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nyheder2019oktober07

New research furthers understanding about what shapes human gut microbiome

A new Northwestern University study finds that despite human's close genetic relationship to apes, the human gut microbiome is more similar to that of Old World monkeys like baboons than to that of apes like chimpanzees.

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Skibe løser nye svovlkrav ved at sende udstødningen i havet

PLUS. Rederier over hele verden har travlt med at installere scrubbersystemer, der vasker røgen og leder stofferne ud i havet, inden de nye krav til svovludledning træder i kraft til nytår.

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Street by Street, Amsterdam Is Cutting Cars Out of the Picture

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Klinikchef: Sådan kommer vi videre efter Svendborgsagen

Mistilliden til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed er ikke svundet, men jeg har nogle konkrete bud på forbedringer, skriver Jan Bonde, klinikchef på Rigshospitalet og tidligere politianmeldt af styrelsen.

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I tried to hack my insomnia with technology. Here’s what worked.

Fancy trackers and headbands are all part of a growing sleep-tech industry. I decided to put them to the test.

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Ny teknologi integrerer operationsstuen, men har ingen effekt

PLUS. Det giver ikke bedre operationer, og hospitalerne sparer hverken tid eller penge med dyr teknologi, der integrerer udstyret på en operationsstue.

33min

How Misha the Bristol polar bear changed zoos forever

The Russian circus polar bear brought to live at Bristol Zoo who helped change zoos.

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Patented concept from Halle: novel, high-performance diodes and transistors

Today's computer processors are increasingly pushed to their limits due to their physical properties. Novel materials could be the solution. Physicists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have investigated if and how these materials might be developed. They have created, tested and filed a patent for a concept that utilises the latest findings from the field of spintronics. The te

39min

J. Robert Schrieffer (1931–2019)

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03015-3 Physicist who shared Nobel for theoretical basis of superconductivity.

46min

Självtvång ska stoppa speldjävulen

Sju spelare sitter runt bordet, sex män och en kvinna. Men i kväll är det ingen som spelar. De har kommit hit för att stödja varandra. En efter en berättar de ärligt om hur spel om pengar trasat sönder deras liv. De övriga i rummet sitter knäpptysta och bara lyssnar.

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Hon förlorade allt på nätkasinon

– Det går snabbt att tillfredsställa behovet. Man sitter där med sin dator. Trycker på knappar. Det kan till och med kamoufleras som jobb. Pengar är inte pengar. Det är bara siffror. Jag blev en stjärna på att fatta dumma beslut. All sans, allt förnuft, allt vett var borta. Så beskriver organisationskonsulten Margareta Börjesson sitt spelande.

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AI-based cytometer detects rare cells in blood using magnetic modulation and deep learning

Detection of rare cells in blood and other bodily fluids has numerous important applications including diagnostics, monitoring disease progression and evaluating immune response. For example, detecting and collecting circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in blood can help cancer diagnostics, study their role in the metastatic cascade and predict patient outcomes. However, because each millilitre of whol

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Brazil highways drive Amazon development—and destruction

Trucker Erik Fransuer spends months at a time driving back and forth on highways that cut through the Amazon in northern Brazil, delivering soy or corn to river ports.

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Lions kill cattle, so people kill lions. Can the cycle end?

Saitoti Petro scans a dirt road in northern Tanzania for recent signs of the top predator on the African savannah. "If you see a lion," he warns, "stop and look it straight in the eyes—you must never run."

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Lions kill cattle, so people kill lions. Can the cycle end?

Saitoti Petro scans a dirt road in northern Tanzania for recent signs of the top predator on the African savannah. "If you see a lion," he warns, "stop and look it straight in the eyes—you must never run."

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US official: Research finds uranium in Navajo women, babies

About a quarter of Navajo women and some infants who were part of a federally funded study on uranium exposure had high levels of the radioactive metal in their systems, decades after mining for Cold War weaponry ended on their reservation, a U.S. health official Monday.

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Our Amazon: Brazilians who live in the world's biggest rainforest

Cattle breeders, indigenous teachers and loggers are among the more than 20 million people living in the Amazon in northern Brazil, carving out a living from the world's largest rainforest.

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Skab sanktioner over for ‘banditter i kitler’

Medicinrådet har ingen sanktionsmuligheder over for lægemiddelfirmaet Biogen, der prissætter Spinraza urimeligt højt – kun at nægte at bruge lægemidlet, hvilket går ud over patienterne. Det skriver Leif Vestergård, medlem af Medicinrådet, som opfordrer statsministeren til at arbejde for fælles europæiske sanktionsmuligheder.

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How to Donate or Recycle Your Lego Bricks

The toy company has partnered with a logistics company to collect, wash, and redistribute used Lego pieces as part of its sustainability goal.

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Scientists use machine-learning algorithms to help automate plant studies

Father of genetics Gregor Mendel spent years tediously observing and measuring pea plant traits by hand in the 1800s to uncover the basics of genetic inheritance. Today, botanists can track the traits, or phenotypes, of hundreds or thousands of plants much more quickly, with automated camera systems. Now, Salk researchers have helped speed up plant phenotyping even more, with machine-learning algo

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Scientists use machine-learning algorithms to help automate plant studies

Father of genetics Gregor Mendel spent years tediously observing and measuring pea plant traits by hand in the 1800s to uncover the basics of genetic inheritance. Today, botanists can track the traits, or phenotypes, of hundreds or thousands of plants much more quickly, with automated camera systems. Now, Salk researchers have helped speed up plant phenotyping even more, with machine-learning algo

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Heat waves could increase substantially in size by mid-century, says new study

Our planet has been baking under the sun this summer as temperatures reached the hottest ever recorded and heat waves spread across the globe. While the climate continues to warm, scientists expect the frequency and intensity of heat waves to increase. However, a commonly overlooked aspect is the spatial size of heat waves, despite its important implications.

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Hydrogen Water Is Not “the New Nutrient;” Health Claims Are Hype, Not Science.

A new fad, drinking hydrogen water, claims to provide all kinds of health benefits. The scientific evidence isn't there.

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New research furthers understanding about what shapes human gut microbiome

A new Northwestern University study finds that despite human's close genetic relationship to apes, the human gut microbiome is more similar to that of Old World monkeys like baboons than to that of apes like chimpanzees.

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New research furthers understanding about what shapes human gut microbiome

A new Northwestern University study finds that despite human's close genetic relationship to apes, the human gut microbiome is more similar to that of Old World monkeys like baboons than to that of apes like chimpanzees.

2h

These Women Say a Trusted Pediatrician Abused Them as Girls. Now They Plan to Sue.

State officials stripped Stuart Copperman of his medical license almost 20 years ago. Armed with a new law, his former patients hope to file civil lawsuits.

2h

Urban, home gardens could help curb food insecurity, health problems

Food deserts are an increasingly recognized problem in the United States, but a new study from the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior indicates urban and home gardens—combined with nutrition education—could be a path toward correcting that disadvantage.

2h

Modified quantum dots capture more energy from light and lose less to heat

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have synthesized magnetically-doped quantum dots that capture the kinetic energy of electrons created by ultraviolet light before it's wasted as heat.

2h

Saturnus har flest månar i solsystemet

Saturnus har passerat gasjätten Jupiter som den planet i solsystemet som har flest månar. Åtminstone när det gäller det antal som astronomerna hittills lyckats upptäcka.

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In two states, legalization of recreational marijuana found to have little effect on crime

Eleven states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana. A new study funded by a grant from the National Institute of Justice sought to determine the effect of this legal change on crimes rates. The study, which looked at legalization and sales of recreational cannabis in Colorado and Washington, found minimal to no effect on rates of violent and property crimes in those states.

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Eight Chinese tech firms placed on U.S. Entity List for their role in human rights violations against Muslim minority groups

Eight Chinese tech firms, including SenseTime and Megvii, have been added to the U.S. government Entity List for their role in enabling human rights violations against Muslim minority groups …

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How deepfakes undermine truth and threaten democracy | Danielle Citron

submitted by /u/If_If_Was_a_5th [link] [comments]

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Nuclear Called Irrelevant in Climate Fight Without Lower Costs

submitted by /u/the_shitpost_king [link] [comments]

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Everyone's Hoping an Election Will End the Brexit Crisis. It Won't.

Tired and frustrated, trust in each other all but gone, Britain and the European Union are on the brink of throwing away three years of painstaking work setting out the terms of their separation over a fundamental—and important—point of principle that both sides refuse to abandon: sovereignty. The United Kingdom and the EU now have barely a week to agree on a compromise that would determine the r

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Gigantisk fyrværkeri: Mælkevejens midte eksploderede for 3,5 millioner år siden

Eksplosionen skyldes et sort hul i midten af vores galakse, siger forsker.

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Thin to win

University of Utah electrical and computer engineering researchers have developed a new kind of optical lens that is much thinner and lighter than conventional camera lenses that also works with night imaging, a future boon for smartphones that could flatten those unsightly 'camera bumps' as well as for drones and night vision cameras for soldiers.

4h

Weight stigma affects gay men on dating apps

Weight stigma is an issue for queer men using dating apps, says a new University of Waterloo study.The study found that Grindr, the most popular dating app for gay, bisexual, two-spirit and queer men, had a negative effect on men's body image, especially when it came to weight. Three out of four gay men are reported to have used Grindr.

4h

Fish in early childhood reduces risk of disease

It doesn't take that much fish for young children to reap big health benefits. Even eating fish just once a week yields good results.

4h

In 2 states, legalization of recreational marijuana found to have little effect on crime

A new study funded by a grant from the National Institute of Justice sought to determine the effect of this legal change on crimes rates. The study, which looked at legalization and sales of recreational cannabis in Colorado and Washington, found minimal to no effect on rates of violent and property crimes in those states.

4h

Regular exercise is good for your heart, no matter how old you are!

Regular exercise is highly beneficial for all patients with cardiovascular disease regardless of age, report investigators in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, published by Elsevier. Their results showed that the patients who benefited most from cardiac rehabilitation were those who started out with the greatest physical impairment.

4h

The effectiveness of electrical stimulation in producing spinal fusion

Researchers from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of published data on the effect of electrical stimulation therapies on spinal fusion. They found significant improvement overall in the rates of bone fusion following a course of electrical stimulation in both preclinical (animal) and clinical (human) studies.

4h

Dags för mystiska fotoner att få priset

Experimentet som bevisade att Albert Einstein hade fel om kvantfysiken har i många år varit en av storfavoriterna för nobelpriset i fysik. Men kanske är det dags för ett fysikpris för mänsklighetens bästa och belöna forskarna bakom den första moderna klimatmodellen, tycker SVT:s vetenskapsreporter Ulrika Engström.

4h

How do you breathe less pollution on school run?

Going on foot, by bike or by car? Three Sheffield families took part in a test to find out.

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The story of thalidomide continues

An international study co-authored by researchers at Tokyo Tech and Tokyo Medical University has unveiled a detailed view of how thalidomide, one of the most notorious drugs ever developed, causes abnormalities in limb and ear development. The findings may contribute to the re-emergence of safe, or non-teratogenic, thalidomide-derived drugs as a treatment for cancer and inflammatory diseases.

7h

Scientists Just Discovered 20 Previously Unknown Moons Orbiting Saturn

It now has more moons than any other planet in the Solar System.

8h

How Cells Sense Oxygen Levels: Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

William Kaelin, Sir Peter Ratcliffe and Gregg Semenza share the 2019 Nobel Prize for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability. New therapies for cancer and conditions… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Cells Sense Oxygen Levels: Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

William Kaelin, Sir Peter Ratcliffe and Gregg Semenza share the 2019 Nobel Prize for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability. New therapies for cancer and conditions… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

This Lake on Mars Was Drying Up 3.5 Billion Years Ago

Mars' Gale Crater once held a lake of liquid water. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ESA/DLR/FU Berlin/MSSS) Mars was a very different place as a young planet. Liquid water dotted the Red Planet’s landscape with lakes and rivers. But the planet’s climate changed drastically in the past few billion years. Today, scientists see the remains of the planet’s bodies of water in dried-up river channels and salt

8h

Which Galaxies are Best Suited for the Evolution of Alien Life?

The Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite of our Milky Way, may be well-suited for the evolution of life. (Credit: John A Davis/Shutterstock) Where in the universe can life evolve? When scientists discuss this question, they’re usually talking about what kinds of planets might support life. But some researchers are thinking bigger. In recent years, astronomers have been investigating whether some ty

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Stephen Lukasik, 88, Who Pushed Tech in National Defense, Is Dead

He oversaw the Defense Department’s research division in the 1960s and ’70s, when it made great early strides in nuclear-device detection, artificial intelligence and computer networking.

9h

Instagram removes 'Following' feature that allowed people to see other users' likes and comments.

Instagram eliminates 'Following' feature, which let users snoop on what their friends were liking and commenting on, something that was making many of the app's users miserable.

9h

'Ozone hole vigilance still required'

It may be the smallest ozone hole in three decades but scientists are warning against complacency.

9h

Study shows Housing First program significantly reduces homelessness over long term

The longest running study of its kind on the 'Housing First' model has found that it significantly reduces homelessness over the long term compared to treatment as usual, according to a study published in The Lancet Psychiatry by scientists at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and St. Michael's Hospital. Housing First provides immediate access to rent supplements and mental health

10h

UNAIDS HIV targets will be missed among gay men in Africa, study suggests

Despite improvements in HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Africa, many are missing out on HIV treatment.

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The Lancet HIV: Severe anti-LGBT legislations associated with lower testing and awareness of HIV in African countries

This first systematic review to investigate HIV testing, treatment and viral suppression in men who have sex with men in Africa finds that among the most recent studies (conducted after 2011) only half of men have been tested for HIV in the past 12 months. In addition, only a quarter of men living with HIV were on antiretroviral therapy or virally suppressed.

10h

Urban, home gardens could help curb food insecurity, health problems

Food deserts are an increasingly recognized problem in the United States, but a new study indicates urban and home gardens — combined with nutrition education — could be a path toward correcting that disadvantage.

10h

Treatment for 'low T' could someday come from a single skin cell

Researchers have successfully grown human, testosterone-producing cells in the lab, paving the way to someday treat low testosterone with personalized replacement cells.

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Voltage gated calcium channels 'read' electric patterns in embryos to create cartilage and bone

Scientists have revealed how the electrical patterns formed within an embryo initiate a cascade of molecular changes that culminate in the development of cartilage and bone. Prior studies have shown these electrical patterns appear like blueprints of the tissues and organs that eventually take shape as the embryo matures. The new study demonstrates that voltage gated calcium channels 'read' the el

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The Atlantic Politics Daily: Sticks and Stones (and Tweets)

Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We appreciate your continued support for our journalism. Today in Politics (Illustration: Paul Spella; Michael Heiman / Getty) President Donald Trump faces backlash after conflicting messages about withdrawing American troops from positions in northeastern Syria— and thus leaving the U.S.’s loca

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Ancient Sippy Cups, A Full-Control Android Hack, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Mark Zuckerberg is reportedly 'nervous' about an Elizabeth Warren presidency

Leaked audio from internal Facebook meeting ostensibly showcases Zuckerberg's candid thoughts on Elizabeth Warren. Zuckerberg tells his staff that they're ready to "go to the mat and and you fight." Warren has not backed down on her calls for busting up the big tech companies. U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren, now one of the leading Democratic presidential nominee frontrunners, is doubling down on h

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Publisher Correction: Seasonal synchronization of sleep timing in industrial and pre-industrial societies

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51010-5

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Scientists Used Gene Editing to Create a Bull Without Horns. It Passed the Trait to its Offspring

A horned bull from a control group is flanked by two hornless offspring of a genome-edited bull. (Credit: Alison Van Eenennaam) In promising news for dairy farmers, researchers have bred what are likely the first offspring from a genome-edited bull. The calves were born without horns, a trait that occurs naturally in cattle but was given to their father via previous DNA-editing research. The offsp

11h

Whole Body Vibration: Does Shaking Up Our Workouts Lead to Better Health?

Does working out on a vibrating plate help make us stronger? (Credit: Alliance Images) Can we vibrate ourselves healthy? That's the premise behind a form of therapy called Whole Body Vibration, or WBV. Proponents argue that subjecting our bones and muscles to rapid vibrations makes them stronger, much in the same way exercise does. The idea is simple: Standing on a vibrating plate forces our muscl

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An App That Can Catch Early Signs Of Eye Disease In A Flash

After his son developed a rare eye cancer, a chemist in Texas developed a smart phone app that uses a camera and artificial intelligence to detect early signs of eye disease. (Image credit: Munson et al., Sci. Adv. 2019; 5 eaax 6363)

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How ISIS Returns

This is the story of how the Islamic State could make its comeback. For weeks now, Iraq has been rocked by anti-government protests and violent crackdowns. Its prime minister, a U.S. ally, may resign . And now America’s local partners in Syria, the Kurds—who have done more than anyone to roll back ISIS there at the expense of thousands of lives—have been left on their own to face a potential inva

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Här är KI-forskaren som arbetat med nobelpristagaren i medicin

Susanne Schlisio, cancerbiolog vid Karolinska institutet, har ingått i nobelpristagaren och cancerforskarens Wiliam Kealins team. Det team som upptäckte hur celler anpassar sig till syretillgång och hur den processen är kopplad till cancer. – Jag är överväldigad och känner mig oerhört hedrad och stolt över Will, säger hon.

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Want to Learn More About Breast Cancer? Read This Book

A 35-year-old journalist responded to her diagnosis with questions — lots of them. In “Radical,” she delivers the facts and the story of her treatment.

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Will having kids be worth it in the 2020s?

I'm only 18, so I'm definitely not ready to have kids. I'd like to wait until I'm at least 25 to have my first child, which would be in 2026… but looking at the state of the world and where it seems to be heading, wouldn't it be selfish? To bring a child into a world that is only getting worse? My hypothetical child would reach their "prime" in 2050, which sounds like a rather precarious year.

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The GM strike is really about the switch to electric cars

submitted by /u/megaboz [link] [comments]

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Can Vegetarianism Stop Climate Change?

submitted by /u/megaboz [link] [comments]

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Plastic has a problem; is chemical recycling the solution?

submitted by /u/thinkB4WeSpeak [link] [comments]

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This Microbe Is Spreading Antibiotic Resistance to Other Bacteria

Scientists found that the superbug MRSA had been gifted its antibiotic resistance from another microbe.

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China Is Breeding Massive Pigs That Weigh More than a Grand Piano

Pork Problems A devastating outbreak of African swine fever has destroyed an estimated half of China’s pig population over the past year or so. That’s a huge deal given that China consumes more pork than any other nation, so China’s government responded by urging farmers to increase pig production — and some have taken that to mean they should breed the biggest pigs we’ve seen this side of “Okja,

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Useless Self-Help Guide Offers Ludicrous Solutions to Everyday Problems

A new book by Randall Munroe, author of the popular science webcomic xkcd, explains how to fix real-world problems by using science to find ridiculously complicated solutions.

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Hypoxia researchers win 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine

Nobel recognizes breakthrough insights into cell's perception and response to changes in oxygen levels. Too title oxygen is a problem. Also too much. Their research unveiled a genuine "textbook discovery." None The 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine has just been awarded to three scientists from the U.S. and U.K. working independently on the same problem: How cells sense and adapt to oxygen availabilit

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Heat waves could increase substantially in size by mid-century, says new study

Scientists found that by mid-century, in a middle greenhouse emissions scenario, the average size of heat waves could increase by 50%. Under high greenhouse gas concentrations, the average size could increase by 80% and the more extreme heat waves could more than double in size.

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Drops in income may not only hurt the wallet, they may harm the brain

Young adults who experience annual income drops of 25% or more may be more at risk of having thinking problems and reduced brain health in middle age, according to a study in Neurology. Researchers examined how often income dropped between 1990 and 2010 for each participant and found that when compared to people with no income drops, people with two or more income drops had smaller total brain vol

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Urban, home gardens could help curb food insecurity, health problems

Food deserts are an increasingly recognized problem in the United States, but a new study from the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, indicates urban and home gardens — combined with nutrition education — could be a path toward correcting that disadvantage.

12h

NASA Releases 3D Mapping Data From the Moon

You can’t take a trip to the real moon, at least not right now. You might be able to visit the surface virtually before long, though. NASA has released a visual data set that it calls the “ CGI Moon Kit ,” which will allow designers to create authentic moonscapes in games and other types of media. The kit is, of course, completely free to download. The data for the Moon Kit comes from NASA’s Luna

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Meningioma molecular profile reliably predicts tumor recurrence

Researchers report tumor's molecular profiles that might better predict meningioma recurrence.

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Modified quantum dots capture more energy from light and lose less to heat

Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have synthesized magnetically-doped quantum dots that capture the kinetic energy of electrons created by ultraviolet light before it's wasted as heat.

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Initiating breastfeeding in vulnerable infants

The benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and child are well-recognized, including for late preterm infants (LPI). But because LPI do not have fully developed brains, they may experience difficulties latching and/or sustaining a latch on the breast to have milk transfer occur. This means that these infants are at high risk for formula supplementation and/or discontinuation of breastfeeding.

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Klimamyter: Hvad er rent faktisk sandt om klimaforandringerne?

En af verdens førende klimaforskere afgør, om klimamyterne holder vand.

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3 Physician-Scientists Will Share 2019 Nobel Prize For Physiology Or Medicine

Three scientists will share this year's Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine by discovering the mechanism cells use to sense and respond to oxygen.

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When Biking and Bears Don’t Mix

Conservationists worry that the popularity of recreational mountain biking and e-bikes in public lands leads to unsafe conditions for humans, as well as for bears and other wildlife.

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China grew a plant on the moon — it sprouted two leaves, data indicates

In January, China became the first nation to land a spacecraft on the far side of the moon. Chang'e-4 lunar rover carried among its payload a small biosphere that housed six lifeforms, including cotton seeds. Using data from that biosphere experiment, researchers constructed a digital image of the cotton plant that reveals it grew two leaves before dying from the cold. None In January, China made

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University targeted in Hungary opens in Vienna

An international university, which moved out from Hungary over fears for academic freedom, has opened its doors in Vienna to defend "free science and thought", its president said Monday.

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Could robots be psychology’s new lab rats?

Science speaks with researchers putting AI brains into robot bodies

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Machine learning helps plant science turn over a new leaf

Salk researchers have developed machine-learning algorithms that teach a computer system to analyze three-dimensional shapes of the branches and leaves of a plant. The study may help scientists better quantify how plants respond to climate change, genetic mutations or other factors.

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Violence linked to social isolation, hypervigilance and chronic health problems

Exposure to violence can negatively impact a person's physical and psychosocial health, according to two new studies published in the policy journal Health Affairs.

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US firearm death rate rose sharply in recent years across most states & demographic groups

The rate at which Americans died from firearm injuries increased sharply starting in 2015, a new study shows. The change occurred to varying degrees across different states, types of firearm death such as homicide and suicide, and demographics. In all, the United States saw a 14% rise in the rate of firearm deaths from 2015 through 2017, compared with the rate seen in the years 1999 through 2014.

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Research on US child firearm injuries lags far behind studies of other causes of death

Firearm injuries kill 2,500 American children each year, and send 12,000 to the ER. But the nation spends far less on studying what led to these injuries, and what might prevent and treat them, than it spends on other causes of death in children. In fact, on a per-death basis, funding for pediatric firearm research is 30 times lower than it would have to be to keep pace with research on other chil

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Four UC Davis studies report on key issues in preventing gun violence

Three research studies by the UC Davis Violence Prevention Research Program (VPRP) — all embargoed for release in Health Affairs Oct. 7, 2019 at 4 p.m. Eastern Time — provide new data and report on current strategies and future efforts that can further reduce firearm-related injury and death. A fourth study, accepted for publication and expected to post online the week of Oct. 7, 2019 in the jou

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Study: More behavioral health care linked to small drop in gun-related suicides

An increase in behavioral health providers is associated with a slight decrease in gun-related suicides, but the difference is small and points to a need to tackle gun violence in other ways, according to the authors of a new study.

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Hulu For iOS Will Now Support Offline Viewing

One of the features of streaming platforms like Netflix is the ability for users to be able to download their shows for offline viewing. This is useful if you’re going somewhere with …

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A multifunctional shape-morphing elastomer with liquid metal inclusions [Engineering]

Natural soft tissue achieves a rich variety of functionality through a hierarchy of molecular, microscale, and mesoscale structures and ordering. Inspired by such architectures, we introduce a soft, multifunctional composite capable of a unique combination of sensing, mechanically robust electronic connectivity, and active shape morphing. The material is composed of…

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Broadband lightweight flat lenses for long-wave infrared imaging [Applied Physical Sciences]

We experimentally demonstrate imaging in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral band (8 μm to 12 μm) using a single polymer flat lens based upon multilevel diffractive optics. The device thickness is only 10 μm, and chromatic aberrations are corrected over the entire LWIR band with one surface. Due to the…

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Sublethal antibiotics collapse gut bacterial populations by enhancing aggregation and expulsion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Antibiotics induce large and highly variable changes in the intestinal microbiome even at sublethal concentrations, through mechanisms that remain elusive. Using gnotobiotic zebrafish, which allow high-resolution examination of microbial dynamics, we found that sublethal doses of the common antibiotic ciprofloxacin cause severe drops in bacterial abundance. Contrary to conventional views…

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Metasurface-generated complex 3-dimensional optical fields for interference lithography [Applied Physical Sciences]

Fast, large-scale, and robust 3-dimensional (3D) fabrication techniques for patterning a variety of structures with submicrometer resolution are important in many areas of science and technology such as photonics, electronics, and mechanics with a wide range of applications from tissue engineering to nanoarchitected materials. From several promising 3D manufacturing techniques…

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Complete cleavage of the N≡N triple bond by Ta2N+ via degenerate ligand exchange at ambient temperature: A perfect catalytic cycle [Chemistry]

An unprecedented, spontaneous, and complete cleavage of the triple bond of N2 in the thermal reaction of 15N2 with Ta214N+ was observed experimentally by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry; mechanistic aspects of the degenerate ligand exchange were addressed by high-level quantum chemical calculations. The “hidden” dis- and reassembly…

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IL-10-producing B cells are enriched in murine pericardial adipose tissues and ameliorate the outcome of acute myocardial infarction [Immunology and Inflammation]

Acute myocardial infarction (MI) provokes an inflammatory response in the heart that removes damaged tissues to facilitate tissue repair/regeneration. However, overactive and prolonged inflammation compromises healing, which may be counteracted by antiinflammatory mechanisms. A key regulatory factor in an inflammatory response is the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10, which can be produced…

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Molecular profiling predicts meningioma recurrence and reveals loss of DREAM complex repression in aggressive tumors [Medical Sciences]

Meningiomas account for one-third of all primary brain tumors. Although typically benign, about 20% of meningiomas are aggressive, and despite the rigor of the current histopathological classification system there remains considerable uncertainty in predicting tumor behavior. Here, we analyzed 160 tumors from all 3 World Health Organization (WHO) grades (I…

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Horsefly object-directed polarotaxis is mediated by a stochastically distributed ommatidial subtype in the ventral retina [Neuroscience]

The ventral compound eye of many insects contains polarization-sensitive photoreceptors, but little is known about how they are integrated into visual functions. In female horseflies, polarized reflections from animal fur are a key stimulus for host detection. To understand how polarization vision is mediated by the ventral compound eye, we…

12h

Creating a neuroprosthesis for active tactile exploration of textures [Neuroscience]

Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) can produce percepts that mimic somatic sensation and, thus, has potential as an approach to sensorize prosthetic limbs. However, it is not known whether ICMS could recreate active texture exploration—the ability to infer information about object texture by using one’s fingertips…

12h

Cooperation mitigates diversity loss in a spatially expanding microbial population [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The evolution and potentially even the survival of a spatially expanding population depends on its genetic diversity, which can decrease rapidly due to a serial founder effect. The strength of the founder effect is predicted to depend strongly on the details of the growth dynamics. Here, we probe this dependence…

12h

Path integral molecular dynamics for bosons [Physics]

Trapped bosons exhibit fundamental physical phenomena and are at the core of emerging quantum technologies. We present a method for simulating bosons using path integral molecular dynamics. The main difficulty in performing such simulations is enumerating all ring-polymer configurations, which arise due to permutations of identical particles. We show that…

12h

Skeletal MyBP-C isoforms tune the molecular contractility of divergent skeletal muscle systems [Physiology]

Skeletal muscle myosin-binding protein C (MyBP-C) is a myosin thick filament-associated protein, localized through its C terminus to distinct regions (C-zones) of the sarcomere. MyBP-C modulates muscle contractility, presumably through its N terminus extending from the thick filament and interacting with either the myosin head region and/or the actin thin…

12h

ROS-based lethality of Caenorhabditis elegans mitochondrial electron transport mutants grown on Escherichia coli siderophore iron release mutants [Genetics]

Caenorhabditis elegans consumes bacteria, which can supply essential vitamins and cofactors, especially for mitochondrial functions that have a bacterial ancestry. Therefore, we screened the Keio Escherichia coli knockout library for mutations that induce the C. elegans hsp-6 mitochondrial damage response gene, and identified 45 E. coli mutations that induce hsp-6::gfp….

12h

Unraveling the structure and dynamics of the human DNAJB6b chaperone by NMR reveals insights into Hsp40-mediated proteostasis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

J-domain chaperones are involved in the efficient handover of misfolded/partially folded proteins to Hsp70 but also function independently to protect against cell death. Due to their high flexibility, the mechanism by which they regulate the Hsp70 cycle and how specific substrate recognition is performed remains unknown. Here we focus on…

12h

Structural pathway for allosteric activation of the autophagic PI 3-kinase complex I [Biochemistry]

Autophagy induction by starvation and stress involves the enzymatic activation of the class III phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase complex I (PI3KC3-C1). The inactive basal state of PI3KC3-C1 is maintained by inhibitory contacts between the VPS15 protein kinase and VPS34 lipid kinase domains that restrict the conformation of the VPS34 activation loop….

12h

Constitutive Siglec-1 expression confers susceptibility to HIV-1 infection of human dendritic cell precursors [Immunology and Inflammation]

The human dendritic cell (DC) lineage has recently been unraveled by high-dimensional mapping, revealing the existence of a discrete new population of blood circulating DC precursors (pre-DCs). Whether this new DC population possesses specific functional features as compared to the other blood DC subset upon pathogen encounter remained to be…

12h

Human papillomavirus 16 promotes microhomology-mediated end-joining [Cell Biology]

Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) arising from aerodigestive or anogenital epithelium that are associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV) are far more readily cured with radiation therapy than HPV-negative SCCs. The mechanism behind this increased radiosensitivity has been proposed to be secondary to defects in DNA repair, although the specific repair…

12h

Bacterial outer membrane vesicles engineered with lipidated antigens as a platform for Staphylococcus aureus vaccine [Microbiology]

Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) represent an interesting vaccine platform for their built-in adjuvanticity and simplicity of production process. Moreover, OMVs can be decorated with foreign antigens using different synthetic biology approaches. However, the optimal OMV engineering strategy, which should guarantee the OMV compartmentalization of most heterologous antigens in quantities…

12h

Linking scaling laws across eukaryotes [Ecology]

Scaling laws relating body mass to species characteristics are among the most universal quantitative patterns in biology. Within major taxonomic groups, the 4 key ecological variables of metabolism, abundance, growth, and mortality are often well described by power laws with exponents near 3/4 or related to that value, a commonality…

12h

Recurrence is required to capture the representational dynamics of the human visual system [Neuroscience]

The human visual system is an intricate network of brain regions that enables us to recognize the world around us. Despite its abundant lateral and feedback connections, object processing is commonly viewed and studied as a feedforward process. Here, we measure and model the rapid representational dynamics across multiple stages…

12h

Lipid-targeting pleckstrin homology domain turns its autoinhibitory face toward the TEC kinases [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The pleckstrin homology (PH) domain is well known for its phospholipid targeting function. The PH-TEC homology (PHTH) domain within the TEC family of tyrosine kinases is also a crucial component of the autoinhibitory apparatus. The autoinhibitory surface on the PHTH domain has been previously defined, and biochemical investigations have shown…

12h

DNA methyltransferase inhibitors induce a BRCAness phenotype that sensitizes NSCLC to PARP inhibitor and ionizing radiation [Cell Biology]

A minority of cancers have breast cancer gene (BRCA) mutations that confer sensitivity to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors (PARPis), but the role for PARPis in BRCA-proficient cancers is not well established. This suggests the need for novel combination therapies to expand the use of these drugs. Recent reports that…

12h

Dynamics of living cells in a cytomorphological state space [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cells are nonequilibrium systems that exchange matter and energy with the environment to sustain their metabolic needs. The nonequilibrium nature of this system presents considerable challenges to developing a general theory describing its behavior; however, when studied at appropriate spatiotemporal scales, the behavior of ensembles of nonequilibrium systems can resemble…

12h

Experience-dependent structural plasticity at pre- and postsynaptic sites of layer 2/3 cells in developing visual cortex [Neuroscience]

The developing brain can respond quickly to altered sensory experience by circuit reorganization. During a critical period in early life, neurons in the primary visual cortex rapidly lose responsiveness to an occluded eye and come to respond better to the open eye. While physiological and some of the molecular mechanisms…

12h

The olfactory coreceptor IR8a governs larval feces-mediated competition avoidance in a hawkmoth [Neuroscience]

Finding a suitable oviposition site is a challenging task for a gravid female moth. At the same time, it is of paramount importance considering the limited capability of most caterpillars to relocate to alternative host plants. The hawkmoth, Manduca sexta (Sphingidae), oviposits on solanaceous plants. Larvae hatching on a plant…

12h

Correction for Brandvain and Haig Outbreeders pull harder in a parental tug-of-war [Corrections]

COMMENTARY Correction for “Outbreeders pull harder in a parental tug-of-war,” by Yaniv Brandvain and David Haig, which was first published October 26, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1816187115 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 115, 11354–11356). The authors note that Fig. 1 appeared incorrectly. The corrected figure and its legend appear below. Fig. 1. Relationship…

12h

Asynchronous nitrogen supply and demand produce nonlinear plant allocation responses to warming and elevated CO2 [Environmental Sciences]

Terrestrial ecosystem responses to climate change are mediated by complex plant–soil feedbacks that are poorly understood, but often driven by the balance of nutrient supply and demand. We actively increased aboveground plant-surface temperature, belowground soil temperature, and atmospheric CO2 in a brackish marsh and found nonlinear and nonadditive feedbacks in…

12h

The capping enzyme facilitates promoter escape and assembly of a follow-on preinitiation complex for reinitiation [Biochemistry]

After synthesis of a short nascent RNA, RNA polymerase II (pol II) dissociates general transcription factors (GTFs; TFIIA, TFIIB, TBP, TFIIE, TFIIF, and TFIIH) and escapes the promoter, but many of the mechanistic details of this process remain unclear. Here we developed an in vitro transcription system from the yeast…

12h

Nanoscale coupling of junctophilin-2 and ryanodine receptors regulates vascular smooth muscle cell contractility [Physiology]

Junctophilin proteins maintain close contacts between the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) and the plasma membrane in many types of cells, as typified by junctophilin-2 (JPH2), which is necessary for the formation of the cardiac dyad. Here, we report that JPH2 is the most abundant junctophilin isotype in native smooth muscle cells…

12h

SOD2 acetylation on lysine 68 promotes stem cell reprogramming in breast cancer [Biochemistry]

Mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2) suppresses tumor initiation but promotes invasion and dissemination of tumor cells at later stages of the disease. The mechanism of this functional switch remains poorly defined. Our results indicate that as SOD2 expression increases acetylation of lysine 68 ensues. Acetylated SOD2 promotes hypoxic signaling via increased…

12h

A mesial-to-lateral dissociation for orthographic processing in the visual cortex [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Efficient reading requires a fast conversion of the written word to both phonological and semantic codes. We tested the hypothesis that, within the left occipitotemporal cortical regions involved in visual word recognition, distinct subregions harbor slightly different orthographic codes adapted to those 2 functions. While the lexico-semantic pathway may operate…

12h

Preoperative metabolic classification of thyroid nodules using mass spectrometry imaging of fine-needle aspiration biopsies [Medical Sciences]

Thyroid neoplasia is common and requires appropriate clinical workup with imaging and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy to evaluate for cancer. Yet, up to 20% of thyroid nodule FNA biopsies will be indeterminate in diagnosis based on cytological evaluation. Genomic approaches to characterize the malignant potential of nodules showed initial promise…

12h

A small-molecule inhibitor of BamA impervious to efflux and the outer membrane permeability barrier [Microbiology]

The development of new antimicrobial drugs is a priority to combat the increasing spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria. This development is especially problematic in gram-negative bacteria due to the outer membrane (OM) permeability barrier and multidrug efflux pumps. Therefore, we screened for compounds that target essential, nonredundant, surface-exposed processes in gram-negative…

12h

IL-37 is increased in brains of children with autism spectrum disorder and inhibits human microglia stimulated by neurotensin [Immunology and Inflammation]

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) does not have a distinct pathogenesis or effective treatment. Increasing evidence supports the presence of immune dysfunction and inflammation in the brains of children with ASD. In this report, we present data that gene expression of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-37, as well as of the proinflammatory…

12h

Ancient Maya wetland fields revealed under tropical forest canopy from laser scanning and multiproxy evidence [Sustainability Science]

We report on a large area of ancient Maya wetland field systems in Belize, Central America, based on airborne lidar survey coupled with multiple proxies and radiocarbon dates that reveal ancient field uses and chronology. The lidar survey indicated four main areas of wetland complexes, including the Birds of Paradise…

12h

Social, demographic, and economic correlates of food and chemical consumption measured by wastewater-based epidemiology [Pharmacology]

Wastewater is a potential treasure trove of chemicals that reflects population behavior and health status. Wastewater-based epidemiology has been employed to determine population-scale consumption of chemicals, particularly illicit drugs, across different communities and over time. However, the sociodemographic or socioeconomic correlates of chemical consumption and exposure are unclear. This stud

12h

Addressing the challenge of carbon-free energy [Colloquium Paper]

This century will witness a major transformation in how energy is acquired, stored, and utilized globally. The impetus for this change comes from the deep impacts that both developed and developing societies have had on our planet’s environment during the past century, and the projections going forward of what will…

12h

Divergent roles of astrocytic versus neuronal EAAT2 deficiency on cognition and overlap with aging and Alzheimer’s molecular signatures [Neuroscience]

The excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter in the brain expressed predominantly in astrocytes and at low levels in neurons and axonal terminals. EAAT2 expression is reduced in aging and sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients’ brains. The role EAAT2 plays in cognitive aging and its…

12h

Ribosome collisions alter frameshifting at translational reprogramming motifs in bacterial mRNAs [Microbiology]

Translational frameshifting involves the repositioning of ribosomes on their messages into decoding frames that differ from those dictated during initiation. Some messenger RNAs (mRNAs) contain motifs that promote deliberate frameshifting to regulate production of the encoded proteins. The mechanisms of frameshifting have been investigated in many systems, and the resulting…

12h

Probing the electric field across thylakoid membranes in cyanobacteria [Plant Biology]

In plants, algae, and some photosynthetic bacteria, the ElectroChromic Shift (ECS) of photosynthetic pigments, which senses the electric field across photosynthetic membranes, is widely used to quantify the activity of the photosynthetic chain. In cyanobacteria, ECS signals have never been used for physiological studies, although they can provide a unique…

12h

GDGT cyclization proteins identify the dominant archaeal sources of tetraether lipids in the ocean [Microbiology]

Glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are distinctive archaeal membrane-spanning lipids with up to eight cyclopentane rings and/or one cyclohexane ring. The number of rings added to the GDGT core structure can vary as a function of environmental conditions, such as changes in growth temperature. This physiological response enables cyclic GDGTs…

12h

Directing differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells toward androgen-producing Leydig cells rather than adrenal cells [Medical Sciences]

Reduced serum testosterone (T), or hypogonadism, affects millions of men and is associated with many pathologies, including infertility, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, and decreased libido and sexual function. Administering T-replacement therapy (TRT) reverses many of the symptoms associated with low T levels. However, TRT is linked to side effects such…

12h

Screening Legionella effectors for antiviral effects reveals Rab1 GTPase as a proviral factor coopted for tombusvirus replication [Microbiology]

Bacterial virulence factors or effectors are proteins targeted into host cells to coopt or interfere with cellular proteins and pathways. Viruses often coopt the same cellular proteins and pathways to support their replication in infected cells. Therefore, we screened the Legionella pneumophila effectors to probe virus–host interactions and identify factors…

12h

Evidence for sharp increase in the economic damages of extreme natural disasters [Economic Sciences]

Climate change has increased the frequency and intensity of natural disasters. Does this translate into increased economic damages? To date, empirical assessments of damage trends have been inconclusive. Our study demonstrates a temporal increase in extreme damages, after controlling for a number of factors. We analyze event-level data using quantile…

12h

Correction for Manca et al., SNARE machinery is optimized for ultrafast fusion [Corrections]

BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “SNARE machinery is optimized for ultrafast fusion,” by Fabio Manca, Frederic Pincet, Lev Truskinovsky, James E. Rothman, Lionel Foret, and Matthieu Caruel, which was first published January 30, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1820394116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 2435–2442). The authors wish to note the following:…

12h

Correction for Ishii et al., MPE-seq, a new method for the genome-wide analysis of chromatin structure [Corrections]

BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for “MPE-seq, a new method for the genome-wide analysis of chromatin structure,” by Haruhiko Ishii, James T. Kadonaga, and Bing Ren, which was first published June 15, 2015; 10.1073/pnas.1424804112 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 112, E3457–E3465). The authors note that on page E3464, left column, lines 4–5, “6…

12h

An ensemble of flexible conformations underlies mechanotransduction by the cadherin-catenin adhesion complex [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The cadherin–catenin adhesion complex is the central component of the cell–cell adhesion adherens junctions that transmit mechanical stress from cell to cell. We have determined the nanoscale structure of the adherens junction complex formed by the α-catenin•β-catenin•epithelial cadherin cytoplasmic domain (ABE) using negative stain electron microscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and…

12h

Early hominins evolved within non-analog ecosystems [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Present-day African ecosystems serve as referential models for conceptualizing the environmental context of early hominin evolution, but the degree to which modern ecosystems are representative of those in the past is unclear. A growing body of evidence from eastern Africa’s rich and well-dated late Cenozoic fossil record documents communities of…

12h

Controlling silk fibroin conformation for dynamic, responsive, multifunctional, micropatterned surfaces [Applied Physical Sciences]

Protein micro/nanopatterning has long provided sophisticated strategies for a wide range of applications including biointerfaces, tissue engineering, optics/photonics, and bioelectronics. We present here the use of regenerated silk fibroin to explore wrinkle formation by exploiting the structure–function relation of silk. This yields a biopolymer-based reversible, multiresponsive, dynamic wrinklin

12h

Ultrasensitive, multiplexed chemoproteomic profiling with soluble activity-dependent proximity ligation [Chemistry]

Chemoproteomic methods can report directly on endogenous, active enzyme populations, which can differ greatly from measures of transcripts or protein abundance alone. Detection and quantification of family-wide probe engagement generally requires LC-MS/MS or gel-based detection methods, which suffer from low resolution, significant input proteome requirements, laborious sample preparation, and exp

12h

Membrane curvature underlies actin reorganization in response to nanoscale surface topography [Cell Biology]

Surface topography profoundly influences cell adhesion, differentiation, and stem cell fate control. Numerous studies using a variety of materials demonstrate that nanoscale topographies change the intracellular organization of actin cytoskeleton and therefore a broad range of cellular dynamics in live cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is not well understood,…

12h

Correction for Sotoudeh et al., Effects of the peer metagenomic environment on smoking behavior [Corrections]

SOCIAL SCIENCES Correction for “Effects of the peer metagenomic environment on smoking behavior,” by Ramina Sotoudeh, Kathleen Mullan Harris, and Dalton Conley, which was first published July 30, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1806901116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 16302–16307). The authors note that Fig. 3 appeared incorrectly. The corrected figure and its…

12h

The rhizobial type III effector ErnA confers the ability to form nodules in legumes [Microbiology]

Several Bradyrhizobium species nodulate the leguminous plant Aeschynomene indica in a type III secretion system-dependent manner, independently of Nod factors. To date, the underlying molecular determinants involved in this symbiotic process remain unknown. To identify the rhizobial effectors involved in nodulation, we mutated 23 out of the 27 effector genes…

12h

Quantifying the future lethality of terror organizations [Applied Physical Sciences]

As terror groups proliferate and grow in sophistication, a major international concern is the development of scientific methods that explain and predict insurgent violence. Approaches to estimating a group’s future lethality often require data on the group’s capabilities and resources, but by the nature of the phenomenon, these data are…

12h

Electronic-cigarette smoke induces lung adenocarcinoma and bladder urothelial hyperplasia in mice [Medical Sciences]

Electronic-cigarettes (E-cigs) are marketed as a safe alternative to tobacco to deliver the stimulant nicotine, and their use is gaining in popularity, particularly among the younger population. We recently showed that mice exposed to short-term (12 wk) E-cig smoke (ECS) sustained extensive DNA damage in lungs, heart, and bladder mucosa…

12h

Expanding the stoichiometric window for metal cross-linked gel assembly using competition [Applied Physical Sciences]

Polymer networks with dynamic cross-links have generated widespread interest as tunable and responsive viscoelastic materials. However, narrow stoichiometric limits in cross-link compositions are typically imposed in the assembly of these materials to prevent excess free cross-linker from dissolving the resulting polymer networks. Here we demonstrate how the presence of molecular…

12h

Correction for Font-Munoz et al., Collective sinking promotes selective cell pairing in planktonic pennate diatoms [Corrections]

ECOLOGY Correction for “Collective sinking promotes selective cell pairing in planktonic pennate diatoms,” by Joan S. Font-Muñoz, Raphaël Jeanneret, Jorge Arrieta, Sílvia Anglès, Antoni Jordi, Idan Tuval, and Gotzon Basterretxea, which was first published July 25, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1904837116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 15997–16002). The authors note that the…

12h

Immune effector monocyte-neutrophil cooperation induced by the primary tumor prevents metastatic progression of breast cancer [Medical Sciences]

Metastatic behavior varies significantly among breast cancers. Mechanisms explaining why the majority of breast cancer patients never develop metastatic outgrowth are largely lacking but could underlie the development of novel immunotherapeutic target molecules. Here we show interplay between nonmetastatic primary breast cancer and innate immune response, acting together to control…

12h

Climate-driven regime shifts in a mangrove-salt marsh ecotone over the past 250 years [Environmental Sciences]

Climate change is driving the tropicalization of temperate ecosystems by shifting the range edges of numerous species poleward. Over the past few decades, mangroves have rapidly displaced salt marshes near multiple poleward mangrove range limits, including in northeast Florida. It is uncertain whether such mangrove expansions are due to anthropogenic…

12h

L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel CaV1.2 regulates chondrogenesis during limb development [Developmental Biology]

All cells, including nonexcitable cells, maintain a discrete transmembrane potential (Vmem), and have the capacity to modulate Vmem and respond to their own and neighbors’ changes in Vmem. Spatiotemporal variations have been described in developing embryonic tissues and in some cases have been implicated in influencing developmental processes. Yet, how…

12h

Shearwaters know the direction and distance home but fail to encode intervening obstacles after free-ranging foraging trips [Evolution]

While displacement experiments have been powerful for determining the sensory basis of homing navigation in birds, they have left unresolved important cognitive aspects of navigation such as what birds know about their location relative to home and the anticipated route. Here, we analyze the free-ranging Global Positioning System (GPS) tracks…

12h

Correction for Wilson, The harmonic mean p-value for combining dependent tests [Corrections]

STATISTICS, GENETICS Correction for “The harmonic mean p-value for combining dependent tests,” by Daniel J. Wilson, which was first published January 4, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1814092116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 1195–1200). The author wishes to note the following, with apologies: “The paper erroneously states that the asymptotically exact test pℛ∘≤α|ℛ|wℛ…

12h

A structure-based rationale for sialic acid independent host-cell entry of Sosuga virus [Biochemistry]

The bat-borne paramyxovirus, Sosuga virus (SosV), is one of many paramyxoviruses recently identified and classified within the newly established genus Pararubulavirus, family Paramyxoviridae. The envelope surface of SosV presents a receptor-binding protein (RBP), SosV-RBP, which facilitates host-cell attachment and entry. Unlike closely related hemagglutinin neuraminidase RBPs from other genera of

12h

A Federal Agency May Investigate Tesla Over Faulty Batteries

Total Recall The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is considering launching an investigation into Tesla over how the electric car company handled batteries that posed a fire hazard. After reports of batteries combusting in Tesla Model S and X vehicles, the company issued a software update in May that also reportedly reduced the distance that the vehicles could travel on

12h

Ancient Megalopolis Uncovered in Israel Was the 'New York City' of Its Time Period

Archeologists recently discovered an ancient lost city in Hasharon, north of Tel Aviv.

12h

Madrid to clip wings of noisy parakeets

Faced with a soaring population of noisy parakeets affecting the environment city authorities in Madrid said Monday they have decided to take steps to cut their numbers.

12h

New Law Makes It Illegal to Distribute Political Deepfakes

On Thursday, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed two new pieces of legislation designed to crack down on deepfakes, the AI-manipulated videos turning up online in alarming numbers. The first, Assembly Bill 602 , gives victims of pornographic deepfakes — by far the most common type on the internet — the right to sue the video’s creators. The other, Assembly Bill 730 , takes aim at a far less p

12h

Madrid to clip wings of noisy parakeets

Faced with a soaring population of noisy parakeets affecting the environment city authorities in Madrid said Monday they have decided to take steps to cut their numbers.

12h

Dual approach needed to save sinking cities and bleaching corals

Local conservation can boost the climate resilience of coastal ecosystems, species and cities and buy them precious time in their fight against sea-level rise, ocean acidification and warming temperatures, a new paper by scientists at Duke University and Fudan University suggests.

12h

Dual approach needed to save sinking cities and bleaching corals

Local conservation can boost the climate resilience of coastal ecosystems, species and cities and buy them time in their fight against sea-level rise, ocean acidification and warming temperatures, a study by scientists at Duke University and Fudan University suggests. In all but extreme situations, these interventions significantly buffer the impacts of climate change and can buy sinking cities an

12h

Analysis of US labor data suggests 'reskilling' workers for a 'feeling economy'

Being able to solve problems and analyze data will not be the keys to your success in the future, says marketing professor Roland Rust at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business. Artificial intelligence will soon have that covered. If you expect to have a viable career, you better get in touch with your emotions, he says, because the "Feeling Economy" is coming.

13h

Artemis, meet ARTEMIS: Pursuing Sun science at the moon

By 2024, NASA will land astronauts, including the first woman and next man, on the Moon as part of the Artemis lunar exploration program. This won't be the first time NASA takes the name Artemis to the Moon though. Two robotic spacecraft orbiting the Moon today were initially known as ARTEMIS—short for Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Su

13h

Revamped crew scheduling model cuts airline delays by as much as 30%

Delays and disruptions in airline operations annually result in billions of dollars of additional costs to airlines, passengers and the economy. Airlines strive to mitigate these costs by creating schedules that are less likely to get disrupted or schedules that are easy to repair when there are disruptions—new research in the INFORMS journal Transportation Science has found a solution using a mat

13h

This Gel Could Prevent Wildfires

Developed by Stanford researchers, the nontoxic, biodegradable gel can be sprayed on vegetation as a long-term fire retardant

13h

Conspiracy theories aren’t true but they are important

Mainstream news outlets in the United States don’t tend to take conspiracy theories seriously. But perhaps they should. Classic examples of conspiracy theories include extraterrestrial visitors, secret government experiments, or alternate explanations for events like the JFK assassination or the 1969 moon landing. With the rise of platforms from Info Wars to the message board 4chan to Twitter , t

13h

Scientists invent new technology to streamline drug discovery

George Mason University researchers have discovered the exact location where two proteins responsible for hiding cancer cells from the immune system bind. This discovery provides a novel approach to developing new cancer immunotherapy medicines that can be administered as a pill, compared to existing intravenous therapeutics. The findings were published in July 2019 in the Journal of Biological Ch

13h

Cells' Oxygen Sensing Discovery Earns Nobel Prize

For the Physiology or Medicine award, Peter Ratcliffe, William Kaelin, and Gregg Semenza are credited with figuring out molecular and genetic responses to oxygen levels.

13h

Scientists invent new technology to streamline drug discovery

George Mason University researchers have discovered the exact location where two proteins responsible for hiding cancer cells from the immune system bind. This discovery provides a novel approach to developing new cancer immunotherapy medicines that can be administered as a pill, compared to existing intravenous therapeutics. The findings were published in July 2019 in the Journal of Biological Ch

13h

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2019

ORNL story tips: Reaching the boiling point for HVACs; showcasing innovation for technology transfer; using neutrons to lend insight into human tissue; and heating the core in a fusion prototype experiment.

13h

Mason scientists invent new technology to streamline drug discovery

George Mason University researchers have discovered the exact location where two proteins responsible for hiding cancer cells from the immune system bind using a transformative protein painting technology. This discovery provides a novel approach to developing new cancer immunotherapy medicines that can be administered as a pill, compared to existing intravenous therapeutics. The findings were pub

13h

Analysis of US labor data suggests 'reskilling' workers for a 'feeling economy'

A study of US labor data suggests AI is already taking 'thinking economy' jobs from humans, and this trend will grow in the future. This will push more people into 'feeling economy' jobs that require things like interpersonal relationship skills and emotional intelligence.

13h

CO2 er faktisk godt – og fire andre ting, du skal vide om klimaet

Her kan du blive klædt på til de udfordringer, vi står overfor

13h

New Tools in the Works to Probe Adult Human Neurogenesis

Conflicting results on the existence of new neurons in adults have researchers designing new ways to identify and count neuronal progenitors—and finally get to the bottom of neurogenesis.

13h

The US Plans to Track Hypersonic Missiles With 1,200 Satellites

Space Development Who? The U.S. Space Development Agency (SDA) is seeking more than $11 billion to deploy up to 1,200 low-orbit satellites to monitor and target enemy hypersonic weapons, Bloomberg reports . The satellites are part of a greater initiative called the “National Defense Space Architecture” that’s meant to keep tabs on new types of hypersonic weaponry being developed by both Russia an

13h

Did a Life Extension Patient Fake His Own Death?

Ivy Plasma, the newly-rebooted plasma transfusion clinic founded by controversial doctor Jesse Karmazin, is back in the news due to confusion surrounding the death of a former patient. Let’s get you up to speed: Like Karmazin’s previous transfusion clinic Ambrosia, Ivy offers transfusions of human plasma — but unlike Ambrosia, FDA restrictions prevent the new clinic from claiming it will do patie

13h

How bike sharing in Seattle rose from the ashes of Pronto's failure

University of Washington transportation researchers looked into why the docked bike-share program Pronto failed while dockless bike sharing has been so successful.

13h

Costs of natural disasters are increasing at the high end

While the economic cost of natural disasters has not increased much on average, averages can be deceptive. The costs of major disasters like hurricanes Katrina, Maria and Dorian or the massive tornado swarms in the Midwest have increased to a disproportionately larger extent than those of lesser events, and these major disasters have become far more expensive, according to an international team of

13h

New silk materials can wrinkle into detailed patterns, then unwrinkle to be 'reprinted'

Tufts engineers have developed silk materials that can wrinkle into highly detailed patterns — including words, textures and images as intricate as a QR code or a fingerprint. The patterns are stable, but can be erased by flooding the surface of the silk with vapor, allowing the surface to be printed again. The researchers demonstrate multiple examples of the silk wrinkle patterns, and envision a

13h

Voltage gated calcium channels 'read' electric patterns in embryos to create cartilage and bone

Scientists have revealed how the electrical patterns formed within an embryo initiate a cascade of molecular changes that culminate in the development of cartilage and bone. Prior studies have shown these electrical patterns appear like blueprints of the tissues and organs that eventually take shape as the embryo matures. The new study demonstrates that voltage gated calcium channels 'read' the el

13h

Big data reveals extraordinary unity underlying life's diversity

Limits to growth lie at the heart of how all living things function, according to a new study carried out by ICTA-UAB researchers.

13h

Treatment for 'low T' could someday come from a single skin cell, USC research shows

USC researchers have successfully grown human, testosterone-producing cells in the lab, paving the way to someday treat low testosterone with personalized replacement cells.

13h

Archaea hold clues to ancient ocean temperatures

Scientists at Stanford have identified molecules that tough microbes use to survive in warming waters, opening a window more broadly into studying conditions in ancient seas.

13h

Early humans evolved in ecosystems unlike any found today

To understand the environmental pressures that shaped human evolution, scientists must reconstruct the ecosystems in which they lived. Because putting together the puzzle of millions-of-years-old ecosystems is a difficult task, many studies draw analogies with present-day African ecosystems, such as the Serengeti. A new study calls into question such approaches and suggests that the vast majority

13h

Predicting terror activity before it happens

Data scientist have developed a model that utilizes publicly available data to accurately predict how lethal a terror organization will become in the future based on only its first 10 attacks.

13h

Ancient Maya canals and fields show early and extensive impacts on tropical forests

New evidence in Belize shows the ancient Maya responded to population and environmental pressures by creating massive agricultural features in wetlands, potentially increasing atmospheric CO2 and methane through burn events and farming, according to geographical research at The University of Texas at Austin published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

13h

New test for thyroid cancer could prevent unnecessary surgery

Each year, thanks to inconclusive tests for thyroid cancer, thousands of people undergo unnecessary surgeries to remove part or all of their thyroids. A new test based on the unique chemical fingerprints of thyroid cancer might change that. It's faster and about two-thirds more accurate than the diagnostic tests doctors use today.

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E-cigarette smoke caused lung cancer in mice

Exposure to electronic-cigarette (E-cig) smoke caused mice to develop lung cancer, a new study finds.

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There was life, but not as we know it

Ancient ecosystems where humans evolved were unlike those of today. Dyani Lewis reports.

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More fuel for early Anthropocene

New evidence suggests Maya culture had larger and earlier impacts on Earth’s systems.

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30 Years Ago: A Look Back at 1989

Three decades ago, a number of uprisings took place around the world, with unhappy citizens taking to the streets—and in some cases, taking up arms—to try to change or remove their governments. A student-led pro-democracy demonstration in China’s Tiananmen Square was violently crushed in June, while hundreds of thousands of anti-Communist protesters in Czechoslovakia were able to bring about a no

13h

Trump’s Sickening Betrayal

The great virtue of Twitter is that it forces users to be concise. One downside is that when an extremely powerful crazy person —the president of the United States, say—uses it, he can sound a bit like the Abrahamic God in one of his more wrathful moments. “If Turkey does anything that I, in my great and unmatched wisdom, consider to be off limits, I will totally destroy and obliterate the Econom

13h

Infants with high fever have double the risk of infection

Infants with a high fever may be at increased risk for infections, according to new research. In a new study, researchers determined that for an infant less than eight weeks old, having a fever was associated with a doubled risk for developing serious bacterial infections, including meningitis and infections of the blood or urinary tract. Based on the findings, the researchers encourage parents o

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More fuel for early Anthropocene

New evidence suggests Maya culture had larger and earlier impacts on Earth’s systems.

13h

There was life, but not as we know it

Ancient ecosystems where humans evolved were unlike those of today. Dyani Lewis reports.

13h

Highlighting hypocrisy reduces anti-Muslim sentiment

Study finds a better way to play the blame game. Mark Bruer reports.

13h

Voltage gated calcium channels 'read' electric patterns in embryos to create cartilage and bone

Scientists at Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University and Harvard Medical School have revealed how, in the case of limb formation, the electrical patterns formed within an embryo initiate a cascade of molecular changes that culminate in the development of cartilage and bone. The study, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), helps answer a central question in

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Big data reveals extraordinary unity underlying life's diversity

From microscopic algae to elephants, life has devised countless ways to thrive in every environment on the planet. But while biologists have tended to focus on the many varied forms that species have evolved, the age of Big Data offers an unprecedented view of some surprisingly common features shared by all creatures great and small.

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Costs of natural disasters are increasing at the high end

While the economic cost of natural disasters has not increased much on average, averages can be deceptive. The costs of major disasters like hurricanes Katrina, Maria and Dorian or the massive tornado swarms in the Midwest have increased to a disproportionately larger extent than those of lesser events, and these major disasters have become far more expensive, according to an international team of

14h

New silk materials can wrinkle into detailed patterns, then unwrinkle to be 'reprinted'

Researchers at Tufts University School of Engineering have developed silk materials that can wrinkle into highly detailed patterns—including words, textures and images as intricate as a QR code or a fingerprint. The patterns take about one second to form, are stable, but can be erased by flooding the surface of the silk with vapor, allowing the researchers to "reverse" the printing and start again

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Ancient Maya canals and fields show early and extensive impacts on tropical forests

New evidence in Belize shows the ancient Maya responded to population and environmental pressures by creating massive agricultural features in wetlands, potentially increasing atmospheric CO2 and methane through burn events and farming, according to geographical research at The University of Texas at Austin published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Early humans evolved in ecosystems unlike any found today

To understand the environmental pressures that shaped human evolution, scientists must first piece together the details of the ancient plant and animal communities that our fossil ancestors lived in over the past 7 million years. Because putting together the puzzle of millions-of-years-old ecosystems is a difficult task, many studies have reconstructed the environments by drawing analogies with pr

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Archaea hold clues to ancient ocean temperatures

Solving a decades-old mystery, Stanford researchers have discovered proteins that enable hardy microbes called archaea to toughen up their membranes when waters are overly warm. Finding these proteins could help scientists piece together the state of Earth's climate going back millions of years to when those archaea were cruising the ancient oceans.

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Voltage gated calcium channels 'read' electric patterns in embryos to create cartilage and bone

Scientists at Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University and Harvard Medical School have revealed how, in the case of limb formation, the electrical patterns formed within an embryo initiate a cascade of molecular changes that culminate in the development of cartilage and bone. The study, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), helps answer a central question in

14h

Big data reveals extraordinary unity underlying life's diversity

From microscopic algae to elephants, life has devised countless ways to thrive in every environment on the planet. But while biologists have tended to focus on the many varied forms that species have evolved, the age of Big Data offers an unprecedented view of some surprisingly common features shared by all creatures great and small.

14h

Electrode-fitted microscope points to better designed devices that make fuel from sunlight

Using an atomic-force microscope fitted with an electrode tip 1,000 times smaller than a human hair, researchers have identified in real time how nanoscale catalysts collect charges that are excited by light in semiconductors. It's a discovery that could help efforts to design devices that can store solar power for later use.

14h

Bacteria trapped — and terminated — by graphene filter

Chemists transform their laser-induced graphene into an air filter that not only traps pathogens but also kills them with a small blast of electricity.

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Rumbles, screams and dinks and donks: the sounds of Mars

NASA’s InSight team reports its lander is adding to the Red Planet’s sonic environment. Barry Keily reports.

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How do conservation efforts stack up?

Not bad, if they go viral or have a lot of support – but they could do better. Natalie Parletta reports.

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A peek into the lung of a mouse

Showing immune cells that cause inflammation after exposure to allergic asthma triggers.

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Coordinated care model leads to decreases in unscheduled, preventable hospitalizations

Oregon Medicaid enrollees are less likely to make unscheduled trips to the hospital following the implementation of the state's accountable-care model, new research shows.

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Revamped crew scheduling model cuts airline delays by as much as 30%

Delays and disruptions in airline operations annually result in billions of dollars of additional costs to airlines, passengers and the economy. Airlines strive to mitigate these costs by creating schedules that are less likely to get disrupted or schedules that are easy to repair when there are disruptions — new research has found a solution using a mathematical optimization model.

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Deep Brain Stimulation Improves Depression Symptoms: Study

The effects of the therapy in a small group of patients were long-lasting, researchers say, adding to evidence that the approach works for treatment-resistant depression.

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Traffic experts, parents don't always see eye to eye on safe cycling routes for children

Parents often disagree with transportation experts over what streets are safe for children to ride bikes, a new study finds.

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Critical process for how breast cancer spreads in bones

Researchers have identified a pair of proteins believed to be critical for spreading, or metastasizing, breast cancer to bone.

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Dog owners often inaccurately measure out kibble

New research finds dog owners are often inaccurate when measuring out kibble using a scoop, putting the dogs at risk of under-nourishment or weight gain.

14h

Bacteria trapped — and terminated — by graphene filter

Chemists transform their laser-induced graphene into an air filter that not only traps pathogens but also kills them with a small blast of electricity.

14h

The cholera bacterium can steal up to 150 genes in one go

Scientists have discovered that predatory bacteria like the cholera pathogen can steal up to 150 genes in one go from their neighbors. The study sheds light on one of the most fundamental mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer.

14h

Was early stick insect evolution triggered by birds and mammals?

Stick and leaf insects are a strikingly bizarre group of insects with a worldwide distribution. They are famous for their impressively large body size and their remarkable ability to camouflage themselves as twigs, leaves or bark in order to hide from potential predators. A team of international researchers has now generated the first phylogenomic tree of these insects.

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Nodulation connected to higher resistance against powdery mildew in legumes

Scientists have long known that nodulation is important to plant health. Nodulation occurs when nodules, which form on the roots of plants (primarily legumes), form a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing bacteria that deliver nutrients to the plant. This process is a key part of sustainable agriculture and makes legumes an important source of protein for much of the world. However, recent r

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Saturn overtakes Jupiter as host to most moons in solar system

The gas giant has 82 moons, surpassing the 79 known to orbit its larger neighbour Saturn has taken over from Jupiter as host to the most moons in the solar system after astronomers spotted 20 more lumps of rock orbiting the ringed planet. It brings the number of Saturnian moons to 82, surpassing the 79 that are known to orbit Jupiter, its larger, inner neighbour. Continue reading…

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Five Radical Climate Policies That Most Americans Actually Like

For the first time in years—and maybe ever—Democrats are getting ambitious about climate change. Several presidential candidates have proposed $1 trillion plans that variously nudge, cajole, and force the economy to reduce carbon pollution. The largest plan, from Senator Bernie Sanders, calls for $16.3 trillion in public investment over 10 years, which would be the biggest economic stimulus packa

14h

Trump’s Defeat on Tax Returns Signals a Big Problem for the President

It’s impossible to deny the cleverness of the legal arguments put together by the Trump administration and President Donald Trump’s personal lawyers as they fight investigations against him. In defending Trump, his attorneys have contended that Congress cannot obtain documents related to Trump’s financial dealings, because that’s a power reserved for prosecutors. Elsewhere, they have argued that

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Scientists observe year-long plateaus in decline of type Ia supernova light curves

A team of scientists have discovered that the fading of infrared light following Type Ia supernovae explosions can be interrupted, with brightness staying the same for up to a year.

14h

Electrode-fitted microscope points to better designed devices that make fuel from sunlight

Using an atomic-force microscope fitted with an electrode tip 1,000 times smaller than a human hair, researchers have identified in real time how nanoscale catalysts collect charges that are excited by light in semiconductors. It's a discovery that could help efforts to design devices that can store solar power for later use.

14h

New study is 'chilling commentary' on future of antibiotics

The health care market is failing to support new antibiotics used to treat some of the world's most dangerous, drug-resistant 'superbugs,' according to a new analysis.

14h

Histone modifications are the influencers of zygotic genome awakening

Scientists have observed changes to the gene-regulating factors during zebrafish development and discovered that modifications to 'histone H3', one of the proteins around which DNA is bound, play an important role in 'zygotic genome activation' or transition of control of zebrafish embryonic development from maternal material to the zygote.

14h

Axion particle spotted in solid-state crystal

Scientists have spotted a famously elusive particle: The axion – first predicted 42 years ago as an elementary particle in extensions of the standard model of particle physics.

14h

Saturn surpasses Jupiter after the discovery of 20 new moons

Move over Jupiter; Saturn is the new moon king. A team has found 20 new moons orbiting Saturn. This brings the ringed planet's total number of moons to 82, surpassing Jupiter, which has 79.

14h

Early hunter-gatherers interacted much sooner than previously believed

A nearly 4,000-year-old burial site found off the coast of Georgia hints at ties between hunter-gatherers on opposite sides of North America, according to new research.

14h

New method gives first global picture of mutual predictability of atmosphere and ocean

Scientists have carried out a novel statistical analysis to determine for the first time a global picture of how the ocean helps predict the low-level atmosphere and vice versa. They observed ubiquitous influence of the ocean on the atmosphere in the extratropics, which has been difficult to demonstrate with dynamic models of atmospheric and oceanic circulation.

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CTE risk, severity increases with years playing American football

The risk and severity of developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) increases with the number of years playing American football according to a new study. These findings reaffirm the relationship between playing tackle football and CTE, and for the first time quantify the strength of that relationship.

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Young infants with fever may be more likely to develop infections

Infants with a high fever may be at increased risk for infections, according to new research.

14h

Coordinated care model leads to decreases in unscheduled, preventable hospitalizations

Oregon Medicaid enrollees are less likely to make unscheduled trips to the hospital following the implementation of the state's accountable-care model, new research shows.

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Community responders more likely to seek help during overdose when naloxone does not work

Calling emergency services is an integral part of overdose response training. This step may be even more important in the setting of rapidly-progressing overdoses from fentanyl. New research from Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction found, however, that community members responding to an overdose with naloxone are more likely to seek emergency help when naloxone does not work or ta

14h

Traffic experts, parents don't always see eye to eye on safe cycling routes for children

Parents often disagree with transportation experts over what streets are safe for children to ride bikes, a Rutgers-led study finds.

14h

Black and ethnic minority people face inequality in diabetes treatment

Black and ethnic minority people are not as likely to be prescribed newer medication for Type 2 diabetes and they experience less adequate monitoring of their condition compared to their white peers, new collaborative research from the University of Surrey and Eli Lilly and Company Limited finds.

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An oral anticoagulant delays the appearance of Alzheimer's disease in mice

Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have identified a possible treatment for Alzheimer's disease.

14h

How to make conservation initiatives more contagious

New research shows conservation initiatives often spread like diseases, helping scientists and policymakers design programmes more likely to be taken up.

14h

China is on track to meet its emissions goals for 2020

Polluting emissions from Chinese thermal power plants declined significantly between 2014 and 2017, according to new research. The study analyzed data from 2014, when China introduced the ambitious Ultra-Low Emissions (ULE) Standards Policy for renovating coal-fired power stations to limit air pollutant emissions, to 2017.

14h

Collagen fiber length lets cells stream away quickly

Collagen fiber length within the body may be a key overlooked parameter that some normal cells use to become invasive, research finds. Collagen is the most abundant protein in mammals, making up skin, bone, tendons, and other soft tissues. Its fibrous nature helps cells to move throughout the body, but until now, it wasn’t clear how the length of fibers influences how cells move in groups. Cells

14h

Vaping-related lung damage resembles mustard gas injuries

American health officials have so far recorded more than 1,000 vaping-related hospitalizations, and at least 18 people have died. These cases seem to be linked to black-market vaping products, not mainstream ones available in stores. The results of the new report suggest that it's the chemical compounds within the vaping products — not the oil itself — that's causing hospitalizations. None Health

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Baby Chicks ASMR | River of No Return

Close your eyes, take a breath, and relax with our River of No Return: ASMR. Because living by your own rules has its perks, and also baby chicks. 🐥 Stream Full Episodes of The River of No Return: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/river-of-no-return/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.faceb

14h

Revamped crew scheduling model cuts airline delays by as much as 30%

Delays and disruptions in airline operations annually result in billions of dollars of additional costs to airlines, passengers and the economy. Airlines strive to mitigate these costs by creating schedules that are less likely to get disrupted or schedules that are easy to repair when there are disruptions — new research in the INFORMS journal Transportation Science has found a solution using a

15h

A new mathematical approach to understanding zeolites

A system developed at MIT helps to identify zeolites that can readily transform into other zeolite forms, which are widely used as catalysts in industrial processes.

15h

12 Things You Can Do in macOS Catalina That You Couldn't Before

We’ve seen the Apple on-stage demos, and the beta versions, and now macOS Catalina (technically macOS 10.15) is here for everyone… well, everyone with a Mac made in the last six or seven years, …

15h

NASA: Rover May Have Found Remnants of Ancient Martian Oasis

Gale Crater Mystery Three billion years ago, Mars looked very different from how it does now. And ever since we’ve been able to land rovers on the planet’s surface, we’ve been trying to get peeks of its distant past. The 100-mile Gale Crater, which is believed to be the result of a massive ancient impact, has scientists particularly fascinated. According to data collected by NASA’s Curiosity rove

15h

TOM-1 protein may put the brakes on Alzheimer’s inflammation

The role of a protein called TOM-1 may lead to a shift toward examining the molecular underpinnings of Alzheimer’s processes, researchers report. “Scientists have known for a long time that inflammation is a driver of Alzheimer’s disease, but inflammation is complex and involves many factors,” says Frank LaFerla, the dean of the School of Biological Sciences at the University of California, Irvin

15h

Is Anyone Going to Get Rich off of Email Newsletters?

It’s unclear to me whether anyone has ever fallen in love over email, but it’s true that the only friendship I’ve ever succeeded in initiating via the internet started in my inbox. Peppermint oil, face spackle, Glossier girls , the physical indignities of “William DeBlasio’s New York”—these were the subjects of Claire Carusillo’s email newsletter, My Second or Third Skin, later renamed That Wet L

15h

The benefits of updating agricultural drainage infrastructure

The massive underground infrastructure that allows farmers to cultivate crops on much of the world's most productive land has outlived its design life and should be updated, according to a new study. Installing higher-capacity pipes and conservation practices would yield a wide range of production and environmental benefits.

15h

Genome-edited bull passes on hornless trait to calves

For the past two years, researchers have been studying six offspring of a dairy bull, genome-edited to prevent it from growing horns. Scientists report that none of the bull's offspring developed horns, as expected, and blood work and physical exams of the calves found they were all healthy. The researchers also sequenced and analyzed the genomes of the calves and their parents looking for any une

15h

A new mathematical approach to understanding zeolites

A system developed at MIT helps to identify zeolites that can readily transform into other zeolite forms, which are widely used as catalysts in industrial processes.

15h

Pressure may be key to fighting climate change with thermoelectric generators

Pressure improves the ability of materials to turn heat into electricity and could potentially be used to create clean generators, according to new work.

15h

From sleeping cell to assassin — how immune cells work

Scientists have carried out one of the most comprehensive studies into how immune cells sense and respond to their environment to fight infection and destroy tumors. The research team said the results provide important insights into how immune responses might be manipulated for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer.

15h

Brain tunes itself to criticality, maximizing information processing

Criticality is truly a set point, and not a mere inevitability. New research confirms this long-standing prediction in the brains of freely behaving animals.

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Anti-Muslim hostility could ebb owing to a simple measure

Nature, Published online: 07 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02999-2 Carefully chosen questions prompt non-Muslims to assign less ‘collective blame’ to Muslims for violent attacks.

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Plans for the First Space Hotel Revealed To Accommodate 400 People.

submitted by /u/David4554w [link] [comments]

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Why do you think with all the available research, media coverage, and protests only 26% of China is 'worried about climate change' and only 13% of US is 'worried about climate change'?

Worried about climate change, 2018 (Ipsos) China: 26% Canada: 20% Germany: 17% Australia: 16% France: 15% Japan: 15% India: 14% Sweden: 14% US: 13% UK: 11% Italy: 8% Saudi Arabia: 8% Mexico: 7% South Korea: 7% Israel: 4% Turkey: 4% Brazil: 2% South Africa: 2% Russia: 1% submitted by /u/-AMARYANA- [link] [comments]

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Axion particle spotted in solid-state crystal

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden, Princeton University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have spotted a famously elusive particle: The axion – first predicted 42 years ago as an elementary particle in extensions of the standard model of particle physics.

15h

Histone modifications are the influencers of zygotic genome awakening

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) observed changes to the gene-regulating factors during zebrafish development and discovered that modifications to 'histone H3', one of the proteins around which DNA is bound, play an important role in 'zygotic genome activation' or transition of control of zebrafish embryonic development from maternal material to the zygote.

15h

New study is 'chilling commentary' on future of antibiotics

The health care market is failing to support new antibiotics used to treat some of the world's most dangerous, drug-resistant 'superbugs,' according to a new analysis by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine infectious disease scientists.

15h

Parents who lie to their kids raise adult liars

For simplicity and speed, parents may employ untruths as conversation-enders and to coerce desirable behavior using empty threats. Telling kids not to lie while modeling contrary behavior is, not surprisingly, a problem. Lying as an adult is just one of the issues lied-to children exhibit as grownups. None Let's set aside the Tooth Fairy, Santa Claus , and the Easter Bunny for a few moments. Ther

15h

Saturn overtakes Jupiter as planet with most moons

Jupiter had been the "moon king" for some 20 years.

15h

The Comic That Explains Where Joker Went Wrong

This story contains spoilers for Joker. For the first few decades of his existence in the world of comic books, the Joker wasn’t a particularly tragic character. Starting with his debut in Batman No. 1 (1940), the villainy of Batman’s archnemesis fluctuated between chillingly ruthless and harmlessly goofy. While always sporting his signature clown makeup, he functioned first as a gangland spree k

15h

Rebuilding After Incarceration

More than 2 million Americans are in the country’s prisons and jails now, giving the United States both the largest number of prisoners and the highest per-capita incarceration rate in the world. For the U.S., the rate is well over 700 prisoners for each 100,000 of population. According to a recent BBC report , the only close contender is Russia, with an imprisonment rate of over 600 per 100,000

15h

Astronauts Just Grew Meat in Space for the First Time

Space Meat In 2018, Israeli-based food tech startup Aleph Farms made a breakthrough in the alt-meat industry by creating the world’s first lab-grown steak , a hunk of cell-cultured meat that mimicked the texture and structure of the beef you’d find at the supermarket. The company hopes to one day provide access to nutritious slaughter-free meat to everyone on Earth — and maybe everyone in space,

15h

UK scientists join the Extinction Rebellion climate change protests

New Scientist spoke to members of Extinction Rebellion who are scientists to find out why they are taking to the streets of London to protest climate change inaction

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Early Earthlings May Have Watched the Galaxy's Center Explode 3.5 Million Years Ago

The mysterious Fermi bubbles at the center of the Milky Way may have been caused by a gargantuan nuclear explosion 3.5 million years ago, new research suggests.

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Hvad er klimaforandringer egentlig?

Mennesker har udledt store mængder drivhusgasser, som ændrer klimaet langt udover det naturlige.

15h

Genome-edited bull passes hornless gene to calves

Researchers produce cattle that lack horns, meaning they cannot use them to injure other animals or humans.

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BBC's Seven Worlds, One Planet shines spotlight on climate crisis

New Attenborough series aims to be as influential as Blue Planet II was on plastic waste A new BBC natural history series narrated by Sir David Attenborough airing later this month will have a conservationist message about the impact of the climate crisis at its heart. Seven Worlds, One Planet will show “where humankind is negatively and positively impacting the health of the planet”, the corpora

15h

Elon Musk Doesn't Know Where the Aliens Are (So, Stop Asking)

At a recent event in Boca Chica, Texas, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk confirms that, to his knowledge, we haven't yet discovered aliens.

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Electrode-fitted microscope points to better designed devices that make fuel from sunlight

Using an atomic-force microscope fitted with an electrode tip 1,000 times smaller than a human hair, University of Oregon researchers have identified in real time how nanoscale catalysts collect charges that are excited by light in semiconductors.

16h

What Top Military Officers Really Think About Trump

F or most of the past two decades, American troops have been deployed all over the world—to about 150 countries. During that time, hundreds of thousands of young men and women have experienced combat, and a generation of officers have come of age dealing with the practical realities of war. They possess a deep well of knowledge and experience. For the past three years, these highly trained profes

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The Genius of That SNL Sketch on Race

Newscasters should never riff on race while reading the day’s headlines, let alone play games on the subject. But during Saturday Night Live ’s latest episode, a group of anchors did exactly that in a memorable sketch from an otherwise uneven night . “ Mid-Day News ” began with a classic SNL setup: the local news program, set somewhere in Florida, with four anchors (played by the host Phoebe Wall

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Particles from 3D printers may be bad for your health

The particles 3D printers emit can negatively affect indoor air quality and have the potential to harm respiratory health, according to a new study. For the study, the researchers collected particles 3D printers emitted and conducted several tests to gauge their impact on respiratory cell cultures. “All of these tests, which were done at high doses, showed that there is a toxic response to the pa

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Nobel prize for medicine: how oxygen affects cells

This year’s winners helped explain oxygen-sensitive processes and their effect on cancers, heart attacks and strokes

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Listen: To boost your mood, talk to a stranger

Talking with strangers may be good for our well-being, Nicholas Epley argues. “People out in their daily lives aren’t social enough for their own well-being,” says Epley, a professor at the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago. “They don’t engage in conversations with strangers, for instance, nearly as much as they ought to to maximize their own well-being .” Epley’s research has

16h

Early hunter-gatherers interacted much sooner than previously believed

A nearly 4,000-year-old burial site found off the coast of Georgia hints at ties between hunter-gatherers on opposite sides of North America, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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The cholera bacterium can steal up to 150 genes in one go

EPFL scientists have discovered that predatory bacteria like the cholera pathogen can steal up to 150 genes in one go from their neighbors. The study sheds light on one of the most fundamental mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer.

16h

Electrode-fitted microscope points to better designed devices that make fuel from sunlight

Using an atomic-force microscope fitted with an electrode tip 1,000 times smaller than a human hair, University of Oregon researchers have identified in real time how nanoscale catalysts collect charges that are excited by light in semiconductors. It's a discovery that could help efforts to design devices that can store solar power for later use.

16h

Scientists observe year-long plateaus in decline of type Ia supernova light curves

A team of scientists, including a researcher from Queen's University Belfast, have discovered that the fading of infrared light following Type Ia supernovae explosions can be interrupted, with brightness staying the same for up to a year.

16h

Early hunter-gatherers interacted much sooner than previously believed

A nearly 4,000-year-old burial site found off the coast of Georgia hints at ties between hunter-gatherers on opposite sides of North America, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Saturn surpasses Jupiter after the discovery of 20 new moons

Move over Jupiter; Saturn is the new moon king. A team led by Carnegie's Scott S. Sheppard has found 20 new moons orbiting Saturn. This brings the ringed planet's total number of moons to 82, surpassing Jupiter, which has 79. The discovery was announced Monday by the International Astronomical Union's Minor Planet Center.

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The cholera bacterium can steal up to 150 genes in one go

EPFL scientists have discovered that predatory bacteria like the cholera pathogen can steal up to 150 genes in one go from their neighbors. The study sheds light on one of the most fundamental mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer.

16h

Novel compound interrupts malaria parasite's lifecycle

An international group of researchers has proven that a molecule called TCMDC-135051 can selectively inhibit a protein that is essential to the lifecycle of Plasmodium falciparum, one of the parasites that causes malaria.

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How plants react to fungi

Plants are under constant pressure from fungi and other microorganisms. The air is full of fungal spores, which attach themselves to plant leaves and germinate, especially in warm and humid weather. Some fungi remain on the surface of the leaves. Others, such as downy mildew, penetrate the plants and proliferate, extracting important nutrients. These fungi can cause great damage in agriculture.

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AAA Car Testing Shows Pedestrian Detection Tech Is Far From Effective

Your ride might seem almost capable of driving itself at times, whether it’s slowing down in response to traffic or parallel parking. Just when you think we’re living in the magical future of autonomous cars, a Tesla gets in a crash trying to drive across a parking lot. AAA recently ran a series of tests with cars that use rudimentary autonomous driving to avoid hitting other cars and pedestrians

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Novel compound interrupts malaria parasite's lifecycle

An international group of researchers has proven that a molecule called TCMDC-135051 can selectively inhibit a protein that is essential to the lifecycle of Plasmodium falciparum, one of the parasites that causes malaria.

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How plants react to fungi

Plants are under constant pressure from fungi and other microorganisms. The air is full of fungal spores, which attach themselves to plant leaves and germinate, especially in warm and humid weather. Some fungi remain on the surface of the leaves. Others, such as downy mildew, penetrate the plants and proliferate, extracting important nutrients. These fungi can cause great damage in agriculture.

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Sweeping extent of global trade in wild animals revealed

Nature, Published online: 07 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02978-7 Comprehensive study of mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles finds that nearly one-fifth of vertebrates are bought and sold around the world.

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Daily briefing: At 15, graphene is ready for prime time

Nature, Published online: 07 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03025-1 The wonder material is on track to deliver on its commercial promise, a lab-made primordial soup yields RNA bases, and hooray! It’s the first Noble of 2019.

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Was early stick insect evolution triggered by birds and mammals?

Stick and leaf insects are a diverse and strikingly bizarre group of insects with a world-wide distribution, which are more common in tropical and subtropical areas. They are famous for their impressively large body size, compared to other insects, and their remarkable ability to camouflage themselves as twigs, leaves or bark in order to hide from potential predators. A team of international resea

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Florida python program nabs 900th snake, including new record

There is more than one python-hunting army in Florida, but the one run by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission just hit another milestone including the largest python the group has ever captured.

16h

Scientists observe year-long plateaus in decline of Type Ia supernova light curves

Scientists at the Center for Astrophysics, Harvard & Smithsonian have announced the discovery that, contrary to previously accepted knowledge, Type Ia supernovae experience light curve decline plateaus, and lengthy ones at that, lasting up to a year.

16h

Was early stick insect evolution triggered by birds and mammals?

Stick and leaf insects are a diverse and strikingly bizarre group of insects with a world-wide distribution, which are more common in tropical and subtropical areas. They are famous for their impressively large body size, compared to other insects, and their remarkable ability to camouflage themselves as twigs, leaves or bark in order to hide from potential predators. A team of international resea

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New method gives first global picture of mutual predictability of atmosphere and ocean

University of Maryland (UMD) scientists have carried out a novel statistical analysis to determine for the first time a global picture of how the ocean helps predict the low-level atmosphere and vice versa. They observed ubiquitous influence of the ocean on the atmosphere in the extratropics, which has been difficult to demonstrate with dynamic models of atmospheric and oceanic circulation. The re

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Florida python program nabs 900th snake, including new record

There is more than one python-hunting army in Florida, but the one run by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission just hit another milestone including the largest python the group has ever captured.

16h

Bacteria trapped—and terminated—by graphene filter

Airborne bacteria may see what looks like a comfy shag carpet on which to settle. But it's a trap.

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Nodulation connected to higher resistance against powdery mildew in legumes

Scientists have long known that nodulation is important to plant health. Nodulation occurs when nodules, which form on the roots of plants (primarily legumes), form a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing bacteria that deliver nutrients to the plant. This process is a key part of sustainable agriculture and makes legumes an important source of protein for much of the world. However, recent r

16h

Dog owners often inaccurately measure out kibble, study finds

A cup might seem like the most obvious way to measure out dry dog food, but new University of Guelph research finds that when it comes to getting portions right, dog owners often get it wrong.

16h

Nodulation connected to higher resistance against powdery mildew in legumes

Scientists have long known that nodulation is important to plant health. Nodulation occurs when nodules, which form on the roots of plants (primarily legumes), form a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing bacteria that deliver nutrients to the plant. This process is a key part of sustainable agriculture and makes legumes an important source of protein for much of the world. However, recent r

16h

Dog owners often inaccurately measure out kibble, study finds

A cup might seem like the most obvious way to measure out dry dog food, but new University of Guelph research finds that when it comes to getting portions right, dog owners often get it wrong.

16h

Curiosity rover finds an ancient oasis on Mars

If you could travel back in time 3.5 billion years, what would Mars look like? The picture is evolving among scientists working with NASA's Curiosity rover.

16h

The Complexity of Napoleon Chagnon, Anthropology's Lightning Rod

Unpublished excerpts from a 2000 interview capture one of the most controversial figures in modern science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

Surprise contributor to multiple sclerosis

The discovery suggests new avenues for devising treatments and is a vital step toward finding a cure.

16h

Soft robot programmed to move like an inchworm

Researchers have created a miniature robot that can crawl with inchworm-like motion. The underlying technology could one day transform industries from aviation to smart wearables.

16h

Navigating 'Neuralville': Virtual town helps map brain functions

Experiments showed that the brain's parahippocampal place area is involved in recognizing a particular kind of place, while the brain's retrosplenial complex is involved in mentally mapping the locations of particular places.

16h

Large genome-wide association study illuminates genetic risk factors for gout

Researchers, using a method called genome-wide association study, have illuminated the genetic underpinnings of high serum urate, the blood condition that brings on gout. The study will inform efforts to develop screening tests for gout risk as well as potential new treatments.

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Glycans May Bind to RNA, Initial Findings Suggest

This is the first time sugars have been found connected to RNA molecules, suggesting a new role for RNA.

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Nodulation connected to higher resistance against powdery mildew in legumes

Scientists have long known that nodulation is important to plant health. Nodulation occurs when nodules, which form on the roots of plants (primarily legumes), form a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing bacteria that deliver nutrients to the plant. This process is a key part of sustainable agriculture and makes legumes an important source of protein for much of the world. However, recent r

16h

Was early stick insect evolution triggered by birds and mammals?

Stick and leaf insects are a strikingly bizarre group of insects with a worldwide distribution. They are famous for their impressively large body size and their remarkable ability to camouflage themselves as twigs, leaves or bark in order to hide from potential predators. A team of international researchers led by the University of Göttingen has now generated the first phylogenomic tree of these i

16h

Bacteria trapped — and terminated — by graphene filter

Rice University chemists transform their laser-induced graphene into an air filter that not only traps pathogens but also kills them with a small blast of electricity.

16h

Researchers discover critical process for how breast cancer spreads in bones

Researchers from the University of Notre Dame have identified a pair of proteins believed to be critical for spreading, or metastasizing, breast cancer to bone.

16h

Novel compound interrupts malaria parasite's lifecycle

Compound inhibits key enzymes, interrupting the parasite's lifecycle in human organisms and preventing transmission to vector insects. This discovery published in Science involved researchers funded by FAPESP.

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The cholera bacterium can steal up to 150 genes in one go

EPFL scientists have discovered that predatory bacteria like the cholera pathogen can steal up to 150 genes in one go from their neighbors. The study sheds light on one of the most fundamental mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer.

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Dog owners often inaccurately measure out kibble, study finds

New University of Guelph research finds dog owners are often inaccurate when measuring out kibble using a scoop, putting the dogs at risk of under-nourishment or weight gain.

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How plants react to fungi

Using special receptors, plants recognize when they are at risk of fungal infection. This new finding could help cultivate resistant crops and reduce pesticide usage.

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Porn, politics are key targets in 'deepfakes': study

So-called "deepfake" videos are proliferating online, with most of them pornographic but with some politically motivated ones as well, security researchers said Monday.

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Soft robot programmed to move like an inchworm

Engineering researchers from the University of Toronto have created a miniature robot that can crawl with inchworm-like motion. The underlying technology could one day transform industries from …

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Did you solve it? Getting coins out of the bank

The answer to today’s money problem Earlier today I set you the following problem. It was a tricky one, and judging from the BTL comments the solution is eagerly awaited. Let me restate the problem before we get there. It concerns a game on a grid with an infinite number of rows and columns, and starts with three coins in the top left corner of the grid, as illustrated here. Continue reading…

16h

The next big California vs. Trump fight is over water and endangered species

Just how far will California Gov. Gavin Newsom go in his high-profile fight with the Trump administration over environmental protections?

16h

Early breeding season for some Arctic seabirds due global warming

The breeding season of some seabirds in Arctic regions takes place earlier as a result of the temperature rise caused by climate change, according to a science article with Francisco Ramírez, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona—as one of the main authors.

16h

Cesium vapor aids in the search for dark matter

Physicists manage to further narrow down range of the search for dark matter.

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Early breeding season for some Arctic seabirds due global warming

The breeding season of some seabirds in Arctic regions takes place earlier as a result of the temperature rise caused by climate change, according to a new article.

16h

NASA's Curiosity Rover finds an ancient oasis on Mars

If you could travel back in time 3.5 billion years, what would Mars look like? The picture is evolving among scientists working with NASA's Curiosity rover.

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'Joker' Just Broke a Big Box Office Record

Also, here are some spankin' new trailers for 'Picard', 'Rick and Morty', 'The Expanse', 'The Walking Dead', 'Star Trek: Discovery', 'Riverdale', and more.

17h

Cesium vapor aids in the search for dark matter

The hunt for dark matter is one of the most exciting challenges facing fundamental physics in the 21st century. Researchers have long known that it must exist, as many astrophysical observations would otherwise be impossible to explain. For example, stars rotate much faster in galaxies than they would if only 'normal' matter existed.

17h

Early breeding season for some Arctic seabirds due global warming

The breeding season of some seabirds in Arctic regions takes place earlier as a result of the temperature rise caused by climate change, according to a science article with Francisco Ramírez, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona—as one of the main authors.

17h

Trump opening California public land to fracking, gas leases. Is it 'reckless'?

The Trump administration has finalized its plans to open hundreds of thousands of acres of federal land in Central California to oil and gas leasing, paving the way for more fracking to soon begin in the state.

17h

Groundbreaking method detects defective computer chips

A technique co-developed by researchers at the Paul Scherer Institut in Switzerland and researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering would allow companies and other organizations to non-destructively scan chips to ensure that they haven't been altered and that they are manufactured to design specifications without error

17h

Diabetes-Alzheimer's link explored at Neuroscience 2019

Surprising links exist between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, and researchers are beginning to unpack the pathology that connects the two. Hear leading scientists announce their new findings at Neuroscience 2019, the world's largest source of emerging news and cutting-edge research on the brain and nervous system.

17h

New method delivers first global picture of mutual predictability of atmosphere and ocean

University of Maryland scientists have carried out a novel statistical analysis to determine for the first time a global picture of how the ocean helps predict the low-level atmosphere and vice versa. They observed ubiquitous influence of the ocean on the atmosphere in the extratropics, which has been difficult to demonstrate with dynamic models of atmospheric and oceanic circulation.

17h

Navigating 'Neuralville': Virtual town helps map brain functions

Experiments showed that the brain's parahippocampal place area is involved in recognizing a particular kind of place, while the brain's retrosplenial complex is involved in mentally mapping the locations of particular places.

17h

Soft robot programmed to move like an inchworm

University of Toronto Engineering researchers have created a miniature robot that can crawl with inchworm-like motion. The underlying technology could one day transform industries from aviation to smart wearables.

17h

UVA discovers surprise contributor to multiple sclerosis

The discovery suggests new avenues for devising treatments and is a vital step toward finding a cure.

17h

Microscopy and Imaging Leader Shinya Inoue Dies

The long-time Marine Biological Laboratory scientist was known for using his own hand-built microscopes to image the dynamics of live cells.

17h

The Complexity of Napoleon Chagnon, Anthropology's Lightning Rod

Unpublished excerpts from a 2000 interview capture one of the most controversial figures in modern science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Park service looks to solve mystery deaths of Isle Royale wolves

One year into its effort to reestablish the wolf population on Isle Royale, the National Park Service and its partners have a problem: The new wolves keep dying and nobody knows why.

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Park service looks to solve mystery deaths of Isle Royale wolves

One year into its effort to reestablish the wolf population on Isle Royale, the National Park Service and its partners have a problem: The new wolves keep dying and nobody knows why.

17h

Pressure may be key to fighting climate change with thermoelectric generators

Pressure improves the ability of materials to turn heat into electricity and could potentially be used to create clean generators, according to new work from a team that includes Carnegie's Alexander Goncharov and Viktor Struzhkin published in Nature Materials.

17h

Carrier-resolved photo-Hall effect

Nature, Published online: 07 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1632-2

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Axionic charge-density wave in the Weyl semimetal (TaSe4)2I

Nature, Published online: 07 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1630-4 In a charge-density-wave Weyl semimetal, an axion is observed and identified as a sliding mode in the charge-density-wave phase characterized by anomalous magneto-electric transport effects.

17h

Study: Porn Accounts for 96 Percent of Deepfakes Online

Fake Nudes On Monday, cybersecurity firm Deeptrace released “The State of Deepfakes,” a report that takes a deep dive into the AI-doctored videos many say threaten to destroy democracy . But by analyzing all 14,678 deepfakes it could find online, the company discovered that the people creating the clips seem far less concerned with manipulating elections — and really, really into the idea of inse

17h

Cesium vapor aids in the search for dark matter

Physicists at Mainz University manage to further narrow down range of the search for dark matter

17h

Early breeding season for some Arctic seabirds due to global warming

The breeding season of some seabirds in Arctic regions takes place earlier as a result of the temperature rise caused by climate change, according to a science article with Francisco Ramírez, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona -as one of the main authors.

17h

CTE risk, severity increases with years playing American football

The risk and severity of developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) increases with the number of years playing American football according to a new study that appears online in Annals of Neurology. These findings reaffirm the relationship between playing tackle football and CTE, and for the first time quantify the strength of that relationship.

17h

Heartbeats align during an Islamic ritual, new study finds

Anthropologists at the University of Connecticut discovered that the heartbeats of Sufi practitioners synchronized during an important ritual. Sufism is a mystical component of Islam that emphasizes coming to know God through direct experience, like trance. Other studies have also found that individuals who are closely connected emotionally and socially experience physiological alignment. None Ne

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Roku's New Interactive Roku TV Pop-Up Ads During Commercials Raise Eyebrows

It's becoming harder and harder to find TVs these days that aren’t "smart" straight from the factory. Smart TVs with their integrated internet connectivity and media platforms make it easier …

17h

Why Is Middle School So Hard for So Many People?

Middle school. The very memory of it prompts disgust. Here’s a thing no one’s thinking: Geez, I wish I still looked the way I did when I was 12. Middle school is the worst. Tweenhood, which starts around age 9 , is horrifying for a few reasons. For one, the body morphs in weird and scary ways. Certain parts expand faster than others, sometimes so fast that they cause literal growing pains; hair g

17h

Disorder compensation controls doping efficiency in organic semiconductors

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12526-6 Though conductivity doping in organic semiconductors has been widely studied in organic electronics, a clear mechanistic picture that explains the phenomenon is still lacking. Here, the authors report a theoretical approach to elucidate the role of disorder compensation in doped organic materials.

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Author Correction: Hsp70 and Hsp40 inhibit an inter-domain interaction necessary for transcriptional activity in the androgen receptor

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12578-8

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Artificial intelligence reveals environmental constraints on colour diversity in insects

Nature Communications, Published online: 07 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12500-2 Deep learning has the potential to identify ecological relationships between environment and complex phenotypes that are difficult to quantify. Here, the authors use deep learning to analyse associations among elevation, climate and phenotype across ~2000 moth species in Taiwan.

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For gene-edited livestock, regulation is in its infancy

Genetically modified salmon are, in principle, the only animal in the world with artificially altered DNA to have made their way onto humanity's plate—if only, for the moment, in Canada.

17h

Vänta klippa navelsträngen kan förhindra hjärnskador hos nyfödda

Vid förlossningar där barnet föds andningspåverkat är rutinen idag att navelsträngen klipps direkt. Barnet förs sedan till ett bord där åtgärder sätts in, bland annat för att få igång andningen. Ola Andersson, neonatolog på Skånes universitetssjukhus och forskare vid Lunds universitet, och hans kollegor undersöker nu vad som händer om navelsträngen inte klipps direkt, utan först efter tre minuter

17h

Så får företag flexiblare tillverkning

Företag som tillverkar produkter får ständigt krav på kortare ledtider, lägre priser och bättre funktionalitet och teknik. Detta gäller särskilt för företag som bygger på så kallade engineer-to-order (ETO), som utvecklar och tillverkar högt kundanpassade produkter där varan börjar utvecklas först när kundordern är lagd. I den traditionella synen på produktlivscykeln kommer kunden in i bilden förs

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Elektriskt ledande plastmaterial kan skrivas ut direkt på tyget

Dagens resurskrävande produktionsprocesser för tryck på textilier kan snart vara historia. Med en ny metod framtagen vid Högskolan i Borås kan flera led i processen skalas bort. Det kan göras genom att med en 3D-skrivare direkt på textilierna skriva ut det som idag trycks med screen- eller Inkjet-teknik. Detta är särskilt intressant vid produktion av smarta och funktionella textilier. Razieh Hash

17h

For gene-edited livestock, regulation is in its infancy

Genetically modified salmon are, in principle, the only animal in the world with artificially altered DNA to have made their way onto humanity's plate—if only, for the moment, in Canada.

17h

Gene-edited livestock carry huge promise but major pitfalls

If American researchers have successfully employed new gene-editing techniques to develop hornless dairy cattle and piglets born castrated—a seeming boon to farmers and ranchers—they are still struggling to move these animals from stable to table.

17h

S.Sudan warns of more oil spills after pipeline rupture

South Sudan's petroleum ministry warned Monday of more oil spills from poorly maintained facilities, after a pipeline leaked 2,000 barrels of oil in the north of the country.

17h

Large genome-wide association study illuminates genetic risk factors for gout

Researchers, using a method called genome-wide association study, have illuminated the genetic underpinnings of high serum urate, the blood condition that brings on gout. The study, co-led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, will inform efforts to develop screening tests for gout risk as well as potential new treatments.

17h

Young infants with fever may be more likely to develop infections

Infants with a high fever may be at increased risk for infections, according to research from Penn State College of Medicine.

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Pressure may be key to fighting climate change with thermoelectric generators

Pressure improves the ability of materials to turn heat into electricity and could potentially be used to create clean generators, according to new work from a team that includes Carnegie's Alexander Goncharov and Viktor Struzhkin published in Nature Materials.

17h

From sleeping cell to assassin — how immune cells work

Scientists at the University of Dundee have carried out one of the most comprehensive studies into how immune cells sense and respond to their environment to fight infection and destroy tumours. The research team, who have published their findings in the journal Nature Immunology, said the results provide important insights into how immune responses might be manipulated for the treatment of autoim

17h

Atopic dermatitis: How allergens get on our nerves

Atopic dermatitis, or eczema, primarily affects infants and children. A skin disease characterized by flare-ups, it is often treated with topical anti-inflammatories. A new study led by Inserm researcher Nicolas Gaudenzio, in collaboration with his colleagues at Stanford University shows that immune cells and sensory neurons interact in the skin to form units that can detect allergens and trigger

17h

Rare 'Lazarus superconductivity' observed in promising, rediscovered material

A team of researchers has observed a rare phenomenon called re-entrant superconductivity in the material uranium ditelluride. Nicknamed 'Lazarus superconductivity,' the phenomenon occurs when a superconducting state arises, breaks down, then re-emerges in a material due to a change in a specific parameter — in this case, the application of a very strong magnetic field. The discovery furthers the

17h

Brain tunes itself to criticality, maximizing information processing

Criticality is truly a set point, and not a mere inevitability. New research from Washington University in St. Louis confirms this long-standing prediction in the brains of freely behaving animals.

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Genome-edited bull passes on hornless trait to calves

For the past two years, researchers at the University of California, Davis, have been studying six offspring of a dairy bull, genome-edited to prevent it from growing horns. UC Davis scientists report that none of the bull's offspring developed horns, as expected, and blood work and physical exams of the calves found they were all healthy. The researchers also sequenced and analyzed the genomes of

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25% of total US health care spending estimated to be waste

A new study estimates about one-quarter of total health care spending in the United States is waste, with a price tag ranging from $760 billion to $935 billion. The United States spends more on health care than any other country. For this analysis, the authors identified government-based reports, articles and peer-reviewed publications from 2012 to 2019 that focused on estimates of costs or saving

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Did providing free essential medicines increase adherence?

More patients who said they couldn't afford their medications adhered to treatment when they received free essential medicines for one year in a randomized clinical trial, but not all measures of health outcomes improved. The trial enrolled 786 patients (764 completed it) at nine primary care sites in Ontario, Canada. Patients were randomly split into two groups: 395 received free essential medici

17h

Association of family relationships during adolescence with later depression risk

Positive family relationships during adolescence appeared to be associated with lower levels of depressive symptoms from adolescence to midlife in this observational study of about 18,000 adolescents followed up until they were 32 to 42 years old.

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How common is high blood pressure among children worldwide?

This study, called a review and meta-analysis, combined the results of 47 articles published from 1994 to 2018 to estimate worldwide how common high blood pressure is among children and adolescents age 19 and younger. Authors report the overall proportion of childhood hypertension was 4%.

17h

The benefits of updating agricultural drainage infrastructure

The massive underground infrastructure that allows farmers to cultivate crops on much of the world's most productive land has outlived its design life and should be updated, according to a new study. Installing higher-capacity pipes and conservation practices would yield a wide range of production and environmental benefits.

17h

Common denominator that triggers asthma in favorable environments

Some so-called pro-allergic environments strongly promote the development of asthma and are responsible for the dramatic increase in the prevalence of asthma, especially in industrialized countries. Researchers at the GIGA of the University of Liège have identified how all these pro-allergic environments act in the same way on the pulmonary immune system to induce the development of allergic asthm

17h

Complex energies, quantum symmetries

New research from Washington University in St. Louis realizes one of the first parity-time symmetric quantum systems, allowing scientists to observe how that kind of symmetry — and the act of breaking of it — leads to previously unexplored phenomena. The work from the laboratory of Kater Murch, associate professor of physics in Arts & Sciences, is published Oct. 7 in the journal Nature Physics.

17h

Study explores how to make conservation initiatives more contagious

New research shows conservation initiatives often spread like diseases, helping scientists and policymakers design programmes more likely to be taken up.

17h

Secrets of lung cancer spread found in patients' blood and biopsies

Early signs that a patient's lung cancer may spread and become untreatable can be picked up in samples of their blood and tumor, according to a trio of papers published in Nature Medicine.

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Medicare overpayments for graduate medical education could total $1.28 billion annually

If Medicare capped funds for Graduate Medical Education (GME) at the rate of $150,000 per resident, the move would free up more than $1 billion a year, according to a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. Medicare could use the savings to address the doctor shortages by specialty and in certain parts of the country, the authors say.

17h

A new mathematical approach to understanding zeolites

A system developed at MIT helps to identify zeolites that can readily transform into other zeolite forms, which are widely used as catalysts in industrial processes.

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China is on track to meet its ultra-low emissions goals for 2020

Polluting emissions from Chinese thermal power plants declined significantly between 2014 and 2017, according to research involving UCL. The study, published today in Nature Energy, analysed data from 2014, when China introduced the ambitious Ultra-Low Emissions (ULE) Standards Policy for renovating coal-fired power stations to limit air pollutant emissions, to 2017.

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New capsule can orally deliver drugs that usually have to be injected

MIT engineers designed a drug capsule that can carry insulin or other protein drugs and protect them from the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract. When the capsule reaches the small intestine, it breaks down to reveal dissolvable microneedles that attach to the intestinal wall and release drug for uptake into the bloodstream.

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Distributing essential medicines for free resulted in a 44% increase in adherence

A new study out of St. Michael's Hospital's MAP Centre for Urban Health Solutions in Toronto found that distributing essential medicines at no charge to patients resulted in a 44% increase in people taking their medications.

17h

Cell death blocker prevents healthy cells from dying

Researchers have discovered a proof-of-concept drug that can prevent healthy cells from dying in the laboratory. The new compound is exceptional because it intervenes in the earliest stages of cell death (apoptosis), before irreversible damage occurs. This is a breakthrough basic research discovery because the ability to block cell death plus keep cells functioning in a perfectly healthy state cou

17h

Gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy safely preserves muscle function

A gene therapy being developed at Penn Medicine to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) successfully and safely stopped the severe muscle deterioration associated with the rare, genetic disease in both small and large animal models, according to a first-of-its-kind study from Penn Medicine researchers. The findings puts the field within closer reach of a safe and effective gene therapy that use

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Dansk ingeniørkunst med et twist

PLUS. Kistefos Museet i norske Jevnaker har netop åbnet sin nye museumsbygning, The Twist, der er tegnet af det danske arkitektfirma BIG. Danske Bladt Industries har været totalentreprenør på byggeriet. Virksomheden kalder byggeriet for sin hidtil »mest avancerede totalentreprisekonstruktion.«

17h

Gene-edited livestock carry huge promise but major pitfalls

If American researchers have successfully employed new gene-editing techniques to develop hornless dairy cattle and piglets born castrated—a seeming boon to farmers and ranchers—they are still struggling to move these animals from stable to table.

17h

Mark Zuckerberg, a Billionaire, Says Billionaires Shouldn’t Exist

Initiate Self-Destruct Mark Zuckerberg, whose wealth amounts to about $69.8 billion , recently made a Bernie Sanders-esque admission: perhaps no one needs to be a billionaire. Specifically, the Facebook CEO was responding to a question about Sanders’ proposed wealth tax during an internal Q&A session on Thursday, according to CNN . “I don’t know if I have an exact threshold on what amount of mone

17h

Was Venus once warm and wet? New study of lava flow suggests not

A new study of the Ovda Fluctus lava flow on Venus indicates that it is made of basaltic lava. This discovery weakens the notion that Venus might once have been Earth-like with an ancient ocean of liquid water.

17h

Another casualty of climate change? Recreational fishing

Another casualty of climate change will likely be shoreline recreational fishing, according to new research from North Carolina State University and Oregon State University. The study finds some regions of the U.S. may benefit from increasing temperatures, but those benefits will be more than offset by declines in fishing elsewhere.

17h

New study shows the evolution and changes of the vegetation of the Orinoco Delta of the last 6200 years

Mauritia flexuosa is the most widespread plant in the Orinoco Delta, in north-western Venezuela. This has not always been the case in the past. This palm, locally known as "moriche," started its domination over the vegetal community of the area 3000 years ago, according to new research that has reconstructed for the first time the ecological dynamics and evolution of the Orinoco's Delta for the la

17h

Scientists discover how to detect precancerous conditions with nanodiamonds

Scientists at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (MEPhI) have studied the optical properties of detonation nanodiamonds when interacting with various biomacromolecules (biopolymer molecules).

17h

Physicists unlock the mystery of thermionic emissions in graphene

When a metal is heated to a sufficiently high temperature, electrons can be ejected out from the surface in a process known as the thermionic emission, a process that is similar to the evaporation of water molecules from the surface of boiling water.

17h

New shine for Sunrise's telescope

The Sunrise mission is an adventure: Carried by a giant helium balloon, the unmanned observatory peers at the Sun from an altitude of more than 35 kilometers; several days of flight are followed by a parachute landing. Twice already, the delicate main mirror of Sunrise's telescope has survived this daring expedition undamaged. "But such a flight does not leave the mirror completely unscathed," exp

17h

Elon Musk: Teslas Will Soon Make “Fart” and “Goat” Noises

Potty Mouth Tesla CEO Elon Musk has a weak spot for potty humor. First, the carmaker introduced a “fart app” for its electric vehicles, which generates rude bathroom sounds. Now, Musk says Teslas will soon be getting “customized horn and movement sounds,”— including “goats” and “farts,” according to a emoji-laden Sunday tweet . Clop And for all the “Monty Python” fanatics out there, Musk is inclu

17h

A new mathematical approach to understanding zeolites

Zeolites are a class of natural or manufactured minerals with a sponge-like structure, riddled with tiny pores that make them useful as catalysts or ultrafine filters. But of the millions of zeolite compositions that are theoretically possible, so far only about 248 have ever been discovered or made. Now, research from MIT helps explain why only this small subset has been found, and could help sci

17h

Rare 'Lazarus superconductivity' observed in promising, rediscovered material

Researchers from the University of Maryland, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) and the University of Oxford have observed a rare phenomenon called re-entrant superconductivity in the material uranium ditelluride. The discovery furthers the case for uranium ditelluride as a promising material for use in quantum computers.

17h

Complex energies, quantum symmetries

In a certain sense, physics is the study of the universe's symmetries. Physicists strive to understand how systems and symmetries change under various transformations.

17h

Genome-edited bull passes on hornless trait to calves

For the past two years, researchers at the University of California, Davis, have been studying six offspring of a dairy bull, genome-edited to prevent it from growing horns. This technology has been proposed as an alternative to dehorning, a common management practice performed to protect other cattle and human handlers from injuries.

17h

The benefits of updating agricultural drainage infrastructure

Massive networks of drains, pipes and tiles that enable food production on much of the world's most productive cropland are due for expansion and replacement to meet the demands of agricultural intensification and climate change. How that infrastructure is updated will have enormous consequences on food production and the environment, according to a new study.

17h

Cell death blocker prevents healthy cells from dying

Scientists in Australia have developed a world-first compound that can keep cells alive and functioning in a perfectly healthy state when they otherwise would have died.

17h

Military drills for robots

Researchers tested ground robots performing military-style exercises, much like Soldier counterparts, at a robotics testing site in Pennsylvania recently as part of a 10-year research project designed to push the research boundaries in robotics and autonomy.

17h

Ethiopian parents can't make up for effects of life shocks on children by spending more on education

Ethiopian parents try to level out the life chances least-advantaged children affected by early life shocks such as famine and low rainfall levels by investing more in their education.

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A timekeeper for siesta

External stimuli can rearrange the hierarchy of neuronal networks and influence behavior. This was demonstrated by scientists using the circadian clock of the fruit fly as an example.

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Another casualty of climate change? Recreational fishing

Another casualty of climate change will likely be shoreline recreational fishing, according to new research. The study finds some regions of the U.S. may benefit from increasing temperatures, but those benefits will be more than offset by declines in fishing elsewhere.

17h

Deep learning used to create virtual 'super instrument'

Scientist describe a new algorithm that combines the capabilities of two spacecraft instruments, which could result in lower cost and higher efficiency space missions. The virtual 'super instrument,' is a computer algorithm that utilizes deep learning to analyze ultraviolet images of the Sun and measure the energy that the Sun emits as ultraviolet light.

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Study explores how to make conservation initiatives more contagious

New research shows conservation initiatives often spread like diseases, helping scientists and policymakers design programmes more likely to be taken up.

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Coastal City Refuses to Retreat

A major showdown looms over how aggressively California cities will confront sea level rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Genome-edited bull passes on hornless trait to calves

For the past two years, researchers at the University of California, Davis, have been studying six offspring of a dairy bull, genome-edited to prevent it from growing horns. This technology has been proposed as an alternative to dehorning, a common management practice performed to protect other cattle and human handlers from injuries.

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Cell death blocker prevents healthy cells from dying

Scientists in Australia have developed a world-first compound that can keep cells alive and functioning in a perfectly healthy state when they otherwise would have died.

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New Mental Health Trend: Ditching the Therapist for a Dominatrix

After six months of therapy, sex and relationships writer Sofia Barrett-Ibarria wasn’t feeling any less depressed. In fact, according to a fascinating new essay she penned for The Guardian , she actually felt worse after each session than she did before it. So she fired her therapist and hired a dominatrix. “I didn’t want another therapist; I wanted someone to just tell me what to do, who could k

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Scientists concerned over US plans to collect DNA data from immigrants

Nature, Published online: 07 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02998-3 Expanded genetic-testing raises concerns about privacy for those who are tested — and their families.

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Three Share Nobel Prize in Medicine for How Cells Sense Oxygen

(Credit: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator. Copyright American Institute of Physics) (Inside Science) — The 2019 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine has been awarded to three scientists “for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability." The 9 million Swedish krona (more than $900,000) prize is shared equally between William Kaelin from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

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Turtle spine signals reveal how movement starts

Our bodies most likely generate and maintain movement through a network of cells, rather than from a single point, researchers report. “Most movements are actually generated in the spinal cord. Naturally, there is a conversation with high-ranking parts of the nervous system, such as the cerebrum, but there are also reflexes that simply stem from the back,” says Rune W. Berg, associate professor a

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Physicists unlock the mystery of thermionic emission in graphene

Researchers discover a new theory that paves the way for the design of better graphene electronics and energy converters.

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Disappearing Peruvian glaciers

It is common knowledge that glaciers are melting in most areas across the globe. The speed at which tropical glaciers in the Peruvian Andes are retreating is particularly alarming, however. In the first detailed investigation of all Peruvian mountain ranges, a research team has ascertained a drastic reduction of almost 30 percent in the area covered by glaciers between 2000 and 2016.

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Proximity to paths and roads is a burden for white-tailed sea eagles

A research team has now measured concentrations of the hormone corticosterone and its metabolic products in white-tailed sea eagles in northern Germany and correlated these values with potential causes of stress. They found that the levels of corticosterone in the birds' urine are higher the closer a breeding pair's nest is to paths or roads.

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Number of depressed over-65s unchanged but antidepressant use soars

The proportion of people aged over 65 on antidepressants has more than doubled in two decades — according to new research. Despite a rise in antidepressant use, there was little change in the number of older people diagnosed with depression. The findings are based on the Cognitive Function and Ageing Studies, conducted at two time points — between 1991 and 1993, and between 2008 and 2011.

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Picoscience and a plethora of new materials

The revolutionary tech discoveries of the next few decades may come from new materials so small they make nanomaterials look like lumpy behemoths. These materials will be designed and refined at the picometer scale, which is a thousand times smaller than a nanometer. A new study moves picoscience in a new direction: taking elements from the periodic table and tinkering with them at the subatomic l

18h

How the colon prioritizes gas detox over energy use

Smelly flatulence is one way our bodies manage our well-being. It turns out expelling noxious gas takes priority in our guts.

18h

Diabetes advances poised to help manage blood sugar after meals

Mealtimes can become a difficult experience for individuals with diabetes. After a meal, blood sugar levels may soar as the food digests or unexpectedly plummet if an insulin dose was more than the meal required.

18h

Large, long-term study suggests link between eating mushrooms and a lower risk of prostate cancer

Results from the first long-term cohort study of more than 36,000 Japanese men over decades suggest an association between eating mushrooms and a lower risk of prostate cancer.

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An ancient rock suggests a new theory for how life started | Tara Djokic

Exactly when and where did life on Earth begin? Scientists have long thought that it emerged three billion years ago in the ocean — until astrobiologist Tara Djokic and her team made an unexpected discovery in the western Australian desert. Learn how an ancient rock found near a hot volcanic pool is shifting our understanding of the origin-of-life puzzle.

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How the colon prioritizes gas detox over energy use

Onions, cabbage, garlic. While nutritious, eating these foods can lead to an embarrassing side effect: smelly flatulence. More than just smelly, hydrogen sulfide, the chemical compound responsible …

18h

Proximity to paths and roads is a burden for white-tailed sea eagles

The white-tailed sea eagle is known for reacting sensitively to disturbances. However, research into which factors have which effects on the animals and how these impacts influence breeding …

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SwRI, international team use deep learning to create virtual 'super instrument'

A study co-written by a Southwest Research Institute scientist describes a new algorithm that combines the capabilities of two spacecraft instruments, which could result in lower cost and higher efficiency space missions. The virtual 'super instrument,' is a computer algorithm that utilizes deep learning to analyze ultraviolet images of the Sun, taken by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, and meas

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Another casualty of climate change? Recreational fishing

Another casualty of climate change will likely be shoreline recreational fishing, according to new research. The study finds some regions of the U.S. may benefit from increasing temperatures, but those benefits will be more than offset by declines in fishing elsewhere.

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Icaros: Flight simulator home trainer

Epidemiological studies show significant correlations between periods spent sitting and the prevalence of chronic diseases. This also applies to children and adolescents. One of the major obstacles to people taking up physical exercise is a lack of motivation. The solution could be Icaros: a flight simulator with exergaming technology that promises the user an element of fun while at the same time

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Unstable packages could deliver drugs that don’t dissolve right

Unstable metal organic frameworks may work as as a system for drug delivery, researchers report. Stable metal organic frameworks, or MOFs, are prized for their ability to capture carbon dioxide or harvest atmospheric water. Of the drugs in development, 90% don’t dissolve well or at all in the body, according to a 2012 study. Metal organic frameworks are rigid, porous structures composed of metal

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Molecular nanocarbons with mechanical bonds

Carbon materials with nano-scale periodicity such as graphene and carbon nanotubes, called "nanocarbons," are expected to become light, highly functional next-generation materials. There have been demands for precise synthesis methods targeting only at the nanocarbon structure with the desired property because their electronic and mechanical properties are greatly different depending on the struct

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The Two Psychological Tricks Trump Is Using to Get Away With Everything

Last Thursday, Donald Trump said something that, on its face, seemed inexplicably self-defeating. Already under attack for having asked Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden, he publicly asked China to do the same. This time there was no whistle-blower forcing Trump’s hand. Having already transgressed the once-sacrosanct principle that foreign powers shouldn’t meddle in American elections, Trump—for n

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What Authoritarians Mean by ‘Corruption’

What if the People’s Republic of China fulfilled Donald Trump’s wish and investigated the Bidens? Chinese President Xi Jinping certainly has the machinery to do the job. Upon assuming control of the Communist Party in 2012, he built a huge apparatus to root out corruption. His regime has investigated more than 1 million officials for supposedly abusing public power, with several sentenced to deat

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Ethiopian parents can't make up for effects of life shocks on children by spending more on education

Ethiopian parents try to level out the life chances of least-advantaged children affected by early life shocks such as famine and low rainfall levels by investing more in their education.

18h

Disappearing Peruvian glaciers

It is common knowledge that glaciers are melting in most areas across the globe. The speed at which tropical glaciers in the Peruvian Andes are retreating is particularly alarming, however. In the first detailed investigation of all Peruvian mountain ranges, a research team from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has ascertained a drastic reduction of almost 30 percent in the

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Climate change is coming for fishing, too

Shoreline recreational fishing will likely be another casualty of climate change, according to new research. The study finds some regions of the US may benefit from increasing temperatures, but those benefits will be more than offset by declines in fishing elsewhere. “If there are not significant efforts to curtail climate change, we’re looking at declines in recreational fishing participation of

18h

Molecular nanocarbons with mechanical bonds

Scientists have succeeded in synthesizing molecular nanocarbons with knots and catenanes by using a novel method in which silicon atoms are used. The epoch-making product of this research will pave the way to the development of new nanocarbon materials with complex geometric structures.

18h

A timekeeper for siesta

External stimuli can rearrange the hierarchy of neuronal networks and influence behaviour. This was demonstrated by scientists from the universities of Würzburg and Brandeis using the circadian clock of the fruit fly as an example.

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Ethiopian parents can't make up for effects of life shocks on children by spending more on education

Ethiopian parents try to level out the life chances least-advantaged children affected by early life shocks such as famine and low rainfall levels by investing more in their education.

18h

Crohn's disease study identifies genetic variant with potential to personalize treatment

A genetic variant carried by 40% of the population explains why some patients develop antibodies against the anti-TNF drugs, infliximab and adalimumab and lose response. The authors conclude that a further trial is required to confirm that genetic testing prior to treatment will reduce the rate of treatment failure by facilitating the most effective choice of therapy for individual patients. The r

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Tror du att du sitter lite på jobbet? Modern teknik visar sanningen

–Tidigare har undersökningar av hur mycket man sitter på jobbet byggt på självskattning, men våra rörelsemätare visar att det inte ger rättvisande resultat, säger Svend Erik Mathiassen, professor i belastningsskadeforskning vid Högskolan i Gävle. Forskarna kan nu med modern teknologi, som små mätinstrument på låret i enklaste fall, mäta stillasittande och fysisk aktivitet, och på så sätt komma nä

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Nyt klimaatlas viser hvor vandet vil komme fra: Nu skal kommunerne finde en vej frem

DMI har udarbejdet et såkaldt klimaatlas, der viser en endnu vådere fremtid, end hidtil forudset. Nu har alle kommuner og forsyninger et ensartet grundlag for at tilpasse og sikre mod fremtidens klima

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Computer model helps make sense of human memory

Researchers have created an artificial network to simulate the brain, demonstrating that tinkering with inhibitory circuits leads to extended memory.

18h

Particles emitted by consumer 3D printers could hurt indoor air quality

The particles emitted from 3D printers can negatively impact indoor air quality and have the potential to harm respiratory health, according to a new study.

18h

Molecular nanocarbons with mechanical bonds

Scientists have succeeded in synthesizing molecular nanocarbons with knots and catenanes by using a novel method in which silicon atoms are used. The epoch-making product of this research will pave the way to the development of new nanocarbon materials with complex geometric structures.

18h

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2019: How cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is being awarded jointly to William G. Kaelin Jr., Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza for identifying molecular machinery that regulates the activity of genes in response to varying levels of oxygen.

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Computer kidney sheds light on proper hydration

A new computer kidney could tell researchers more about the impacts of medicines taken by people who don't drink enough water.

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Drax: Block on power station development overruled

The Planning Inspectorate had ruled against new gas-fired turbines on climate change concerns.

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Spotify gains Siri support on iOS 13, arrives on Apple TV

In a long-awaited move, Spotify announced this morning its iOS 13 app would now offer Siri support and its streaming music service would also become available on Apple TV. That means you can …

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Typing speed on mobile is catching up to keyboards

Typing speed on mobile devices is catching up to that of physical keyboards, a study of more than 37,000 users shows. The research also finds that 10-19-year-olds can type about 10 words per minute faster than can people in their 40s. The participants reported spending an average of six hours per day on their mobile devices , so it’s no wonder they are skilled and have correspondingly fast finger

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The key to a long life may be genes that protect against stress

Long-lived animals like the grey whale and naked mole rat have genes that protect them from stress and cancer

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How the colon prioritizes gas detox over energy use

Onions, cabbage, garlic. While nutritious, eating these foods can lead to an embarrassing side effect: smelly flatulence. More than just smelly, hydrogen sulfide, the chemical compound responsible for the rotten-egg aroma, is deadly if inhaled at doses of more than 700 parts per million. (Thankfully, a bout of flatulence contains just .001 to 1 ppm sulfide.)

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Particles emitted by consumer 3-D printers could hurt indoor air quality

Consumer-grade 3-D printers have grown in popularity in recent years, but the particles emitted from such devices can negatively impact indoor air quality and have the potential to harm respiratory health, according to a study from researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and UL Chemical Safety.

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How the colon prioritizes gas detox over energy use

Onions, cabbage, garlic. While nutritious, eating these foods can lead to an embarrassing side effect: smelly flatulence. More than just smelly, hydrogen sulfide, the chemical compound responsible for the rotten-egg aroma, is deadly if inhaled at doses of more than 700 parts per million. (Thankfully, a bout of flatulence contains just .001 to 1 ppm sulfide.)

18h

Blog: Sæt nu it-sikkerhed på skoleskemaet!

Version2s blogger Christian Iversen skal ansætte it-folk i tre lande og undrer sig over, hvorfor det skal være så svært at finde egnede kandidater. Måske skal svaret findes i folkeskolen?

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Most Deepfakes Are Porn, and They're Multiplying Fast

Researchers worry that doctored videos may disrupt the 2020 election, but a new report finds that 96 percent of deepfakes are pornographic.

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Nobelpris för cellens livsnödvändiga anpassningsförmåga

I år tillkännagavs Nobelpriset i fysiologi eller medicin strax innan lunchtid på måndagen den 7 oktober, då Thomas Perlmann, sekreterare i Nobelkommittén, berättade att årets nobelpris i fysiologi eller medicin 2019 ska delas lika mellan tre forskande läkare: William G. Kaelin, Jr., Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe och Gregg L. Semenza.

18h

Diabetes advances poised to help manage blood sugar after meals

Mealtimes can become a difficult experience for individuals with diabetes. After a meal, blood sugar levels may soar as the food digests or unexpectedly plummet if an insulin dose was more than the meal required.

19h

Russia Could Take the Lead on Human Gene Editing

There’s broad consensus that genetically modifying humans isn’t a good idea, at least not anytime in the near future. But it seems Russia has less qualms about the idea , which could leave it to determine the future of the technology. After Chinese geneticist He Jiankui announced he had used CRISPR to genetically edit two human embryos there was widespread outrage from both the scientific communi

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Minnesota Legislature considers 'Clean Energy First' policy

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Energy Transition? Not So Fast, One Expert Says

submitted by /u/Koalaman21 [link] [comments]

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Otydlighet drabbar barn i migrationsprocess

I en avhandling från Stockholms universitet gör Louise Dane samspelet tydligare – mellan principen om barnets bästa, barns rätt till familjeliv och privatliv samt intresset av reglerad invandring. Louise Dane föreslår en modell för bedömning i enskilda ärenden som stöd för rättstillämpare. Hon ger även ett antal rekommendationer till framförallt lagstiftare i syfte att stärka barns rättigheter oc

19h

How academic freedom strengthens the bonds of accumulated knowledge

Humans are unique in that we learn socially and actively teach each other lessons of survival. Freedom of expression allows accumulated knowledge, that which is passed down through generations and across cultures, to flourish within and benefit society. The opinions expressed in this video do not necessarily reflect the views of the Charles Koch Foundation, which encourages the expression of dive

19h

Understanding T-cell polyfunctionality: How single cell proteomics data drive CAR-T cell therapy research and development

Vladimir Senyukov, Director of BioAnalytical Development at Precision Biosciences, talks about investigating T-cell cytokine production using single cell proteomics in order to unlock the therapeutic potential of allogenic CAR-T cells.

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Academic freedom prevents us from getting trapped in circles of delusion

If channels of expression aren't kept open, there runs a risk of pluralistic ignorance. We all have the right to express ideas even if they're incorrect. How would we know whether an idea is right or wrong without expressing and evaluating it? Enlightenment Now: The Case for Reason, Science, Humanism, and Progress List Price: $18.00 New From: $9.89 in Stock Used From: $8.50 in Stock

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Molecular nanocarbons with mechanical bonds

Scientists at Nagoya University have succeeded in synthesizing molecular nanocarbons with knots and catenanes by using a novel method in which silicon atoms are used. The epoch-making product of this research will pave the way to the development of new nanocarbon materials with complex geometric structures.

19h

Particles emitted by consumer 3D printers could hurt indoor air quality

The particles emitted from 3D printers can negatively impact indoor air quality and have the potential to harm respiratory health, according to a study from researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and UL Chemical Safety.

19h

How the colon prioritizes gas detox over energy use

Smelly farts are one way our bodies manage our well-being. It turns out expelling noxious gas takes priority in our guts.

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Antipsychotics linked to accumulation of hospital days in persons with Alzheimer's disease

People with Alzheimer's disease who used antipsychotic drugs had a higher number of accumulated hospital days than people with Alzheimer's disease who did not use antipsychotics, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The results were published in the Journal of American Medical Directors Association. During a two-year follow-up, persons who initiated antipsychotic drugs

19h

Large, long-term study suggests link between eating mushrooms and a lower risk of prostate cancer

Results from the first long-term cohort study of more than 36,000 Japanese men over decades suggest an association between eating mushrooms and a lower risk of prostate cancer.

19h

Computer model helps make sense of human memory

Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) and the RIKEN Center for Brain Science have created an artificial network to simulate the brain, demonstrating that tinkering with inhibitory circuits leads to extended memory.

19h

Disappearing Peruvian glaciers

It is common knowledge that glaciers are melting in most areas across the globe. The speed at which tropical glaciers in the Peruvian Andes are retreating is particularly alarming, however. In the first detailed investigation of all Peruvian mountain ranges, a research team from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has ascertained a drastic reduction of almost 30 percent in the

19h

Proximity to paths and roads is a burden for white-tailed sea eagles

A research team led by Dr. Oliver Krone from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) has now measured concentrations of the hormone corticosterone and its metabolic products in white-tailed sea eagles in northern Germany and correlated these values with potential causes of stress. They found that the levels of corticosterone in the birds' urine are higher the closer a bre

19h

Using velocity-induced acoustic oscillations as a standard ruler at cosmic dawn

Our current understanding of physics suggests that there are two main types of matter in the universe known as dark and baryonic matter. Dark matter is made up of material that scientists cannot directly observe, as it does not emit light or energy. On the other hand, baryonic matter is made up of normal atomic matter, including protons, neutrons and electrons.

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Coal ash rule would risk putting carcinogen in water

Proposed amendments to the federal 2015 Coal Ash Rule risk putting carcinogenic hexavalent chromium in water supplies across the country, preliminary findings show. Allowing coal ash to be spread on soil or stored in unlined pits and landfills will raise the risk that several toxic elements could leach out of the coal ash, the study indicates. Federal rules currently prohibit the uncontrolled dis

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Models designed to predict when and how the roads of Bizkaia will deteriorate

A researcher at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Engineering-Bilbao has developed behaviour models of the International Roughness Index (IRI) and the Coefficient of Transverse Friction to predict the future situation of the highway network of Bizkaia. The models provide the chance to predict highway repairs, to consider the type of repairs that need to be carried out and to optimize budget allocations.

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SUTD physicists unlock the mystery of thermionic emission in graphene

SUTD researchers discover a new theory that paves the way for the design of better graphene electronics and energy converters.

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Picoscience and a plethora of new materials

The revolutionary tech discoveries of the next few decades may come from new materials so small they make nanomaterials look like lumpy behemoths. These materials will be designed and refined at the picometer scale, which is a thousand times smaller than a nanometer. A new Yale study moves picoscience in a new direction: taking elements from the periodic table and tinkering with them at the subato

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A fortress of ice and snow

After only a few days of searching, experts from the MOSAiC expedition have now found a suitable ice floe where they will set up the research camp for their one-year-long drift through the Arctic Ocean. Consequently, one of the most important milestones in the expedition has been reached ahead of schedule, and before the Polar Night falls. Nevertheless, the search, which involved satellite imagery

19h

Researchers discover a link between two important products of nitric oxide

Ever since three U.S.-based researchers working independently unveiled the role of nitric oxide in mediating blood vessel dilation, endothelial cell contraction and smooth muscle relaxation, their discoveries have served as a basis for novel treatments for high blood pressure and erectile dysfunction, among other conditions.

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Chinese activists protest the use of traditional treatments—they want medical science

In the West, the number of people challenging scientific authority has been growing in past decades. This has, among other things, led to a decline in the support for mass vaccination programmes and to an increase in alternative forms of treatment. In China, however, activists are defending modern medical science and criticising traditional Chinese medicine, which hospitals are obliged to offer to

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AMD Unveils Radeon RX 5500 Navi For Desktop And Mobile To Take On GeForce GTX Turing

Not long after recent rumors of incoming entry-level Navi-based Radeon graphics cards started making the rounds, AMD has made an official announcement of its new Radeon RX 5500 family. As its …

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Samsung introduces Chromebook 4 and Chromebook 4+ starting at $229.99

Samsung has expanded its Chromebook lineup on Monday with the introduction of the Samsung Chromebook 4 and Chromebook 4+. The two systems are essentially identical save for screen size and connectivity …

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Amazon Updates 10-inch Fire Tablet With Faster Processor and USB Type-C

Amazon's Fire tablets advance at a crawl. Each generation makes such minor changes it's almost impossible to tell them apart. However, the latest update to …

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Amazon introduces a Kindle for kids

While it’s true that many parents are doing their best to reduce screen time as much as possible, there’s something to be said for the Kindle Kids Edition. The best and worst thing about the …

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Indian hotel startup OYO is now worth $10 billion

The founder of India's biggest hotel chain is pumping $2 billion into his own company, upping his stake in the business and making it India's second-most valuable startup.

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First meat grown in space lab 248 miles from Earth

Israeli company successfully cultures bovine cells on International Space Station Lab-grown meat has been successfully cultured in space for the first time. The Israeli food technology startup Aleph Farms grew the meat on the International Space Station, 248 miles (399 km) away from any natural resources. Continue reading…

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The 2019 Medicine Nobel

So we have the first prize of the 2019 Nobel season, Medicine/Physiology for William Kaelin Jr. (Dana-Farber), Peter Ratcliffe (Oxford), and Gregg Semenza (Johns Hopkins), for their work in cellular adaptation to oxygen levels. This was not one of the outcomes that was in the top of the betting range, but it sure wasn’t in the bottom, either, since these same researchers shared the Lasker Prize i

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ClpX-ClpP protein complex could be starting point for new antibiotics

Antibiotics are still the most important weapon for combating bacterial infections. But medical science is running out of ammunition because of more and more frequently occurring resistances. Scientists from the Technical University of Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology have now elucidated the structure of the proteolytic complex ClpX-ClpP. This is a key to the development

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PSR J0453+1559 may be a neutron star–white dwarf binary, study suggests

Astronomers have investigated a compact binary radio pulsar system known as PSR J0453+1559, with the aim of shedding more light on its mysterious nature. The new study, published September 26 on arXiv.org, challenges previous assumptions, suggesting that system contains a white dwarf companion.

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Big Mouth and the Poisoning of Teenage Boys’ Minds

There’s no shortage of explosive bodily fluids on Big Mouth , the raucous Netflix comedy about a group of teens fumbling their way through puberty. But early in the first episode of the newly released third season, the series presents a more shocking visual than usual. During wood-shop class, Jay (voiced by Jason Mantzoukas) gets distracted by a female classmate’s bare shoulder and accidentally s

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ClpX-ClpP protein complex could be starting point for new antibiotics

Antibiotics are still the most important weapon for combating bacterial infections. But medical science is running out of ammunition because of more and more frequently occurring resistances. Scientists from the Technical University of Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology have now elucidated the structure of the proteolytic complex ClpX-ClpP. This is a key to the development

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Picoscience and a plethora of new materials

The revolutionary tech discoveries of the next few decades, the ones that will change daily life, may come from new materials so small they make nanomaterials look like lumpy behemoths.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Buer vejen på Lillebæltsbroen mindre om sommeren?

Netop nu skifter temperaturen hurtigt. En læser spørger, om wirerne på Lillebæltsbroen bliver længere i varmen, så vejbanen buer mindre. Det svarer Vejdirektoratet på.

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Star Wars News: 'The Rise of Skywalker' Won't Retcon 'Last Jedi'

J.J. Abrams says he never found himself "trying to repair anything" while working on the forthcoming movie.

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Airbnb Wants to Send You to Antarctica. Don't Fall for It

The company is seeking five volunteers to go collect snow samples, but the stunt looks more like advertising than actual science.

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Killing ‘Dead-End’ Jobs Blocks Career Opportunity

Opinion: We shouldn't automate “on-ramp” jobs away, which offer experience, education, and connections.

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The last mammoths died on a remote island

Isolation, extreme weather, and the possible arrival of humans may have killed off the holocene herbivores just 4,000 years ago.

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Where Progressives Are Winning

LISBON—Across Europe, progressives have despaired the rise of the far right, over austerity policies crippling the welfare state, and of growing anti-immigrant sentiment as the region has grappled with an array of crises in recent years. Everywhere, except here. In Portugal, a left-wing government came to power four years ago as the country was still dealing with the effects of the European debt

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Här är Nobelpriset i medicin – på en minut

Tre forskares upptäckt har lett fram till nya lovande strategier för att bekämpa blodbrist, cancer och många andra sjukdomar, och tilldelas därför årets Nobelpris i medicin. Men vad är det egentligen de kommit på? SVT sammanfattar årets Nobelpristagare tillsammans med vetenskapsnyheternas Victoria Dyring.

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Genombrott för njursjuka bäddade för dopning

Läkaren Arne Ljungqvist är känd för sitt engagemang mot dopning inom idrotten. För honom är hormonet erytropoietin – en central del av årets medicinpris – en källa till både glädje och ilska.

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Indonesia's huge fires and toxic haze will cause health problems for years to come

Indonesia is currently in the throes of an environmental emergency. Thousands of hectares of forest are burning across the vast country, causing toxic smoke to be released into the atmosphere. This has led to eerie apocalyptic scenes of deep red skies, deserted streets and people with their faces covered with masks.

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Governments must provide fundamental rights to certain animals: scientist

Legal proceedings conducted on behalf of apes and animals who are starved for the purpose of an ecological project. What position do animals actually have in the rule of law? And what changes need to be made? Ph.D. candidate Janneke Vink defends her dissertation on 10 October.

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Models designed to predict when and how the roads of Bizkaia will deteriorate

A researcher at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Engineering-Bilbao has developed behaviour models of the international roughness index (IRI) and the coefficient of transverse friction to predict the future situation of the highway network of Bizkaia. The models provide the chance to predict highway repairs, to consider the type of repairs that need to be carried out and to optimize budget allocations.

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Unlocking the genetic secrets of the malaria parasite

A new method to control the timing of gene deletion in the malaria parasite has been developed by researchers at the Crick, which could lead to better vaccines.

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A timekeeper for siesta

Circadian clocks must be flexible and they must be able to adapt to varying environmental conditions. Otherwise, it would be impossible for living beings to change their patterns of activity when the days get shorter again as is happening now. After all, Drosophila, also known as the common fruit fly, no longer needs a long siesta in autumn to protect itself from excessive heat and predators as in

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Nobel Prize in Medicine: 1901-Present

Here's a look at past winners of the Nobel Prize in Medicine.

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Trio Wins Nobel Prize in Medicine for Figuring Out 'One of Life's Most Essential Adaptive Processes'

This year's Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine has been awarded jointly to three scientists who figured out how cells sense and adapt to changes in levels of oxygen, the Nobel Assembly at Sweden's Karlinska Institute announced this morning (Oct. 7).

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How the Iberian Lynx Bounced Back From the Brink of Extinction

Two decades ago, fewer than 100 Iberian lynx remained, but thanks to captive breeding and habitat management the population is recovering

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Governments must provide fundamental rights to certain animals: scientist

Legal proceedings conducted on behalf of apes and animals who are starved for the purpose of an ecological project. What position do animals actually have in the rule of law? And what changes need to be made? Ph.D. candidate Janneke Vink defends her dissertation on 10 October.

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Unlocking the genetic secrets of the malaria parasite

A new method to control the timing of gene deletion in the malaria parasite has been developed by researchers at the Crick, which could lead to better vaccines.

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A timekeeper for siesta

Circadian clocks must be flexible and they must be able to adapt to varying environmental conditions. Otherwise, it would be impossible for living beings to change their patterns of activity when the days get shorter again as is happening now. After all, Drosophila, also known as the common fruit fly, no longer needs a long siesta in autumn to protect itself from excessive heat and predators as in

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Discovery of Molecular Switch for How Cells Use Oxygen Wins 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine

Research by William Kaelin, Jr., Peter Ratcliffe and Gregg Semenza led the way for applications in treating anemia, cancer and other diseases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nobelpriset i medicin för hur celler anpassar sig till syret

Djur behöver syre för att i sina celler omvandla föda till användbar energi. Syrets fundamentala betydelse har varit känd under lång tid men hur celler anpassar sig efter syretillgänglighet förblev länge okänt. William G. Kaelin, Jr., Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe och Gregg L. Semenza upptäckte hur celler känner av och anpassar sig till förändrade syrenivåer. Deras forskning identifierade ett molekylärt

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3 get Nobel Medicine prize for learning how cells use oxygen

Two Americans and a British scientist won the 2019 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for discovering how the body's cells sense and react to oxygen levels, work that has paved the way for new strategies to fight anemia, cancer and other diseases, the Nobel Committee said.

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My Family Story of Love, the Mob, and Government Surveillance

O n June 16, 1975, when I was 12 years old, my mother, Brenda, married Charles “Chuckie” O’Brien, who a few weeks later would become a leading suspect in the notorious disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa, the former president of the Teamsters union. To hear more feature stories, see our full list or get the Audm iPhone app. Chuckie had known Hoffa since he was a boy, loved him like a father, and was his

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Getting to grips with how birds land stably on complex surfaces

Nature, Published online: 07 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02959-w Tree-dwelling birds can land on perches that vary in size and texture. Force measurements and video-footage analysis now reveal that birds rely on rapid and robust adjustments of their toe pads and claws to land stably.

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Unilever to halve use of new plastic

Anglo-Dutch commercial giant Unilever said Monday it will cut its use of new plastic by half by 2025 as pressure grows on multinational companies to do more for the environment.

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“Do we have the will to do anything about it?” James Heathers reflects on the Eysenck case

We have a tension about resolving inaccuracies in scientific documents when they’re past a certain age. Specifically, what should we do with old papers that are shown to be not just wrong, which is a fate that will befall most of them, but seriously misleading, fatally flawed, or overwhelmingly likely to be fabricated, i.e. when they … Continue reading

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Discovery of Molecular Switch for How Cells Use Oxygen Wins 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine

Research by William Kaelin, Jr., Peter Ratcliffe and Gregg Semenza led the way for applications in treating anemia, cancer and other diseases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Utilities vs Renewable Energy

We are beginning to experience some growing pain with widespread adoption of wind and solar energy. Solar in particular is causing utility companies some heartache because of its distributed design and intermittent energy production. None of the issues raised are fatal problems, but we do need to address them head on. The basic problem is that we cannot simply look at each piece of energy product

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Fattigmands-kvantebitten bliver konkurrent til storebror

PLUS. En lang række problemer kan løses effektivt med en ny type bit, der er en mellemting mellem en almindelig bit og en kvantebit.

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We Asked Author Shea Serrano What Movies Must Be Made

Hollywood needs ideas. We asked the leader of the #FOHArmy what movies he'd make if he ran a studio.

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Tespo Connect Review: A Noisy, Messy Failure

Tespo's machine dispenses personalized vitamins, but it's not worth the counter space.

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Partnership plans to produce Mo-99 to fill global demand for medical applications

SHINE Medical Technologies and partner Phoenix LLC have developed a new way to produce molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) for use in medical applications. They claim that testing has shown their new technology breaks the world record for the strongest nuclear fusion reactor in a steady-state system.

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Image of the Day: Coral Disease

A mysterious illness is causing tissue loss in many species.

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Med Bokmässan 2019 i backspegeln

VoF Göteborg kan såhär i svallvågorna av årets bokmässa konstatera att Bokmässan 2019 blev en succé. Montern hade en strid ström av besökare, föreningen kunde räkna hem 28 nya medlemmar som tecknade sitt medlemskap direkt i montern, lådan med senaste numret av Folkvett sålde slut redan på lördagen och vi genomförde ett antal programpunkter i […] The post appeared first on Vetenskap och Folkbildn

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Tama bin hotar vilda

Resultaten stämmer överens med flera andra studier som visar att tambin konkurrerar med vildbin om nektar och pollen, enligt studien som publicerats i tidskriften Plos one. Städer har varit fristad för bin Ju närmare de parisiska kuporna forskarna tittade, desto färre pollinerande skalbaggar och vildbin såg de. Detta är ett problem eftersom vilda pollinatörer minskar dramatiskt, samtidigt som de h

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Nobel in Physiology or Medicine for How Cells Sense Oxygen Levels

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine goes to William G. Kaelin, Jr., Peter J. Ratcliffe and Gregg L. Semenza “for their discoveries of how cells sense and adapt to oxygen availability.” They identified molecular machinery that regulates gene activity in response to changing levels of oxygen.

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The Nobel Prize in Medicine Goes to Your Body’s Oxygen Detector

Three scientists won the award for uncovering the molecular switch that regulates how cells behave when oxygen levels drop.

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Sonos is letting customers rent its speakers for $16 a month in a service that may expand worldwide

The company has launched its rental service, which is called Flex, for select customers in the Netherlands. The company will consider expanding Flex based on demand there.

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Microscope prints patterns at the nanoscale

Researchers from AMOLF's 3-D-Photovoltaics group have used an atomic force microscope to electrochemically print at the nanoscale. This technique can print structures for a new generation of solar cells on chips. The researchers published their results today in the online journal Nanoscale.

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Demens påverkar munhälsan

Kognitiv funktion och demens kan på ett dramatiskt sätt påverka förutsättningarna för munhälsa. En ny avhandling pekar på ett tydligt samband.

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A symbiotic boost for greenhouse tomato plants

Use of saline water to irrigate crops would bolster food security for many arid countries; however, this has not been possible due to the detrimental effects of salt on plants. Now, researchers at KAUST, along with scientists in Egypt, have shown that saline irrigation of tomato is possible with the help of a beneficial desert root fungus. This represents a new key technology for countries lacking

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A symbiotic boost for greenhouse tomato plants

Use of saline water to irrigate crops would bolster food security for many arid countries; however, this has not been possible due to the detrimental effects of salt on plants. Now, researchers at KAUST, along with scientists in Egypt, have shown that saline irrigation of tomato is possible with the help of a beneficial desert root fungus. This represents a new key technology for countries lacking

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Big Tobacco, war and politics

Nature, Published online: 07 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02991-w The legal habit still kills more than eight million people a year. Felicity Lawrence praises a history.

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Image: Hubble finds Medusa in the sky

The galaxy pictured in this Hubble image has an especially evocative name: the Medusa merger.

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