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nyheder2019oktober04

A dusty lab in the sky

Joe Nuth loves dust. Among astronomers, that puts him in a minority.

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Iran-linked group tried to hack U.S. 2020 presidential campaigns, Microsoft says

The hack targeted email addresses belonging to U.S. presidential campaigns, government officials and journalists, according to new data unveiled by Microsoft. Microsoft linked the hack to the …

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College Students Don’t Want Fancy Libraries

Back in the 1940s, college libraries had something of an existential crisis. Charles Gosnell, a prominent library-sciences scholar and college librarian in New York, suggested that shifting academic priorities and space constraints threatened to deplete certain book collections, particularly those in highly technical fields such as chemistry, economics, and education. By phasing out the seemingly

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Dolemite Is My Name Shows Just How Good Eddie Murphy Can Be

Eddie Murphy has been missing from the big screen in recent years. He’s appeared only sporadically in rinky-dink comedies such as A Thousand Words or inspirational dramas such as Mr. Church , and the spark of joy that powered his comic persona for decades has seemed lost for quite a while. His new film, Dolemite Is My Name , is a perfectly charming biopic of Rudy Ray Moore, the legendary entertai

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Kitty Hawk’s Extremely Quiet Flying Car Has a 100-Mile Range

Stealth VTOL Flying car startup Kitty Hawk has revealed its third electric aircraft — and it can cover 160 kilometers (100 miles) while making almost no noise at all. Project Heaviside is a high-performance, single-seater aircraft that’s capable of vertical take off and landing (VTOL), according to Kitty Hawk’s website . The company claims the craft’s electric propulsion system, tiny proportions,

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September 2019 equal hottest on record: monitor

Last month was the equal hottest September in history, the European Union's satellite monitoring service said Friday, the fourth month in a row with near- or record-breaking temperatures.

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Researchers unlock potential to use CRISPR to alter the microbiome

Researchers have developed a new way to deliver the DNA-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 into microorganisms in the lab, providing a way to efficiently launch a targeted attack on specific bacteria.

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Scientists Solve a Puzzle: What’s Really in a Fatberg

The grisly results of an autopsy in the U.K. were made public on Friday, and they were not pretty. But they did hold a few surprises.

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Daily briefing: An early setback might boost your career in the long run

Nature, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03001-9 A near loss can lead to a big win, coral-watching satellites track bleaching in Hawaii and veggie meals tempt meat fans, too.

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The End Of Guinea Worm Was Just Around the Corner. Not Anymore

The World Health Organization had hoped to eradicate the painful parasite by 2020. That deadline just got moved a decade into the future. And dogs are part of the problem. (Image credit: Sally Deng for NPR)

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The Scandal Has Spiraled Out of Trump’s Control

As last week came to a close, Donald Trump was confronting the most serious crisis of his presidency , as Democrats moved forward with impeachment hearings in a serious scandal over his pressuring Ukraine to interfere in the 2020 election. Seven days later, the scandal is even more serious, but it has metastasized. This is no longer a controversy about a whistle-blower complaint, an American ally

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Nu sker det endelig: Kæmpestort net samler plastik-skrald op i Stillehavet

Men konceptet til 157 millioner kroner batter ikke noget i det store billede, siger dansk forsker.

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Google using dubious tactics to target people with 'darker skin' in facial recognition project: sources

Tech giant Google wants your face—especially if you've got "darker skin."

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The 'Goldilocks' principle for curing brain cancer

Researchers found that a stable body temperature holds the key to awakening the body's immune response to fight off brain cancer.

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Weak spot in pathogenic bacteria

Antibiotics are still the most important weapon for combatting bacterial infections. But medical science is running out of "ammunition" because of more and more frequently occurring resistances. Research teams have now elucidated the structure of the proteolytic complex ClpX-ClpP. This is a key to development of innovative antibiotics which target the degradation process of defective proteins in

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A breath test for opioids

A test to detect opioid drugs in exhaled breath has been developed by engineers and physicians. A breath test could be useful in caring for chronic pain patients as well as for checking for illegal drug use.

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Scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate

Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to specific changes in a set of 18 genes involved in the development of the cochlear ganglion — a group of nerves that transmit sound from the ear to the brain, according to a new study.

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People eat more when dining with friends and family

People eat more with friends and family than when dining alone — a possible throwback to our early ancestors' approach to survival, according to a new study. This phenomenon is known as 'social facilitation'.

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New defensive mechanism against bacterial wound infections

Wound inflammation which results in impaired wound healing can have serious consequences for patients. Researchers have discovered a new defensive mechanism which enables our skin to actively kill bacteria. Central to this mechanism is a cellular messenger molecule known as 'interleukin 6', whose mode of action may be used in the future to prevent wound infections.

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Graphene turns 15 on track to deliver on its promises

Scientists analyze the current graphene landscape and market forecast for graphene over the following decade.

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Determining the activity of noble-metal-free catalyst particles

Chemists have developed a new method with which they can characterize individual noble-metal-free nanoparticle catalysts. The particles could be a cheap alternative to precious metal catalysts for obtaining hydrogen from water by means of electrolysis.

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New fluorescence method reveals signatures of individual microbes

Researchers have developed a new method that reveals the unique fluorescence patterns produced by individual cells in mixtures of bacteria, yeast and fungi. They combined confocal microscopy with micro-spectroscopy to determine the fluorescence signatures from different types of microbes. They trained machine learning systems to analyze the images and identify different individual cells and cell-t

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Scientists create brain-mimicking environment to grow 3D tissue models of brain tumors

Researchers have developed 3-dimensional human tissue culture models of pediatric and adult brain cancers in a brain-mimicking microenvironment, that includes brain-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) — the complex network of proteins and amino acids with bound sugars that not only provides support for surrounding neural tissue, but also helps to guide cell growth and development. The development

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Were hot, humid summers the key to life's origins?

Chemists have found that deliquescent minerals, which dissolve in water they absorb from humid air, can assist the construction of proteins from simpler building blocks during cycles timed to mimic day and night on the early Earth.

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While Searching for the Perfect Vaccine, Keep Using the Very Good

The anti-vaccine movement fails to live up to its own rhetoric — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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N-Acetyl Cysteine: A Warning Shot

I’ve highlighted several articles here over the years that cast doubt (to say the least) on the popular belief that Antioxidants Are Always Good For You. These other views do not seem to have penetrated the public consciousness yet, though, to judge by the way that foods and supplements are advertised. Today brings another example, and it vividly illustrates how the simple story gets things very

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The 'Goldilocks' principle for curing brain cancer

University of Minnesota Medical School researchers found that a stable body temperature holds the key to awakening the body's immune response to fight off brain cancer.

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Major NIH grant will support early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease via skin testing

An expert team from Case Western Reserve University has received a five-year, $3.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for diagnosing Parkinson's disease (PD) via an innovative skin testing approach.

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While Searching for the Perfect Vaccine, Keep Using the Very Good

The anti-vaccine movement fails to live up to its own rhetoric — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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"Criminalization of Survival" | Paul Rucker

Visual artist, cellist and TED Fellow Paul Rucker performs a disarming rendition of "Criminalization of Survival," a piece he created to explore the fragile journey of life in light of the brutality of the immigration crisis.

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'Lucy in the Sky' Review: Natalie Portman Stars in an Astronaut Love Triangle Inspired by Reality

"Lucy in the Sky" is a fictional story of an astronaut coping with a return to Earth, apparently inspired by a real-life event.

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Red Dead Redemption 2 comes to PC on November 5

We knew it was coming eventually, and now Rockstar has made it official with the announcement that Red Dead Redemption 2 is coming to the PC this fall. The game will have exclusive bonuses for …

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Research shows the 'magic range' of twisted bilayer graphene is larger than previously expected

In materials science and quantum physics, flat bands and correlated behaviors within the "magic angle" twisted bilayer graphene (tBLG) has sparked significant interest, although many of its properties face intense debate. In a new report published in Science Advances, Emilio Codecido and colleagues in the departments of physics and materials science in the U.S. and Japan observed both superconduct

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Researchers unlock potential to use CRISPR to alter the microbiome

Researchers have developed a new way to deliver the DNA-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 into microorganisms in the lab, providing a way to efficiently launch a targeted attack on specific bacteria.

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The fast dance of electron spins

Metal complexes show a fascinating behavior in their interactions with light, which for example is utilized in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, quantum computers, or even in cancer therapy. In many of these applications, the electron spin, a kind of inherent rotation of the electrons, plays an important role. Researchers succeeded in simulating the extremely fast spin flip processes tha

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Antibiotic resistant genes prevalent in groundwater

The spread of antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) through the water system could put public safety at-risk. Researchers studied and compared samples from an advanced groundwater treatment facility in California and groundwater aquifers to detect differences in ARG concentrations. They found that the advanced groundwater treatment facility reduced nearly all targeted ARGs to below detection limits, b

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Graphene turns 15 on track to deliver on its promises

Scientists analyze the current graphene landscape and market forecast for graphene over the following decade.

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Targeting certain rogue T cells prevents and reverses multiple sclerosis in mice

Multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disorder, is known to be driven by 'helper' T cells, white blood cells that mount an inflammatory attack on the brain and spinal cord. A new study pinpoints the specific subgroup of helper T cells that cause MS, as well as a protein on their surface, called CXCR6, that marks them. An antibody targeting CXCR6 both prevented and reversed MS in a mouse model, the res

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Sinking groundwater levels threaten the vitality of riverine ecosystems

Groundwater is the world's largest source of freshwater and it is of vital importance for food production. Increasing extraction of groundwater in recent decades has resulted in sinking water tables worldwide. A study by a hydrologist shows that almost 20 percent of the catchments areas where groundwater is pumped suffer from a flow that is too low to sustain freshwater ecosystems. This number is

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Determining the activity of noble-metal-free catalyst particles

Chemists have developed a new method with which they can characterize individual noble-metal-free nanoparticle catalysts. The particles could be a cheap alternative to precious metal catalysts for obtaining hydrogen from water by means of electrolysis.

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Early menopause predictor of heart disease

Women who reach menopause before the age of 50 have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to researchers.

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Cleaning up our air – Science Weekly podcast

An estimated 7 million people die every year from exposure to polluted air. Nicola Davis looks at the science behind air pollution and at the policies to tackle it Continue reading…

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Cleaning up our air – Science Weekly podcast

An estimated 7 million people die every year from exposure to polluted air. Nicola Davis looks at the science behind air pollution and at the policies to tackle it. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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The American Sitcom Queen Behind Peaky Blinders

D uring the 1980s and ’90s, Caryn Mandabach was the sitcom producer with the golden touch. The shows she spearheaded read like a greatest hits of American comedy: Roseanne , The Cosby Show , Cybill , Grace Under Fire , 3rd Rock From the Sun , That ’70s Show . Working for Carsey-Werner, an independent production house with uncanny success, Mandabach helped preside over a remarkable revival of the

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Analysis of HIV-1B in Indonesia illuminates transmission dynamics of the virus

Research into the molecular phylogeny (evolutionary history) of the HIV-1B virus in Indonesia has succeeded in illuminating the transmission period and routes for three clades (main branches of the virus). This includes a clade thought to be unique to Indonesia, as well as clades that spread from Thailand, Europe and America in the 1970s and 1980s.

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New fluorescence method reveals signatures of individual microbes

Researchers have developed a new method that reveals the unique fluorescence patterns produced by individual cells in mixtures of bacteria, yeast and fungi. They combined confocal microscopy with micro-spectroscopy to determine the fluorescence signatures from different types of microbes. They trained machine learning systems to analyze the images and identify different individual cells and cell-t

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Smart insole can double as lifesaving technology for diabetic patients

Researchers are developing a graphene sensing system that detects early signs of foot ulcers before they form so people living with diabetes can access preventative healthcare and confidently manage their health.

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Twin baby stars grow amongst a twisting network of gas and dust

Astronomers have obtained an extremely high-resolution image showing two disks in which young stars are growing, fed by a complex pretzel-shaped network of filaments of gas and dust. Observing this remarkable phenomenon sheds new light on the earliest phases of the lives of stars and helps astronomers determine the conditions in which binary stars are born.

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Scientists create brain-mimicking environment to grow 3D tissue models of brain tumors

Researchers have developed 3-dimensional human tissue culture models of pediatric and adult brain cancers in a brain-mimicking microenvironment, that includes brain-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) — the complex network of proteins and amino acids with bound sugars that not only provides support for surrounding neural tissue, but also helps to guide cell growth and development. The development

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Long-term study data shows DBS is effective treatment for most severe form of depression

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of an area in the brain called the subcallosal cingulate (SCC) provides a robust antidepressant effect that is sustained over a long period of time in patients with treatment-resistant depression — the most severely depressed patients who have not responded to other treatments.

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Were hot, humid summers the key to life's origins?

Chemists have found that deliquescent minerals, which dissolve in water they absorb from humid air, can assist the construction of proteins from simpler building blocks during cycles timed to mimic day and night on the early Earth.

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Scientists ID new targets to treat fibrosis, a feature of many chronic diseases

When it comes to repairing injured tissue, specialized cells in the body known as fibroblasts are called into action. Fibroblasts give rise to healing cells called myofibroblasts, which generally is good in the short term — but bad when myofibroblast activation gets out of hand. Now, researchers show how fibroblast activation and myofibroblast formation occurs, providing clues for how to target f

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Study pinpoints Alzheimer's plaque emergence early and deep in the brain

By scanning whole brains of Alzheimer's model mice from an early age, researchers were able to precisely trace the terrible march of amyloid plaques from deep brain structures outward along specific circuits. They also showed that plaque density in a key region in humans scales with disease stage.

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FODMAPs diet relieves symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease

New research has found that a diet low in fermented carbohydrates has improved certain gut symptoms and improved health-related quality of life for sufferers of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

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“Famous” Tesla Vandal Caught by Sentry Mode Turns Herself In

Got Keyed It’s never a good idea to mess with somebody else’s car — especially when that car is a Tesla. On Monday, Electrek reported that Tesla Model 3 owner Alan Tweedie was at his daughter’s soccer game when a stranger badly keyed his car. What the perpetrator didn’t know: the Model 3’s Sentry Mode — a surveillance feature that makes sure nobody messes with a parked Tesla — recorded the whole

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What makes people happy when skies are gray? The color yellow

The farther you live from the equator, the more likely you link the sunny color to joy

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Restrictive housing is associated with increased risk of death after release from prison

A new study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found that being held in restrictive housing (i.e., solitary confinement) is associated with an increased risk of death after a person is released from prison.

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Tanning salons cluster in gay neighborhoods in large US cities, Stanford study finds

Neighborhoods with high proportions of gay and bisexual men are twice as likely to have an indoor tanning salon than neighborhoods with fewer sexual minority men, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Apple TV Plus show Servant gets trailer, release date reveal – CNET

Executive Producer M. Night Shyamalan said he pictures 60 episodes for this half-hour thriller.

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Supreme Court to hear abortion regulation case

The Supreme Court is adding an abortion case to its busy election-year docket, agreeing to take up a Louisiana law that could leave the state with just one clinic.

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How to predict extinction in our extreme ‘new normal’

Faced with unprecedented change, animals and plants are scrambling to keep up—with mixed results. A new model helps predict what could drive species to extinction. “It is difficult to predict how organisms will respond to changes in extreme events because these events tend to be, by definition, quite rare,” says Carlos Botero, assistant professor of biology at Washington University in St. Louis.

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Dust in ice cores leads to new knowledge on the advancement of the ice before the ice age

Working with the ice core ReCap, drilled close to the coast in East Greenland, researchers wondered why the dust particles from the interglacial period — the warmer period of time between the ice ages — were several times bigger than the dust particles from the ice age. The research led to the invention of a method able to map the advancement of the glaciers in cold periods and the melting in wa

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Mike Pence Failed in His Most Important Duty

In the throes of Watergate, Vice President Spiro Agnew was caught up in an unrelated corruption scandal. He pleaded guilty and resigned his office on October 10, 1973. To that point, Agnew had served as a useful insurance policy for Richard Nixon, in the manner of the joke Charles II is sometimes reputed to have made to his even more unpopular brother when the latter warned him against plots. “Ne

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You’re polluting your office just by existing

You could be polluting your office space, new research suggests. Researchers have been conducting one of the largest studies of its kind in the office spaces of a building rigged with thousands of sensors. The goal is to identify all types of indoor air contaminants and recommend ways to control them through a building’s design and operation. “If we want to provide better air quality for office w

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Microbiome provides new clues to determining development of colon cancer

Findings showcasing a connection between bacteria in the microbiome and colon cancer, which may be used to screen younger populations at risk, were published in the journal Gastroenterology by researchers from the George Washington University.

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NUS scientist designs 'express courier service' for immune cells

Dr Andy Tay, a researcher with the National University of Singapore (NUS) who is currently doing his post-doctoral training at Stanford University, has successfully invented a novel transfection method to deliver DNA into immune cells with minimal stress on these cells. This new technique is expected to boost DNA-based cancer immunotherapy by significantly improving the process of generating high-

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Innovation is the antidote to corruption | Efosa Ojomo

Traditional thinking on corruption goes like this: if you put good laws in place and enforce them well, then economic development increases and corruption falls. In reality, we have the equation backwards, says innovation researcher Efosa Ojomo. In this compelling talk, he offers new thinking on how we could potentially eliminate corruption worldwide by focusing on one thing: scarcity. "Societies

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Watch a Paralyzed Man “Walk” Using a Mind-Reading Exoskeleton

First Steps A French man was able to regain control over all four of his paralyzed limbs thanks to a mind-controlled exoskeleton suit, the BBC reports . A video shows 30-year-old Thibault (last name redacted) wearing the bulky 143-pound exoskeleton, which hangs from a support rail attached to the ceiling. In the clip, he walks across the room and moves both of his arms in all directions. “It was

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When a Vice President Becomes a Threat

It was the kind of performance that has made Mike Pence’s career. Speaking with reporters yesterday in Arizona—his voice slow with that wholesome midwestern drawl, his eyebrows lifted more in sorrow than in anger—the vice president came valiantly to the defense of his persecuted boss amid growing controversy over President Donald Trump’s phone call with his Ukrainian counterpart. “One of the main

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Researchers unlock potential to use CRISPR to alter the microbiome

Researchers at Western University have developed a new way to deliver the DNA-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 into microorganisms in the lab, providing a way to efficiently launch a targeted attack on specific bacteria.

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Health care provider collaboration benefits patients with HIV

Health care providers who receive on-the-job training and collaborate with other professionals are more likely to help patients access HIV testing and primary care, both of which help decrease transmission, researchers report. In a longitudinal study, researchers examined how interprofessional collaboration among social workers, educators, and other health providers and on-the-job training affect

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Targeting certain rogue T cells prevents and reverses multiple sclerosis in mice

Multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disorder, is known to be driven by 'helper' T cells, white blood cells that mount an inflammatory attack on the brain and spinal cord. A new study from Boston Children's Hospital pinpoints the specific subgroup of helper T cells that cause MS, as well as a protein on their surface, called CXCR6, that marks them. An antibody targeting CXCR6 both prevented and rever

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Graphene turns 15 on track to deliver on its promises

In a special Nature Nanotechnology issue celebrating 15 years since the Nobel Prize-winning 'ground-breaking experiments on graphene,' the Graphene Flagship analyses the current graphene landscape and market forecast for graphene over the following decade.

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Researchers find antibiotic resistant genes prevalent in groundwater

The spread of antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) through the water system could put public safety at-risk. Researchers studied and compared samples from an advanced groundwater treatment facility in California and groundwater aquifers to detect differences in ARG concentrations. They found that the advanced groundwater treatment facility reduced nearly all targeted ARGs to below detection limits, b

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The fast dance of electron spins

Metal complexes show a fascinating behavior in their interactions with light, which for example is utilized in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, quantum computers, or even in cancer therapy. In many of these applications, the electron spin, a kind of inherent rotation of the electrons, plays an important role. Sebastian Mai and Leticia González from the University of Vienna succeeded in

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Researchers unlock potential to use CRISPR to alter the microbiome

Researchers at Western University have developed a new way to deliver the DNA-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 into microorganisms in the lab, providing a way to efficiently launch a targeted attack on specific bacteria.

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Researchers find antibiotic resistant genes prevalent in groundwater

With climate change comes increasing water shortages, and potentially longer periods of drought. As policymakers look urgently to wastewater recycling to stem the gap in water resources, the question is— how best to reuse water and ensure public safety. New and emerging contaminants like antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) pose a potential hazard to public safety and water security. One concern is t

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Researchers Are Freezing Their Ship Into Arctic Ice To Study Climate Change

An ambitious Arctic expedition has reached a milestone. Researchers have found a floe to freeze into, where they'll construct an observatory and study Arctic systems from a ship. (Image credit: Ravenna Koenig)

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Ny svensk forskning: Fler hjärtdonationer kan bli möjliga

Fler hjärtan kan komma att användas för organdonation enligt ny svensk studie. Hjärtan med tillfällig försämrad funktion som tidigare valts bort ser ut att återhämta sig och fungera bra hos mottagaren.

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Gigantic Nile dam prompts clash between Egypt and Ethiopia

Nature, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02987-6 The Renaissance Dam project has sparked a dispute over Ethiopia's development needs, versus Egypt's concerns over water scarcity and climate change.

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Frekvensen svigter: Britisk nedbrud udstiller svaghed ved fremtidens elnet

Fremtidens elnet kommer til at mangle de tunge, roterende generatorer til at stabilisere frekvensen. Det blev et problem under det nylige britiske nedbrud, viser en analyse. Herhjemme er Energinet allerede i gang med at udvikle løsningen.

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Researchers discover a new defensive mechanism against bacterial wound infections

Wound inflammation which results in impaired wound healing can have serious consequences for patients. Researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered a new defensive mechanism which enables our skin to actively kill bacteria. Central to this mechanism is a cellular messenger molecule known as 'interleukin 6', whose mode of action may be used in the future to prevent wound i

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New 3D printing technique for biomaterials

A new way of 3D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants.

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People eat more when dining with friends and family — Study

People eat more with friends and family than when dining alone — a possible throwback to our early ancestors' approach to survival, according to a new study. This phenomenon is known as 'social facilitation'.

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More energy means more effects — in proton collisions

The higher the collision energy of particles, the more interesting the physics. Scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow have found further confirmation of this assumption, this time in the high energy collision of protons with protons or lead nuclei.

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Extracurriculars Are ‘Not Worth It Unless You’re Passionate’

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two high schoolers who run a youth-literacy organization. After Sabine Wood read a newspaper article about Andrea Liao’s Book the Future project, which arranges book drives for local organization

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Device microwaves weeds in the field

A new device uses microwaves to control weeds, rather than herbicides. Placing some freshly picked nettles on a plate, Graham Brodie of the University of Melbourne, closes the door to the microwave oven and hits start. There’s some popping and spluttering, and a fair bit of steam. In thirty seconds everything stops, and the weeds lie limp on the plate. “And that is how we can kill weeds without h

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Netflix's ‘Unnatural Selection’ Trailer Makes Crispr Personal

A new docuseries digs into the existential promise and peril of the gene-editing revolution.

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3D Printing Everything: Ultra-Cheap, Zero-Waste Products Are Coming

This blog is an excerpt from my next book The Future is Faster Than You Think , co-authored with Steven Kotler, to be released January 28 th , 2020. 3D printing is about to transform manufacturing as we know it, decimating waste, multiplying speed to market, and harnessing never-before-used materials. Additive manufacturing products and services are projected to more than double by 2024, just fiv

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What you might have missed

The 10-billion-year history of Andromeda's cannibalistic past, the mystery of the female orgasm and the consequences of a nuclear war between India and Pakistan – here are some highlights from a week in science.

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CNIO uses organoid technology and single-cell sequencing to advance in the study of bladder cancer

* Bladder cancer research has been hampered by the inability to establish stable long-term cultures of normal urothelial cells, responsible for 90% of these tumours* CNIO researchers used organoid technology to establish long-term cultures that maintain their identity, from which they identified a population of proliferating stem cells that could not be studied until now* The results of this work

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Dust in ice cores leads to new knowledge on the advancement of the ice before the ice age

Working with the ice core ReCap, drilled close to the coast in East Greenland, postdoc Marius Simonsen wondered why the dust particles from the interglacial period — the warmer period of time between the ice ages — were several times bigger than the dust particles from the ice age. His research led to the invention of a method able to map the advancement of the glaciers in cold periods and the m

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Chinese activists protest the use of traditional treatments — they want medical science

In China, traditional Chinese medicine has the same status in the health system as modern medical science. This has led thousands of science activists to protest that the state neglects its duty to treat its citizens with evidence-based medicine. New research from the University of Copenhagen has investigated these protests.

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Weak spot in pathogenic bacteria

Antibiotics are still the most important weapon for combatting bacterial infections. But medical science is running out of "ammunition" because of more and more frequently occurring resistances. Research teams from the Technical University of Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology has now elucidated the structure of the proteolytic complex ClpX-ClpP. This is a key to developme

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Researchers unlock potential to use CRISPR to alter the microbiome

Researchers at Western University have developed a new way to deliver the DNA-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 into microorganisms in the lab, providing a way to efficiently launch a targeted attack on specific bacteria.

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Trump tweets were systematic plan of attack in Presidential campaign — study

Donald Trump used Twitter effectively to promote his campaign, communicate policy goals and attack opponents as part of a systematic campaign ahead of the 2016 US Presidential elections — a new study reveals.

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Does Eating Too Much Fiber Cause Mineral Deficiencies?

The Institute of Medicine hasn’t set an upper limit on fiber, meaning that there’s no amount at which it’s considered toxic. That doesn’t mean that an excess of fiber… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Årsag til teledatafejl: Timer-funktion sendte ufærdigt materiale videre

Rigspolitiets it-system til konvertering af teledata har i årevis haft en egenrådig timerfunktion, som har afbrudt konverteringsprocessen, før den reelt var færdig.

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Report examines state efforts to address intersection of climate policy and equity goals

As New Jersey and other states lead nationwide efforts to address climate change, they are recognizing the disproportionate impact that climate change has on disadvantaged populations, according to a new Rutgers report.

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Intimate partner violence against women creates economic hardship, study finds

Women who experience intimate partner violence, including physical, emotional, and controlling abuse, are more likely to suffer material hardship—the inability to purchase food, housing, utilities, medical care or other needs for a healthy life, according to a Rutgers-led study.

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Image: The Netherlands from orbit

The Netherlands is featured in this false-color image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission. This image was processed in a way that included the near-infrared channel, which makes vegetation appear bright red.

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Going with the floe: Scientists to set up Arctic ice camp

Scientists have chosen an ice floe on which to begin setting up a research camp for a year-long international expedition to study the Arctic, Germany's Alfred Wegener Institute said Friday.

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New 3-D imaging technology maps Scottish coral reefs

Newly developed 3-D imaging technology has allowed scientists to map an area of cold-water coral reefs off the coast of Scotland to see whether it has recovered since being declared a Marine Protected Area 16 years ago. The images show that in areas of the Darwin Mounds that had been heavily trawled, coral growth is still very sparse, and there has been no real recolonization. However, healthy cor

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Analysis of HIV-1B in Indonesia illuminates transmission dynamics of the virus

Research into the molecular phylogeny (evolutionary history) of the HIV-1B virus in Indonesia has succeeded in illuminating the transmission period and routes for three clades (main branches of the virus). This includes a clade thought to be unique to Indonesia, as well as clades that spread from Thailand, Europe and America in the 1970s and 1980s.

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MSU economist's research on colony collapse disorder published in national journal

The work of a Montana State University professor examining the economic impacts of colony collapse disorder among commercial honeybees was published in the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists last month.

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Zymo Research launches new RNA-Seq library prep kit

Zymo Research is excited to announce the fastest and easiest total RNA-Seq library prep kit that allows users to go from sample to sequencer in a single day!

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MSU economist's research on colony collapse disorder published in national journal

The work of a Montana State University professor examining the economic impacts of colony collapse disorder among commercial honeybees was published in the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists last month.

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Work less to save the planet? How to make sure a four-day week actually cuts emissions

The idea of a four-day working week is gaining traction. Recently, several high-profile companies have trialled reduced hours. And in the UK, the Labour Party has pledged a 32-hour four day work week within ten years should it come to power.

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Do nature documentaries make a difference?

Nature documentaries raise species awareness and promote pro-conservation behaviours, but don't lead to donations to conservation charities, a new Irish study has revealed.

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Sun science has a bright future on the moon

There are many reasons NASA is pursuing the Artemis mission to land astronauts on the moon by 2024: It's a crucial way to study the moon itself and to pave a safe path to Mars. But it's also a great place to learn more about protecting Earth, which is just one part of the larger Sun-Earth system.

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Scientists find way to quantify how well cutting-edge microscopy technique works

In 2017, Salk scientists reported that tilting a frozen protein sample as it sat under an electron microscope was an effective approach to acquiring better information about its structure and helping researchers understand a host of diseases ranging from HIV to cancer. Now, they have developed a mathematical framework that underlies some of those initial observations.

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Molecular hydrogen becomes semimetallic at pressures above 350 GPa

According to condensed matter physics predictions, at a high enough pressure, hydrogen should dissociate and transform into an atomic metal. However, the exact pressure range at which this occurs has not yet been ascertained, and the process through which hydrogen becomes a metal is still somewhat unclear.

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New research into Tasmanian Aboriginal history will help care for the land

American farmer and poet Wendell Berry said of the first Europeans in North America that they came with vision, but not with sight. They came with vision of former places but not the sight to see what was before them. Instead of adapting their vision to suit the place, they changed the landscape to fit their vision.

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Betta Fish: The Dazzling Siamese Fighting Fish

From home aquariums to wedding reception tables, bettas have become popular fish thanks to their vibrant colors and flashy fins. But in their native home in Southeast Asia, where bettas are much less glitzy, their numbers are dropping.

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Do nature documentaries make a difference?

Nature documentaries raise species awareness and promote pro-conservation behaviours, but don't lead to donations to conservation charities, a new Irish study has revealed.

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Scientists find way to quantify how well cutting-edge microscopy technique works

In 2017, Salk scientists reported that tilting a frozen protein sample as it sat under an electron microscope was an effective approach to acquiring better information about its structure and helping researchers understand a host of diseases ranging from HIV to cancer. Now, they have developed a mathematical framework that underlies some of those initial observations.

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Breakthrough research leads to new product that forecasts long-term drought

Recently published climate research led by Sanjiv Kumar, a professor in Auburn University's School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, has already provided the basis of a pioneering new outlook product that is capable of forecasting drought.

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New research into Tasmanian Aboriginal history will help care for the land

American farmer and poet Wendell Berry said of the first Europeans in North America that they came with vision, but not with sight. They came with vision of former places but not the sight to see what was before them. Instead of adapting their vision to suit the place, they changed the landscape to fit their vision.

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IsoPlexis' New Software & Applications Pave the Way for Novel Functional Understanding of Single-Cell Immune Activation and Further Application Expansion

IsoPlexis expands visualizations for single-cell mapping and targeting in their new IsoSpeak software suite, as well as new Chip applications on the IsoLight

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I Aalborg bygger de verdens største fabrik til methanol-brændselsceller

PLUS. Med en produktionskapacitet på 750 MW brændselsceller årligt skal en ny fabrik i Aalborg være med til at gøre verdens transport mere bæredygtig.

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Shape of volcanic ash influences contamination of water sources in volcanically active regions

Contaminants from volcanic eruptions leach into water at different rates depending on the shape of the volcanic ash particles, according to new research that could enhancing scientists' ability to predict water quality risk in volcanically active regions.

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The mass inflow and outflow rates of the Milky Way

According to the most widely accepted cosmological models, the first galaxies began to form between 13 and 14 billion years ago. Over the course of the next billion years, the cosmic structures now observed first emerged. These include things like galaxy clusters, superclusters and filaments, but also galactic features like globular clusters, galactic bulges, and supermassive black holes (SMBHs).

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Global bank urges cities to invest in new infrastructure to adapt to climate change

The impacts of climate change on weather, sea levels, food and water supplies should be seen as an investment opportunity for our cities, says global investment banking firm Goldman Sachs.

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Britain is a nation of pet lovers—and it has the Victorians to thank

Britain was the first country in the world to start a welfare charity for animals, as early as 1824. Now, almost 20m cats and dogs have a loving place in the country's homes, and almost one in two households is accompanied by a furry, scaly, or feathered friend.

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Determining the activity of noble-metal-free catalyst particles

Chemists have developed a new method with which they can characterise individual noble-metal-free nanoparticle catalysts. The particles could be a cheap alternative to precious metal catalysts for obtaining hydrogen from water by means of electrolysis.

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Global danger

Freiburg hydrologist presents new results showing how sinking groundwater levels threaten the vitality of riverine ecosystems

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Promising steps towards hope for a treatment for schizophrenia

The latest brain scan research from the Psychiatric Imaging group at the MRC LMS published on 3 October in Nature Communications has reported how the MOR system contributes to the negative symptoms displayed in schizophrenia patients.

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New fluorescence method reveals signatures of individual microbes

University of Tsukuba researchers have developed a new method that reveals the unique fluorescence patterns produced by individual cells in mixtures of bacteria, yeast and fungi. They combined confocal microscopy with micro-spectroscopy to determine the fluorescence signatures from different types of microbes. They trained machine learning systems to analyze the images and identify different indiv

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Early menopause predictor of heart disease

Women who reach menopause before the age of 50 have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to researchers from The University of Queensland.

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The relationship between lifetime drinking and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction

New research from the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation suggests that the impact of alcohol consumption on coronary heart disease may be underestimated. Hence, epidemiological research suggesting that moderate drinking has a protective effect on cardiovascular health needs to be reevaluated taking drinking during adolescence and emerging adulthood into

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Stanford scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate

Insect-eating bats navigate effortlessly in the dark and dolphins and killer whales gobble up prey in murky waters thanks in part to specific changes in a set of 18 genes involved in the development of the cochlear ganglion — a group of nerves that transmit sound from the ear to the brain, according to a study by researchers at Stanford University.

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Touchscreen Motorized Repeating Pipette from BrandTech® Scientific

The BRAND® HandyStep® touch motorized repeating pipette features a touchscreen interface for intuitive operation.

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Brain cell transplants survive without anti-rejection drugs

A new method allows for the successful transplant certain protective brain cells without the need for lifelong anti-rejection drugs, researchers report. As reported in the journal Brain , the new approach selectively circumvents the immune response against foreign cells, allowing transplanted cells to survive, thrive, and protect brain tissue long after stopping immune-suppressing drugs. The abil

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Hurricane Sandy may have worsened gentrification in Brooklyn and Queens

In New York City alone, Superstorm Sandy killed 44 people, flooded 17 percent of the city's land, uprooted trees, collapsed houses, ran ships aground, deluged subway stations, and blew up power lines. And the impact it has had on the city's housing may go beyond the $19 billion in property damage it caused; the 2012 storm may have exacerbated gentrification's potency in some of the neighborhoods h

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Triggering morel fruiting

Morels are economically, culturally, and ecologically important fungi, widely prized as a culinary delicacy, but also because they influence geochemical cycling in forest ecosystems. By deciphering the fruiting-related decomposition mechanisms of morel with multi-omic approaches, the results revealed a striking capability of morel mycelium to acquire carbon from lignocellulosic-abundant matters su

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The fast dance of electron spins

Metal complexes show a fascinating behavior in their interactions with light, which for example is utilized in organic light emitting diodes, solar cells, quantum computers, or even in cancer therapy. In many of these applications, the electron spin, a kind of inherent rotation of the electrons, plays an important role. Recently, the chemists Sebastian Mai and Leticia González from the Faculty of

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New NMR approach for studying droplet-shaped cell content

Researchers in Utrecht have found a new way to observe membraneless compartments at an unprecedented level of resolution. The existence of these so-called biomolecular condensates in the cell contradicts every textbook on the subject. This is the first time that they have been observed in the test tube with a high degree of precision. The researchers and their colleagues in Germany will publish th

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Determining the activity of noble-metal-free catalyst particles

Chemists have developed a new method with which they can characterize individual noble-metal-free nanoparticle catalysts. The particles could be a cheap alternative to precious metal catalysts for obtaining hydrogen from water by means of electrolysis. "In order to develop effective nanoparticles, we need to understand how the structure and activity of individual particles or small particle groups

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Scientists start mapping the hidden web that scaffolds the universe

After counting all the normal, luminous matter in the obvious places of the universe—galaxies, clusters of galaxies and the intergalactic medium—about half of it is still missing. So not only is 85% of the matter in the universe made up of an unknown, invisible substance dubbed "dark matter," we can't even find all the small amount of normal matter that should be there.

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Wet-dry cycles could have allowed for synthesis of building blocks for RNA on early Earth

A team of researchers with members from institutions in Germany, the U.K. and Japan has developed a new theory to explain how RNA could have originated on early Earth. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group outlines what they describe as a plausible sequence of events that could have led to the natural synthesis of the building blocks of RNA. Nicholas Hud and David Fialho with

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Wet-dry cycles could have allowed for synthesis of building blocks for RNA on early Earth

A team of researchers with members from institutions in Germany, the U.K. and Japan has developed a new theory to explain how RNA could have originated on early Earth. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group outlines what they describe as a plausible sequence of events that could have led to the natural synthesis of the building blocks of RNA. Nicholas Hud and David Fialho with

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Triggering morel fruiting

Morels are economically, culturally, and ecologically important fungi, widely prized as a culinary delicacy, but also because they influence geochemical cycling in forest ecosystems. By deciphering the fruiting-related decomposition mechanisms of morel with multi-omic approaches, the results revealed a striking capability of morel mycelium to acquire carbon from lignocellulosic-abundant matters su

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New NMR approach for studying droplet-shaped cell content

Researchers in Utrecht have found a new way to observe membraneless compartments at an unprecedented level of resolution. The existence of these so-called biomolecular condensates in the cell contradicts every textbook on the subject. This is the first time that they have been observed in the test tube with a high degree of precision. The researchers and their colleagues in Germany will publish th

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IDT partners with Argonaut Manufacturing Services to provide custom lyophilized products and reduce environmental impact

Partnership provides automation and high throughput-ready reagents without cold chain shipping and storage requirements

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New king cricket species discovery in Costa Rica

A group of four Texas A&M Department of Entomology undergraduate students took their knowledge from the classroom and put it to use in discovering a new species of king cricket during a recent study abroad trip to Costa Rica.

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New king cricket species discovery in Costa Rica

A group of four Texas A&M Department of Entomology undergraduate students took their knowledge from the classroom and put it to use in discovering a new species of king cricket during a recent study abroad trip to Costa Rica.

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What Would Facebook Regulation Look Like? Start With the FCC

Opinion: Platform giants need to meet the public interest standard, just like broadcast media.

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HP Omen X 2S Review: A Secondary Screen Doubles Your Gaming Pleasure

This brawny gaming laptop has a secondary display embedded above the keyboard.

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Climate change comes at a cost for iconic pāua

The pāua, New Zealand's most famous shellfish, lauded globally for its iconic multi-colored shell, is under threat with climate change, new research reveals.

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A catalog of DNA replication proteins

Maintenance of genome integrity—and prevention of diseases such as cancer—requires complete and faithful replication of the genome every cell division cycle.

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These beliefs about learning are holding you back

If you think you just don’t have the brain for certain skills, you’re deceiving yourself, a new book argues. This belief undermines your ability to learn—whether it’s math, basketball, or playing the clarinet. “Why do we need this dichotomous thinking about people being smart or not? Everyone’s on a growth journey.” In the new book, Limitless Mind (Harper Collins, 2019), Jo Boaler, a professor of

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Framgångsrika multinationella dotterbolag – en fråga om avstånd

Vad är det som avgör om multinationella dotterbolag blir framgångsrika eller misslyckas? Hur påverkar kulturella avstånd de ekonomiska resultaten? Och hur påverkas företag av avstånd i formella strukturer mellan värd- och hemlandet? Ny forskning från Högskolan i Halmstad svarar på de här frågorna. Doktoranden Henrique Correa da Cunha undersöker hur utländska dotterbolag från utvecklingsmarknader

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Climate change comes at a cost for iconic pāua

The pāua, New Zealand's most famous shellfish, lauded globally for its iconic multi-colored shell, is under threat with climate change, new research reveals.

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A catalog of DNA replication proteins

Maintenance of genome integrity—and prevention of diseases such as cancer—requires complete and faithful replication of the genome every cell division cycle.

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A cosmic pretzel

Astronomers using ALMA have obtained an extremely high-resolution image showing two disks in which young stars are growing, fed by a complex pretzel-shaped network of filaments of gas and dust. Observing this remarkable phenomenon sheds new light on the earliest phases of the lives of stars and helps astronomers determine the conditions in which binary stars are born.

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MSU economist's research on colony collapse disorder published in national journal

Randy Rucker and two colleagues are the authors of a paper published last month that examines the economic impacts of colony collapse disorder.

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A breath test for opioids

A test to detect opioid drugs in exhaled breath has been developed by engineers and physicians at UC Davis. A breath test could be useful in caring for chronic pain patients as well as for checking for illegal drug use.

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3-D printing technique accelerates nanoscale fabrication 1000-fold

Using a new time-based method to control light from an ultrafast laser, researchers have developed a nanoscale 3-D printing technique that can fabricate tiny structures 1000 times faster than conventional two-photon lithography (TPL) techniques, without sacrificing resolution.

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Hazards mapping, history and the future of Rust Belt cities

Using geographic information systems (GIS) and archaeology to model industrial hazards in postindustrial cities to guide planning and development.

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Dads Drinking Before Conception May Cause Heart Defects in Babies

A massive new study has linked fathers’ alcohol consumption to heightened risk of their kids being born with congenital heart defects. And that includes far more than the glass of wine a dad-to-be may have had before getting down to the gritty work of conception — CNN reports that the future kid’s heart health can even be impacted by alcohol consumption months before date night. It shouldn’t be t

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Apple envisions virtual keyboards with a tactile feel in newly released patent application

The way the patent describes it as working is the electrodes are disposed on a surface, in particular, a display showing a virtual keyboard. Each key would have one or more of its own electrodes, …

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Arbor Biosciences™ Launches Bulk Offerings of Cell-Free Expression Systems

New myTXTL bulk packagings align with volumes required for high-throughput organizations in synthetic biology.

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Ombyttede koordinater i teledatasag: Master blev placeret ved Etiopien

Der lader til at være blevet byttet rundt i en del af de mastekoordinator, som politiet har modtaget fra teleudbyderne.

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Dealing a therapeutic counterblow to traumatic brain injury

A team of biomedical engineers are developing a therapy which shows early indications it can protect neurons and stimulate the regrowth of blood vessels in damaged tissue.

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Identifying a gene for canine night blindness

Researchers have identified the gene mutation responsible for a form of night blindness in dogs. Strategies to treat this condition, which affects a layer of neurons just below the primary photoreceptor cells, could also inform treatment of other diseases that rely on targeting this cell type.

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Drinking more sugary beverages of any type may increase type 2 diabetes risk

People who increase their consumption of sugary beverages — whether they contain added or naturally occurring sugar — may face moderately higher risk of type 2 diabetes.

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Daddy daycare: Why some songbirds care for the 'wrong' kids

Interspecific feeding — when an adult of one species feeds the young of another — is rare among songbirds, and scientists could only speculate on why it occurs, but now, researchers have new insight into this behavior.

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Another Week, Another Nutrition Axiom Upended: Is Eating Meat Unhealthy?

Nutrition experts have warned that eating red meat can be bad for your health. Then a multi-part meta-analysis, published Monday in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, concluded that red meat may not be so harmful after all. The fighting among scientists and nutrition experts began almost immediately.

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Gene-Hacked Mosquito Researchers Are Battling Amongst Themselves

Hybrid Vigor In September, the journal Scientific Reports published a study detailing what happened when a team of researchers gene-edited mosquitoes to be infertile and then released the bugs into the wild. TL;DR: the plan, intended to decrease the population of disease-spreading mosquitoes, was a dismal failure . Not only did the population bounce back within 18 months, but according to the stu

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Seks videoklip: Kollisioner, beundring og pludselige opbremsninger med Teslas nye selvkørende funktion

Teslaer er nu begyndt at komme når du kalder. Det giver både uro på parkeringspladserne og uhæmmet begejstring blandt Tesla-ejerne, viser deres egne videoer.

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Glowing nanoparticles can stop heart cells beating — or set them racing

Nature, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02986-7 Particles are triggered by infrared light and could be embedded deep in the body.

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Liver tumours’ odd metabolisms might be their weak spot

Nature, Published online: 03 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02970-1 People with a certain type of liver cancer die sooner if they have higher levels of some metabolic proteins.

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A filament fit for space: Silk is proven to thrive in outer space temperatures

The scientists who discovered that natural silks get stronger the colder they get, have finally solved the puzzle of why.

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Coral-tracking satellites monitor reef bleaching in near-real time

Nature, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02802-2 The system is helping scientists in Hawaii monitor what could be the state’s most damaging ocean heat wave ever.

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First maps of areas suitable for spotted lanternfly's establishment in US and world

Maps identifying the areas suitable for establishment of the spotted lanternfly (SLF) in the United States and other countries have been published.

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Severe morning sickness associated with higher risk of autism

Children whose mothers had hyperemesis gravidarum — a severe form of a morning sickness — during pregnancy were 53% more likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, according to new research.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Panos Panay on Microsoft Surface

The company’s hardware chief discusses the state of mobile productivity, dual-screen devices, and why the Surface phone isn’t a phone.

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Hurricanes May Be Reshaping Big Parts of the Ocean

Scientists are just starting to tease out the long-distance changes that hurricanes inflict on coastlines and the deep ocean alike.

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An Open Source License That Requires Users to Do No Harm

Open source software can generally be freely copied and reused. One developer wants to impose ethical constraints on the practice.

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Företag vill få fler sälturister till västkusten

I en ny forskningsrapport från AgriFood Economics Centre vid SLU har företagen för första gången kartlagts. – Sälsafarier arrangeras framför allt av mindre företag hos vilka sälen är ett av många erbjudanden. Andra verksamheter är till exempel fisketurism och guidade skärgårdsturer, säger Staffan Waldo som är en av forskarna bakom rapporten. Sälturism erbjuds längs hela den svenska kusten, men fl

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Image of the Day: Floating Frog

A frog performs a balancing act in a region where amphibians are threatened.

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Mission To Find Life On Mars

The next NASA rover to Mars, the Mars 2020 Rover (final name to be determined), launches next July. It will arrive at Mars in February 2021. This is the next iteration of rover design and has some interesting new features, include a drone that can fly around to survey more of the Martian surface. But perhaps the feature that is getting the most attention is the drill. For the first time a Mars ro

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Apple raises production of iPhone 11 models by about 10%: Nikkei

Apple Inc has asked suppliers to increase production of its iPhone 11 models by up to 8 million units, or about 10%, Nikkei Asian Review reported, hinting that demand for the recently launched …

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A new way to corrosion-proof thin atomic sheets

A variety of two-dimensional materials that have promising properties for optical, electronic, or optoelectronic applications have been held back by the fact that they quickly degrade when exposed to oxygen and water vapor. The protective coatings developed thus far have proven to be expensive and toxic, and cannot be taken off.

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Artificial gut aims to expose the elusive microbiome

The microbiome is a collection of trillions of bacteria that reside in and on our bodies. Each person's microbiome is unique—just like a fingerprint—and researchers are finding more and more ways in which it impacts our health and daily lives. One example involves an apparent link between the brain and the bacteria in the gut. This brain-gut "axis" is believed to influence conditions such as Parki

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Scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate

Evolutionary adaptations like echolocation that are shared by unrelated species arose in part due to identical, independently acquired genetic changes, according to a new Stanford study of whole genome sequences.

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Artificial gut aims to expose the elusive microbiome

The microbiome is a collection of trillions of bacteria that reside in and on our bodies. Each person's microbiome is unique—just like a fingerprint—and researchers are finding more and more ways in which it impacts our health and daily lives. One example involves an apparent link between the brain and the bacteria in the gut. This brain-gut "axis" is believed to influence conditions such as Parki

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Scientists uncover genetic similarities among species that use sound to navigate

Evolutionary adaptations like echolocation that are shared by unrelated species arose in part due to identical, independently acquired genetic changes, according to a new Stanford study of whole genome sequences.

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The role of a cavity in the hypernova ejecta of a gamma-ray burst

Since 2018, a new style of research has been introduced in gamma-ray-burst (GRB) studies: It does not describe the prompt radiation phase observed by the Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory and the NASA Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope by a time-integrated spectral analysis. Such analyses are typically applied to long GRBs and obtain a band spectrum with various fitting parameters. This procedure, as re

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Universal latent anion donors for ultralow work function solution-processable electrodes

NUS scientists have reported in Nature the discovery of latent universal electron donors from common anions, like oxalate, which can potently transfer electrons to organic semiconductors, realizing the dream to achieve electron injection layers with ultralow work functions which can yet be processed from solution in the ambient. This is expected to open many new possibilities, not only for organic

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Fed's Mester: Running a 'hot' economy risks faster automation

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Water harvester makes it easy to drink water from thin air

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paralyzed man able to move all 4 limbs using exoskeleton

submitted by /u/BillNyeTheGulagGuy [link] [comments]

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Paralysed man moves in mind-reading exoskeleton

submitted by /u/zebandit69 [link] [comments]

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2,000 Atoms Exist in Two Places at Once in Unprecedented Quantum Experiment

The new experiment demonstrated a bizarre quantum effect from the double-slit experiment at an unprecedented scale.

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Home aquarium hobbyists are helping save 30 rare fish from extinction

The pet trade often harms wildlife but some dedicated amateur fish-keepers are working to keep many species of fish from extinction

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Ny dekan på Københavns Universitets natur- og biovidenskabelige fakultet

Katrine Krogh Andersen bliver 1. januar 2020 ny dekan på Det Natur- og Biovidenskabelige Fakultet…

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So You Want to Quit Vaping? No One Actually Knows How

E-cigarettes can be more addictive and even harder to quit than regular cigarettes, so kicking the habit may take even more vigilance.

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GoPro Hero 7 Black Deal: $70 Off Right Now

The Hero 7 is still a great deal at $329, with superb image stabilization and awesome time-lapse video.

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Så tänker elever när de väljer gymnasieskola

– Resultaten reser frågan om ifall elever generellt väljer skola baserat på sin förmåga att bedriva kvalitativ undervisning, men även frågan om hur skolor på en konkurrensutsatt skolmarknad har agerat för att möta elevernas preferenser, säger Mikael Thelin vid institutionen för kulturgeografi, som undersökt vilka faktorer som är viktigast för eleverna när de väljer gymnasieskola. En av de största

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Vaccines in the News: The Good, the Bad, and the Imminent Loss of Our Measles Elimination Status

A quick recap of vaccine-related news from over the past several weeks.

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Astronomers observe how two suns collect matter in a binary system

Stars are born in the midst of large clouds of gas and dust. Local densifications first form "embryos," which then collect matter and grow. But how exactly does this accretion process work? And what happens when two stars form in a disk of matter? High-resolution images of a young stellar binary system for the first time reveal a complex network of accretion filaments nurturing two protostars at t

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Team studies 2000-year-old Herculaneum Scrolls

Researchers led by the renowned ancient artifacts expert Professor Brent Seales will be using the U.K."s Diamond Light Source synchrotron science facility in the heart of Oxfordshire to examine a collection of world-famous ancient artifacts owned by the Institut de France. Using this powerful light source and special techniques the team has developed, the researchers are working to virtually unwra

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Large-scale mapping of protein networks behind tumor growth in the lungs

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have used highly sophisticated molecular analyses to identify key proteins in the signaling pathways that cancers use to spread in the body. The study could help in personalizing cancer treatment and developing new drugs.

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Large-scale mapping of protein networks behind tumor growth in the lungs

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have used highly sophisticated molecular analyses to identify key proteins in the signaling pathways that cancers use to spread in the body. The study could help in personalizing cancer treatment and developing new drugs.

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Watch: Kitty Hawk reveals Heaviside, its latest flying vehicle

Back in 2016, it was revealed that the Google co-founder had been secretly funding a pair of flying vehicle startups, one of which was Kitty Hawk. A year later, the company unveiled its hovercraft-like …

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Scorpion Venom Could Lead to New Antibiotics

Scientists isolate and synthesize two compounds that can fight common, and even drug-resistant, infections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scorpion Venom Could Lead to New Antibiotics

Scientists isolate and synthesize two compounds that can fight common, and even drug-resistant, infections — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Weird repeating signals from deep space may be created by starquakes

Fast radio bursts are mysterious signals from space. Some of them repeat many times – and these may be caused by powerful starquakes

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Frederiksberg Kommune lækker persondata til 7.000 forkerte e-Boks-modtagere

Datatilsynet: »Et klart brud på persondatasikkerheden.«

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Transforming CRM Operations With Artificial Intelligence –

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Kronik: Forskningspolitik – Når grønt bliver til guld

Danske virksomheder efterspørger forskning i teknik og naturvidenskab, og så skal samarbejdet mellem universiteter og virksom­heder styrkes for at regeringens CO2-mål kan nås.

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‘More women are being nominated’: Nobel academy head discusses diversity

Nature, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02988-5 Ahead of this year’s award announcements, Göran Hansson speaks about measures to address the imbalance in gender and ethnicity among winners.

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The Many Threats to Our Coastlines: Five Questions for Gilbert M. Gaul

In "The Geography of Risk," journalist Gilbert M. Gaul argues that decades of reckless development and faulty planning, along with the effects of climate change and the specter of more severe storms in the years ahead, are combining to pose a grave threat to America's high-risk coastal areas.

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Foto: Amager Bakke åbner endelig – Her er de tekniske detaljer, du skal lægge mærke til

Amager Bakke, der officielt åbner i dag, er blevet forsinket og fordyret og afhængigt af affaldsimport og politisk hjælp for at løbe rundt. Men det er også en teknisk kraftpræstation. Se nogle af de spændende detaljer her.

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Authors retract paper claiming religious upbringing is linked to less generosity

Over at Psychology Today, Tyler VanderWeele reports on the case of a paper that earned significant headlines — and has now been retracted: In 2015, a paper by Jean Decety and co-authors reported that children who were brought up religiously were less generous. The paper received a great deal of attention, and was covered by … Continue reading

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The Problem With Mobilization Theory

A theory for how to win the 2020 presidential election has quickly become conventional wisdom among Democratic campaign strategists and many prominent pundits. It goes like this: The country has become so polarized that swing voters barely exist anymore. Elections are now decided by which side better manages to mobilize its base. So Democrats need to stop worrying about winning over moderates—and

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The Mystery of the Ukraine-Call Transcript

Twice during a press conference on Wednesday, President Donald Trump went out of his way to assert that a transcript of his call with Ukraine’s president, released last week, was verbatim. “I had a transcript done by very, very talented people—word for word, comma for comma. Done by people that do it for a living. We had an exact transcript,” Trump said, without any prompting. A few minutes later

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You Can’t Drain the Swamp and Also Defend the President

The last serious effort to “drain the swamp” in Washington, D.C., came after Watergate, when Congress pushed through sweeping reforms inspired by the misdeeds of Richard Nixon’s administration and the backlash its criminal acts produced. The new ethics rules and laws forbade some lobbying by former members of Congress and their staffers; forced elected officials and some of their family members t

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How academic freedom strengthens the bonds of accumulated knowledge

Humans are unique in that we learn socially and actively teach each other lessons of survival. Freedom of expression allows accumulated knowledge, that which is passed down through generations and across cultures, to flourish within and benefit society. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of Stand Together, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoint

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We're Pulling Tuna Out Of The Ocean At Unprecedented — And Unsustainable — Rates

A new study finds that tuna harvests, including of some species considered "vulnerable," have increased by an astonishing 1,000% in the last 60 years — a rate some scientists warn is unsustainable. (Image credit: NiCK/Getty Images)

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Paralysed man walks using mind-controlled exoskeleton

French patient’s breakthrough could lead to brain-controlled wheelchairs, say experts A French man paralysed in a nightclub accident has walked again thanks to a brain-controlled exoskeleton, providing hope to tetraplegics seeking to regain movement. The patient trained for months, harnessing his brain signals to control a computer-simulated avatar to perform basic movements before using the robo

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Uber's new helicopter service is an expensive, time-consuming adventure

It cost me more than three times the money and an extra 15 minutes to fly to my local airport in an Uber helicopter than if I had taken the highway in an Uber X. It also required multiple cab …

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Paralysed man moves in mind-reading exoskeleton

A man who had not walked for two years was able to move all his limbs thanks to new technology.

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Highlight negative results to improve science

Nature, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02960-3 Publishers, reviewers and other members of the scientific community must fight science’s preference for positive results — for the benefit of all, says Devang Mehta.

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VU0155069 inhibits inflammasome activation independent of phospholipase D1 activity

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50806-9

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An Internally Quenched Fluorescent Peptide Substrate for Protealysin

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50764-2

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TFEB activates Nrf2 by repressing its E3 ubiquitin ligase DCAF11 and promoting phosphorylation of p62

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50877-8

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Imaging Rheumatoid Arthritis in Mice Using Combined Near Infrared and 19F Magnetic Resonance Modalities

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50043-0 Imaging Rheumatoid Arthritis in Mice Using Combined Near Infrared and 19 F Magnetic Resonance Modalities

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Phylogeny and morphology of Lasiodiplodia species associated with Magnolia forest plants

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50804-x

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Multiparametric radiobiological assays show that variation of X-ray energy strongly impacts relative biological effectiveness: comparison between 220 kV and 4 MV

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50908-4 Multiparametric radiobiological assays show that variation of X-ray energy strongly impacts relative biological effectiveness: comparison between 220 kV and 4 MV

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Sex differences in risk factors for stroke in patients with hypertension and hyperhomocysteinemia

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50856-z

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Årets Nobelpriser: Bliver det mon Greta Thunberg, Lene Hau, Morten Meldal, Søren Johansen og Katarina Juselius?

PLUS. Ingeniørens bud i år er, at priserne i fysik og kemi falder inden for kvantefysik og astrokemi. Der er flere danskere i spil, men de må nok karakteriseres som outsidere. Greta Thunberg er bookmakernes favorit til fredsprisen.

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Adaptation of Plasmodium falciparum to humans involved the loss of an ape-specific erythrocyte invasion ligand

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12294-3 Here, Proto et al. show that human infective Plasmodium falciparum isolates contain an inactivating mutation in the erythrocyte invasion associated gene PfEBA165, while homologues of ape-infective Laverania species are intact, and that expression of intact PfEBA165 is incompatible with parasite growth in huma

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Observation of a phonon bottleneck in copper-doped colloidal quantum dots

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12558-y Weak electron-phonon scattering that can enable long-lived hot electrons in semiconductors is of interest in hot carrier solar cells. Here, the authors report copper-doped colloidal cadmium-selenide quantum dots with hot electron lifetime extended by more than 30-fold compared to undoped dots.

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Prebiotic condensation through wet–dry cycling regulated by deliquescence

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-11834-1 Wet–dry cycling is regarded as a possible driving force of condensation reactions under prebiotic conditions. Here, the authors propose that water uptake by deliquescent minerals could have facilitated the wet phase and simulate this scenario using the oligomerization of glycine as a model reaction.

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Nanomechanical characterization of quantum interference in a topological insulator nanowire

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12560-4 The density of states (DOS) of a topological insulator nanowire is expected to show Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations, but they are never observed so far. Here, Kim et al. reveal AB oscillations in the DOS of a Bi2Se3 nanowire via nanomechanical resonance measurements.

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Mitochondrial calcium exchange links metabolism with the epigenome to control cellular differentiation

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12103-x Myofibroblast differentiation contributes to extracellular matrix remodeling and fibrosis. Here, the authors report that alterations in mitochondrial calcium uptake is essential for metabolic reprogramming and epigenetic signaling for activation of the myofibroblast gene program.

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Arctigenin attenuates diabetic kidney disease through the activation of PP2A in podocytes

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12433-w Arctigenin (ATG) is the major active component of a Chinese herbal remedy known to reduce proteinuria in patients with diabetic kidney disease (DKD). Here, Zhong et al. identify PP2A as a pharmacological target of ATG in podocytes, and find that PP2A is responsible for some of the beneficial effects of ATG in

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Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials testing behavioural interventions to promote household action on climate change

Nature Communications, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12457-2 It is not clear which are the most effective mechanisms to achieve sustainable lifestyle behaviour. Here the authors study the impact of behavioural interventions excluding economic incentives by performing a large-scale meta-analysis and find that these interventions promote sustainable behaviours to a small

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En ny tilgang til arbejdet med sikkerhed og kvalitet

Sundhedsvæsenet er komplekst, men hvad er det, der gør det komplekst, og hvad betyder det i hverdagen?

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Study pinpoints Alzheimer's plaque emergence early and deep in the brain

By scanning whole brains of Alzheimer's model mice from an early age, researchers were able to precisely trace the terrible march of amyloid plaques from deep brain structures outward along specific circuits. They also showed that plaque density in a key region in humans scales with disease stage.

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Were hot, humid summers the key to life's origins?

Chemists at Saint Louis University, in collaboration with scientists at the College of Charleston and the NSF/NASA Center for Chemical Evolution, found that deliquescent minerals, which dissolve in water they absorb from humid air, can assist the construction of proteins from simpler building blocks during cycles timed to mimic day and night on the early Earth.

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Scientists create brain-mimicking environment to grow 3D tissue models of brain tumors

Researchers have developed 3-dimensional human tissue culture models of pediatric and adult brain cancers in a brain-mimicking microenvironment, that includes brain-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) — the complex network of proteins and amino acids with bound sugars that not only provides support for surrounding neural tissue, but also helps to guide cell growth and development. The development

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Temple scientists ID new targets to treat fibrosis — a feature of many chronic diseases

When it comes to repairing injured tissue, specialized cells in the body known as fibroblasts are called into action. Fibroblasts give rise to healing cells called myofibroblasts, which generally is good in the short term — but bad when myofibroblast activation gets out of hand. Now, Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University researchers show how fibroblast activation and myofibroblast fo

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Bose discontinues Sleepbuds due to faulty battery, will offer full refund to all customers

Photo by Chris Welch / The Verge Bose is fully discontinuing its Sleepbuds, the $250 earbuds that were designed to be worn during sleep to help drown out disturbances and other …

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How Penn State Is Cutting Greenhouse Emissions In Half — And Saving Money

The university, which is as big as a city, has slashed its carbon emissions since 2004. That effort is now paying for itself in lower energy costs. Could actual cities do the same? (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

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Were hot, humid summers the key to life's origins?

Uncovering how the first biological molecules (like proteins and DNA) arose is a major goal for researchers attempting to solve the origin of life. Today, chemists at Saint Louis University, in collaboration with scientists at the College of Charleston and the NSF/NASA Center for Chemical Evolution, published a study in the journal Nature Communications that suggests deliquescent minerals—which di

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Trump Will Never Escape the I Word

“The White House in Crisis” blares the afternoon banner on CNN. The visiting Finnish president is treated to a trademark Donald Trump tirade against the press. A mysterious manila envelope is delivered to Capitol Hill, and the United States’ former special envoy to Ukraine testifies behind closed doors. The House impeachment inquiry is barely 10 days old, and every news cycle is already awash in

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ARA: accurate, reliable and active histopathological image classification framework with Bayesian deep learning

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50587-1

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Association between underweight and pulmonary function in 282,135 healthy adults: A cross-sectional study in Korean population

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50488-3

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Interplay and Targetome of the Two Conserved Cyanobacterial sRNAs Yfr1 and Yfr2 in Prochlorococcus MED4

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-49881-9

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A Phospholipid Profile at 4 Months Predicts the Onset of Celiac Disease in at-Risk Infants

Scientific Reports, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50735-7

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PODCAST: Hvad er Electro-fuels? Og hvorfor må vi ikke skyde raketter af i Danmark?

Kunstige brændstoffer fremstillet af vindmøllestrøm kan være en af vejene til at nå regeringens ambitiøse klimamål. Ny energi-app prøver at forudsige dit elforbrug. Forbud mod opsendelser vil begrave dansk raketudvikling.

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I Ran GPT2 For The First Time: It Made A Game To Play

View this image first. Alright, so the above image is a wall of text. So let me explain. This is the output of a program called GPT2 described and published in this MIT research paper. Wanting to play around with the software, I downloaded it, and went through the hell and high water troubleshooting to get it running properly. The first thing I did was give it a test prompt… the first two parag

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Were hot, humid summers the key to life's origins?

Uncovering how the first biological molecules (like proteins and DNA) arose is a major goal for researchers attempting to solve the origin of life. Today, chemists at Saint Louis University, in collaboration with scientists at the College of Charleston and the NSF/NASA Center for Chemical Evolution, published a study in the journal Nature Communications that suggests deliquescent minerals—which di

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Fra 'spildevands-fald' til grøn ruinpark

150 millioner liter spildevand udledes årligt til Mølleåen fra et enkelt kloakoverløb i Lyngby. Men nu skal bæredygtigheden fremmes på flere fronter i et projekt, der samtidig introducerer en helt ny metode til at håndtere forurenede industriområder.

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Psykiaterne slås om pladsen på Skejby

Overlægerne i psykiatrien ved Universitetshospitalet Skejby mener, de sidder som sild i en tønde på deres kontorer. Nej, der er ikke pladsmangel og lægerne må vænne sig stormandskontorer, siger direktør.

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Extinction Rebellion plans fortnight of worldwide climate action

Extinction Rebellion climate protesters are planning to bring disruption to 60 cities around the world from Monday in a fortnight of civil disobedience, warning of an environmental "apocalypse".

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In northwest Spain, conservation efforts pay off as bears thrive

Daylight is only just breaking over Spain's Cantabrian Mountains and already a dozen enthusiasts are up and about in the hope of spotting a brown bear.

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In northwest Spain, conservation efforts pay off as bears thrive

Daylight is only just breaking over Spain's Cantabrian Mountains and already a dozen enthusiasts are up and about in the hope of spotting a brown bear.

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Danmark som foregangsland og diabetes som modelsygdom

Flertallet af patienter med type 2 diabetes vil blive behandlet af praktiserende læger, og derfor skal vi igen have fart på data-arbejdet, skriver praktiserende læge.

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Scientists fight to save unique Guiana coral reef

Off the coast of Guiana, a French overseas department perched on the north coast of South America, scientists scour the choppy waters for signs of life.

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'Incredibly rare' monkey born at Australian zoo

One of the world's rarest monkeys has been born at an Australian zoo.

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Black year for European beekeepers

This year has been a black one for many European beekeepers, particularly in France and Italy, where unpredictable weather has produced what are being termed the worst honey harvests ever.

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'Incredibly rare' monkey born at Australian zoo

One of the world's rarest monkeys has been born at an Australian zoo.

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Black year for European beekeepers

This year has been a black one for many European beekeepers, particularly in France and Italy, where unpredictable weather has produced what are being termed the worst honey harvests ever.

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Climate change pushes Italy beekeepers to the brink

Unusual weather driven by climate change is wreaking havoc on bee populations, including in northern Italy where the pollinating insects crucial to food production are struggling to survive.

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Climate change pushes Italy beekeepers to the brink

Unusual weather driven by climate change is wreaking havoc on bee populations, including in northern Italy where the pollinating insects crucial to food production are struggling to survive.

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Scientists Are About to 'Unravel' Ancient Papyrus Scrolls Charred by Vesuvius

We might finally know what the famous Herculaneum scrolls contain.

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How much are you polluting your office air just by existing?

Just by breathing or wearing deodorant, you have more influence over your office space than you might think, a growing body of evidence shows. But could these basic acts of existence also be polluting the air in the office room where you work?

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Psykiaterne tager bladet fra munden: Nyt it-system er en hæmsko

For først gang kommer de danske psykiatere med en advarsel om Sundhedsplatformen: Risikoen for medicinfejl er øget og betingelserne for at give god behandling er forringet med det nye it-system i Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland. Vi arbejder på at forbedre systemet, svarer de ansvarlige.

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Ny professor: Politikerne skal fokusere mere på multisygdom

Et nyt videnscenter på Slagelse Sygehus skal forske i, hvordan multisyge får en bedre behandling. Især patienter med en kronisk somatisk sygdom kombineret med en psykiatrisk sygdom er hårdt ramt.

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Samarbejde giver mere effektiv behandling af to sjældne gigt- og bindevævssygdomme

Et samarbejde mellem en reumatolog og en nyrespecialist har reduceret antallet af ambulante besøg og har desuden forbedret kvaliteten for både forskningen og behandlingen af to sjældne sygdomme.

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Justitsminister: Rigspolitiets håndtering af teledata har været særdeles utilfredsstillende

Rigspolitichefen, rigsadvokaten og Justitsministeriets departement har afleveret redegørelser i teledata-sagen til justitsministeren.

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Astronomers Have a Bold Plan to Film The Black Hole at The Centre of Our Galaxy

The same ones that gave us the first black hole image.

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Network science reveals the secrets of the world’s best soccer team

A new kind of analysis shows why the Barcelona team of 2009-10 stands head and shoulders above the rest. And the same approach could do the same for other sports.

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Flu vaccine offered to every primary school child in England

Health professionals to give 600,000 children aged 10-11 free vaccine against winter flu Every primary school child in England is to be offered vaccination against winter flu in an attempt to safeguard them and their family from the virus, the health service has announced, promising no shortage of vaccines regardless of the Brexit outcome. This year’s flu vaccination campaign will be the biggest

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Ny magnetkamera hittar svar på oklar bröstsmärta

Som första sjukhus i Europa har Skånes universitetssjukhus börjat använda en ny magnetkamera och undersökningsteknik för att diagnosticera oklar bröstsmärta – en åkomma som oftast drabbar kvinnor. Tekniken kan innebära att patienter får rätt diagnos i ett tidigare skede och därmed en bättre behandling.

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Kinesiske aktivister vil have lægevidenskab frem for alternativ behandling

I Kina har traditionel kinesisk medicin samme status i sundhedssystemet som moderne lægevidenskab….

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Restoring the Sex and Rage to Jane Austen

Demand for Jane Austen far exceeds supply. When the novelist died in 1817 at the age of 41, she left only six full-length novels, plus three unpublished works and a collection of juvenilia. Yet in the two centuries since, Austen has become, as the British writer Alexander McCall Smith once put it , “a movement, a mood, a lifestyle, an attitude, and perhaps most tellingly of all, a fridge magnet.”

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Muskelgigt: Samarbejde mellem hospital og praksis giver resultater

Et tæt samarbejde mellem praktiserende læger og Sydvestjysk Sygehus i Esbjerg giver forbedret og mere effektiv behandling af muskelgigtpatienter.

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Photos of the Week: Foggy Mosque, Sticky Louvre, Jack Black

Smog in Bangkok, illusions in a German castle, protests in Hong Kong and Iraq, fighting in Donetsk, the World Athletics Championships in Doha, China’s 70th anniversary, surfing in Japan, fire-prevention goats in California, an orphaned elephant in Myanmar, and much more

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Rick Perry Is Said to Be Resigning as Energy Secretary by Year’s End

An aggressive promoter of President Trump’s fossil fuel agenda, Mr. Perry ended his run as one of the longest-serving cabinet members in a tumultuous administration.

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Brain Stimulation Shows Promise in Treating Severe Depression

Years ago, more than two dozen patients received an electrical implant to counter their depression. They’re still feeling better, a new study finds.

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Long-term study data shows DBS is effective treatment for most severe form of depression

A study published online on Friday, October 4, in The American Journal of Psychiatry found that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of an area in the brain called the subcallosal cingulate (SCC) provides a robust antidepressant effect that is sustained over a long period of time in patients with treatment-resistant depression–the most severely depressed patients who have not responded to other treatment

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Long-term mental health benefits of gender-affirming surgery for transgender individuals

For transgender individuals, gender-affirming surgery can lead to long-term mental health benefits, according to new research published online today in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Some ICU admissions may be preventable, saving money and improving care

Many admissions to the intensive care unit may be preventable, potentially decreasing health care costs and improving care, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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It's Time for a World without Gender

Let’s treat people based on who they are rather than on the form of their genitals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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It's Time for a World without Gender

Let’s treat people based on who they are rather than on the form of their genitals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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It's Time for a World without Gender

Let’s treat people based on who they are rather than on the form of their genitals — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Facebook CEO defends being a billionaire in live Q�

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg answered town hall questions during a live stream Thursday.

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Gentagne persondata-svipsere: Arrangør af it-konference advaret om samme læk for to år siden

Det var ikke rigtigt, da IDC fortalte Version2, at der ikke tidligere havde været privacy-problemer med selskabets konference-app.

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‘Flydende el’ er dyr, men nødvendig

PLUS. Flydende brændstoffer baseret på el fra vind og sol kan gøre især den tunge transport grøn. Men det kræver store investeringer.

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Honey fungus secrets fall to science

Citizen scientists have helped shed light on a type of fungi that can spread underground for miles.

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Klimaforsker: 3 ting batter noget, hvis du vil ændre dit eget klimaaftryk

Rigtig mange af os affaldssorterer, men det har ingen indflydelse i det store klimaregnestykke.

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How do you think society will react to entire industries being almost fully automated in the near future?

For instance, there are already fully automated warehouses than employ a handful of people rather than the hundreds they use to employ. When the tech is cost-effective and good enough, major warehouses that employee hundreds of thousands of workers like Amazon will go almost wholly automated, probably within the next ten years. How long of a time gap do you think there will be until other industr

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Paralysed man moves in mind-reading exoskeleton

submitted by /u/solar-cabin [link] [comments]

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The Good Place Wonders How to Reform #MeToo’s Disgraced Men

This post contains spoilers for the second episode of The Good Place ’s fourth season. The Good Place ’s kooky philosophical explorations have addressed touchy current topics before— refugees , artificial intelligence , ghosting . Now the NBC sitcom raises another one of the toughest questions of our era. Can the men exposed by #MeToo be redeemed? Over the show’s first three seasons, the heroes o

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What Rolls Like an Armadillo but Lives in the Sea?

A scientist studying the defenses of mollusks called chitons thinks these sea creatures might be less primitive than expected.

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Finally, Wendy’s Made a Tabletop RPG at NYCC

We’re living in a golden age of “games” that are really just ironic cash-in advertisements for fast food companies. Not since the Wild West of cheap NES cartridges …

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News at a glance

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Split decisions

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Justice and genes

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Outside-in

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Evolution of vocal learning and spoken language

Although language, and therefore spoken language or speech, is often considered unique to humans, the past several decades have seen a surge in nonhuman animal studies that inform us about human spoken language. Here, I present a modern, evolution-based synthesis of these studies, from behavioral to molecular levels of analyses. Among the key concepts drawn are that components of spoken language

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The neurobiology of language beyond single-word processing

In this Review, I propose a multiple-network view for the neurobiological basis of distinctly human language skills. A much more complex picture of interacting brain areas emerges than in the classical neurobiological model of language. This is because using language is more than single-word processing, and much goes on beyond the information given in the acoustic or orthographic tokens that ente

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From speech and talkers to the social world: The neural processing of human spoken language

Human speech perception is a paradigm example of the complexity of human linguistic processing; however, it is also the dominant way of expressing vocal identity and is critically important for social interactions. Here, I review the ways that the speech, the talker, and the social nature of speech interact and how this may be computed in the human brain, using models and approaches from nonhuman

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The neural basis of combinatory syntax and semantics

Human language allows us to create an infinitude of ideas from a finite set of basic building blocks. What is the neurobiology of this combinatory system? Research has begun to dissect the neural basis of natural language syntax and semantics by analyzing the basics of meaning composition, such as two-word phrases. This work has revealed a system of composition that involves rapidly peaking activ

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A heavy toll

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Good vibrations

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An imitation circuit

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T cells at work

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Warty pig sticking

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Dawn of methylotrophy

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Americium in a MOF

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Global wildlife trade across the tree of life

Wildlife trade is a multibillion dollar industry that is driving species toward extinction. Of >31,500 terrestrial bird, mammal, amphibian, and squamate reptile species, ~18% ( N = 5579) are traded globally. Trade is strongly phylogenetically conserved, and the hotspots of this trade are concentrated in the biologically diverse tropics. Using different assessment approaches, we predict that, owin

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Unified prebiotically plausible synthesis of pyrimidine and purine RNA ribonucleotides

Theories about the origin of life require chemical pathways that allow formation of life’s key building blocks under prebiotically plausible conditions. Complex molecules like RNA must have originated from small molecules whose reactivity was guided by physico-chemical processes. RNA is constructed from purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, both of which are required for accurate information transfe

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Inception of memories that guide vocal learning in the songbird

Animals learn many complex behaviors by emulating the behavior of more experienced individuals. This essential, yet still poorly understood, form of learning relies on the ability to encode lasting memories of observed behaviors. We identified a vocal-motor pathway in the zebra finch where memories that guide learning of song-element durations can be implanted. Activation of synapses in this path

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Gas flow and accretion via spiral streamers and circumstellar disks in a young binary protostar

The majority of stars are part of gravitationally bound stellar systems, such as binaries. Observations of protobinary systems constrain the conditions that lead to stellar multiplicity and subsequent orbital evolution. We report high–angular resolution observations of the circumbinary disk around [BHB2007] 11, a young binary protostar system. The two protostars are embedded in circumstellar disk

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Seconds-scale coherence on an optical clock transition in a tweezer array

Coherent control of high–quality factor optical transitions in atoms has revolutionized precision frequency metrology. Leading optical atomic clocks rely on the interrogation of such transitions in either single ions or ensembles of neutral atoms to stabilize a laser frequency at high precision and accuracy. We demonstrate a platform that combines the key strengths of these two approaches, based

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Gas filaments of the cosmic web located around active galaxies in a protocluster

Cosmological simulations predict that the Universe contains a network of intergalactic gas filaments, within which galaxies form and evolve. However, the faintness of any emission from these filaments has limited tests of this prediction. We report the detection of rest-frame ultraviolet Lyman-α radiation from multiple filaments extending more than one megaparsec between galaxies within the SSA22

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Active site rearrangement and structural divergence in prokaryotic respiratory oxidases

Cytochrome bd–type quinol oxidases catalyze the reduction of molecular oxygen to water in the respiratory chain of many human-pathogenic bacteria. They are structurally unrelated to mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidases and are therefore a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. We determined the structure of the Escherichia coli cytochrome bd-I oxidase by single-particle cryo–elec

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Scalable submicrometer additive manufacturing

High-throughput fabrication techniques for generating arbitrarily complex three-dimensional structures with nanoscale features are desirable across a broad range of applications. Two-photon lithography (TPL)–based submicrometer additive manufacturing is a promising candidate to fill this gap. However, the serial point-by-point writing scheme of TPL is too slow for many applications. Attempts at p

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Cryo-EM structure of a dimeric B-Raf:14-3-3 complex reveals asymmetry in the active sites of B-Raf kinases

Raf kinases are important cancer drug targets. Paradoxically, many B-Raf inhibitors induce the activation of Raf kinases. Cryo–electron microscopy structural analysis of a phosphorylated B-Raf kinase domain dimer in complex with dimeric 14-3-3, at a resolution of ~3.9 angstroms, shows an asymmetric arrangement in which one kinase is in a canonical "active" conformation. The distal segment of the

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Stochastic antagonism between two proteins governs a bacterial cell fate switch

Cell fate decision circuits must be variable enough for genetically identical cells to adopt a multitude of fates, yet ensure that these states are distinct, stably maintained, and coordinated with neighboring cells. A long-standing view is that this is achieved by regulatory networks involving self-stabilizing feedback loops that convert small differences into long-lived cell types. We combined

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Decline of the North American avifauna

Species extinctions have defined the global biodiversity crisis, but extinction begins with loss in abundance of individuals that can result in compositional and functional changes of ecosystems. Using multiple and independent monitoring networks, we report population losses across much of the North American avifauna over 48 years, including once-common species and from most biomes. Integration o

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Differential soil fungus accumulation and density dependence of trees in a subtropical forest

The mechanisms underlying interspecific variation in conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD) are poorly understood. Using a multilevel modeling approach, we combined long-term seedling demographic data from a subtropical forest plot with soil fungal community data by means of DNA sequencing to address the feedback of various guilds of soil fungi on the density dependence of trees. We show

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A bacterial light response reveals an orphan desaturase for human plasmalogen synthesis

Plasmalogens are glycerophospholipids with a hallmark sn -1 vinyl ether bond. These lipids are found in animals and some bacteria and have proposed membrane organization, signaling, and antioxidant roles. We discovered the plasmanylethanolamine desaturase activity that is essential for vinyl ether bond formation in a bacterial enzyme, CarF, which is a homolog of the human enzyme TMEM189. CarF med

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Satellite testing of a gravitationally induced quantum decoherence model

Quantum mechanics and the general theory of relativity are two pillars of modern physics. However, a coherent unified framework of the two theories remains an open problem. Attempts to quantize general relativity have led to many rival models of quantum gravity, which, however, generally lack experimental foundations. We report a quantum optical experimental test of event formalism of quantum fie

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New Products

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Review with care

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A heavy toll

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Good vibrations

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An imitation circuit

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Tænkeboks: Sommerdagens temperatur var 33 grader C

Her får du løsningen på opgaven fra uge 39!

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Radio Atlantic: Understanding the Whiste-Blower

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) Representative Elissa Slotkin of Michigan says the decision she made to back an impeachment inquiry reminds her of when she worked at the Pentagon toward the end of Barack Obama’s administration, urging that American troops be sent into Iraq to contain ISIS. “If I came home to Michigan and talked about it with my

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A mind-controlled exoskeleton helped a man with paralysis walk again

A man who has paralysis has managed to walk again using an exoskeleton he controls with his mind. The suit is directed by electrodes that rest on the brain's surface, but it can't yet allow independent walking

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An 'unprecedented' rise in infant mortality in England linked to poverty

New study, published in BMJ Open, links a rise in infant mortality in England to poverty.

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NASA Paying Four Companies to Learn How to Make Fuel on the Moon

The space agency is dishing out almost $20 million to research creating rocket fuel from material found on the Moon and Mars. (Credit: NASA Goddard) NASA has awarded a total of $17.4 million to four private aerospace companies to study and produce technologies that could help future space missions create fuel on the Moon and Mars. The companies include Jeff Bezo’s spaceship company, Blue Origin, a

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: Dirt Doesn’t Vote

Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We appreciate your continued support for our journalism. Today in Politics (Brian Snyder / Reuters) Quick , picture a map of the 2016 presidential election. You may be thinking of an Electoral College map, with each state shaded red or blue. Though President Donald Trump touts his Electoral-Coll

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Fossilised partial skeleton of new flying reptile species found in Queensland

Pterosaur had four-metre wingspan, lived about 90m years ago and was capable of crossing continents In the heart of Queensland, palaeontologists have found the fossilised partial skeleton of a new pterosaur species capable of flying across continents. The pterosaur, with a four-metre wingspan, may have lived about 90m years ago. Continue reading…

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The Same Old Encryption Debate Has a New Target: Facebook

Attorney general William Barr seems eager to reignite the encryption wars, starting with the social media giant.

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The Lancet Neurology: Pioneering study suggests that an exoskeleton for tetraplegia could be feasible

A whole-body exoskeleton, operated by recording and decoding brain signals, has helped a tetraplegic patient to move all four of his paralysed limbs, according to results of a 2-year trial published in The Lancet Neurology journal.

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Vaping Outbreak Surpasses 1,000 Cases. And It's Not Slowing Down.

Investigators still don't know what's causing the illnesses.

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When Photographs Turn the Real Into the Surreal

Mladen Antonov's brilliant image from Phuket island asks onlookers to suspend reality and imagine more.

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The world's first psilocybin research center is opening in Jamaica

FieldTrip Ventures is opening the world's first psilocybin research center at the University of the West Indies. More research on magic mushrooms follows mounting evidence of the efficacy of ketamine and MDMA. Ronan Levy of FieldTrip believes psychedelics could help treat a wide range of mental health conditions. None When I noticed articles floating around about the opening of the world's first

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Prototype smartphone app can help parents detect early signs of eye disorders in children

A researcher's prototype smartphone app — designed to help parents detect early signs of various eye diseases in their children such as retinoblastoma, an aggressive pediatric eye cancer — has passed its first big test.

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Instagram’s New App, Whistle-Blower Protocol, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Kidney function may affect risks associated with prescription opioids

Compared with other pain medications, prescription opioids were linked with higher risks of death and hospitalization, particularly with higher doses. The risk of death associated with opioids was highest among people with lower kidney function.

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Elon Musk Paid Convict to Investigate Man He Called “Pedo Guy”

Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk paid a convicted felon called James Howard-Higgins $52,000 to investigate Vernon Unsworth, the British cave diver that Musk called a “pedo guy” last year, according to a bombshell investigation by BuzzFeed News . Musk and his staff didn’t respond to multiple requests by BuzzFeed . Musk’s loose cannon approach to leadership, including a disastrous weed joke that turn

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Here’s the First-Ever Pic Of “Cosmic Web” Connecting All Galaxies

Cosmic Links For the first time, scientists have directly observed something called the “cosmic web,” a vast network of hydrogen channels believed to connect all the galaxies in the universe . Astrophysicists were able to spot the cosmic megastructure lurking between galaxies 12 billion light years away in the Aquarius constellation, The Guardian reports . Not only is a landmark scientific breakt

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'Giant bird table' at Rhossili, Gower helps save species

With a warning hundreds of wildlife species are at risk in Wales, one Gower farm is helping conservation.

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Japan’s Hayabusa2 Spacecraft Drops Off Its Last Robot on Asteroid Ryugu

Japan’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft has been hanging around the asteroid Ryugu for more than a year, dropping off robots and blasting the surface with metal slugs. The Japanese Space Agency (JAXA) hopes to bring Hayabusa2 and its precious cargo of asteroid samples home soon, but first, there’s just one more robot to deploy. Hayabusa2 carried several robots with it to Ryugu, and JAXA confirms the spacecr

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I, Robot: Our Changing Relationship With Technology

Do you ever catch yourself yelling at your Alexa? Or typing questions into Google that you would never ask aloud? This week, we explore our changing relationship with technology. (Image credit: Lee Woodgate/Getty Images/Ikon Images)

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Just add water: Chemists suggest a fix for insoluble drugs

Stable metal organic frameworks are prized for their ability to capture carbon dioxide or harvest atmospheric water, but researchers have developed a use for unstable metal organic frameworks: as a system for drug delivery.

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Dealing a therapeutic counterblow to traumatic brain injury

A team of NJIT biomedical engineers are developing a therapy which shows early indications it can protect neurons and stimulate the regrowth of blood vessels in damaged tissue.

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Identifying a gene for canine night blindness

An international team of researchers led by the University of Pennsylvania's Keiko Miyadera has identified the gene mutation responsible for a form of night blindness in dogs. Strategies to treat this condition, which affects a layer of neurons just below the primary photoreceptor cells, could also inform treatment of other diseases that rely on targeting this cell type.

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Dads Who Drink Right Before A Pregnancy Might Harm Their Baby's Health, Too

Potential dads should lay off the alcohol before conceiving a child, new research says. (Credit: G-Stock Studio/Shutterstock) We’ve known for decades that pregnant women who drink alcohol put their baby at risk of developmental problems. New research out today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology examined a connection that gets less attention — dad’s drinking habits. Paternal drinking

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Young People on Cell Phones Are Catching Up to Their Parents' Keyboard Typing Speeds

Younger cellphone users are closing the gap between how fast they type on a mobile device and how fast the average keyboard user can type. (Credit: Jacob Lund/Shutterstock) Texting on a flip phone keyboard in the early 2000s wasn't a speedy affair. But fast-forward almost two decades later, and we can type out everything from texts to emails on our smartphones. And as time goes on, scientists say

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Three-dimensional structure of the genome replication machine discovered

Researchers have discovered how the enzyme DNA polymerase delta works to duplicate the genome that cells hand down from one generation to the next.

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Targeting regulator of mitochondrial cell death delivers anticancer activity

A novel anticancer molecule created by researchers showed therapeutic activity in preclinical models of various cancer types.

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A Week Break From Facebook Can Make You Less Depressed

Spending time away from Facebook tends to improve people’s moods and help them make healthier, more positive life choices. The findings were as nuanced as they were intriguing. A break from Facebook led respondents to disconnect from the news cycle, according to the Nieman Journalism Lab , though that’s probably also good for staving off feelings of misery. After just a week-long break from Faceb

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Nasa invites bids from firms to build lunar lander for 2024 mission

Artemis project aims to create a ‘sustained’ human presence on the moon by 2028 There can be no doubt that Nasa is serious about trying to land astronauts on the moon by 2024. Even though the Artemis programme has yet to be fully funded , Nasa has issued a call to US companies for a lunar landing spacecraft that will place the first woman and the next man on the moon’s surface. The call has been

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Placenta pathology may clarify racial disparities in preemie health outcomes

African-American infants are twice as likely to die in the first year of life than white infants, for reasons that are complex and not well understood. Results from a recent study suggest that specific abnormalities in the placenta from African-American preterm births may hold clues to the physical mechanisms behind racial disparities in preemie health outcomes.

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Prototype smartphone app can help parents detect early signs of eye disorders in children

A Baylor University researcher's prototype smartphone app — designed to help parents detect early signs of various eye diseases in their children such as retinoblastoma, an aggressive pediatric eye cancer — has passed its first big test.

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How much are you polluting your office air just by existing?

Could your basic acts of existence be polluting the air in the office room where you work? To find out, a team of engineers has been conducting one of the largest studies of its kind.

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Low birth weight linked to cardiovascular risk

In a recent study, researchers discovered that if children had a low birth weight, they were more likely to exhibit cardiovascular risk factors in fifth grade.

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Just add water: Chemists suggest a fix for insoluble drugs

Stable metal organic frameworks are prized for their ability to capture carbon dioxide or harvest atmospheric water, but researchers have developed a use for unstable metal organic frameworks: as a system for drug delivery.

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New test assists physicians with quicker treatment decisions for sepsis

A new test to determine whether antibiotics will be effective against certain bacterial infections is helping physicians make faster and better prescription treatment choices.

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Mounting brain organoid research reignites ethical debate

As research involving the transplantation of human 'mini-brains' — known as brain organoids — into animals to study disease continues to expand, so do the ethical debates around the practice. A new article seeks to clarify the abilities of brain organoids and suggests an ethical framework that better defines and contextualizes these organoids and establishes thresholds for their use.

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Implanted memories teach birds a song

A new songbird study that shows memories can be implanted in the brain to teach vocalizations — without any lessons from the parent.

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'Destiny 2: Shadowkeep' Is Ready to Kill the Past

The new expansion is a haunted one that draws considerable dynamism and tension from making nostalgia horrific.

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'Flash drought' worsening across 14 Southern US states

More than 45 million people across 14 Southern states are now in the midst of what's being called a "flash drought" that's cracking farm soil, drying up ponds and raising the risk of wildfires, scientists said Thursday.

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A critical point about the brain

Neuroscience is one of the most fascinating fields of study, spanning science, art and philosophy. Okay, I may be biased here, but if you really think about it, we are trying to understand emotion, motivation, intelligence, and consciousness. We are trying to discover what sets humans apart, what unifies animals, what causes neurological disease, all […]

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US Drug Addicts May Soon Have a “Safe” Place to Shoot Up

For decades, the United States’ war on drugs has focused on punishing anyone using or trafficking illegal substances. But that could be changing as a controversial initiative designed to reduce drug use, by essentially legalizing it under narrow circumstances, just scored a major win in the nation’s court system. Overdose prevention sites, or safe injection sites , are facilities where drug users

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The Impact of the Claristep Filtration System on Protein Recovery and Adsorption

Download this application note to learn about how a novel multiplexed filtration device makes sample preparation rapid with negligible differences in protein loss!

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How much are you polluting your office air just by existing?

Could your basic acts of existence be polluting the air in the office room where you work? To find out, a team of engineers at Purdue University has been conducting one of the largest studies of its kind.

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Drinking more sugary beverages of any type may increase type 2 diabetes risk

People who increase their consumption of sugary beverages — whether they contain added or naturally occurring sugar — may face moderately higher risk of type 2 diabetes.

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How CBD Keeps THC in Check

The two main compounds in cannabis are in a constant balancing act. THCCBD.jpg Image credits: Marco Verch via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Human Thursday, October 3, 2019 – 16:00 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) — Many people who use cannabis do it for the euphoric effects caused by the main psychoactive ingredient, tetrahydrocannabinol, often called THC. But THC can also cause

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U.S., U.K. urge Facebook not to encrypt messages as they fight child abuse, terrorism

(This Octoebr 3 story has been refilled to correct headline and grafs 1-4 to show agreement involves only the U.S. and the U.K., not Australia. Australia signed a separate open letter to Facebook) …

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World wildlife trade affects one in five species, says report

More than 5,500 species of birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles are bought and sold on the worldwide animal market, a volume that is around 50 percent higher than earlier estimates, a study …

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Ibrutinib linked to high blood pressure and other heart problems, study suggests

Over half of people prescribed the targeted blood cancer-fighting drug ibrutinib developed new or worsened high blood pressure within six months of starting the medication. The analysis is also the first to tie ibrutinib-related hypertension to a heightened risk of heart problems, particularly atrial fibrillation. Moreover, the association of ibrutinib with cardiovascular complications remained re

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Why the language-ready brain is so complex

Scientists argue for a new model of language, involving the interaction of multiple brain networks. This model is much more complex than the classical neurobiological model of language, which was largely based on single-word processing.

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Living with fire risk is not easy

A research team has outlined governance and policy approaches to better manage wildfires.

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Floating galaxy’s radio burst sheds light on galactic halos

The signal from a fast radio burst—an enigmatic blast of cosmic radio waves lasting less than a millisecond—is helping researchers characterize the diffuse gas in the halo of a massive galaxy. Their findings reveal that the massive galaxy sports an unexpectedly inactive halo, with a very low density and weak magnetic field. This discovery gave scientists a rare glimpse of galactic halos, which co

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Why the biggest pledges on emissions are from the smallest countries

Several small countries have joined a pledge to reach net zero emissions by 2050, despite the difficulties. While the larger countries have promised some emissions cuts and funding for green energy, they have yet to match the pledges of the small countries. Several studies have found that poorer countries will be hit harder by climate change than the richer ones. In case you haven't heard, climat

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World wildlife trade affects one in five species, says report

More than 5,500 species of birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles are bought and sold on the worldwide animal market, a volume that is around 50 percent higher than earlier estimates, a study published in Science said Thursday.

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World wildlife trade affects one in five species, says report

More than 5,500 species of birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles are bought and sold on the worldwide animal market, a volume that is around 50 percent higher than earlier estimates, a study published in Science said Thursday.

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Why language is humanity's greatest invention | David Peterson

Civilization rests upon the existence of language, says language creator David Peterson. In a talk that's equal parts passionate and hilarious, he shows how studying, preserving and inventing new languages helps us understand our collective humanity — and gives a quick lesson on High Valyrian, one of two languages he created for "Game of Thrones" (along with Dothraki). "Language is not merely a t

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This Brain Computer Uses Your Jugular Like a USB Cable

submitted by /u/StcStasi [link] [comments]

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Hi-tech greenhouses to be built on two East Anglia [UK] farms

submitted by /u/UnstatesmanlikeChi [link] [comments]

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Robots to replace 200,000 US jobs in banking in 10 years

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Just add water: Chemists suggest a fix for insoluble drugs

Stable metal organic frameworks are prized for their ability to capture carbon dioxide or harvest atmospheric water, but U-M researchers have developed a use for unstable metal organic frameworks: as a system for drug delivery.

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Why Trump Wouldn’t Say ‘Jockstrap’

We have, apparently, found a word that President Donald Trump simply will not say: jockstrap . In the midst of a rant against House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, delivered in front of reporters at a press availability yesterday with the president of Finland, Trump displayed a peculiar case of what linguists call “taboo avoidance.” Schiff had earlier criticized Secretary of State Mi

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Interstellar Object’s Home Solar System May Resemble Our Own

Common Comet Astronomers across the globe were quick to begin studying 2I/Borisov — the second known interstellar object to visit our solar system — almost immediately upon its detection in August . Those observations are already yielding fascinating insights into the comet — including the fact that its solar system of origin might not be that different from our own. Familiar Space An Institute o

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Daddy daycare: Why some songbirds care for the wrong kids

Interspecific feeding—when an adult of one species feeds the young of another—is rare among songbirds, and scientists could only speculate on why it occurs, but now, Penn State researchers have new insight into this behavior.

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Daddy daycare: Why some songbirds care for the wrong kids

Interspecific feeding—when an adult of one species feeds the young of another—is rare among songbirds, and scientists could only speculate on why it occurs, but now, Penn State researchers have new insight into this behavior.

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Plants alert neighbors to threats using common 'language'

New research from Cornell University shows that plants can communicate with each other when they come under attack from pests.

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Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs

The old saying that people marry their parents may be true for poison dart frogs, and it may even lead to the formation of new species, according to a new study in Nature based on work at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI).

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Plants alert neighbors to threats using common 'language'

New research from Cornell University shows that plants can communicate with each other when they come under attack from pests.

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Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs

The old saying that people marry their parents may be true for poison dart frogs, and it may even lead to the formation of new species, according to a new study in Nature based on work at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI).

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NASA finds a transitioning cyclone Mitag filling the sea of Japan

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Sea of Japan on Oct. 3 and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Mitag. Clouds associated with the storm blanketed the Sea of Japan and satellite imagery indicated the storm was becoming extra-tropical.

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Scientists Plan to Capture a Feasting Black Hole on Video

Candid Camera The black hole cinematic universe is growing: scientists running the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) just announced plans to capture real-time video footage of Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way. The EHT, an international network of observatories that combine their data to function like a planet-sized telescope, first captured that groundbreakin

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Global wildlife trade higher than was thought

At least one in five vertebrate species on Earth are bought and sold on the wildlife market.

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Lungs of “Vape Lung” Patients Look Like They Inhaled Poison

A strange vaping-related respiratory illness is sweeping the United States, afflicting more than 800 patients and killing at least 16 . Officials still aren’t sure what’s causing “vape lung,” but theories range from the oils in vaping cartridges to fumes from the vaping devices themselves . In an attempt to solve the mystery, a team of researchers from the Mayo Clinic analyzed samples of lung tis

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Patients say ask before using medical records for research

A new study led by Michigan Medicine researchers finds that even when patients understand the overall benefit to society, they still want to be able to give consent at least once before their de-identified data is used for research. The feeling was especially strong among racial and ethnic minorities.

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New test assists physicians with quicker treatment decisions for sepsis

A new test to determine whether antibiotics will be effective against certain bacterial infections is helping physicians make faster and better prescription treatment choices.

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Just add water: U-M chemists suggest a fix for insoluble drugs

Stable metal organic frameworks are prized for their ability to capture carbon dioxide or harvest atmospheric water, but U-M researchers have developed a use for unstable metal organic frameworks: as a system for drug delivery.

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WVU researchers study link between low birth weight and cardiovascular risk

In a recent study, West Virginia University researcher Amna Umer discovered that if children had a low birth weight, they were more likely to exhibit cardiovascular risk factors in fifth grade.

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Enceladus’ Deep Ocean Contains Basic Building Blocks of Life

If you wanted to pick an example of how NASA’s deep space missions of exploration have changed our understanding of the solar system over just one lifetime, Enceladus’ would be a great choice. Voyager 2’s observations of the Saturnian moon showed a surface that might have been shaped by cryovolcanism but provided relatively few details. The arrival of Cassini changed everything. In 2005, the Satu

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Sims-like disaster models help plan for human freak-outs

Computer models are helping public health researchers plan for disasters. For instance, if a plume of toxic smoke was to hit downtown Los Angeles, would you be better staying inside your building or dashing for the street? Computer models help researchers test out different scenarios to answer just these kinds of questions. Joshua M. Epstein , a professor in the College of Global Public Health at

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Drug that targets body clock may prevent heart attack damage

New research in mice shows that an innovative method targeting body clock mechanisms could promote better repair of the heart muscle after a heart attack.

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Eastern Equine Encephalitis: Causes, Symptoms and Prevention

The Eastern equine encephalitis virus is spread by mosquitoes and, in rare cases, can lead to a life-threatening brain infection.

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Daddy daycare: Why some songbirds care for the wrong kids

Interspecific feeding — when an adult of one species feeds the young of another — is rare among songbirds, and scientists could only speculate on why it occurs, but now, Penn State researchers have new insight into this behavior.

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Large-scale mapping of protein networks behind tumor growth in the lungs

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have used highly sophisticated molecular analyses to identify key proteins in the signaling pathways that cancers use to spread in the body. The study could help in personalizing cancer treatment and develop new drugs.

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Stem cell studies offer hope for childhood neurological condition

Two new studies report progress in using stem cells to develop new therapies for Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD), a rare genetic condition affecting boys that can be fatal before 10 years of age.

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Ant-plant partnerships may play unexpected role in ant evolution

Partnerships between ant and plant species appear to arise from — but not drive — rapid diversification of ants into new species.

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Global wildlife trade a key factor in species decline

Market is more extensive and damaging to biodiversity than previously thought

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Flaming Objects Falling From Sky Were Not Meteorites, Experts Say

UFO Fireballs Mysterious balls of fire rained down in seven locations on a Chilean island last week and astronomers have no idea what they are. Small flaming objects were first spotted on September 25, crash landing on the island of Chiloe in southern Chile, CNET reports . The objects were still so hot from their descent through Earth’s atmosphere, they started a series of small fires. Crash Site

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To Keep the Lights on during Blackouts, Austin Explores Microgrids

The city is connecting rooftop solar installations and storage batteries to increase resilience during storms and heat waves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A ‘Chilling Message’: Trump Critics See a Deeper Agenda in California Feud

From Pennsylvania to New Mexico, the collateral damage to other states is mounting in President Trump's regulatory and environmental feud with California.

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Disney+ May Not Come to Fire TV Over Reported Ad Beef Between Amazon and Disney

Holding out for Disney+ on Fire TV? Not so fast.Read more…

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Nuclear War Between India and Pakistan Could Devastate the Entire Planet

A test of the first hydrogen bomb by the U.S. in 1952 as part of Operation Ivy. (Photo courtesy of National Nuclear Security Administration/Nevada Site Office) Skies darkened by smoke worldwide. …

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The Great British Baking Show Technical Challenges Are a Scourge

Once upon a teatime, The Great British Baking Show was a baking competition. Contestants gathered in a big, unfailingly over-warm tent, clad in their Marks-and-Sparks separates and their greige aprons, awkwardly enthusiastic about being on television but entirely committed to proving themselves as Britain’s best bakers. Mary Berry still had glasses. Paul Hollywood still had pigment in his hair. F

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Hiding spots and predators benefit reef fish

Two factors play a critical role in supporting reef fish populations and—ultimately—creating conditions that favor the growth of both coral reefs and seagrass, researchers report. “Previous work has shown mixed results on whether the presence of large predator species benefits reef fish populations, but we found that the presence of Nassau grouper ( Epinephelus striatus ) had an overall positive

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New neurodevelopmental syndrome and NKAP gene

Researchers have identified a gene mutation that causes developmental delay, intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities and musculoskeletal problems in children. The newly diagnosed condition, called NKAP-related syndrome, arises from mutations in the NKAP gene, which plays a key role in human development.

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Massive filaments fuel the growth of galaxies and supermassive black holes

Based on direct observations researchers have discovered massive filaments between galaxies in a proto-cluster, extending over more than 1 million parsecs and providing the fuel for intense formation of stars and the growth of super massive black holes within the proto-cluster.

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Toxin promotes cattle-to-cattle transmission of deadly Escherichia coli strains

Shiga toxin subtype 2a (Stx2a) may play a key role in promoting the colonization and transmission of life-threatening Escherichia coli strains in cattle, according to a new study.

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How the influenza virus achieves efficient viral RNA replication

Researchers offer new insights on how subunits of the influenza virus polymerase co-evolve to ensure efficient viral RNA replication.

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The Ukraine Whistle-Blower Did Everything Right

The Trump administration's attacks on the whistle-blower aren't just baseless—they could have a corrosive long-term effect.

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More than a quarter of UK mammals face extinction

A report on nature in the UK also shows 41% of species have experienced decline.

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Hurricane Dorian Was Worthy of a Category 6 Rating

The Category-1-to-5 Saffir-Simpson scale for rating hurricanes is inadequate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hurricane Dorian Was Worthy of a Category 6 Rating

The Category-1-to-5 Saffir-Simpson scale for rating hurricanes is inadequate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Plants alert neighbors to threats using common 'language'

New research shows that plants can communicate with each other when they come under attack from pests.

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Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs

By rearing frogs with parents — or foster parents — of different colors, biologists discovered that behavior in response to color may be more important than genetics in the evolution of new species.

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First-Ever Image of the 'Cosmic Web' Reveals the Gassy Highway That Connects the Universe

A groundbreaking new image provides direct evidence of a 'cosmic web' of gas that links every galaxy in the universe.

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Humans may be trading far more species of wildlife than we thought

Estimates based on two wildlife databases suggest 5000 species are traded around the world, with larger, more distinctive animals most at risk

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We've had our best glimpse of a web of matter that spans the universe

A vast spider web of matter is thought to stretch across the universe. Now astronomers have seen its filaments between several galaxies for the first time

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Thousands of UK wildlife and plant species are in decline

The most comprehensive assessment yet of the state of nature in the UK has found the area occupied by more than 6500 species has shrunk by 5 per cent since 1970

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Implanting false memories in a bird's brain changes its tune

Young zebra finches that have never heard adults sing learned to produce notes of different lengths because of false memories researchers implanted in their brains

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The U.S. Government Keeps Too Many Secrets

That the U.S. government has a problem with classifying information—the process of identifying and protecting documents and discussions that must be kept secret to preserve national security—was established long before President Donald Trump’s Ukraine scandal returned the subject to the headlines. Eight blue-ribbon U.S. government commissions have addressed the subject since World War II, Elizabe

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Trump Finally Has His Lawyer

P at Cipollone had been working as White House counsel for just two months when his boss issued his first performance review. During a private ceremony in the Oval Office, Donald Trump was walking around the room, shaking hands, when he stopped and greeted Cipollone and his former law partner Tom Yannucci. Cipollone introduced his old friend and told the president that the two had once worked tog

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Astronomers spot the filaments of gas that feed the galaxies

Observation bolsters prevailing theory of how the cosmos evolved

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Should central banks issue digital currency? Suddenly, it’s an urgent question.

Stable digital currencies—and particularly Facebook’s plans to launch one—have central bankers playing defense.

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Why the language-ready brain is so complex

In a review article published in Science, Peter Hagoort, professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at Radboud University and director of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, argues for a new model of language, involving the interaction of multiple brain networks. This model is much more complex than the classical neurobiological model of language, which was largely based on single-word proces

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Implanted memories teach birds a song

A new songbird study that shows memories can be implanted in the brain to teach vocalizations — without any lessons from the parent.

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Glowing gas reveals faint filaments of the cosmic web

Faintly glowing wisps of gas, excited by the intense light of surrounding star-forming galaxies, have given astronomers a rare glimpse of one of the Universe's largest but most elusive features — the intergalactic filaments of the cosmic web.

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A new, unified pathway for prebiotic RNA synthesis

Adding to support for the RNA world hypothesis, Sidney Becker and colleagues have presented what's not been shown before — a single chemical pathway that could generate both the purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, the key building blocks of RNA.

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Uncovering drug-like small molecules in the human microbiome

Gene clusters once hidden in the human microbiome, whose products resemble clinically used drugs, are now more discoverable, thanks to a new bioinformatics approach.

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Global wildlife trade is higher than previous estimates show

At least one in five vertebrate species on Earth are bought and sold on the wildlife market, according to a new study, the trade estimates for which are 40-60% higher than prior recorded estimates.

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Scientists discover interaction between good and bad fungi that drives forest biodiversity

Researchers from the University of Maryland and the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that the type of beneficial soil fungi living around tree roots determined how quickly the trees accumulated harmful, pathogenic fungi as they grew and could play a key role in determining forest biodiversity.

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Massive filaments fuel the growth of galaxies and supermassive black holes

Based on direct observations researchers have discovered massive filaments between galaxies in a proto-cluster, extending over more than 1 million parsecs and providing the fuel for intense formation of stars and the growth of super massive black holes within the proto-cluster.

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Researchers outline policy approaches to transform fire management

A research team led by Colorado State University's Courtney Schultz has outlined governance and policy approaches to better manage wildfires.

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Toxin promotes cattle-to-cattle transmission of deadly Escherichia coli strains

Shiga toxin subtype 2a (Stx2a) may play a key role in promoting the colonization and transmission of life-threatening Escherichia coli strains in cattle, according to a study published Oct. 3 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Tom McNeilly of the Moredun Research Institute, David Gally of the University of Edinburgh, and colleagues.

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How the influenza virus achieves efficient viral RNA replication

New insights on how subunits of the influenza virus polymerase co-evolve to ensure efficient viral RNA replication are provided by a study published Oct. 3 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Nadia Naffakh of the Institut Pasteur, and colleagues.

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Ant-plant partnerships may play unexpected role in ant evolution

Partnerships between ant and plant species appear to arise from — but not drive — rapid diversification of ants into new species. Katrina Kaur of the University of Toronto, Canada, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Why Lifesaving Drugs May Be Missing on Your Next Flight

Citing chronic shortages, airlines have received exemptions from regulations requiring that flights carry five drugs on board.

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How the Trump inquiry compares to those of the past

The formal opening of an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump late last month has focused the nation’s attention on what happens next. What does history suggest? The impeachment power, as outlined in Article II of the US Constitution, is straightforward but also vague: “The President, Vice President, and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeac

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Researchers Implant Memories in Zebra Finch Brains

Juvenile birds learn the length of the sounds in a song from a false memory introduced via optogenetics, instead of from real interactions with a tutor bird.

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The Mad King’s Enablers

This morning, President Donald Trump committed an impeachable offense on camera . Responding to questioning from reporters about his effort to pressure President Volodymyr Zelensky of Ukraine to launch an investigation into one of his Democratic rivals, former Vice President Joe Biden, Trump reiterated his demand that Ukraine “start a major investigation into the Bidens,” before suggesting that “

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Populations of UK’s most important wildlife have plummeted since 1970

Quarter of mammals and nearly half of birds assessed are at risk of extinction, says State of Nature report Populations of the UK’s most important wildlife have plummeted by an average of 60% since 1970, according to the most comprehensive analysis to date. The State of Nature report also found that the area inhabited by officially designated “priority species” has shrunk by 27%. The species are

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Scientists observe mysterious cosmic web directly for first time

Observations reveal cluster of galaxies about 12bn light years away linked by gas filaments The cosmic web, a vast, mysterious structure that links up far-flung galaxies, has been observed directly for the first time. The observations reveal that an ancient cluster of galaxies about 12bn light years away in the constellation of Aquarius are linked together by a network of faint gas filaments. The

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Study: Higher Air Pollution Linked to Increases in Violent Crime

Crime and Pollutionment A team of researchers from the University of Colorado State University have found strong links between exposure to air pollution and “aggressive behavior,” according to a new study . While they found a correlation, the exact causation is still unknown. “The results are fascinating, and also scary,” associate professor in atmospheric science and co-author Jeff Pierce said i

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The cosmic web exists

Astronomers have confirmed it by viewing gas billions of light years away. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Late finisher

A newly described species suggests Australian pterosaurs may have persisted longer than we thought.

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Drilling down: scientists update estimates of Earth’s carbon reservoirs

A 10-year study finds that it’s massive, compared to carbon above ground. Richard A Lovett reports.

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How we learn and forget while sleeping

Researchers have found a clue to the mystery of retaining selective memories. Paul Biegler reports.

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Implanted memories teach birds a song

A father holds up his newborn, their faces only inches apart, and slowly repeats the syllables "da" and "dee." After months of hearing these sounds, the baby begins to babble and gradually "da da da" is refined to the word "Daddy."

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How the influenza virus achieves efficient viral RNA replication

New insights on how subunits of the influenza virus polymerase co-evolve to ensure efficient viral RNA replication are provided by a study published October 3 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Nadia Naffakh of the Institut Pasteur, and colleagues. As the authors note, the findings could lead to novel strategies for antiviral drug development.

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Scientists discover interaction between good and bad fungi that drives forest biodiversity

Scientists have long understood that forest biodiversity is driven in part by something called rare-species advantage—that is, an individual tree has a better chance of survival if there are only a few other trees of the same species around. As a result, when the number of trees of any given species rises, survival rates among individual trees of that species drop. Scientists agree that rare-speci

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Ant-plant partnerships may play unexpected role in ant evolution

Partnerships between ant and plant species appear to arise from—but not drive—rapid diversification of ants into new species. Katrina Kaur of the University of Toronto, Canada, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

1d

Implanted memories teach birds a song

A father holds up his newborn, their faces only inches apart, and slowly repeats the syllables "da" and "dee." After months of hearing these sounds, the baby begins to babble and gradually "da da da" is refined to the word "Daddy."

1d

How the influenza virus achieves efficient viral RNA replication

New insights on how subunits of the influenza virus polymerase co-evolve to ensure efficient viral RNA replication are provided by a study published October 3 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Nadia Naffakh of the Institut Pasteur, and colleagues. As the authors note, the findings could lead to novel strategies for antiviral drug development.

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Researchers outline policy approaches to transform fire management

Wildfires are natural hazards that are becoming more intense and extensive with climate change. Scientists have previously described what major transformations should take place to contend with these fires, including the need to adapt to more fire on the landscape, change the way communities are designed, allow for more prescribed fire and thin fuels like brush and smaller trees.

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Scientists discover interaction between good and bad fungi that drives forest biodiversity

Scientists have long understood that forest biodiversity is driven in part by something called rare-species advantage—that is, an individual tree has a better chance of survival if there are only a few other trees of the same species around. As a result, when the number of trees of any given species rises, survival rates among individual trees of that species drop. Scientists agree that rare-speci

1d

Ant-plant partnerships may play unexpected role in ant evolution

Partnerships between ant and plant species appear to arise from—but not drive—rapid diversification of ants into new species. Katrina Kaur of the University of Toronto, Canada, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Massive filaments fuel the growth of galaxies and supermassive black holes

An international group of scientists led by the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research has used observations from the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile and the Suprime-Cam at the Subaru telescope to make detailed observations of the filaments of gas connecting galaxies in a large, distant proto-cluster in the early universe.

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NASA finds a transitioning cyclone Mitag filling the sea of Japan

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Sea of Japan on Oct. 3 and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Mitag. Clouds associated with the storm blanketed the Sea of Japan and satellite imagery indicated the storm was becoming extra-tropical.

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Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs

By rearing frogs with parents — or foster parents — of different colors, a team from the University of Pittsburgh working at the Smithsonian in Panama discovered that behavior in response to color may be more important than genetics in the evolution of new species.

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Plants alert neighbors to threats using common 'language'

New research from Cornell University shows that plants can communicate with each other when they come under attack from pests.

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Shape-shifting structures take the form of a face, antenna

Researchers have created the most complex shape-shifting structures to date — lattices composed of multiple materials that grow or shrink in response to changes in temperature. To demonstrate their technique, team printed flat lattices that shape morph into a frequency-shifting antenna or the face of pioneering mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss in response to a change in temperature.

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Wildlife Trade Entangles Nearly a Fifth of the Planet's Vertebrate Animals

In the first global estimate of its kind, researchers tally an incredible 5,600 species harvested for commercial use—and predict which ones could be next — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Academic freedom prevents us from getting trapped in circles of delusion

If channels of expression aren't kept open, there runs a risk of pluralistic ignorance. We all have the right to express ideas even if they're incorrect. How would we know whether an idea is right or wrong without expressing and evaluating it? The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of Stand Together, which encourages the expression of diverse viewpoints within a

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How to make carbon pricing palatable to air travelers

Travellers are willing to pay a little more for flights if they know the extra money will be used to address carbon emissions, a new study has found.

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Wildlife Trade Entangles Nearly a Fifth of the Planet's Vertebrate Animals

In the first global estimate of its kind, researchers tally an incredible 5,600 species harvested for commercial use—and predict which ones could be next — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brooding bees lose sleep for their young – and other offspring

This and other insights raise questions about the evolution and purpose of sleep. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Space is watching

Hubble captures a fading star, the Engraved Hourglass Nebula.

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How to make carbon pricing palatable to air travellers

Travellers are willing to pay a little more for flights if they know the extra money will be used to address carbon emissions, a new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business has found.

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How to make carbon pricing palatable to air travellers

Travellers are willing to pay a little more for flights if they know the extra money will be used to address carbon emissions, a new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business has found.

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Managed forests in New Hampshire rich in carbon

A new study examining carbon stocks in an actively managed mixed wood forest in New Hampshire finds that places with more trees have more carbon stored in both the trees and the soil. The findings demonstrate the connection between above ground and below ground carbon, which has implications for forest management strategies.

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Protein associated with many diseases fully visualized for first time

For the first time, researchers have learned at the molecular level how the P2X7 protein receptor – which is associated with inflammation, coronary artery disease, cancer, multiple sclerosis and more – works. The findings could one day inspire new drugs to treat numerous medical conditions.

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How long does memory last? For shape memory alloys, the longer the better

Scientists captured live action details of the phase transitions of shape memory alloys, giving them a better idea how to improve their properties for applications.

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Incidence of pediatric, adolescent and young adult head and neck melanoma is up 51 percent

Head and neck melanoma among pediatric, adolescent and young adult populations in the United States and Canada increased by 51.1% from 1995 to 2014.

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'Damage Suppressor' Protein Protects Adorable Tardigrades … and Human Cells, Too

Scientists deciphered a key ingredient in tardigrades' arsenal of superpowers, learning how a unique protein in microscopic water bears provides protection from harmful radiation.

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NASA's push to save the Mars InSight lander's heat probe

NASA's InSight lander, which is on a mission to explore the deep interior of Mars, positioned its robotic arm this past weekend to assist the spacecraft's self-hammering heat probe. Known as "the mole," the probe has been unable to dig more than about 14 inches (35 centimeters) since it began burying itself into the ground on Feb. 28, 2019.

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Drip, drip: Former Harvard stem cell researcher up to 18 retractions

Piero Anversa, a former star researcher at Harvard Medical School who left the institution under a cloud, is up to 18 retractions. But that’s barely half of the 31 papers by Anversa’s group that Harvard has requested journals pull over concerns about the integrity of the findings. The two articles, published in the Proceedings of … Continue reading

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Big cities go green to fight against climate change

Cities are at the forefront fighting against climate change in a range of ways, according to a new article. In 2018, New York became the first US city to require buildings to publicly display letter grades indicating their energy efficiency. So when the law goes into effect in 2020, you’ll see an A, B, or C on front doors, similar to the way restaurants currently feature their health ratings. New

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This is how a 'fuzzy' universe may have looked

Scientists have found that the early universe, and the very first galaxies, would have looked very different depending on the nature of dark matter. For the first time, the team has simulated what early galaxy formation would have looked like if dark matter were "fuzzy," rather than cold or warm.

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Protein associated with many diseases fully visualized for first time

For the first time, researchers have observed at the molecular level how a protein associated with numerous health problems works.

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