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nyheder2019oktober10

An intriguing Android game that will twist your brain

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Why do neuroscientists study weird animals?: A primer on neuroethology

Why do neuroscientists study weird animals? And I don’t mean borderline weird; I mean the kind of extraordinary animals that can create electric fields and lift 100 times their body weight. The sort of animals that can camouflage despite being colorblind and can capture flying prey in fractions of a second. The kind of creatures […]

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Hong Kong Is the Latest Tripwire for Tech Firms in China

Blizzard, Apple, and Google remove signs of support for pro-democracy protesters, in apparent concessions to the politics underlying the Chinese market.

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Tips on Technique: Ergonomics at the Lab Bench

Thermo Fisher invites you to join them for this educational webinar.

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Skin cancer above the neck more likely to spread, research shows

Forty-five patients with new diagnoses of MM were investigated over a period of 6 months and were divided into two groups of patients, with above neck MM and below neck MM. The aim of the study was to see which types of MM were more likely to metastasize (spread) in terms of location.

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The Queer Rights Movement Faces Down the Supreme Court

Photographer Tasos Katopodis captures a historical effort for civil rights in America’s capital.

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Honeybees are math stars

Start thinking about numbers and they can become large very quickly. The diameter of the universe is about 8.8×1023 km and the largest known number—googolplex, 1010100—outranks it enormously. Although that colossal concept was dreamt up by brilliant mathematicians, we're still pretty limited when it comes to assessing quantities at a glance. 'Humans have a threshold limit for instantly processing

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The Mystery of Rudy Giuliani’s Vienna Trip

Last night, when Rudy Giuliani told me he couldn’t get together for an interview, his reason made sense: As with many nights of late, he was due to appear on Hannity . When I suggested this evening instead, his response was a bit more curious. We would have to aim for lunch, Giuliani told me, because he was planning to fly to Vienna, Austria, at night. He didn’t offer any details beyond that. Giu

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The bee-all of numbers

Turns out honeybees are pretty good at maths – provided you ask the right question.

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Honeybees are math stars

Start thinking about numbers and they can become large very quickly. The diameter of the universe is about 8.8×1023 km and the largest known number—googolplex, 1010100—outranks it enormously. Although that colossal concept was dreamt up by brilliant mathematicians, we're still pretty limited when it comes to assessing quantities at a glance. 'Humans have a threshold limit for instantly processing

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The ‘Forever Chemicals’ You Eat, a $200 Spy Setup, and More News

Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.

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Massive California power outage triggers chaos in science labs

Nature, Published online: 10 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03086-2 Researchers without access to back-up power scramble to save experiments and invaluable specimens.

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In bid to boost transparency, bioRxiv begins posting peer reviews next to preprints

A related experiment will provide new test of “portable” peer reviews

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That new yarn? Wearable, washable textile devices are possible with MXene-coated yarns

Researchers have figured out how to add more conductivity into functional fabric devices, by coating yarns with a 2-dimensional carbon-based material called MXene, to make conductive threads. The group has developed a dip-coating method, similar to the dyeing process, that can produce a conductive yarn strong enough for use in industrial knitting machines and durable enough to make it through wash

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California’s power outage means problems for electric cars. Tesla says charge up, quick.

A San Francisco Bay Area power utility shut off power to more than half a million customers amid a wildfire threat, and Tesla vehicles flashed a warning to charge up beforehand.

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These Kinetic Pants Harness Your Body Heat to Stay Smooth and Wrinkle Free

Did you know that what you wear can directly influence how your brain works? It’s true. According to a team of psychological scientists from California State University, Northridge and Columbia University , the clothes we wear directly influence the way our brains process abstract thinking. When you dress to look and feel good, you’re actually activating the most creative part of your brain into

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Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal

Researchers at EPFL have created a metallic microdevice in which they can define and tune patterns of superconductivity. Their discovery, which holds great promise for quantum technologies of the future, has just been published in Science.

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Combination of techniques could improve security for IoT devices

A multi-pronged data analysis approach that can strengthen the security of Internet of Things (IoT) devices — such as smart TVs, home video cameras and baby monitors — against current risks and threats has been created by a team of Penn State World Campus students.

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The Most Unique Golf Course in the World

Most golf courses look the same: large, bright-green stretches of closely cropped lawns, flanked by lush vegetation and peppered with ponds and sand-filled bunkers. Golfers drive around the courses in golf carts. They pay their annual dues—often multiple thousands of dollars—to golf clubs, which foster an aristocratic playing experience, lending the sport its presidential connotation . Across the

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Don’t Like Shots? Swallow This Pill Full of Microneedles Instead

Without a dose of insulin at least once a day, people with diabetes can see their blood sugar reach dangerous levels. Unfortunately, an insulin pill won’t work — the gastrointestinal tract breaks the protein down too quickly to make oral ingestion of insulin possible. The only option left: getting stuck with a needle every day. At least, that’s always been the case. But now, researchers from MIT

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Sweat monitors predict behavioral issues in teens severely affected with autism

When people become stressed, their bodies can respond by sweating. Now, researchers are monitoring how much adolescents severely affected by autism sweat in order to better understand when behavioral issues, such as aggression, are likely to occur.

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That new yarn? Wearable, washable textile devices are possible with MXene-coated yarns

Researchers have figured out how to add more conductivity into functional fabric devices, by coating yarns with a 2-dimensional carbon-based material called MXene, to make conductive threads. The group has developed a dip-coating method, similar to the dyeing process, that can produce a conductive yarn strong enough for use in industrial knitting machines and durable enough to make it through wash

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'Sticky' gene may help Valium calm nerves

For years, scientists thought that these powerful sedatives, which are used to treat anxiety, muscle spasms, and sleeping disorders, worked alone to calm nerves. Now, researchers show that this view of the drugs and the neural circuits they affect may have to change. In a study of mice, scientists discovered that both may need the assistance of a 'sticky' gene, named after a mythological figure, c

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Rotavirus infection may turn on type 1 diabetes

Rotavirus infection may play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes, according to a new article.

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Engineers solve 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing

Engineers have solved a 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing. They've formulated the 'inverse chirp z-transform,' an algorithm related to one that's running on your cell phone right now. It took some computing power and some math expertise to do it.

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Beyond the 'replication crisis,' does research face an 'inference crisis'?

For the past decade, social scientists have been unpacking a 'replication crisis' that has revealed how findings of an alarming number of scientific studies are difficult or impossible to repeat. Efforts are underway to improve the reliability of findings, but cognitive psychology researchers say that not enough attention has been paid to the validity of theoretical inferences made from research f

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The CA Blackouts Are Oh-so-Coincidentally Not Affecting Big Tech

Keep On Truckin’ Right now, hundreds of thousands of Californians are living without electricity — utility company Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) hit the kill switch to prevent its own decaying infrastructure from sparking another wildfire. But suspiciously absent from the blackout map : the campuses of major tech companies, Wired reports , including Google, Tesla, Facebook, and Netflix. There are

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Dyson Sucks the Air Out of Its Electric-Car Dreams

The British household-products maker had promised to invest $2.5 billion in EVs. Now, it says it can't produce one that's “commercially viable.”

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EPA proposes rewrite of rules on lead contamination in water

The Trump administration on Thursday proposed a rewrite of rules for dealing with lead pipes contaminating drinking water, but critics say the changes appear to give water systems decades more time to replace pipes leaching dangerous amounts of toxic lead.

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SLAS Technology releases part 1 of special 2-part issue

In the October Special Issue of SLAS Technology, Guest Editors Soojung Claire Hur, Ph.D., and Deok-Ho Kim, Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA) introduce a collection of articles and reviews focused on the advancement in technologies that are playing a major role in shifting healthcare closer to more predictive, preventative and personalized medicine.

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Changes in driver shifts and pick-up choices for food delivery services can boost profits

The food delivery business, popularized by mobile online services such as Grubhub, OrderUp, and DoorDash, has become a $200 billion industry, which is expected to grow by more than 15% annually over the next five years. New research published in the INFORMS journal Transportation Science reveals how food delivery businesses can implement changes in driver shifts and order delivery structures that

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Sweating for science

When people become stressed, their bodies can respond by sweating. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri are monitoring how much adolescents severely affected by autism sweat in order to better understand when behavioral issues, such as aggression, are likely to occur.

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To save climate, tax carbon at $75 per ton: IMF

The world's biggest carbon polluting nations should jointly agree to tax emissions at $75 per ton in the next decade to keep climate change at safe levels, the International Monetary Fund said Thursday.

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USB-C Has Finally Come Into Its Own

“The port of the future” has become the port of right now—with one big exception.

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Taking RTKI drugs during radiotherapy may not aid survival, worsens side effects

Taking certain cancer-fighting drugs while undergoing radiation therapy may not increase survival for patients, but may, instead, increase side effects, according to a team of researchers.

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Beyond the 'replication crisis,' does research face an 'inference crisis'?

For the past decade, social scientists have been unpacking a 'replication crisis' that has revealed how findings of an alarming number of scientific studies are difficult or impossible to repeat. Efforts are underway to improve the reliability of findings, but cognitive psychology researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst say that not enough attention has been paid to the validity of

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Engineers solve 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing

Engineers Alexander Stoytchev and Vladimir Sukhoy have solved a 50-year-old puzzle in signal processing. They've formulated the 'inverse chirp z-transform,' an algorithm related to one that's running on your cell phone right now. It took some computing power and some math expertise to do it.

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Study suggests ice on lunar south pole may have more than one source

The discovery of ice deposits in craters scattered across the Moon's south pole has helped to renew interest in exploring the lunar surface, but no one is sure exactly when or how that ice got there. A new study published in the journal Icarus suggests that while a majority of those deposits are likely billions of years old, some may be much more recent.

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Scientists are decoding the genetic mechanisms of aging

The discovery in the 1990s that a mutation in a single gene of an experimental worm could double its lifespan set off a stampede of research on the molecular biology of aging and triggered hopes that drug therapies or other interventions could be developed to extend healthy human lifespan. But as is often the case in science, the genetic regulation of aging is more complicated than it first appear

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That new yarn?!—Wearable, washable textile devices are possible with MXene-coated yarns

Producing functional fabrics that perform all the functions we want, while retaining the characteristics of fabric we're accustomed to is no easy task.

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Scientists are decoding the genetic mechanisms of aging

The discovery in the 1990s that a mutation in a single gene of an experimental worm could double its lifespan set off a stampede of research on the molecular biology of aging and triggered hopes that drug therapies or other interventions could be developed to extend healthy human lifespan. But as is often the case in science, the genetic regulation of aging is more complicated than it first appear

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Scientists ask: How can liquid organelles in cells coexist without merging?

New research may help to explain an intriguing phenomenon inside human cells: how wall-less liquid organelles are able to coexist as separate entities instead of just merging together.

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Impacts of low-dose exposure to antibiotics unveiled in zebrafish gut

An antibiotic commonly found at low concentrations in the environment can have major impacts on gut bacteria, report researchers at the University of Oregon.

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Impacts of low-dose exposure to antibiotics unveiled in zebrafish gut

An antibiotic commonly found at low concentrations in the environment can have major impacts on gut bacteria, report researchers at the University of Oregon.

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Scientists ask: How can liquid organelles in cells coexist without merging?

New research may help to explain an intriguing phenomenon inside human cells: how wall-less liquid organelles are able to coexist as separate entities instead of just merging together.

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Parker's Aggressive Goals for the Season | Gold Rush

With time running out on his license, Parker sets aggressive goals for his crew. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on

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Adult Humans Can Regenerate Cartilage: Study

Collagen inside ankles has more turnover than that in hips, thanks to the action of microRNAs.

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What Bruce Lee can teach us about living fully | Shannon Lee

Most of us know Bruce Lee as the famous martial artist and action film star — but he was also a philosopher who taught "self-actualization": the practice of how to be yourself in the best way possible. In this inspiring talk, Bruce's daughter Shannon Lee takes us inside the mind of her father, exploring how to use his philosophy in your daily life to achieve profound personal growth and make a la

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Scientists ask: How can liquid organelles in cells coexist without merging?

New research may help to explain an intriguing phenomenon inside human cells: how wall-less liquid organelles are able to coexist as separate entities instead of just merging together.

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NASA Has a Plan to Encourage Private Space Stations

Space Business NASA is encouraging private companies to develop their own space stations — and it has a fat wad of cash to invest in promising ideas. The space agency hopes to spur increased development in the space industry, both to assist and improve current operations and to launch new standalone projects, according to Space.com . NASA has about $561 million set aside to invest in these privat

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Rotavirus infection may turn on type 1 diabetes

Rotavirus infection may play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes, according to a front matter article published Oct. 10 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Leonard C. Harrison of the University of Melbourne in Australia, and colleagues.

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That new yarn? — wearable, washable textile devices are possible with MXene-coated yarns

Drexel University researchers have figured out how to add more conductivity into functional fabric devices, by coating yarns with a 2-dimensional carbon-based material called MXene, to make conductive threads. The group has developed a dip-coating method, similar to the dyeing process, that can produce a conductive yarn strong enough for use in industrial knitting machines and durable enough to ma

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Scientists ask: How can liquid organelles in cells coexist without merging?

New research may help to explain an intriguing phenomenon inside human cells: how wall-less liquid organelles are able to coexist as separate entities instead of just merging together.

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When studying immune cells, environment matters

For years, scientists have used cells grown in petri dishes to study the metabolic processes that fuel the immune system. But a new report suggests looking outside the dish and into living organisms gives a drastically different view of the way immune cells process and use energy.

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New CEOs can raise their social game to keep their jobs

A new study shows that two key factors can make freshly appointed CEOs more vulnerable and raise the odds they'll get fired. The job security of a new CEO tends to suffer when the stock market reacts badly or when the previous CEO stays on as board chair, according to the study. But the study found that the new CEO can overcome these challenges with what researchers call "social influence behavio

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Gut immunity more developed before birth than previously thought

The first comprehensive look at the immune system of the fetal gut shows that it is far more developed before birth, and could help develop new maternal vaccines and reveal if we are predisposed to autoimmune diseases before birth.

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Da Vinci's Forgotten Design for the Longest Bridge in the World Proves What a Genius He Was

Had da Vinci's bridge been built, the bridge would have been incredibly sturdy

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Nobel-Winning Astrophysicist Says We’ll Never Colonize Exoplanets

Ain’t Happening It’s been a busy week for astrophysicist Michel Mayor. On Tuesday, he won a Nobel Prize for his work detecting exoplanets . Then, on Wednesday, he crushed the dreams of anyone hoping to one day colonize those planets. “If we are talking about exoplanets,” Mayor told Agence France-Presse when asked about off-world colonization, “things should be clear: we will not migrate there.” R

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Andy Rubin’s Essential Gem Isn’t Just a New Phone

The Essential Gem makes clear that it’s becoming harder to disassociate new products from the people making them.

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Water + air + electricity = hydrogen peroxide

A reactor produces pure hydrogen peroxide solutions from water, air and energy.

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“Jeff Bezos’s Master Plan”

In the 25 years since Jeff Bezos founded an online bookstore, the Amazon chairman and CEO has become one of the most powerful people on Earth. His company controls nearly 40 percent of all e-commerce in the United States. It owns 42 percent of the paper-book market and a third of the streaming-video market. By one estimate, Amazon Web Services commands almost half of the cloud-computing industry,

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'Sticky' gene may help Valium calm nerves

For years, scientists thought that these powerful sedatives, which are used to treat anxiety, muscle spasms, and sleeping disorders, worked alone to calm nerves. Now, in an article published in Science, researchers from the National Institutes of Health show that this view of the drugs and the neural circuits they affect may have to change. In a study of mice, scientists discovered that both may n

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When studying immune cells, environment matters

For years, scientists have used cells grown in petri dishes to study the metabolic processes that fuel the immune system. But a new report in Immunity suggests looking outside the dish and into living organisms gives a drastically different view of the way immune cells process and use energy.

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Scientists ask: How can liquid organelles in cells coexist without merging?

New research may help to explain an intriguing phenomenon inside human cells: how wall-less liquid organelles are able to coexist as separate entities instead of just merging together. The study by University at Buffalo researchers was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

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New material could someday power quantum computer

Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery.

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Scientists 'must be allowed to cry' about destruction of nature

Scientists witnessing the destruction of the natural world must be supported and 'allowed to cry,' researchers say.

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New tool visualizes nature's benefits worldwide

The researchers set out to understand where nature contributes the most to people and how many people may be affected by future changes. By 2050, up to 5 billion people could be at higher risk of water pollution, coastal storms and under-pollinated crops.

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Scientists are decoding the genetic mechanisms of aging

Scientists describes the mechanisms by which longevity is regulated post-transcriptionally, or after a genetic blueprint has been transcribed from an organism's DNA. The identification of these mechanisms will serve as a road map for screening new, more specific drugs to prolong healthy lifespan. The laboratory focuses on research on regeneration and aging.

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Key uncertainties identified for models of mosquito distribution in the US

A computational analysis has identified key regions in the United States where model-based predictions of mosquito species distribution could be improved.

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U.S. overtaken by Singapore as world's most competitive economy

Singapore topped the World Economic Forum's annual list due, in part, to its strong infrastructure, labor markets and health markers. The U.S. ranked in second place, but was named the world's most competitive large economy. The report also found that some Asian nations seem to be benefitting from the U.S.-China trade war. None Singapore has overtaken the U.S. as the world's most competitive econ

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Health Officials Urge Caution in Reducing Opioids for Pain Patients

In a newly published guide, federal health officials say doctors “should never abandon” pain patients and warn of acute withdrawal and other risks.

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Nobel-Winning HIF Pathway Could Offer Clues About the Origin of Animal Life

Sponges, one of the most ancient animal lineages, can maintain normal gene activity even as oxygen levels drop. sponge-cropped.jpg Tethya wilhelma , a type of sponge that can survive with hardly any oxygen even though it lacks a HIF pathway. Image credits: Oliver Voigt, LMU Munich. Rights information: This image may only be reproduced with this Inside Science article. Creature Thursday, October

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It’s Possible to Inherit More DNA From One Parent Than the Other

Updated at 10:52 a.m. on October 11, 2019. Before Natalie Nakles was born, before the egg from which she was conceived was even fully mature, something went slightly awry. The egg that would help form her ended up with two copies of chromosome 16. So today, 24-year-old Nakles does not, as most people do, have one set of chromosomes from each parent. She has two copies of chromosome 16 from her mo

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The Story Keeps Getting Worse for the White House

Updated at 3:48 p.m. on October 10, 2019. If the president’s fundamental defense against impeachment is that there’s nothing to see here and people should move along , Thursday morning was not a good day for the president. As The Wall Street Journal first reported, two men who assisted in Rudy Giuliani’s investigations in Ukraine on behalf of Donald Trump were arrested Wednesday night. Lev Parnas

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It's Lights Out in California to Deal With Climate Risks

An intentional blackout was aimed at keeping power equipment from sparking a wildfire — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dismissed EPA science advisers gather in ‘unprecedented’ challenge to Trump administration

Ousted air quality experts stage their own review of agency’s particulate science

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Virgin Orbit Aims to Send First Commercial Cubesats to Mars

The small, standardized satellites known as “Cubesats” have increased access to space — many launches include caches of Cubesats along with the main payload. Those tiny satellites are all hanging out around Earth, but that could change soon. Virgin Orbit, the rocket-based spinoff of Virgin Galactic, has signed a deal with Polish satellite company SatRevolution to send the first commercial Cubesat

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Vaping Outbreak Death Toll Climbs to More Than 2 Dozen

More than two dozen people have died in connection with an outbreak of vaping-related lung illnesses across the U.S.

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Twist-based refrigeration: Twisting and coiling 'twistocaloric' yarns to keep cool

Researchers have discovered a new technology for refrigeration that is based on twisting and untwisting fibers. They demonstrated twist-based refrigeration using materials as diverse as natural rubber, ordinary fishing line and nickel titanium wire.

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Water + air + electricity = hydrogen peroxide

A reactor produces pure hydrogen peroxide solutions from water, air and energy.

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AI and big data predict which research will influence future medical treatments

An artificial intelligence/machine learning model to predict which scientific advances are likely to eventually translate to the clinic has been developed.

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Enhancing memory network via brain stimulation

Magnetic stimulation of the posterior parietal cortex increases functional connectivity of a neural network implicated in memory, shows human research. This finding confirms a previous study, validating further exploration of this technique for experimental and clinical applications.

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'Tricked' bacteria open new pathways to antimicrobial treatments

Scientists have developed a new technique to trick bacteria into revealing hundreds of holes in their cell walls, opening the door for drugs that destroy bacteria's cells.

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Carnivorous plant study captures universal rules of leaf making

Leaves display a remarkable range of forms from flat sheets with simple outlines to the cup-shaped traps found in carnivorous plants.

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Archaeology: Social inequality in Bronze Age households

Archaeogenetic analyses provide new insights into social inequality 4,000 years ago: nuclear families lived together with foreign women and individuals from lower social classes in the same household.

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Suicide in low- and middle-income countries

Future treatment and prevention of suicidal behavior in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) should involve a wider range of approaches beyond just the treatment of psychiatric illness, according to a new study.

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Human Employees Are Viewing Clips from Amazon's Home Surveillance Service

Recordings from yet another Amazon-owned smart home device are being reviewed by a team of human workers, again raising concerns that audio and video captured by such devices may not be as private …

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Race, gender overlap for kids and ‘brilliant’ stereotype

Children, regardless of their own race, share the stereotype that links being “brilliant” to white men more than white women, research finds. Children don’t apply this gender-split stereotype to black men and women, say the researchers. “Among adults, gender stereotypes apply differently to men and women depending on their race,” explains Andrei Cimpian, an associate professor in New York Univers

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Someone Deepfaked Barack Obama Into “Black Panther”

Wakanda Forever The deepfakers of YouTube have struck again. This time, former U.S. president Barack Obama takes over for actor Chadwick Boseman as the Marvel superhero Black Panther from the 2018 blockbuster of the same name. In the video, faux-Obama delivers a stirring speech at the United Nations about how the fictional nation of Wakanda is finally ready to open up to the world — a fitting cho

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Twist-based refrigeration: Twisting and coiling 'twistocaloric' yarns to keep cool

Researchers have discovered a new technology for refrigeration that is based on twisting and untwisting fibers. They demonstrated twist-based refrigeration using materials as diverse as natural rubber, ordinary fishing line and nickel titanium wire.

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People pay more attention to stimuli they associate with danger

A new analysis of how people prioritize their attention when determining safety and danger in busy settings, such as crossing a road, suggests that a person will pay more attention to something if they learn it is associated with danger.

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CRISPR enzyme programmed to kill viruses in human cells

Researchers have now turned a CRISPR RNA-cutting enzyme into an antiviral that can be programmed to detect and destroy RNA-based viruses in human cells.

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Light-based strategy effectively treats carbon monoxide poisoning in rats

Investigators recently developed a phototherapy strategy that was highly effective for removing carbon monoxide in rats.

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Sleep Deprivation Shuts Down Production of Essential Brain Proteins

A deficit arises in molecules needed for neurons to communicate efficiently — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Submarine canyons aren’t the same as those on land

Submarine canyons are surprisingly and fundamentally different from ravines on land, researchers report. Submarine canyons are a final frontier on planet Earth. There are thousands of these breathtaking geological features hidden within the depths of the ocean—yet scientists have more high-resolution imagery of the surface of Mars than of Earth’s ocean floor. In an effort to shed light on these m

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Sleep Deprivation Shuts Down Production of Essential Brain Proteins

A deficit arises in molecules needed for neurons to communicate efficiently — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sleep Deprivation Shuts Down Production of Essential Brain Proteins

A deficit arises in molecules needed for neurons to communicate efficiently — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study Topic Influences Funding Disparity for Black Scientists

A new analysis finds that black scientists tend to propose projects that have lower rates of funding from the National Institutes of Health than other fields.

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Carnivorous plant study captures universal rules of leaf making

Leaves display a remarkable range of forms from flat sheets with simple outlines to the cup-shaped traps found in carnivorous plants.

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Scientists 'must be allowed to cry' about destruction of nature

Scientists witnessing the destruction of the natural world must be supported and 'allowed to cry,' researchers say.

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Study identifies religious bias against refugees

When you hold constant national origin, religion is the most powerful source of discrimination against refugees to the United States — mattering more than gender, age, fluency in English or professional skill. The study also shows that while anti-Muslim bias prevails across the board in the US, it differs across subgroups.

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Endometriosis may be costing us much more than previously thought

Along with significant physical pain, endometriosis also hurts Australian women at the hip pocket, as well as having significant economic effects on society as a whole, a new study published today in PLOS ONE confirms.

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Suicide in low- and middle-income countries

Future treatment and prevention of suicidal behavior in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) should involve a wider range of approaches beyond just the treatment of psychiatric illness, according to a new University of Bristol study published on World Mental Health Day today in PLOS Medicine.

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Johns Hopkins researchers discover material that could someday power quantum computer

Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers.

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Synaptic function closely tied to overall need for sleep, regardless of day or night

The natural need for sleep and the brain's synaptic function are closely linked, according to a pair of studies in mice, which suggest that sleep deprivation may also deprive the brain of key proteins required for synaptic activities including plasticity.

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Keeping cool by twisting and coiling 'twistocaloric' yarns

Scientists have figured out how to induce a cooling effect in materials by a change in yarn or fiber twist, which they call 'twistocaloric' cooling.

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Global model reveals a future without nature's crucial contributions to humanity

A new model that captures nature's contributions to human wellbeing and compares them to peoples' future needs shows that, within the next thirty years, as many five billion people could face water and food insecurity — particularly in Africa and South Asia.

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Ancient DNA reveals social inequality in bronze age Europe households

Providing a clearer picture of intra-household inequality in ancient times, new research reports that prehistoric German households near the Lech Valley consisted of a high-status core family and unrelated low-status individuals.

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Archaeology — Social inequality in Bronze Age households

Archaeogenetic analyses provide new insights into social inequality 4,000 years ago: nuclear families lived together with foreign women and individuals from lower social classes in the same household.

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New tool visualizes nature's benefits worldwide

The researchers set out to understand where nature contributes the most to people and how many people may be affected by future changes. By 2050, up to 5 billion people could be at higher risk of water pollution, coastal storms and under-pollinated crops.

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Water + air + electricity = hydrogen peroxide

A reactor developed by Rice University engineers produces pure hydrogen peroxide solutions from water, air and energy.

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Research shows that doing the twist is hot, unwinding is cool

An international team led by researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and Nankai University in China has discovered a new technology for refrigeration that is based on twisting and untwisting fibers. In research published in the Oct. 11 issue of the journal Science, they demonstrated twist-based refrigeration using materials as diverse as natural rubber, ordinary fishing line and nickel ti

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People pay more attention to stimuli they associate with danger

A new analysis of how people prioritize their attention when determining safety and danger in busy settings, such as crossing a road, suggests that a person will pay more attention to something if they learn it is associated with danger. Toby Wise of University College London, UK, and colleagues report their findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Explained: The lifetime of an evaporating liquid drop

The lifespan of a liquid droplet which is transforming into vapour can now be predicted thanks to a new theory. The new understanding can now be exploited in a myriad of natural and industrial settings where the lifetime of liquid drops governs a process' behavior and efficiency.

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Fridges made from twisty materials could be better for the environment

Cooling powered by twisting materials could make more efficient and sustainable fridges that don't rely on compressing greenhouse gasses

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Wealthy families in prehistoric Europe may have had live-in slaves

Ancient DNA suggests that during the Bronze Age, wealthy families once lived with poorer individuals, suggesting live-in slavery could be 1300 years older than we thought

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How treacherous brain cells aid cancer’s invasion

Nature, Published online: 10 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03008-2 The neural cells called astrocytes feed the brain’s own fat to metastatic cancer cells.

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Impacts of low-dose exposure to antibiotics unveiled in zebrafish gut

An antibiotic commonly found at low concentrations in the environment can have major impacts on gut bacteria, report researchers.

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E-cigarettes, tobacco and cannabis products are littering high schools

High schools in the San Francisco Bay area are being contaminated by plastics and toxic litter from e-cigarettes, cannabis products and combustible tobacco products such as cigarettes and cigarillos, a new study has found.

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Five patterns of gun ownership by motivation, practices, other features

Can firearm owners be grouped into distinct groups based on the number and types of firearms owned, primary reason for having firearms and other patterns of ownership? A new study says, yes.

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Ice on lunar south pole may have more than one source

New research sheds light on the ages of ice deposits reported in the area of the Moon's south pole — information that could help identify the sources of the deposits and help in planning future human exploration.

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Wealthy families in prehistoric Europe may have had live-in slaves

Ancient DNA suggests that during the Bronze Age, wealthy families once lived with poorer individuals, suggesting live-in slavery could be 1300 years older than we thought

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Vaping Illnesses Climb Upward, Nearing 1,300 With 29 Deaths

The cause of the outbreak is still unknown, and the only advice health officials can offer so far is to avoid vaping.

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Architecture of human Rag GTPase heterodimers and their complex with mTORC1

The Rag guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) recruit the master kinase mTORC1 to lysosomes to regulate cell growth and proliferation in response to amino acid availability. The nucleotide state of Rag heterodimers is critical for their association with mTORC1. Our cryo–electron microscopy structure of RagA/RagC in complex with mTORC1 shows the details of RagA/RagC binding to the RAPTOR subunit of

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Phase-change heterostructure enables ultralow noise and drift for memory operation

Artificial intelligence and other data-intensive applications have escalated the demand for data storage and processing. New computing devices, such as phase-change random access memory (PCRAM)–based neuro-inspired devices, are promising options for breaking the von Neumann barrier by unifying storage with computing in memory cells. However, current PCRAM devices have considerable noise and drift

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Torsional refrigeration by twisted, coiled, and supercoiled fibers

Higher-efficiency, lower-cost refrigeration is needed for both large- and small-scale cooling. Refrigerators using entropy changes during cycles of stretching or hydrostatic compression of a solid are possible alternatives to the vapor-compression fridges found in homes. We show that high cooling results from twist changes for twisted, coiled, or supercoiled fibers, including those of natural rub

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Spatial control of heavy-fermion superconductivity in CeIrIn5

Although crystals of strongly correlated metals exhibit a diverse set of electronic ground states, few approaches exist for spatially modulating their properties. In this study, we demonstrate disorder-free control, on the micrometer scale, over the superconducting state in samples of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeIrIn 5 . We pattern crystals by focused ion beam milling to tailor the boundar

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Direct electrosynthesis of pure aqueous H2O2 solutions up to 20% by weight using a solid electrolyte

Hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) synthesis generally requires substantial postreaction purification. Here, we report a direct electrosynthesis strategy that delivers separate hydrogen (H 2 ) and oxygen (O 2 ) streams to an anode and cathode separated by a porous solid electrolyte, wherein the electrochemically generated H + and HO 2 – recombine to form pure aqueous H 2 O 2 solutions. By optimizing a

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The low density and magnetization of a massive galaxy halo exposed by a fast radio burst

Present-day galaxies are surrounded by cool and enriched halo gas extending for hundreds of kiloparsecs. This halo gas is thought to be the dominant reservoir of material available to fuel future star formation, but direct constraints on its mass and physical properties have been difficult to obtain. We report the detection of a fast radio burst (FRB 181112), localized with arcsecond precision, t

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Chemical bond formation showing a transition from physisorption to chemisorption

Surface molecules can transition from physisorption through weak van der Waals forces to a strongly bound chemisorption state by overcoming an energy barrier. We show that a carbon monoxide (CO) molecule adsorbed to the tip of an atomic force microscope enables a controlled observation of bond formation, including its potential transition from physisorption to chemisorption. During imaging of cop

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Observation of half-quantum flux in the unconventional superconductor {beta}-Bi2Pd

Magnetic flux quantization is one of the defining properties of a superconductor. We report the observation of half-integer magnetic flux quantization in mesoscopic rings of superconducting β-Bi 2 Pd thin films. The half-quantum fluxoid manifests itself as a phase shift in the quantum oscillation of the superconducting critical temperature. This result verifies unconventional superconductivity of

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Synergistic sorbent separation for one-step ethylene purification from a four-component mixture

Purification of ethylene (C 2 H 4 ), the largest-volume product of the chemical industry, currently involves energy-intensive processes such as chemisorption (CO 2 removal), catalytic hydrogenation (C 2 H 2 conversion), and cryogenic distillation (C 2 H 6 separation). Although advanced physisorbent or membrane separation could lower the energy input, one-step removal of multiple impurities, espec

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Shisa7 is a GABAA receptor auxiliary subunit controlling benzodiazepine actions

The function and pharmacology of -aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABA A Rs) are of great physiological and clinical importance and have long been thought to be determined by the channel pore–forming subunits. We discovered that Shisa7, a single-passing transmembrane protein, localizes at GABAergic inhibitory synapses and interacts with GABA A Rs. Shisa7 controls receptor abundance at synapse

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Control of aversion by glycine-gated GluN1/GluN3A NMDA receptors in the adult medial habenula

The unconventional N -methyl–aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits GluN3A and GluN3B can, when associated with the other glycine-binding subunit GluN1, generate excitatory conductances purely activated by glycine. However, functional GluN1/GluN3 receptors have not been identified in native adult tissues. We discovered that GluN1/GluN3A receptors are operational in neurons of the mouse adult medial

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Global modeling of natures contributions to people

The magnitude and pace of global change demand rapid assessment of nature and its contributions to people. We present a fine-scale global modeling of current status and future scenarios for several contributions: water quality regulation, coastal risk reduction, and crop pollination. We find that where people’s needs for nature are now greatest, nature’s ability to meet those needs is declining.

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New Products

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The forebrain synaptic transcriptome is organized by clocks but its proteome is driven by sleep

Neurons have adapted mechanisms to traffic RNA and protein into distant dendritic and axonal arbors. Taking a biochemical approach, we reveal that forebrain synaptic transcript accumulation shows overwhelmingly daily rhythms, with two-thirds of synaptic transcripts showing time-of-day–dependent abundance independent of oscillations in the soma. These transcripts formed two sharp temporal and func

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Sleep-wake cycles drive daily dynamics of synaptic phosphorylation

The circadian clock drives daily changes of physiology, including sleep-wake cycles, through regulation of transcription, protein abundance, and function. Circadian phosphorylation controls cellular processes in peripheral organs, but little is known about its role in brain function and synaptic activity. We applied advanced quantitative phosphoproteomics to mouse forebrain synaptoneurosomes isol

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Migratory DCs activate TGF-{beta} to precondition naïve CD8+ T cells for tissue-resident memory fate

Epithelial resident memory T (eT RM ) cells serve as sentinels in barrier tissues to guard against previously encountered pathogens. How eT RM cells are generated has important implications for efforts to elicit their formation through vaccination or prevent it in autoimmune disease. Here, we show that during immune homeostasis, the cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) epigenetically con

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Comment on "Cultural flies: Conformist social learning in fruitflies predicts long-lasting mate-choice traditions"

The claims of Danchin et al . (Research Articles, 30 November 2018, p. 1025) regarding long-lasting mate preference based on conformity may result from systematic experimental error. Even if mate copying were a genuine phenomenon, it is unlikely to result in persisting culture in the wild.

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Response to Comment on "Cultural flies: Conformist social learning in fruitflies predicts long-lasting mate-choice traditions"

Thornquist and Crickmore claim that systematic experimental error may explain the results of Danchin and colleagues. Their claim rests on mistakes in their analyses, for which we provide corrections. We reassert that conformity in fruitflies predicts long-lasting mate-preference traditions.

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Axonal transport: Driving synaptic function

The intracellular transport system in neurons is specialized to an extraordinary degree, enabling the delivery of critical cargo to sites in axons or dendrites that are far removed from the cell center. Vesicles formed in the cell body are actively transported by kinesin motors along axonal microtubules to presynaptic sites that can be located more than a meter away. Both growth factors and degra

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News at a glance

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Mastering regulation

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Twisting is cool

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Keeping track of time

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Four-thousand-year-old genomes show deep roots of social inequality

Nature, Published online: 10 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03046-w Genealogies gleaned from ancient human DNA are set to transform archaeology.

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Testing, testing: How will measurement change in the future of education?

We need to embrace a plethora of schooling options as necessary to help different types of learners get to success. On top of testing for literacy and math competence, we should also test for other things that are clearly important to parents, such as whether kids feel safe and cared for. These things are softer but more difficult to assess. To improve our education system, we need to understand

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New research sheds light on the ages of lunar ice deposits

The discovery of ice deposits in craters scattered across the Moon's south pole has helped to renew interest in exploring the lunar surface.

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A Lego-like approach to improve nature's own ability to kill dangerous bacteria

A research team has demonstrated how it could improve upon the ability of nature's exquisitely selective collection of antimicrobial enzymes to attack bacteria in a way that's much less likely to cause bacterial resistance.

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Biologically-inspired skin improves robots' sensory abilities

Sensitive synthetic skin enables robots to sense their own bodies and surroundings – a crucial capability if they are to be in close contact with people. Inspired by human skin, a team has developed a system combining artificial skin with control algorithms and used it to create the first autonomous humanoid robot with full-body artificial skin.

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Milky Way raids intergalactic 'bank accounts'

Gas blown out of the Milky Way disk from exploding stars falls back onto the galaxy to form new generations of stars. In an effort to account for this recycling process, astronomers were surprised to find a surplus of incoming gas.

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Physics researchers explore unknown energy regions

Physicists are using photon-proton collisions to capture particles in an unexplored energy region, yielding new insights into the matter that binds parts of the nucleus together.

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Explained: The lifetime of an evaporating liquid drop

The lifespan of a liquid droplet which is transforming into vapour can now be predicted thanks to a new theory. The new understanding can now be exploited in a myriad of natural and industrial settings where the lifetime of liquid drops governs a process' behavior and efficiency.

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How fast will seas rise? A dying Greenland glacier holds clues

Scientists watch a warming ocean melt and fracture the ice

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A fridge made from a rubber band? Twisted elastic fibers could cool your food

“Twistocaloric” effect could usher in new wave of cooling technology free of greenhouse gases

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Why are adult daughters missing from ancient German cemeteries?

DNA and artifacts reveal marriage and inheritance patterns among Bronze Age farmers

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Researchers discover material that could someday power quantum computer

Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers.

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Water + air + electricity = hydrogen peroxide

The production of hydrogen peroxide can be much safer and simpler through a process developed at Rice University.

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Research shows that doing the twist is hot, unwinding is cool

An international team led by researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and Nankai University in China has discovered a new technology for refrigeration that is based on twisting and untwisting fibers.

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Scientists 'must be allowed to cry' about destruction of nature

Scientists witnessing the destruction of the natural world must be supported and "allowed to cry", researchers say.

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New tool visualizes nature's benefits worldwide

Nature supports people in critical ways, often at a highly local level. Wild bees buzz through farms, pollinating vegetables as they go. Nearby, wetlands might remove chemicals from the farm's runoff, protecting a community drinking water source. In communities all around the world, nature's contributions are constantly flowing to people. Scientists have mapped these contributions at local levels

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AI and big data predict which research will influence future medical treatments

An artificial intelligence/machine learning model to predict which scientific advances are likely to eventually translate to the clinic has been developed by Ian Hutchins and colleagues in the Office of Portfolio Analysis (OPA), a team led by George Santangelo at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This work, described in a Meta-Research article published October 10 in the open-access journal

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Key uncertainties identified for models of mosquito distribution in the US

A computational analysis has identified key regions in the United States where model-based predictions of mosquito species distribution could be improved. Andrew Monaghan of the University of Colorado Boulder and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Study identifies religious bias against refugees

Give me your Christian, your female, your English-speaking with a good education? While not the words on the Statue of Liberty, these seem to be the kinds of refugees that the American public prefers—according to a new study by researchers at the University of California San Diego, the University of Wisconsin-Madison and New York University Abu Dhabi.

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Social inequality in Bronze Age households

Social inequality already existed in southern Germany 4000 years ago, even within one household, a new study published in the journal Science finds. Archaeological and archaeogenetic analyses of Bronze Age cemeteries in the Lech Valley, near Augsburg, show that families of biologically related persons with higher status lived together with unrelated women who came from afar and also had a high sta

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Carnivorous plant study captures universal rules of leaf making

Leaves display a remarkable range of forms from flat sheets with simple outlines to the cup-shaped traps found in carnivorous plants.

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Mastering regulation

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Twisting is cool

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Keeping track of time

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Scientists at the MDI Biological Laboratory are decoding the genetic mechanisms of aging

A new paper by MDI Biological Laboratory scientists Jarod Rollins, Ph.D., and Aric Rogers, Ph.D., co-corresponding authors, describes the mechanisms by which longevity is regulated post-transcriptionally, or after a genetic blueprint has been transcribed from an organism's DNA. The identification of these mechanisms will serve as a road map for screening new, more specific drugs to prolong healthy

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Study suggests ice on lunar south pole may have more than 1 source

New research sheds light on the ages of ice deposits reported in the area of the Moon's south pole — information that could help identify the sources of the deposits and help in planning future human exploration.

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Jeff Bezos’s Master Plan

1.0 Where in the pantheon of American commercial titans does Jeffrey Bezos belong? Andrew Carnegie’s hearths forged the steel that became the skeleton of the railroad and the city. John D. Rockefeller refined 90 percent of American oil, which supplied the pre-electric nation with light. Bill Gates created a program that was considered a prerequisite for turning on a computer. To hear more feature

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Why do the good guys have to beat the climate cheats?

Filthy-fuel suffering is here today: 95% of humans breathe "dangerously polluted air," and globally "1 in 6 deaths are caused by air pollution." Paying extra for cleaner energy buys reduced suffering for today's kids and all future humans. For more "moral clarity" always look under "the numbers," and put their abstract tacit tradeoffs in concrete and personal terms. None Like the kid in the emper

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Nature giveth, and humans taketh away

To our detriment, if we continue on current trajectories, and global modelling shows just how. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Analogue approach offers solution to quantum problems

Quantum chemists may soon be using simulators to reach results. Barry Keily reports.

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Koalas help solve a viral puzzle

It involves an insight into how the body uses DNA to tame retroviruses. Paul Biegler reports.

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Would you like some chemicals with that?

You might have no choice if you eat out. Natalie Parletta reports.

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A glimpse of a newly discovered exoplanet

With no atmosphere, it isn't habitable for life.

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AI and big data predict which research will influence future medical treatments

An artificial intelligence/machine learning model to predict which scientific advances are likely to eventually translate to the clinic has been developed by Ian Hutchins and colleagues in the Office of Portfolio Analysis (OPA), a team led by George Santangelo at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This work, described in a Meta-Research article published October 10 in the open-access journal

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Key uncertainties identified for models of mosquito distribution in the US

A computational analysis has identified key regions in the United States where model-based predictions of mosquito species distribution could be improved. Andrew Monaghan of the University of Colorado Boulder and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Carnivorous plant study captures universal rules of leaf making

Leaves display a remarkable range of forms from flat sheets with simple outlines to the cup-shaped traps found in carnivorous plants.

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Cyberstalker Locates Victim by Enhancing Reflection in Her Eye

The Eyes Have It Posting a photo to social media could’ve cost Japanese pop star Ena Matsuoka her life. On September 1, obsessed stalker Hibiki Sato attacked Matsuoka outside her home, dragging her to a dark corner to sexually assault her, according to an Asia One report — and, in a creepy digital twist, he found her by analyzing a reflection in her eye in a selfie. Online Clues Following his sub

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NASA Boss Ends Feud With Elon, Plans SpaceX Factory Tour

Cribs: Hawthorne Edition NASA chief Jim Bridenstine and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk seem to have made peace. Despite recent tension between the two of them, Bridenstine has scheduled a Thursday tour of SpaceX’s Hawthorne, California factory, Reuters reports . It’s nice to see them getting along, and the tour is a hopeful sign that public spats over who failed to deliver what to whom — and a test vehicle

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How chlamydia takes up new DNA from host

Molecular biologists have pinpointed a gene that allows chlamydia to take up DNA from its host environment.

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Sharing data for improved forest protection and monitoring

Although the mapping of aboveground biomass is now possible with satellite remote sensing, these maps still have to be calibrated and validated using on-site data gathered by researchers across the world.

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Intelligent, shape-morphing, self-healing material for soft robotics

Advances in the fields of soft robotics, wearable technologies, and human/machine interfaces require a new class of stretchable materials that can change shape adaptively while relying only on portable electronics for power. Researchers have developed such a material that exhibits a unique combination of high electrical and thermal conductivity with actuation capabilities that are unlike any other

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Why it’s time to start talking about blockchain ethics

Blockchain technology is changing the nature of money and organizations. We should probably start pondering the potential consequences.

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Homes Once Used as Meth Labs Can Make New Owners Sick Years Later

In October 2013, a family of five moved into a home in Victoria, Australia. Soon, everyone in the family — including three children between the ages of 7 and 11 — began experiencing health problems. They couldn’t sleep and coughed all the time. The youngest child started acting fearful and aloof. He began having vivid nightmares and developing skin rashes. Less than two years after moving in, the

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Study identifies 5 patterns of gun ownership by motivation, practices, other features

Can firearm owners be grouped into distinct groups based on the number and types of firearms owned, primary reason for having firearms and other patterns of ownership? A UC Davis Health study published today in the journal Injury Prevention says, yes.

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E-cigarettes, tobacco and cannabis products are littering high schools

High schools in the San Francisco Bay Area are being contaminated by plastics and toxic litter from e-cigarettes, cannabis products and combustible tobacco products such as cigarettes and cigarillos, a new study by researchers at UC San Francisco has found.

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Nytter det at droppe oksekød og flyrejser, når lande som Kina udleder meget mere CO2?

Din CO2-udledning er meget højere end en kinesers. Så der er ingen undskyldning, siger forsker.

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A lethal virus carried by ‘vampires’ is rampaging across the Americas

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03005-5 Viral genomes suggest that rabies strains carried by vampire bats travel from South America to North America, and vice versa.

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Former NASA Scientist “Convinced” We Already Found Life on Mars

We’ve spent decades and billions of dollars to answer one simple question: is there life on Mars? But according to an opinion piece for Scientific American by former NASA scientist Gilbert Levin, we may already have learned we’re not alone in the universe during an experiment Levin led for NASA’s Viking mission to Mars in 1976. NASA sent two separate Viking orbiter and lander pairs to the Red Pla

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Tracking wild pigs in real time and understanding their interaction with agro-ecosystems

A new study investigates how the success of a wild pig invasion may be dependent on how they use their surrounding food resources, and how when it comes to agriculture, the pigs continue their destructive trend.

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What Is Mental Health?

It's more than a buzzword — mental health impacts every aspect of our lives.

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Germany’s synagogue shooting was live-streamed on Twitch—but almost no one saw it

The rapid response to the shootings in Halle shows how tech firms are learning from Christchurch.

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Brain scans may provide clues to suicide risk

Researchers have identified brain circuitry differences that might be associated with suicidal behavior in individuals with mood disorders. The study provides a promising lead toward tools that can predict which individuals are at the highest risk for suicide.

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Scientists track wheat aphids and their natural enemies for better pest management in Pakistan

Scientists have studied the distribution and population dynamics of wheat aphids and their natural enemies in Pakistan through seasons and periods of time. This research could be useful to develop better pest management methods and safer, healthier crops in wheat production.

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Biomedical sciences researchers isolate gut bacteria that can prevent and cure rotavirus infection

The presence of specific microbiota, or microorganisms that live in the digestive tract, can prevent and cure rotavirus infection, which is the leading cause of severe, life-threatening diarrhea in children worldwide, according to a new study.

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Koala epidemic provides lesson in how DNA protects itself from viruses

In animals, infections are fought by the immune system. Studies on an unusual virus infecting wild koalas reveal a new form of 'genome immunity.'

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Viagra shows promise for use in bone marrow transplants

Researchers have demonstrated a new, rapid method to obtain donor stem cells for bone marrow transplants using a combination of Viagra and a second drug called Plerixafor. Bone marrow transplants, used mostly in the treatment of cancer, are life-saving procedures to restore the stem cells that generate new blood cells throughout a person's life.

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Longtime DNA mystery illuminated by buttons and flies

Biologists have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect development.

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Simmering inequity: a city’s worst heat hits low-income residents

Nature, Published online: 10 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03003-7 The burden of the ‘urban heat-island’ effect falls most heavily on economically disadvantaged neighborhoods.

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Squashed nuclei undermine long-held doctrine of nuclear structure

Nature, Published online: 10 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03006-4 Stable cadmium nuclei can change shape even when their energies are low.

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Rosy octopuses are more warty the deeper they dwell in the sea

Nature, Published online: 08 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03004-6 Shallow-water residents have nearly smooth skin, but their deep-living brethren are covered in lumps and bumps.

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#MeToo kostede en nobelpris

PLUS. En amerikaner måtte i år vinke farvel til en Nobelpris, han med garanti havde fået, hvis prisen var tildelt hans felt for 5-10 år siden.

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1st 2016 presidential debate left women sad and men angry

Men and woman had significantly different emotional responses to the first presidential election debate in 2016 between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, according to research using facial-recognition software. Unlike traditional political science debate assessment that relies on post-debate interviews or real-time self-reporting, the researchers recorded viewers with webcams as they watched the

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A Photo Trip to the Bungle Bungles

In the Kimberley region of Western Australia sits Purnululu National Park, a protected area of nearly 600,000 acres established as a park in 1987. Purnululu is home to the Bungle Bungle Range, featuring spectacular “beehive dome” karst sandstone formations—some rising more than 600 feet above the surrounding plains. Paths within the park take visitors through mazes of narrow channels, isolated va

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Joe Maddon Was Doomed by His Own Success

Over a century and a half marked primarily by disappointment, the Chicago Cubs have fired their share of managers. But never before had they done so with the warmth and gratitude that marked their farewell at the end of the 2019 season to Joe Maddon, the manager who just three years ago led the franchise to its first World Series victory in more than 100 years . In a joint press conference announ

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Impacts of low-dose exposure to antibiotics unveiled in zebrafish gut

An antibiotic commonly found at low concentrations in the environment can have major impacts on gut bacteria, report researchers at the University of Oregon.

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New research sheds light on the ages of lunar ice deposits

The discovery of ice deposits in craters scattered across the Moon's south pole has helped to renew interest in exploring the lunar surface.

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Pyramid-Size Asteroid to Hurtle Past Earth (Again)

A fast-moving visitor is approaching our cosmic neighborhood. Dubbed 2019 SX5, this near-Earth object is about the size of the Great Pyramid of Giza.

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NEW! Cell Culture Inserts for Use in Multi-well Plates

NEW! BRAND Insert 2in1 is suitable for 2D and 3D cell culture.

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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite needed 3 orbits to see all of Super Typhoon Hagibis

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a composite visible image of the very large Super Typhoon Hagibis in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Oct. 10. It took Suomi NPP three orbits to capture images to show the entire storm that revealed it maintained its impressive structure.

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Europe eyes improved 'space weather' resilience

The Sun's outbursts can disrupt technology on Earth, and Europe needs better protection.

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Depression may reduce the amount of white matter in the brain

Depression appears to cause changes to the structure of the brain, as well as the other way around. That may be due to behaviour changes that can shrink unused brain pathways

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Will a ban on snacking on public transport really help combat obesity?

A proposal to ban snacks on public transport has appeared in a UK government report. But it doesn't seem based on evidence, and the government won't discuss it

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New CEOs can raise their social game to keep their jobs, says study

A new study shows that two key factors can make freshly appointed CEOs more vulnerable and raise the odds they'll get fired.

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Aerial photographs shed light on Mont Blanc ice loss

In 1919, the Swiss pilot and photographer Walter Mittelholzer flew over Mont Blanc in a biplane photographing the alpine landscape. Exactly 100 years later, researchers from the University of Dundee in Scotland have recreated his photographs to show the impact that climate change has had upon the mountain's glaciers.

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Lonza's MODA-ES™ Platform helps Nephron Pharmaceuticals move from paper to an EBR in nine months – Case study to be presented at 2019 ISPE Annual Meeting

· Lonza has partnered with Nephron Pharmaceuticals Corporation to implement Lonza’s next-generation MODA-ES™ EBR Platform to streamline manufacturing compliance reporting· The MODA-ES™ Platform was implemented at Nephron in an aggressive nine-month time frame, improving operational efficiency and enabling a significant product line expansion· Full results of the collaboration will be co-presented

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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite needed 3 orbits to see all of Super Typhoon Hagibis

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a composite visible image of the very large Super Typhoon Hagibis in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on Oct. 10. It took Suomi NPP three orbits to capture images to show the entire storm that revealed it maintained its impressive structure.

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Right whale mothers 'whisper' to their calves to avoid attracting predators

As new moms, North Atlantic right whales tone down their underwater vocalizations and 'whisper' to their young calves to avoid attracting predators, a new study by scientists at Syracuse University, Duke University and NOAA Fisheries' Northeast Fisheries Center finds. The study is the first to record examples of this acoustic behavior by mother right whales.

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New CEOs can raise their social game to keep their jobs, says Rice University study

A new study shows that two key factors can make freshly appointed CEOs more vulnerable and raise the odds they'll get fired. The job security of a new CEO tends to suffer when the stock market reacts badly or when the previous CEO stays on as board chair, according to the study by Rice University and Peking University management experts. But the study found that the new CEO can overcome these chal

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Explained: The lifetime of an evaporating liquid drop

The lifespan of a liquid droplet which is transforming into vapour can now be predicted thanks to a theory developed at the University of Warwick. The new understanding can now be exploited in a myriad of natural and industrial settings where the lifetime of liquid drops governs a process' behaviour and efficiency.

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The biggest threat of deepfakes isn’t the deepfakes themselves

The mere idea of AI-synthesized media is already making people stop believing that real things are real.

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Are food comas a way to lock in long-term memories?

There may be a connection between food comas, resting after eating, and the formation of long-term memories, according to new research in sea slugs. “The sensation of a ‘food coma’ after a hearty meal is well known to anyone who has ever experienced a Thanksgiving dinner,” says senior author Thomas Carew, a professor in the Center for Neural Science at New York University. “In fact, most animals

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Tracking wild pigs in real time and understanding their interaction with agro-ecosystems

Domestic pigs can be cute, but invasive wild pigs—also known as feral swine—are another matter entirely. First brought to the U.S. by early European settlers, wild pigs have earned a reputation for being highly destructive creatures in North America. With few natural predators aside from humans, and the highest reproductive potential of any mammal of similar size, two to six million are wreaking h

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Daily briefing: The first drug designed for a single patient

Nature, Published online: 10 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03089-z Ultra-personalized medicine, the coral that can revive after bleaching and ten common statistical mistakes to watch out for.

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Tracking wild pigs in real time and understanding their interaction with agro-ecosystems

Domestic pigs can be cute, but invasive wild pigs—also known as feral swine—are another matter entirely. First brought to the U.S. by early European settlers, wild pigs have earned a reputation for being highly destructive creatures in North America. With few natural predators aside from humans, and the highest reproductive potential of any mammal of similar size, two to six million are wreaking h

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Researchers discover how chlamydia takes up new DNA from host

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chlamydia trachomatis is the most commonly reported sexually transmitted bacterial disease in the U.S., totaling 1.7 million cases in 2017. Rates are highest among teenagers and young adults. Left untreated, chlamydia can cause blindness and sterility. Beyond the U.S., chlamydia is the leading sexually transmitted bacterial infection wor

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Has global warming stopped? The tap of incoming energy cannot be turned off

As a result of industrialization, the carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere has increased continuously over the past 100 years, which is considered the main reason behind global warming. However, the observational global mean atmospheric temperature leveled off over the first decade of the 21st century, in contrast to the rapid warming during the late 20th century. This phenomenon, known as the

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Researchers discover how chlamydia takes up new DNA from host

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, chlamydia trachomatis is the most commonly reported sexually transmitted bacterial disease in the U.S., totaling 1.7 million cases in 2017. Rates are highest among teenagers and young adults. Left untreated, chlamydia can cause blindness and sterility. Beyond the U.S., chlamydia is the leading sexually transmitted bacterial infection wor

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Scientists track wheat aphids and their natural enemies for better pest management in Pakistan

For the first time, CABI scientists have studied the distribution and population dynamics of wheat aphids and their natural enemies in Pakistan through seasons and periods of time. This research could be useful to develop better pest management methods and safer, healthier crops in wheat production.

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A Lego-like approach to improve nature's own ability to kill dangerous bacteria

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers antibiotic resistance one of the most urgent public health threats, one that affects communities worldwide. The ramifications of bacteria's ability to become resistant to antibiotics can be seen in hospitals, public places, our food supply, and our water.

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Plant death may reveal genetic mechanisms underlying cell self-destruction

Hybrid plants—those produced by crossing two different types of parents—often die in conditions in which both parents would survive. It's called hybrid lethality. Certain hybrid tobacco plants, for example, thrive at 36 degrees Celsius, but die at 28 degrees Celsius, which is the temperature at which both parents would thrive.

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Electrochemistry to benefit photonics: Nanotubes can control laser pulses

An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Laboratory of Nanomaterials at the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) has shown that the nonlinear optical response of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by electrochemical gating. This approach enabled designing a device for controlling the laser pulse duration.

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Update 'Nearest Relative' criteria under Mental Health Act to increase patient choice

Better provision must be made to allow people with mental health problems detained under the Mental Health Act to select a nominated person to act on their behalf, rather than automatically choosing a nearest relative.

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Researchers develop intelligent, shape-morphing, self-healing material for soft robotics

Advances in the fields of soft robotics, wearable technologies, and human/machine interfaces require a new class of stretchable materials that can change shape adaptively while relying only on portable electronics for power. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed such a material that exhibits a unique combination of high electrical and thermal conductivity with actuation capabili

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Mutation of the co-chaperone Tsc1 in bladder cancer diminishes Hsp90 acetylation and reduces drug sensitivity and selectivity

The researchers have recently identified the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 as a new co-chaperone of Hsp90 that affects Hsp90 binding to its inhibitors.Their findings suggest that TSC1 status may predict response to Hsp90 inhibitors in patients with bladder cancer, and co-targeting HDACs can sensitize tumors with Tsc1 mutations to Hsp90 inhibitors.

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Light-based strategy effectively treats carbon monoxide poisoning in rats

Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital recently developed a phototherapy strategy that was highly effective for removing carbon monoxide in rats.

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Aerial photographs shed light on Mont Blanc ice loss

Photographs taken in the exact same spot 100 years apart show the impact of climate change on the Mont Blanc massif.

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Nanostructures help to reduce the adhesion of bacteria

Scientists has shown how bacteria adhere to rough surfaces at the microscopic level. The team has discovered that precise analysis of the topographical composition of nanostructured surfaces provides a direct means of deriving the adhesive forces that bind bacteria to the surface. This discovery has opened up promising new avenues of research, including ways of combating the bacteria that are so h

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Watching energy transport through biomimetic nanotubes

Scientists have investigated a simple biomimetic light-harvesting system using advanced spectroscopy combined with a microfluidic platform. The double-walled nanotubes work very efficiently at low light intensities, while they are able to get rid of excess energy at high intensities. These properties are useful in the design of novel materials for the harvesting and transport of photon energy.

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Modelling ion beam therapy

A group of physicists have used Monte Carlo modelling to produce a consistent theoretical interpretation of accurate experimental measurements of ion beams in liquid water, which is the most relevant substance for simulating interactions with human tissue.

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Nanostructures help to reduce the adhesion of bacteria

Scientists has shown how bacteria adhere to rough surfaces at the microscopic level. The team has discovered that precise analysis of the topographical composition of nanostructured surfaces provides a direct means of deriving the adhesive forces that bind bacteria to the surface. This discovery has opened up promising new avenues of research, including ways of combating the bacteria that are so h

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Watching energy transport through biomimetic nanotubes

Scientists have investigated a simple biomimetic light-harvesting system using advanced spectroscopy combined with a microfluidic platform. The double-walled nanotubes work very efficiently at low light intensities, while they are able to get rid of excess energy at high intensities. These properties are useful in the design of novel materials for the harvesting and transport of photon energy.

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Placenta transit of an environmental estrogen

The human fetus is considered to be particularly sensitive to environmental contaminants. A team has now been able to demonstrate for the first time how the widespread food estrogen zearalenone behaves in the womb. Using a new analytical method, it was shown that the xenoestrogen migrates through the placenta and is partially converted to other harmful substances.

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Serum neurofilament is a discriminative biomarker between frontotemporal dementia and psychiatric disorders

Early symptoms of frontotemporal dementia are often confused with symptoms occurring in psychiatric disorders. Researchers show that serum neurofilament levels can be used as a diagnostic tool to differentiate between these conditions.

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Scientists track wheat aphids and their natural enemies for better pest management in Pakistan

For the first time, CABI scientists have studied the distribution and population dynamics of wheat aphids and their natural enemies in Pakistan through seasons and periods of time. This research could be useful to develop better pest management methods and safer, healthier crops in wheat production.

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A Lego-like approach to improve nature's own ability to kill dangerous bacteria

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers antibiotic resistance one of the most urgent public health threats, one that affects communities worldwide. The ramifications of bacteria's ability to become resistant to antibiotics can be seen in hospitals, public places, our food supply, and our water.

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Plant death may reveal genetic mechanisms underlying cell self-destruction

Hybrid plants—those produced by crossing two different types of parents—often die in conditions in which both parents would survive. It's called hybrid lethality. Certain hybrid tobacco plants, for example, thrive at 36 degrees Celsius, but die at 28 degrees Celsius, which is the temperature at which both parents would thrive.

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I'm Convinced We Found Evidence of Life on Mars in the 1970s

The Labeled Release experiment on the Viking mission reported positive results, although most have dismissed them as inorganic chemical reactions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tro på arbetsförmåga – väg till ett fungerande arbetsliv

Avhandlingen Critical factors in the return-to-work process. Perspectives of individuals with mental health problems, vocational rehabilitation professionals and employers , är signerad arbetsterapeut Susanne Porter som nu doktorerat i ämnet hälsovetenskap med inriktning psykisk hälsa. Den bygger på studier gjorda med personer som har psykisk ohälsa, med professionella som arbetar inom arbetsreha

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Sharing data for improved forest protection and monitoring

Although the mapping of aboveground biomass is now possible with satellite remote sensing, these maps still have to be calibrated and validated using on-site data gathered by researchers across the world. IIASA contributed to the establishment of a new global database to support Earth Observation and encourage investment in relevant field-based measurements and research.

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Secrets to climate change adaptation uncovered in the European corn borer moth

Biologists have found two genes that may permit some insect species to survive climate change by adjusting their biological annual clocks while others succumb. The researchers looked at the European corn borer moth and pinpointed variation in two circadian clock genes — per and Pdfr — that enable different populations of the moth to adapt their transitions to longer or shorter winters.

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New study analyzes FEMA-funded home buyout program

An analysis of FEMA's 30-year-old property buyout program offers new insight into the growing debate on managed retreat — moving people and assets out of flood-prone areas.

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The Milky Way kidnapped several tiny galaxies from its neighbor

A team of astronomers has discovered that several of the small — or 'dwarf' — galaxies orbiting the Milky Way were likely stolen from the Large Magellanic Cloud, including several ultrafaint dwarfs, but also relatively bright and well-known satellite galaxies, such as Carina and Fornax.

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Modelling ion beam therapy

A group of physicists have used Monte Carlo modelling to produce a consistent theoretical interpretation of accurate experimental measurements of ion beams in liquid water, which is the most relevant substance for simulating interactions with human tissue.

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Food comas and long-term memories: New research points to an appetizing connection

There may be a connection between food comas — resting after eating — and the formation of long-term memories, a team of neuroscientists concludes based on its study on brain activity in sea slugs.

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Plant death may reveal genetic mechanisms underlying cell self-destruction

Hybrid plants, which produced by crossing two different types of parents, often die in conditions in which both parents would survive. Certain hybrid tobacco plants, for example, thrive at 36 degrees Celsius, but die at 28 degrees Celsius, which is the temperature at which both parents would thrive. Researchers have begun to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which hybrid tobacco plant cells meet

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Experimental vaccine offers long-term protection against Ebola

Scientists show, on the molecular level, how an experimental vaccine offers long-term protection against the disease.

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Navy Scientist Known For “UFO-Like Tech” Patents Fusion Reactor

Space Age A U.S. Navy researcher with a quasi-facetious reputation for working on “UFO-like technology” just patented a compact nuclear fusion reactor that could allegedly fit inside of a vehicle — and don’t worry, we’re going to try our hardest to unpack that for you. Salvatore Cezar Pais, the engineer who also patented room-temperature superconductors for the Navy, was granted a patent for a sm

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Babies burdened by environmental estrogens in mothers' wombs

Early childhood life in the womb is particularly sensitive to the effects of environmental pollutants. A team from Empa and the University of Vienna has now for the first time been able to show how a pollutant from contaminated food – the environmental estrogen zearalenone – spreads in the womb and is metabolized into harmful metabolites.

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Tracking wild pigs in real time and understanding their interaction with agro-ecosystems

A new study in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications investigates how the success of a wild pig invasion may be dependent on how they use their surrounding food resources, and how when it comes to agriculture, the pigs continue their destructive trend.

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New customized drug treatment bypasses a single child's unique mutation within a year of diagnosis

An unprecedented case at Boston Children's Hospital shows that it's possible to do something that's never been done before: identify a patient's unique mutation, design a customized drug to bypass it, manufacture and test the drug, and obtain permission from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to begin treating the patient — all in less than one year.

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Researchers discover how chlamydia takes up new DNA from host

A recent paper by a team of molecular biologists headquartered at the University of Kansas pinpointed a gene that allows chlamydia to take up DNA from its host environment.

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Milky Way raids intergalactic 'bank accounts,' Hubble study finds

Gas blown out of the Milky Way disk from exploding stars falls back onto the galaxy to form new generations of stars. In an effort to account for this recycling process, astronomers were surprised to find a surplus of incoming gas.

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A Lego-like approach to improve nature's own ability to kill dangerous bacteria

In a paper recently published in Biomacromolecules, a Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute research team demonstrated how it could improve upon the ability of nature's exquisitely selective collection of antimicrobial enzymes to attack bacteria in a way that's much less likely to cause bacterial resistance.

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Biologically inspired skin improves robots' sensory abilities

Sensitive synthetic skin enables robots to sense their own bodies and surroundings — a crucial capability if they are to be in close contact with people. Inspired by human skin, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed a system combining artificial skin with control algorithms and used it to create the first autonomous humanoid robot with full-body artificial skin.

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I'm Convinced We Found Evidence of Life on Mars in the 1970s

The Labeled Release experiment on the Viking mission reported positive results, although most have dismissed them as inorganic chemical reactions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Robots to Replace 200,000 Banking Jobs: Report – Fortunly

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No more needles: New capsule design just as effective as injections

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Ambulance Drone

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Chrome will use AI to describe images for blind and low-vision users

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Mediterranean basin badly hit by climate change: study

Temperatures in the Mediterranean basin are increasing much faster than the global average, threatening food and water supplies, scientists warned Thursday in a new study.

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Google Stadia To Use Predictive AI To Reduce Streaming Lag While Gaming

Console gaming fans are looking forward to the next year or so as the PS5 game console is set to land in the holiday season of 2020. The Google Stadia game streaming platform is set to launch …

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UK vacuum maker Dyson scraps electric car project

Dyson, the British company best known for groundbreaking vacuum cleaners, is scrapping its electric car project because it doesn't make business sense.

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Stable radicals can solve unconventional problems in modern science and technology

Verdazyl radicals are stable molecules that are part of a variety of organic substances. You can literally sense, touch, and see them. More importantly, they can be applied for a variety of purposes since their properties differ from other classical organic molecules. Under certain conditions, these radicals have characteristics allowing them to solve unconventional problems in modern science and

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Noah-MP captures major hydrological patterns in China

The Noah land surface model with multi-parameterization options (Noah-MP) simulates the major spatiotemporal patterns of hydrological variables in China, a vast country characterized by complex terrain and large river basins across a wide range of climates.

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The Milky Way kidnapped several tiny galaxies from its neighbor

Just like the moon orbits the Earth, and the Earth orbits the sun, galaxies orbit each other according to the predictions of cosmology.

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Nanostructures help to reduce the adhesion of bacteria

Scientists have shown how bacteria adhere to rough surfaces at the microscopic level. Now a team of researchers has discovered that precise analysis of the topographical composition of nanostructured surfaces provides a direct means of deriving the adhesive forces that bind bacteria to a surface. This discovery has opened up promising new avenues of research, including ways of combating the bacter

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Secrets to climate change adaptation uncovered in the European corn borer moth

A team of biologists led by Tufts University has found two genes that may permit some insect species to survive climate change by adjusting their biological annual clocks while others succumb. The ability to synchronize behavioral, morphological and other transitions with the seasons is integral to the life cycle of most insects. In the study published today in Current Biology, the researchers loo

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Secrets to climate change adaptation uncovered in the European corn borer moth

A team of biologists led by Tufts University has found two genes that may permit some insect species to survive climate change by adjusting their biological annual clocks while others succumb. The ability to synchronize behavioral, morphological and other transitions with the seasons is integral to the life cycle of most insects. In the study published today in Current Biology, the researchers loo

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Modelling ion beam therapy

Hadron beam therapy, which is often used to treat solid tumours, involves irradiating a tumour with a beam of high-energy charged particles, most often protons; these transfer their energy to the tumour cells, destroying them. It is important to understand the precise physics of this energy transfer so the tumour can be targeted precisely. Pablo de Vera of MBN Research Center, Frankfurt, Germany a

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The Less You Know About Parasite, the Better

“If I had all this, I would be kinder.” So says Kim Ki-taek (played by Song Kang-ho), one of the main characters in the film Parasite , of his new employers’ home. It’s a modern mansion filled with burnished wood, polished glass, and every resource imaginable—the polar opposite of where Ki-taek lives with his family, a subterranean hovel that peers out onto a back alley in Seoul. To the Kims, the

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FSU physics researchers break new ground, explore unknown energy regions

Florida State University physicists are using photon-proton collisions to capture particles in an unexplored energy region, yielding new insights into the matter that binds parts of the nucleus together.

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Researchers decode the immune response to Ebola vaccine

The vaccine rVSV-EBOV is currently used in the fight against Ebola virus. Since 2018, more than 200,000 people have been vaccinated. However, how the vaccine actually works was only partially known. The research team led by Prof. Dr. Florian Klein from the Cologne University Hospital and the German Centre for Infection Research (DZIF) managed to decode the antibody response triggered by rVSV-EBOV.

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'Tricked' bacteria open new pathways to antimicrobial treatments

Scientists have developed a new technique to trick bacteria into revealing hundreds of holes in their cell walls, opening the door for drugs that destroy bacteria's cells.

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Genetics of nephropathia epidemica researched by Kazan Federal University

This particular inquiry pertains to CCR5 — a gene which has lately been on the focuses of research worldwide. In particular, CCR5 deletion was used in China to perform the first ever genetic editing on human embryos. It's also known that a CCR5-Δ32 mutation can make people immune to HIV.

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Brain scans may provide clues to suicide risk

Researchers have identified brain circuitry differences that might be associated with suicidal behavior in individuals with mood disorders. The study, published in Psychological Medicine, provides a promising lead toward tools that can predict which individuals are at the highest risk for suicide.

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CABI scientists track wheat aphids and their natural enemies for better pest management in Pakistan

For the first time, CABI scientists have studied the distribution and population dynamics of wheat aphids and their natural enemies in Pakistan through seasons and periods of time. This research could be useful to develop better pest management methods and safer, healthier crops in wheat production.

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Volleyball: The secret to sneaky float serves

A team of researchers performed wind tunnel experiments to determine the role of asymmetry caused by the orientation of a volleyball on its aerodynamic characteristics. They found that switching from the standard panel arrangement to a hexagonal or dimpled pattern may improve the consistency of flight, with many potential applications in aviation.

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Algorithm personalizes which cancer mutations are best targets for immunotherapy

As tumor cells multiply, they often spawn tens of thousands of genetic mutations. Figuring out which ones are the most promising to target with immunotherapy is like finding a few needles in a haystack. Now a new model hand-picks those needles so they can be leveraged in more effective, customized cancer vaccines.

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New electrolyte stops rapid performance decline of next-generation lithium battery

Researchers have designed and tested a new electrolyte composition that could greatly accelerate the adoption of the next generation of lithium-ion batteries.

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Light my fire: How to startup fusion devices every time

Researchers have constructed a framework for starting and raising a fusion plasma to temperatures rivaling the sun in hundreds of milliseconds.

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Why rats prefer company of the young and stressed

Researchers have identified a neural pathway implicated in social interaction between adult and juvenile animals.

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Study finds public support for health care providers talking about gun safety

Most Californians, including most gun owners, agree that gun safety conversations between health care providers and patients are appropriate when there is a gun in the home and risk of injury is elevated.

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Maternal obesity speeds up aging in offspring

The effects of maternal obesity even pass across generations to offspring, accelerating the rate of aging of metabolic problems that occur in normal life.

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Solution to Ice Age ocean chemistry puzzle

New research into the chemistry of the oceans during ice ages is helping to solve a puzzle that has engaged scientists for more than two decades. At issue is how much of the CO2 that entered the ocean during ice ages can be attributed to the 'biological pump', where atmospheric carbon is absorbed by phytoplankton and sequestered to the seafloor as organisms die and sink.

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China Will Make Citizens Scan Faces to Sign Up for Internet

Accessing the Web Starting in December, Quartz reports , tech companies in China will scan the face of anyone who signs up for internet service or a new cellphone number. The legislation was introduced by China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology in September to prevent fraud and “safeguard the legitimate rights and interests of citizens in the cyberspace,” as Quartz reports. The mo

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Watching energy transport through biomimetic nanotubes

Scientists from the University of Groningen (the Netherlands) and the University of Würzburg (Germany) have investigated a simple biomimetic light-harvesting system using advanced spectroscopy combined with a microfluidic platform. The double-walled nanotubes work very efficiently at low light intensities, while they are able to get rid of excess energy at high intensities. These properties are us

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Vibration in one direction only

Electronic components such as transistors transmit electric currents in one direction only. What if we could create materials that could achieve similar effects for mechanical vibrations? For many applications, having materials that transmit vibrations in one direction, but not in the other, would be extremely useful. In nature, such materials do not exist, but a group of physicists from the Unive

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Linguists track impact of cognitive decline across three decades of one writer's diaries

Linguistics researchers have identified a relationship between language change and the transition from healthy to a diagnosis of severe dementia. A study of one individual's diary entries over 31 years tracking the omission and then inclusion of the first-person pronoun "I", found the transition occurred around the time the writer was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that individuals

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Modelling ion beam therapy

A group of physicists have used Monte Carlo modelling to produce a consistent theoretical interpretation of accurate experimental measurements of ion beams in liquid water, which is the most relevant substance for simulating interactions with human tissue. This work has now been published in EPJ D.

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How skin cells from foot soles could help relieve amputees of stump injury

Imperial scientists hope to re-engineer stump skin for more comfortable prosthetics — using skin from the sole of the foot as a template.

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Musical perception: nature or nurture?

This is the subject of the research by Juan Manuel Toro (ICREA) and Carlota Pagès Portabella, researchers at the Center for Brain and Cognition, published in the journal Psychophysiology as part of a H2020 project being carried out with Fundació Bial to understand the neuronal bases of musical cognition.

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Has global warming stopped? The tap of incoming energy cannot be turned off

A rapid increase in the global ocean heat content has been detected in observations during the warming slowdown period, at a rate of about 9.8 × 1021 J yr-1. That is, from the energy point of view, there is no slowdown in global warming if we take the ocean into consideration.

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Food comas and long-term memories — New research points to an appetizing connection

There may be a connection between food comas — resting after eating — and the formation of long-term memories, a team of neuroscientists concludes based on its study on brain activity in sea slugs.

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NHS needs to act on patient feedback, say Sheffield health researchers

Researchers from the University of Sheffield School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) are today making a series of recommendations for NHS mental health trusts to change the way they collect and use patient feedback to improve the quality of care for inpatients.

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Sharing data for improved forest protection and monitoring

Although the mapping of aboveground biomass is now possible with satellite remote sensing, these maps still have to be calibrated and validated using on-site data gathered by researchers across the world. IIASA contributed to the establishment of a new global database to support Earth Observation and encourage investment in relevant field-based measurements and research.

1d

Secrets to climate change adaptation uncovered in the European corn borer moth

Biologists have found two genes that may permit some insect species to survive climate change by adjusting their biological annual clocks while others succumb. The researchers looked at the European corn borer moth and pinpointed variation in two circadian clock genes — per and Pdfr — that enable different populations of the moth to adapt their transitions to longer or shorter winters.

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AI-based cytometer detects rare cells in blood using magnetic modulation and deep learning

Researchers at UCLA Samueli School of Engineering, led by Prof. Aydogan Ozcan, have developed a new cytometry platform to detect rare cells in blood with high throughput and low cost.

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Stable radicals can solve unconventional problems in modern science and technology

Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University study reaction properties of verdazyl radicals, which can expand scientific knowledge into the field of organic chemistry and help to obtain new materials. The first results are related to control of the target compounds structures through chemical transformations and following obtaining various properties of the molecules by combining structural blocks.

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The Milky Way kidnapped several tiny galaxies from its neighbor

A team of astronomers led by scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has discovered that several of the small — or 'dwarf' — galaxies orbiting the Milky Way were likely stolen from the Large Magellanic Cloud, including several ultrafaint dwarfs, but also relatively bright and well-known satellite galaxies, such as Carina and Fornax.

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Noah-MP captures major hydrological patterns in China

The Noah land surface model with multi-parameterization options (Noah-MP) simulates the major spatiotemporal patterns of hydrological variables in China, a vast country characterized by complex terrain and large river basins across a wide range of climates.

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Barriers to access to hearing aids for children

Researchers looked at demographic, socioeconomic and clinical factors that were associated with timely access to hearing aids for children.

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Firearm-related eye injuries to patients under 21

Researchers used data from a national registry of hospitalized trauma cases in the United States to examine patterns of firearm-related eye injuries among patients under age 21 from 2008 through 2014. There were about 8,700 eye injuries from firearms in the US during that time, of which nearly a quarter (1,972) were in patients under 21, mostly male adolescents ages 12 to 18.

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CRISPR enzyme programmed to kill viruses in human cells

A team led by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has now turned a CRISPR RNA-cutting enzyme into an antiviral that can be programmed to detect and destroy RNA-based viruses in human cells.

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International group of researchers assert importance of diversity in genomics research

Broadening diversity among participants in human genomics research will maximize its potential to discover causes and possible treatments of diseases, requiring thoughtful study design and methodological considerations, write members of an international genomics consortium in the journal Cell.

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Buttons and flies help Hopkins solve longtime DNA mystery

Biologists at Johns Hopkins University have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect development.

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New study reveals an innate genome immune response to retroviruses in koalas

A new study from researchers at UMass Medical School and the University of Queensland in Australia identifies a never-before-seen type of immune response in an animal already known for being unique: the koala bear. Koalas use a novel genetic defense system to fight off infection through retroviruses, a system identified when scientists focused on KoRV-A, a retrovirus sweeping through the koala pop

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Gut immunity more developed before birth than previously thought

The first comprehensive look at the immune system of the fetal gut shows that it is far more developed before birth, and could help develop new maternal vaccines and reveal if we are predisposed to autoimmune diseases before birth.

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Viagra shows promise for use in bone marrow transplants

Researchers at UC Santa Cruz have demonstrated a new, rapid method to obtain donor stem cells for bone marrow transplants using a combination of Viagra and a second drug called Plerixafor. Bone marrow transplants, used mostly in the treatment of cancer, are life-saving procedures to restore the stem cells that generate new blood cells throughout a person's life.

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Koala epidemic provides lesson in how DNA protects itself from viruses

In animals, infections are fought by the immune system. Studies on an unusual virus infecting wild koalas, by a team of researchers from the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Queensland, reveal a new form of 'genome immunity.' The study appears Oct. 10 in the journal Cell.

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Biomedical sciences researchers isolate gut bacteria that can prevent and cure rotavirus infection

The presence of specific microbiota, or microorganisms that live in the digestive tract, can prevent and cure rotavirus infection, which is the leading cause of severe, life-threatening diarrhea in children worldwide, according to a new study by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University.

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Viagra helps mobilize bone marrow stem cells for transplantation in mice

The combination of two clinically approved drugs — Viagra and Plerixafor — rapidly and efficiently mobilizes blood stem cells from the bone marrow into the bloodstream in mice, researchers report Oct. 10 in the journal Stem Cell Reports. This strategy is almost as effective as the current standard protocol for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization.

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Nervous system's role in age-related weakness

A study finds new evidence to support the belief that the nervous system plays an important role in age-related weakness.

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Children associate white, but not black, men with 'brilliant' stereotype, new study finds

The stereotype that associates being 'brilliant' with white men more than white women is shared by children regardless of their own race, finds a team of psychology researchers. By contrast, its study shows, children do not apply this stereotype to black men and women.

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Protective mediators can help heal injured tendon cells by attacking inflammation

Tendon tears, both to the rotator cuff and Achilles heel, are common injuries, especially in aged individuals. Painful and disabling, they can adversely impact quality of life. New approaches are required to help patients suffering from chronic tendon injuries. A novel study identified mediators that promote resolution of inflammation as potential new therapeutics to push chronically injured tendo

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Brain mechanisms have potential to block arthritis pain

Because pain is a complex condition, treating it efficiently continues to pose challenge for physicians. Past pain research typically has focused upon the spinal cord or the peripheral areas of the nervous system located outside the spinal cord and brain. However, a research team recently investigated how some mechanisms in the brain contribute to pain.

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New science on cracking leads to self-healing materials

Cracks in the desert floor appear random to the untrained eye, even beautifully so, but the mathematics governing patterns of dried clay turn out to be predictable — and useful in designing advanced materials.

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System can minimize damage when self-driving vehicles crash

Engineers have developed decision-making and motion-planning technology to limit injuries and damage when self-driving vehicles are involved in unavoidable crashes. After recognizing that a collision of some kind is inevitable, the system works by analyzing all available options and choosing the course of action with the least serious outcome.

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Illegal urban off-road vehicles as risky as motorcycles in cities

People who illegally ride off-road vehicles, such as dirt bikes and all-terrain vehicles, on city streets suffer similar crash injuries as motorcyclists, but are less likely to die even though many riders don't wear helmets, according to new research.

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Ex-smokers, light smokers not exempt from lung damage

A new study shows that smoking even a few cigarettes a day is harmful to lungs and that former smokers continue to lose lung function at a faster rate than never-smokers for decades after quitting.

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First entirely digital clinical trial encourages physical activity

As little as a daily ping on your phone can boost physical activity, researchers report in a new study.

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Nanoparticles may have bigger impact on the environment than previously thought

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have shown that nanoparticles may have a bigger impact on the environment than previously thought.

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Capturing elephants from the wild hinders their reproduction for over a decade

Capturing elephants to keep in captivity not only hinders their reproduction immediately, but also has a negative effect on their calves, according to new research.

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Underuse of lifesaving drugs after heart attacks

Many heart attack patients in China fail to receive beta-blockers which could prevent another event and save their life.

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Review of 96 healthy eating studies finds 'nudges' yield best changes in eating habits

A gentle nudge in the right direction is sometimes all people need. In this case, new research finds it works when it comes to promoting healthy eating.

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Nanoparticles may have bigger impact on the environment than previously thought

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have shown that nanoparticles may have a bigger impact on the environment than previously thought.

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Uncovering the presynaptic distribution and profile of mitochondria

Scientists have provided unprecedented insight into the presynaptic distribution and profile of mitochondria in the developing and mature calyx of Held.

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New diagnostic criteria may enable earlier detection of cognitive impairment in women

Study finds when verbal memory test cut-offs were tailored to patient sex, more female patients and fewer male patients were considered to have amnesic mild cognitive impairment. This could change the way aMCI diagnoses are determined and make it easier to catch the condition in its early stages.

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Virtual review of cancer clinical trial treatment options quicker than conventional method

Using virtual, cloud-based, interconnected computing techniques applied to 51,000 variables, researchers reduced the time needed to assess a cancer patient's tumor profile and suitability for clinical trials from 14 to 4 days. This method also increased two-fold, over a four-year period, the number of cases that could be assessed compared to conventional methods.

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Social determinant screening useful for families with pediatric sickle cell disease

Individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD) face the burdens of chronic illness and often racial disparities, both of which may increase vulnerability to adverse social determinants of health (SDoH). For children with SCD, living in poverty is associated with lower quality of life, higher healthcare utilization and higher complication rates.

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Infectious disease in marine life linked to decades of ocean warming

New research shows that long-term changes in diseases in ocean species coincides with decades of widespread environmental change.

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Revealed: top UK thinktank spent decades undermining climate science

Institute of Economic Affairs has links to 14 members of Boris Johnson’s cabinet How vested interests tried to turn the world against climate science The UK’s most influential conservative thinktank has published at least four books, as well as multiple articles and papers, over two decades suggesting manmade climate change may be uncertain or exaggerated. The Institute of Economic Affairs (IEA)

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A Virus in Koala DNA Shows Evolution in Action

Many animals, including humans, have DNA left over from ancient viral infections. In koalas, researchers are studying the process in real time.

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Explore biodiversity around you

Do you want to know more about the world around you? iNaturalist allows anyone, anywhere to contribute to a global record of biodiversity by uploading pictures of plants and animals with their smartphone or computer. In a new podcast episode, co-host Justin Schell talks with Dr. Carrie Seltzer, the Stakeholder Engagement Strategist for iNaturalist, and with representatives and a volunteer from the

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Structure of the mitochondrial import gate reveals distinct preprotein paths

Nature, Published online: 10 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1680-7

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Fredag i København: Kulturnat for tekniske pilfingre

PLUS. Teknologi er også kultur, viser programmet for Kulturnatten i København næste fredag. Læs her om nogle af arrangementerne med naturvidenskabelig profil.

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Planting Tiny Spy Chips in Hardware Can Cost as Little as $200

A new proof-of-concept hardware implant shows how easy it may be to hide malicious chips inside IT equipment.

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Nanostructures help to reduce the adhesion of bacteria

Scientists has shown how bacteria adhere to rough surfaces at the microscopic level. The team has discovered that precise analysis of the topographical composition of nanostructured surfaces provides a direct means of deriving the adhesive forces that bind bacteria to the surface. This discovery has opened up promising new avenues of research, including ways of combating the bacteria that are so h

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Watching energy transport through biomimetic nanotubes

Scientists from the University of Groningen (the Netherlands) and the University of Würzburg (Germany) have investigated a simple biomimetic light-harvesting system using advanced spectroscopy combined with a microfluidic platform. The double-walled nanotubes work very efficiently at low light intensities, while they are able to get rid of excess energy at high intensities. These properties are us

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Placenta transit of an environmental estrogen

The human foetus is considered to be particularly sensitive to environmental contaminants. A team led by Benedikt Warth from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna and Tina Bürki from the Swiss Materials Science and Technology Institute, Empa, has now been able to demonstrate for the first time how the widespread food estrogen zearalenone behaves in the womb. Using a new analytical m

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HKU-led study on language speed and efficiency

Are some languages more efficient than others? In a recent study led by the University of Hong Kong (HKU) titled 'Different languages, similar encoding efficiency: comparable information rates across the human communicative niche', an international and interdisciplinary team comprising scientists at the Laboratoire Dynamique Du Langage (France), Ajou University (South Korea) and HKU analyzed 17 la

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Serum neurofilament is a discriminative biomarker between frontotemporal dementia and psychiatric disorders

Early symptoms of frontotemporal dementia are often confused with symptoms occurring in psychiatric disorders. Reporting their findings in Journal of Neurology, Finnish researchers from the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Oulu show that serum neurofilament levels can be used as a diagnostic tool to differentiate between these conditions

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Ebola antibodies at work

Scientists in Israel and Germany show, on the molecular level, how an experimental vaccine offers long-term protection against the disease.

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Plant death may reveal genetic mechanisms underlying cell self-destruction

Hybrid plants, which produced by crossing two different types of parents, often die in conditions in which both parents would survive. Certain hybrid tobacco plants, for example, thrive at 36 degrees Celsius, but die at 28 degrees Celsius, which is the temperature at which both parents would thrive. Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan have begun to unravel

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Natural 'bumblebee medicine' found in heather

Preserving heather in the natural landscape could have benefits for wild bees, say scientists.

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Does digital technology make students stupid?

Worry over test scores has led many to blame digital technology for waning educational achievement. New studies show that the persistent effects of "screen time" are not yet understood and may be short-lived. Many experts argue the best approach is to teach students the strategic and selective use of digital technology. None We've been here before. When books were the fresh new tech, Socrates bel

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CRISPR enzyme programmed to kill viruses in human cells

Many of the world's most common or deadly human pathogens are RNA-based viruses—Ebola, Zika and flu, for example—and most have no FDA-approved treatments. A team led by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has now turned a CRISPR RNA-cutting enzyme into an antiviral that can be programmed to detect and destroy RNA-based viruses in human cells.

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Buttons and flies help biologists solve longtime DNA mystery

Biologists at Johns Hopkins University have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect development.

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What does climate science tell us about monster storms like Hurricane Michael?

In the record-hot Florida fall of 2018, Hurricane Michael was rabid with hidden energy absorbed from a Gulf of Mexico 4 to 6 degrees warmer than normal.

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California blames EPA for stalled plans to curb pollution

California's top clean-air official fired back against Trump administration charges that the state hasn't done enough to fight pollution within its borders, saying the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency should "do its job."

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The Swing-District Factor in Impeachment

House Democrats are on recess and back in their districts this week, gauging how their constituents feel about impeachment. Public opinion has moved toward support of the impeachment inquiry, but many Democratic strategists remain especially concerned that the 31 House Democrats who represent districts that backed President Donald Trump in 2016 could face a backlash if they ultimately vote to imp

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How we're using DNA tech to help farmers fight crop diseases | Laura Boykin

Nearly 800 million people worldwide depend on cassava for survival — but this critical food source is under attack by entirely preventable viruses, says computational biologist and TED Senior Fellow Laura Boykin. She takes us to the farms in East Africa where she's working with a diverse team of scientists to help farmers keep their crops healthy using a portable DNA lab and mini supercomputer th

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CRISPR enzyme programmed to kill viruses in human cells

Many of the world's most common or deadly human pathogens are RNA-based viruses—Ebola, Zika and flu, for example—and most have no FDA-approved treatments. A team led by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has now turned a CRISPR RNA-cutting enzyme into an antiviral that can be programmed to detect and destroy RNA-based viruses in human cells.

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Buttons and flies help biologists solve longtime DNA mystery

Biologists at Johns Hopkins University have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect development.

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Astronomers show how supergiant stars repeatedly cool and heat up

An international team of professional and amateur astronomers, which includes Alex Lobel, astronomer at the Royal Observatory of Belgium, has determined in detail how the temperature of four yellow hypergiants increases from 4000 degrees to 8000 degrees and back again in a few decades. They will publish their findings in the professional journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

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Engineers put Leonardo da Vinci's bridge design to the test

In 1502 A.D., Sultan Bayezid II sent out the Renaissance equivalent of a government RFP (request for proposals), seeking a design for a bridge to connect Istanbul with its neighbor city Galata. …

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Batteries, exoplanets, cosmology and cell biology win Nobel laurels

And humanity is enriched in both body and spirit

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How to defeat AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis

As with other conflicts, money is the sinews of the war on disease

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How spider silk avoids hungry bacteria

No antibiotics are involved

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Human Gut Virome is Stable and Person-Specific

Most of the viruses present in people’s guts are bacteriophages, but how they interact with resident bacteria is still an open question.

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You probably score worse than monkeys on questions about the world

New Scientist readers are more knowledgeable than the general public and experts on the state of the world, but still score worse than monkeys would on some questions

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The Actual Reason Meat Is Not Healthy

Last week, as Americans grappled with the prospect of presidential impeachment and the national capacity for surprise seemed fatally depleted, news came out that shook people to their core. It was about meat. Eating red and processed meat, the headlines declared, was no longer unhealthy. It seemed—at a glance—that a bad thing was now a good thing. The stories were based on a recently published an

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Prehistoric humans ate bone marrow like canned soup 400,000 years ago

Researchers have uncovered evidence of the storage and delayed consumption of animal bone marrow at Qesem Cave near Tel Aviv. The research provides direct evidence that early Paleolithic people saved animal bones for up to nine weeks before feasting on them inside the cave.

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Warm ocean water attacking edges of Antarctica's ice shelves

Upside-down 'rivers' of warm ocean water are eroding the fractured edges of thick, floating Antarctic ice shelves from below, helping to create conditions that lead to ice-shelf breakup and sea-level rise, according to a new study. The findings describe a new process important to the future of Antarctica's ice and the continent's contribution to rising seas. Models and forecasts do not yet account

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Randomized controlled trial suggests healthier diet may directly reduce depression

Young adults with depression whose diet is usually unhealthy showed significantly fewer symptoms of depression after eating a healthy diet for three weeks, according to a new study.

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Meet Siamraptor suwati, a new species of giant predatory dinosaur from Thailand

Fossils discovered in Thailand represent a new genus and species of predatory dinosaur, according to a new study.

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Humans have salamander-like ability to regrow cartilage in joints

Contrary to popular belief, cartilage in human joints can repair itself through a process similar to that used by creatures such as salamanders and zebrafish to regenerate limbs, researchers have found.

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Women around the world face abuse during birth

More than one-third of women in four low- and middle-income countries experience mistreatment during childbirth in health facilities, research finds. The study shows that women were at the highest risk of experience physical and verbal abuse between 30 minutes of birth until 15 minutes after birth. Here, study leader Meghan Bohren from the University of Melbourne Centre for Health Equity and WHO

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Här är Nobelprisen i litteratur – på en minut

I år delades två litteraturpris ut i Nobels minne, ett för 2018 och ett för 2019. Men vilka fick priserna och varför? SVT sammanfattar årets Nobelpristagare tillsammans med Kulturnyheternas Hannes Fossbo, i klippet ovan och nedan.

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Removing invasive mice from the Farallon Islands would benefit threatened birds

New research from Point Blue Conservation Science shows the significant negative impact that invasive, non-native house mice on the Farallon Islands are having to the threatened ashy storm-petrel. Original modeling by ecologists published today in the journal Ecosphere shows the potential impacts to the petrel's population if mice are allowed to remain. The super-abundant mice encourage migrating

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Listen: Mindfulness at work can make you a better coworker

Including just a few minutes of mindfulness at work in each day makes employees more helpful and productive, according to new research. “Mindfulness is really about calming down and being in touch with what is happening in the present moment,” says Lindsey Cameron, a professor of management at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. Cameron is coauthor of the study in Or

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Lad os elske generne sammen

Mads Koch Hansen skal ikke være bekymret – jeg vil gøre mit yderste for, at Nationalt Genom Center får et åbent, tæt og godt samarbejde med klinikken.

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Removing invasive mice from the Farallon Islands would benefit threatened birds

New research from Point Blue Conservation Science shows the significant negative impact that invasive, non-native house mice on the Farallon Islands are having to the threatened ashy storm-petrel. Original modeling by ecologists published today in the journal Ecosphere shows the potential impacts to the petrel's population if mice are allowed to remain. The super-abundant mice encourage migrating

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Reef fish caring for their young are taken advantage of by other fish

Among birds, the practice of laying eggs in other birds' nests is surprisingly common. This phenomenon, known as brood parasitism, was unknown in coral reef fish because most marine fish don't provide any parental care at all. Now, however, biologists studying an unusual kind of coral reef fish that does care for its young have found that, sure enough, other fish are taking advantage of this to ge

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Light my fire: How to start up fusion devices every time

How do you start a fusion reaction, the process that lights the sun and stars, on Earth? Like lighting a match to start a fire, you first produce plasma, the state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei that fuels fusion reactions, and raise it to temperatures rivaling the sun in hundreds of milliseconds.

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Milky Way raids intergalactic 'bank accounts,' Hubble study finds

Our Milky Way is a frugal galaxy. Supernovas and violent stellar winds blow gas out of the galactic disk, but that gas falls back onto the galaxy to form new generations of stars. In an ambitious effort to conduct a full accounting of this recycling process, astronomers were surprised to find a surplus of incoming gas.

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Luca powers up for a spacewalk

European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Luca Parmitano is preparing to step out into space for his first spacewalk of the Beyond mission.

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Why DNA Might Be the Data Storage Solution of the Future

A new machine may be the tipping point for making DNA-based data storage mainstream.

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The Question Trump Republicans Must Ask Themselves

Is it possible to believe that President Donald Trump is abandoning a vital ally to slaughter, that he is ensuring the rebirth of a genocidal terrorist group that threatens the United States, and that he ought to be the 2020 GOP nominee? Republicans must now confront that question. On Twitter yesterday morning, Senator Lindsey Graham lamented that “a disaster is in the making” in an area of north

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Media alert: New articles on the ethics of genome editing published in The CRISPR Journal

The CRISPR Journal announces the publication of its October 2019 Special Issue on The Ethics of Human Genome Editing.

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Nobelpriset i kemi: De skapade en laddningsbar värld

Kungl. Vetenskapsakademien har beslutat utdela Nobelpriset i kemi 2019 till amerikanerna John B. Goodenough och Stanley Whittingham, och japanen Akira Yoshino ”för utveckling av litiumjonbatterier”. Litiumjonbatterier används i världens alla länder för att driva den bärbara elektronik som vi använder för att kommunicera, arbeta, forska, lyssna på musik och ta del av kunskap. Litiumjonbatterier ha

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Socialtjänsten allt större hyresvärd

En ny studie från Göteborgs universitet visar att socialtjänsten i allt fler kommuner har varit tvungen utöka sitt arbete med boendeinsatser. – Gruppen som har socialtjänsten som hyresvärd har ökat markant samtidigt som bostadslösheten spridit sig från storstäderna till mindre kommuner, säger Matti Wirehag, doktorand i socialt arbete vid Göteborgs universitet. Med hjälp av data från Socialstyrels

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Would you stand up to an oppressive regime or would you conform? Here's the science

Margaret Atwood's novel The Handmaid's Tale described the horror of the authoritarian regime of Gilead. In this theocracy, self-preservation was the best people could hope for, being powerless to kick against the system. But her sequel, The Testaments, raises the possibility that individuals, with suitable luck, bravery and cleverness, can fight back.

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New insights into salamander limb development

A new paper by University of Kentucky researchers was recently published in the journal eLife, offering new insights and implications into the study of limb development and the evolution of vertebrate limbs.

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Sustainability and efficiency: the new trends driving the plastics industry

With a combined workforce of almost 300,000 employees, plastics is one of Germany's major industrial sectors. The industry also enjoys a strong position on the international stage, due in no small part to its productive research performance. At this year's "K" trade fair, the world's leading industry event for plastics, a total of 11 Fraunhofer Institutes will be exhibiting innovative, sustainable

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The lifespan of an evaporating liquid drop

The lifespan of a liquid droplet which is transforming into vapour can now be predicted thanks to a theory developed at the University of Warwick. The new understanding can now be exploited in a myriad of natural and industrial settings where the lifetime of liquid drops governs a process' behaviour and efficiency.

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River relic spied by Mars Express

Mars may seem to be an alien world, but many of its features look eerily familiar—such as this ancient, dried-up river system that stretches out for nearly 700 kilometres across the surface, making it one of the longest valley networks on the planet.

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The Divided States of America: How social media reveals social fragmentation

Far from being an egalitarian melting pot of diverse opinions and worldviews, the Internet has grown to mirror the same social divisions that exist offline. The U.S. is fragmented into physically segregated communities with polarized idealogical differences. That is the conclusion of a new paper by the New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI) published in the Journal of the Royal Society Inte

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Podcast Extra: Q&A with Nobel Prize winner John Goodenough

Nature, Published online: 09 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03079-1 Benjamin Thompson chats to Goodenough about being awarded a Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

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New insights into salamander limb development

A new paper by University of Kentucky researchers was recently published in the journal eLife, offering new insights and implications into the study of limb development and the evolution of vertebrate limbs.

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For newborn planets, solar systems are naturally baby-proof

Numerical simulations by a group of astronomers, led by Mario Flock from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, have shown that young planetary systems are naturally "baby-proof": Physical mechanisms combine to keep young planets in the inner regions from taking a fatal plunge into the star. Similar processes also allow planets to be born close to stars—from pebbles trapped in a region close to t

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Simple materials offer a peek into the quantum realm

As reported in Nature Physics, a Berkeley Lab-led team of physicists and materials scientists was the first to unambiguously observe and document the unique optical phenomena that occur in certain types of synthetic materials called moire; superlattices. The new findings will help researchers understand how to better manipulate materials into light emitters with controllable quantum properties.

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Gut microbes can be picky eaters – here's why it matters

We choose our food for a variety of reasons, including personal preference, availability, cost and healthiness. But we should also take our gut microbes' preferences into account, a new study published in Cell suggests.

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Trash to treasure: Scientists convert municipal waste to biofuel precursors

As the need for energy security grows, scientists are investigating nonfood biomass sources that can be used to create valuable biofuels and bioproducts. Among these sources is municipal solid waste (MSW)—in other words, trash that's produced every day around the world in significant amounts.

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Compound in breast milk fights harmful bacteria

A compound in human breast milk fights infections by harmful bacteria while allowing beneficial bacteria to thrive, according to researchers. Human breast milk has more than 200 times the amount of glycerol monolaurate (GML) than is found in cows' milk. Infant formula has none. Future research will determine if GML could be a beneficial additive to cow's milk and infant formula.

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One in five cardiac rehab patients are depressed, anxious, or stressed

Patients with depression, anxiety or stress are more likely to drop out of cardiac rehabilitation, reports a new study.

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New production technique for high-performance polymer could make for better body armor

Using a new composite nanoparticle catalyst, researchers have shown they can make degradation-resistant PBO, a polymer used to make body armor and other high-performance fabrics.

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New mechanism fueling brain metastasis

Scientists described a novel mechanism through which astrocytes, the most abundant supporting cells in the brain, also promote cancer cell growth and metastasis in the brain.

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Core symptom of schizophrenia reversed in adult mice

Researchers have restored normal working memory to a mouse model of schizophrenia, eliminating a core symptom of the disorder that, in people, has proven virtually impossible to treat.

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Electronic solid could reduce carbon emissions in fridges and air conditioners

A promising replacement for the toxic and flammable greenhouse gases that are used in most refrigerators and air conditioners has been identified.

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Gut microbes can be picky eaters – here's why it matters

We choose our food for a variety of reasons, including personal preference, availability, cost and healthiness. But we should also take our gut microbes' preferences into account, a new study published in Cell suggests.

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Wells Fargo report: A.I. will cut 200,000 American bank jobs over next decade

Wells Fargo report predicts over 200,000 jobs will be lost. The banking industry is investing $150 billion a year into tech. Automation technologies are becoming increasingly more sophisticated. A new era of banking is upon us. The advent and rise of A.I. technological prowess is a force to be reckoned with. No industry is safe: the latest in the crosshairs is the banking industry. A recent repor

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Scientists Found New Antibiotic Molecules—Right In the Human Microbiome

The human microbiome is the dark matter of biology: we know it’s there and critically balances health from disease. We can broadly examine microbe members with advanced DNA sequencing methods and infer their species makeup. With several doses of antibiotics, we can even observe what happens when we temporarily lose our trillions of symbiotic microbugs. Spoiler: the results, ranging from depressiv

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With Category Theory, Mathematics Escapes From Equality

The equal sign is the bedrock of mathematics. It seems to make an entirely fundamental and uncontroversial statement: These things are exactly the same. But there is a growing community of mathematicians who regard the equal sign as math’s original error. They see it as a veneer that hides important complexities in the way quantities are related — complexities that could unlock solutions to an en

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Brie Larson Says Marvel's Superheroines Want an All-Female Movie

Also: The new 'Matrix' flick might have found another cast member.

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The rise, fall and rise again of businesses serving more than just their shareholders

What's the purpose of a business? For a long time, the textbook answer to that question has been purely "to make as much money as possible for its shareholders." But business leaders—who often themselves get huge payouts from this model—are beginning to challenge this orthodoxy.

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Healthier food can fight sleep deprivation’s effects

A better diet is associated with reduced side effects of sleep deprivation, according to new research. As part of recent research, Maryam Hamidi had to repeatedly stay awake from 8 AM until 5 AM the next day. As part of the study, she also needed to keep supplies of both healthy and unhealthy snacks stacked in her office. Then, somewhere along the line, Hamidi, a nutrition scientist at Stanford U

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Enhancing memory network via brain stimulation

Magnetic stimulation of the posterior parietal cortex increases functional connectivity of a neural network implicated in memory, shows human research published in eNeuro. This finding confirms a previous study, validating further exploration of this technique for experimental and clinical applications.

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Science snapshots — Waste to fuel, moire superlattices, mining cellphones for energy data

As reported in Nature Physics, a Berkeley Lab-led team of physicists and materials scientists was the first to unambiguously observe and document the unique optical phenomena that occur in certain types of synthetic materials called moire; superlattices. The new findings will help researchers understand how to better manipulate materials into light emitters with controllable quantum properties.

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The secret to sneaky float serves

A team of researchers led by the University of Tsukuba performed wind tunnel experiments to determine the role of asymmetry caused by the orientation of a volleyball on its aerodynamic characteristics. They found that switching from the standard panel arrangement to a hexagonal or dimpled pattern may improve the consistency of flight, with many potential applications in aviation.

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Testing, testing: How will measurement change in the future of education?

We need to embrace a plethora of schooling options as necessary to help different types of learners get to success. On top of testing for literacy and math competence, we should also test for other things that are clearly important to parents, such as whether kids feel safe and cared for. These things are softer but more difficult to assess. To improve our education system, we need to understand

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Daring Tourists Can Now Visit Chernobyl’s Control Room

It’s been more than 33 years since the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, in present-day Ukraine, experienced a critical failure that resulted in the worst nuclear disaster in history. As time has passed, the area around the power plant has become a grisly tourist attraction, drawing visitors who want to experience the eeriness of a place that has remained largely untouched for decades. Previously, v

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Trophy hunting – can it really be justified by 'conservation benefits'?

Killing animals for fun is an activity which divides opinion. It can also be a highly emotive issue, with high profile cases like the death of Cecil the lion sparking global media coverage and outcry. There were even calls for the American dentist who admitted killing Cecil to be charged with illegal hunting.

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Trophy hunting – can it really be justified by 'conservation benefits'?

Killing animals for fun is an activity which divides opinion. It can also be a highly emotive issue, with high profile cases like the death of Cecil the lion sparking global media coverage and outcry. There were even calls for the American dentist who admitted killing Cecil to be charged with illegal hunting.

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Flere elbiler har problemer med lang ladetid i Danmark

PLUS. En række elbiler på markedet snegler sig afsted, når de lades op i hjemmet eller på en række offentlige ladestationer. Men det er primært et problem i Danmark, mener elbilforening.

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Study offers solution to Ice Age ocean chemistry puzzle

New research into the chemistry of the oceans during ice ages is helping to solve a puzzle that has engaged scientists for more than two decades. At issue is how much of the CO2 that entered the ocean during ice ages can be attributed to the 'biological pump', where atmospheric carbon is absorbed by phytoplankton and sequestered to the seafloor as organisms die and sink.

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Why rats prefer company of the young and stressed

Researchers have identified a neural pathway implicated in social interaction between adult and juvenile animals, according to new research in rats published in JNeurosci.

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Maternal obesity speeds up aging in offspring

The effects of maternal obesity even pass across generations to offspring, accelerating the rate of aging of metabolic problems that occur in normal life.

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Research sheds new light on how the brain forms and recalls memories

Neuroscientists at the University of Birmingham have proved how different parts of the human brain work together to create and retrieve episodic memory.

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Study finds public support for health care providers talking about gun safety

Most Californians, including most gun owners, agree that gun safety conversations between health care providers and patients are appropriate when there is a gun in the home and risk of injury is elevated.

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New study analyzes FEMA-funded home buyout program

An analysis of FEMA's 30-year-old property buyout program offers new insight into the growing debate on managed retreat–moving people and assets out of flood-prone areas.

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Helping conservation initiatives turn contagious

New research shows that conservation initiatives go viral, which helps scientists and policymakers better design successful programs more likely to be adopted.

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Best Ways to Improve Cloud ERP with AI and Machine Learning

submitted by /u/erp_oodles [link] [comments]

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Fossil fuel industry sees the future of their product in hard-to-recycle plastic

Plastic pollution and the climate crisis are two inseparable parts of the same problem, though they aren't treated as such. Many countries have implemented plastic bag charges and plastic straw bans while action to phase out fossil fuels lags far behind, due in part to the inertia of the huge oil and gas companies that dominate the sector.

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Why Humans' Extinct 'Hobbit' Relatives Were So Small

The diminutive size of the extinct human relative called the Hobbit, or Homo floresiensis, could come down to really fast evolution.

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Removing invasive mice from the Farallon Islands would benefit threatened birds

New research shows the significant negative impact that invasive, non-native house mice on the Farallon Islands are having to the threatened ashy storm-petrel. Original modeling by ecologists shows the potential impacts to the petrel's population if mice are allowed to remain. The super-abundant mice encourage migrating burrowing owls to stay on the island, who later in the winter switch from eati

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A new run of the CLOUD experiment examines the direct effect of cosmic rays on clouds

CERN's colossal complex of accelerators is in the midst of a two-year shutdown for upgrade work. But that doesn't mean all experiments at the Laboratory have ceased to operate. The CLOUD experiment, for example, has just started a data run that will last until the end of November.

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Scientists design graphene filter to purify methane from biogas

UNSW researchers are using 'wonder material' graphene to generate sustainable energy in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

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Demonstrating slow light in rubidium vapor using single photons from a trapped ion

Quantum networks can be practically implemented to interface with different quantum systems. In order to photonically link hybrid systems with combined unique properties of each constituent system, scientists must integrate sources with the same photon emission wavelength. For instance, trapped ions and neutral atoms can both have compelling properties as nodes and memories within quantum networks

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After Sparring, NASA and SpaceX Declare a Shared Mission

The space agency’s administrator, Jim Bridenstine, met Elon Musk at SpaceX headquarters on Thursday to review progress toward launching NASA astronauts.

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The Mega Rich Are Having Trouble Finding Pilots For Private Jets

Empty Cockpit Bad news for the extremely wealthy: airplane pilots are abandoning their gigs flying private jets for more steady work at commercial airlines. Pilots seem to be attracted to steady jobs that provide regular pay rather than the hourly wages and short notice that come with captaining some rich folks’ private planes, according to The Independent . The result is a labor shortage that’s

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Danmarks største CO2-udleder i industrien: Aalborg Portland kæmper med sine grønne mål

Trods store investeringer har selskabet svært ved at nå egne grønne mål.

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Trods grønne mål: Udslip stiger med 17 procent i største danske CO2-virksomheder

Stigningen er et problem for de politiske klima-ambitioner, mener de økonomiske vismænd.

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Se listen: 20 virksomheder står bag en tredjedel af al energirelateret CO2-udledning

Fossilvirksomheder er de store 'klimaskurke', slår Guardian-afsløring fast.

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Om 10 år flyver du måske over Atlanten på alger

Forskere kigger mod havet for at finde alternative brændstoffer.

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Affaldsglas kan hjælpe med at holde varmen: Husstande kan spare 800 kroner om året

Et projekt i Næstved tester en ny slags isolering af fjernvarmerør, som kan spare energi og give lavere varmeregninger.

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EU åbner for klima-toldmur: Handelskrig mellem 'grønne' og 'sorte' lande kan opstå

CO2-told omkring EU vil nedbringe udledningen af drivhusgasser i Asien, siger eksperter.

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Bekymret for klimaet og fremtiden? Her er tre gode råd fra en psykolog

Hvorfor bekymrer man sig? Og hvad kan man gøre ved det?

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Støttepartier presser regeringen om biobrændstof: Ud med rapsolie – ind med svinefedt

Kun affaldsprodukter skal fremover blandes i benzin som biobrændstof, lyder krav.

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If we label eco-anxiety as an illness, climate denialists have won

The UK media reports a “tsunami” of cases of eco-anxiety in children. It is no medical condition, though, it is a rational response to the state of the climate, says Graham Lawton

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Neurofeedback increases self-esteem by rebalancing brain circuits in depression

A study published in the journal Neuroimage: Clinical found that patients with Major Depressive Disorder, who had recovered from symptoms, were able to strengthen some of their brain connections, thereby increasing their self-esteem. The research showed that connectivity between certain brain regions – previously found to be decreased when feeling guilt in people with a history of depression – cou

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Light my fire: How to startup fusion devices every time

Researchers have constructed a framework for starting and raising a fusion plasma to temperatures rivaling the sun in hundreds of milliseconds.

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New electrolyte stops rapid performance decline of next-generation lithium battery

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory have designed and tested a new electrolyte composition that could greatly accelerate the adoption of the next generation of lithium-ion batteries.

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Targeting immune cells may be potential therapy for Alzheimer's

A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that microglia drive neurodegeneration in diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, that are linked to tau protein. Targeting microglia may help treat such diseases.

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Researchers identify new therapeutic target for pulmonary fibrosis

Researchers in Japan have identified a genetic mutation that causes a severe lung disease called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) by killing the cells lining the lung's airways. The study, which will be published October 10 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that protecting these cells by inhibiting a cell death pathway called necroptosis could be a new therapeutic approach

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Reducing, reusing Europe's 2.5 million tonnes of plastic in e-waste each year

Plastics account for about 20% of materials in electronic and electrical equipment (EEE); most isn't designed for recovery and reuse. To reduce Europe's 2.5 million tonnes of plastic components discarded annually in e-waste, a European Commission-funded, UN-supported campaign calls on consumers to favor electronic products made with recycled plastic, and on manufacturers to redesign products to bo

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Sunlight degrades polystyrene faster than expected

Researchers show that polystyrene, one of the world's most ubiquitous plastics, may degrade in decades or centuries when exposed to sunlight, rather than thousands of years as previously thought.

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How America Lost Dinner

Right now, a box of food from a meal-kit company is probably moldering in my apartment building’s mail room. I haven’t been down there in a few days, so maybe there isn’t one at this very moment . But more than two years of living in this building has taught me there’s basically always at least one box, forgotten and slightly stinky. When I visit friends, I often walk past a similar scene next to

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Researchers find black offenders more likely to be arrested than white offenders when committing violent crime together

Racial disparities at every level of the criminal justice system in America are well documented. Now, a new study by Florida State University researchers reveals it also exists at the initial level of arrest, even when the crime is committed by a diverse pair of co-offenders.

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One in four of London's green spaces breaches air quality safety limits

More than one quarter of London's parks, playground, and open spaces exceed international safety limits for air quality.

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To build a better semiconductor, first identify its defects

Gallium oxide is a remarkable wide-bandgap semiconductor material. Put simply, that means it could potentially be used to create electronic devices that can operate under extreme conditions – such as when exposed to high heat and high doses of radiation. But before it can find widespread use, we need to know more about it.

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Online prototype could improve ocean migratory species governance

An online mapping and knowledge platform prototype could soon offer free and easily accessible information on the migratory patterns of endangered species in the ocean.

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Ice core source discovery adds to study of volcanic activity, climate system interactions

A new discovery by University of Maine researchers that challenges the established volcanic source of particles found in an ice core from the South Pole adds to the global record of volcanism and is relevant to several research disciplines.

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Liver fluke linked to liver disease in U.K. horses

A harmful parasite that costs the U.K. cattle and sheep industry an estimated £300 million per year may also be an under‐recognised cause of liver disease in horses, a study by the University of Liverpool has found.

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Naturally occurring fungi could curb moose tick plague, entomologists find

Cheryl Sullivan was in the woods one warm October day, flicking yet another tick from her leg, "which felt like the tenth of the day," she says.

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Scientists find recipe for greener garden waste disposal

Scientists have developed a recipe that addresses a growing need for sustainable disposal of urban garden waste in China and could also be useful in North America.

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Online prototype could improve ocean migratory species governance

An online mapping and knowledge platform prototype could soon offer free and easily accessible information on the migratory patterns of endangered species in the ocean.

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Liver fluke linked to liver disease in U.K. horses

A harmful parasite that costs the U.K. cattle and sheep industry an estimated £300 million per year may also be an under‐recognised cause of liver disease in horses, a study by the University of Liverpool has found.

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Naturally occurring fungi could curb moose tick plague, entomologists find

Cheryl Sullivan was in the woods one warm October day, flicking yet another tick from her leg, "which felt like the tenth of the day," she says.

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The Fearful Mind

Fear is a hardwired response, but it doesn’t have to rule our emotions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Fearful Mind

Fear is a hardwired response, but it doesn’t have to rule our emotions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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23andMe Just Opened a Pop-Up Shop in a Mall

23andMe is moving out of the home and into the mall. The popular at-home DNA testing company just opened its first store, a new Bloomberg story reveals, launching a pop-up retail shop at the Westfield Valley Fair mall in Santa Clara, California, on October 1. Now, rather than going online to order one of the company’s DNA testing kits, which cost between $99 and $199, and waiting for it to arrive

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The secret to sneaky float serves

A research team led by the University of Tsukuba studied the aerodynamics of a volleyball using a wind tunnel and hitting robot. They found that no matter the orientation of a standard ball, the pattern of panels presents an asymmetric surface to the flow of air, leading to deviations in its flight patterns. This work may help shed light on unsolved questions in the field of fluid dynamics.

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New approach for the simulation of quantum chemistry—modelling the molecular architecture

Searching for new substances and developing new techniques in the chemical industry: tasks that are often accelerated using computer simulations of molecules or reactions. But even supercomputers quickly reach their limits. Now researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching (MPQ) have developed an alternative, analogue approach. An international team around Javier Argüello-L

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Offering solutions to Ice Age ocean chemistry puzzle

New research into the chemistry of the oceans during ice ages is helping to solve a puzzle that has engaged scientists for more than two decades.

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Fires continue to rage through the habitat of a newly discovered Amazonian primate

Imagine the thrill of discovering a new species of primate. For a conservationist, it's the stuff that dreams are made of. Then picture the nightmare scenario in which you're forced to watch helplessly as the habitat of that newly discovered species is engulfed in flames. That is the heartbreaking reality faced by Rodrigo Costa Araújo and his colleagues at the National Institute of Amazonian Resea

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Electrochemistry to benefit photonics: nanotubes can control laser pulses

An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Laboratory of Nanomaterials at the Skoltech Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials (CPQM) has shown that the nonlinear optical response of carbon nanotubes can be controlled by electrochemical gating. This approach enabled designing a device for controlling the laser pulse duration. The results of the study were published in the p

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Astronomers investigate a black hole candidate during outburst

Using MeeKAT telescope, astronomers have studied a black hole candidate X-ray binary system known as H1743−322 during an outburst that took place last year. Results of the study, presented in a paper published October 1 on arXiv.org, could help astronomers to untangle the mysteries of black holes existing as part of binary systems.

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Drop the doom and gloom: Climate journalism is about empowerment

There is a simple irony in dealing with climate change. To get a handle on the problem means that, at a certain level, the conversation has to move away from climate change. What does that mean?

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High Schools Need to Get Over It and Embrace Esports

Opinion: Rather than bucking the trend, politicians and educators should help students avoid gaming addiction and build healthy, productive team play.

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Make Your Own Vinyl Records With the $1,100 Phonocut

The Phonocut is an at-home vinyl lathe, allowing anyone with a digital audio file and a dream to cut a 10-inch record.

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Affordable and mobile purification of dialysis water

People who suffer from end stage renal desease frequently undergo dialysis on a fixed schedule. For patients this artificial washing of the blood is a major burden. To remove toxins from the blood, large quantities of dialysis water for clearance are required. Until now there has been no solution so far to recover this dialysate cost-effectively. Therefore a cryo-purification method is being devel

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Tests start at CERN for large-scale prototype of new technology to detect neutrinos

Scientists working at CERN have started tests of a new neutrino detector prototype, using a very promising technology called "dual phase." If successful, this new technology will be used at a much larger scale for the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by the U.S Department of Energy's Fermilab.

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Physics researchers break new ground, explore unknown energy regions

Florida State University physicists are using photon-proton collisions to capture particles in an unexplored energy region, yielding new insights into the matter that binds parts of the nucleus together.

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Vådservietter, vatpinde og et gebis: Briter har dissekeret fedtklump fra kloakken

Et fedtbjerg, der blev fundet under en engelsk badeby er blevet dissekeret. De ældre i byen har fodret fedbjerget med vådservietter, inkontinensbind og vatpinde, viser undersøgelsen.

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Scientists call on public to help solve snow gum murder mystery

Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) are asking the public to help investigate a phenomenon that's killing Australia's iconic snow gums.

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Testing, testing: How will measurement change in the future of education?

We need to embrace a plethora of schooling options as necessary to help different types of learners get to success. On top of testing for literacy and math competence, we should also test for other things that are clearly important to parents, such as whether kids feel safe and cared for. These things are softer but more difficult to assess. To improve our education system, we need to understand

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Removing invasive mice from the Farallon Islands would benefit threatened birds

New research from Point Blue Conservation Science shows the significant negative impact that invasive, non-native house mice on the Farallon Islands are having to the threatened ashy storm-petrel. Original modeling by ecologists published today in the journal Ecosphere shows the potential impacts to the petrel's population if mice are allowed to remain. The super-abundant mice encourage migrating

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Defects on the surface of catalysts determine their activity

Many technical processes, including chemical production, exhaust gas purification and the chemical storage of solar energy would not be possible without catalysts. In the chemical industry, the vast majority of products produced come into contact with at least one heterogeneous catalyst. Such catalysts are solid substances on whose surfaces gaseous substances adsorb and react. The catalyst enables

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How to protect homes from wildfire is subject of professor's new book

The 2018 wildfire season was the deadliest and most destructive on record in California, according to CAL FIRE. Yet, after almost every wildfire, a house survives, somehow protected from the flames that consumed its neighbors.

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Scientists call on public to help solve snow gum murder mystery

Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) are asking the public to help investigate a phenomenon that's killing Australia's iconic snow gums.

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Ancient fossils reveal fresh clues about early life on land

Slime has been present on Earth for a very long time—almost 2 billion years, according to a recent reassessment of fossil evidence.

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Peering into batteries: X-rays reveal lithium-ion's mysteries

Billions of smartphone owners are familiar with the dreaded "low battery" symbol on their devices. While consumers groan, scientists are working to understand why and when lithium-ion batteries in phones, plug-in electric vehicles, and other applications lose charge or fail.

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Resisting Protein Degradation: The Cells Fight Back

With all the work going into targeted protein degradation now ( recent review ), we’re discovering a lot of things about it that weren’t apparent at first. To pick an obvious one, these things have several steps in their mechanism (binding to the target protein, binding to a ubiquitin ligase to form a ternary complex, ubiquitination of the target, and its subsequent degradation), and there can be

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'Tricked' bacteria open new pathways to antimicrobial treatments

Scientists have developed a new technique to trick bacteria into revealing hundreds of holes in their cell walls, opening the door for drugs that destroy bacteria's cells.

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'Tricked' bacteria open new pathways to antimicrobial treatments

Scientists have developed a new technique to trick bacteria into revealing hundreds of holes in their cell walls, opening the door for drugs that destroy bacteria's cells.

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Quantum state of single electrons controlled by 'surfing' on sound waves

Researchers have successfully used sound waves to control quantum information in a single electron, a significant step towards efficient, robust quantum computers made from semiconductors.

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New Steam Feature Adds Online Play to All Local Multiplayer Games

Valve is introducing a new feature to Steam designed to allow local multiplayer games to stream seamlessly over the internet. Remote Play Together could reinvigorate …

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New method could make bulletproof armor material even tougher

A new way to produce a polymer material called polybenzoxazole, a product in bulletproof vests and other high-performance fabrics, could help body armor resist degradation, researchers report. Degradation is a problem that has plagued materials that contain PBO, known commercially as Zylon, in the past. “We show that using a nanoparticle catalyst, we can produce PBO in more environmentally friend

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Rymdväder kräver internationellt samarbete

Under de senaste 10-20 åren har riskerna från rymdväder uppmärksammats med ökande intresse och på bred internationell nivå. Rymdväder omfattar vissa fysikaliska tillstånd och fenomen i jordens närmiljö, som i grund och botten skapas av solens aktivitet genom strålning, energirika partiklar, samt elektriska och magnetiska fält. Precis som vanligt väder är rymdväder väldigt dynamiskt. Under extrema

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China Bends Another American Institution to its Will

For all the concern about military confrontation in the South China Sea, economic leverage might be the most powerful weapon in Beijing’s arsenal. It is deployed more effectively, or at least more often, than all the missiles, tanks, and artillery in the People’s Liberation Army. If power is the ability to force others to do what you want them to do, then China exerts its power with yuan more tha

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To Prepare for Automation, Stay Curious and Don’t Stop Learning

submitted by /u/Arzu_1982 [link] [comments]

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As AI expands, companies must allow employees to rethink their jobs

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Milky Way's center will be revealed by NASA's Webb Telescope

The center of our galaxy is a crowded place: A black hole weighing 4 million times as much as our sun is surrounded by millions of stars whipping around it at breakneck speeds. This extreme environment is bathed in intense ultraviolet light and X-ray radiation. Yet much of this activity is hidden from our view, obscured by vast swaths of interstellar dust.

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Stormy waters ahead for coastal towns: what are the options?

Australians love property and being near water. But fast forward 30 years and the two may be incompatible, judging by global forecasts warning of sea level rises that could threaten thousands of coastal residents in decades to come.

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Depression circuit works differently in male and female mice

Mice have a sex-distinct circuit for depression that activates during stress and testosterone controls, according to new research. Depression affects women nearly twice as much as men, but unraveling the brain’s blueprint that regulates this behavior, let alone identifying specific molecular differences between sexes, has proven difficult. The results, which appear in Biological Psychiatry , focu

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GPS helping provide more precise precipitation predictions

Scientists are using GPS signals to measure air moisture for better weather forecasting. The method is now being incorporated into the Bureau of Meteorology's weather forecast models following successful tests over Australia, off the back of World Space Week 2019.

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Using machine learning to understand climate change

Methane is a potent greenhouse gas added to the atmosphere through both natural and human activities. To predict the impacts of human emissions, researchers need a complete picture of the methane cycle. Researchers used data science to determine how much methane is emitted from the ocean into the atmosphere each year. Their results fill a longstanding gap in methane cycle research and will help cl

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Sunlight degrades polystyrene faster than expected

A study published by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that polystyrene, one of the world's most ubiquitous plastics, may degrade in decades or centuries when exposed to sunlight, rather than thousands of years as previously thought. The study published Oct. 10, 2019, in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters.

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Sunlight degrades polystyrene much faster than expected

Polystyrene persists in the environment for millennia, according to some international governmental agencies. This estimate is based on the amount of time required for microbes to break down the plastic. But now researchers have challenged this common assumption with the finding that sunlight can break down polystyrene over a much shorter time scale, from decades to centuries. They report their re

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UK fast food ‘linked to Brazilian forest fires’

Greenpeace asks fast-food chains to stop selling meat from animals fed on soya from Brazil.

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Making Sense of Modern Cosmology

Confused by all those theories? Good — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The gun death epidemic is getting worse

The rate at which Americans died from firearm injuries increased sharply starting in 2015, a new study shows. This recent increase occurred to varying degrees across different states, types of firearm deaths such as homicide and suicide , and demographic groups. In all, the United States saw a 14% rise in the rate of gun-related deaths of all kinds from 2015 to 2017 compared with the rate from be

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Cold-blooded mammals roamed Earth for tens of millions of years

Two protomammals from the dinosaur era were still cold-blooded like their reptile ancestors, even though their skeletons and brains were mammal-like

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Malaysia finds hornbill 'ivory' in massive wildlife seizure

Almost 800 animal parts including a huge stash of hornbill "ivory", pangolin scales and deer's antlers, have been seized in a raid on Borneo island, officials in Malaysia said on Thursday.

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Why You Never See Your Friends Anymore

Just under a century ago, the Soviet Union embarked on one of the strangest attempts to reshape the common calendar that has ever been undertaken. As Joseph Stalin raced to turn an agricultural backwater into an industrialized nation, his government downsized the week from seven to five days. Saturday and Sunday were abolished. In place of the weekend, a new system of respite was introduced in 19

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Parrot Anafi FPV Review: A More Affordable VR-Ready Drone

Parrot's latest drone now offers first-person POV flying, but still lacks collision detection.

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Malaysia finds hornbill 'ivory' in massive wildlife seizure

Almost 800 animal parts including a huge stash of hornbill "ivory", pangolin scales and deer's antlers, have been seized in a raid on Borneo island, officials in Malaysia said on Thursday.

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Sunlight degrades polystyrene faster than expected

A study published by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) shows that polystyrene, one of the world's most ubiquitous plastics, may degrade in decades or centuries when exposed to sunlight, rather than thousands of years as previously thought. The study published October 10, 2019, in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters.

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Image of the Day: Patient-Derived Organoids

Three-dimensional tissue cultures grown from cancer patients’ own tumors can predict responses to the drug irinotecan.

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Ancient Food Storage

There are many things we take for granted in modern life, skills that humanity developed over literally hundreds of thousands of years, but also many modern conveniences that are fairly recent. One is food storage – saving food for later consumption. We began as hunter-gatherers, a lifestyle that involves mostly consuming food right as it is acquired. This creates times of feast and famine, but l