host switches, leading to the emergence of new clones that are a threat to human and animal health. However, the bacterial traits that underpin a multihost ecology are not well understood. Following transmission to a new host, bacterial populations are influenced by powerful forces such as gene

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Durable multitransgene expression in vivo using systemic, nonviral DNA delivery

Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are transforming therapies for rare human monogenic deficiency diseases. However, adaptive immune responses to AAV and its limited DNA insert capacity, restrict their therapeutic potential. HEDGES (high-level extended duration gene expression system), a nonviral DNA- and liposome-based gene delivery platform, overcomes these limitations in immunoco

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Allosteric modulation of nucleoporin assemblies by intrinsically disordered regions

Intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins are implicated in key macromolecular interactions. However, the molecular forces underlying IDR function within multicomponent assemblies remain elusive. By combining thermodynamic and structural data, we have discovered an allostery-based mechanism regulating the soluble core region of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) composed of nucleoporins Nup

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In vivo-mimicking microfluidic perfusion culture of pancreatic islet spheroids

Native pancreatic islets interact with neighboring cells by establishing three-dimensional (3D) structures, and are surrounded by perfusion at an interstitial flow level. However, flow effects are generally ignored in islet culture models, although cell perfusion is known to improve the cell microenvironment and to mimic in vivo physiology better than static culture systems. Here, we have develop

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Why Moliere most likely did write his plays

As for Shakespeare, a hard-fought debate has emerged about Molière, a supposedly uneducated actor who, according to some, could not have written the masterpieces attributed to him. In the past decades, the century-old thesis according to which Pierre Corneille would be their actual author has become popular, mostly because of new works in computational linguistics. These results are reassessed he

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Nanoscale coupling of endocytic pit growth and stability

Clathrin-mediated endocytosis, an essential process for plasma membrane homeostasis and cell signaling, is characterized by stunning heterogeneity in the size and lifetime of clathrin-coated endocytic pits (CCPs). If and how CCP growth and lifetime are coupled and how this relates to their physiological function are unknown. We combine computational modeling, automated tracking of CCP dynamics, e

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Crustal seismic velocity responds to a magmatic intrusion and seasonal loading in Icelands Northern Volcanic Zone

Seismic noise interferometry is an exciting technique for studying volcanoes, providing a continuous measurement of seismic velocity changes ( dv / v ), which are sensitive to magmatic processes that affect the surrounding crust. However, understanding the exact mechanisms causing changes in dv / v is often difficult. We present dv / v measurements over 10 years in central Iceland, measured using

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Phospholipid remodeling is critical for stem cell pluripotency by facilitating mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition

Metabolic reprogramming has emerged as a key regulator of cell fate decisions. Roles of glucose and amino acid metabolism have been extensively documented, whereas lipid metabolism in pluripotency remains largely unexplored. Using a high-coverage lipidomics approach, we reveal dynamic changes in phospholipids occurring during reprogramming and show that the CDP-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway for

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Modeling other minds: Bayesian inference explains human choices in group decision-making

To make decisions in a social context, humans have to predict the behavior of others, an ability that is thought to rely on having a model of other minds known as "theory of mind." Such a model becomes especially complex when the number of people one simultaneously interacts with is large and actions are anonymous. Here, we present results from a group decision-making task known as the volunteer'

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Mechanistic reconstruction of glycoprotein secretion through monitoring of intracellular N-glycan processing

N-linked glycosylation plays a fundamental role in determining the thermodynamic stability of proteins and is involved in multiple key biological processes. The mechanistic understanding of the intracellular machinery responsible for the stepwise biosynthesis of N-glycans is still incomplete due to limited understanding of in vivo kinetics of N-glycan processing along the secretory pathway. We pr

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Elucidating the active {delta}-opioid receptor crystal structure with peptide and small-molecule agonists

Selective activation of the -opioid receptor (DOP) has great potential for the treatment of chronic pain, benefitting from ancillary anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects. Moreover, DOP agonists show reduced adverse effects as compared to μ-opioid receptor (MOP) agonists that are in the spotlight of the current "opioid crisis." Here, we report the first crystal structures of the DOP in an ac

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The release of surface-anchored {alpha}-tectorin, an apical extracellular matrix protein, mediates tectorial membrane organization

The tectorial membrane (TM) is an apical extracellular matrix (ECM) that hovers over the cochlear sensory epithelium and plays an essential role in auditory transduction. The TM forms facing the luminal endolymph-filled space and exhibits complex ultrastructure. Contrary to the current extracellular assembly model, which posits that secreted collagen fibrils and ECM components self-arrange in the

5h

A conserved ATP- and Scc2/4-dependent activity for cohesin in tethering DNA molecules

Sister chromatid cohesion requires cohesin to act as a protein linker to hold chromatids together. How cohesin tethers chromatids remains poorly understood. We have used optical tweezers to visualize cohesin as it holds DNA molecules. We show that cohesin complexes tether DNAs in the presence of Scc2/Scc4 and ATP demonstrating a conserved activity from yeast to humans. Cohesin forms two classes o

5h

Integrating climate adaptation and biodiversity conservation in the global ocean

The impacts of climate change and the socioecological challenges they present are ubiquitous and increasingly severe. Practical efforts to operationalize climate-responsive design and management in the global network of marine protected areas (MPAs) are required to ensure long-term effectiveness for safeguarding marine biodiversity and ecosystem services. Here, we review progress in integrating c

5h

The commonness of rarity: Global and future distribution of rarity across land plants

A key feature of life's diversity is that some species are common but many more are rare. Nonetheless, at global scales, we do not know what fraction of biodiversity consists of rare species. Here, we present the largest compilation of global plant diversity to quantify the fraction of Earth's plant biodiversity that are rare. A large fraction, ~36.5% of Earth's ~435,000 plant species, are exceed

5h

Antarctic environmental change and biological responses

Antarctica and the surrounding Southern Ocean are facing complex environmental change. Their native biota has adapted to the region's extreme conditions over many millions of years. This unique biota is now challenged by environmental change and the direct impacts of human activity. The terrestrial biota is characterized by considerable physiological and ecological flexibility and is expected to

5h

Climate change threatens New Guineas biocultural heritage

New Guinea is the most biologically and linguistically diverse tropical island on Earth, yet the potential impacts of climate change on its biocultural heritage remain unknown. Analyzing 2353 endemic plant species distributions, we find that 63% of species are expected to have smaller geographic ranges by 2070. As a result, ecoregions may have an average of –70 ± 40 fewer species by 2070. Species

5h

Climate change effects on plant-soil feedbacks and consequences for biodiversity and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems

Plant-soil feedbacks (PSFs) are interactions among plants, soil organisms, and abiotic soil conditions that influence plant performance, plant species diversity, and community structure, ultimately driving ecosystem processes. We review how climate change will alter PSFs and their potential consequences for ecosystem functioning. Climate change influences PSFs through the performance of interacti

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5h

HIV-Positive Babies Fare Better When Treatment Starts at Birth

Although not practical in many areas, the approach reveals clues to how the immune system battles the infection — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Nearly 40% of species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change

Almost 40% of global land plant species are categorized as very rare, and these species are most at risk for extinction as the climate continues to change, according to new University of Arizona-led research.

5h

A method with roots in AI uncovers how humans make choices in groups and social media

The choices we make in large group settings—such as in online forums and social media—might seem fairly automatic to us. But our decision-making process is more complicated than we know. So, researchers have been working to understand what's behind that seemingly intuitive process.

5h

Did bad luck kill the Neanderthals?

We need to consider demography, not just external factors, study suggests.

5h

How stem cells help repair hearts

Study suggests they trigger an immune response.

5h

Freeze. I've got a chemical

Study points to serotonin as the reason we stop when startled..

5h

Boats bug whales

Study suggests human-generated noise is inhibiting humpback communications.

5h

Gym sessions feeling futile? It might be your microbiome

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03649-3 Gut bacteria partly determine whether exercise improves the health of men with pre-diabetes.

5h

Machine learning leads to speedy screening for drug-resistant microbes

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03668-0 A highly accurate tool slashes the time needed to detect resistant pathogens.

5h

How Sled Dogs from Siberia Helped the Inuit Conquer the Arctic

A new study shows that the Inuit brought dogs with them when settling North America, and these dogs' descendants are still working today. SledDog_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Markus Trienke via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Creature Wednesday, November 27, 2019 – 13:30 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) — Huskies, malamutes and Greenland sled dogs are fluffy, hard-chargin

5h

Researchers determine dinosaur replaced teeth as fast as sharks

A meat-eating dinosaur species (Majungasaurus) that lived in Madagascar some 70 million years ago replaced all its teeth every couple of months or so, as reported in a new study published today in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, surprising even the researchers.

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Inbreeding and population/demographic shifts could have led to Neanderthal extinction

Small populations, inbreeding, and random demographic fluctuations could have been enough to cause Neanderthal extinction, according to a study published November 27, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Krist Vaesen from Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands, and colleagues.

5h

Nearly 40% of species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change

Almost 40% of global land plant species are categorized as very rare, and these species are most at risk for extinction as the climate continues to change, according to new University of Arizona-led research.

5h

Barbequed clams on the menu for ancient Puerto Ricans

Scientists have reconstructed the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico by analysing the remains of clams.

5h

Molière most likely did write his own plays

Two French researchers from the CNRS and Ecole nationale des chartes have disproved the theory holding that Corneille was Molière's ghostwriter—a popular and century-old theory defended by some academics and writers. According to their forthcoming study in Science Advances, Molière is most likely the only author of his numerous masterpieces.

5h

Ostrich eggshell beads reveal 10,000 years of cultural interaction across Africa

Ostrich eggshell beads are some of the oldest ornaments made by humankind, and they can be found dating back at least 50,000 years in Africa. Previous research in southern Africa has shown that the beads increase in size about 2,000 years ago, when herding populations first enter the region. In the current study, researchers Jennifer Miller and Elizabeth Sawchuk investigate this idea using increas

5h

HIV-Positive Babies Fare Better When Treatment Starts at Birth

Although not practical in many areas, the approach reveals clues to how the immune system battles the infection — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The best water flossers for healthier teeth and gums

Get gunk from between your teeth with a strong, narrow stream of water. (Lesly Juarez/) Some people prefer water flossing to traditional string flossing—my dentist has described it like hosing down a deck as opposed to sweeping one. Water flossing is also preferable for people with orthodontic work (like those pesky permanent retainers) or those with crooked teeth. It's also a bit better for the

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Can black holes get any bigger? Seems that's a yes

Astronomers find one with a mass 70 times the Sun.

5h

Keeping an eye on the ionosphere

Incoherent scatter radar takes measurements above Antarctica.

5h

Exercising Before Eating Burns More Fat: Study

Men had better fat-burning results when they had breakfast after cycling instead of beforehand.

5h

Where the Nurse Prescribes Heroin

A new program in Glasgow will give drug users pharmaceutical-grade heroin twice daily in a bid to reduce drug-related deaths.

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Alternativ klimaløsning: Flere hvaler kan fjerne enorme mængder CO2

Hvaler er mere effektive end træer, når det kommer til at optage CO2, siger forskere.

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Climate Change: Are we passing some key 'tipping points'?

Irreversible climatic changes could be triggered in a few decades say some scientists but not everyone agrees.

5h

Oddly shaped parks cut mortality risk for nearby residents

Irregularly shaped parks reduce the mortality risk of residents who live near them, according to a new study "Nearly all studies investigating the effects of natural environments on human health are focused on the amount of a community's green space," the researchers write in their new paper. "We found that the shape or form of green space has an important role in this association." In the study,

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Scientists find new way to identify, manipulate topological metals for spintronics

Topological materials have become a hot topic in quantum materials research, as they have potential applications for quantum information and spintronics. This is because topological materials have strange electronic states in which an electron's momentum is connected to its spin orientation, something that can be exploited in new ways to encode and transmit information. One type of topological mat

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Concordia researcher hopes to use big data to make pipelines safer

Oil and gas pipelines have become polarizing issues in Canada, but supporters and detractors alike can agree that the safer they are, the better.

5h

Newly-discovered 'comma' shrimp is 90 million years old

Researchers have discovered the world's oldest "comma" shrimp, a tiny crustacean shaped like its punctuation namesake. The 90-million-year-old creature fills in a major evolutionary gap for a family of marine animals now found in abundance around the planet, according to the researchers. The fossilized shrimp, named Eobodotria muisca , comes from Mesozoic rocks in tropical South America. Research

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Molecular catalyst converts carbon dioxide to methanol

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03563-8 A molecular catalyst dispersed on carbon nanotubes has been found to catalyse the electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide to methanol — a liquid fuel and industrially useful bulk chemical.

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The structures and gating mechanism of human calcium homeostasis modulator 2

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1781-3 Cryo-electron microscopy structures of the active and inhibited human CALHM2 channel suggest a two-stage gating mechanism in which the S1 helix adjusts the pore size, which is then fine-tuned by the N-terminal helix.

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FACT caught in the act of manipulating the nucleosome

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1820-0

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Upper-plate rigidity determines depth-varying rupture behaviour of megathrust earthquakes

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1784-0 Models compiled from subduction zones worldwide show that the elastic properties of the rock overlying shallow subduction megathrusts can be used to estimate potential slip, possibly enabling early tsunami warnings.

5h

Climate tipping points — too risky to bet against

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03595-0 The growing threat of abrupt and irreversible climate changes must compel political and economic action on emissions.

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Domino electroreduction of CO2 to methanol on a molecular catalyst

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1760-8 Individual cobalt phthalocyanine derivative molecules immobilized on carbon nanotubes effectively catalyse the electroreduction of CO2 to methanol via a domino process with high activity and selectivity and stable performance.

5h

Healing hearts, stranded ship and disease-fighting mosquitoes

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03628-8 The latest science news, in brief.

5h

Ready-made cellular plugs heal skin wounds

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03602-4 The finding that a thin sheet of fibrous tissue under the skin contains a prefabricated, movable cellular sealant that can heal deep wounds might have implications for the treatment of scars and ulcers.

5h

Quantum dots realize their potential

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03607-z Scientists have engineered semiconducting nanocrystals called quantum dots that lack toxic heavy metals and are highly efficient light emitters. These nanostructures might be used in displays, solar cells and light-emitting diodes.

5h

An acute immune response underlies the benefit of cardiac stem-cell therapy

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1802-2

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Distributed coding of choice, action and engagement across the mouse brain

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1787-x Recordings from 30,000 neurons in 42 brain regions are used to delineate the spatial distribution of neuronal activity underlying vision, choice, action and behavioural engagement in mice.

5h

A wide star–black-hole binary system from radial-velocity measurements

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1766-2 Radial-velocity measurements of a Galactic B-type star show a dark companion that seems to be a black hole of about 68 solar masses, in a widely spaced binary system.

5h

Oyster deaths: American slipper limpet is innocent

Natural history collections are unique archives of biodiversity. They document how living things transform over time and what effects aspects like climate change or other man-made environmental changes have on their distribution. A good example is the decline in numbers of the European oyster (Ostrea edulis) in the North Sea, which has been continuing for over 100 years. Researchers from Kiel Univ

6h

New method accelerates development of protein therapeutics

Glycosylation—the attachment of sugars to proteins—plays a critical role in both cellular function and in the development of therapeutics, like vaccines.

6h

Could climate tipping points lead to collapse of human civilisation?

There is mounting evidence that key environmental tipping points are likely to be breached, but the global danger is still unclear

6h

Oyster deaths: American slipper limpet is innocent

Natural history collections are unique archives of biodiversity. They document how living things transform over time and what effects aspects like climate change or other man-made environmental changes have on their distribution. A good example is the decline in numbers of the European oyster (Ostrea edulis) in the North Sea, which has been continuing for over 100 years. Researchers from Kiel Univ

6h

A new theory for how black holes and neutron stars shine bright

For decades, scientists have speculated about the origin of the electromagnetic radiation emitted from celestial regions that host black holes and neutron stars—the most mysterious objects in the universe.

6h

New method accelerates development of protein therapeutics

Glycosylation—the attachment of sugars to proteins—plays a critical role in both cellular function and in the development of therapeutics, like vaccines.

6h

New launch communications segment empowers Artemis

As Artemis astronauts lift off from NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Florida, new ground systems will provide them with the communications links needed to ensure safety and mission success.

6h

NASA-NOAA satellite finds tropical storm Kammuri strengthening

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kammuri in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and found several areas of very strong thunderstorms.

6h

Neonicotinoids: Despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk

Since 2013, a European Union (EU) moratorium has restricted the application of three neonicotinoids to crops that attract bees because of the harmful effects they are deemed to have on these insects. Yet researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the Institut de l'Abeille (ITSAP) have just demonstrated that residues of these insecticides—and especially of imidacloprid—can still be detected in rape necta

6h

Puffins stay cool thanks to their large beak

Tufted puffins regulate their body temperature thanks to their large bills, an evolutionary trait that might explain their capacity to fly for long periods in search for food.

6h

Once We Hit Climate 'Tipping Points' There May Be No Going Back

Global warming could push ecosystems into collapse sooner than scientists first predicted.

6h

Thermo-chemical power generation integrated with forced convection cooling

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology combine forced convection cooling with thermo-electrochemical energy conversion to create a self-sustaining liquid cooling system. A liquid electrolyte is circulated through a cell to cool a hot object, and the reversible chemical reaction in the cell generates a higher electric power than the hydrodynamic pump work required to drive the liquid through t

6h

How do scars form? Fascia function as a repository of mobile scar tissue

In the riddle about the origin of scar tissue, researchers have reached an important next step. A team led by Helmholtz Zentrum München found that scars are made from a tissue beneath the skin: fascia. This new knowledge led to further discoveries about scarring mechanisms and the fascia matrix which are crucial for the research on scarless skin regeneration and the prevention of fibrosis. The fin

6h

New Cretaceous mammal fossil sheds light on evolution of middle ear

Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) have reported a new species of multituberculate — a type of extinct Mesozoic rodent — with well-preserved middle ear bones from the Cretaceous Jehol Biota of China.

6h

Scientists now know what DNA's chaperone looks like

Researchers have discovered the structure of the FACT protein — a mysterious protein central to the functioning of DNA.

6h

Chinese Academy of Sciences leads discovery of unpredicted stellar black hole

An international team, headed by Professor LIU Jifeng of the National Astronomical Observatory of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), spotted a stellar black hole with a mass 70 times greater than the Sun. The monster black hole is located 15,000 light-years from Earth and has been named LB-1 by the researchers.

6h

Nine climate tipping points now 'active,' warn scientists

More than half of the climate tipping points identified a decade ago are now 'active,' a group of leading scientists have warned.

6h

New high-resolution images show how malaria parasites evade frontline drugs

The first-ever detailed images of a malaria protein, a known key modulator of drug resistance, show how the parasite evades antimalarials — and may help scientists find ways to restore the drugs' potency.

6h

Stem cell therapy helps broken hearts heal in unexpected way

A study in Nature shows stem cell therapy helps hearts recover from a heart attack, although not for the biological reasons originally proposed two decades ago that today are the basis of ongoing clinical trials. The study reports that injecting living or even dead heart stem cells into the injured hearts of mice triggers an acute inflammatory process, which in turn generates a wound healing-like

6h

Neonicotinoids: Despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk

Since 2013, a European Union (EU) moratorium has restricted the application of three neonicotinoids to crops that attract bees because of the harmful effects they are deemed to have on these insects. Yet researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the Institut de l'Abeille (ITSAP) have just demonstrated that residues of these insecticides—and especially of imidacloprid—can still be detected in rape necta

6h

Puffins stay cool thanks to their large beak

Tufted puffins regulate their body temperature thanks to their large bills, an evolutionary trait that might explain their capacity to fly for long periods in search for food.

6h

Climate emergency: world 'may have crossed tipping points'

Warning of 'existential threat to civilisation' as impacts lead to cascade of unstoppable events The world may already have crossed a series of climate tipping points, according to a stark warning from scientists. This risk is "an existential threat to civilisation", they say, meaning "we are in a state of planetary emergency". Tipping points are reached when particular impacts of global heating

6h

New Zealand Opens World's First HIV-Positive Sperm Bank

Ahead of World Aids Day, three charities have launched the world's first sperm bank for HIV-positive donors in New Zealand, the BBC reports . The facility, called Sperm Positive, could help fight the stigma that still surrounds the illness. Three HIV-positive men have already signed up. The men have such a low level of the virus in their blood that the illness cannot be transmitted through either

6h

Why we should be far more afraid of climate tipping points

Scientists argue we may cross the point of no return for some ecosystems in a little more than a decade.

6h

A New Method of Hunting Nearby Black Holes Turns up a Monster

Astronomers say this new way to find black holes could expand the small number discovered so far in our Milky Way galaxy.

6h

Bile acid metabolites control TH17 and Treg cell differentiation

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1785-z Screening of a library of bile acid metabolites revealed two derivatives of lithocholic acid that act as regulators of T helper cells that express IL-17a and regulatory T cells, thus influencing host immune responses.

6h

Towards spike-based machine intelligence with neuromorphic computing

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1677-2 The authors review the advantages and future prospects of neuromorphic computing, a multidisciplinary engineering concept for energy-efficient artificial intelligence with brain-inspired functionality.

6h

Malaria parasites fine-tune mutations to resist drugs

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03587-0 Drug resistance in malaria parasites is mediated by mutations in a transporter protein. The transporter's structure reveals the molecular basis of how key mutations bring about resistance to different drugs.

6h

Twofold expansion of the Indo-Pacific warm pool warps the MJO life cycle

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1764-4 Since the 1980s, rapid warming of the Indo-Pacific warm pool has altered global rainfall pattern by changing the residence time of the Madden–Julian Oscillation, decreasing it by 3–4 days over the Indian Ocean and increasing it over the Indo-Pacific by 5–6 days.

6h

Highly efficient and stable InP/ZnSe/ZnS quantum dot light-emitting diodes

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1771-5 A method of engineering efficient and stable InP/ZnSe/ZnS quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) has improved their performance to the level of state-of-the-art cadmium-containing QD-LEDs, removing the problem of the toxicity of cadmium in large-panel displays.

6h

MLLT3 governs human haematopoietic stem-cell self-renewal and engraftment

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1790-2 MLLT3 is identified as a crucial regulator of the self-renewal of human haematopoietic stem cells, and helps to maintain an active chromatin state in haematopoietic stem-cell regulatory genes during culture.

6h

Global satellite-observed daily vertical migrations of ocean animals

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1796-9 Satellite-derived analysis of daily vertical migrations of ocean animals shows that the relative abundance and total biomass of these animals differ between different regions globally, depending on the availability of food and necessity to avoid predators.

6h

Structure and drug resistance of the Plasmodium falciparum transporter PfCRT

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1795-x Structural, functional and in silico analyses of the chloroquine-resistance transporter PfCRT of Plasmodium falciparum suggest that distinct mechanistic features mediate the resistance to chloroquine and piperaquine in drug-resistant parasites.

6h

Podcast: Nature's 2019 PhD survey, and older women in sci-fi novels

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03680-4 Listen to the latest science updated, brought to you by Nick Howe and Shamini Bundell.

6h

All ears about ancient mammals

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03605-1 The configuration of middle-ear bones in an ancient fossil suggests that specializations suited to eating plants might have influenced how the jaw joint evolved to form the mammal's ear.

6h

Patch repair of deep wounds by mobilized fascia

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1794-y Cells that populate scar tissue in mammalian skin migrate to wounds as prefabricated matrix from the subcutaneous fascia, including embedded blood vessels, macrophages and peripheral nerves.

6h

Stem-cell therapies use immune system to repair broken hearts

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03645-7 Study in mice shows that a chemical can also improve the organs' performance.

6h

Cretaceous fossil reveals a new pattern in mammalian middle ear evolution

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1792-0 The mammalian middle ear is thought to have evolved independently several times, and a specimen of the new species Jeholbaatar kielanae provides support for the idea, with evolution of the chewing apparatus perhaps driving migration of the auditory bones.

6h

Chromatin structure dynamics during the mitosis-to-G1 phase transition

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1778-y Analysis of the dynamics of chromosome reorganization after exit from mitosis reveals the distinct but mutually influential forces that drive chromatin reconfiguration.

6h

Scientists now know what DNA's chaperone looks like

It's long been known that the proteins that package DNA, like students at a high school dance, require a chaperone. But what exactly that guardian looks and acts like has been a mystery—until now.

6h

New Cretaceous mammal fossil sheds light on evolution of middle ear

Researchers from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) have reported a new species of multituberculate—a type of extinct Mesozoic rodent—with well-preserved middle ear bones from the Cretaceous Jehol Biota of China. The findings were published in Nature on November 27.

6h

Nine climate tipping points now 'active,' warn scientists

More than half of the climate tipping points identified a decade ago are now "active", a group of leading scientists have warned.

6h

Scientists discover unpredicted stellar black hole

An international team headed by Professor LIU Jifeng of the National Astronomical Observatory of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) spotted a stellar black hole with a mass 70 times greater than the sun. The monster black hole is located 15,000 light-years from Earth and has been named LB-1 by the researchers.

6h

Our Planet May Be Barreling Toward a Tipping Point

A thawing Antarctica, a transforming Amazon, and other devastating changes may be more likely than scientists previously believed.

6h

Black Friday 2019: The 17 Best Camera and Photography Deals (From Nikon to GoPro)

We dove deep into Black Friday and Cyber Monday discounts to find the best sales on cameras, lenses, drones, and related gear.

6h

Lab-Evolved E. coli Makes Energy Solely from Carbon Dioxide

Bacteria that produce energy from inorganic carbon could have applications in sustainable biofuels.

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds tropical storm Kammuri strengthening

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kammuri in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and found several areas of very strong thunderstorms.

6h

A new theory for how black holes and neutron stars shine bright

Columbia astrophysicists employed massive super-computer simulations to calculate the mechanisms that accelerate charged particles in extreme environments. They concluded their energization is powered by the interplay of chaotic motion and reconnection of super-strong magnetic fields.

6h

Scientists now know what DNA's chaperone looks like

It's long been known that the proteins that package DNA, like students at a high school dance, require a chaperone. But what exactly that guardian looks and acts like has been a mystery—until now.

6h

Biodiversity and wind energy

The location and operation of wind energy plants are often in direct conflict with the legal protection of endangered species. The almost unanimous opinion of experts from local and central government authorities, environmental NGOs and expert offices is that the current mechanisms for the protection of bats in wind power projects are insufficient.

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Biodiversity and wind energy

The location and operation of wind energy plants are often in direct conflict with the legal protection of endangered species. The almost unanimous opinion of experts from local and central government authorities, environmental NGOs and expert offices is that the current mechanisms for the protection of bats in wind power projects are insufficient.

6h

Glass from a 3D printer

ETH researchers used a 3D printing process to produce complex and highly porous glass objects. The basis for this is a special resin that can be cured with UV light.

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Habitat restoration alone not enough to support threatened caribou

New research suggests restoring habitat may not be enough to save threatened woodland caribou — an iconic animal that's a major part of boreal forests in North America and a key part of the culture and economy of many Indigenous peoples in Canada.

6h

Contagious cancer in shellfish is spreading across the Atlantic Ocean

By learning how contagious cancer spread among shellfish, scientists hope to better understand how cancer metastasizes in people.

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Research affirms imaging technique's ability to characterize healthy and non-healthy tissue

In an article published in the peer-reviewed SPIE publication Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO), 'Influence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue in breast surgery specimens,' research observed across 92 ex vivo breast specimens suggests that there is little to no impact on the optical signatures of breast tissue after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

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Oyster deaths: American slipper limpet is innocent

Researchers from Kiel University (CAU), in cooperation with the NORe museum association for the North and Baltic Sea region and the Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum in Frankfurt, have managed to shine some light on the decline in numbers of the European oyster. They have concluded that the occurrence of the invasive American slipper limpet (Crepidula fornicata) is not one

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Carbon intensity of power sector down in 2019

Engineers from Carnegie Mellon University's Scott Institute for Energy Innovation have compiled carbon emissions for the US electric power sector for the second quarter (Q2) of 2019 as part of the CMU Power Sector Carbon Index.

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New method accelerates development of protein therapeutics

Northwestern Engineering researchers have developed a quick, cell-free system to create biosynthetic pathways to build and study sugar structures.

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Physiotherapy 'postcode lottery' uncovered

New research finds that the amount of physiotherapy available following hip and knee replacements comes down to a 'postcode lottery.'Those living in London and the North of England are more likely to receive physiotherapy, patients in the South West are the least likely to receive physiotherapy. The research also reveals other factors impacting whether patients receive physiotherapy — including h

6h

Scholars find that irregularly shaped parks reduce mortality risk

Some community parks are square, a reflection of the city block where they're located — but irregularly shaped parks reduce the mortality risk of residents who live near them, concluded a study by Huaquing Wang, a Ph.D. Urban and Regional Sciences student and Lou Tassinary, professor of visualization.

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National group publishes approach to improve pediatric sepsis surveillance

Sepsis is a major public health problem, contributing to substantial disability, death, and healthcare costs in the United States among both adults and children. Though sepsis is the focus of worldwide prevention and quality improvement efforts, tracking sepsis rates and outcomes is challenging because a definitive diagnostic test does not yet exist. Sepsis is particularly difficult to track in in

6h

A Flawless Twitter Dunk 12 Years in the Making

Twitter says it will soon redistribute inactive account handles. Just don't come for @flawless.

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Trump signs PACT Act, making animal torture a federal crime

All 50 states and local governments have animal cruelty laws, but before this week it was only a federal crime to torture animals in conjunction with so-called "animal crushing" videos. Now, the act of animal torture itself is a federal crime punishable by up to seven years in prison. The bill passed unanimously in the House and the Senate. None President Trump signed a bipartisan bill on Monday

6h

Flesh-Ripping Dinosaurs Replaced Their Teeth Multiple Times a Year

A high rate of tooth turnover gave these prehistoric carnivores an edge

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Big trucks, little emissions

Researchers reveal a new integrated, cost-efficient way of converting ethanol for fuel blends that can reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

6h

How to tell if your cleaning supplies are about to kill you

Update from Buffalo Wild Wings, Burlington: • cleaning crews on scene • GM died trying to help clean up Super 8 or sodium hypochlorite last night • leaves behind wife, infant son • 10 others injured expected to be ok • grief counselors here • will remain closed today #WCVB pic.twitter.com/5nWNBX07LS — Josh Brogadir (@JoshBrogadirTV) November 8, 2019

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Brewing your own kombucha is easier—and cheaper—than you may think

You can use berries, honey and a wide assortment of fruit and sweetners to flavor your kombucha just the way you like it. (Sewcream via Deposit Photos/) Kombucha first came to the U.S. as a hippie-health fad in the '70s, made its comeback into hipster cafes a couple of years ago, and now you can find it in pretty much any major convenience store. But you're not here to figure out where to buy a b

6h

Monitor stands that just might improve your horrible computer posture

Put your feet flat on the floor and roll your shoulders back. (John Hoang via Unsplash/) A computer monitor stand keeps your spreadsheets and email inbox at eye level, giving you less reason to hunch over your keyboard. Plus, a good stand will free up desk space, making room for a more organized work area. Before buying one, test out a variety of heights using stacks of books. Once you know your

6h

Daily briefing: Leaked China files reveal arrests by algorithm

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03682-2 Documents say that, in just one week in 2017, more than 15,000 people flagged by algorithm were interned. Plus: lion-cub mummies discovered in Egypt and how hardy corals could help save the world's reefs.

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Elon Musk: 250K People Have Pre-Ordered Cybertrucks

Order Up It seems Tesla stans weren't deterred by the company's less-than-stellar debut of the Cybertruck. Less than one week after Elon Musk unveiled the electric truck — and nearly died before our eyes when it spectacularly failed a live durability test — he tweeted that 250,000 people have pre-ordered the futuristic-looking vehicle. Holding Steady Not all of the pre-orders came immediately aft

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Europe faces up to new space challenges

European ministers met Wednesday in Spain aiming to defend its top space ranking against challenges from the United States and China, and increasingly from industry disruptors such as Elon Musk's Space X.

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Unique sled dogs helped the inuit thrive in the North American Arctic

The legacy of these Inuit dogs survives today in Arctic sled dogs, making them one of the last remaining descendant populations of indigenous, pre-European dog lineages in the Americas.

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Scientists find new way to identify, manipulate topological metals for spintronics

A recent study gives researchers an easier way of finding Weyl semimetals and manipulating them for potential spintronic devices.

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Concordia researcher hopes to use big data to make pipelines safer

In a recent paper in the Journal of Pipeline Systems Engineering and Practice, researchers at Concordia and the Hong Kong Polytechnic University look at the methodologies currently used by industry and academics to predict pipeline failure and their limitations. Nasiri and his colleagues found that the existing academic literature and industry practices around pipeline failures need to further evo

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Most shoppers unaware of major risk factor for most common form of glaucoma in UK

New study suggests that less than a fifth of shoppers were aware of the need for tests of the pressure inside their eyes (intraocular pressure), when measured at a Pop-Up health check station set up across eight shopping centers in England.The study also found that when the eye pressure test was advertised alongside a blood pressure test, significantly more shoppers took up the opportunity to answ

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Neonicotinoids: Despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk

Since 2013, a European Union moratorium has restricted the application of three neonicotinoids to crops that attract bees because of the harmful effects they are deemed to have on these insects. Yet researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the Institut de l'Abeille (ITSAP) have just demonstrated that residues of these insecticides can still be detected in rape nectar from 48% of the plots of studied f

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Grimes: Humanity Is At The "End of Art, Human Art"

Do 'The Robot' Last week, indie pop singer-songwriter Grimes made an appearance on a strophysicist Sean Carroll's Mindscape podcast . During the segment, the pop singer, who studied neuroscience before pursuing her music career, opined that humanity is at the "end of art, human art" — AI, in Grimes' mind, will soon master the arts and sciences, surpassing humans in the ability to produce superior

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The Dark Side of Gratitude

Why saying 'thanks' can be detrimental — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Wine aerators that make your favorite vino taste better, faster

Drastically improve your wine without waiting for it to decant. (Kym Ellis/) The larger, rounder flavors of aerated wine aren't just available to you at vineyards and upscale restaurants. New gadgets can let you get you that decanted taste in a fraction of the time. Wine aerating allows your wine to "breathe" through oxidation and evaporation, which in turn enhances the flavor profile and scent o

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Laser hair removal machines for at-home use

For smoother skin. (Thought Catalog via Unsplash/) Dealing with unwanted hair can be frustrating, especially if you regularly deal with ingrown hairs. If you're not into shaving, waxing, sugaring, epilating, or chemically burning off your hair, you can always try semi-permanent laser hair removal. Though this was once only available through salons, with the right tools, a mind toward safety, and

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Black silicon can help detect explosives

Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, and Melbourne Center for Nanofabrication developed an ultrasensitive detector based on black silicon. The device is able to detect trace amounts of nitroaromatic compounds and can be applied to identify the majority of explosives or highly toxic pollutan

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Photosynthesis: Living laboratories

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists Marcel Dann and Dario Leister have demonstrated for the first time that cyanobacteria and plants employ similar mechanisms and key proteins to regulate cyclic electron flow during photosynthesis.

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Transparent wood: the building material of the future?

When Timothée Boitouzet studied architecture in Japan, where buildings need to survive earthquakes, he realised the next smart material might be one that humans have used for thousands of years—wood.

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Coordinating the removal of RNA-DNA hybrids

Two research teams led by Professors Brian Luke and Helle Ulrich at the Institute of Molecular Biology have deciphered how two enzymes, RNase H2 and RNase H1, are coordinated to remove RNA-DNA hybrid structures from chromosomes. RNA-DNA hybrids are important for promoting normal cell activities like gene regulation and DNA repair, but having too many is also a risk for DNA damage and can lead to n

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Impact crater data analysis of Ryugu asteroid illuminates complicated geological history

Analysis of the impact craters on Ryugu using the spacecraft Hayabusa 2's remote sensing image data has illuminated the geological history of the Near-Earth asteroid.

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Researchers finally grasp the work week of enzymes

Enzymes are used widely in our everyday lives. Like tiny soldiers, enzymes in washing powder work to dismantle fat stains from clothing, just as they are used to transform straw into bioethanol or act as miniature pharmaceutical factories.

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Photosynthesis: Living laboratories

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists Marcel Dann and Dario Leister have demonstrated for the first time that cyanobacteria and plants employ similar mechanisms and key proteins to regulate cyclic electron flow during photosynthesis.

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Coordinating the removal of RNA-DNA hybrids

Two research teams led by Professors Brian Luke and Helle Ulrich at the Institute of Molecular Biology have deciphered how two enzymes, RNase H2 and RNase H1, are coordinated to remove RNA-DNA hybrid structures from chromosomes. RNA-DNA hybrids are important for promoting normal cell activities like gene regulation and DNA repair, but having too many is also a risk for DNA damage and can lead to n

7h

Researchers finally grasp the work week of enzymes

Enzymes are used widely in our everyday lives. Like tiny soldiers, enzymes in washing powder work to dismantle fat stains from clothing, just as they are used to transform straw into bioethanol or act as miniature pharmaceutical factories.

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Scientists Just Created a Bacteria That Eats CO2 to Reduce Greenhouse Gases

Researchers engineered a strain of E. coli bacteria that can consume carbon dioxide and turn it into energy. The synthetic life-form could someday help combat climate change.

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Forests Could Turn from Allies to Enemies in the Fight Against Climate Change

Climate change may cause trees to live faster and die younger, releasing their carbon into the atmosphere. Bare-Forest.jpg Image credits: William Anderegg Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Science story. Earth Wednesday, November 27, 2019 – 11:30 Gabriel Popkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — Trees around the world are dying earlier and decaying faster than

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CO2-guzzling bacteria made in the lab could help tackle climate change

Bacteria have been engineered to live off carbon dioxide. As well as pulling the greenhouse gas from the air they could be used to make food and fuel

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AI magic bean could save farmers millions

Farmers across the world could jack up giant profits using an Artificial Intelligence soil monitoring system developed at Brunel University London.

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The use of certain neonicotinoids could benefit bumblebees, new study finds

Not all neonicotinoid insecticides have negative effects on bees, according to researchers at Lund University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Their new study indicates that the use of certain neonicotinoids could benefit bumblebees and pollination.

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Puffins stay cool thanks to their large beak

Tufted puffins regulate their body temperature thanks to their large bills, an evolutionary trait that might explain their capacity to fly for long periods in search for food.

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Elon Musk Says Tesla's Cybertruck Orders Have Climbed to 200,000

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E. coli bacteria engineered to eat carbon dioxide

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Tesla May Replace Windshield Wipers with Lasers

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Carbon intensity of power sector down in 2019

Engineers from Carnegie Mellon University's Scott Institute for Energy Innovation have compiled carbon emissions for the U.S. electric power sector for the second quarter (Q2) of 2019 as part of the CMU Power Sector Carbon Index. The index tracks carbon emissions and electricity generation over time and by energy source. Compared to Q2 of 2018, total U.S. power generation fell by 4% in Q2 of 2019,

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Så används Pisa-rapporterna i media

Världens största elevstudie, OECD:s Pisa-rapporter, har blivit en symbol för både misslyckande och framgångar – inte bara för svensk skola. Enligt en undersökning från Södertörns högskola visar hur rapporterna görs till brickor i samhällsdebatten. Inte minst genom hur medierna använder sig av dem på nyhets- och opinionssidor. "Nytt skolfiasko i Pisa-rapport", "Pisakatastrofen kan bli skolans rädd

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Smartphone lenses that will improve your mobile photography

Crisp chicken, crispy photos, crisp memories. (Eaters Collective/) If you don't feel like shelling out a cool grand or more for the new iPhone 11 and its ( admittedly great ) camera, there are plenty of smartphone attachments to upgrade the camera on the phone you've already got. From fisheye effects to closeups to long-distance shots, here are some options for all types of photoshoots: Compatibl

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'I'm known as an activist.' New UNAIDS leader takes charge

Winnie Byanyima brings eclectic background to big challenge

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Back to the future: The original time crystal makes a comeback

System that inexorably loops in time may remain practically unachievable, however

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Biodiversity and wind energy

The location and operation of wind energy plants are often in direct conflict with the legal protection of endangered species. The almost unanimous opinion of experts from local and central government authorities, environmental NGOs and expert offices is that the current mechanisms for the protection of bats in wind power projects are insufficient. This is one conclusion from a survey by the Leibn

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Black silicon can help detect explosives

Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, and Melbourne Center for Nanofabrication developed an ultrasensitive detector based on black silicon. The device is able to detect trace amounts of nitroaromatic compounds and can be applied to identify the majority of explosives or highly toxic pollutan

7h

Problems of homophobia and transphobia in sport

The diverse field of sport is not free from discrimination. In a sports system characterized by a binary gender order and gender stereotypes, LGBTI* people can feel insecure and sometimes discriminated against. This often prevents them from actively participating in sport. The EU project OUTSPORT presents the findings of the full survey which involved more than 5,500 respondents. It also makes rec

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Exploring drug repurposing to treat glioblastoma

MALT1 blockers have long been in clinical use for the treatment of blood cancers. A study suggests that these drugs could potentially also be developed as a treatment option for glioblastoma, the most common and lethal type of brain tumor.

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New study shows a minimum dose of hydromethylthionine could slow cognitive decline

In a paper published in today's online issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, TauRx has reported unexpected results of a pharmacokinetic analysis of the relationship between treatment dose, blood levels and pharmacological activity of the drug hydromethylthionine on the brain in over 1,000 patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease.

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Comprehensive reviews by leading experts focus on challenging areas of vitamin D research

Although much is known about the important role of vitamin D in bone metabolism and in certain areas of non-skeletal health, there are many open questions and topics of debate. This special issue of Calcified Tissue International features seven state-of-the-art expert reviews which provide insights into current consensus and new directions of research in a wide range of topics — including vitamin

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The Best Books of 2019

In our efforts to increase and diffuse knowledge, we highly recommend these 45 titles released this year

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Gut microbes may predict whether exercising will prevent diabetes

Exercising helps some people avoid developing diabetes but not others, and we may now know why: it could be down to features of the human gut microbiome

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Twitter Plans to Delete Dead People's Accounts, Prompting Outrage

Thanos Snap Twitter is set to begin spring cleaning accounts that have been inactive for longer than six months. Users will have until December 11th to log in at least once to save their accounts from being wiped. It's a controversial move, especially since the cull will include users who have passed away, the BBC reports . Over My Dead Body Twitter sent out emails to the holders of the inactive

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Bekymret minister klar til at forbyde svampemidler »så snart der er grundlag for det«

PLUS. Miljøministeren vil hurtigst muligt have forskere til at svare på, hvilke kilder der gør svampeinfektioner resistente over for medicin, så patienterne dør.

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Ben Franklin invented a mesmerizing instrument with a deadly reputation

Mesmerism was about more than just hypnosis. (Wikimedia Commons/) What's the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you'll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci's hit podcast . The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week hits Apple , Anchor , and everywhere else you listen to podcasts every Wednesday morning. It's your new favorite source for the strangest

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This AI Came Up With Hilarious Pie Names Based on Harry Potter

Harry Potter Pies Just in time for the holiday season, AI researcher Janelle Shane fed an AI around 2,000 existing names of real-life pies — and some juicy Harry Potter fan fiction. The result: some hysterical names for pies you could only find inside Hogwarts' Great Hall. On her blog "AI Weirdness," Shane details some of the choice names her AI came up with. A couple standouts: "Voldemort Crumbl

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E. coli bacteria engineered to eat carbon dioxide

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03679-x Feat could turn bacteria into biological factories for energy and even food.

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High-tech faucet upgrades to get you flowing into the future

Give your kitchen a lift with a new faucet. (Amazon/) Indoor plumbing is sort of magical on its own, but a high-tech faucet may renew your sense of wonder about having potable water come directly into your house. Here are some smart faucets to make your life easier, in both the kitchen and the bathroom: The best touchless faucet on the market. (Amazon/) Stylish and functional, this Moen faucet le

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Researchers say animal-like embryos preceded animal appearance

Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors before diversifying into 30-40 distinct anatomical designs. When and how animal ancestors made the transition from single-celled microbes to complex multicellular organisms is unclear. But a new scientific study suggests animal-like embryological traits developed long before animals themselves.

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Animal embryos evolved before animals

A new study by an international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of Bristol and Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, has discovered that animal-like embryos evolved long before the first animals appear in the fossil record.

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Gene discovery in fruit flies could help search for new treatments for mitochondrial disease

Scientists have identified a protein in fruit flies that can be targeted to reverse the effects of disease-causing mutations in mitochondrial genes. The discovery could provide clues about how to counteract human mitochondrial diseases, for which there is currently no cure.

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Not seeing the trees for the wood

Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience have shown how it is possible that objects stand out less when they are surrounded by similar objects. This surroundings-suppressing effect is caused by feedback from higher visual brain areas. The results of this research are important for a better understanding of the way in which the brain transforms incoming light into a cohesive imag

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Can obesity limit antiarrhythmic drug effectiveness?

New study shows that some antiarrhythmic medications used to treat AFib are less effective in patients who are obese.

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USC researchers show how feathers propel birds through air and history

A comparison of flight feathers shows key functional and structural differences that propelled birds through evolution and across the planet.

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CMU algorithm rapidly finds anomalies in gene expression data

Computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University have devised an algorithm to rapidly sort through mountains of gene expression data to find unexpected phenomena that might merit further study. What's more, the algorithm then re-examines its own output, looking for mistakes it has made and then correcting them.

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Why do we freeze when startled? New study in flies points to serotonin

A Columbia University study in fruit flies has identified serotonin as a chemical that triggers the body's startle response, the automatic deer-in-the-headlights reflex that freezes the body momentarily in response to a potential threat. Today's study reveals that when a fly experiences an unexpected change to its surroundings, such as a sudden vibration, release of serotonin helps to literally —

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Material for safer football helmets may reduce head injuries

Scientists at the University of California Santa Barbara, HRL Laboratories LLC, and the US Army Research Laboratory have developed elastic microlattice pads that can withstand both single hits and a series of impacts better than existing state-of-the-art foams used in football helmets. Their research, publishing Nov. 27 in the journal Matter, suggests that the material may pave the way for helmets

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Researchers study chickens, ostriches, penguins to learn how flight feathers evolved

If you took a careful look at the feathers on a chicken, you'd find many different forms within the same bird — even within a single feather. The diversity of feather shapes and functions expands vastly when you consider the feathers of birds ranging from ostriches to penguins to hummingbirds. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Cell on Nov. 27 have taken a multidisciplinary approach to und

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Laboratory-evolved bacteria switch to consuming CO2 for growth

Over the course of several months, researchers in Israel created Escherichia coli strains that consume CO2 for energy instead of organic compounds. This achievement in synthetic biology highlights the incredible plasticity of bacterial metabolism and could provide the framework for future carbon-neutral bioproduction. The work appears Nov. 27 in the journal Cell.

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Humans co-evolved with immune-related diseases — and it's still happening

Some of the same mutations allowing humans to fend off deadly infections also make us more prone to certain inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, such as Crohn's disease. In a Review published Nov. 27, 2019 in the journal Trends in Immunology, researchers describe how ancestral origins impact the likelihood that people of African or Eurasian descent might develop immune-related diseases. The autho

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Blue Whale Hearts May Beat Only Twice a Minute During a Dive

Nature's most extreme animal has an equally extreme circulatory system, researchers found.

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Human Go Champion Who Lost to AI Says Machines Cannot Be Defeated

GG No Re Lee Se-dol, the Go champion who famously lost to DeepMind's artificial intelligence player AlphaGo, has thrown in the towel for good. He believes that AI is so sophisticated that it's become pointless for him to try and improve — the algorithms will always be ahead, he told Yonhap News Agency . "With the debut of AI in Go games, I've realized that I'm not at the top even if I become the

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This microbe no longer needs to eat food to grow, thanks to a bit of genetic engineering

Biochemical makeover allows Escherichia coli to use carbon dioxide as a building block for its cells

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Why do we freeze when startled? New study in flies points to serotonin

A Columbia University study in fruit flies has identified serotonin as a chemical that triggers the body's startle response, the automatic deer-in-the-headlights reflex that freezes the body momentarily in response to a potential threat. Today's study reveals that when a fly experiences an unexpected change to its surroundings, such as a sudden vibration, release of serotonin helps to literally—an

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Gene discovery in fruit flies could help search for new treatments for mitochondrial disease

Scientists have identified a protein in fruit flies that can be targeted to reverse the effects of disease-causing mutations in mitochondrial genes. The discovery could provide clues about how to counteract human mitochondrial diseases, for which there is currently no cure.

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Animal embryos evolved before animals

Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors, before diversifying into 30 or 40 distinct anatomical designs. When and how animal ancestors made the transition from single-celled microbes to complex multicellular organisms has been the focus of intense debate.

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Laboratory-evolved bacteria switch to consuming CO2 for growth

Over the course of several months, researchers in Israel created Escherichia coli strains that consume CO2 for energy instead of organic compounds. This achievement in synthetic biology highlights the incredible plasticity of bacterial metabolism and could provide the framework for future carbon-neutral bioproduction. The work appears November 27th in the journal Cell.

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Material for safer football helmets may reduce head injuries

Scientists at the University of California Santa Barbara, HRL Laboratories LLC, and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have developed elastic microlattice pads that can withstand both single hits and a series of impacts better than existing state-of-the-art foams used in football helmets. Their research, publishing November 27 in the journal Matter, suggests that the material may pave the way for h

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New algorithm rapidly finds anomalies in gene expression data

Computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University have devised an algorithm to rapidly sort through mountains of gene expression data to find unexpected phenomena that might merit further study. What's more, the algorithm then re-examines its own output, looking for mistakes it has made and then correcting them.

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Researchers show how feathers propel birds through air and history

Birds of a feather may flock together, but the feathers of birds differ altogether.

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Is This the First Fossil of an Embryo?

Mysterious 609-million-year-old balls of cells may be the oldest animal embryos — or something else entirely.

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Why do we freeze when startled? New study in flies points to serotonin

A Columbia University study in fruit flies has identified serotonin as a chemical that triggers the body's startle response, the automatic deer-in-the-headlights reflex that freezes the body momentarily in response to a potential threat. Today's study reveals that when a fly experiences an unexpected change to its surroundings, such as a sudden vibration, release of serotonin helps to literally—an

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Gene discovery in fruit flies could help search for new treatments for mitochondrial disease

Scientists have identified a protein in fruit flies that can be targeted to reverse the effects of disease-causing mutations in mitochondrial genes. The discovery could provide clues about how to counteract human mitochondrial diseases, for which there is currently no cure.

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Laboratory-evolved bacteria switch to consuming CO2 for growth

Over the course of several months, researchers in Israel created Escherichia coli strains that consume CO2 for energy instead of organic compounds. This achievement in synthetic biology highlights the incredible plasticity of bacterial metabolism and could provide the framework for future carbon-neutral bioproduction. The work appears November 27th in the journal Cell.

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New algorithm rapidly finds anomalies in gene expression data

Computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University have devised an algorithm to rapidly sort through mountains of gene expression data to find unexpected phenomena that might merit further study. What's more, the algorithm then re-examines its own output, looking for mistakes it has made and then correcting them.

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Researchers show how feathers propel birds through air and history

Birds of a feather may flock together, but the feathers of birds differ altogether.

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Right-to-Repair Groups Don't Buy Apple's Answers to Congress

Apple's responses around "same unit repairs" is sort of the tech version of defining what "is" is.

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Dance of the RNases: Coordinating the removal of RNA-DNA hybrids

Two research teams led by Professors Brian Luke and Helle Ulrich at the Institute of Molecular Biology have deciphered how two enzymes, RNase H2 and RNase H1, are coordinated to remove RNA-DNA hybrid structures from chromosomes.

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A step forward in the struggle against neuroblastoma, a type of childhood cancer

A protein called CD44 makes it possible to identify the population of mother cells that are responsible for the aggressive nature and low survival rate of neuroblastoma, a type of childhood cancer that mainly affects children of two and three years old.

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Federal Government Is Failing on Climate Readiness, Watchdog Says

A new Government Accountability Office report finds little progress has been made in reducing the nation's vulnerability to climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How smartphones really work | Cathy Mulzer

Ever wondered how your smartphone works? Take a journey down to the atomic level with scientist Cathy Mulzer, who reveals how almost every component of our high-powered devices exists thanks to chemists — and not the Silicon Valley entrepreneurs that come to most people's minds. As she puts it: "Chemistry is the hero of electronic communications."

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Does Thanksgiving affect what you think tastes good?

There's probably more behind the taste of turkey, mashed potatoes, yams, and cranberry sauce than you think, an expert in what makes food taste good or bad says. Don Katz , a professor at Brandeis University who is both a neuroscientist and psychologist, was eager to apply his perspective to the Thanksgiving table. Here are four things to know about taste as you look forward to dining on this yea

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Researchers replanting reefs one coral at a time

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03678-y Lab-bred coral larvae could provide stopgap for damaged reefs

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How to Not Die This Thanksgiving

Last week, the U.S. received a "food safety alert" from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There has been another outbreak of E. coli in lettuce. The federal agency recommends disposing of all lettuce from Salinas, California—some 75,000 pounds have already been dumped—as well as any lettuce of unclear origin. This particular type of E. coli causes not just diarrhea and vomiting but

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Ten Smithsonian Artifacts You Can 3-D Print

Gift-giving gets real with this list, which includes Neil Armstrong's spacesuit, an Abraham Lincoln life mask and a coral skeleton

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Study: Student attitudes toward cheating may spill over into their careers

A recent study authored by professors at two California State University campuses, including San Francisco State University, found that students' tolerance for cheating has a high probability of bleeding over into their careers later on. That's concerning to San Francisco State Professor and Chair of Marketing Foo Nin Ho, a co-author of the study. "If [students] have this attitude while they're in

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Building a better battery with machine learning

Designing the best molecular building blocks for battery components is like trying to create a recipe for a new kind of cake, when you have billions of potential ingredients. The challenge involves determining which ingredients work best together—or, more simply, produce an edible (or, in the case of batteries, a safe) product. But even with state-of-the-art supercomputers, scientists cannot preci

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Breast milk could help prevent heart disease caused by premature birth, RCSI study

Early use of breast milk could play a vital role in preventing heart disease in prematurely born infants, according to a paper led by researchers at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland) and the Rotunda Hospital.

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Solving fossil mystery could aid quest for ancient life on Mars

The search for evidence of life on Mars could be helped by fresh insights into ancient rocks on Earth.

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Artificial intelligence: Towards a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms

The automatic identification of complex features in images has already become reality thanks to artificial neural networks. Facebook's automatic tagging system and Google's image search engine are just two examples. We know that these networks are inspired by the human brain, but their working mechanism is still mysterious. SISSA scientists propose a new approach for studying deep neural networks

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Japanese anime and zoos boost public interest in conservation of real-life animal characters

Animated shows with animal characters can increase public interest in real wildlife, including boosting donations to conservation programs at zoos. A new national analysis in Japan highlights the potential of entertainment-conservation partnerships to increase public interest in the natural world even as communities become increasingly urbanized.

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Japanese anime and zoos boost public interest in conservation of real-life animal characters

Animated shows with animal characters can increase public interest in real wildlife, including boosting donations to conservation programs at zoos. A new national analysis in Japan highlights the potential of entertainment-conservation partnerships to increase public interest in the natural world even as communities become increasingly urbanized.

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Floating nurseries and robotic fleet deliver coral babies to damaged parts of Great Barrier Reef

Coral experts have scaled up their advanced technological approach to restoring baby corals on damaged areas of the Great Barrier Reef, using large inflatable 'coral nurseries' to help grow coral babies and a robotic 'LarvalBoat' to help disperse them back onto damaged sections of reef.

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New app helps users reduce student debt

A recent college graduate has come up with a new way to help himself and others carrying student debt to reduce their loans faster.

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Floating nurseries and robotic fleet deliver coral babies to damaged parts of Great Barrier Reef

Coral experts have scaled up their advanced technological approach to restoring baby corals on damaged areas of the Great Barrier Reef, using large inflatable 'coral nurseries' to help grow coral babies and a robotic 'LarvalBoat' to help disperse them back onto damaged sections of reef.

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Croatia to increase renewable energy consumption by 2030

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Solar, wind and hydro power could soon surpass coal

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The Case for Sending Robots to Day Care, Like Toddlers

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Fertility Rate in U.S. Hit a Record Low in 2018

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Your personality traits can change with some work

Personality traits can change through persistent intervention and major life events, a review of recent research suggests. Personality traits, identified as neuroticism, extraversion , openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness, can predict a wide range of important outcomes such as health, happiness, and income. Because of this, these traits might represent an important target

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How Stalagmites Get Their Shapes

Researchers developed a physics-based model to explain how the structures on cave floors take so many different forms.

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Scientists develop first implantable magnet resonance detector

A new miniature NMR implant measures neuronal activity.

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Clown fish survival depends on environment more than genetics

Clown fish are unable to genetically adapt to changes in their environment. Such is the conclusion of a study, unprecedented in the field of submarine environmental research, by a international group of scientists.

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Photosynthesis — living laboratories

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists Marcel Dann and Dario Leister have demonstrated for the first time that cyanobacteria and plants employ similar mechanisms and key proteins to regulate cyclic electron flow during photosynthesis.

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Ultrahigh temperature superfluidity made possible in atomic gases via mixed dimensions

Seeking higher transition temperature has been a major theme of superconductivity and superfluidity research. A new study shows that ultrahigh reduced transition temperature, up to Tc/TF ~ 1, has now been made possible in two-component atomic Fermi gases via a tunable pairing interaction strength, using mixed dimensions where one component is in a deep one-dimensional optical lattice with a large

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Impact crater data analysis of Ryugu asteroid illuminates complicated geological history

Analysis of the impact craters on Ryugu using the spacecraft Hayabusa2's remote sensing image data has illuminated the geological history of the Near-Earth asteroid and revealed 77 craters. Through analyzing the location patterns and characteristics of the craters, it was discovered that the asteroid's eastern and western hemispheres were likely formed at different periods of time.It is hoped that

9h

The molecule that can AUTAC bad proteins

Tohoku University researchers have developed a strategy that could help cells get rid of disease-related debris. Further research could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases, Down syndrome, and maybe even aging-related diseases. The findings were published in the journal Molecular Cell.

9h

Researchers finally grasp the work week of enzymes

Scientists have found a novel way of monitoring individual enzymes as they chomp through fat. The method offers far greater insight into how enzymes function and opens up the possibility of tailoring enzyme composition for useful industrial applications such as pharmaceutical and bioethanol development and production. This, according to a new study by the University of Copenhagen and Novozymes.

9h

Discovery by Hebrew University scientists could revolutionize chemotherapy

Hebrew University Professor Alexander Binshtok has developed a method to limit the delivery of chemotherapy drugs to malignant cells, leaving healthy ones alone. The discovery has the potential to revolutionize cancer treatment by reducing or eliminating painful side effects associated with chemotherapy.

9h

Heart-on-a-Chip Technology Predicts Preclinical Systolic and Diastolic in vivo Observations for Novel Cardiac Drug in Development

TARA Biosystems, Inc. today reported in vivo and in vitro functional data from a study of investigational candidate, MYK-491, showing that TARA's human iPSC-derived organ-on-a-chip technology can directly measure in vivo cardiac performance.

9h

Nightingales practise new songs in winter to impress mates in spring

Thrush nightingales migrate to Africa during winter. While there, they experiment with new songs to impress mates during the spring breeding season in Europe

9h

How many voters really switch parties in British elections? What the evidence tells us

With the 2019 election campaign in full swing, there is little evidence in the polls that things are changing. The overall picture shows both the Conservatives and Labour are both gaining support but the Conservatives remain on track for a majority.

9h

Wildlife are exposed to more pollution than previously thought

Sometimes, pollution is blatantly obvious: the iridescent slick of an oil spill, goopy algae washing up on a beach or black smoke belching from a smokestack. But, more often than not, pollution is more inconspicuous.

9h

Scooped in science? Relax, credit will come your way

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03648-4 A study of protein databases shows that discoverers who are second to publish still end up getting a substantial portion of the recognition.

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These 5 electrical engineering courses will teach you the basics—or maybe launch your new career

The Ultimate Electrical Engineering Master Class Bundle offers a complete introduction to creating and servicing electronics and electrical systems. Electrical engineers earn over $86,000 a year. The courses teach circuit fundamentals, power design and even solar energy basics. None If you've ever had an affinity for machines or just wanted to know how to fix faulty household gadgets on your own,

9h

The Democrats' Next Goal for Impeachment

For two weeks, Americans—somewhere between 10 million and 14 million of them —were fixated on the impeachment drama unfolding before the House Intelligence Committee: Ambassador William Taylor's revelation of another damning phone call involving President Donald Trump; Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland's explicit confirmation of a quid pro quo between the president and Ukraine; for

9h

Why Some People Love the Smell of Gasoline

Don't feel guilty if you enjoy the scent of gasoline. Science can explain the sweet smell of this chemical cocktail.

9h

Wildlife are exposed to more pollution than previously thought

Sometimes, pollution is blatantly obvious: the iridescent slick of an oil spill, goopy algae washing up on a beach or black smoke belching from a smokestack. But, more often than not, pollution is more inconspicuous.

9h

Uber's London Rivals Are Plotting Its Downfall

Irresistible deals for drivers and passengers are creating a frenetic race as fellow ride-hailing services try to cash in on uncertainty.

9h

The Beauty of Hawaii, Minus All the Human-Made Crap

Photographer Leah Schretenthaler's latest series erases the condos and freeways to show the Aloha State's real majesty.

9h

Guidebooks or grandmas? Where most moms get their pregnancy advice

UC study says pregnant women still rely on their mothers despite what many self-help guidebooks recommend.

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Glass from a 3D printer

ETH researchers used a 3D printing process to produce complex and highly porous glass objects. The basis for this is a special resin that can be cured with UV light.

9h

Silencing retroviruses to awaken cell potential

Silencing of retroviruses in the human genome is a crucial step in the production of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from somatic cells. Researchers led by a team from the University of Tsukuba have now identified a protein, called TAF-Iα, that controls retrovirus silencing, allowing the production of high quality iPSCs that could be used in applications ranging from stem cell therapy and o

9h

Inadequacies in current early-stage lung cancer treatment revealed

Researchers from Tohoku University and Tohoku University Hospital have revealed why some existing cancer treatments are ineffective in tackling the early-stages of lung cancer. A team led by Professor Tetsuya Kodama investigated the ability of anti-cancer agents to affect early-stage lung metastatic tumors.

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World's oldest comma shrimp was way ahead of the curve

Scientists have discovered the world's oldest "comma" shrimp, a tiny crustacean shaped like its punctuation namesake.

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Could this desert beetle help humans harvest water from thin air?

Researchers glean new insights into how insect sucks moisture from the atmosphere

9h

World's oldest comma shrimp was way ahead of the curve

Scientists have discovered the world's oldest "comma" shrimp, a tiny crustacean shaped like its punctuation namesake.

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An AI Debated Its Own Potential for Good vs. Harm. Here's What It Came up With

Artificial intelligence is going to overhaul the way we live and work. But will the changes it brings be for the better? As the technology slowly develops (let's remember that right now, we're still very much in the narrow AI space and nowhere near an artificial general intelligence ), whether it will end up doing us more harm than good is a question at the top of everyone's mind. What kind of re

9h

Bottlenose dolphins found to have right-side bias

A team of researchers with the Dolphin Communication Project, St. Mary's College of Maryland and Hunter College, has found evidence that indicates bottlenose dolphins have a right-side bias. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of bottlenose dolphins living off the coast of Bimini, The Bahamas, and what they learned about them.

9h

Experts explain the effect of climate change on infrastructure

From fires in the Amazon and in Australia, to flash flooding in Europe, right across the globe we are witnessing the impact of climate change on the environment. But how does a changing climate affect key infrastructure? Engineering experts explain.

9h

ATLAS Experiment probes the quark-gluon plasma in a new study of photo-produced muon pairs

At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the electromagnetic fields of Lorentz-contracted lead nuclei in heavy-ion collisions act as intense sources of high-energy photons, or particles of light. This environment allows particle physicists to study photon-induced scattering processes, which can not be studied elsewhere.

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How a Billionaire Couple Greased the Skids for Nancy Pelosi's Drug-Pricing Bill

Former Enron employee John Arnold and his wife Laura have financed much of the Democrats' efforts to cut prescription drug costs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bottlenose dolphins found to have right-side bias

A team of researchers with the Dolphin Communication Project, St. Mary's College of Maryland and Hunter College, has found evidence that indicates bottlenose dolphins have a right-side bias. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of bottlenose dolphins living off the coast of Bimini, The Bahamas, and what they learned about them.

9h

Doggone it! How an 18,000-year-old puppy could change everything we know about dogs

Dogor was two months old when he died and has been well preserved in the Siberian ice. But is he an early modern wolf – or one of the world's very oldest domesticated dogs? Name: Dogor. Appearance: Sharp teeth, soft nose, fluffy all over, cute as hell. Continue reading…

9h

Mental practice may improve golfers' putting performance

Researchers are lending support to Arnold Palmer's famous assertion that golf is predominantly played in 'the six inches between the ears'.

9h

Experts call for more active prevention of tooth decay for children's teeth

Three-year trial comparing three treatment strategies for tooth decay in children's teeth finds no evidence to suggest that conventional fillings are more successful than sealing decay into teeth, or using preventive methods alone. 43% of those participating in the study experienced toothache or dental infection regardless of the treatment received.

9h

Tech makes memes more accessible for people with visual impairments

A new method can automatically identify memes and make them intelligible via existing assistive technologies, researchers report. People with visual impairments use social media like everyone else, often with the help of screen reader software. But that technology falls short when it comes to memes, which don't include alternate text, or alt text, to describe what's depicted in the image. Memes a

9h

The War-Crimes President

Donald Trump is a war-crimes enthusiast. This is not an exaggeration, a mischaracterization, or a misrepresentation. As a candidate, the president regaled his audiences with vivid tales of brutality, some apocryphal, and vowed to imitate them. On the campaign trail, Trump frequently invoked a false story about General John Pershing crushing a Muslim insurgency in the Philippines with bullets dipp

9h

Chess piece found in Jordan may be world's oldest

John Oleson with the University of Victoria has reported that a small object found in Jordan made of sandstone might be the oldest chess piece ever found. In his presentation at the American Schools of Oriental Research this past week, he spoke about the object and what it might represent.

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Thanksgiving Break

Well, as I have done for many years now, I am home today following this well-precedented preparation for chocolate pecan pie. I will post a picture of the end product, which I strongly recommend for its vitamin content and general benefits! Next post here will be on some book recommendations – that will go up either Friday or Monday. Tomorrow is more cooking. We will be preparing our standard men

9h

Building a better battery with machine learning

Researchers have turned to the power of machine learning and artificial intelligence to dramatically accelerate battery discovery.

9h

Helper protein worsens diabetic eye disease

In a recent study using mice, lab-grown human retinal cells and patient samples, scientists say they found evidence of a new pathway that may contribute to degeneration of the light sensitive tissue at the back of the eye.

9h

Researchers use machine learning tools to reveal how memories are coded in the brain

These findings indicate that stable short-term memory information exists within a population of neurons with dynamic activity.

9h

UBC research highlights need to safeguard drones and robotic cars against cyber attacks

UBC researchers executed successful stealth attacks on real and simulated robotic vehicles, revealing vulnerabilities in the attack detection system most commonly used by such vehicles.

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Patient's place of residence matters when choosing cost-effective anticoagulation therapy

Appropriately selected anticoagulation therapy can help to reduce the medical costs of patients suffering from atrial fibrillation. A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that direct oral anticoagulants can be a more cost-effective alternative than traditional warfarin therapy when the patient's place of residence is taken into consideration. Published in Geospatial Health, the s

9h

Novel theranostic reagent could enhance detection and therapy of prostate cancer

A novel nuclear medicine radiotracer could help identify the extent of metastatic prostate cancer and select patients for therapy. The study is featured in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

9h

Solving fossil mystery could aid Mars life quest

Research which suggests that structures previously thought to be fossils may, in fact, be mineral deposits could save future Mars missions valuable time and resources.

9h

Solving fossil mystery could aid Mars life quest

Research which suggests that structures previously thought to be fossils may, in fact, be mineral deposits could save future Mars missions valuable time and resources.

9h

A falling rocket booster just completely flattened a building in China

Despite how easy it is to prevent, China continues to allow launch debris to rain down on rural towns and threaten people's safety.

9h

Seven Autumns of Mourning in Newtown

Seven years ago, in Newtown, Connecticut, Halloween was canceled. We were working to dig ourselves out of the damage caused by Hurricane Sandy, finding detours through a maze of roads closed by downed trees, keeping kids busy through a full week of "storm day" school closings, and improvising meals on hot plates as we waited for full power to return. Newtown normally hosts Halloween along its lov

9h

Watch a Dog-Like Robot Climb Straight up a Ladder

Higher Learning We've seen four-legged robots dance , crank out some push-ups , and even backflip through autumn leaves . But now, IEEE Spectrum reports that a team of Japanese roboticists has taught a dog-like robot a new trick: how to autonomously climb a vertical ladder. Thumbs Up The team from Tokyo Metropolitan University and Okayama University presented their quadruped robot at the 2019 IEE

9h

Researchers use deep learning method to delve into predicting RNA structures in world first

In a world-first, a team of Griffith University researchers has used an artificial intelligence method to better predict RNA secondary structures, with the hope it can be developed into a tool to better understand how RNAs are implicated in various diseases such as cancer.

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Australian experiment to establish how aggressive cancer cells behave in a zero-gravity environment

UTS researcher Dr. Joshua Chou is looking to replicate the promising results of experiments he has carried out on cancer cells in the zero gravity chamber built by his team in the UTS School of Biomedical Engineering.

9h

Top Dark Matter Candidate Loses Ground to Tiniest Competitor

Most of the universe's heft, oddly enough, could come in the form of particles billions of times lighter than the electron — a featherweight itself, as particles go. Streaming through the cosmos in thick hordes, these wispy "axion" particles could deliver a collective wallop as the missing dark matter that appears to outweigh all visible matter 6-to-1. For decades, physicists have searched for th

9h

Researchers use deep learning method to delve into predicting RNA structures in world first

In a world-first, a team of Griffith University researchers has used an artificial intelligence method to better predict RNA secondary structures, with the hope it can be developed into a tool to better understand how RNAs are implicated in various diseases such as cancer.

9h

New study highlights disparity in black financial literacy

Even though African Americans make a significant economic contribution in the United States, their financial wellness lags behind that of the rest of the country, particularly that of whites, according to a new report from George Washington University.

10h

Fish kills and undrinkable water: Here's what to expect for the Murray Darling this summer

A grim summer is likely for the rivers of the Murray-Darling Basin and the people, flora and fauna that rely on it. Having worked for sustainable management of these rivers for decades, I fear the coming months will be among the worst in history for Australia's most important river system.

10h

Natural van der Waals heterostructural single crystals with magnetic and topological properties

Heterostructures with magnetism and topology (geometry) are promising materials to realize exotic topological quantum states. However, such materials are challenging to engineer or synthesize. In a new report on Science Advances, Jiazhen Wu and an interdisciplinary research team in the departments of Materials Research, Optoelectronic Science, Physics, Condensed Matter Research and Advanced Materi

10h

What is MRP and can it predict the result of the UK general election?

A statistical technique called multi-level regression and post-stratification (MRP) correctly predicted the last UK election when other polls failed. This is how it works

10h

A.I. predicts which drug combos will best treat TB

With a shortage of new tuberculosis drugs in the pipeline, a software tool can predict how current drugs—including unlikely candidates—can combine in new ways to create more effective treatments. "This could replace our traditional trial-and-error system for drug development that is comparatively slow and expensive," says Sriram Chandrasekaran, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the

10h

What the US defense industry can tell us about how to fight climate change

Achieving the large-scale cuts in greenhouse gas emissions that will be needed will require the development and adoption of new technologies at a rate not seen since the information technology revolution.

10h

Study: Student attitudes toward cheating may spill over into their careers

A study co-authored by an SF State marketing professor finds that students who tolerate cheating in the classroom may also turn a blind eye to unethical behavior in the workplace.

10h

Producing better guides for medical-image analysis

MIT researchers have devised a method that accelerates the process for creating and customizing templates used in medical-image analysis, to guide disease diagnosis.

10h

Cancer research that's out-of-this-world

University of Technology (UTS) researcher Dr. Joshua Chou is looking to replicate the promising results of experiments he has carried out on cancer cells in the zero gravity chamber built by his team in the UTS School of Biomedical Engineering.

10h

Politically extreme counties may act as magnets, migration patterns suggest

In a study of county-to-county migration patterns in the US, researchers found that when people migrate, they tend to move to other counties that reflect their political preferences.

10h

Japanese anime and zoos boost public interest in conservation of real-life animal characters

Animated shows with animal characters — specifically the Japanese anime Kemono Friends — can increase public interest in real wildlife, including boosting donations to conservation programs at zoos. A new national analysis in Japan highlights the potential of entertainment-conservation partnerships to increase public interest in the natural world even as communities become increasingly urbanized

10h

Russian Farmers Are Strapping VR Headsets to Dairy Cows

Bovine Escapism In a bid to get more and better milk out of their cows, Russian farmers have taken to strapping specially-modified virtual reality headsets on their cows' heads and giving them relaxing, pleasant virtual experiences. It's not clear whether the milk improved as a result, according to Engadget , but the cows seemed happier while looking at a VR field than they were while faced with

10h

Knives Out Is No Ordinary Murder Mystery

Knives Out had me with the directness of its setup: a fancy manse; a rich, dysfunctional family; and a shocking murder in need of a solution. In walks Detective Benoit Blanc (played by Daniel Craig), a master crime-solver with a résumé as thick as his southern accent. "I suspect foul play … I have eliminated no suspects," he intones when asked why he's there. The writer and director Rian Johnson,

10h

Untangling the secrets of worm and spider silks

Robot spiders spinning giant silk webs to catch space trash? What may sound like sci-fi fodder to some might actually ignite the imagination of others. Thanks to its exceptional strength, toughness and thermal stability, silk has attracted a lot of attention in recent years, providing inspiration to manufacture synthetic counterparts that mimic its biological structure and function.

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Untangling the secrets of worm and spider silks

Robot spiders spinning giant silk webs to catch space trash? What may sound like sci-fi fodder to some might actually ignite the imagination of others. Thanks to its exceptional strength, toughness and thermal stability, silk has attracted a lot of attention in recent years, providing inspiration to manufacture synthetic counterparts that mimic its biological structure and function.

10h

Amerikansk politi indsætter robothunden Spot

Robotter fra Boston Dynamics er trukket i uniform og har to gange været auktion i Massachusetts, USA. Borgerretsgruppe advarer om konsekvenserne.

10h

On Hope (in a Time of Hopelessness)

Almost everyone I love is having a hard time right now. This is about hope—but not in the way we often talk about it.

10h

The 20 Best Thanksgiving TV Episodes, Ranked

Looking for something on-brand to watch this Thanksgiving? These are all available to stream right now.

10h

A fifth fundamental force could really exist, but we haven't found it yet

The universe is governed by four fundamental forces: gravity, electromagnetism and the strong and weak nuclear forces. These forces drive the motion and behavior of everything we see around us. At least, that's what we think. But over the past several years, there's been increasing evidence of a fifth fundamental force. New research hasn't discovered this fifth force, but it does show that we stil

10h

Dutch-Chinese radio telescope antennas unfolded behind the moon

The three antennas on the Dutch-Chinese radio telescope, which is currently located behind the moon, have been unfolded. This was officially announced today by the Dutch team. The Netherlands-China Low Frequency Explorer (NCLE) hung in space waiting for over a year. This was longer than initially planned, as the accompanying communications satellite had to assist a Chinese lunar lander for a longe

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Arming the immune system

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03636-8 In 1796, English physician Edward Jenner introduced the first vaccine, for smallpox, when he infected a young boy with cowpox. In the years since, vaccines — a name derived from the Latin word for cow — have been developed for many diseases, saving millions of lives. But the fight to conquer infectious disease continues.

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Only vaccines can eradicate parasitic worms

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03643-9 Microbiologist Jeffrey Bethony details progress in efforts to protect people from hookworms and schistosomiasis.

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Building a better malaria vaccine

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03639-5 As the first vaccine against the malaria parasite begins to roll out, scientists are working on a wide variety of alternatives that they hope will provide more protection.

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Don't demonize parents who are hesitant to vaccinate — discuss their worries instead

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03641-x Anthropologist Heidi Larson calls for dialogue to reassure people about the safety and efficacy of vaccines.

10h

Research round-up: Vaccines

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03637-7 A vaccine candidate for HIV steps into phase III trials, signs emerge that antibiotics impair vaccine performance, and other highlights from clinical trials and laboratory studies.

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The case for mandatory vaccination

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03642-w When immunization rates dip, legislation is often strengthened. But does the evidence stack up?

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Vaccines

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03635-9 Vaccination is a life-saving intervention, infections that once killed millions are now preventable. But there is still work to be done, many pathogens remain and there are still infections against which we have little defence.

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Tailoring vaccines for older people and the very young

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03638-6 Infants and those over 65 are at the highest risk of infectious disease. A better understanding of age-specific immunity is needed to design vaccines that work for them.

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How plants and insects inherit immunity from their parents

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03640-y Passing on short-term immunity to offspring is common in vertebrates, but plants and invertebrates take transgenerational immunity much further.

10h

Antimicro­bi­als are now more ef­fect­ive against can­ine bac­teria in Finland thanks to antibiotic regulation

Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from dogs is decreasing, according to the latest FINRES-Vet report. One likely reason is the diminished use of antimicrobials, which have been linked to the development of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria from cats are still more susceptible to antibiotics compared to bacteria from dogs.

10h

Detritus on the Moon

NASA has a list of every item astronauts left behind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

NUS researchers use machine learning tools to reveal how memories are coded in the brain

These findings indicate that stable short-term memory information exists within a population of neurons with dynamic activity.

10h

Building a better battery with machine learning

In two new papers, researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have turned to the power of machine learning and artificial intelligence to dramatically accelerate battery discovery.

10h

Russian disinformation campaigns on Twitter may not actually work

One of the first major studies to look at how online disinformation campaigns affect public opinion has found that a Russian troll factory's efforts did little to sway people's views

10h

Study sheds more light on the properties of a Type Ia supernova discovered very young

An international team of astronomers has conducted follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2017cfd—a Type Ia supernova that was discovered some 38 hours after the fitted first-light time. Results of the new study, presented in a paper published November 18 on arXiv.org, reveal more details about the properties of this source.

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Antimicro­bi­als are now more ef­fect­ive against can­ine bac­teria in Finland thanks to antibiotic regulation

Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from dogs is decreasing, according to the latest FINRES-Vet report. One likely reason is the diminished use of antimicrobials, which have been linked to the development of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria from cats are still more susceptible to antibiotics compared to bacteria from dogs.

10h

Strategy to help cells get rid of disease-related debris

Tohoku University researchers have developed a strategy that could help cells get rid of disease-related debris. Further research could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases, Down syndrome, and maybe even aging-related diseases. The findings were published in the journal Molecular Cell.

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Strategy to help cells get rid of disease-related debris

Tohoku University researchers have developed a strategy that could help cells get rid of disease-related debris. Further research could lead to treatments for neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases, Down syndrome, and maybe even aging-related diseases. The findings were published in the journal Molecular Cell.

10h

Linkage between evolution of pregnancy and cancer spread explained

Scientists at Yale have explained a potentially important connection in the evolution of mammalian pregnancy and the spread of cancer.

10h

How weather radar can keep tabs on the elusive magpie goose

You're probably familiar with weather radar that shows bands of rain blowing in to ruin your plans for the day, or the ominous swirling pattern of a cyclone.

10h

Seeking natural solutions for a manmade problem

Bryan Berger is confronting one of the biggest environmental challenges of modern times: air, soil and water contamination caused by a group of toxic chemicals whose widespread use and human health consequences are only now coming to light globally.

10h

Evidence for anisotropy of cosmic acceleration

The observed acceleration of the Hubble expansion rate has been attributed to a mysterious "dark energy" which supposedly makes up about 70% of the universe. Professor Subir Sarkar from the Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford along with collaborators at the Institut d'Astrophysique, Paris and the Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen have used observations of 740 Type Ia supernovae to

10h

Air quality has worsened since 2016, associated with more premature deaths in U.S.

In the United States, annual average levels of fine particulate matter—PM2.5, a measure of solid particles and liquid droplets that are 2.5 micrometers or smaller found in the air—declined 24 percent from 2009 to 2016, then increased 5 percent between 2016 to 2018.

10h

Linkage between evolution of pregnancy and cancer spread explained

Scientists at Yale have explained a potentially important connection in the evolution of mammalian pregnancy and the spread of cancer.

10h

Thailand reverses ban on weed killer linked to cancer

Thailand reversed a decision Wednesday to ban a controversial weedkiller and extended the permitted use of two other pesticides for six months, following pushback from its multi-billion dollar agriculture industry.

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MR-guidet fokuseret ultralydsbehandling – en ny behandling i Danmark?

Hvis MR-guidet fokuseret ultralydsbehandling skal etableres i Danmark, bør det ske på et center, hvor man i forvejen har den fornødne højtspecialiserede erfaring, skriver læger og forskere fra Aarhus Universitetshospital.

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Thailand reverses ban on weed killer linked to cancer

Thailand reversed a decision Wednesday to ban a controversial weedkiller and extended the permitted use of two other pesticides for six months, following pushback from its multi-billion dollar agriculture industry.

10h

Moose: Like having wild livestock in the woods

Moose prefer to browse on deciduous trees. Then conifers take over and affect the species diversity in the forest. One researcher contends that Norwegian wildlife management is not good enough to address what happens in the wake of these large herbivores.

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Så undviker du att falla för shoppinghysterin

Black Friday lockar konsumenter att handla mer. Samtidigt nås vi dagligen av klimatrapporter med uppmaningar till förändrade konsumtionsvanor och motreaktioner som White Monday växer sig starkare. Vad är det som får konsumenter att falla för köphysteri, trots en ökad klimatångest? – När vi shoppar är en viktig trigger hur "alla andra" gör, vilket är en orsak till att handeln fortsätter slå nya re

10h

Study zeroes in on source of arsenic in Bengal Basin's deep wells

High, harmful concentrations of arsenic are found in aquifers all over the world, but the groundwater of the Bengal Basin, in the northeastern part of the Indian subcontinent, contains the most severe arsenic contamination. Naturally occurring arsenic is considered a carcinogen and has been linked to miscarriage and infant death, as well as cardiovascular disease and various cancers later in life.

10h

Dads in prison can bring poverty, instability for families on the outside

Studies of the societal effects of prison often focus on the imprisoned: their physical and mental health, job prospects after release, their likelihood of returning to jail.

10h

Politically extreme counties may act as magnets, migration patterns suggest

It may not be just location, location, location that influences where people move to in the United States, but also politics, politics, politics, according to a team of researchers.

10h

Moose: Like having wild livestock in the woods

Moose prefer to browse on deciduous trees. Then conifers take over and affect the species diversity in the forest. One researcher contends that Norwegian wildlife management is not good enough to address what happens in the wake of these large herbivores.

10h

Scientists develop first implantable magnet resonance detector

A team of neuroscientists and electrical engineers from Germany and Switzerland developed a highly sensitive implant that enables to probe brain physiology with unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution. They introduce an ultra-fine needle with an integrated chip that is capable of detecting and transmitting nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data from nanoliter volumes of brain oxygen metabolism

10h

Helper protein worsens diabetic eye disease

In a recent study using mice, lab-grown human retinal cells and patient samples, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they found evidence of a new pathway that may contribute to degeneration of the light sensitive tissue at the back of the eye.

11h

Molecular eraser enables better data storage and computers for AI

Scientists have added a crucial tool to the atomic-scale manufacturing toolkit with major implications for today's data driven — carbon-intensive — world, according to new research from the University of Alberta in Canada.

11h

On balance, some neonicotinoid pesticides could benefit bees

The story of neonicotinoids is growing more nuanced. Europe has banned outdoor use of three of these insecticides to protect bee populations. Two other neonicotinoids are still permitted, but little is known about their impact on bees. New research reported in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology on one of the permitted neonicotinoids indicates it effectively controls pests and might even help

11h

Atomic-scale manufacturing method could enable ultra-efficient computers

As computers continue to infiltrate almost every aspect of modern life, their negative impact on the environment grows. According to recent estimates, the electricity required to power today's computers releases a total of more than 1 gigatonne of carbon emissions to the atmosphere each year. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a new manufacturing process that could enable ultra-

11h

New pads absorb shock better than foam with air flow and easy manufacture

HRL Laboratories has published test results showing shock-absorbing pads made from HRL's microlattice material had up to 27% higher energy absorption efficiency than the current best-performing expanded polystyrene foam when sustaining a single impact and up to 35% higher energy absorption efficiency than state-of-the-art vinyl nitrile foam when impacted repeatedly. Microlattice could replace curr

11h

Tinder may not actually be very good for finding a partner

A survey of Tinder users in Norway suggests that half don't connect with their matches in the real world. Even fewer meet someone keen on a long-term relationship

11h

Your guide to the ever-shrinking solitude on Planet Earth

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03634-w How to be alone.

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11h

Sleepwalkers Podcast: Rethinking Our Relationship With AI

A podcast series examines AI and its influence on humans.

11h

LG OLED TV Black Friday Deal: LG B9 Drops to a New Low Price

You can snag a gorgeous LG 4K TV for $1,200 now through Black Friday and Cyber Monday.

11h

On balance, some neonicotinoid pesticides could benefit bees: study

The story of neonicotinoids is growing more nuanced. Europe has banned outdoor use of three of these insecticides to protect bee populations. Two other neonicotinoids are still permitted, but little is known about their impact on bees. New research reported in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology on one of the permitted neonicotinoids indicates it effectively controls pests and might even help

11h

Molecular eraser enables better data storage and computers for AI

Scientists have added a crucial tool to the atomic-scale manufacturing toolkit with major implications for today's data driven—carbon intensive—world, according to new research from the University of Alberta in Canada.

11h

An 18th-Century Birthing Scam

Last year, I briefly got hooked on scam stories. I wasn't alone. Reporters, TV and podcast producers, critics, and readers all trained their eyes on hoaxes and hoaxers ranging from the fake German heiress Anna Delvey to the would-be inventor Elizabeth Holmes to the fraudster Billy McFarland, whose failed Fyre Festival provided fodder for two separate documentaries. The New Yorker , meanwhile, ran

11h

Scientific Fraud in China

There is a systemic problem with fraud in Chinese medical science. The problem goes all the way to the top.

11h

Two Interstellar Intruders Are Upending Astronomy

Researchers grapple with the meaning of the first objects entering our solar system from beyond — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Image of the Day: Changing Forests

Carbon dioxide and temperature need to increase in a constant ratio for plants to keep up with climate change.

11h

We still don't know whether vaping is safe or not

Vaping was once thought to be "95 per cent safer than smoking", but a sudden rise in deaths and injury linked to e-cigarettes is causing some people to reconsider

11h

Cows wearing VR headsets might produce better milk

submitted by /u/Colakim3 [link] [comments]

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The Next 10-20 years are going to be crazy.

The timeframe posited by an earlier post on the subreddit that speculated about the vast changes that will occur in society in the future was set at 40 to 50 years from today. Honestly though, the reality is that the next 10 to 20 years will be just as crazy and that is what makes trying to ascertain the state of the world in 4-5 decades completely impossible, the rate of change has already accel

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The Vegan Economy is the beginning of a whole new industry and era

submitted by /u/lordsunil [link] [comments]

11h

White squirrel 'hotspots' investigated in Sussex

A woman who records sightings of the unusual rodents found hotspots for them in East and West Sussex.

11h

Chinese ministry investigates duplications in papers by university president

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03599-w Four journals also say they are scrutinizing papers coauthored by Cao Xuetao after scientists raise questions about images on Twitter and PubPeer.

11h

Researchers create 'smart' surfaces to help blood-vessel grafts knit better, more safely

Researchers at McMaster University have created a new coating to prevent clotting and infection in synthetic vascular grafts, while also accelerating the body's own process for integrating the grafted vessels.

12h

Could Lab Work Be Affecting My Fertility?

I never considered that possibility before—but I am now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Image: Attica floods

With heavy rain causing flooding and mudslides in both Italy and France this week, parts of Greece have also been affected. The region of Attica, west of Athens, received torrential rain leading to hundreds of houses being flooded—particularly in the beach town of Kineta.

12h

Image: Vega-C fairing's trial by sound

The 10-m high fairing of Europe's inaugural Vega-C launcher atop a structural model of its upper stage, being prepared for acoustic testing within ESA's Large European Acoustic Facility (LEAF) – which is able to simulate the extreme noise of a rocket take-off.

12h

The impact of the soil microbiota on the mitigation of greenhouse gases in tropical forests

was the topic of a lecture given by Tsai Siu Mui, a professor and vice-director at CENA-USP.

12h

The microscopic advances that are opening big opportunities in cell biology

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03650-w A proliferation of imaging techniques spells good news for careers.

12h

A cell biology path outside of academia

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03651-9 Erika Shugart shares her experiences moving from the lab to policy and communication.

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Academics should not need to live in fear for the pursuit of their science

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03626-w Attacks on scholars are on the rise at the same time as universities find themselves at the centre of student protests.

12h

How a cell scientist in São Paulo is battling malaria

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03652-8 Celia Garcia shares her thoughts on the state of science in Brazil.

12h

What Happens When You Buy From Gift Guides

From 2009 to 2018, I was the secret Santa behind God knows how many Louis Vuitton wallets and Prada perfumes under American Christmas trees. As an editor at the luxury-shopping website PurseBlog, I was the gift-guide maestro, orchestrating hundreds of product suggestions each season. I gift-guided my brains out for weeks at a time, doing the unseen busywork behind tens of thousands of luxe Christ

12h

Think Twice Before Giving Gifts With a Microphone or Camera

Black Friday is going to be overrun with cheap, internet-connected gifts. Just make sure you know exactly what you're buying.

12h

Who's Regulating Self-Driving Cars? Often, No One

Two hearings reveal that neither the federal government nor many states are monitoring the hundreds of self-driving vehicles being tested on US roads.

12h

China Is Still Building an Insane Number of New Coal Plants

While the rest of the world turns away from the fossil fuel, China is investing big in coal-powered electricity.

12h

Researchers create 'smart' surfaces to help blood-vessel grafts knit better, more safely

Researchers at McMaster University have created a new coating to prevent clotting and infection in synthetic vascular grafts, while also accelerating the body's own process for integrating the grafted vessels.

12h

Swiss army knife for genome research

It is the the dream of every molecular geneticist: an easy-to-use program that compares datasets from different cellular conditions, identifies enhancer regions and then assigns them to their target genes. A research team led by Martin Vingron at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin has now developed a program that does all of this.

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Swiss army knife for genome research

It is the the dream of every molecular geneticist: an easy-to-use program that compares datasets from different cellular conditions, identifies enhancer regions and then assigns them to their target genes. A research team led by Martin Vingron at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics in Berlin has now developed a program that does all of this.

12h

Could Lab Work Be Affecting My Fertility?

I never considered that possibility before—but I am now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

First measures of Earth's ionosphere found with the largest atmospheric radar in the Antarctic

There's chaos in the night sky about 60 to 600 miles above Earth's surface. Called the ionosphere, this layer of Earth's atmosphere is blasted by solar radiation that breaks down the bonds of ions. Free electrons and heavy ions are left behind, constantly colliding.

12h

Hal toalett sparar vatten

Forskare vid amerikanska Pennsylvania State University har utvecklat en ny typ av ytbeläggning som är så hal att allt glider ner i toaletten utan att lämna spår efter sig. Även bakterier halkar av ytan, enligt studien som publicerats i tidskriften Nature Sustainability. Fördelen är att det går åt mycket mindre vatten för att spola rent. Även användningen av rengöringsmedel kan minskas.

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My hunger strike could be deadly. But I am willing to risk that for climate action | Eric Tien

I'm dizzy, angry and desperate – but I'm prepared to put my body on the line to force action to stop billions of deaths I desperately want to eat, but I would rather have a future. It's day 10 of Extinction Rebellion's global climate hunger strike and more than 500 people have ended their fasts. I am not ready to end mine. I am willing to starve to death, if that would help initiate real climate

12h

Theorem explains why quantities such as heat and power can fluctuate in microscopic system

The second law of thermodynamics states that the total entropy of an isolated system always tends to increase over time until it reaches a maximum. In other words, disorganization increases without outside intervention. Electrical equipment inevitably heats up as part of the energy is dissipated in the form of heat instead of being used for mechanical work, and objects deteriorate over time but do

12h

Firefox vil blokere for fingerprinting til januar

Slut med at tracke brugere med smarte tricks.

12h

Første gang i fem år: Andel af praksis med lukket patienttilgang falder

For første gang siden 2014 er andelen af lægepraksis med lukket patienttilgang faldet, viser ny opgørelse fra PLO. Faldet ændrer dog ikke på, at niveauet fortsat er meget højt set i en historisk kontekst.

12h

Ultraprecise Measurement Pinpoints the Proton's Size

Scientists are finally approaching a consensus on the decades-old question — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Første private 5G-netværk i drift på tysk testfabrik

Siemens har åbnet for det første selvstændige 5G-netværk på sit testcenter i Nürnberg. Her kører selvkørende robotter og konventionelle automationssystemer nu trådløst over 5G.

12h

The eagles have landed: Singapore shows off rare Philippine raptors

Singapore showed off two critically-endangered eagles Wednesday that were loaned from the Philippines as part of a breeding programme to reverse the dwindling numbers of the feathered giants.

12h

Hackere stjæler betalingskort-oplysninger via falske betalingsportaler

Især små og mellemstore webshops anvender ofte tredjeparts-betalingsportaler. Hackere kan efterligne denne type eksterne betalingsportaler, hvortil kunder risikerer at levere betalingskortoplysninger til uønskede parter.

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IC4 kører bedre og bedre, men der er stadig langt til IC3's driftsikkerhed

PLUS. Hangardronningerne er kørt ud på sidesporet og resten har fået ny software.

12h

The eagles have landed: Singapore shows off rare Philippine raptors

Singapore showed off two critically-endangered eagles Wednesday that were loaned from the Philippines as part of a breeding programme to reverse the dwindling numbers of the feathered giants.

12h

Vigtig tysk elmotorvej forsinket – tidligst færdig i 2026

PLUS. Uden ny elmotorvej vil danske vindmøller og kraftværker sandsynligvis fortsat blive stoppet for tyske penge. Forsinkelse påvirker hele det europæiske elsystem..

13h

These corals could survive climate change — and help save the world's reefs

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03629-7 Ocean warming threatens to wipe out corals, but scientists are trying to protect naturally resilient reefs and are nursing some others back to health.

13h

Can Peer Support Programs Help Those Living With HIV?

A support group for black gay men with HIV credits its popularity to a powerful sense of belonging and a programming style that doesn't conform to the requirements of most federal grants. "The CDC may say, 'Oh, black gay men are hard to find,'" says cofounder Larry Scott-Walker. "But for us, it's easy."

13h

This girl's TikTok "makeup" video went viral for discussing the Uighur crisis

A smart bit of bait-and-switch that got past the moderators shows how the app is growing up. But it also raises questions about censorship on the platform.

13h

Statsrevisorerne kritiserer praksislægerne: I følger ikke lægemiddelanbefalingerne

Lægerne er ikke gode nok til at følge lægemiddelanbefalingerne, og Sundheds- og Ældreministeriet gør ikke nok for at gøre retningslinjerne tilgængelige, påpeger statsrevisorerne i ny rapport. Sundhedsministeren vil forbedre koordinationen af oplysninger.

13h

Vi skäms för våra klädinköp

Många vill handla sina kläder hållbart, men lyckas inte alltid leva upp till sina förväntningar. Det skapar ofta en känslor av misslyckande och skam. För att kunna ställa om till ett mer hållbart konsumerande, hjälper det att förstå människors känslor kring kläder. – Vi mår dåligt över att vi misslyckas med att göra hållbara val när vi köper kläder och skor. Istället för att vända kritiken mot in

13h

Neil deGrasse Tyson: Scientists' brains are wired to see differently

There are many people who have discomfort engaging with a scientific perspective of the world — for some, for instance, it conflicts with what they were taught during their religious upbringings. We can all gain a greater view of life — the cosmos — by getting to know scientists, especially when we're at an impasse in our lives. Scientists' view of the world retains a "distance" to it — it's obse

13h

Cory Booker Blew It

Near the end of the latest Democratic debate, Cory Booker did something unusual for a presidential candidate: He admitted that his campaign was in trouble. "I have not yet qualified for the December stage," the senator from New Jersey confessed , "If you believe in my voice and that I should be up here, please go to CoryBooker.com. Please help." The plea worked. A surge of contributions pushed Bo

13h

How to Talk About the Truth and Trump at Thanksgiving

Between bites of ham, he is always liable to say it. "The New York Knicks will never ever win the NBA championship!" my uncle jabs seemingly every year, mouth full, at the Thanksgiving table. The last time the Knicks were professional basketball champions was in 1973, nine years before my birth. I am a resolute Knicks fan and a vegan. Unc despises both. "Soooo if the Knicks win the championship,

13h

The Great American Eye-Exam Scam

On a beautiful summer day a few months ago, I walked down to the part of the Connecticut River that separates Vermont from New Hampshire, and rented a kayak. I pushed myself off the dock—and the next thing I remember is being underwater. Somehow, the kayak had capsized as it entered the river. I tried to swim up, toward the light, but found that my own boat blocked my way to safety. Doing my best

13h

In 1621, the Wampanoag Tribe Had Its Own Agenda

In the familiar American account of the first Thanksgiving in 1621, the Pilgrims who settled in Plymouth were pious English refugees, one of many boatloads of Europeans who fled the tyranny of the Old World to become a liberty-loving people in the New. The Indians whom they encountered (rarely identified by tribe) overcame their caution and proved to be friendly (a term requiring no explanation).

13h

Cutting nanoparticles down to size

A new technique in chemistry could pave the way for producing uniform nanoparticles for use in drug delivery systems.

13h

Authors "in shock" when image reuse doesn't fly with publishers of paper on emu oil and stem cells

A team of researchers in Iran has lost a 2018 paper on using emu oil to prepare stem cells because they tried to recycle previously published images. The journal told us that a whistleblower had raised concerns about the article, prompting an involved back-and-forth with the authors and even efforts at accommodation before the eventual … Continue reading

13h

General election 2019: Why you should think climate change not Brexit

Brexit may seem important right now, but whoever wins the election will be in charge halfway to 2030 – a crucial time in efforts to limit dangerous warming, says Jacob Aron

13h

Klimatutvecklingen går åt fel håll

I förra veckan kom rapporten Production Gap från en internationell forskargrupp som visar att planerna för utvinning av fossila bränslen ligger långt över vad som är förenligt med klimatmålen.

13h

Omsorg i Spanien beroende av migration

Vem ska ta hand om gamla mamma? I Spanien är det ofta papperslösa kvinnor från Latinamerika. Det spanska systemet är riggat för att papperslösa ska utföra omsorgsarbetet. Utan papperslösa och andra migranter skulle ekvationen inte gå ihop. – Det är inte ett arbete som inte kan göras. Hela ekonomin är beroende av att det är ett arbete som blir gjort, säger Ingrid Jerve Ramsøy, doktorand vid Malmö

13h

New image offers close-up view of interstellar comet

Yale astronomers have taken a new, close-up image of the interstellar comet 2l/Borisov.

13h

Global storms on Mars launch dust towers into the sky

Dust storms are common on Mars. But every decade or so, something unpredictable happens: A series of runaway storms breaks out, covering the entire planet in a dusty haze.

13h

The preponderance of nonsynonymous A-to-I RNA editing in coleoids is nonadaptive

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13275-2 The neural tissues of coleoids have a greater fraction of nonsynonymous sites than synonymous sites subject to high levels of A-to-I RNA editing, a pattern thought to indicate widespread adaptive editing. Here the authors propose and provide evidence for an alternative, nonadaptive explanation.

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Anisotropic polymer nanoparticles with controlled dimensions from the morphological transformation of isotropic seeds

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13263-6 Understanding and controlling self-assembly processes at multiple length scales is essential to design and create advanced materials. Here the authors report a method for the production of highly anisotropic nanoparticles with controlled dimensions based on the morphological transformation of initially isotr

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RNA secondary structure prediction using an ensemble of two-dimensional deep neural networks and transfer learning

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13395-9 The limited availability of high-resolution 3D RNA structures for model training limits RNA secondary structure prediction. Here, the authors overcome this challenge by pre-training a DNN on a large set of predicted RNA structures and using transfer learning with high-resolution structures.

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Unraveling cis and trans regulatory evolution during cotton domestication

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13386-w Relatively little is known about the complexity of regulatory evolution accompanying polyploid crop domestication. Here, using reciprocal hybrids between wild and domesticated allotetraploid cotton lines, the authors catalog cis and trans regulatory variants and show their equivalent effects on cotton fiber

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Impact of transport electrification on critical metal sustainability with a focus on the heavy-duty segment

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13400-1 Resource impacts from the electrification of transport sector in terms of heavy-duty vehicles are understudied. Here the authors find that a mass deployment of plug-in electric vehicles in the heavy-duty segment at the global level can substantially increase the lithium demand.

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Analysis of polarimetric satellite measurements suggests stronger cooling due to aerosol-cloud interactions

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13372-2 The radiative forcing due to aerosol-cloud interactions constitutes one of the largest uncertainties of anthropogenic radiative forcing. Direct satellite measurements of the relevant aerosol properties reveal that the resulting cooling from anthropogenic aerosols is much stronger than previously thought.

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Solid-to-liquid phase transitions of sub-nanometer clusters enhance chemical transformation

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13509-3 Understanding the dynamic evolution of the catalysts' structure under reaction conditions is crucial in heterogeneous catalysis. Here the authors use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to show an anomalous decrease in reaction free energies and barriers on dynamical sub-nanometer Au clusters supported

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GraphTyper2 enables population-scale genotyping of structural variation using pangenome graphs

Nature Communications, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13341-9 Structural variants may be omitted in sequence analysis despite their importance in genome variation and phenotypic impact. Here the authors present GraphTyper2, which uses pangenome graphs to genotype structural variants using short-reads and can be applied in large-scale sequencing studies.

14h

Don't Get Mad, but 'Hangry' Isn't Really Angry

Anger comes in many flavors, it turns out, and the hunger-induced variety isn't quite like the others.

14h

Artificial intelligence-based algorithm for intensive care of traumatic brain injury

A recent Finnish study, published in Scientific Reports, presents the first artificial intelligence (AI) based algorithm that may be utilized in the intensive care unit for treating patients with severe traumatic brain injury. The project is a collaborative project between three Finnish university hospitals: Helsinki University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital and Turku University Hospital.

14h

What protects killer immune cells from harming themselves?

White blood cells, which release a toxic potion of proteins to kill cancerous and virus-infected cells, are protected from any harm by the physical properties of their cell envelopes, find scientists from UCL and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne. Until now, it has been a mystery to scientists how these white blood cells — called cytotoxic lymphocytes — avoid being killed by their o

14h

Cutting nanoparticles down to size — new study

A new technique in chemistry could pave the way for producing uniform nanoparticles for use in drug delivery systems.

14h

Cromolyn sodium delays disease onset and is neuroprotective in the SOD1G93A Mouse Model of ALS

Investigators find treatment with an anti-inflammatory drug delayed the onset of disease in a mouse model of ALS.

14h

Deportation worries may increase high blood pressure risk

The fear of deportation was associated with double the risk of developing high blood pressure over a four-year period, in a study of Mexican-born women who reside in an agricultural area of California.Worries associated with immigration policies and enforcement may have negative impacts on the long-term cardiovascular health of immigrants, their families and community.

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Imaging uncovers secrets of medicine's mysterious ivory manikins

Little is known about the origins of manikins — small anatomical sculptures thought to be used by doctors four centuries ago — but now advanced imaging techniques have offered a revealing glimpse inside these captivating ivory dolls. Researchers using micro-CT successfully identified the material composition and components of several ancient ivory manikins, according to a new study.

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Gunshot injuries have long-term medical consequences

Researchers are trying to identify injury patterns and predict future outcomes for victims of gun violence who are seen in the emergency room and later readmitted to the hospital, according to new research. They found that patients who had gunshot injuries to the chest or abdomen were more likely to be readmitted to the hospital.

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Scaling behaviour in music and cortical dynamics interplay to mediate music listening pleasure

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54060-x

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Effect of Different Insulin Therapies on Obstetric-Fetal Outcomes

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54164-4

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The balance between NRF2/GSH antioxidant mediated pathway and DNA repair modulates cisplatin resistance in lung cancer cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54065-6

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A cellular automaton model for spheroid response to radiation and hyperthermia treatments

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54117-x

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A new source of root-knot nematode resistance from Arachis stenosperma incorporated into allotetraploid peanut (Arachis hypogaea)

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54183-1 A new source of root-knot nematode resistance from Arachis stenosperma incorporated into allotetraploid peanut ( Arachis hypogaea )

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Unraveling the selective antibacterial activity and chemical composition of citrus essential oils

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54084-3

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A diarylamine derived from anthranilic acid inhibits ZIKV replication

Scientific Reports, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-54169-z

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Ny næstformand i PLO

Mireille Lacroix fra Sydfyn overtager posten som næstformand i PLO. Det blev vedtaget på foreningens repræsentantskabsmøde lørdag, der også banede vej for tre nye ansigter i bestyrelsen.

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The truth in Moby-Dick, what makes science trustworthy, and the board game that won a war: Books in brief

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03622-0 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week's best science picks.

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Why Trump (Probably) Won't Ditch Rudy

Over the past week, I asked multiple GOP officials when, if ever, they thought President Donald Trump would publicly distance himself from his personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, who is at the center of the House impeachment inquiry. Their responses were eerily similar: "Can it be two years ago?" asked one White House official who, like others, requested anonymity in order to be candid. "Ideally thre

14h

Nasa hjælper ESA med faldskærme til Mars-rover

Det er et kapløb med tiden at få faldskærmene til ExoMars 2020-missionen til at fungere. Missionen risikerer to års udsættelse.

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Green palm oil push: Kit Kat, Dove makers could face fines

Companies that make top brands including Kit Kat chocolate and Dove soap may face fines if they fail to buy more green palm oil under new rules aimed at improving the controversial industry's environmental sustainability.

14h

Boomers Are Not Okay

For more than two decades, the Conservative politician David Willetts was the member of Parliament representing Havant, a cozy middle-class town in southern England. He dealt with the usual problems: traffic in the town center, littering along the seafront. After the 2007 financial crash, though, he noticed something alarming. He was regularly visited by young couples—the man might be a nurse, hi

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China says it has met its carbon reduction goal early

China has realized its 2020 target for reducing carbon emissions ahead of schedule, the ecology and environment ministry reported Wednesday.

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In US, climate anxiety churns up psychological storm

In the melting Arctic, communities are racing to maintain their way of life. In the rising Pacific, residents are sounding alarm bells. And in Rhode Island, Kate Schapira and her husband are not having a baby.

14h

Go for lunch: Japanese yakitori chicken gets space thumbs-up

Japanese chicken yakitori kebabs, one of the country's most-loved fast foods, will soon be making an appearance in orbit after Japan's space agency cleared them for astronaut meals.

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Habitat restoration alone not enough to support threatened caribou: study

New UBC research suggests restoring habitat may not be enough to save threatened woodland caribou—an iconic animal that's a major part of boreal forests in North America and a key part of the culture and economy of many Indigenous peoples in Canada.

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Habitat restoration alone not enough to support threatened caribou: study

New UBC research suggests restoring habitat may not be enough to save threatened woodland caribou—an iconic animal that's a major part of boreal forests in North America and a key part of the culture and economy of many Indigenous peoples in Canada.

15h

Woody plants with undesirable tendencies

A literature review out of Oklahoma State University focused on notable woody plants that can disrupt biodiversity by behaving as a weed or an invasive plant.

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Woody plants with undesirable tendencies

A literature review out of Oklahoma State University focused on notable woody plants that can disrupt biodiversity by behaving as a weed or an invasive plant.

15h

Många kör för fort i tätort

Mer än var tredje bilist kör för fort i tätort, framför allt på gator med hastighetsbegränsning 40 kilometer i timmen. Sämst är det på genomfartsgator i villa- och ytterområden. Men det finns sätt att få ned hastigheten. – Resultaten visar att hastighetsefterlevnaden är bättre i de fall där man förväntar sig oskyddade trafikanter. Efterlevnaden är också generellt bättre i stadsmiljö än på genomfa

15h

Protect Italy's new funding agency

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03624-y Lawmakers must ensure that a much-needed funding agency is independent and autonomous.

15h

Discovering hidden plant medicines on your doorstep

EI is part of the global effort to sequence the DNA all of the known species of animals, plants and fungi on earth, known as the Earth BioGenome Project. Contributing to the UK arm Darwin Tree of Life Project, one aspect from EI is unearthing useful new medicines that are produced in plants by decoding their genomic data profile.

15h

How to measure inequality as 'experienced difference'

A new way of measuring wealth inequality better accounts for the way we experience it. In a paper published in Economics Letters, economists Samuel Bowles of the Santa Fe Institute and Wendy Carlin of University College London and the Santa Fe Institute propose a novel twist on the widely used Gini coefficient—a workhorse statistical measure for gauging the gap between haves and have-nots.

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Discovering hidden plant medicines on your doorstep

EI is part of the global effort to sequence the DNA all of the known species of animals, plants and fungi on earth, known as the Earth BioGenome Project. Contributing to the UK arm Darwin Tree of Life Project, one aspect from EI is unearthing useful new medicines that are produced in plants by decoding their genomic data profile.

15h

25 Cognitive Biases – The Psychology of Human Misjudgement

submitted by /u/blogmoneymedia [link] [comments]

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An interesting article explaining the concepts of Data Preprocessing

submitted by /u/mlheadredditor [link] [comments]

15h

Nu starter drøftelserne af fremtidens mål for Humaniora

Ledelse, medarbejdere og studerende i råd, udvalg og nævn skal i foråret drøfte…

15h

University of Nebraska: Honesty, it's not for everyone

Elisabeth Bik reported 4 years ago 11 falsified papers by University of Nebraska oncologists. One was retracted, two corrected, the rest ignored.

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Alexa will soon express emotions through its voice

submitted by /u/ubuntu_mate [link] [comments]

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Cows wearing VR headsets might produce better milk

submitted by /u/TobySomething [link] [comments]

17h

New Low-Cost Nuclear Reactor Barrier Could've Withstood Chernobyl and Fukushima

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

17h

P-pille til mænd og optimering af søvn er blandt årets hædrede forskerspirer projekter

Fire projekter vinder Årets forskerspirer og modtager hæder i Københavns Universitets…

17h

Ørsted på vej med brintsatsning

PLUS. Elektrolyse-teknologien i dag befinder sig dér, hvor offshore vindkraft var for ti år siden, forklarer Ørsteds nye brint-chef.

17h

Mental practice may improve golfers' putting performance

Researchers from Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software, hosted at University of Limerick (UL), are lending support to Arnold Palmer's famous assertion that golf is predominantly played in 'the six inches between the ears'.

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Experts call for more active prevention of tooth decay for children's teeth

Three-year trial comparing three treatment strategies for tooth decay in children's teeth finds no evidence to suggest that conventional fillings are more successful than sealing decay into teeth, or using preventive methods alone. 43% of those participating in the study experienced toothache or dental infection regardless of the treatment received. FiCTION is the largest study of its kind to date

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Election explained: What to look out for on climate change and the environment

If you care about what the parties are promising to do about the environment, here are some key issues to watch for.

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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #47, 2019

Wildfires and attribution from the scientific and public perspectives Two papers (happily both open-access) come at wildfires and climate from more or less opposite directions. In a model of scientific circumspection in its most virtuous form, Lewis et al study conducive factors for 2018 wildfires in Queensland, Australia, in Deconstructing factors contributing to the 2018 fire weather in Queensl

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Habitat restoration alone not enough to support threatened caribou: UBC study

New UBC research suggests restoring habitat may not be enough to save threatened woodland caribou–an iconic animal that's a major part of boreal forests in North America and a key part of the culture and economy of many Indigenous peoples in Canada.

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Bad news for Nemo

The beloved anemone fish popularized by the movies 'Finding Nemo' and 'Finding Dory' don't have the genetic capacity to adapt to rapid changes in their environment, according to a new study.

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First measures of Earth's ionosphere found with the largest atmospheric radar in the Antarctic

Using the Program of the Antarctic Syowa Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere/Incoherent Scatter (PANSY) radar, the largest and fine-resolution atmospheric radar in the Antarctic, researchers performed the first incoherent scatter radar observations in the southern hemisphere.

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ADHD og autisme kan skyldes samme fejl i hjernen

Flere danskere med ADHD og autisme har en mutation, der ændrer nervecellerne.

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UK set for 'active' role at European space meeting

After some doubts, it seems Britain will now play its part in the big European Space Agency council.

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UK raises funding to European Space Agency more than 15%

Boris Johnson moves to safeguard British role in most important projects

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Du kommer nok til at kunne logge på Google med MitID-enhed – men ikke omvendt

NemID-afløseren MitID får følgeskab af en U2F-enhed, som Digitaliseringsstyrelsen forventer kan bruges til at logge på blandt andet Google med.

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The tough dogs that helped people to settle a frozen land

Nature, Published online: 27 November 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03659-1 Heritage of Arctic dogs traced in part to canines that immigrated from Siberia more than a millennium ago.

20h

Great auk extinction: Humans wiped out giant seabird

Extinction reconstruction with ancient DNA reveals humans were responsible for the demise of the giant, flightless great auk.

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Exercise bikes that make exercising at home way more convenient

Exercise bikes for the home or office. (Wavebreak Media LTD/) In 1796, a "medical electrician" by the name of Francis Lowndes created a machine called the Gymnasticon , essentially a couple of wheels that turn with the power of your legs and arms. In the past 200-plus years since, humanity has made great strides in stationary bike technology. The best bikes can fold up, fit under your desk, and p

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Baby monitors to help you keep an eye on things from the other, more interesting room

Check in from the other room. (Kevin /) Being a parent can be stressful, and often new parents want to keep a constant eye on their infant. Luckily, a baby monitor will let you check in on them during sleep time or even if you're just out of the room for a moment. We've compiled a list of great options for parents: everything from audio and video monitoring tools to a smart sock that checks vital

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Water limitations to large-scale desert agroforestry projects for carbon sequestration [Letters (Online Only)]

Vegetation and soils take up 20% of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emission (1), and vegetation also plays an active role in regulating global water cycle (2). In PNAS, Branch and Wulfmeyer (3) conduct a detailed regional-scale simulation to show that agroforestry can significantly enhance rainfall in some desert regions and…

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Reply to Wang and D'Odorico: On the sustainability of large-scale desert plantations as a partial solution for climate change [Letters (Online Only)]

We thank Wang and D'Odorico for their letter (1), "Water limitations to large-scale desert agroforestry projects for carbon sequestration." We agree entirely that water resources are vital for the sustainability of desert plantations. However, the focus of this work (2) is not water quantities per se, but the rainfall enhancement…

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Focus on an island rule may hide morphological disparity in insular plants [Letters (Online Only)]

The island rule (1, 2) posits that large mainland species evolve to be small on islands, while small mainland species evolve to be large. Biddick et al. (3) assess the signal of an island rule in plant traits on islands off the coast of New Zealand, concluding that some plant…

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Reply to Brian and Walker-Hale: Support for the island rule does not hide morphological disparity in insular plants [Letters (Online Only)]

We would like to thank Brian and Walker-Hale (1) for their insightful comments on our paper (2). Their ideas prompt us to think differently and more deeply about morphological variability in island plants. However, we would like to reconcile their reservations about the variability that is inherent in morphometric data…

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