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nyheder2019oktober05

I Heard It Before, So It Must Be True

Repeated exposure to implausible statements makes them feel less so — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The future of gas stations (Norway)

submitted by /u/leonerdo_ [link] [comments]

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Basic Income Recipients Spent the Money on “Literal Necessities”

submitted by /u/onlyartist6 [link] [comments]

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The GM strike is really about the switch to electric cars

submitted by /u/cambeiu [link] [comments]

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$500 a month for free: Data shows how people spent the money.

submitted by /u/onlyartist6 [link] [comments]

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Marc Benioff says capitalism, as we know it, is dead.

submitted by /u/onlyartist6 [link] [comments]

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Uninhabitable Planets

Calling a distant world Earth-like is bad practice; calling it habitable is not much better — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Gigabyte Cranks AMD Ryzen 9 3950X Flagship CPU To A Blazing 4.3GHz Across All 16 Cores

The Ryzen 9 3950X Zen 2 flagship desktop processor was supposed to launch last month, but at the last minute, AMD said that it was delaying its release until November. Hardcore enthusiasts …

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Find a room of your own: top 10 tips for women who want to write

Give up wanting to be liked, live with imposter syndrome and love what you do. Suzanne Moore advises aspring women writers How does a woman write? This woman is writing on her laptop in bed wearing her lipstick. She looks quite ridiculous. She is wishing the teenagers downstairs would make less noise and will go down periodically to shout at them and to get some biscuits, maybe some cheese, a sma

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Weekend reads: The need for more honesty in science; a fight between authors of a GM mosquito paper; faked academic CVs

Before we present this week’s Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured a case of doing the right thing in autism research; … Continue reading

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Ancient Sippy Cups Could Help Explain a Prehistoric Baby Boom

By weaning their infants off breast milk, mothers may have helped early European farming populations expand.

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Is It Possible to Get Fit Fast?

Everybody wants to get that beach body right now or to run that 10k next month, but can you really get fit fast? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This Week’s Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through October 5)

AUTOMATION UPS Gets FAA Clearance to Roll Out a Fleet of Delivery Drones Allison Matyus | Digital Trends “The move essentially will allow UPS to create its own drone airline. The company’s UPS Flight Forward program now has full FAA Part 135 Standard certification to operate a fleet of drones beyond an operators’ line of sight and the ability to fly drones at night. The company’s Matternet drones

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Lilly Singh’s Late-Night Challenge

Go ahead, label Lilly Singh an outsider. The newest addition to late night knows she’s a television rarity—a “ unicorn ,” as she calls herself. “The media has mentioned I’m a bisexual woman of color so much I feel like I need to change my name,” Singh quipped during the opening monologue of her new show, A Little Late With Lilly Singh . At the time, she laughed off the joke with a graphic of a fa

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Synes du, spaniere snakker hurtigt? De når faktisk ikke frem til pointen, før du gør

Alle sprog er lige hurtige til at komme frem med budskabet, viser forskning.

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This Peer-to-Peer Real Estate Investing Platform Is Changing the Mortgage Game

Technological advancement often brings disruption and democratization. It replaces the old with the new and facilitates the rapid expansion of access to specialized tools and information that previously had been the purview of a select few. And nowhere is this more true in the 21st century than the financial services industry. The first big wave came when online trading platforms like E-Trade dem

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A Bug in Popular Android Phones Gives Hackers Full Control

FCC comment bots, a "bulletproof" hosting takedown, and more of the week's top security news.

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'Rule of Capture' Combines Legal Thriller and Dystopian Sci-Fi

Author Christopher Brown's new novel centers on a lawyer struggling to defend political prisoners.

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"Biggest Shark of All Time" Gets Downsized

Real megalodons weren’t nearly as enormous as their silver-screen counterparts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In Case You Missed It

Top news from around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Elektricitet kunne finde god anvendelse i landvæsenet

Dynamo-elektriske maskiner kan med fordel benyttes på sukkerfabrikker og som boremaskiner, drejebænke og rundsave. Men om elektriciteten engang vil afløse damplokomotivet, er endnu et åbent spørgsmål, ifølge Opfindelsernes Bog fra 1883.

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men, masculinity, and the unfinished conversation, with Liz Plank

None In the past half century or so feminism has had its hands plenty full dealing with the abuse and inequality women suffer at the hands of horribly behaved men and the systems they build. Too full to worry much about what the hell is going on inside those men and why. And there are powerful arguments to be made for the fact that it is not women's responsibility to help men figure out how not t

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The Viral Video Game Where You Play a Horrible Goose

Untitled Goose Game begins with a honk. A goose emerges from a bush, focused and ready, with no other purpose than to test the mettle of local villagers. The makers of this video game—the best-selling title for the Nintendo Switch as of this week—describe it as a “slapstick-stealth-sandbox” experience, in which players direct a bird to do mildly mean things to people as they go about their day. T

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Wolf Gourmet Precision Griddle Review: Not That Precise

You can choose a specific temperature for your pancakes, but in a serious design flaw, the cooking surface heats unevenly.

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Why NASA's Annoyed About Elon Musk's Giant Rocket

SpaceX has never flown a person into space in its first spacecraft, the Crew Dragon. But already Musk is showing off his big, shiny Starship — and NASA is bristling.

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Can You Count Past Infinity?

How many different types of infinity are there, and can we count past any of them?

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What If Earth Had a Global Hyperloop Network?

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MAD Architects unveils solar-powered Hyperloop transit system

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The U.S. Gives Military Aid to Corrupt Countries All the Time

If you take Donald Trump at face value about his now-infamous phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, which occurred shortly after he mysteriously stopped military aid meant for Ukraine, he was only concerned about sending millions to a country known for corruption. It was just a coincidence that he named his political rival’s son, Hunter Biden. He raised an important issue, albei

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New Research: China Is Winning Some Health-Care Battles — And Losing Others

A suite of new research shows the country beating infectious diseases over the last two decades. But deaths from lifestyle-related diseases like cancer and diabetes are on the rise. (Image credit: Wang HE/Getty Images)

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The First Smartphone War

Mechanized combat and photography grew up together. In the Iraqi city of Mosul, they merged.

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These Small Cars Can Help Drive the Autonomous Future

Researchers are using 1/10th-size models to test self-driving technology more cheaply and easily than full-size vehicles.

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15 Spooky Tech Deals on Drones, Headphones, and Horror Games

It's the first weekend of October. Time to get your Halloween jitters on.

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Cardiff Half Marathon: Worry over environmental impact

Organisers of the Cardiff Half Marathon have taken measures to reduce the event's carbon footprint.

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I can see the future, but I don't know what it holds. Is humanity ready?

As technological progress accelerates exponentially humanity faces a philosophical and ethical challenge in the mid-term future (upcoming 50 years). There are so many key technologies on the edge of a breakthrough or actually are already beginning to be a part of society. There is biotechnological advancements like CRISPR CAS9 Genome Editing where people could be "designed" to be the biological p

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Redefining the “experts” in education reform might be the key to success

The right kind of education reform will happen with people instead of to people. Part of this requires redefining who the "experts" are in education. It might be beneficial to loosen control on the part of those that train principals and teachers. If educators can view themselves as hosts to the conversation of what schools could look like, the movement for change becomes more courageous.

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The Best Economic News No One Wants to Talk About

Stop me if this sounds familiar: For most American workers, real wages have barely budged in decades. Inequality has skyrocketed. The richest workers are making all the money. Earnings for low-income workers have been pathetic this entire century. These claims help drive the interpretation of breaking economic news. For example, the Labor Department yesterday reported that the unemployment rate f

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Where Freedoms Are Expanding—Slowly

A little more than a year ago, I stood among a crush of reporters shouting questions at President Donald Trump and his Uzbek counterpart, Shavkat Mirziyoyev, in the Oval Office, and asked Mirziyoyev what his White House meeting would ultimately mean for the Uzbek people. His reply was a standard one: The visit, he said, showed that Uzbekistan’s voice mattered in international affairs—but then, ac

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Marijuana Reform Should Focus On Inequality

Especially because Americans of color have borne the brunt of the drug war, they deserve to share in the marijuana boom now taking hold across the country. And if America’s long history with another smokable intoxicant—tobacco—is any guide, government rules will decide who can profit from growing the crop. At the moment, though, those rules favor well-connected corporate growers rather than indep

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Ugens debat: Skal krydstogtskibe tvinges til landstrøm?

Ifølge de europæiske havnes organisation, ESPO, undlader mange krydstogtskibe at benytte landstrøm i de havne, hvor det findes. I stedet lader de deres fossildrevne generatorer køre videre i havnen, fordi det er billigere. Det fik mange læsere på ing.dk til at ryge af raseri. I stedet lader de d…

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Apple Offers Repairs for Busted iPhone 6s Models So Long As It's Their Fault

If you’re an Apple user who’s still rocking an iPhone 6s or 6s Plus and it suddenly started refusing to turn on, don’t worry: It’s Apple’s fault, not yours.Read more…

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Commonwealth targets climate change with regeneration projects

The Commonwealth on Friday launched an ideas-sharing network to tackle the effects of climate change through replicable regeneration projects.

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Divers fight Senegal's plastic tide

When the sight of plastic bags, bottles and other debris littering the seabed becomes too much, there's just one thing to do: don your diving suit, strap on an air tank and fish out the stuff yourself.

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The Only Time Trump Wants International Cooperation

Love your nation. Celebrate its sovereignty. Never buy into the misguided idea that someone else’s country should tell you how to run yours. President Donald Trump’s speech to the United Nations General Assembly last week was an ode to chest-thumping nationalism. But in one specialized field of human endeavor, Trump seems to believe that America is not nearly great enough: sliming political rival

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The Boring Company's Las Vegas Loop tunnel project is coming to life

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The Himalayan village that confiscates single-use plastics

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Im looking forward to the future of Real Estate

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French Entrepreneur Creates Light Without Electricity

submitted by /u/doctortesla [link] [comments]

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Rumskib af stål er få måneder fra jomfrutur

PLUS. SpaceX er kun to måneder fra opsendelsen af rum­skibet Starship, der på sigt skal fragte gods og mennesker til Månen og Mars.

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It’s not just Greta Thunberg: why are we ignoring the developing world’s inspiring activists? | Chika Unigwe

Young people in the global south have been tackling the climate crisis for years. They should be celebrated too Ridhima Pandey was just nine years old in 2017 when she filed a lawsuit against the Indian government for failing to take action against climate change. Pandey’s fierce, astounding passion for the environment is not accidental. Her mother is a forestry guard and her father an environmen

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Kamala Khan will be a main character in the 'Marvel's Avengers' game

After a few years of waiting, the Marvel's Avengers game from Crystal Dynamics is almost ready for release. During a panel at New York Comic-Con, the company revealed one more …

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Åh, åh, ÅHHH JA! Det sker der, når kvinder (endelig) kommer

Kvindens krop sætter gang i det hele store system, når hun rammer klimaks.

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Oldest ever illustrated book is a guide to Ancient Egyptian underworld

The Book of Two Ways is a 4000-year-old illustrated guide to the Ancient Egyptian underworld, and fragments of the earliest known copy have now been found

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The Himalayan village that confiscates single-use plastics

This tiny Himalayan village has shunned single-use plastics – the impact is too serious for them.

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Russisk mand dømt for at misbruge computer på hemmeligt atombombe-anlæg

Manden brugte supercomputeren til at grave efter bitcoins.

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London’s Mayoralty: Britain’s Last Political Refuge?

Britain’s highest political office might be on Downing Street, but its safest can be found across town at London City Hall. The position of mayor of London, like that of prime minister, is one of the most nationally and internationally visible positions in British politics—albeit with a fraction of the responsibility. It’s a job that wields plenty of soft power, though, and past holders of the of

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Growing Crops in the Desert with Seawater

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. 3D printed architecture examples at the facility tour in China, Sep. 2019. Housing cost may get cheaper with this technology." data-inlineentryid="ph1I0CaMDnAbP/AnrA80jkNtpkqxUYZElYlN8IFQrnM=_16d9a33baed:5903a6f:ad5391a1" data-u="0">

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Bara Marocko och Gambia gör tillräckligt för att nå 1,5-gradersmålet

“Hur vågar ni?” frågade Greta Thunberg världens ledare i sitt tal vid FN:s klimatmöte. “Ni har stulit min framtid med era tomma ord.” Och ja, hittills har världens ledare inte hållit vad de lovat i Parisavtalet. Bara två afrikanska länder har klimatambitioner i linje med 1,5 graders uppvärmning.

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Hampshire farmers join Extinction Rebellion climate protest

They want to highlight the fact they are one of the industries worst affected by climate change.

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Robot Butlers when?

When do you think Robot Butlers will become common place? submitted by /u/kiwi5151 [link] [comments]

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Paralyzed man crosses room with brain-controlled exoskeleton

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Paralyzed man walks again with brain-controlled exoskeleton

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Japan's Hayabusa 2 releases rover to land on asteroid Ryugu

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In a Quantum First, Physicists Put 2,000 Atoms in Two Places at Once

We're getting closer to the boundary of quantum and classical physics.

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Caspase-7 uses RNA to enhance proteolysis of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and other RNA-binding proteins [Biochemistry]

To achieve swift cell demise during apoptosis, caspases cleave essential proteins for cell survival and removal. In addition to the binding of preferred amino acid sequences to its substrate-binding pocket, caspase-7 also uses exosites to select specific substrates. 4 lysine residues (K38KKK) located in the N-terminal domain of caspase-7 form…

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Anti-evolution drug may help treat resistant breast cancers

Some breast tumours evolve resistance to chemotherapy, but a new drug already in human trials could restore the effectiveness of the main existing treatment

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PayPal Unfriends Facebook's Libra Cryptocurrency

The payment company was to be one of the 28 founding members of the Libra Association. Its departure reflects concerns of other financial players.

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Space Photos of the Week: Oh Pioneers!

Two twin probes from the 1970s sent back some of our first images from Saturn and Jupiter.

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A US Election Phishing Attack, Quitting Vaping, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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'Red Dead Redemption 2' Is Finally Coming to PC—and Stadia, Too!

Rejoice, PC users. You're getting your cowboy game. Yee—and we can't stress this enough—haw.

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: Mr. Vice President

Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We appreciate your continued support for our journalism. Today in Politics (Alex Wong / Getty) Vice President Mike Pence has by all accounts been a dutiful Robin to President Donald Trump’s Batman, going to bat for him even in those rare instances when other Republicans are mum. But with an impe

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Nine Nobel Prize Predictions for 2019

(Credit: Abigail Malate/Copyright American Institute of Physics) (Inside Science) — Every year, the Nobel Prizes in physiology or medicine, physics, and chemistry honor great advances and discoveries in science. Last year, one of our top contenders in medicine — checkpoint inhibitors for cancer therapy — won. We were not as successful in the other two categories. But buoyed by that modicum of s

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Baby Binary Star Gives Astronomers a Glimpse at How Planets Like Tatooine Form

With the help of ALMA's dust-penetrating gaze, researchers got this snapshot of a young stellar pair in action. (Credit:ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), Alves et al.) Astronomers recently imaged two budding stars locked in a gravitational waltz that twisted their planet-forming disks into a pretzel-shaped knot. The stars, recently imaged with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), are givin

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Planet Nine Might Be a Black Hole the Size of a Baseball

Tiny black holes are thought to speckle the universe, and new research posits the solar system may have captured one. (Credit: nagualdesign/Tom Ruen/Wikimedia Commons) Something strange may be lurking in the outer solar system. The odd orbits of distant space rocks suggest there’s a giant, elusive world dubbed Planet Nine waiting out there to be discovered. But now, in a new research paper, a team

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This New Prosthetic Leg Hooks Into Users' Nervous Systems

One of the study participants walking with a prototype of the new prosthetic leg. (Credit: Federica Barberi) A new prosthetic leg integrates with a wearer's nervous system to give real-time feedback about their environment. Users can report they can "feel" where their artificial leg is in space, giving them the ability to complete a range of tasks previously out of reach. Researchers described tes

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Treating pulmonary embolism: How safe and effective are new devices?

A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association identifies the risks and benefits of novel interventional devices compared to anticoagulation alone in the treatment of patients with pulmonary embolism. Authors conclude there is little data — particularly, as it pertains to the treatment of patients with 'intermediate-risk PE' — that suggests these interventional approaches are mor

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Melting ice – the future of the Arctic | DW Documentary

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Quadriplegic Man Uses Exoskeleton to Walk, Move Arms Again

When I was a child, the age-appropriate science magazines the school would distribute sometimes had stories about upcoming medical advances. That was where I first encountered the idea that scientists might one day construct a robotic exoskeleton that could help a man to walk. We’ve covered innovations in the field before at ET, including the development of remote-control limbs. Now, scientists h

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Watch the First Video of a Virus Growing in Real-Time

For the first time, researchers have captured the formation of individual viruses on camera in real-time — and the footage could yield new insights into how best to fight the bugs. In a paper published recently in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the team from Harvard’s John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences details how it obtained the footage usin

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Ancient Greek Scroll's Hidden Contents Revealed Through Infrared Imaging

More than 200 years ago, a scroll damaged by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius was unrolled and pasted onto cardboard, even though it had writing on the back. New imagery shows some of what's hidden. (Image credit: A. Tournié, Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation)

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NASA sets 1st all-female spacewalk after suit flap in spring

The first all-female spacewalk is back on, six months after a suit-sizing flap led to an embarrassing cancellation.

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Yellow cedar rejected for threatened species listing

An iconic Alaska tree with roots that can freeze to death if not covered by snow was rejected Friday by a federal agency for the threatened species list.

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Turmoil mounts at MIT Media Lab as scientist is ousted for sexual harassment

V. Michael Bove was terminated last week, further roiling a center already in turmoil over ties to convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein

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Yellow cedar rejected for threatened species listing

An iconic Alaska tree with roots that can freeze to death if not covered by snow was rejected Friday by a federal agency for the threatened species list.

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Earth's Magnetic Poles Can Flip Much More Often Than Anyone Thought

Earth's magnetic field flipped 26 times every million years during the Cambrian period, the highest frequency ever documented.

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Optical imager poised to improve diagnosis and treatment of dry eye disease

Researchers have developed a new non-invasive optical imaging system that promises to improve diagnosis and treatments for dry eye disease. Dry eye, which often causes irritation and blurred vision, occurs when there is instability in the inner layer of the tear film that protects the outside of the eye.

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Next-generation single-photon source for quantum information science

Over the last two decades, tremendous advances have been made in the field of quantum information science. Scientists are capitalizing on the strange nature of quantum mechanics to solve difficult problems in computing and communications, as well as in sensing and measuring delicate systems. One avenue of research in this field is optical quantum information processing, which uses photons—tiny par

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Anesthetizing fish may affect research outcomes

Fish use colorful patterns to signal to each other, including advertising for mates and warding off rivals. Studying these colors, especially in small and squirmy species, sometimes entails anesthetizing and photographing the fish to obtain color measurements from digital images.

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'Raising Dion' Is the Latest in the Netflix Era of Just OK TV

The series is not likely to be some rogue outlier show that can't quite take off; it's the streaming giant's new normal.

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Anesthetizing fish may affect research outcomes

Fish use colorful patterns to signal to each other, including advertising for mates and warding off rivals. Studying these colors, especially in small and squirmy species, sometimes entails anesthetizing and photographing the fish to obtain color measurements from digital images.

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Anesthetizing fish may affect research outcomes

Fish use colorful patterns to signal to each other, including advertising for mates and warding off rivals. Studying the relationship between color and behavior sometimes entails anesthetizing and photographing the fish, but anesthetics may alter coloration, influencing the traits researchers are trying to study.

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New insights into the genomic landscape of meningiomas identified FGFR3 in a subset of patients with favorable prognoses

The identification of oncogenic mutations has provided further insights into the tumorigenesis of meningioma and the possibility of targeted therapy.

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American Journal of Roentgenology finds no consensus on handling outside imaging studies

According to an ahead-of-print article published in the January issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), there is 'no consensus' among academic radiologists regarding how to handle second-opinion consultations on outside studies. Developing best practices could help radiologists 'gain more clarity from a malpractice mitigation standpoint and have greater leverage with payers for appro

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Getting Ready for the 2019 Nobel Prizes

Beginning early Monday morning, Inside Science will cover the three most anticipated science prizes of the year. nobel2019_landingpageillo2.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics Culture Friday, October 4, 2019 – 16:30 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — It's almost time for the world of science to turn its eyes to Sw

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Infrared Imaging Gives Researchers Better View Of Contents On Ancient Papyrus Scroll

After more than 200 years, with the help of infrared imaging technology, physicists have been able to finally read what's on the back of a draft of Philodemus' History of the Academy.

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Twin Births in the U.S. Are Dropping, and Experts Have a Theory

Researchers believe that the decline may be connected to advances in embryo transfers during in vitro fertilization.

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This Brilliant Children’s Book Introduces Kids to Basic STEM Concepts

If you’re a parent or educator, you already know how important it is to introduce children to basic STEM concepts as early as possible. Not only does a STEM kids education prepare our children for the kinds of jobs they’ll have in our new information-based and highly technological society, but it also instills valuable life skills like ingenuity, problem-solving, experimentation, resilience, team

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Twin Baby Stars Caught Feeding from Their Mother, a Twisted 'Pretzel' of Interstellar Dust

Twin baby stars snuggle inside a "pretzel" of glowing gas and dust in an image captured by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array telescope.

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The 1st All-Female Spacewalk Is Back On, After Medium-Size Spacesuits Acquired

NASA is gearing up for a marathon of spacewalks, and one of them could be the first spacewalk to be conducted entirely by women.

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Toyota Used VR to Teach a Home Helper Robot How to Clean

Household HAL Japanese tech giant Toyota’s Research Institute (TRI) is training robots to fulfill random household tasks by letting humans look through the bots’ eyes via virtual reality. “When teaching a task, a person can try different approaches, making use of their creativity to use the robot’s hands and tools to perform the task,” TRI wrote in a press release . “This makes leveraging and usi

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Kitty Hawk’s New Flying Car Promises a (Near) Silent Flight

Larry Page's aviation outfit, helmed by Sebastian Thrun, built the Heaviside with eight motors and a big wing to help generate lift.

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Salk scientists find way to quantify how well cutting-edge microscopy technique works

Salk scientists provide a foundation for quantitatively determining how differences in viewing angles affect the resulting 3D structures of proteins, and could help other researchers determine the best setup for experiments to improve the imaging technique called cryo-EM.

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Next-generation single-photon source for quantum information science

University of Illinois Physics Professor Paul Kwiat and his former postdoctoral researcher Fumihiro Kaneda (now at Tohoku University) have built what Kwiat believes is 'the world's most efficient single-photon source.' And they are still improving it. With planned upgrades, the apparatus could generate upwards of 30 photons at unprecedented efficiencies. Sources of that caliber are precisely what'

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Optical imager poised to improve diagnosis and treatment of dry eye disease

Researchers have developed a new non-invasive optical imaging system that promises to improve diagnosis and treatments for dry eye disease. Dry eye, which often causes irritation and blurred vision, occurs when there is instability in the inner layer of the tear film that protects the outside of the eye.

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Household bleach inactivates chronic wasting disease prions

A 5-minute soak in a 40% solution of household bleach decontaminated stainless steel wires coated with chronic wasting disease (CWD) prions, according to a new study. The scientists used the wires to model knives and saws that hunters and meat processors use when handling deer, elk and moose – all of which are susceptible to CWD.

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On Philosophy, Death and the Sea

A young philosopher finds philosophy consoling because it is impossible. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Flash Drought in the South Brings Record Heat Without Rain

Autumn is here, and it’s still hot. Here is what we know about the record-breaking temperatures and low precipitation across much of the American South.

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Researchers discover a link between two important products of nitric oxide

Oxide plays a key role in cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases as well as cancer. Experiments reveal a hitherto unknown mechanism underlying the formation of nitroso thiols.

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Facebook Just Livestreamed an Employee Q&A With Mark Zuckerberg

About Face On Tuesday, The Verge published leaked audio of a Facebook employee Q&A session during which CEO Mark Zuckerberg commented on Senator Elizabeth Warren’s plans to breakup big tech companies if she were to win the presidency. A Warren presidency “would suck for us,” he told attendees — comments that the popular presidential hopeful has since used to remind voters of her plan for broader

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Tesla Smart Summon and Curious Owners: What Could Go Wrong?

Smart Summon is the latest Tesla feature making headlines that aren’t good news for Tesla. The feature lets a driver remotely get his car out of a parking space and drive across the lot to where the driver stands in wait. It’s part of Tesla Version 10.0 software that became available Sept. 26. Tesla owners, a proud bunch, have chosen to video-record their initial experiences. The rollout has not

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The Books Briefing: Remembering Pain on the Page

The narratives of historical and personal traumas rely on reliving painful memories to help process past experiences—and to help understand how their effects live on in the future. Ta-Nehisi Coates considered the national memory of slavery when writing his debut novel, The Water Dancer , which examines the psychological effects of the institution’s torments, such as family separation. The trauma

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Rick Perry’s most surprising legacy as energy secretary could be bigger science budget

Artificial intelligence became a bigger DOE priority under Perry

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3D scaffold could let docs test cancer drugs on patient cells

A new 3D structure for growing cancer cell cultures could allow doctors to test medications on model tumors they grow from a patient’s own cells, researchers report. Unlike previous devices, researchers made the new structure from protein fibers that cells know how to modify. “We can potentially use the cultures to do things like drug testing or single cell analysis , which may help us identify t

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Optical imager poised to improve diagnosis and treatment of dry eye disease

Researchers have developed a new non-invasive optical imaging system that promises to improve diagnosis and treatments for dry eye disease. Dry eye, which often causes irritation and blurred vision, occurs when there is instability in the inner layer of the tear film that protects the outside of the eye.

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New metasurface design can control optical fields in three dimensions

A team led by scientists has designed and tested a 3D-printed metamaterial that can manipulate light with nanoscale precision. Their designed optical element focuses light to discrete points in a 3D helical pattern.

22h

Iranian Hackers Targeted a US Presidential Candidate

A revelation from Microsoft offers a chilling reminder that Russia is not the only country interested in swaying the 2020 election.

22h

Australia Just Had a Bad Flu Season. That May Be a Warning for the U.S.

In 2017, a terrible flu season in Australia presaged an American outbreak in which 79,000 died. Experts advise getting the shot soon.

22h

Listening to gospel music 'unexpectedly' linked to several maladaptive traits

New research predicts links between music and film preferences and recent models of unhealthy and psychopathic personality traits. A study on 379 participants found that conservative music tastes and a preference for faith-based movies that were the most strongly correlated to dysfunctional personality traits. Psychopathy's component of "boldness" corresponded to enjoyment of rhythmic beats, like

22h

Inhibition of histone deacetylase 2 reduces MDM2 expression and reduces tumor growth in dedifferentiated liposarcoma

Here the researchers present in silico, in vitro, and mouse xenograft studies that suggest that specifically targeting HDAC2 reduces MDM2 expression and has anti-tumor affects in DDLPS. In a murine DDLPS xenograft model, romidepsin reduced tumor growth and lowered tumor MDM2 expression.

22h

Household bleach inactivates chronic wasting disease prions

A 5-minute soak in a 40% solution of household bleach decontaminated stainless steel wires coated with chronic wasting disease (CWD) prions, according to a new study published in PLOS One. The scientists used the wires to model knives and saws that hunters and meat processors use when handling deer, elk and moose – all of which are susceptible to CWD. The research was conducted at Rocky Mountain L

22h

Aging and cancer: A surprising two way relationship

Although aging is the greatest risk factor for cancer, a recent study demonstrates how aging cells might, paradoxically, hinder cancer progression.

22h

U.S. agency reviews whether 2,000 Teslas should have been recalled

U.S. regulators said on Friday they were reviewing whether Tesla Inc should have recalled 2,000 of its electric cars in May instead of issuing a software upgrade to fix a potential defect that …

22h

A global push to get from disease genes to medicines

With 70,000 DNA markers in hand, new organization aims to draft a road map for figuring out what they do

22h

Hong Kong Bans Surveillance-Thwarting Face Masks

Forget Me Not With pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong entering their fourth month, the nation’s Chief Executive, Carrie Lam, has announced a ban on “any facial covering that is likely to prevent identification” during public demonstrations. “We believe that the new law will create a new deterrence effect against masked violent protesters and rioters,” Lam explained during a live-streamed press c

22h

2-part cancer drug works without kidney side effects

A new anti-cancer drug has less toxic effects on the kidneys than current drugs do, researchers report. The new drug works like a “magic bullet” that goes directly to cancer cells’ mitochondria—the power generators of cells. Once the drug reaches the tumor, two active molecules—an anti-cancer drug and a sensitizer—are released at once, where they attack the mitochondria, leading to the death of c

22h

Evacuating Australia's drought-affected fish

To prevent another summer of mass fish deaths, authorities have launched a painstaking operation.

22h

Herculaneum scroll: Shining a light on 2,000-year-old secrets

Scientists in Oxfordshire are trying to decipher scrolls buried when Mount Vesuvius erupted in AD79.

22h

Climate change: Polarstern icebreaker begins year-long Arctic drift

The research vessel is spearheading the biggest ever scientific expedition at the North Pole.

23h

Google Finds Zero-Day Android Exploit Affecting Pixel, Samsung, and More

The exploit affects a handful of phones from Google, Samsung, Huawei, and others. Google also notes there is evidence the exploit is already active in the …

23h

Brain-Controlled Exoskeleton Enables Paralyzed Patient to Walk

The machine cannot be used outside of the lab yet, but the results are promising.

23h

New metasurface design can control optical fields in three dimensions

A team led by scientists has designed and tested a 3D-printed metamaterial that can manipulate light with nanoscale precision. Their designed optical element focuses light to discrete points in a 3D helical pattern.

23h

Light-up tattoos use electronics printed right onto skin

A new print-in-place technique for electronics is gentle enough to work on delicate surfaces including paper and human skin, researchers report. The advance could enable technologies such as high-adhesion, embedded electronic tattoos, and bandages tricked out with patient-specific biosensors. “When people hear the term ‘printed electronics,’ the expectation is that a person loads a substrate and

23h

Scientists on Arctic Expedition Choose Ice Floe That’ll Be Home for a Year

The Mosaic mission has picked the ice floe it will be frozen into for the next year, to learn more about global warming's effects on the Arctic.

23h

How Common Are Psychotic Experiences?

Psychotic experiences are more common than you might think and don't mean you have a mental health condition.

23h

F.D.A. Approves New H.I.V.-Prevention Drug, but Not for Women

Citing a lack of evidence, the agency will require Gilead to conduct further trials in women.

23h

Scientists Zap Birds’ Brains With Light to Implant False Memories

Bird Brained Most zebra finches learn to sing by mimicking the songs of their parents. But now, a team of University of Texas Southwestern researchers has managed to implant memories of songs the birds had never heard before right into the animals’ brains — and they did so using patterns of light. Familiar Tune In a paper published in the journal Science on Thursday, the researchers detail how th

23h

This other bariatric surgery better reduces diabetes

For people with obesity, a procedure rarely performed in the US more effectively eliminates type 2 diabetes than Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, a small study shows. Researchers thought that the less common procedure—called biliopancreatic diversion—better reduces diabetes because it typically causes greater weight loss than the more common surgery. But in a small study, the researchers found that bili

23h

The Supreme Court Will Soon Test Its Commitment to Abortion Rights

For legal nerds, the alarm has sounded: The Supreme Court decided this morning that it will hear June Medical Services LLC v. Gee , the first big abortion case it has granted since President Donald Trump’s two Supreme Court appointees, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh, took the bench. This may be the Court’s first step in radically shifting its approach to abortion cases, gradually undoing the st

23h

Republicans Don’t Want To Talk About It

When then-candidate Donald Trump urged the Russian government to find Hillary Clinton’s missing emails, in 2016, his own running mate Mike Pence turned on him, warning the Kremlin of “serious consequences” if Russian hackers had interfered in the election. The leader of Trump’s party in the House of Representatives, Paul Ryan, advised the “devious thug” Vladimir Putin to “stay out of this electio

23h

Ingestible sensor allows patients to be independent but still supported during TB treatment

Ingestible sensor enables patients to take tuberculosis drugs independently and receive timely support from medical staff. 100% of patients in US, trial were cured and preferred the new technology with the potential to revolutionize the treatment and cure of tuberculosis, the world´s biggest infectious disease killer.

23h

Scientists find timekeepers of gut's immune system

Shift work and jet lag disrupt not just sleep cycles, but feeding and digestive cycles as well. Such disruptions have been linked to risk of obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, infection, and other conditions. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified an immune cell that helps set the daily rhythms of the gut. The findings open the door to new treat

23h

New metasurface design can control optical fields in three dimensions

A team led by scientists at the University of Washington has designed and tested a 3D-printed metamaterial that can manipulate light with nanoscale precision. As they report in a paper published Oct. 4 in Science Advances, their designed optical element focuses light to discrete points in a 3D helical pattern.

23h

The Veterinarian Will See Your Dinosaur Now

We asked a pet doctor how he’d treat the fossilized injuries found to have affected some of prehistory’s most fearsome reptiles.

23h

More Than 100 People Got Legionnaires' at a State Fair. Hot Tubs May Be to Blame.

More than 100 people have fallen ill with Legionnaires' disease after attending a North Carolina state fair last month, and officials say the outbreak source may have been hot tubs.

23h

New test detects opioids on the breath

A new test can detect opioids in a person’s breath, researchers report. A breath test could be useful in caring for chronic pain patients as well as for checking for illegal drug use. “There are a few ways we think this could impact society,” says Cristina Davis, chair of the mechanical and aerospace engineering department at the University of California, Davis, who led the research along with Mi

23h

This is how you kick facial recognition out of your town

Bans on the technology have mostly focused on law enforcement, but there’s a growing movement to get it out of school, parks, and private businesses too.

23h

New metasurface design can control optical fields in three dimensions

A team led by scientists at the University of Washington has designed and tested a 3-D-printed metamaterial that can manipulate light with nanoscale precision. As they report in a paper published Oct. 4 in the journal Science Advances, their designed optical element focuses light to discrete points in a 3-D helical pattern.

23h

Demonstration of slow light in rubidium vapor using single photons from a trapped ion

Practical implementation of quantum networks is likely to interface different types of quantum systems. Photonically linked hybrid systems, combining unique properties of each constituent system, have typically required sources with the same photon emission wavelength. Trapped ions and neutral atoms both have compelling properties as nodes and memories in a quantum network but have never been pho

23h

Ancient Greek text concealed on the back of unrolled papyrus revealed through shortwave-infrared hyperspectral imaging

Only a few Herculaneum rolls exhibit writing on their reverse side. Since unrolled papyri are permanently glued to paperboard, so far, this fact was known to us only from 18th-century drawings. The application of shortwave-infrared (SWIR; 1000-2500 nm) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) to one of them ( PHerc. 1691/1021) has revealed portions of Greek text hidden on the back more than 220 years after th

23h

Dominant nonlocal superconducting proximity effect due to electron-electron interaction in a ballistic double nanowire

Cooper pair splitting (CPS) can induce nonlocal correlation between two normal conductors that are coupled to a superconductor. CPS in a double one-dimensional electron gas is an appropriate platform for extracting a large number of entangled electron pairs and is one of the key ingredients for engineering Majorana fermions with no magnetic field. In this study, we investigated CPS by using a Jos

23h

Giant optical nonlinearity interferences in quantum structures

Second-order optical nonlinearities can be greatly enhanced by orders of magnitude in resonantly excited nanostructures. These resonant nonlinearities continually attract attention, particularly in newly discovered materials. However, they are frequently not as heightened as currently predicted, limiting their exploitation in nanostructured nonlinear optics. Here, we present a clear-cut theoretic

23h

High-efficiency single-photon generation via large-scale active time multiplexing

Deterministic generation of single- and multiphoton states is a key requirement for large-scale optical quantum information and communication applications. While heralded single-photon sources (HSPSs) using nonlinear optical processes have enabled proof-of-principle demonstrations in this area of research, they are not scalable as their probabilistic nature severely limits their generation effici

23h

Extreme biomimetics: Preservation of molecular detail in centimeter-scale samples of biological meshes laid down by sponges

Fabrication of biomimetic materials and scaffolds is usually a micro- or even nanoscale process; however, most testing and all manufacturing require larger-scale synthesis of nanoscale features. Here, we propose the utilization of naturally prefabricated three-dimensional (3D) spongin scaffolds that preserve molecular detail across centimeter-scale samples. The fine-scale structure of this collag

23h

Ultralong cycle stability of aqueous zinc-ion batteries with zinc vanadium oxide cathodes

Rechargeable aqueous zinc-ion batteries are promising candidates for large-scale energy storage but are plagued by the lack of cathode materials with both excellent rate capability and adequate cycle life span. We overcome this barrier by designing a novel hierarchically porous structure of Zn-vanadium oxide material. This Zn 0.3 V 2 O 5 ·1.5H 2 O cathode delivers a high specific capacity of 426

23h

Rapid laser solver for the phase retrieval problem

Tailored physical systems were recently exploited to rapidly solve hard computational challenges, such as spin simulators, combinatorial optimization, and focusing through scattering media. Here, we address the phase retrieval problem where an object is reconstructed from its scattered intensity distribution. This is a key problem in many applications, ranging from x-ray imaging to astrophysics,

23h

Controlling three-dimensional optical fields via inverse Mie scattering

Controlling the propagation of optical fields in three dimensions using arrays of discrete dielectric scatterers is an active area of research. These arrays can create optical elements with functionalities unrealizable in conventional optics. Here, we present an inverse design method based on the inverse Mie scattering problem for producing three-dimensional optical field patterns. Using this met

23h

Interference of clocks: A quantum twin paradox

The phase of matter waves depends on proper time and is therefore susceptible to special-relativistic (kinematic) and gravitational (redshift) time dilation. Hence, it is conceivable that atom interferometers measure general-relativistic time-dilation effects. In contrast to this intuition, we show that (i) closed light-pulse interferometers without clock transitions during the pulse sequence are

23h

Stimulated transformation of soft helix among helicoidal, heliconical, and their inverse helices

Dynamic modulation of soft helix in terms of the molecular organization, handedness, and pitch length could result in a sophisticated control over its functions, opening numerous possibilities toward the exploration of previously unidentified applications. Here, we report a dynamic and reversible transformation of a soft helical superstructure among the helicoidal (molecules orthogonal to helical

23h

Extending electron paramagnetic resonance to nanoliter volume protein single crystals using a self-resonant microhelix

Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy on protein single crystals is the ultimate method for determining the electronic structure of paramagnetic intermediates at the active site of an enzyme and relating the magnetic tensor to a molecular structure. However, crystals of dimensions typical for protein crystallography (0.05 to 0.3mm) provide insufficient signal intensity. In this work,

23h

Hidden writing revealed on ancient scroll buried in same ash as Pompeii

Infrared imaging uncovers new words from a famous philosopher—and corrects some errors

23h

This Bizarre, Eel-Like Shark Prowled the Oceans 350 Million Years Ago

Paleontologists discovered the first nearly complete skeleton of an ancient shark belonging to the genus Phoebodus.

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Aggressive breast cancers store large amounts of energy, which enables it to spread

Researchers found that aggressive breast cancers store glycogen in very large amounts, offering an explanation of how cells can change their function to evade treatment, grow and spread. Targeting an enzyme involved in this process could potentially treat or prevent metastases.

1d

Rare view into the formation of viruses

For the first time, researchers have captured images of the formation of individual viruses, offering a real-time view into the kinetics of viral assembly. The research provides new insights into how to fight viruses and engineer self-assembling particles.

1d

This Bizarre, Eel-Like Shark Prowled the Oceans 350 Million Years Ago

Paleontologists discovered the first nearly complete skeleton of an ancient shark belonging to the genus Phoebodus.

1d

Lab-made primordial soup yields RNA bases

Nature, Published online: 04 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02622-4 The chemical feat strengthens theory that the first life on Earth was based on RNA.

1d

Scientist designs 'express courier service' for immune cells

A researcher who is currently doing his post-doctoral training at Stanford University, has successfully invented a novel transfection method to deliver DNA into immune cells with minimal stress on these cells. This new technique is expected to boost DNA-based cancer immunotherapy by significantly improving the process of generating high-quality genetically modified immune cells.

1d

Basic Income Recipients Spent the Money on “Literal Necessities”

A popular argument levied by opponents of universal basic income (UBI) — an unconditional, periodic payment given to all members of a society — is that recipients will use the money on frivolous purchases. But the first data is finally trickling in from a UBI experiment in Stockton, California — and it seems most of the 125 people in the program used the $500 they received each month for food, ut

1d

Study shows reduced Illinois Medicaid spending in pediatric population, limited savings from care coordination

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago are reporting in JAMA Network Open that Medicaid expenditures for children and young adults have decreased in Illinois. However, a care coordination demonstration project did not further reduce the cost of care for kids participating in the program within its first year.

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First video of viruses assembling

For the first time, researchers have captured images of the formation of individual viruses, offering a real-time view into the kinetics of viral assembly. The research provides new insights into how to fight viruses and engineer self-assembling particles.

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The three things that could kill the pilotless airliner

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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The James Franco Lawsuit Has a Point to Make About ‘Comfort Zones’

Late yesterday, news broke : Two women, Sarah Tither-Kaplan and Toni Gaal, are suing James Franco and two of his partners in the acting school Studio 4—on the grounds that the men “engaged in widespread inappropriate and sexually charged behavior towards female students by sexualizing their power as a teacher and an employer by dangling the opportunity for roles in their projects.” The allegation

1d

Trump, Facing Farmers’ Discontent, Plans Help for Ethanol

Amid rising political pressure from trade-war fallout, the Trump administration is moving to increase purchases of domestic grain to make ethanol.

1d

Impact of exosomal HIV-1 Tat expression on the human cellular proteome

The researcher's previous work has demonstrated that exosomal formulations of Tat can reverse HIV-1 latency in primary CD4+ T lymphocytes isolated from long term antiretroviral treated individuals suggesting a potential role for Tat as a therapeutic HIV-1 Latency Reversal Agent.

1d

Study: Aggressive breast cancers store large amounts of energy, which enables it to spread

Researchers found that aggressive breast cancers store glycogen in very large amounts, offering an explanation of how cells can change their function to evade treatment, grow and spread. Targeting an enzyme involved in this process could potentially treat or prevent metastases.

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As Temperatures Rise, "Flash Drought" Takes Hold across South

Areas have gone from near-record wetness to drought conditions in just a matter of months — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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