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nyheder2019oktober08

6h

Exclusive: A Deeper Look at the PlayStation 5—Haptics, UI Facelift, and More

Now that the name is official, we've got more details about Sony's next-gen console—from the haptics-packed controller to UI improvements.

9h

Kinesisk magnettog skal køre 2.000 kilometer på to timer

Kina planlægger en ny maglev-rute på 2.200 kilometer mellem byerne Beijing og Guangzhou, hvor magnettoge skal kunne køre op til 1.000 kilometer i timen.

11h

These Farm Fields All Have One Thing in Common: Wells

The proliferation of wells in some states is starving local streams and rivers.

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What's Causing a Woman's Roller-Coaster Ride of Cardiac Arrest?

Something is wreaking havoc on this patient's heart.

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The Human Cost of Climate Change

A study compares the impacts of heating on cities across the globe.

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Dancing With Dragonflies, For Science

Two scientists realize that before you can find out how dragonflies migrate, you have to catch them.

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The Top 10 Science Experiments of All Time

These seminal experiments changed our understanding of the universe and ourselves.

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The World Has a Fertilizer Problem. Bioengineered Corn Could Save Us

Multiple scientists are working to grow corn that can fertilize itself, bypassing the need for nitrogen-based fertilizers that can harm the environment.

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How Social Media Helped Uncover a Skunk That Uses Tools

Researchers tap a treasure trove of observations in social media posts by amateur photographers.

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17-Year-Old May Be First Teen Vaping Death in U.S.

A Bronx boy has died, becoming what is believed to be the youngest of the 23 people to die nationwide from the mysterious vaping-related lung illness.

10min

Twitter admits it used two-factor phone numbers and emails for serving targeted ads

Twitter has said it used phone numbers and email addresses, provided by users to set up two-factor authentication on their accounts, to serve targeted ads. In a disclosure Tuesday, the social …

11min

Nobel Prize in Physics: 1901-Present

Here's a look at all winners of the Nobel Prize in physics, including Steven Chu, Aage Niels Bohr and Enrico Fermi.

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23min

Genes play a role in dog breed differences in behavior

Border collies are highly trainable, greyhounds love to chase, and German shepherds make good guard dogs. While the environment plays a role, traits like these are highly heritable, according to a study of 101 dog breeds by a team of researchers including James Serpell of the University of Pennsylvania. The work identifies 131 genetic variants associated with breed differences in behavior.

25min

Scientists identify molecule that could have helped cells thrive on early Earth

A new study, led by Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, PhD, of Scripps Research, and Sheref Mansy, PhD, of the University of Trento, offers an explanation for how "protocells" could have emerged on early Earth, eventually leading to the cells we know today. Their work, published in the journal SMALL, suggests that molecules called cyclophospholipids may have been the ingredient necessary for protocells

25min

Craving junk food after a sleepless night?

When you're sleep deprived, you reach for doughnuts and pizza. A new study has figured out why you crave more calorie-dense, high-fat foods after a sleepless night. Blame it on your sleepy nose — or olfactory system. First, it goes into hyperdrive, sharpening the food odors for the brain. But then there is a breakdown in communication with brain areas that receive food signals. Then decisions abo

25min

PET offers more precise screening method to select candidates for radionuclide therapy

PET scanning can offer more precise selection of patients for neuroendocrine tumor therapy, allowing some patients to qualify who would otherwise have been ineligible, according to an article featured in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

25min

Surviving Y2K: What did we learn from the biggest tech scare in history?

In terms of programming, the year 2000 was perhaps the biggest digital change to date across the world. The reason for this is because, in the years before, two digits were allocated to computing related to the year. With 2000, three had to be allocated. Programmers around the world came together and successfully drove the Y2K conversion. The freedom they were given by politicians, who didn't ent

37min

BMO invests $78 million annually in employee learning—that’s $1,726 per employee

BMO Financial Group just won a 2019 ATD BEST Award for Leadership in Corporate Learning . BMO invests $78 million annually in employee learning, which in 2018 averaged out to $1,726 and 23.7 hours per employee. The Fourth Industrial Revolution has begun. Future-minded companies are investing in soft skills or 'human skills' learning solutions for their talent. None BMO Financial Group, or the Ban

37min

Study: Innovative pancreatic cancer treatment may rev up immune system

A research team at the University of Rochester Wilmot Cancer Institute reports that combining a type of radiation therapy with immunotherapy not only cures pancreatic cancer in mice, but appears to reprogram the immune system to create an 'immune memory' in the same way that a vaccine keeps the flu away.The result is that the combination treatment also destroyed pancreatic cells that had spread to

39min

Meet the 'mold pigs,' a new group of invertebrates from 30 million years ago

Fossils preserved in Dominican amber reveal a new family, genus and species of microinvertebrate from the mid-Tertiary period, a discovery that shows unique lineages of the tiny creatures were …

40min

Rat poison eyed in 2 California mountain lion deaths

Two Southern California mountain lions that were part of a National Park Service study have been found dead and rodent poison has been confirmed as the cause in one case and is suspected in the other.

55min

3 Researchers Awarded Nobel Prize In Physics

Three researchers were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for discoveries that illuminate our place in the Universe.

57min

1A Across America: Renewable Energy And Resistance

The push for renewable energy is dividing some communities in parts of the country where wind energy has major potential. (Image credit: James Morrison/WAMU)

57min

How the First Exoplanets Were Discovered

The first exoplanets ever discovered were found orbiting the pulsar PSR B1257+12. It took years for astronomers to find exoplanets around sun-like stars. (Credit:NASA/JPL-Caltech) In 1992, astronomers discovered the first exoplanet, or planet outside our solar system. But it didn’t come in any form they’d really anticipated. Neutron stars are the second densest type of object in the universe outsi

57min

Rat poison eyed in 2 California mountain lion deaths

Two Southern California mountain lions that were part of a National Park Service study have been found dead and rodent poison has been confirmed as the cause in one case and is suspected in the other.

58min

Engineers develop thin, lightweight lens that could produce slimmer camera phones, longer-flying drones

Electrical and computer engineering researchers have developed a new kind of optical lens that is much thinner and lighter than conventional camera lenses that also works with night imaging, a future boon for smartphones that could flatten those unsightly 'camera bumps' as well as for drones and night vision cameras for soldiers.

58min

NYU scholar makes recommendations to end disparities in stem for English learners

In her latest research article, published in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), NYU Professor Okhee Lee provides recommendations to support a federal mandate in the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 which requires that English language proficiency standards align with content standards.

1h

Mystery oil spills blot more than 130 Brazilian beaches

The source of large blots of oil staining more than 130 beaches in northeastern Brazil remained a mystery Tuesday despite President Jair Bolsonaro's assertions they came from outside the country and were possibly the work of criminals.

1h

NYU scholar makes recommendations to end disparities in stem for English learners

Although non-native English speaking students are just as capable as their peers of learning subject matter in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) fields, they face additional barriers because of a misalignment in the way K-12 schoolwork is taught. Referred to as English learners, these students are learning the English language in tandem with other coursework. However, English la

1h

Watching This Volcano Erupt From Space Is Absolutely Epic

Big Smoke Watching a massive volcano erupt is truly jaw dropping — but that’s nothing compared to the incredible view astronauts get from the International Space Station. NASA astronauts were treated to an amazing sight this past summer, according to Syfy Wire , when the Raikoke Volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Eastern Russia erupted into a massive cloud of dark smoke. Ash and volcanic gases

1h

Boeing to invest $20 million in Virgin Galactic

Boeing plans to invest $20 million in Virgin Galactic as the space tourism company nears its goal of launching passengers on suborbital flights.

1h

Proposals would dam Little Colorado River for hydropower

The Little Colorado River cuts across the northeast corner of Arizona, emptying its waters into the much-larger Colorado River after a more than 330-mile journey.

1h

If You Think Using a VPN Is Complicated or Expensive, You’re Wrong

Privacy and security are two extremely rare commodities in the modern world of the internet. Most of us know it, but few of us do much about it, maybe because we assume it would be too much trouble or cost too much money to be able to use the internet with absolute certainty our browsing wasn’t being tracked by advertisers or other even less scrupulous parties. But now, you can get three years of

1h

Screening kindergarten readiness

Starting kindergarten can be a challenging time for children as many are leaving home and learning to interact with others for the first time. As such, it is important for kindergartners to receive proper support from their teachers.

1h

Endangered black rhino expecting first calf

For the first time, there's a pregnant black rhino at the Potter Park Zoo in Lansing, Michigan and Michigan State University veterinarians are part of the team bringing her to term. Vets and students from MSU's College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Center are working alongside the zoo staff to monitor the pregnancy, as well as learn from and plan for delivery.

1h

Endangered black rhino expecting first calf

For the first time, there's a pregnant black rhino at the Potter Park Zoo in Lansing, Michigan and Michigan State University veterinarians are part of the team bringing her to term. Vets and students from MSU's College of Veterinary Medicine and Veterinary Medical Center are working alongside the zoo staff to monitor the pregnancy, as well as learn from and plan for delivery.

1h

Pesticide companies leverage regulations for financial gains

Pesticides are present in many food products and play a central role in the production of traded agriculture, giving them global and economic significance—and necessitating proper regulation. Yet, some pesticide companies may put profit ahead of protecting the public from potential harms.

1h

Buying less is better than buying 'green'—for the planet and your happiness

Humans' overconsumption of resources—from the food and clothes we buy to the methods of transportation we choose—is a leading contributor to global climate change, says University of Arizona researcher Sabrina Helm. Therefore, it's increasingly important to understand the choices consumers make and how those decisions affect the health of a planet with limited resources.

1h

Mechanical engineer's simple running hack is fun and increases efficiency

Attention runners: The next time you go out for a jog, you might want to strap a light resistance band between your feet. This rather quirky but oddly effective hack, according to UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer Elliot Hawkes, could make you a more efficient runner by approximately 6.4%.

1h

Pesticide companies leverage regulations for financial gains

Some pesticide companies may put profit ahead of protecting the public from potential harms. By acquiring regulations that ban older, out-of-patent products, innovative companies can make room for more expensive, patented alternatives.

1h

Mechanical engineer's simple running hack is fun and increases efficiency

Attention runners: The next time you go out for a jog, you might want to strap a light resistance band between your feet. This rather quirky but oddly effective hack, according to UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer Elliot Hawkes, could make you a more efficient runner by approximately 6.4%.

1h

How we're helping local reporters turn important stories into national news | Gangadhar Patil

Local reporters are on the front lines of important stories, but their work often goes unnoticed by national and international news outlets. TED Fellow and journalist Gangadhar Patil is working to change that. In this quick talk, he shows how he's connecting grassroots reporters in India with major news outlets worldwide — and helping elevate and expose stories that might never get covered otherw

1h

Skin cancer prevention program may have reduced melanoma in Australians

A skin cancer prevention program called SunSmart may have contributed to a recent reduction in melanoma among younger residents of Melbourne, according to a new study. According to the authors, the findings may have substantial implications for the future delivery of skin cancer prevention programs.

1h

Who is telling the truth about their health?

When researchers or policymakers ask health related questions — which they do a lot — they often rely on self-reported rather than tested health data. Researchers looked into how reliable this type of data is for research and found that, depending on country or age, self-reported data could be highly biased.

1h

Research maps key signaling pathways linking calcium entry and exit in activated T cells

Like entrance and exit doors on a building, a cell's outer surface has doors — channels, pumps, and transporters that selectively control what molecules enter or exit. In the immune system, T cells possess unique sets of 'doors', including ones that specialize in calcium ion movement. Now, researchers describe a unique mechanism for coordinating these calcium entrance and exit 'doors' on T cells

1h

DNA metabarcoding useful for analyzing human diet

A new study demonstrates that DNA metabarcoding provides a promising new method for tracking human plant intake, suggesting that similar approaches could be used to characterize the animal and fungal components of human diets. The study demonstrated that dietary plant DNA can be amplified and sequenced from human stool using methods commonly applied to wildlife studies.

1h

UA research shows drug can extend survival rates for heart failure patients

Blood pressure medication can prevent fluid retention and muscle wasting in heart failure.

1h

Screening kindergarten readiness

University of Missouri College of Education researchers have found that a readiness test can predict kindergarteners' success in school after 18 months.

1h

New Law Makes HIV Prevention Drugs Available Without Prescription

California residents can now obtain two HIV prevention drugs without a prescription — a first-in-the-nation development that could dramatically improve access to the medications. One of the drugs, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), is taken similarly to a birth control pill. Anyone with an elevated risk of contracting HIV — for example, a person who regularly engages in condomless sex with partners

1h

Moving an Ancient Town to Higher Ground

The town of Hasankeyf , Turkey, is one of the oldest continuously inhabited settlements in the world, with evidence of people living there as far back as 12,000 years ago. In a matter of months, most of the ancient town will be abandoned—flooded by a reservoir rising behind the Ilisu Dam , one of Turkey’s newest and largest hydroelectric projects. The controversial project will affect 199 upstrea

1h

Putting a meniscus on micropillars could cool electronics

A new study shows how the shape of nanostructures affects how well they retain water and heat. As our electronic devices get more sophisticated, they also generate more heat that must be released for maximum performance. Researchers are perfecting a way to dissipate the heat through a unique process involving tiny liquid drops on top of an array of micropillars. As reported in the journal Langmui

1h

Pharmacists provide patient value in team-based care

As part of an innovative model being used at UNT Health Science Center, Dr. Cheng Yuet and three other pharmacists manage the care of patients with chronic diseases such as asthma, diabetes and hypertension.

2h

Research supports expanding insurance coverage of non-invasive prenatal testing

Research conducted by the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences provides evidence to support expansion of insurance plan coverage of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), a simple maternal blood draw which screens for fetal chromosomal disorders including trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome), and trisomy 21 (Down syndrome), to women under

2h

Online patient portal usage linked to higher rates of flu shots, blood pressure checks

Patients who use online platforms connected to their health records are more likely to take preventative health measures.

2h

Breath test for opioids shows promise in pilot study

A pilot study of a new test that detects opioid metabolites in exhaled breath has shown promising results. The next step is a larger validation study.

2h

September var globalt den varmeste nogensinde registreret

Danmarks temperaturer var gennemsnitlige i september – men Grønland var varm siger DMI.

2h

Oobleck's Weird Properties Demystified

Scientists have made the first 3D model of cornstarch and water, a bizarre substance called oobleck.

2h

First meat grown in space lab 248 miles from Earth | Science

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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Astronomers Just Found 20 More Moons Around Saturn

Crowded Sky Astronomers just discovered another 20 moons floating around Saturn, bringing the total number up to 82. With Jupiter at a measly 79 moons, the Carnegie Institute discovery makes Saturn the most-orbited planet in the solar system — as long as we’re ignoring the vast junkyard of human-made satellites clogging the sky around Earth. Moony McMoonface Scientists hope a closer look at the a

2h

Calling out hypocrisy can fight anti-Muslim bias

A simple, one-minute intervention can reduce anti-Muslim sentiment, researchers report. What’s more, the effect held when tested again a month, and a year later. Emile Bruneau, who runs the Peace and Conflict Neuroscience Lab at the University of Pennsylvania, wanted to understand why collective blame—holding an entire population responsible for the acts of a single person belonging to that group

2h

Buying less is better than buying 'green' — for the planet and your happiness

A University of Arizona-led study found that people who consume less are happier than those who engage in other pro-environmental consumer behaviors, like buying environmentally friendly products.

2h

Large study reveals PTSD has strong genetic component like other psychiatric disorders

In the largest and most diverse genetic study of PTSD to date, scientists from UC San Diego School of Medicine and more than 130 institutions in the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium found that genetics accounts for 5 to 20% of the variability in PTSD risk following a traumatic event.

2h

Rice bran may help curb malnutrition, diarrhea for infants

A new study led by Colorado State University found that adding rice bran for infants who were being weaned from their mother's milk resulted in them receiving more nutrients that enhanced growth and reduced diarrhea.

2h

The Evolution of the Universe

Some 15 billion years ago the universe emerged from a hot, dense sea of matter and energy. As the cosmos expanded and cooled, it spawned galaxies, stars, planets and life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

3.5 Million Years Ago, Our Galaxy Was Rocked by an Explosion

Roughly 3.5 million years ago, the sky turned into a massive flare of bubbling gas shining out of the galaxy’s center — a true spectacle for the early ancestors of modern humans. And there’s a chance we could catch the next event with our own eyes. The explosion, also known as a Fermi bubble, was essentially our galaxy discharging a huge quantity of nuclear energy, including deadly ionizing radia

2h

These Astounding Performances Made Track's Top Event a Hit

WIRED editor Nick Thompson and running expert Knox Robinson discuss the showstoppers at the IAAF track and field championships in Qatar.

2h

How I overcame impostor syndrome after leaving academia

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03036-y Desiree Dickerson discusses learning to control the voice in her head that insisted she wasn’t good enough.

2h

Fun run

Attention runners: The next time you go out for a jog, you might want to strap a light resistance band between your feet. This rather quirky but oddly effective hack, according to UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer Elliot Hawkes, could make you a more efficient runner by approximately 6.4%.

2h

Hormone therapy has a bigger impact than chemotherapy on women's quality of life in bc

Contrary to the commonly held view, 2 years after diagnosis, hormone therapy, a highly effective breast cancer treatment worsens quality of life to a greater extent and for a longer time, especially in menopausal patients. Deleterious effects of chemotherapy are more transient. Given that current international guidelines recommend the prescription of hormone therapy for 5 to 10 years, it is import

2h

Lymphoma stage at diagnosis may predict when and where new cancer forms

A new study shows the stage at which lymphoma is originally diagnosed impacts the types of second cancers that may form after treatment.

2h

One in three young adults receive medication for opioid use disorder after overdose

A new study found that one in three young adults receive medication for opioid use disorder within 12 months of a non-fatal opioid overdose. The study shows which medications — buprenorphine, methadone or naltrexone — are being taken, and how long after the overdose they receive the treatment.

2h

The deeper these octopuses live, the wartier their skin

Deep beneath the ocean's surface, surprisingly cute pink octopuses creep along the seafloor. Some of them have super warty skin, and some are smooth. Scientists weren't sure if these octopuses were even members of the same species, and they didn't know how to explain the differences in the animals' looks. But a new study shows that the deeper in the ocean the octopuses live, the bumpier their skin

2h

Cheap as chips: Identifying plant genes to ensure food security

Scientists have developed a new approach enabling researchers to more efficiently identify the genes that control plant traits. This method will enable plant breeders and scientists to develop more affordable, desirable, and sustainable plant varieties. The application will be most valuable for the fruit, vegetable and grain crops that are critical for global food security and human nutrition.

2h

Stabilizing multilayer flows may improve transportation of heavy oils

During the past 20 years, the oil industry has begun to transition away from light oils toward heavier oils. But transporting heavy oils cost-effectively is a challenge because heavy oils are viscous — essentially a thick, sticky and semifluid mess. One way to outmaneuver this problem is a viscoplastic lubrication technique. It can complement existing methods to stabilize interfaces within multil

2h

New addiction treatments hold promise for stemming the opioid crisis

Concerns over the opioid epidemic have sparked a strong scientific interest in why some people become addicted while others don't. Now, researchers are proposing novel treatment strategies that could help prevent abuse of opioids and other substances.

2h

Limitations of method for determining protein structure

A new study by chemists shows that X-ray crystallography, the standard method for determining the structure of proteins, can provide inaccurate information about membrane proteins, which in turn could lead to poor and inefficient drug design.

2h

Mapping normal breast development to better understand cancer

Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers, and some forms rank among the most difficult to treat. Its various types and involvement of many different cells makes targeting such tumors difficult. Now, researchers have used a state-of-the-art technology to profile each cell during normal breast development in order to understand what goes wrong in cancer.

2h

How can ultrasonic brain stimulation cure brain diseases?

Scientists found a calcium channel expressed in astrocytes in the brain to be a highly sensitive target for LILFU-induced neuronal activity in the motor cortex, such as tail movement.

2h

Pressure runs high at edge of solar system

Out at the boundary of our solar system, pressure runs high. This pressure, the force plasma, magnetic fields and particles like ions, cosmic rays and electrons exert on one another when they flow and collide, was recently measured by scientists in totality for the first time — and it was found to be greater than expected.

2h

Scientists observe a single quantum vibration under ordinary conditions

Scientists have for the first time created and observed a single phonon in a common material at room temperature.

2h

Believing in climate change doesn't mean you are preparing for climate change

Researchers found that although coastal homeowners may perceive a worsening of climate change-related hazards, these attitudes are largely unrelated to a homeowner's expectations of actual home damage.

2h

How to deal when things fall apart

In Earth Emotions , Australia philosopher Glenn Albrecht provides a blueprint for dealing with emotional turmoil resulting from climate change. Technology has many wonderful applications, but distraction and entertainment cannot be the foundation of our devices. Time remains for preparing to deal with the consequences of climate change, if we act now. None Beginning an article by listing recent d

2h

Limitations of method for determining protein structure

A new study by chemists shows that X-ray crystallography, the standard method for determining the structure of proteins, can provide inaccurate information about membrane proteins, which in turn could lead to poor and inefficient drug design.

2h

Scientists observe a single quantum vibration under ordinary conditions

Scientists have for the first time created and observed a single phonon in a common material at room temperature.

2h

On North Korea, the Chickens Are Coming Home to Roost

With little fanfare, certainly not the kind on display during his meetings with Kim Jong Un, the bill is coming due for Donald Trump’s diplomacy with North Korea. More than sanctions, more than summits, what has been most distinctive about that diplomacy is how the president has thoroughly personalized it—whether by measuring his “nuclear button” against the North Korean leader’s when they were a

2h

Europe’s most active volcano reveals its strength through low rumbles

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03007-3 An analysis of sound waves from Mount Etna showcases a method that could aid volcano monitoring worldwide.

2h

After 50-year conservation effort, songbird flies off U.S. endangered species list

Kirtland’s warbler had been under federal protection since 1967

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California’s shutting off power to prevent fires. Here are some better options.

Microgrids, buried lines, better building standards and more.

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Skin cancer prevention program may have reduced melanoma in Australians

A skin cancer prevention program called SunSmart may have contributed to a recent reduction in melanoma among younger residents of Melbourne, according to a study published Oct. 8 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Suzanne Dobbinson of Cancer Council Victoria in Australia, and colleagues. According to the authors, the findings may have substantial implications for the future delivery of s

3h

Who is telling the truth about their health?

When researchers or policymakers ask health related questions — which they do a lot — they often rely on self-reported rather than tested health data. IIASA researchers looked into how reliable this type of data is for research and found that, depending on country or age, self-reported data could be highly biased.

3h

Research maps key signaling pathways linking calcium entry and exit in activated T cells

Like entrance and exit doors on a building, a cell's outer surface has doors — channels, pumps, and transporters that selectively control what molecules enter or exit. In the immune system, T cells possess unique sets of 'doors', including ones that specialize in calcium ion movement. Now, Temple researchers describe a unique mechanism for coordinating these calcium entrance and exit 'doors' on T

3h

What Happens When Your Town Dries Up?

California’s Central Valley is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the United States—it yields a third of the produce grown in the country and is the world’s largest supplier of canned tomatoes. But a seven-year drought has threatened the viability of the valley’s farmland, and many rural communities have suffered greatly as a result. Joris Debeij’s short documentary When a Town Ru

3h

Cooling nanotube resonators with electrons

Researchers report on a technique that uses electron transport to cool a nanomechanical resonator near the quantum regime.

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Modern family roles improve life satisfaction for parents

Increased equality has a positive effect on mothers and fathers. Thanks to greater freedom to strike an individual balance between caring for children and working in paid employment, mothers and fathers today are happier with their lives than parents were 20 or 30 years ago, a study by sociologists has shown.

3h

Identifying a cyanobacterial gene family that helps control photosynthesis

A new study has identified a family of genes in cyanobacteria that help control carbon dioxide fixation.

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How Many People Have Died in Outer Space?

Following the only deaths to have ever occurred in space, the USSR started a policy requiring all cosmonauts to wear pressurized spacesuits during reentry. (Credit: Peakpx.com) For many wannabe astronauts, the idea of venturing into the great unknown would be a dream come true. But over the past 50 years, there's been a slew of spaceflight-related tragedies that are more akin to an astronaut's wor

3h

Salty soil is no problem for these tomatoes, thanks to some microbial helpers

Root fungus helps plants thrive even with the added sodium

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Fringe Idea: Should We Gene-Hack Animals to Make Them Smarter?

Dr. More Oh Scientists are learning more and more ways to gene-hack new traits into animals, including genetic alterations that could enhance their intelligence. In March, scientists altered monkey brains to be more humanlike, seeing an immediate boost in the animals’ memory and cognitive skills. While doing so is still impossible, the developments raise the question of whether humanity could som

3h

A Dazzling Quarter Century of Exoplanet Discovery

A pair of astrophysicists have won a Nobel Prize for discovering something that—as is often the case in science—at first they couldn’t believe was real. Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz were awarded the prize in physics today for finding 51 Pegasi b, the first known planet orbiting another sun-like star. (They share the prize with the physicist James Peebles, for his theoretical work on the origins

3h

Imprisonment: Doctor who illegally prescribed 500,000 doses of opioids to serve 40 years

According to law enforcement officials, every individual who visited Smithers' practice in Martinsville, Virginia, was given an opioid prescription. Patients traveled hundreds of miles to visit his practice, where Smithers only accepted cash or credit cards and not insurance. Smithers and similar doctors represent one part of the chain of responsible parties who contributed to the opioid epidemic

3h

Scientists Use Gene-Hacking to Breed Hornless Bulls

GMO Bulls Scientists figured out how to gene-hack bulls so that they never grew horns — a development expected to make dairy farming easier and safer for workers and less painful for bulls. “We’ve demonstrated that healthy hornless calves with only the intended edit can be produced,” University of California, Davis, animal scientist Alison Van Eenennaam said in a press release , “and we provided

3h

Facebook plugs booming business version into Portal

Facebook said Tuesday its Portal smart screens would be incorporated in its Workplace social network for businesses, which has grown to more than three million paid users.

3h

Concussion Damage Lingers On

Detailed scans of hockey players found the protective tissue surrounding brain cells was loosened two weeks after a concussion. Concussion Damage Lingers On Video of Concussion Damage Lingers On Sports Tuesday, October 8, 2019 – 13:30 Sofie Bates, Contributor Athletes may be returning to play sooner than they should. Detailed scans of hockey players found that the protective tissue surrounding b

3h

All the Exoplanets That Came Before 1995

Several exoplanets were found before the 1995 discovery that netted Mayor and Didier this year’s physics Nobel. Why weren’t the others honored? many-exoplanets.jpg Image credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt Space Tuesday, October 8, 2019 – 13:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Half of this year’s Nobel Prize in physics went to Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz “for the discovery of an exopl

3h

Prenatal stress could affect baby's brain

New research has found that maternal stress before and during pregnancy could affect a baby's brain development.

3h

Meat Grown in Space for the First Time Ever

This cultivated meat is "slaughter-free."

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Climate change will make California wildfires even worse

The severity of wildfires in the Sierra Nevada region of California has been sensitive to changes in climate over the past 1,400 years, according to new research. The findings suggest that future climate change is likely to drive increased fire activity in the Sierras. “Our data show that climate has been the main driver of fire on a regional scale,” says lead author Richard Vachula, a PhD studen

4h

Meet the 'mold pigs,' a new group of invertebrates from 30 million years ago

Fossils preserved in Dominican amber reveal a new family, genus and species of microinvertebrate from the mid-Tertiary period, a discovery that shows unique lineages of the tiny creatures were living 30 million years ago.

4h

Yale study examines shifts in fertility rates among Generation X women

A new study examines shifts in fertility behaviors among Generation X women in the United States — those born between 1965-1982 — compared to their Baby Boomer counterparts, and explores whether the fertility of college-educated women is increasing more quickly across cohorts in Generation X than the fertility of their less educated counterparts.

4h

New approach for modern power grids that increases efficiency, reduces cost

Scientists have developed a novel approach to allow for a small, well-defined risk of constraint violation to overcome the challenges that come with conservative current approaches used in modern power grids.

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A close up on the real world: Atomic migration under ambient conditions

Researchers have reported an environmental transmission electron microscopy technique that has allowed in situ visualization of the atomic changes of a metal surface in an electric field under ambient conditions. The activation of oxygen gas molecules by electron tunneling was found to result in atomic migration that could be followed progressively. It is hoped that the tunneling-electron-attached

4h

Hypersonic research spotlights future flight challenges

Engineers are advancing what researchers know about hypersonic flight. A new study describes a series of tests that elucidate the conditions a future aircraft may experience traveling faster than 10 times the speed of sound.

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Nobel prize for physics: exoplanets and cosmology

Two of this year’s winners discovered a planet around another star. The third turned cosmology into a science

4h

Pregnant Women Should Get Flu and Whooping Cough Shots, C.D.C. Says

Millions do not, and they may be endangering their babies as well as themselves. Only 35 percent of pregnant women get both vaccines; about half get one.

4h

One in three young adults receive medication for opioid use disorder after overdose

A new study found that one in three young adults receive medication for opioid use disorder within 12 months of a non-fatal opioid overdose. The study, led by researchers at Boston Medical Center's Grayken Center for Addiction, in collaboration with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH), shows which medications — buprenorphine, methadone or naltrexone — are being taken, and how lon

4h

Lymphoma stage at diagnosis may predict when and where new cancer forms

Colorado study shows the stage at which lymphoma is originally diagnosed impacts the types of second cancers that may form after treatment.

4h

DNA metabarcoding useful for analyzing human diet

A new study demonstrates that DNA metabarcoding provides a promising new method for tracking human plant intake, suggesting that similar approaches could be used to characterize the animal and fungal components of human diets. The study, published in the journal mSystems, demonstrated that dietary plant DNA can be amplified and sequenced from human stool using methods commonly applied to wildlife

4h

Surviving Y2K: What did we learn from the biggest tech scare in history?

In terms of programming, the year 2000 was perhaps the biggest digital change to date across the world. The reason for this is because, in the years before, two digits were allocated to computing related to the year. With 2000, three had to be allocated. Programmers around the world came together to and successfully drove the Y2K conversion. The freedom they were given by politicians, who didn't

4h

Meet the 'mold pigs,' a new group of invertebrates from 30 million years ago

Fossils preserved in Dominican amber reveal a new family, genus and species of microinvertebrate from the mid-Tertiary period, a discovery that shows unique lineages of the tiny creatures were living 30 million years ago.

4h

Court Documents: Elon Musk Called Himself a “Fucking Idiot”

The Saga Continues Elon Musk regretted calling Vernon Unsworth a “child rapist” in an email to BuzzFeed , a court document filed by the British diver reveals. “I didn’t expect Buzzfeed to publish an off the record email,” Musk said, according to the document. “My intent was to have them investigate and come to their own conclusions, not publish my email directly. Still, I’m a fucking idiot.” Case

4h

Er global opvarmning overhovedet et problem i Danmark?

Få overblik over, om global opvarmning også har konsekvenser for Danmark.

4h

'Big Bang Theory' gets shout out to Nobel Prize announcement

Life imitated art Tuesday when "The Big Bang Theory"—the popular U.S. television show, not the scientific explanation for how the universe began—made its way into the annals of Nobel history.

4h

WTO urges quick ban on harmful fisheries subsidies

The World Trade Organization on Tuesday called for countries to speed up talks aimed at hammering out an agreement on banning harmful fisheries subsidies.

4h

WTO urges quick ban on harmful fisheries subsidies

The World Trade Organization on Tuesday called for countries to speed up talks aimed at hammering out an agreement on banning harmful fisheries subsidies.

4h

Why German parents are happier than 20 years ago

Mothers and fathers today are happier with their lives than parents were 20 or 30 years ago, according to a new study in Germany. The mother looks after the children, the father works full time—these traditional roles stubbornly remained the norm for a long time. But in recent decades, the normative expectations of mothers and fathers have changed. Motherhood is no longer seen as an obligatory pa

4h

DNA metabarcoding useful for analyzing human diet

A new study demonstrates that DNA metabarcoding provides a promising new method for tracking human plant intake, suggesting that similar approaches could be used to characterize the animal and fungal components of human diets. The study, published in the journal mSystems, demonstrated that dietary plant DNA can be amplified and sequenced from human stool using methods commonly applied to wildlife

4h

DNA metabarcoding useful for analyzing human diet

A new study demonstrates that DNA metabarcoding provides a promising new method for tracking human plant intake, suggesting that similar approaches could be used to characterize the animal and fungal components of human diets. The study, published in the journal mSystems, demonstrated that dietary plant DNA can be amplified and sequenced from human stool using methods commonly applied to wildlife

4h

Expert: “Zombie Deer Disease” May Have Already Spread to Humans

In February, health experts began issuing a warning that sounded like something out of science fiction: that an infection known colloquially as “zombie deer disease” was sweeping the globe — and it could make the jump to humans . Formally known as chronic wasting disease (CWS) , the infection eats away at the brains of deer, causing the animals to exhibit zombie-like symptoms including aggression

4h

Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief

If you want to convince people not to trust an inaccurate political post on Facebook, labeling it as satire can help, a new study finds.

4h

Meet the 'mold pigs,' a new group of invertebrates from 30 million years ago

Fossils preserved in Dominican amber reveal a new family, genus and species of microinvertebrate from the mid-Tertiary period, a discovery that shows unique lineages of the tiny creatures were living 30 million years ago.

4h

Cell Phone Service Must Be Restored Quicker after Hurricanes

Officials pressure wireless companies so first responders and residents can communicate and save lives — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

The FBXW2-MSX2-SOX2 axis regulates stem cell property and drug resistance of cancer cells [Cell Biology]

SOX2 is a key transcription factor that plays critical roles in maintaining stem cell property and conferring drug resistance. However, the underlying mechanisms by which SOX2 level is precisely regulated remain elusive. Here we report that MLN4924, also known as pevonedistat, a small-molecule inhibitor of neddylation currently in phase II…

4h

Transcriptional control of lung alveolar type 1 cell development and maintenance by NK homeobox 2-1 [Developmental Biology]

The extraordinarily thin alveolar type 1 (AT1) cell constitutes nearly the entire gas exchange surface and allows passive diffusion of oxygen into the blood stream. Despite such an essential role, the transcriptional network controlling AT1 cells remains unclear. Using cell-specific knockout mouse models, genomic profiling, and 3D imaging, we found…

4h

A distinct lineage of giant viruses brings a rhodopsin photosystem to unicellular marine predators [Environmental Sciences]

Giant viruses are remarkable for their large genomes, often rivaling those of small bacteria, and for having genes thought exclusive to cellular life. Most isolated to date infect nonmarine protists, leaving their strategies and prevalence in marine environments largely unknown. Using eukaryotic single-cell metagenomics in the Pacific, we discovered a…

4h

RNA ligation precedes the retrotransposition of U6/LINE-1 chimeric RNA [Genetics]

Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) amplifies via retrotransposition. Active L1s encode 2 proteins (ORF1p and ORF2p) that bind their encoding transcript to promote retrotransposition in cis. The L1-encoded proteins also promote the retrotransposition of small-interspersed element RNAs, noncoding RNAs, and messenger RNAs in trans. Some L1-mediated retrotransposition events consist…

4h

SerpinB1 controls encephalitogenic T helper cells in neuroinflammation [Immunology and Inflammation]

SerpinB1, a protease inhibitor and neutrophil survival factor, was recently linked with IL-17–expressing T cells. Here, we show that serpinB1 (Sb1) is dramatically induced in a subset of effector CD4 cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Despite normal T cell priming, Sb1−/− mice are resistant to EAE with a paucity…

4h

Crystal structure of cis-aconitate decarboxylase reveals the impact of naturally occurring human mutations on itaconate synthesis [Immunology and Inflammation]

cis-Aconitate decarboxylase (CAD, also known as ACOD1 or Irg1) converts cis-aconitate to itaconate and plays central roles in linking innate immunity with metabolism and in the biotechnological production of itaconic acid by Aspergillus terreus. We have elucidated the crystal structures of human and murine CADs and compared their enzymological properties…

4h

Glioblastoma ablates pericytes antitumor immune function through aberrant up-regulation of chaperone-mediated autophagy [Immunology and Inflammation]

The contractile perivascular cells, pericytes (PC), are hijacked by glioblastoma (GB) to facilitate tumor progression. PC’s protumorigenic function requires direct interaction with tumor cells and contributes to the establishment of immunotolerance to tumor growth. Cancer cells up-regulate their own chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), a process that delivers selective cytosolic proteins to…

4h

Aldh1b1 expression defines progenitor cells in the adult pancreas and is required for Kras-induced pancreatic cancer [Medical Sciences]

The presence of progenitor or stem cells in the adult pancreas and their potential involvement in homeostasis and cancer development remain unresolved issues. Here, we show that mouse centroacinar cells can be identified and isolated by virtue of the mitochondrial enzyme Aldh1b1 that they uniquely express. These cells are necessary…

4h

Parkinson’s disease-associated iPLA2-VIA/PLA2G6 regulates neuronal functions and {alpha}-synuclein stability through membrane remodeling [Medical Sciences]

Mutations in the iPLA2-VIA/PLA2G6 gene are responsible for PARK14-linked Parkinson’s disease (PD) with α-synucleinopathy. However, it is unclear how iPLA2-VIA mutations lead to α-synuclein (α-Syn) aggregation and dopaminergic (DA) neurodegeneration. Here, we report that iPLA2-VIA–deficient Drosophila exhibits defects in neurotransmission during early developmental stages and progressive cell loss

4h

African trypanosomes expressing multiple VSGs are rapidly eliminated by the host immune system [Microbiology]

Trypanosoma brucei parasites successfully evade the host immune system by periodically switching the dense coat of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) at the cell surface. Each parasite expresses VSGs in a monoallelic fashion that is tightly regulated. The consequences of exposing multiple VSGs during an infection, in terms of antibody response…

4h

Apparent thinning of human visual cortex during childhood is associated with myelination [Neuroscience]

Human cortex appears to thin during childhood development. However, the underlying microstructural mechanisms are unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), quantitative MRI (qMRI), and diffusion MRI (dMRI) in children and adults, we tested what quantitative changes occur to gray and white matter in ventral temporal cortex (VTC) from childhood…

4h

Cell models of lipid-rich {alpha}-synuclein aggregation validate known modifiers of {alpha}-synuclein biology and identify stearoyl-CoA desaturase [Neuroscience]

Microscopy of Lewy bodies in Parkinson’s disease (PD) suggests they are not solely filamentous deposits of α-synuclein (αS) but also contain vesicles and other membranous material. We previously reported the existence of native αS tetramers/multimers and described engineered mutations of the αS KTKEGV repeat motifs that abrogate the multimers. The…

4h

Maize sugary enhancer1 (se1) is a gene affecting endosperm starch metabolism [Plant Biology]

sugary enhancer1 (se1) is a naturally occurring mutant allele involved in starch metabolism in maize endosperm. It is a recessive modifier of sugary1 (su1) and commercially important in modern sweet corn breeding, but its molecular identity and mode of action remain unknown. Here, we developed a pair of near-isogenic lines,…

4h

Early detection and monitoring of cerebral ischemia using calcium-responsive MRI probes [Chemistry]

Cerebral ischemia is one of the leading causes of mortality and disability in infants and adults and its timely diagnosis is essential for an efficient treatment. We present a methodology for fast detection and real-time monitoring of fluctuations of calcium ions associated with focal ischemia using a molecular functional MRI…

4h

Dronc-independent basal executioner caspase activity sustains Drosophila imaginal tissue growth [Developmental Biology]

Caspase is best known as an enzyme involved in programmed cell death, which is conserved among multicellular organisms. In addition to its role in cell death, caspase is emerging as an indispensable enzyme in a wide range of cellular functions, which have recently been termed caspase-dependent nonlethal cellular processes (CDPs)….

4h

Individual and collective encoding of risk in animal groups [Ecology]

The need to make fast decisions under risky and uncertain conditions is a widespread problem in the natural world. While there has been extensive work on how individual organisms dynamically modify their behavior to respond appropriately to changing environmental conditions (and how this is encoded in the brain), we know…

4h

Variable impacts of contemporary versus legacy agricultural phosphorus on US river water quality [Environmental Sciences]

Phosphorus (P) fertilizer has contributed to the eutrophication of freshwater ecosystems. Watershed-based conservation programs aiming to reduce external P loading to surface waters have not resulted in significant water-quality improvements. One factor that can help explain the lack of water-quality response is remobilization of accumulated legacy (historical) P within the…

4h

A marine plasmid hitchhiking vast phylogenetic and geographic distances [Environmental Sciences]

Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) plays an important role in bacterial evolution and serves as a driving force for bacterial diversity and versatility. HGT events often involve mobile genetic elements like plasmids, which can promote their own dissemination by associating with adaptive traits in the gene pool of the so-called mobilome….

4h

Climate cooling and clade competition likely drove the decline of lamniform sharks [Evolution]

Understanding heterogeneity in species richness between closely related clades is a key research question in ecology and evolutionary biology. Multiple hypotheses have been proposed to interpret such diversity contrasts across the tree of life, with most studies focusing on speciation rates to explain clades’ evolutionary radiations, while often neglecting extinction…

4h

The role of multilevel selection in host microbiome evolution [Evolution]

Animals are associated with a microbiome that can affect their reproductive success. It is, therefore, important to understand how a host and its microbiome coevolve. According to the hologenome concept, hosts and their microbiome form an integrated evolutionary entity, a holobiont, on which selection can potentially act directly. However, this…

4h

Experimental evolution of immunological specificity [Evolution]

Memory and specificity are hallmarks of the adaptive immune system. Contrary to prior belief, innate immune systems can also provide forms of immune memory, such as immune priming in invertebrates and trained immunity in vertebrates. Immune priming can even be specific but differs remarkably in cellular and molecular functionality from…

4h

The nucleosome core particle remembers its position through DNA replication and RNA transcription [Genetics]

Nucleosomes are the fundamental structural unit of chromatin. In addition to stabilizing the DNA polymer, nucleosomes are modified in ways that reflect and affect gene expression in their vicinity. It has long been assumed that nucleosomes can transmit memory of gene expression through their covalent posttranslational modifications. An unproven assumption…

4h

Inhibition of {Delta}24-dehydrocholesterol reductase activates pro-resolving lipid mediator biosynthesis and inflammation resolution [Immunology and Inflammation]

Targeting metabolism through bioactive key metabolites is an upcoming future therapeutic strategy. We questioned how modifying intracellular lipid metabolism could be a possible means for alleviating inflammation. Using a recently developed chemical probe (SH42), we inhibited distal cholesterol biosynthesis through selective inhibition of Δ24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24). Inhibition of DH

4h

Preclinical murine platform to evaluate therapeutic countermeasures against radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome [Medical Sciences]

Radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS) is a limiting factor for therapeutic abdominopelvic radiation and is predicted to be a major source of morbidity in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological terrorism. In this study, we developed an in vivo mouse-modeling platform that enables spatial and temporal manipulation of potential…

4h

Immunization against poly-N-acetylglucosamine reduces neutrophil activation and GVHD while sparing microbial diversity [Microbiology]

Microbial invasion into the intestinal mucosa after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) triggers neutrophil activation and requires antibiotic interventions to prevent sepsis. However, antibiotics lead to a loss of microbiota diversity, which is connected to a higher incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). Antimicrobial therapies that eliminate invading bacteria

4h

Structural and functional analyses reveal promiscuous and species specific use of ephrin receptors by Cedar virus [Microbiology]

Cedar virus (CedV) is a bat-borne henipavirus related to Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV), zoonotic agents of fatal human disease. CedV receptor-binding protein (G) shares only ∼30% sequence identity with those of NiV and HeV, although they can all use ephrin-B2 as an entry receptor. We demonstrate that…

4h

NanoSIMS imaging reveals metabolic stratification within current-producing biofilms [Microbiology]

Metal-reducing bacteria direct electrons to their outer surfaces, where insoluble metal oxides or electrodes act as terminal electron acceptors, generating electrical current from anaerobic respiration. Geobacter sulfurreducens is a commonly enriched electricity-producing organism, forming thick conductive biofilms that magnify total activity by supporting respiration of cells not in direct contac

4h

The NMDA receptor activation by d-serine and glycine is controlled by an astrocytic Phgdh-dependent serine shuttle [Neuroscience]

Astrocytes express the 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (Phgdh) enzyme required for the synthesis of l-serine from glucose. Astrocytic l-serine was proposed to regulate NMDAR activity by shuttling to neurons to sustain d-serine production, but this hypothesis remains untested. We now report that inhibition of astrocytic Phgdh suppressed the de novo synthesis of…

4h

A Tmc1 mutation reduces calcium permeability and expression of mechanoelectrical transduction channels in cochlear hair cells [Neuroscience]

Mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) currents were recorded from cochlear hair cells in mice with mutations of transmembrane channel-like protein TMC1 to study the effects on MET channel properties. We characterized a Tmc1 mouse with a single-amino-acid mutation (D569N), homologous to a dominant human deafness mutation. Measurements were made in both Tmc2…

4h

Fine control of aerenchyma and lateral root development through AUX/IAA- and ARF-dependent auxin signaling [Plant Biology]

Lateral roots (LRs) are derived from a parental root and contribute to water and nutrient uptake from the soil. Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid protein (AUX/IAA; IAA) and auxin response factor (ARF)-mediated signaling are essential for LR formation. Lysigenous aerenchyma, a gas space created by cortical cell death, aids internal oxygen transport within…

4h

Future epidemiological and economic impacts of universal influenza vaccines [Population Biology]

The efficacy of influenza vaccines, currently at 44%, is limited by the rapid antigenic evolution of the virus and a manufacturing process that can lead to vaccine mismatch. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) recently identified the development of a universal influenza vaccine with an efficacy of…

4h

Correction for Arlinghaus et al., Opinion: Governing the recreational dimension of global fisheries [Correction]

OPINION Correction for “Opinion: Governing the recreational dimension of global fisheries,” by Robert Arlinghaus, Joshua K. Abbott, Eli P. Fenichel, Stephen R. Carpenter, Len M. Hunt, Josep Alós, Thomas Klefoth, Steven J. Cooke, Ray Hilborn, Olaf P. Jensen, Michael J. Wilberg, John R. Post, and Michael J. Manfredo, which was…

4h

Correction for Kalogriopoulos et al., Structural basis for GPCR-independent activation of heterotrimeric Gi proteins [Correction]

BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Structural basis for GPCR-independent activation of heterotrimeric Gi proteins,” by Nicholas A. Kalogriopoulos, Steven D. Rees, Tony Ngo, Noah J. Kopcho, Andrey V. Ilatovskiy, Nina Sun, Elizabeth A. Komives, Geoffrey Chang, Pradipta Ghosh, and Irina Kufareva, which was first published July 30, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1906658116…

4h

Retraction for Bearzi et al., Identification of a coronary vascular progenitor cell in the human heart [Retraction]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Retraction for “Identification of a coronary vascular progenitor cell in the human heart,” by Claudia Bearzi, Annarosa Leri, Francesco Lo Monaco, Marcello Rota, Arantxa Gonzalez, Toru Hosoda, Martino Pepe, Khaled Qanud, Caroline Ojaimi, Silvana Bardelli, Domenico D’Amario, David A. D’Alessandro, Robert E. Michler, Stefanie Dimmeler, Andreas M. Zeiher,…

4h

Retraction for Boni et al., Notch1 regulates the fate of cardiac progenitor cells [Retraction]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Retraction for “Notch1 regulates the fate of cardiac progenitor cells,” by Alessandro Boni, Konrad Urbanek, Angelo Nascimbene, Toru Hosoda, Hanqiao Zheng, Francesca Delucchi, Katsuya Amano, Arantxa Gonzalez, Serena Vitale, Caroline Ojaimi, Roberto Rizzi, Roberto Bolli, Katherine E. Yutzey, Marcello Rota, Jan Kajstura, Piero Anversa, and Annarosa Leri, which…

4h

Phosphorylation of mitochondrial matrix proteins regulates their selective mitophagic degradation [Cell Biology]

Mitophagy is an important quality-control mechanism in eukaryotic cells, and defects in mitophagy correlate with aging phenomena and neurodegenerative disorders. It is known that different mitochondrial matrix proteins undergo mitophagy with very different rates but, to date, the mechanism underlying this selectivity at the individual protein level has remained obscure….

4h

Reply to Head-Gordon and Paesani: Liquid water, a branched polymer with ~100-fs short-lived heterogeneous hydrogen bonds [Physical Sciences]

The letter by Head-Gordon and Paesani (hereafter HG-P) (1) contains several confusions about our results that we clarify here. The title claiming that liquid water is not a dynamic polydisperse branched polymer is not supported by any information in their letter. Their first paragraph alleges that the oxygen–oxygen radial distribution…

4h

More data needed for claims about the earliest Oldowan artifacts [Biological Sciences]

Recent claims about early tool making and use have proved controversial (1–4). In PNAS, Braun et al. (5) report Oldowan artifacts from Ledi-Geraru, Ethiopia. The claimed minimum age of 2.581 Ma for these artifacts would, even if accurate, imply a marginally older beginning for the Oldowan than the ∼2.58 Ma…

4h

Reply to Sahle and Gossa: Technology and geochronology at the earliest known Oldowan site at Ledi-Geraru, Ethiopia [Biological Sciences]

Sahle and Gossa (1) identify 2 components of our paper with which they disagree. Their concerns are based on misunderstandings of our paleomagnetic data and the published details of the Bokol Dora 1 (BD 1) artifact assemblage. The normal paleomagnetic sequence at BD 1 cannot represent the Reunion subchron [2.128…

4h

Breathing drives CSF: Impact on spaceflight disease and hydrocephalus [Biological Sciences]

With great interest we have read the article in PNAS by Van Ombergen et al. (1) asserting that long-duration spaceflights cause persistent enlargement of brain cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces in cosmonauts. Remarkably, the postflight ventricular volume changes in the lateral ventricle correlate positively with visual acuity loss—a well-known sequela of…

4h

Reply to Ludwig et al.: A potential mechanism for intracranial cerebrospinal fluid accumulation during long-duration spaceflight [Biological Sciences]

We thank Ludwig et al. for their interest in our work (1) and for bringing a revealing aspect of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics to our attention (2). The flow reversal of the internal CSF circulation during forced breathing maneuvers in interrelation with cranial and thoracic venous vasculature responses demonstrated by…

4h

QnAs with Gunter P. Wagner [QnAs]

Günter P. Wagner works at the interface of population genetics and evolutionary developmental biology, and has made several key contributions to both fields. A professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Yale University, Wagner was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2018. Wagner focuses on the evolution of…

4h

The beginning of an era of functional genomics in Rickettsiology is steeped in history [Microbiology]

Human diseases caused by bacteria in the genus Rickettsia, commonly referred to as typhus or spotted fevers, are among the oldest and most severe scourges of humankind. All of the diseases’ agents utilize blood-sucking arthropods as vectors, which influences disease epidemiology. Epidemic typhus continues to cause outbreaks today in situations…

4h

Nucleosomes remember where they were [Genetics]

A central postulate in chromatin biology is that nucleosomes are inherited through replication, and evidence for the recycling of nucleosomes from ahead of the replication fork to behind goes back more than 40 y (1, 2). Early electron microscopic observations of chromatin fibers revealed that nucleosomes form directly behind the…

4h

Optimal compressed sensing strategies for an array of nonlinear olfactory receptor neurons with and without spontaneous activity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

There are numerous different odorant molecules in nature but only a relatively small number of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in brains. This “compressed sensing” challenge is compounded by the constraint that ORNs are nonlinear sensors with a finite dynamic range. Here, we investigate possible optimal olfactory coding strategies by maximizing…

4h

Task-based fMRI predicts response and remission to exposure therapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Exposure and ritual prevention (EX/RP) is an effective first-line treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but only some patients achieve minimal symptoms following EX/RP. Herein, we investigate whether task-based neural activity can predict who responds best to EX/RP. Unmedicated adult patients with OCD (n = 36) and healthy participants (n =…

4h

Crystal growth kinetics as an architectural constraint on the evolution of molluscan shells [Biochemistry]

Molluscan shells are a classic model system to study formation–structure–function relationships in biological materials and the process of biomineralized tissue morphogenesis. Typically, each shell consists of a number of highly mineralized ultrastructures, each characterized by a specific 3D mineral–organic architecture. Surprisingly, in some cases, despite the lack of a mutual…

4h

Intragenomic variability and extended sequence patterns in the mutational signature of ultraviolet light [Biochemistry]

Mutational signatures can reveal properties of underlying mutational processes and are important when assessing signals of selection in cancer. Here, we describe the sequence characteristics of mutations induced by ultraviolet (UV) light, a major mutagen in several human cancers, in terms of extended (longer than trinucleotide) patterns as well as…

4h

Unusual dynamics of the divergent malaria parasite PfAct1 actin filament [Biochemistry]

Gliding motility and host cell invasion by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium falciparum (Pf), the causative agent of malaria, is powered by a macromolecular complex called the glideosome that lies between the parasite plasma membrane and the inner membrane complex. The glideosome core consists of a single-headed class XIV myosin PfMyoA…

4h

Fibulin-4 exerts a dual role in LTBP-4L-mediated matrix assembly and function [Biochemistry]

Elastogenesis is a hierarchical process by which cells form functional elastic fibers, providing elasticity and the ability to regulate growth factor bioavailability in tissues, including blood vessels, lung, and skin. This process requires accessory proteins, including fibulin-4 and -5, and latent TGF binding protein (LTBP)-4. Our data demonstrate mechanisms in…

4h

Generation of the configurational ensemble of an intrinsically disordered protein from unbiased molecular dynamics simulation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in eukaryotic proteomes, play a major role in cell signaling, and are associated with human diseases. To understand IDP function it is critical to determine their configurational ensemble, i.e., the collection of 3-dimensional structures they adopt, and this remains an immense challenge in structural…

4h

DDX5 helicase resolves G-quadruplex and is involved in MYC gene transcriptional activation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

G-quadruplexes (G4) are noncanonical secondary structures formed in guanine-rich DNA and RNA sequences. MYC, one of the most critical oncogenes, forms a DNA G4 in its proximal promoter region (MycG4) that functions as a transcriptional silencer. However, MycG4 is highly stable in vitro and its regulatory role would require active…

4h

Transferrin receptor binds virus capsid with dynamic motion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Canine parvovirus (CPV) is an important pathogen causing severe diseases in dogs, including acute hemorrhagic enteritis, myocarditis, and cerebellar disease. Cross-species transmission of CPV occurs as a result of mutations on the viral capsid surface that alter the species-specific binding to the host receptor, transferrin receptor type-1 (TfR). The interaction…

4h

SDS22 selectively recognizes and traps metal-deficient inactive PP1 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The metalloenzyme protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), which is responsible for ≥50% of all dephosphorylation reactions, is regulated by scores of regulatory proteins, including the highly conserved SDS22 protein. SDS22 has numerous diverse functions, surprisingly acting as both a PP1 inhibitor and as an activator. Here, we integrate cellular, biophysical, and…

4h

RNA polymerases as moving barriers to condensin loop extrusion [Cell Biology]

To separate replicated sister chromatids during mitosis, eukaryotes and prokaryotes have structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) condensin complexes that were recently shown to organize chromosomes by a process known as DNA loop extrusion. In rapidly dividing bacterial cells, the process of separating sister chromatids occurs concomitantly with ongoing transcription. How…

4h

Highly efficient DSB-free base editing for streptomycetes with CRISPR-BEST [Applied Biological Sciences]

Streptomycetes serve as major producers of various pharmacologically and industrially important natural products. Although CRISPR-Cas9 systems have been developed for more robust genetic manipulations, concerns of genome instability caused by the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and the toxicity of Cas9 remain. To overcome these limitations, here we report development of…

4h

The making of natural iron sulfide nanoparticles in a hot vent snail [Applied Biological Sciences]

Biomineralization in animals exclusively features oxygen-based minerals with a single exception of the scaly-foot gastropod Chrysomallon squamiferum, the only metazoan with an iron sulfide skeleton. This unique snail inhabits deep-sea hot vents and possesses scales infused with iron sulfide nanoparticles, including pyrite, giving it a characteristic metallic black sheen. Since…

4h

Cryptic diversity of a widespread global pathogen reveals expanded threats to amphibian conservation [Applied Biological Sciences]

Biodiversity loss is one major outcome of human-mediated ecosystem disturbance. One way that humans have triggered wildlife declines is by transporting disease-causing agents to remote areas of the world. Amphibians have been hit particularly hard by disease due in part to a globally distributed pathogenic chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis [Bd])….

4h

Observation of Rydberg exciton polaritons and their condensate in a perovskite cavity [Applied Physical Sciences]

The condensation of half-light half-matter exciton polaritons in semiconductor optical cavities is a striking example of macroscopic quantum coherence in a solid-state platform. Quantum coherence is possible only when there are strong interactions between the exciton polaritons provided by their excitonic constituents. Rydberg excitons with high principal value exhibit strong…

4h

Epsilon iron as a spin-smectic state [Applied Physical Sciences]

Using X-ray emission spectroscopy, we find appreciable local magnetic moments until 30 GPa to 40 GPa in the high-pressure phase of iron; however, no magnetic order is detected with neutron powder diffraction down to 1.8 K, contrary to previous predictions. Our first-principles calculations reveal a “spin-smectic” state lower in energy…

4h

Propinquity drives the emergence of network structure and density [Applied Physical Sciences]

The lack of large-scale, continuously evolving empirical data usually limits the study of networks to the analysis of snapshots in time. This approach has been used for verification of network evolution mechanisms, such as preferential attachment. However, these studies are mostly restricted to the analysis of the first links established…

4h

The structure of the colorectal cancer-associated enzyme GalNAc-T12 reveals how nonconserved residues dictate its function [Biochemistry]

Polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyl transferases (GalNAc-Ts) initiate mucin type O-glycosylation by catalyzing the transfer of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) to Ser or Thr on a protein substrate. Inactive and partially active variants of the isoenzyme GalNAc-T12 are present in subsets of patients with colorectal cancer, and several of these variants alter nonconserved residues with…

4h

Single-molecule localization microscopy as nonlinear inverse problem [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

We present a statistical framework to model the spatial distribution of molecules based on a single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) dataset. The latter consists of a collection of spatial coordinates and their associated uncertainties. We describe iterative parameter-estimation algorithms based on this framework, as well as a sampling algorithm to numerically…

4h

Cell division rates decrease with age, providing a potential explanation for the age-dependent deceleration in cancer incidence [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

A new evaluation of previously published data suggested to us that the accumulation of mutations might slow, rather than increase, as individuals age. To explain this unexpected finding, we hypothesized that normal stem cell division rates might decrease as we age. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated cell division rates…

4h

Mast cells are critical for controlling the bacterial burden and the healing of infected wounds [Cell Biology]

Skin wound infections are a significant health problem, and antibiotic resistance is on the rise. Mast cells (MCs) have been shown to contribute to host–defense responses in certain bacterial infections, but their role in skin wound superinfection is unknown. We subjected 2 MC-deficient mouse strains to Pseudomonas aeruginosa skin wound…

4h

Phosphorylation of DEPDC5, a component of the GATOR1 complex, releases inhibition of mTORC1 and promotes tumor growth [Cell Biology]

The Pim and AKT serine/threonine protein kinases are implicated as drivers of cancer. Their regulation of tumor growth is closely tied to the ability of these enzymes to mainly stimulate protein synthesis by activating mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) signaling, although the exact mechanism is not completely understood….

4h

CRIF1 as a potential target to improve the radiosensitivity of osteosarcoma [Cell Biology]

Resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), which is a conventional treatment for osteosarcoma that cannot be resected, undermines the efficacy of this therapy. However, the mechanism by which IR induces radioresistance in osteosarcoma is not defined. Here, we report that CR6-interacting factor-1 (CRIF1) is highly expressed in osteosarcoma and undergoes nuclear-cytoplasmic…

4h

A self-assembled Ru-Pt metallacage as a lysosome-targeting photosensitizer for 2-photon photodynamic therapy [Chemistry]

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment procedure that relies on cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the light activation of a photosensitizer. The photophysical and biological properties of photosensitizers are vital for the therapeutic outcome of PDT. In this work a 2D rhomboidal metallacycle and a 3D octahedral metallacage…

4h

Excited-state proton transfer relieves antiaromaticity in molecules [Chemistry]

Baird’s rule explains why and when excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions happen in organic compounds. Bifunctional compounds that are [4n + 2] π-aromatic in the ground state, become [4n + 2] π-antiaromatic in the first 1ππ* states, and proton transfer (either inter- or intramolecularly) helps relieve excited-state antiaromaticity. Computed nucleus-independent…

4h

Selective cadmium regulation mediated by a cooperative binding mechanism in CadR [Chemistry]

Detoxification of the highly toxic cadmium element is essential for the survival of living organisms. Pseudomonas putida CadR, a MerR family transcriptional regulator, has been reported to exhibit an ultraspecific response to the cadmium ion. Our crystallographic and spectroscopic studies reveal that the extra cadmium selectivity of CadR is mediated…

4h

Factors driving the seasonal and hourly variability of sea-spray aerosol number in the North Atlantic [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Four North Atlantic Aerosol and Marine Ecosystems Study (NAAMES) field campaigns from winter 2015 through spring 2018 sampled an extensive set of oceanographic and atmospheric parameters during the annual phytoplankton bloom cycle. This unique dataset provides four seasons of open-ocean observations of wind speed, sea surface temperature (SST), seawater particle…

4h

Ca isotopes record rapid crystal growth in volcanic and subvolcanic systems [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Kinetic calcium isotope effects can be used as growth-rate proxies for volcanic and subvolcanic minerals. Here, we analyze Ca isotopic compositions in experimental and natural samples and confirm that large kinetic effects (>2‰) can occur during magmatic plagioclase crystallization. Experiments confirm theoretical predictions that disequilibrium isotope effects depend mainly on…

4h

An experimental test of the ovulatory homolog model of female orgasm [Evolution]

The ovulatory homolog model of female orgasm posits that the neuro-endocrine mechanisms underlying female orgasm evolved from and are homologous to the mechanisms mediating copulation-induced ovulation in some mammals. This model predicts that pharmacological agents that affect human orgasm, such as fluoxetine, should also affect ovulation in animals with copulation-induced…

4h

Predicting kidney transplant outcomes with partial knowledge of HLA mismatch [Medical Sciences]

We consider prediction of graft survival when a kidney from a deceased donor is transplanted into a recipient, with a focus on the variation of survival with degree of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch. Previous studies have used data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) to predict survival…

4h

Raman interrogation of the ferroelectric phase transition in polar metal LiOsO3 [Physics]

Ferroelectric (FE) distortions in a metallic material were believed to be experimentally inaccessible because itinerant electrons would screen the long-range Coulomb interactions that favor a polar structure. It has been suggested by Anderson and Blount [P. W. Anderson, E. I. Blount, Phys. Rev. Lett. 14, 217−219 (1965)] that a transition…

4h

Generation and detection of spin-orbit coupled neutron beams [Physics]

Spin-orbit coupling of light has come to the fore in nanooptics and plasmonics, and is a key ingredient of topological photonics and chiral quantum optics. We demonstrate a basic tool for incorporating analogous effects into neutron optics: the generation and detection of neutron beams with coupled spin and orbital angular…

4h

Magnetic field-driven quantum criticality in antiferromagnetic CePtIn4 [Physics]

Physics of the quantum critical point is one of the most perplexing topics in current condensed-matter physics. Its conclusive understanding is forestalled by the scarcity of experimental systems displaying novel aspects of quantum criticality. We present comprehensive experimental evidence of a magnetic field-tuned tricritical point separating paramagnetic, antiferromagnetic, and metamagnetic…

4h

Generics designate kinds but not always essences [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

People believe that some categories are kinds with reliable causal structure and high inductive potential (e.g., tigers). Widely endorsed theories propose that people are biased to assume kinds are essential, and so naturally determined by internal causal properties. Generic language (e.g., “men like sports”) is 1 mechanism thought to evoke…

4h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Diversity decline in mackerel sharks Adult female great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias, a species of the shark order Lamniformes. Image courtesy of George T. Probst (photographer). A multitude of factors, including variations in speciation and extinction rates, determine species richness, but the causes of lineage decline and disappearance are unclear….

4h

News Feature: Fighting a fungal scourge [Environmental Sciences]

Researchers trying to rescue amphibians from a global fungus epidemic are finding that bacteria may be their best allies. More than a decade ago, amphibian microbial ecologist Reid Harris watched a mother salamander as she marched in a figure-eight pattern through her clutch of soft, jellylike eggs. He knew that…

4h

Bacterial twist to an antiviral defence

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02974-x The discovery of an antiviral defence system in bacteria that shares some components with a key antiviral defence pathway in animals provides insight into how this important response might have evolved.

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Influenza evolution patterns change with time, complicating vaccine design

Skoltech scientists discovered new patterns in the evolution of the influenza virus. This may help predict mutations in the viral genome and ultimately help design better vaccines. Research results were published in the top scientific journal PNAS.

4h

Research identifies factors influencing how religious identity interacts with workplace

Religious beliefs can affect how employees do their jobs. But religious identity in the workplace is often neglected in human resources theory and practice, making it a diversity issue that's prone to tension and conflict. To address gaps in the literature on how employees' religious and work identities interact, a new study reviewed relevant research to help employers support religious identity a

4h

Transcriptomic analysis of human endogenous retroviruses in systemic lupus erythematosus [Letters (Online Only)]

Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are integrated retroviral elements within the human genome. Tokuyama et al. (1) recently published a computational tool, “ERVmap,” to analyze genome-wide, locus-specific expression of human ERVs. The authors found increased expression of 124 ERV loci in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), compared to controls, and 0…

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Reply to Iniguez et al.: ERVmap is a validated approach to mapping proviral endogenous retroviruses in the human genome [Letters (Online Only)]

Iñiquez et al. (1) claim that ERVmap (2) contains methodological errors and Telescope is more accurate in assigning ambiguous reads (1, 3). Telescope detected 19 elevated and 4 repressed endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), while ERVmap found 124 elevated ERVs (2). Iñiquez et al. (1) claim that this difference is due to…

4h

Civilian public sector employment as a long-run outcome of military conscription [Political Sciences]

Since at least T. H. Marshall, scholars have recognized military service as a form of sacrifice that warrants compensation from the state. War-widow pensions, expansion of the franchise, and subsidized higher education are all examples of rights and benefits “bestowed” in return for wartime mobilization. Similarly, in the United States,…

4h

Engineering the stereoisomeric structure of seed oil to mimic human milk fat [Applied Biological Sciences]

Human milk fat substitute (HMFS) is a class of structured lipid that is widely used as an ingredient in infant formulas. Like human milk fat, HMFS is characterized by enrichment of palmitoyl (C16:0) groups specifically at the middle (sn-2 or β) position on the glycerol backbone, and there is evidence…

4h

Mother-to-embryo vitellogenin transport in a viviparous teleost Xenotoca eiseni [Physiology]

Vitellogenin (Vtg), a yolk nutrient protein that is synthesized in the livers of female animals, and subsequently carried into the ovary, contributes to vitellogenesis in oviparous animals. Thus, Vtg levels are elevated during oogenesis. In contrast, Vtg proteins have been genetically lost in viviparous mammals, thus the yolk protein is…

4h

Cell-type-specific transcriptome and histone modification dynamics during cellular reprogramming in the Arabidopsis stomatal lineage [Plant Biology]

Plant cells maintain remarkable developmental plasticity, allowing them to clonally reproduce and to repair tissues following wounding; yet plant cells normally stably maintain consistent identities. Although this capacity was recognized long ago, our mechanistic understanding of the establishment, maintenance, and erasure of cellular identities in plants remains limited. Here, we…

4h

Genetic contributions to variation in human stature in prehistoric Europe [Anthropology]

The relative contributions of genetics and environment to temporal and geographic variation in human height remain largely unknown. Ancient DNA has identified changes in genetic ancestry over time, but it is not clear whether those changes in ancestry are associated with changes in height. Here, we directly test whether changes…

4h

A novel chlorophyll protein complex in the repair cycle of photosystem II [Plant Biology]

In oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, photosystem II (PSII) is a unique membrane protein complex that catalyzes light-driven oxidation of water. PSII undergoes frequent damage due to its demanding photochemistry. It must undergo a repair and reassembly process following photodamage, many facets of which remain unknown. We have discovered a PSII subcomplex…

4h

Sustained ER stress promotes hyperglycemia by increasing glucagon action through the deubiquitinating enzyme USP14 [Medical Sciences]

Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays an important role in metabolic diseases like obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), although the underlying mechanisms and regulatory pathways remain to be elucidated. Here, we induced chronic low-grade ER stress in lean mice to levels similar to those in high-fat diet (HFD)–fed obese…

4h

Sugar starvation-regulated MYBS2 and 14-3-3 protein interactions enhance plant growth, stress tolerance, and grain weight in rice [Plant Biology]

Autotrophic plants have evolved distinctive mechanisms for maintaining a range of homeostatic states for sugars. The on/off switch of reversible gene expression by sugar starvation/provision represents one of the major mechanisms by which sugar levels are maintained, but the details remain unclear. α-Amylase (αAmy) is the key enzyme for hydrolyzing…

4h

Fitness effects but no temperature-mediated balancing selection at the polymorphic Adh gene of Drosophila melanogaster [Evolution]

Polymorphism in the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) protein of Drosophila melanogaster, like genetic variation in many other enzymes, has long been hypothesized to be maintained by a selective trade-off between thermostability and enzyme activity. Two major Adh variants, named Fast and Slow, are distributed along latitudinal clines on several continents. The…

4h

4h

Influenza evolution patterns change with time, complicating vaccine design

Skoltech scientists discovered new patterns in the evolution of the influenza virus. This may help predict mutations in the viral genome and ultimately help design better vaccines. Research results were published in the top scientific journal PNAS.

4h

Research identifies factors influencing how religious identity interacts with workplace

To address gaps in the literature on how employees' religious and work identities interact, a new study reviewed relevant research to help employers support religious identity and reduce conflict in the workplace.

4h

Flagging false Facebook posts as satire helps reduce belief

If you want to convince people not to trust an inaccurate political post on Facebook, labeling it as satire can help, a new study finds.Researchers at The Ohio State University found that flagging inaccurate political posts because they had been disputed by fact-checkers or fellow Facebook users was not as good at reducing belief in the falsehoods or stopping people from sharing them.

4h

Tea and banana plants have been genetically modified by bacteria

Around 1 in 20 flowering plants are naturally transgenic, with added bacterial genes that can make them produce unusual chemicals

4h

Study examines shifts in fertility rates among Generation X women

A new, Yale-led study examines shifts in fertility behaviors among Generation X women in the United States—those born between 1965-1982—compared to their Baby Boomer counterparts, and explores whether the fertility of college-educated women is increasing more quickly across cohorts in Generation X than the fertility of their less educated counterparts.

4h

Trump Is Killing a Fatally Flawed Syria Policy

In times of policy confusion, there’s a stock phrase some Trump officials reach for, almost like a mantra: “We’ve been very clear.” Trying to explain why the president seemed to be opening the way for Turkey to attack America’s Syrian Kurdish partners, a senior administration official intoned it again and again: Trump wasn’t endorsing an invasion; he was just moving a handful of troops out of the

4h

The deeper these octopuses live, the wartier their skin

Deep beneath the ocean's surface, surprisingly cute warty pink octopuses creep along the seafloor. But not all these octopuses look alike. While we humans love a good "Is your skin oily, dry, or combination?" quiz, members of one octopus species take variations in skin texture to a whole new level. Some have outrageous warts, while others appear nearly smooth-skinned. Scientists weren't sure if th

4h

A simple way to control swarming molecular machines

The swarming behavior of about 100 million molecular machines can be controlled by applying simple mechanical stimuli such as extension and contraction. This method could lead to the development of new swarming molecular machines and small energy-saving devices.

4h

The deeper these octopuses live, the wartier their skin

Deep beneath the ocean's surface, surprisingly cute warty pink octopuses creep along the seafloor. But not all these octopuses look alike. While we humans love a good "Is your skin oily, dry, or combination?" quiz, members of one octopus species take variations in skin texture to a whole new level. Some have outrageous warts, while others appear nearly smooth-skinned. Scientists weren't sure if th

4h

Daily briefing: How biological advances have changed who we think we are

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03035-z How science has shifted our sense of identity, a US plan to DNA-print immigrants worries bioethicists and the physics Nobel goes to exoplanet and cosmology pioneers.

5h

Influenza evolution patterns change with time, complicating vaccine design

Skoltech scientists discovered new patterns in the evolution of the influenza virus. This may help predict mutations in the viral genome and ultimately help design better vaccines. Research results were published in a top scientific journal PNAS.

5h

Yale study examines shifts in fertility rates among Generation X women

A new, Yale-led study examines shifts in fertility behaviors among Generation X women in the United States — those born between 1965-1982 — compared to their Baby Boomer counterparts, and explores whether the fertility of college-educated women is increasing more quickly across cohorts in Generation X than the fertility of their less educated counterparts.

5h

The deeper these octopuses live, the wartier their skin

Deep beneath the ocean's surface, surprisingly cute pink octopuses creep along the seafloor. Some of them have super warty skin, and some are smooth. Scientists weren't sure if these octopuses were even members of the same species, and they didn't know how to explain the differences in the animals' looks. But a new study shows that the deeper in the ocean the octopuses live, the bumpier their skin

5h

The NBA Is Going to Have to Choose

The NBA reveled in the praise it got for being the pro sports league that welcomes its players’ and employees’ opinions on political and social issues. But the league’s respect for open expression—which supposedly distinguished it from the NFL—suddenly has its limits. A posting on Twitter Friday by the Houston Rockets general manager Daryl Morey showing support for the Hong Kong protesters has fr

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The Trump Administration Doesn’t Care About Allies

Here are the terms of the deal: Turkey takes responsibility for the 11,000 imprisoned ISIS fighters, and 70,000 collaborators now held in the al Hawl and Ain Issa detention camps by Syrian Democratic Forces; and the U.S. withdraws its forces from northern Syria so Turkey can invade. Turkey will establish a 30-kilometer zone into which it will forcibly repatriate 1 million Syrian refugees on Turki

5h

How Syphilis Sneaked Up on Americans

In 2018, rates of sexually transmitted diseases in the United States increased for the fifth year in a row, and combined cases of syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia reached a record high, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report released today showed. The number of primary and secondary syphilis cases—the disease’s most infectious stages—increased 14 percent from 2017 to 2018, to more

5h

Tea and peanut plants have been genetically modified by bacteria

Around 1 in 20 flowering plants are naturally transgenic, with added bacterial genes that can make them produce unusual chemicals

5h

Science Is Not about Getting More "Likes"

Extraordinary groupthink leads to extraordinary ignorance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

New study challenges our understanding of premature aging

Disturbances in the function of mitochondrial DNA can accelerate the ageing process in ways that are different than previously thought, according to a new study. Offering a new perspective to ageing, the researchers suggest that accelerated ageing is the result of abnormal cell nucleotide levels and compromised nuclear DNA maintenance.

5h

The science Of Breaking Bad: Would you know if meth was cooked inside your house?

Researchers analysed the contamination levels in household items from a home suspected to have previously been used for cooking methamphetamine, to determine whether surface wipe samples can adequately establish contamination and define the health risks. Results demonstrate methamphetamine has continued to mobilise after manufacture for a period exceeding five years when the property was under new

5h

Children's language skills may be harmed by social hardship

Children from disadvantaged backgrounds are three times more likely to develop difficulties with language than those from more affluent areas, research suggests.

5h

A simple way to control swarming molecular machines

The swarming behavior of about 100 million molecular machines can be controlled by applying simple mechanical stimuli such as extension and contraction. This method could lead to the development of new swarming molecular machines and small energy-saving devices.

5h

Compact infrared spectrometer

Researchers have developed a compact infrared spectrometer. It's small enough to fit on a computer chip but can still open up interesting possibilities — in space and in everyday life.

5h

Tau Linked to RNA Splicing Errors in Flies

In brain samples from people with Alzheimer’s disease, the protein aggregates more strongly bound proteins involved in processing RNA, the same study finds.

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A New Way to Make Azides

I wanted to mention this paper that’s out in Nature , especially since I was mentioning azide/alkyne click chemistry the other day. If you’re using that system in any sort of chemical diversity sense, you’ve run into problems on the azide end. There are not a whole lot of commercially available azides out there (although definitely more than there used to be before this reaction became popular!)

5h

The story of thalidomide continues

An international study has unveiled a detailed view of how thalidomide, one of the most notorious drugs ever developed, causes abnormalities in limb and ear development. The findings may contribute to the re-emergence of safe, or non-teratogenic, thalidomide-derived drugs as a treatment for cancer and inflammatory diseases.

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Skeptical Science New Research for Week #40, 2019

44 articles, 12 open access Long levers Economists and macroeconomics must necessarily deal with a grand experiment wherein none of the variables feeding the show can be adjusted or fixed; economists face worse problems than do researchers pursuing cutting-edge experimental physics. Our experience with and expectations of economic phenomena as factors of predictable results are necessarily shaped

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How the Greenland ice sheet fared in 2019

This is a re-post from Carbon Brief Dr Ruth Mottram , Dr Martin Stendel and Dr Peter Langen are climate scientists at the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) in Copenhagen, which is part of the Polar Portal . Dr Andreas Ahlstrøm and Dr Kenneth D. Mankoff are chief research consultant and senior scientist at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland , respectively. As the end of August sees

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Scientists have identified the presence of cancer-suppressing cells in pancreatic cancer

Researchers have identified cells containing a protein called Meflin that has a role in restraining the progression of pancreatic cancer. They have also shown that cancer progression can be controlled by artificially increasing the amount of this protein in the cells.

5h

Future intent: Would you let an automated car do the driving?

Researchers have surveyed more than 2000 drivers across Australia, France and Sweden for two separate studies investigating what people think about travelling in automated cars. The first international study found French drivers were more likely to one day buy an automated car than drivers in Australia or Sweden. The second study surveyed local Queensland drivers and identified what they saw as th

5h

When laying their eggs, tobacco hawkmoths avoid plants that smell of caterpillar feces

Scientists have demonstrated that not only plant odors determine the best oviposition site for egglaying hawkmoths, but also the frass of other larvae. They specified the repelling substance in the feces which signals the presence of competing conspecifics. Moreover, the researchers identified an odorant receptor which is involved in the detection of the typical smell of larval frass and thereby g

5h

Dog ownership associated with longer life, especially among heart attack and stroke survivors

Dog ownership was associated with a 33% lower risk of early death for heart attack survivors living alone and 27% reduced risk of early death for stroke survivors living alone, compared to people who did not own a dog. Dog ownership was associated with a 24% reduced risk of all-cause mortality and a 31% lower risk of death by heart attack or stroke compared to non-owners.

5h

Three Share Physics Nobel for Exoplanet and Cosmological Discoveries

(Credit: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator/Courtesy American Institute of Physics) (Inside Science) — The 2019 Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to three scientists “for contribution to our understanding of the evolution of the universe and Earth’s place in the cosmos."This year’s prize was awarded to James Peebles of Princeton University “for theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology,

5h

A simple intervention enduringly reduces anti-Muslim sentiment

Research from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, in collaboration with Northwestern and University of Granada, found that a simple intervention can reduce anti-Muslim hostility by calling out the hypocrisy of blaming an entire group — but not your own — for the act of a single person. The effects remained even a full year later.

5h

Scientists observe a single quantum vibration under ordinary conditions

Scientists at MIT and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology have for the first time created and observed a single phonon in a common material at room temperature.

5h

Pressure runs high at edge of solar system

Out at the boundary of our solar system, pressure runs high. This pressure, the force plasma, magnetic fields and particles like ions, cosmic rays and electrons exert on one another when they flow and collide, was recently measured by scientists in totality for the first time—and it was found to be greater than expected.

5h

BioAlchemy: Treating wastewater at the point of production

Treating wastewater is an arduous process relying on complex sewage systems and treatment plants. While this is easier in developed areas with the requisite infrastructure, providing such services in rural areas is challenging. In recent years, decentralizing wastewater treatment—using devices to treat water locally—is increasingly seen as a preferable alternative.

5h

Warty octopus dives deep for change

A new study reveals that ocean depth decides the skin texture of a very special cephalopod.

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Research shows size matters

We now have the data to prove it. Mark Bruer reports.

5h

Curiosity finds ancient salty lakes on Mars

The discovery could provide insights into how climate change affects a planet. Richard A Lovett reports.

5h

Canine pals could be the secret to longevity

Studies confirm that dog owners live longer, healthier lives. Natalie Parletta reports.

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A bird's eye view of forests can predict their demise earlier

This new method could spark timely efforts to save the trees. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Illuminating breast tissue

A new technique could give an insight into breast cancer.

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Science Is Not about Getting More "Likes"

Extraordinary groupthink leads to extraordinary ignorance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The Danger of Abandoning Our Partners

The abrupt policy decision to seemingly abandon our Kurdish partners could not come at a worse time. The decision was made without consulting U.S. allies or senior U.S. military leadership and threatens to affect future partnerships at precisely the time we need them most, given the war-weariness of the American public coupled with ever more sophisticated enemies determined to come after us. In n

5h

There’s a Huge, Angry Backlash Against Fake Meat

Fake meat is having a huge moment right now. With massive financial gains , brands like Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are creating an entirely new — and thriving — market. But not everybody is on board with veggie burgers that aren’t entirely “veggie,” as Vox reports , with critics arguing that fake meat is unhealthy and go against the idea of consuming “whole,” GMO-free foods. CEOs of major c

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From 'weirdo' PhD stargazer to Nobel Physics laureate

As a student astronomer scanning the skies with homemade instruments a quarter of a century ago, Didier Queloz spent months doubting the data that led him to an inescapable conclusion: he'd just discovered the first planet outside Earth's solar system.

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Study reveals limitations of method for determining protein structure

A new study by chemists at the University of Arkansas shows that X-ray crystallography, the standard method for determining the structure of proteins, can provide inaccurate information about a critical set of proteins—those found in cell membranes—which in turn could be leading to poor and inefficient drug design.

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Cheap as chips: identifying plant genes to ensure food security

An international team of scientists led by the University of Goettingen has developed a new approach that enables researchers to more efficiently identify the genes that control plant traits. This method will enable plant breeders and scientists to develop more affordable, desirable, and sustainable plant varieties. The application will be most valuable for the fruit, vegetable and grain crops tha

5h

Study reveals limitations of method for determining protein structure

A new study by chemists at the University of Arkansas shows that X-ray crystallography, the standard method for determining the structure of proteins, can provide inaccurate information about a critical set of proteins—those found in cell membranes—which in turn could be leading to poor and inefficient drug design.

5h

Cheap as chips: identifying plant genes to ensure food security

An international team of scientists led by the University of Goettingen has developed a new approach that enables researchers to more efficiently identify the genes that control plant traits. This method will enable plant breeders and scientists to develop more affordable, desirable, and sustainable plant varieties. The application will be most valuable for the fruit, vegetable and grain crops tha

5h

Many Europeans relatively unhappy with their employment status

Temporary or informally employed people are less satisfied with their lives than those with a permanent job. The most apparent differences can be seen in countries with strict labour laws. Tatiana Karabchuk and Natalia Soboleva from HSE University investigated the legislative impact on the social well-being of employed populations in European countries and Russia.

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Study of past California wildfire activity suggest climate change will worsen future fires

In the wake of recent wildfires that have ravaged northern and central California, a new study finds that the severity of fire activity in the Sierra Nevada region has been sensitive to changes in climate over the past 1,400 years. The findings, published in Environmental Research Letters, suggest that future climate change is likely to drive increased fire activity in the Sierras.

5h

Sweet corn growers, processors could dramatically increase yield, profit

In an industry struggling to maintain profitability, it's curious that U.S. processing sweet corn—the corn that ends up in cans and freezer bags—is falling so far below its potential. Yet, that's what a new study in PLOS ONE clearly demonstrates.

5h

Identifying a cyanobacterial gene family that helps control photosynthesis

A new Michigan State University study has identified a family of genes in cyanobacteria that help control carbon dioxide fixation.

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Forward or backward? New pathways for protons in water or methanol

A collaborative ultrafast spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations study shows that proton vacancies in the form of hydroxide/methoxide ions are as relevant for proton transfer between acids and bases as hydrated excess protons (H3O+, H5O2+), thus pointing for a clear demand for refinement of the microscopic picture for aqueous proton transport—in solution as well as in hydrogen f

5h

Cooling nanotube resonators with electrons

Mechanical resonators have been used with great success as new resources in quantum technology. Carbon nanotube mechanical resonators have shown to be excellent ultra-high sensitive devices for the study of new physical phenomena at the nanoscale level (e.g. spin physics, quantum electron transport, surface science, and light-matter interaction).

5h

When laying their eggs, tobacco hawkmoths avoid plants that smell of caterpillar feces

Ovipositing insects use odor cues to select suitable food substrates for their offspring in order to increase the survival rates of the larvae. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology demonstrated that not only may plant odors determine the best oviposition site, but also the frass of other larvae of the same species. They specified the repelling substance in the feces of tob

5h

App endgame: Detect dyslexia earlier

Dyslexia makes reading a struggle for millions of people, but the learning disability is rarely diagnosed before age seven. Now, a team of educators and scientists led by UConn professors has made a game-like app that could help teachers identify younger kids at risk.

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Believing in climate change doesn't mean you are preparing for climate change, study finds

Believing in climate change has no effect on whether or not coastal homeowners are protecting their homes from climate change-related hazards, according to a new study from the University of Notre Dame.

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Doom Eternal joins this year’s game-delay club, will launch March 2020

For some reason, id Software is also delaying this year's port of 1997's Doom 64.

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Mirror’s $40 Personal Training Sessions Sound Like a Deal but Here’s the Catch

It is a universal truth that personal trainers can be an expensive part of a fitness routine. To get around that, Mirror—that at-home, interactive mirror/LCD screen you see ads for everywhere—is …

5h

Was Heidi the Octopus Really Dreaming?

They’re far from us on the tree of life, and their brains are very different, and some scientists say we should take care before we assume that cephalopods sleep like we do.

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Sweet corn growers, processors could dramatically increase yield, profit

In an industry struggling to maintain profitability, it's curious that U.S. processing sweet corn—the corn that ends up in cans and freezer bags—is falling so far below its potential. Yet, that's what a new study in PLOS ONE clearly demonstrates.

5h

Identifying a cyanobacterial gene family that helps control photosynthesis

A new Michigan State University study has identified a family of genes in cyanobacteria that help control carbon dioxide fixation.

5h

When laying their eggs, tobacco hawkmoths avoid plants that smell of caterpillar feces

Ovipositing insects use odor cues to select suitable food substrates for their offspring in order to increase the survival rates of the larvae. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology demonstrated that not only may plant odors determine the best oviposition site, but also the frass of other larvae of the same species. They specified the repelling substance in the feces of tob

5h

Report: Wildfires threaten California's progress in cutting greenhouse gases

The wildfires that raged last year from Paradise to Malibu made for California's deadliest, most destructive fire season on record.

5h

New large-sized insect species discovered in tropical forest

Scientists at the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland have studied the diversity of tropical parasitoid wasps for years. Parasitoid wasps are among the most species rich animal taxa on Earth, but their tropical diversity is still poorly known. Recently, the research group sampled Afrotropical rhyssine wasps, which are among the largest wasps. Scientists from three countries and

5h

New large-sized insect species discovered in tropical forest

Scientists at the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland have studied the diversity of tropical parasitoid wasps for years. Parasitoid wasps are among the most species rich animal taxa on Earth, but their tropical diversity is still poorly known. Recently, the research group sampled Afrotropical rhyssine wasps, which are among the largest wasps. Scientists from three countries and

5h

Pressure runs high at edge of solar system

Out at the boundary of our solar system, pressure runs high. This pressure, the force plasma, magnetic fields and particles like ions, cosmic rays and electrons exert on one another when they flow and collide, was recently measured by scientists in totality for the first time — and it was found to be greater than expected.

5h

Joe Biden Won’t Be the Last Target

President Donald Trump has now urged both Ukraine and China to launch investigations of the Biden family. More than 60 percent of Americans disapprove of this behavior. But millions of Trump-aligned voters don’t seem to think he did anything wrong. They correctly perceive that Hunter Biden showed poor moral character by accepting a large salary to sit on the board of a Ukrainian energy company th

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Accidental discovery of strong and unbreakable molecular switch

An organic material that can repeatedly change shape without breaking would have many useful applications, such as artificial muscles, pumps or as a switch. Physicists accidentally discovered a material with that property.

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Rare 'Lazarus superconductivity' observed in promising, rediscovered material

A team of researchers has observed a rare phenomenon called re-entrant superconductivity in the material uranium ditelluride. Nicknamed 'Lazarus superconductivity,' the phenomenon occurs when a superconducting state arises, breaks down, then re-emerges in a material due to a change in a specific parameter — in this case, the application of a very strong magnetic field. The discovery furthers the

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The effectiveness of electrical stimulation in producing spinal fusion

Researchers performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of published data on the effect of electrical stimulation therapies on spinal fusion. They found significant improvement overall in the rates of bone fusion following a course of electrical stimulation in both preclinical (animal) and clinical (human) studies.

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Regular exercise is good for your heart, no matter how old you are!

Regular exercise is highly beneficial for all patients with cardiovascular disease regardless of age, report investigators. Their results showed that the patients who benefited most from cardiac rehabilitation were those who started out with the greatest physical impairment.

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Novel, high-performance diodes and transistors

Today's computer processors are increasingly pushed to their limits due to their physical properties. Novel materials could be the solution. Physicists have investigated if and how these materials might be developed. They have created, tested and filed a patent for a concept that utilizes the latest findings from the field of spintronics.

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Rice irrigation worsened landslides in deadliest earthquake of 2018

Irrigation significantly exacerbated the earthquake-triggered landslides in Palu, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, in 2018, according to an international study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists.

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Modern family roles improve life satisfaction for parents

Increased equality has a positive effect on mothers and fathers. Thanks to greater freedom to strike an individual balance between caring for children and working in paid employment, mothers and fathers today are happier with their lives than parents were 20 or 30 years ago, a study by sociologists at the University of Zurich has shown.

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Trump Takes Aim at the 'Open Skies' Cold War Treaty With Russia

The Open Skies treaty has provided invaluable intelligence for its 34 signatory countries. Now Donald Trump reportedly wants out.

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Play May Be a Deeper Part of Human Nature Than We Thought

An animal study brings us closer to understanding our own behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Four Loko continues to wreak havoc among young drinkers

Supersized alcopops — such as Four Loko — are sugary high alcohol beverages containing up to 5.5 standard drinks of alcohol in one 23.5 oz. can. Two studies led by Dr. Matthew Rossheim at George Mason's College of Health and Human Services found most students who drank Four Loko did so while underage, many blacked out or vomited, and most grossly underestimated its alcohol content despite new ma

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Study reveals limitations of method for determining protein structure

A new study by chemists at the University of Arkansas shows that X-ray crystallography, the standard method for determining the structure of proteins, can provide inaccurate information about membrane proteins, which in turn could lead to poor and inefficient drug design.

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Need to balance guides development of limb-body coordination

The need to feel balanced drives the development of coordination between body and limbs as zebrafish larvae learn to swim, a new study finds.

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How can ultrasonic brain stimulation cure brain diseases?

IBS scientists found a calcium channel expressed in astrocytes in the brain to be a highly sensitive target for LILFU-induced neuronal activity in the motor cortex, such as tail movement.

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How to keep cool in a blackout during a heatwave

If there is no power for air-conditioning, and tap water is the only resource available, spreading it across the skin is the best way to prevent the body overheating irrespective of the climate, according to a new study from the University of Sydney.

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Tau-mediated RNA splicing errors linked to Alzheimer's disease

A collaborative study provides evidence for a new molecular cause for neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease that links alterations in RNA splicing and tau-mediated neurodegeneration.

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Experimental growth factor shows promise for treating knee osteoarthritis

A new experimental growth factor therapy appears to prevent a worsening of osteoarthritis by increasing the thickness of cartilage in the knee joint and preventing further loss, according to results from an early clinical trial that were published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Developing electrically active materials to repair damaged hearts

When a heart attack occurs, muscle in the heart tissue can be scarred, interfering with electrical activity necessary for healthy heart function. Using artificial materials to patch or rebuild damaged parts has been tried but only recently has work focused on the electrical properties needed for proper cardiac operation. In this week's APL Bioengineering, investigators review the use of electrical

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Stabilizing multilayer flows may improve transportation of heavy oils

During the past 20 years, the oil industry has begun to transition away from light oils toward heavier oils. But transporting heavy oils cost-effectively is a challenge because heavy oils are viscous — essentially a thick, sticky and semifluid mess. One way to outmaneuver this problem, reported in Physics of Fluids, is a viscoplastic lubrication technique. It can complement existing methods to st

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Mapping normal breast development to better understand cancer

Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers, and some forms rank among the most difficult to treat. Its various types and involvement of many different cells makes targeting such tumors difficult. Now, Salk Institute researchers have used a state-of-the-art technology to profile each cell during normal breast development in order to understand what goes wrong in cancer.

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Researchers find global ocean methane emissions dominated by shallow coastal waters

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that is being added to the atmosphere through both natural processes and human activities, such as energy production and agriculture.

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Rice irrigation worsened landslides in deadliest earthquake of 2018

Irrigation significantly exacerbated the earthquake-triggered landslides in Palu, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, in 2018, according to an international study.

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The story of thalidomide continues

An international study has unveiled a detailed view of how thalidomide, one of the most notorious drugs ever developed, causes abnormalities in limb and ear development. The findings may contribute to the re-emergence of safe, or non-teratogenic, thalidomide-derived drugs as a treatment for cancer and inflammatory diseases.

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New mechanism in the liver helps prevent invasive fungal infections

An expert in intravital microscopy is making breakthroughs in invasive fungal infections. He has discovered a pathway by which liver macrophages capture fungi before dissemination to target organs like the brain. This not only provides an explanation as to why individuals with liver disease have enhanced risk of fungal infection, but also points to therapeutic options to prevent these infections,

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Accidental discovery of strong and unbreakable molecular switch

An organic material that can repeatedly change shape without breaking would have many useful applications, such as artificial muscles, pumps or as a switch. Physicists accidentally discovered a material with that property.

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Scientists discover new antibiotic in tropical forest

Scientists have discovered an antibiotic produced by a soil bacterium from a Mexican tropical forest that may help lead to a 'plant probiotic,' more robust plants and other antibiotics. Probiotics, which provide friendlier bacteria and health benefits for humans, can also be beneficial to plants, keeping them healthy and more robust. The new antibiotic, known as phazolicin, prevents harmful bacter

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Heat waves could increase substantially in size by mid-century

Scientists found that by mid-century, in a middle greenhouse emissions scenario, the average size of heat waves could increase by 50%. Under high greenhouse gas concentrations, the average size could increase by 80% and the more extreme heat waves could more than double in size.

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Rare 'Lazarus superconductivity' observed in promising, rediscovered material

A team of researchers has observed a rare phenomenon called re-entrant superconductivity in the material uranium ditelluride. Nicknamed 'Lazarus superconductivity,' the phenomenon occurs when a superconducting state arises, breaks down, then re-emerges in a material due to a change in a specific parameter — in this case, the application of a very strong magnetic field. The discovery furthers the

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Common denominator that triggers asthma in favorable environments

Some so-called pro-allergic environments strongly promote the development of asthma and are responsible for the dramatic increase in the prevalence of asthma, especially in industrialized countries. Researchers at the GIGA of the University of Liège have identified how all these pro-allergic environments act in the same way on the pulmonary immune system to induce the development of allergic asthm

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A Lesson for Ravens: Don’t Eat the Tortoises

Tim Shields didn’t see any young tortoises himself. For the most part, the only sign of them was their shells, desiccated and punctured, scattered around the landscape and piled under the occasional Joshua tree. He was working on a long-term monitoring project in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts, where over the past few decades juvenile tortoises had all but disappeared from the study areas. This p

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Play May Be a Deeper Part of Human Nature Than We Thought

An animal study brings us closer to understanding our own behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sweet corn growers, processors could dramatically increase yield, profit

In an industry struggling to maintain profitability, it's curious that U.S. processing sweet corn – the corn that ends up in cans and freezer bags – is falling so far below its potential. Yet, that's what a new study clearly demonstrates.

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Study of past California wildfire activity suggest climate change will worsen future fires

A new study finds that climate has been the dominant controller of wildfire activity in the Sierra Nevada region of the past 1,400 years, suggesting that future climate change is poised to make fires worse.

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Forward or backward? New pathways for protons in water or methanol

A collaborative ultrafast spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations study shows that proton vacancies in the form of hydroxide/methoxide ions are as relevant for proton transfer between acids and bases as hydrated excess protons, thus pointing for a clear demand for refinement of the microscopic picture for aqueous proton transport – in solution as well as in hydrogen fuel cells or

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Så kan allergi tränas bort

I dag finns allergivacciner för de allra svårast drabbade av pollen- och pälsdjursallergi. Men att komma till rätta med matallergier har visat sig betydligt svårare. Rådet som ges till matallergiker är att helt undvika de livsmedel, eller allergener, som ger en reaktion. Något som kan ge en ständig rädsla för en allergireaktion. Men de senaste årtiondena har ny forskning gett mjölk, ägg- och jord

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Creating a single phonon in ambient conditions

EPFL physicists have for the first time successfully observed a single quantum of vibrational energy at ambient conditions, involving the oscillation of more than 100 billion atoms. The work opens up new possibilities for the study of quantum phenomena and ultrafast quantum technologies at room temperature.

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Cheap as chips: identifying plant genes to ensure food security

An international team of scientists led by the University of Goettingen has developed a new approach enabling researchers to more efficiently identify the genes that control plant traits. This method will enable plant breeders and scientists to develop more affordable, desirable, and sustainable plant varieties. The application will be most valuable for the fruit, vegetable and grain crops that ar

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Relatively unhappy

Temporary or informally employed people are less satisfied with their lives than those with a permanent job. The most apparent differences can be seen in countries with strict labour laws. Tatiana Karabchuk and Natalia Soboleva from HSE University investigated the legislative impact on the social well-being of employed populations in European countries and Russia. https://link.springer.com/article

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New large-sized insect species discovered in tropical forest

Scientists at the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland have studied the diversity of tropical parasitoid wasps for years. Parasitoid wasps are among the most species rich animal taxa on Earth, but their tropical diversity is still poorly known. Recently, the research group sampled Afrotropical rhyssine wasps, which are among the largest wasps. Scientists from three countries and

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Unlocking the secrets of gallstones

How gallstones are formed in the body was previously unknown, despite the fact that they are among the ten most common reasons for a stay in hospital. The secret behind gallstones has now been revealed by a team of researchers at the Department of Medicine 1 and 3 at Universitätsklinikum Erlangen at FAU. The

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Melanoma variability at the single-cell level predicts treatment responses

In a new study published in EBioMedicine, researchers with Moffitt Cancer Center's Donald A. Adam Melanoma and Skin Cancer Center of Excellence reveal that differences at the single-cell level can predict responses to initial BRAF inhibitor therapy, and that leveraging these differences may improve patient outcomes.

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Using machine learning to understand climate change

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas added to the atmosphere through both natural and human activities. To predict the impacts of human emissions, researchers need a complete picture of the methane cycle. University of Rochester researchers used data science to determine how much methane is emitted from the ocean into the atmosphere each year. Their results fill a longstanding gap in methane cycle r

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Study of past California wildfire activity suggest climate change will worsen future fires

A new study finds that climate has been the dominant controller of wildfire activity in the Sierra Nevada region of the past 1,400 years, suggesting that future climate change is poised to make fires worse.

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Lyt selv: Støj fra sorte huller støtter Einsteins relativitetsteori

Nye analyser af tyngdebølge-data fra kollisionen af to sorte huller bekræfter Einsteins almene relativitetsteori ved påvisning af det såkaldte ’no hair’-teorem.

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Stabilizing multilayer flows may improve transportation of heavy oils

During the past 20 years, the oil industry has begun a gradual transition away from light oils, which are being consumed progressively, toward heavier oils. But transporting heavy oils cost-effectively is a big challenge because heavy oils are viscous—essentially a thick, sticky and semifluid mess.

6h

Developing electrically active materials to repair damaged hearts

When a heart attack occurs, muscle in the heart tissue can be scarred, interfering with electrical activity necessary for healthy heart function. Drug treatments are available that alleviate further damage, but these don't lead to tissue regeneration. Using artificial materials to patch or rebuild damaged parts has been tried but only recently has work focused on the electrical properties needed f

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4D printing makes lattice that turns into a face

A new 4D-printing technique uses latticework composed of multiple materials that grow or shrink in response to environmental changes, finally making the most complex shape changes possible. Over the past decade, scientists have found inspiration in nature—like the way that plants and flowers unfurl their leaves and blooms—as they have sought to develop new materials and techniques for 3D and 4D p

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Robots are mass-producing the meal of the future: insects

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Artificial womb: Dutch researchers given €2.9m to develop prototype

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Watch what would happen if all the ice on Earth melted overnight

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WiFi system identifies people through walls by their walk

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China’s path to AI domination has a problem: brain drain

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Developing electrically active materials to repair damaged hearts

When a heart attack occurs, muscle in the heart tissue can be scarred, interfering with electrical activity necessary for healthy heart function. Drug treatments are available that alleviate further damage, but these don't lead to tissue regeneration. Using artificial materials to patch or rebuild damaged parts has been tried but only recently has work focused on the electrical properties needed f

6h

Mahatma Gandhi and sustainable science

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03010-8 The champion of India’s freedom movement was an innovator and supporter of sustainable science.

6h

Too many medications? This tool says which ones can go

An electronic tool called MedSafer could help doctors and pharmacists reduce medication overload among elderly patients, research finds. Elderly people often take multiple prescription medications for different health conditions. While some medications are needed, polypharmacy and medication overload can be costly and even harmful. However, reducing the number of potentially inappropriate medicat

6h

Sweet corn growers, processors could dramatically increase yield, profit

In an industry struggling to maintain profitability, it's curious that U.S. processing sweet corn – the corn that ends up in cans and freezer bags – is falling so far below its potential. Yet, that's what a new study in PLOS One clearly demonstrates.

6h

Maternal obesity hastens offspring aging, increasing diabetes & heart disease likelihood

New research in The Journal of Physiology has shown that the effects of maternal obesity even pass across generations to offspring, accelerating the rate of aging of metabolic problems that occur in normal life.

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‘Satellite Babies’ Are Raised Abroad, Then Return to the U.S.—And Their Parents

When Misty Ouyang returned to her parents’ home in the United States as a toddler, she’d forgotten who her mom was. Ouyang, now a 21-year-old senior at Boston University, spent the first four years of her life with extended family in Fuzhou, China. “I remember when my grandma told me I was going back to the United States, I didn’t understand why and was very scared,” she recalls. “I didn’t want t

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The transformative power of video games | Herman Narula

A full third of the world's population — 2.6 billion people — play video games, plugging into massive networks of interaction that have opened up opportunities well beyond entertainment. In a talk about the future of the medium, entrepreneur Herman Narula makes the case for a new understanding of gaming — one that includes the power to create new worlds, connect people and shape the economy.

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New thyroid cancer test is faster and more accurate

A new preoperative test for thyroid cancer is faster and about two-thirds more accurate than the diagnostic tests doctors use today, report researchers. Although more validation will be necessary before doctors can use it clinically, the new metabolic thyroid test shows promise for preventing thousands of unnecessary thyroid removals each year, such as the partial removal Amanda Helms had due to

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Dual approach needed to save sinking cities and bleaching corals

Local conservation can boost the climate resilience of coastal ecosystems, species and cities and buy them time in their fight against sea-level rise, ocean acidification and warming temperatures, a study by scientists suggests. In all but extreme situations, these interventions significantly buffer the impacts of climate change and can buy sinking cities and bleaching corals time to adapt until t

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Modified quantum dots capture more energy from light and lose less to heat

Scientists have synthesized magnetically-doped quantum dots that capture the kinetic energy of electrons created by ultraviolet light before it's wasted as heat.

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Nobel in Physics for Exoplanets and Cosmology

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to James Peebles "for theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology" and to Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz "for the discovery of an exoplanet orbiting a solar-type star."

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Dual approach needed to save sinking cities and bleaching corals

Local conservation can boost the climate resilience of coastal ecosystems, species and cities and buy them time in their fight against sea-level rise, ocean acidification and warming temperatures, a study by scientists suggests. In all but extreme situations, these interventions significantly buffer the impacts of climate change and can buy sinking cities and bleaching corals time to adapt until t

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Machine learning helps plant science turn over a new leaf

Researchers have developed machine-learning algorithms that teach a computer system to analyze three-dimensional shapes of the branches and leaves of a plant. The study may help scientists better quantify how plants respond to climate change, genetic mutations or other factors.

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Initiating breastfeeding in vulnerable infants

The benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and child are well-recognized, including for late preterm infants (LPI). But because LPI do not have fully developed brains, they may experience difficulties latching and/or sustaining a latch on the breast to have milk transfer occur. This means that these infants are at high risk for formula supplementation and/or discontinuation of breastfeeding.

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Modified quantum dots capture more energy from light and lose less to heat

Scientists have synthesized magnetically-doped quantum dots that capture the kinetic energy of electrons created by ultraviolet light before it's wasted as heat.

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Meningioma molecular profile reliably predicts tumor recurrence

Researchers report tumor's molecular profiles that might better predict meningioma recurrence.

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A cool alternative to air conditioning

An inexpensive passive cooling technology could be used to cool buildings in cities, reducing energy consumption.

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Cooling nanotube resonators with electrons

In a study in Nature Physics, ICFO researchers report on a technique that uses electron transport to cool a nanomechanical resonator near the quantum regime.

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Identifying a cyanobacterial gene family that helps control photosynthesis

A new Michigan State University study has identified a family of genes in cyanobacteria that help control carbon dioxide fixation.

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Believing in climate change doesn't mean you are preparing for climate change, study finds

Notre Dame researchers found that although coastal homeowners may perceive a worsening of climate change-related hazards, these attitudes are largely unrelated to a homeowner's expectations of actual home damage.

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WVU-led study reveals uptick in suicide and fatal drug overdoses among blacks, Hispanics, women

New research from Ian Rockett, professor emeritus of the WVU School of Public Health, shows that suicides among blacks, Hispanics and women are underreported.

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New addiction treatments hold promise for stemming the opioid crisis, scientists say

Concerns over the opioid epidemic have sparked a strong scientific interest in why some people become addicted while others don't. Now, researchers are proposing novel treatment strategies that could help prevent abuse of opioids and other substances.

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Forward or backward? New pathways for protons in water or methanol

A collaborative ultrafast spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations study shows that proton vacancies in the form of hydroxide/methoxide ions are as relevant for proton transfer between acids and bases as hydrated excess protons, thus pointing for a clear demand for refinement of the microscopic picture for aqueous proton transport – in solution as well as in hydrogen fuel cells or

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Severe allergic reactions identified with peripherally inserted central catheters

Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) that use a magnetized tip to guide insertion were associated with serious allergic reactions in patients, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Severe adverse reactions occurred in patients within minutes of PICC insertion.

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Canada’s next prime minister must commit to a sustainable future

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03009-1 Justin Trudeau’s Liberal Party has struggled to live up to its promises on the environment. Whoever wins the coming election can and must do better.

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Læger om lang ventetid på patientklager: Frygteligt frustrerende

Det skader muligheden for at lære af fejl, når der går langt over et år med at behandle patienternes klagesager, påpeger lægeformand. Den lange ventetid bliver ikke løst foreløbigt, svarer direktøren for Styrelsen for Patientklager.

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Fully Operational F-16 Fighter for Sale in Florida

Flying high-performance fighter jets usually requires years of training and successful navigation of military bureaucracy. Right now, it just requires about $8.5 million to buy a fully operational F-16 fighter that’s on sale in Florida . That’s maybe a bit simplistic — you’d also have to adhere to onerous government regulations that control access to military aircraft. In essence, it would cost m

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Can Preventing Seizures Alter the Course of Autism?

Experimental surgeries to prevent seizures may help scientists understand the link between autism and epilepsy.

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Costs of natural disasters are increasing at the high end

While the economic cost of natural disasters has not increased much on average, averages can be deceptive. The costs of major disasters like hurricanes Katrina, Maria and Dorian or the massive tornado swarms in the Midwest have increased to a disproportionately larger extent than those of lesser events, and these major disasters have become far more expensive, according to an international team of

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Predicting terror activity before it happens

Data scientist have developed a model that utilizes publicly available data to accurately predict how lethal a terror organization will become in the future based on only its first 10 attacks.

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How Old Is Your Brain? This AI Can Tell You

Delaying “brain age” may sound like the latest quick-fix gimmick on a late-night infomercial, but the science underlying the concept is very real. Rather than reflecting the average functional state of your chronological age, brain age looks at how well your brain is aging relative to how many birthdays you’ve celebrated. We all know people that seem sharper and act much younger than their age—th

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Modern family roles improve life satisfaction for parents

Increased equality has a positive effect on mothers and fathers. Thanks to greater freedom to strike an individual balance between caring for children and working in paid employment, mothers and fathers today are happier with their lives than parents were 20 or 30 years ago, a study by sociologists at the University of Zurich has shown.

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Rice irrigation worsened landslides in deadliest earthquake of 2018 finds NTU study

Irrigation significantly exacerbated the earthquake-triggered landslides in Palu, on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, in 2018, according to an international study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists.

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Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded for Studies of Earth’s Place in the Universe

The cosmologist James Peebles split the prize with two astronomers, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, for work the Nobel judges said “transformed our ideas about the cosmos.”

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Här är Nobelpriset i fysik – på en minut

Tre forskare tilldelas i år Nobelpriset i fysik, som delas upp i två delar. Den ena halvan går till två personer som upptäckte den första exoplaneten – och den andra har, ja vaddå? SVT sammanfattar årets Nobelpristagare tillsammans med vetenskapsnyheternas Victoria Dyring.

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Danfoss-bossens selskab vil generere strøm af saltvand fra oversvømmet gaslager

Selskabet Saltpower har søgt om tilladelse til at udnytte vandet fra en saltkaverne i et gaslager nord for Viborg til at demonstrere, at osmotisk tryk kan lave grøn strøm. Men de lokale er skeptiske over for at udlede vandet til en beskyttet del af Limfjorden.

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Vatten i den beboeliga zonen

Med hjälp av ett instrument på rymdteleskopet Hubble observerade forskare en planet 111 ljusår från jorden, medan den gjorde åtta passager framför sin stjärna. Efter noggranna analyser kunde forskarna se att planetens atmosfär absorberar en del av stjärnans ljus just vid de våglängder som motsvarar vattenmolekylers vibration. Det finns alltså vattenånga i atmosfären. Planeten kallas K2-18 b. Den h

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Nobelpris för upptäckter om universum

Vad består universum av? Och finns det andra planetsystem som det vi lever i? Sådana frågor kittlar de flestas fantasi och förundran, och de är huvudfrågorna bakom årets Nobelpris i fysik.

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Prenatal stress could affect baby's brain, say researchers

New research from King's College London has found that maternal stress before and during pregnancy could affect a baby's brain development.

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A close up on the real world — atomic migration under ambient conditions

Osaka University researchers have reported an environmental transmission electron microscopy technique that has allowed in situ visualization of the atomic changes of a metal surface in an electric field under ambient conditions. The activation of oxygen gas molecules by electron tunneling was found to result in atomic migration that could be followed progressively. It is hoped that the tunneling-

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When laying their eggs, tobacco hawkmoths avoid plants that smell of caterpillar feces

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology demonstrated that not only plant odors determine the best oviposition site for egglaying hawkmoths, but also the frass of other larvae. They specified the repelling substance in the feces which signals the presence of competing conspecifics. Moreover, the researchers identified an odorant receptor which is involved in the detection of t

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Children's language skills may be harmed by social hardship

Children from disadvantaged backgrounds are three times more likely to develop difficulties with language than those from more affluent areas, research suggests.

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New study challenges our understanding of premature ageing

Disturbances in the function of mitochondrial DNA can accelerate the ageing process in ways that are different than previously thought, according to a new Finnish study published in Nature Metabolism. Offering a new perspective to ageing, the researchers suggest that accelerated ageing is the result of abnormal cell nucleotide levels and compromised nuclear DNA maintenance. The study was conducted

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New approach for modern power grids that increases efficiency, reduces cost

SUTD worked with International Researchers to develop a novel approach to allow for a small, well-defined risk of constraint violation to overcome the challenges that come with conservative current approaches used in modern power grids.

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The science of 'Breaking Bad': Would you know if meth was cooked inside your house?

Researchers analysed the contamination levels in household items from a home suspected to have previously been used for cooking methamphetamine, to determine whether surface wipe samples can adequately establish contamination and define the health risks.Results demonstrate methamphetamine has continued to mobilize after manufacture for a period exceeding five years when the property was under new

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Future intent: Would you let an automated car do the driving?

Researchers have surveyed more than 2000 drivers across Australia, France and Sweden for two separate studies investigating what people think about travelling in automated cars. The first international study found French drivers were more likely to one day buy an automated car than drivers in Australia or Sweden. The second study surveyed local Queensland drivers and identified what they saw as th

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High thermoelectric performance in low-cost SnS0.91Se0.09 crystals

Thermoelectric materials technology can convert between heat and electricity within a materials construct, but many existing materials contain rare or toxic elements. In a new study on Science, Wenke He and colleagues reported the temperature dependent interplay between three separate electronic bands in hole-doped tin sulfide (SnS) crystals. The materials behaviour allowed synergistic optimizatio

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2019 Nobel Prize in Physics: Evolution of the universe and discovery of exoplanet orbiting solar-type star

This year's Nobel Prize in Physics is being awarded "for contributions to our understanding of the evolution of the universe and Earth's place in the cosmos," with one half to James Peebles "for theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology" and the other half jointly to Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz "for the discovery of an exoplanet orbiting a solar-type star."

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Two meteor showers peak this week: The Draconids and the Southern Taurids

A skywatcher's doubleheader is on tap this week as a pair of meteor showers will peak on back-to-back nights.

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The White House Abused the Classification System

In 1975, Congress established the first intelligence oversight committees. The Watergate break-in had prompted a constitutional crisis, and in the course of investigating Watergate, Congress realized that it had an urgent need to review classified documents and activities in order to serve as a check on a president who was willing to use the nation’s intelligence agencies to investigate his polit

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Hjärtinfarktspatienter som har hund lever längre

Att hundägande förknippas med bättre hälsa i Sverige har en forskargrupp vid Uppsala universitet visat även i tidigare studier t. Bland annat visade de 2017 visade de bland annat att hundägande var kopplat till lägre dödlighet generellt. I en ny studie använde forskargruppen information från det svenska Patientregistret tillsammans med Jordbruksverkets hundägarregister och Svenska Kennelklubbens

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The Physics Nobel Goes to the Big Bang and Exoplanets

James Peebles, Michel Mayor, and Didier Queloz share the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics for their discoveries of the universe beyond our solar system.

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A window for trap-free charge transport in organic semiconductors

Organic semiconductors, a class of carbon-based materials with optical and electronic properties, are now commonly used to fabricate a variety of devices, including solar cells, light-emitting diodes and field-effect transistors. These semiconducting materials can exhibit a characteristic known as highly unipolar charge transport, which essentially means that they predominantly conduct either elec

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Exoplanets: tantalising search for life beyond the solar system

This year's Nobel Prize for Physics honoured Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, Swiss astronomers who proved the existence of a planet orbiting a star far beyond the Earth's solar system.

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Giant Molecules Exist in Two Places at Once in Unprecedented Quantum Experiment

The new study demonstrates a bizarre quantum effect at never-before-seen scales — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hundreds of Interstellar Objects May Visit Our Solar System Each Year

New research suggests the interstellar interlopers may indicate the presence of a vast number of as yet undetected giant exoplanets. Oumuamua_topNteaser.jpg An artist’s impression of the interstellar object 'Oumuamua. Image credits: ESA/Hubble, NASA, ESO, M. Kornmesser Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Space Tuesday, October 8, 2019 – 09:15 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — In 2017, a

8h

CTE risk goes up 30% for each year of playing football

For every year of absorbing the pounding and repeated head collisions that come with playing football, a person’s risk of developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy increases by 30%, according to new research. For every 2.6 years of play, the risk of developing the condition doubles, the study finds. These new findings from an analysis of 266 deceased former amateur and professional football pla

8h

Faster method spots anatomy to protect from radiation

CT scans help identify organs at risk of injury from radiation therapy. A new automated technique uses a deep-learning algorithm to make the process easier. Radiation therapy is one of the most widely used cancer treatments, but a drawback of the procedure is that it can cause collateral damage to healthy tissue in proximity to cancerous growths. The work appears in Nature Machine Intelligence .

8h

A simple way to control swarming molecular machines

The swarming behavior of about 100 million molecular machines can be controlled by applying simple mechanical stimuli such as extension and contraction. This method could lead to the development of new swarming molecular machines and small energy-saving devices.

8h

Ancient Maya canals and fields show early and extensive impacts on tropical forests

New evidence in Belize shows the ancient Maya responded to population and environmental pressures by creating massive agricultural features in wetlands, potentially increasing atmospheric CO2 and methane through burn events and farming, according to geographical research.

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Early humans evolved in ecosystems unlike any found today

To understand the environmental pressures that shaped human evolution, scientists must reconstruct the ecosystems in which they lived. Because putting together the puzzle of millions-of-years-old ecosystems is a difficult task, many studies draw analogies with present-day African ecosystems, such as the Serengeti. A new study calls into question such approaches and suggests that the vast majority

8h

Bad News: Vaping Nicotine Linked to Lung Cancer in Mice

Heads up, vape nation: there’s a chance that ripping some fat nicotine-infused clouds could end up giving you cancer. In a landmark study funded by the National Institutes of Health, researchers at New York University found that e-cigarette vapor causes lung cancer and maybe even bladder cancer in mice, as CNBC reports . It’s the first time a study has found concrete links between nicotine vaping

8h

Smaller than a coin

ETH researchers have developed a compact infrared spectrometer. It's small enough to fit on a computer chip but can still open up interesting possibilities — in space and in everyday life.

8h

SwRI hypersonic research spotlights future flight challenges

Southwest Research Institute engineers are advancing what researchers know about hypersonic flight. A new study presented at the 2019 Joint Army-Navy-NASA-Air Force (JANNAF) Propulsion Meeting describes a series of tests conducted at SwRI's San Antonio headquarters that elucidate the conditions a future aircraft may experience traveling faster than 10 times the speed of sound.

8h

A simple way to control swarming molecular machines

The swarming behavior of about 100 million molecular machines can be controlled by applying simple mechanical stimuli such as extension and contraction. This method could lead to the development of new swarming molecular machines and small energy-saving devices.

8h

Scientists have identified the presence of cancer-suppressing cells in pancreatic cancer

Researchers have identified cells containing a protein called Meflin that has a role in restraining the progression of pancreatic cancer. They have also shown that cancer progression can be controlled by artificially increasing the amount of this protein in the cells. These findings could lead to the development of new therapies against pancreatic cancer.

8h

New 'supercondensers' store electric charge in textile materials

Researchers of the Alcoi campus of Valencia's Polytechnic University (UPV) have developed new devices that store electric charge in textile materials, which could be used to, for example, charge our mobile phone. They are supercondensers placed on active carbon tissues that stand out due to their electric properties and high level of power. Their work has been published in the European Polymer Jou

8h

The Flawed Glory of the Replacements’ Don’t Tell a Soul

The legendary alt-rock group the Replacements was formed in 1979 as a ramshackle outfit led by a smart-ass Minneapolis janitor named Paul Westerberg. At the time, punk was the least commercial music you could make, with the movement’s biggest acts, such as the Ramones and The Clash, beginning to embrace more conventional rock sounds. Minneapolis felt as far as you could get, culturally speaking,

8h

Why Everything Is Getting Louder

K arthic Thallikar first noticed the noise sometime in late 2014, back when he still enjoyed taking walks around his neighborhood. He’d been living with his wife and two kids in the Brittany Heights subdivision in Chandler, Arizona, for two years by then, in a taupe two-story house that Thallikar had fallen in love with on his first visit. The double-height ceilings made it seem airy and expansiv

8h

I Nobelprisets fotspår: Jakten på exoplaneter har bara börjat

Fram till 1995 fanns inga kända planeter som kretsade kring vanliga stjärnor utanför solsystemet – exoplaneter. Nu känner vi till tusentals, och nya upptäcks nästan dagligen. Innan vi hade något att jämföra med trodde de flesta forskare att andra planetsystem skulle likna vårt: steniga planeter närmast stjärnan, några av dem kanske med atmosfärer som jorden och Venus. Längre ut gasjättar som mest

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Doris Lessing at 100: roving time and space

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02992-9 On the centenary of the Nobel laureate’s birth, Patrick French explores her science-infused series Canopus in Argos.

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From the archive

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02976-9 How Nature reported a satellite TV system in India in 1969, and an explorer who learnt survival techniques from indigenous Arctic groups in 1919.

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Don’t miss your PhD deadline

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03020-6 Top tips for avoiding last-minute disasters and filing your thesis on time.

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Not Brain Dead: Patient Trapped in Vegetative State by Unethical Doctors

A man was kept in a vegetative state to save a hospital's reputation.

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Nobelpriset i fysiologi eller medicin: cellers anpassning till syrebrist

De forskande läkarna William G. Kaelin Jr, Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe och Gregg L. Semenza belönas för upptäckter som är helt centrala för vår förståelse av hur vi på organism- och cellnivå anpassar oss till variationer i syrenivåer, vilket har stor betydelse inom fysiologin, såsom vid fysisk ansträngning, sårläkning och under fosterutvecklingen, men även för flera sjukdomsprocesser relaterade till ex

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Axion particle spotted in solid-state crystal

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden, Princeton University, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have spotted a famously elusive particle: The axion, first predicted 42 years ago as an elementary particle in extensions of the standard model of particle physics. The results of the experiment

8h

Is Death Reversible?

An experiment that partially revived slaughterhouse pig brains raises questions about the precise end point of life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Is Death Reversible?

An experiment that partially revived slaughterhouse pig brains raises questions about the precise end point of life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Accidental discovery of strong and unbreakable molecular switch

An organic material that can repeatedly change shape without breaking would have many useful applications, such as artificial muscles, pumps or as a switch. Physicists at Radboud University accidentally discovered a material with that property. Their findings will be published in the scientific journal Nature Communications on October 8th.

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Molecular basis of drug's effects on limb and ear development revealed

Researchers in Japan and Italy have deepened understanding of the way in which thalidomide causes developmental abnormalities at the molecular level. An international study co-authored by researchers at Tokyo Institute of technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tokyo Medical University has unveiled a detailed view of how thalidomide, one of the most notorious drugs ever developed, causes abnormalities in limb

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An intelligent, shape-morphing, self-healing material for integrated artificial muscle and nervous tissue

Advances in the fields of soft robotics, wearable technologies and human/machine interfaces require a new class of stretchable materials that can change shape adaptively while relying only on portable electronics for power. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed such a material that exhibits a unique combination of high electrical and thermal conductivity with actuation capabilit

8h

The surprising decline of entrepreneurship and innovation in the West

The idea that we are living in an entrepreneurial age, experiencing rapid disruptive technological innovation on a scale amounting to a new "industrial revolution" is a pervasive modern myth. Scholars have written academic papers extolling the coming of the "entrepreneurial economy". Policymakers and investors have pumped massive amounts of funding into start-up ecosystems and innovation. Business

8h

Indian paper wasps have their favourite places in their nests

A new study from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) has shown that Indian paper wasps distribute themselves non-randomly in their nests, a strategy that may help them exchange food efficiently and avoid the spread of infections. The study was carried out by Ph.D. student Nitika Sharma and Professor Raghavendra Gadagkar, and published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

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Histone modifications are the influencers of zygotic genome awakening

The zebrafish is an important model organism in biology. Humans and zebrafish share 70 percent of their genes, and more than 80 percent of human genes associated with disease are known to have a zebrafish counterpart. Additionally, their entire genome sequence has been identified, and it is more efficient to grow fish than mice.

8h

Bollinger's Electric Pickup and SUV Are Made for the Mud

The EV startup is packing the battery-driven duo with all the features they need to conquer field and stream.

8h

The Big Lure of Tiny Keyboards

Minimalists intent on freeing up desk space are shrinking their keyboards.

8h

Indian paper wasps have their favourite places in their nests

A new study from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) has shown that Indian paper wasps distribute themselves non-randomly in their nests, a strategy that may help them exchange food efficiently and avoid the spread of infections. The study was carried out by Ph.D. student Nitika Sharma and Professor Raghavendra Gadagkar, and published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

8h

Histone modifications are the influencers of zygotic genome awakening

The zebrafish is an important model organism in biology. Humans and zebrafish share 70 percent of their genes, and more than 80 percent of human genes associated with disease are known to have a zebrafish counterpart. Additionally, their entire genome sequence has been identified, and it is more efficient to grow fish than mice.

8h

Molecular basis of drug's effects on limb and ear development revealed

Researchers in Japan and Italy have deepened understanding of the way in which thalidomide causes developmental abnormalities at the molecular level. An international study co-authored by researchers at Tokyo Institute of technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tokyo Medical University has unveiled a detailed view of how thalidomide, one of the most notorious drugs ever developed, causes abnormalities in limb

8h

New silk materials can wrinkle into detailed patterns, then unwrinkle to be 'reprinted'

Engineers have developed silk materials that can wrinkle into highly detailed patterns — including words, textures and images as intricate as a QR code or a fingerprint. The patterns are stable, but can be erased by flooding the surface of the silk with vapor, allowing the surface to be printed again. The researchers demonstrate multiple examples of the silk wrinkle patterns, and envision a wide

8h

Big data reveals extraordinary unity underlying life's diversity

Limits to growth lie at the heart of how all living things function. The diversity of life is staggering. From microscopic algae to elephants, life has devised countless ways to thrive in every environment on the planet. But while biologists have tended to focus on the many varied forms that species have evolved, the age of 'big data' offers an unprecedented view of some surprisingly common featur

8h

New test for thyroid cancer could prevent unnecessary surgery

Each year, thanks to inconclusive tests for thyroid cancer, thousands of people undergo unnecessary surgeries to remove part or all of their thyroids. A new test based on the unique chemical fingerprints of thyroid cancer might change that. It's faster and about two-thirds more accurate than the diagnostic tests doctors use today.

8h

How bike sharing in Seattle rose from the ashes of Pronto's failure

Transportation researchers looked into why the docked bike-share program Pronto failed while dockless bike sharing has been so successful.

8h

Analysis of US labor data suggests 'reskilling' workers for a 'feeling economy'

A study of US labor data suggests AI is already taking 'thinking economy' jobs from humans, and this trend will grow in the future. This will push more people into 'feeling economy' jobs that require things like interpersonal relationship skills and emotional intelligence.

8h

Glycans found binding to mammalian RNA

A team of researchers at Stanford University has found evidence of glycans binding with mammalian RNA. The group has written a paper describing their findings and have posted it on the bioRxiv preprint server.

8h

This is what you need to know about carbon capture and storage

Why is there so much talk about storing CO2 underground? Doesn't it cost more than it's worth? Here we provide the research scientists' answers and explanations of why CCS is climate technology that we are completely dependent on. (And yes, it is perfectly safe.)

8h

2-D-based single photon emitters integrated with CMOS-compatible silicon nitride waveguides

Researchers from the Photonics Research Group, an imec research group at Ghent university and MIT announced that they have integrated single photon emitters in 2-D layered materials with a silicon nitride photonic chip. Even for moderate quantum yields, dielectric cavities could be designed such that the single photon extraction into the guided mode can reach unity. The results published in Nature

8h

Discussions about racism strongly differ in the Finnish news media and discussion forums

On the popular Suomi24 discussion forum, users see immigration and minorities as a threat to "the ordinary Finnish people," while journalists address racism from a historical and international perspective.

8h

Is Death Reversible?

An experiment that partially revived slaughterhouse pig brains raises questions about the precise end point of life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Glycans found binding to mammalian RNA

A team of researchers at Stanford University has found evidence of glycans binding with mammalian RNA. The group has written a paper describing their findings and have posted it on the bioRxiv preprint server.

8h

This Transhumanist Implanted Magnet-Triggered LEDs Under Her Skin

Modern Cyborgs The kneecap in transhumanist Winter Mraz’s leg isn’t the one she was born with — instead, it’s a 3D-printed replica doctors created for her following a serious car crash. Devices designed to address medical problems are the most common kind of cyborg tech . But a growing number of people, including Mraz herself, are taking it upon themselves to voluntarily enhance their bodies with

8h

Relocating China's pig industry could have unintended consequences

Writing in Nature Sustainability, an international group of agriculture and environmental scientists warn that the Chinese Government's desire to relocate its pig industry from the South, in order to protect water quality could have unintended detrimental consequences.

8h

NASA small satellites can aid hurricane forecasts with GPS

Eight briefcase-size satellites flying in a row may be key to improving forecasts of a hurricane's wind speed—detecting whether it will make landfall as a Category 1 or a Category 5. NASA's Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) fleet, launched in 2016, was designed to show whether the same GPS signals your phone uses for navigation can be used to measure winds deep within a hurricane

8h

Researchers discover how water is regenerated on asteroids

Scientists have discovered how water molecules can be regenerated on asteroids moving through space, in an exciting breakthrough that could extend to other bodies such as the moon.

8h

Shedding new light on West Africa's birds and butterflies

How do you identify a soaring scavenger from its flight silhouette, or pinpoint which species of swallowtail has just fluttered by on gossamer wings? These were among the challenges facing the survey teams as they attempted to shine a spotlight on the wildlife treasures concealed within the tropical forests on both sides of the border between Guinea and Liberia.

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Shedding new light on West Africa's birds and butterflies

How do you identify a soaring scavenger from its flight silhouette, or pinpoint which species of swallowtail has just fluttered by on gossamer wings? These were among the challenges facing the survey teams as they attempted to shine a spotlight on the wildlife treasures concealed within the tropical forests on both sides of the border between Guinea and Liberia.

8h

Sorry, Stalkers: Instagram Ditches ‘Following’ Activity Tab

(via Sarah Palmer/Instagram) Instagram has removed the “Following” tab from its Activity feed. The what? The “Following” tab, …

8h

Hearthstone player banned for supporting Hong Kong protesters during live stream

Image: Blizzard via InvenGlobal Blizzard has issued a year-long ban to a Hearthstone player who expressed support for the Hong Kong protestors during a competition live stream. …

8h

Photos: Hidden Ruins of an Old Scottish Whisky Distillery

These ruined stone buildings hidden in the forest in the Scottish Highlands would have been an ideal site for making illicit whisky.

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Hidden Scottish Ruins May Have Been Illegal Whisky Stills, Says Archaeologist

Mystery surrounds a group of ruined stone buildings hidden in a remote forest in the Scottish Highlands, with an archaeologist suggesting they were once an illegal whisky distillery.

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Ny satellit ska leta efter “jordens tvilling”

Rymdteleskopet Plato skjuts upp år 2026. Uppdraget är tydligt: att hitta planeter som liknar vårt eget hem i universum. Projektet är en fortsättning på den Nobelprisbelönade jakten på exoplaneter, det vill säga planeter utanför vårt solsystem.

8h

A simple intervention enduringly reduces anti-Muslim sentiment

In the United States and Europe Muslims are often collectively blamed for extremist violence by individual Muslims, like Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik in San Bernardino, or the three coordinated attacks from members of the Islamic State in Paris in 2015. The same doesn't hold, however, when the terrorist committing the act is a white Christian, like Dylann Roof's attacks in Charleston, South Ca

8h

Controlling robots across oceans and space

This Autumn is seeing a number of experiments controlling robots from afar, with ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano directing a robot in The Netherlands and engineers in Germany controlling a rover in Canada.

8h

Using loss of resilience as an early warning signal to predict the likelihood of forest mortality

A team of researchers from Duke University and Princeton University has found that it is possible to use loss of resilience as an early warning signal to predict the likelihood of forest mortality. In their paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change, Yanlan Liu, Mukesh Kumar, Gabriel Katul and Amilcare Porporato describe their study of California forests using data from satellites and wh

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Extraordinarily warm temperatures above Antarctica cause hot and dry extremes in Australia, researchers warn

Changes in springtime winds high above the South Pole are set to trigger higher than usual temperatures and fire-prone weather conditions in Australia, an international study involving Monash scientists has warned.

8h

Mapping white clover heritage

Four-leaved clovers may or may not bring good luck. What's indisputable is that all white clovers, whether with three or four leaves, have many benefits.

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Mapping white clover heritage

Four-leaved clovers may or may not bring good luck. What's indisputable is that all white clovers, whether with three or four leaves, have many benefits.

8h

Nobel in Physics for Exoplanets and Cosmology

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to James Peebles "for theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology" and to Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz "for the discovery of an exoplanet… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Hyaluronan tecken på svår dengueinfektion

Denguevirusinfektion överförs med myggor och ökar snabbt i världen på grund av den globala uppvärmningen och resor utomlands. Infektionen orsakar lidande, förbrukar resurser inom sjukvården, och kan ibland utvecklas till en dödlig sjukdom som bland annat yttrar sig i en kraftigt ökat läckage i blodkärlen som leder till vätskeförlust. Det finns inget effektivt denguevirusvaccin och ingen specifik

8h

Pigs observed using tools for the first time

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in France has found evidence of pigs using tools—a first. In their paper published in the journal Mammalian Biology, the group describes multiple instances of Visayan warty pigs using sticks and bark to assist with nest building.

8h

Vi måler hos beboerne: Metrostøj holder sig inden for grænsen

Ingeniørens støjmålinger fra to lejligheder på Haraldsgade viser, at støjen fra den nye metrostrækning, Cityringen, overholder grænseværdierne.

8h

Pigs observed using tools for the first time

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in France has found evidence of pigs using tools—a first. In their paper published in the journal Mammalian Biology, the group describes multiple instances of Visayan warty pigs using sticks and bark to assist with nest building.

8h

A study on tropical fish sheds light on species invasions

Biodiversity, i.e., the variety of life forms on Earth, is in great danger. Human-driven climate change and intensive land use are altering ecosystems, and globalisation facilitates the transport of non-native species into already disturbed habitats. Invasive populations are a major cause of extinction, so controlling their impact is crucial. In his dissertation, M.Sc Sebastiano De Bona shed light

8h

Patented concept from Halle: novel, high-performance diodes and transistors

Today's computer processors are increasingly pushed to their limits due to their physical properties. Novel materials could be the solution. Physicists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have investigated if and how such materials might be developed. They have created, tested and filed a patent for a concept using the latest findings from the field of spintronics. The team report

9h

A study on tropical fish sheds light on species invasions

Biodiversity, i.e., the variety of life forms on Earth, is in great danger. Human-driven climate change and intensive land use are altering ecosystems, and globalisation facilitates the transport of non-native species into already disturbed habitats. Invasive populations are a major cause of extinction, so controlling their impact is crucial. In his dissertation, M.Sc Sebastiano De Bona shed light

9h

Graphene filter grabs bacteria to kill them with a zap

A new self-sterilizing filter made of laser-induced graphene grabs bacteria out of the air and kills them with small pulses of electricity, researchers report. Airborne bacteria may see what looks like a comfy shag carpet on which to settle. But it’s a trap. The flexible filter that chemist James Tour’s lab at Rice University developed may be of special interest to hospitals. According to the Cen

9h

Sandra Boynton’s Captivating Universe

Timothy Sean O’Connell I knew I was in the right place when I spotted cartoon-fowl statuaries flanking the gate of a rural drive. Bright, fat beaks and combs bulged out from stoic, teardrop bodies. These were unmistakably Sandra Boynton chickens. Since the early 1970s, Boynton has herded her animals onto greeting cards, calendars, and songbooks. But she is best known for her board books, written

9h

How women's life-long experiences of being judged by their appearance affect how they feel in open-plan offices

A key reason many organisations want to move their employees to open-plan workspaces is to encourage collaboration and improve communication. The assumption is that the increased visibility and access workers have to one another will ease the flow of information and enhance learning, well-being, and collegiality.

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No-deal Brexit would leave science dead for years, say Nobel prizewinners

Top scientists accuse Boris Johnson of sacrificing the UK’s research reputation – and billions of pounds in EU grants Two Nobel laureates and other top scientists are accusing Boris Johnson of destroying Britain’s global reputation by behaving “like a clown” and pursuing a no-deal Brexit that would leave UK science “dead” for years. The government has assured anxious academics it still has a clea

9h

Microfibers Are the New Microbeads. Grab Your Pitchforks

We must declare war on microfibers. But keeping the tiny plastics out of the environment won’t be so easy as an outright ban.

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2019 Nobel Prize in Physics Goes To Three Astronomers

It’s Nobel Prize time of year again (it always seems to come around so fast), and the Nobel Prizes for Medicine and Physics have been announced. The physics prize goes to three astronomers , James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, for contributing to our understanding of the universe and our place in it. This is a more abstract Nobel Prize theme than many, and the first awardee, James Peeb

9h

Image of the Day: Brain-Computer Interface Electrode

A newly developed device can better measure brain waves such as those used to control a robotic car.

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A dormant volcano: the black hole at the heart of our galaxy is more explosive than we thought

The supermassive black hole at the heart of our galaxy spat out an enormous flare of radiation 3.5 million years ago that would have been clearly visible from Earth.

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Pedestrian detection systems don’t work very well, AAA finds

submitted by /u/salanganes01af [link] [comments]

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How differences in the genetic 'instruction booklet' between humans and Neanderthals influenced traits

When it comes to our differences from Neanderthals, most of what we know comes from comparing fossils. But fossils can only tell us about bones and not whole living organisms.

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How differences in the genetic 'instruction booklet' between humans and Neanderthals influenced traits

When it comes to our differences from Neanderthals, most of what we know comes from comparing fossils. But fossils can only tell us about bones and not whole living organisms.

9h

In the Amazon, protected areas often lose out when the search for energy is on

Addressing policy "blind spots" that allow energy production and mineral exploration to trump environmental protection could help improve the outlook for conservation in the Amazon Basin, according to a new study.

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Using 'World of Warcraft' to cut gamer screen time, increase maker revenue

Yulia Nevskaya's first foray into the "World of Warcraft" started one evening at 7 p.m. She created an avatar to represent her in the online video game and set off to explore another land.

9h

Re­searchers de­vel­op a com­pact in­frared spec­trom­e­ter

ETH researchers have developed a compact infrared spectrometer. It's small enough to fit on a computer chip but can still open up interesting possibilities—in space and in everyday life.

9h

Why Campaigns to Change Language Often Backfire – Facts So Romantic

Opponents of the phrase “car accident” argue that language is intertwined with accountability. Photograph by Alan Poulson Photography / Shutterstock In the first decades of the 20th century, people around the world began succumbing to an entirely new cause of mortality. These new deaths, due to the dangers of the automobile, soon became accepted as a lamentable but normal part of modern life. A h

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Nobel Prize in Physics Honors Scientists Who Transformed Our Ideas About the Cosmos

The Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to three scientists for unraveling the structure and history of the universe and for changing our perspective of Earth’s place in it.

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Breastfeeding can help tackle climate crisis but it's on governments, not mums to save the world

In the midst of debates about how to best tackle the climate crisis, breastfeeding was recently highlighted as a significant way women can help to make a difference. But while there is no doubt of the important role breastfeeding can play, there must be caution in the way such messages are communicated.

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Defining and measuring sustainability

Back in 2009 when I was completing my book Sustainability Management and preparing it for publication by Columbia University Press in 2010, I was also working with colleagues at Columbia's Earth Institute and School of Continuing Education (now Professional Studies) to develop a new master's program in Sustainability Management. I remember struggling to provide a meaningful and bounded definition

9h

Physicists measure the variation of the top-quark mass for the first time

For the first time, CMS physicists have investigated an effect called the "running" of the top quark mass, a fundamental quantum effect predicted by the Standard Model.

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Cosmology and Exoplanets Win 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics

James Peebles, who helped found the field of cosmology, shares the prize with Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, discoverers of the first exoplanet around another sunlike star — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A close up on the real world—atomic migration under ambient conditions

Increasing our understanding of how individual atoms and molecules participate in chemical reactions is critical to the development of new technologies. However, to date it has not been possible to image atomic dynamics on metal surfaces under conditions that are similar to those of the industrial processes of interest. Now, researchers from Osaka University have used in situ environmental transmi

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New method cuts out steps in the production of smart and functional textiles

Today's resource-intensive production processes for printing on textiles can soon be history. With a new method, developed within a doctoral project at the University of Borås, Sweden, several stages of the process can be cut out.

9h

String Theory Does Not Win a Nobel, and I Win a Bet

Science writer John Horgan wins a 2002 bet with physicist Michio Kaku that by 2020 no unified theory of physics will win a Nobel Prize — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Cosmology and Exoplanets Win 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics

James Peebles, who helped found the field of cosmology, shares the prize with Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, discoverers of the first exoplanet around another sunlike star — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Artificial womb: Dutch researchers given €2.9m to develop prototype

Model from Eindhoven University will surround baby with fluid and deliver oxygen and nutrients via umbilical cord Attempts to create an artificial womb for premature babies have been given a boost by the award of a €2.9m (£2.6m) grant to develop a working prototype for use in clinics. The model, which is being developed by researchers at the Eindhoven University of Technology, would provide babie

10h

Cyprus-based project to monitor Mideast emissions

A new Cyprus-based project aims to fill a research gap on greenhouse gas emissions in the east Mediterranean and Middle East in order to help policy makers seeking to tackle climate change in the vulnerable region, officials said Tuesday.

10h

String Theory Does Not Win a Nobel, and I Win a Bet

Science writer John Horgan wins a 2002 bet with physicist Michio Kaku that by 2020 no unified theory of physics will win a Nobel Prize — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Nature's Headbangers

How the surprisingly intricate drumming of woodpeckers evolved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Samsung Electronics flags 56% fall in Q3 operating profit

Samsung Electronics said on Tuesday it expected operating profits to drop more than 50 percent in the third quarter as it struggles with a long-running slump in the global chip market.

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Three Share Physics Nobel for Exoplanet and Cosmological Discoveries

The new laureates discovered the first planet orbiting a solar-type star and improved our understanding of how the universe evolved. nobel2019_physicswinner.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics Physics Tuesday, October 8, 2019 – 07:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — The 2019 Nobel Prize in physics has been awa

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A Cow, a Controversy, and a Dashed Dream of More Humane Farms

The gene-edited bull was a marvel, with calves who'd inherited his trait. But a surprise in his DNA ignited a scientific feud and doomed them all.

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An AI Pioneer Wants His Algorithms to Understand the 'Why'

Deep learning is good at finding patterns in reams of data, but can't explain how they're connected. Turing Award winner Yoshua Bengio wants to change that.

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Nature's Headbangers

How the surprisingly intricate drumming of woodpeckers evolved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Meet America’s newest military giant: Amazon

How the most powerful company in e-commerce positioned itself to become one of the world’s biggest national security contractors.

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Nobel physics prize awarded for cosmology and astronomy discoveries

Princeton’s James Peebles honoured alongside Didier Queloz and Michel Mayor of Geneva University

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Nature's Headbangers

How the surprisingly intricate drumming of woodpeckers evolved — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

New Encryption System Protects Data from Quantum Computers

As quantum computing creeps closer, IBM successfully demonstrates a way to secure sensitive information — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Opera 64 adds tracking blocker, speeds up loading times

Opera already offers a number of beneficial tools. There’s its built-in ad blocker that removes the need for any extensions, cryptojacking protection, and a free and unlimited VPN proxy, which …

10h

Tile Sticker and Tile Slim are the company's thinnest trackers to date

That’s exactly what they’ve done with the new Tile Sticker and Tile Slim.

10h

Forskere får Nobelpris for at opdage nye planeter

Nobelprisen i fysik går i år til tre forskere, som har ændret vores forståelse af universet.

10h

Nobelpris i fysik belønner indsigt om universets udvikling og vores egen plads i kosmos

Canadieren James Peebles og schweizerne Michel Mayor og Didier Queloz modtager årets Nobelpris i fysik.

10h

New Encryption System Protects Data from Quantum Computers

As quantum computing creeps closer, IBM successfully demonstrates a way to secure sensitive information — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Non-antibiotic cures for cows could speed up treatments for people

As the global antibiotic resistance crisis grows, chemical-based aerosol sprays and electrical signals to wake up the immune system are being developed to treat cow infections. These non-antibiotic therapies for livestock could also help to limit the spread of antibiotic resistance through the human food chain.

10h

Russia bestows medal on US astronaut in failed launch

Russia has decorated NASA astronaut Nick Hague, who survived an aborted space launch last year, with one of its highest honours, the Order of Courage, a Kremlin decree said on Tuesday.

10h

Non-antibiotic cures for cows could speed up treatments for people

As the global antibiotic resistance crisis grows, chemical-based aerosol sprays and electrical signals to wake up the immune system are being developed to treat cow infections. These non-antibiotic therapies for livestock could also help to limit the spread of antibiotic resistance through the human food chain.

10h

Swiss Nobel Physics laureates hail win as 'simply extraordinary'

Two Swiss scientists who on Tuesday won the Nobel Physics Prize along with a Canadian-American colleague hailed their win as "simply extraordinary".

10h

Makt i samhället ger makt på nätet

Det som var tänkt att vara inkluderande, kan istället skapa hinder för demokratiska offentliga samtal, menar Malin Holm, forskare vid statsvetenskapliga institutionen vid Uppsala universitet. – Ofta talar man om hur marginaliserade grupper har lyckats göra sig hörda genom att använda nätet. Jag ville istället studera hur priviligierade grupper använder sig av nätet för att påverka och förändra de

10h

How science has shifted our sense of identity

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03014-4 Biological advances have repeatedly changed who we think we are, writes Nathaniel Comfort, in the third essay of a series marking Nature’s anniversary on how the past 150 years have shaped science today.

10h

Physics Nobel goes to exoplanet and cosmology pioneers

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02964-z Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, who discovered the first extrasolar planet orbiting a Sun-like star, share award with theoretical cosmologist James Peebles.

10h

Hospital Closures in Rural U.S. Reach a Crisis Point

In the past decade, more than 100 rural hospitals have closed, and more than 20 percent, or 430 hospitals across 43 states, are now near collapse. This is despite the fact that rural hospitals are not only crucial for health care but also survival of their small rural communities.

11h

Cancel Billionaires

Nineteen new names were added last week to the Forbes 400, a ranking of America’s richest of the rich, a list including entrepreneurs, executives, financiers, and inheritors. The two richest people, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and Microsoft’s Bill Gates, are now each worth more than $100 billion. This is the exaggerated edge of an exaggerated trend. Even with today’s promising wage trends , the gap betwe

11h

How the Court Could Limit Abortion Rights Without Overturning Roe

Sometime in the next nine months, the Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in June Medical Services v. Gee , a major Louisiana case that could shape the future of legal abortion in America. The case does not technically threaten Roe v. Wade : Louisiana and its supporters have not asked the Court to formally overturn Roe (the decision establishing women’s constitutional right to terminate a preg

11h

Lægestafetten: Jeg behandler alt fra diskusprolapser til hovedtraumer

Når neurokirurg Anne Helene Jacobsen skal koble fra efter en hård arbejdsdag på Neurologisk Afdeling på OUH, cykler hun med Team Rynkeby. Og så ville hun indføre lægelige assistenter til at udføre alt papirarbejde, hvis hun var sundhedsminister.

11h

Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded for Cosmology and Exoplanet Discoveries

The cosmologist James Peebles split the prize with the astrophysicists Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz, for work the Nobel judges said “transformed our ideas about the cosmos.”

11h

UN agency meant to be limiting flying emissions votes to block action

The agency’s own scheme will not stop greenhouse gas emissions soaring, yet members have voted to block all other efforts to slow the growth

11h

Nobel prize in physics for discovery of exoplanet orbiting a star

The Nobel prize in physics has been jointly awarded to James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz for their contributions to our understanding of the evolution of the universe and Earth’s place in the cosmos.

11h

Nobel Prize for Physics awarded to 3 scientists for their contribution to understanding of the evolution of the universe

Canadian-American cosmologist James Peebles and Swiss astronomers Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz on Tuesday won the Nobel Physics Prize for research increasing our understanding of our place in the universe, the jury said.

11h

Physics Nobel honors architect of modern cosmology, discoverers of other worlds

Researchers found the first exoplanet around a sunlike star and laid the groundwork for a universe with dark matter and dark energy

11h

Nobel prize in physics awarded to cosmology and exoplanet researchers

James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz honoured for for ‘improving our understanding of evolution of universe and Earth’s place in the cosmos’ Three scientists have been awarded the 2019 Nobel prize in physics for groundbreaking discoveries about the evolution of the Universe and the Earth’s place within it. The Canadian scientist James Peebles has been awarded half of the 9m Swedish krono

11h

Materials scientist will soon be up to 30 retractions

A researcher at Swinburne University of Technology in Australia will soon add three more retractions to his burgeoning count, making 30. Ali Nazari has lost 27 papers from several journals, as we’ve reported over the past few months. According to an upcoming notice obtained by Retraction Watch, the International Journal of Material Research (IJMR) will … Continue reading

11h

Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded for Discovery of Extrasolar Planets

This morning the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for “contributions to our understanding of the evolution of the universe and Earth’s place in the cosmos.” James Peebles, a physicist at Princeton University, won half the prize for his contributions to physical cosmology, while Michel Mayor, a physicist at the University of Geneva, and Didier Queloz, an astronomer at Geneva and at the Cavendish

11h

3 Scientists Win Nobel Prize In Physics For Work On Earth's Place In The Universe

The Royal Swedish Academy of Science made the announcement Tuesday in Stockholm that a Canadian-American and two Swiss scientists had won the prize. (Image credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser/Nick Risinger )

11h

Nobel physics prize: 'Ground-breaking' win for planets and Big Bang

Three scientists have been awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics for discoveries about the Universe.

11h

11h

UMD discovers new mechanism in the liver that helps prevent invasive fungal infections

An expert in intravital microscopy, Meiqing Shi, University of Maryland, is making breakthroughs in invasive fungal infections. In Nature Communications, Shi has discovered a pathway by which liver macrophages capture fungi before dissemination to target organs like the brain. This not only provides an explanation as to why individuals with liver disease have enhanced risk of fungal infection, but

12h

Accidental discovery of strong and unbreakable molecular switch

An organic material that can repeatedly change shape without breaking would have many useful applications, such as artificial muscles, pumps or as a switch. Physicists at Radboud University accidentally discovered a material with that property. Their findings will be published in the scientific journal Nature Communications on Oct. 8.

12h

Scientists discover new antibiotic in tropical forest

Scientists from Rutgers University and around the world have discovered an antibiotic produced by a soil bacterium from a Mexican tropical forest that may help lead to a 'plant probiotic,' more robust plants and other antibiotics. Probiotics, which provide friendlier bacteria and health benefits for humans, can also be beneficial to plants, keeping them healthy and more robust. The new antibiotic,

12h

Dog ownership associated with longer life, especially among heart attack and stroke survivors

Dog ownership was associated with a 33% lower risk of death for heart attack survivors living alone and 27% reduced risk of death for stroke survivors living alone, compared to people who did not own a dog. Dog ownership was associated with a 24% reduced risk of all-cause mortality and a 31% lower risk of death by heart attack or stroke compared to non-owners.

12h

Nobel Prize in Physics to be awarded

The 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics will be awarded Tuesday, a day after two Americans and one British scientist were given the award for Physiology or Medicine.

12h

Nobel prize in physics awarded for work on cosmology – live!

James Peebles, Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz honoured for ‘improving our understanding of evolution of universe and Earth’s place in the cosmos’ 11.14am BST Peebles has been asked if he has advice for young people considering a career in science. He does indeed: You should enter it for the love of the science. The awards and prizes, they are charming and very much appreciated, but that’s not par

12h

Sony disables PlayStation 4 Facebook integration

Sony has turned off Facebook integration on the PlayStation 4, meaning users can no longer link their Facebook and console accounts, the company announced in a terse blog post. As a …

12h

Global airborne microbial communities controlled by surrounding landscapes and wind conditions

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51073-4

12h

Association between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and all-cause mortality in the general population of northern China

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50924-4

12h

SLE Plasma Profiling Identifies Unique Signatures of Lupus Nephritis and Discoid Lupus

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50231-y

12h

12h

Tristetraprolin targets Nos2 expression in the colonic epithelium

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50957-9

12h

Association between oral health and dementia in the elderly: a population-based study in Korea

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50863-0

12h

Doc2b Ca2+ binding site mutants enhance synaptic release at rest at the expense of sustained synaptic strength

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50684-1 Doc2b Ca 2+ binding site mutants enhance synaptic release at rest at the expense of sustained synaptic strength

12h

Cross-modal size-contrast illusion: Acoustic increases in intensity and bandwidth modulate haptic representation of object size

Scientific Reports, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50912-8

12h

Nobelpriset går till upptäckten av nya planeter

Nobelpriset i fysik har tilldelats James Peebles för förståelsen av jordens plats i universum samt Michel Mayor och Didier Queloz för upptäckten av planeter utanför vårt solsystem.

12h

The LGBTQ Rights Movement Is Changing, and So Is the Supreme Court

A skydiving instructor in New York, a funeral-home director in Michigan, a child-welfare advocate in Georgia: Donald Zarda, Aimee Stephens, and Gerald Lynn Bostock are three people who seemingly have little in common, save for one extraordinary fact. Each claims to have been fired because they are gay or transgender, and all three will argue their cases before the U.S. Supreme Court this week. Th

12h

Context-specific regulation of surface and soluble IL7R expression by an autoimmune risk allele

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12393-1 Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a central cytokine in T cell homeostasis. Here the authors show that allelic variation at rs6897932, an autoimmune GWAS risk allele at IL7R, regulates surface and soluble IL-7R in stimulated monocytes, indicating a function of monocytes in IL-7-related autoimmunity.

12h

Global ocean methane emissions dominated by shallow coastal waters

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12541-7 The ocean emits the greenhouse gas methane, but its vastness renders estimations challenging. Here the authors use machine learning to map global ocean methane fluxes, finding a disproportionate contribution from shallow coastal waters, and a link between primary production and methane cycling.

12h

Hypothalamic neuronal circuits regulating hunger-induced taste modification

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12478-x Hunger modulates perception of good and bad tastes. Here, the authors report that orexigenic AgRP neurons in the hypothalamus mediate these effects through glutamatergic lateral hypothalamic neurons that send distinct projections to the lateral septum and lateral habenula.

12h

Photoactivation of silicon rhodamines via a light-induced protonation

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12480-3 Activatable fluorophores are of interest for a wide range of applications but the need for caging groups complicates their development and application. Here, the authors report on a photoactivatable silicon rhodamine derivative and its application in live cell imaging and single-particle tracking.

12h

Fungal dissemination is limited by liver macrophage filtration of the blood

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12381-5 Patients with liver diseases are at increased risk of fungal infections. Here the authors show that Kupffer cells are critical for the filtration of fungi out of the blood and thereby for liver-mediated protection against disseminating fungal infection.

12h

Direct imaging of light-element impurities in graphene reveals triple-coordinated oxygen

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12537-3 Annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy is able to distinguish the contrasts between light elements. Here, the authors directly image the bonding configurations of oxygen and nitrogen atoms in defective graphene, and surprisingly identify instances of unusual triple-coordinated oxygen wit

12h

Mesopelagic fishes dominate otolith record of past two millennia in the Santa Barbara Basin

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12600-z Little is known about the long-term dynamics of mesopelagic fish despite their large contribution to total fish biomass. Here, the authors analyze the Santa Barbara Basin otolith record and suggest that mesopelagic fish populations were large but fluctuated with surface climate over the last ~2000 years.

12h

Structure of ribosome-bound azole-modified peptide phazolicin rationalizes its species-specific mode of bacterial translation inhibition

Nature Communications, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12589-5 The authors report the identification of phazolicin (PHZ) – a prokaryotic translation inhibitory peptide – and its structure in complex with the E. coli ribosome, delineating PHZ’s mode of action and suggesting a basis for its bacterial species-specific activity.

12h

Machine behaviour is old wine in new bottles

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03002-8

12h

Don’t pull punches in peer review

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03024-2

12h

Use the term ‘productivity’ with care — it’s political

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03022-4

12h

First exoplanet found around a Sun-like star

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-02553-0 In 1995, astronomers detected a blisteringly hot Jupiter-mass planet orbiting closer to its host star than Mercury is to the Sun. This discovery recast our thinking of how planets form and led to a new era of exoplanetary exploration.

12h

Anonymity takes more than protecting personal details

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03023-3

12h

Online Map Leads Archaeologist to Maya Discovery

Lidar has transformed the study of ancient civilizations, but maps made with the technology are expensive. Takeshi Inomata found a great one for free.

12h

”Vi pratar om telepatisk förmåga på riktigt”

Vem kommer att belönas med Nobelpriset i fysik idag? Vetenskapsredaktionens fysikexpert Ulrika Engström pratar om allt från telepati till klimat och kvinnliga pristagare.

12h

Supercomputer simulates 77,000 neurons in the brain in real-time

A brain-inspired computer can simulate part of the sensory cortex in real time, using tens of thousands of virtual neurons. It is the first time such a complex simulation has run this fast

12h

Scientists discover new antibiotic in tropical forest

Scientists from Rutgers University and around the world have discovered an antibiotic produced by a soil bacterium from a Mexican tropical forest that may help lead to a "plant probiotic," more robust plants and other antibiotics.

12h

3 Scientists Win Physics Nobel For Work On The Universe's Evolution

A Canadian and two Swiss scientists on Tuesday won the Nobel Prize in Physics for contributions to our understanding of the evolution of the universe and Earth's position in the cosmos.

12h

Scientists discover new antibiotic in tropical forest

Scientists from Rutgers University and around the world have discovered an antibiotic produced by a soil bacterium from a Mexican tropical forest that may help lead to a "plant probiotic," more robust plants and other antibiotics.

12h