Search Posts

nyheder2019oktober11

Turkish ISP Blocks Social Media Sites Near Syrian Border

Partially government-owned Türk Telekom restricted access to Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and WhatsApp for about 48 hours as Turkey attacked the Kurds.

1h

The Atlantic Politics Daily: What Democrats Can Do Next

Editor’s note: We’re taking a break on Monday, October 14. The Politics Daily will return to your inbox next Tuesday. Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We appreciate your continued support for our journalism. What We’re Watching Today (EVAN VUCCI / AP ) No GOP candidate for president has won Minnesota since Richard Nixon in 1972

1h

Telegram must halt sale of its crypto token due to an SEC emergency restraining order

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge The US Securities and Exchange Commission has formally instructed Telegram Group, the parent company of the Telegram encrypted messaging …

18min

21min

Vivid gladiator fresco discovered at Pompeii

A vivid fresco depicting an armour-clad gladiator standing victorious as his wounded opponent stumbles gushing blood has been discovered in the ancient Roman city of Pompeii, Italy's culture …

1h

Fatal Familial Insomnia: The Disease That Kills By Stealing Sleep

(Credit: Rachata Teyparsit/Shutterstock) A brief bout of insomnia can be maddening. You know what it feels like. We all do. Lying awake chasing feverish thoughts from our minds while the slow tick of passing minutes compounds sleep-stealing anxiety. For most of us these episodes are a brief interruption to our sleep schedules. Others experience more persistent insomnia, but at a level that's often

1h

Alexei Leonov, First Person to Walk in Space, Dies at 85

Cosmonaut Alexei Leonov trains for the Apollo-Soyuz mission in April 1975 . (Credit: NASA) Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov, the first person to walk in space, has died at the age of 85 at the Burdenko Military Hospital in Moscow. His death was announced Friday, Oct. 11, by Roscosmos, Russia’s space agency. Born in 1934, Leonov became the eleventh Soviet cosmonaut and achieved major milestones of sp

1h

Should You Eat Red Meat? Navigating a World of Contradicting Studies

The new study still finds that reducing unprocessed red meat consumption by three servings in a week is associated with an an approximately eight per cent lower lifetime risk of heart disease, cancer and early death. (Credit: Shutterstock) Another diet study, another controversy and the public is left wondering what to make of it. This time it’s a series of studies in the Annals of Internal Medici

1h

Researchers identify potential therapy for liver disease in people living with HIV

Researchers have identified a novel therapeutic strategy to significantly improve liver disease in people living with HIV.

1h

Drug reverses signs of liver disease in people living with HIV

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health and their colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston report that the injectable hormone tesamorelin reduces liver fat and prevents liver fibrosis (scarring) in people living with HIV. The study was conducted by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the National Cancer Institute, both parts of NIH. Th

1h

Daily consumption of sweets, cakes and unhealthy foods associated with acne, study reveals

The research, presented at the 28th EADV Congress in Madrid, evaluated the exposure to different worsening factors on acne more than 6,700 participants across six countries in North America, South America and Europe. It is the first research of its kind, analysing both external and internal factors that can influence acne.

1h

Black holes stunt growth of dwarf galaxies

Astronomers have discovered that powerful winds driven by supermassive black holes in the centers of dwarf galaxies have a significant impact on the evolution of these galaxies by suppressing star formation.

2h

In the Sea, Not All Plastic Lasts Forever

Polystyrene, a common ocean pollutant, decomposes in sunlight much faster than thought, a new study finds.

2h

2h

Hydrologic simulation models that inform policy decisions are difficult to interpret

Hydrologic models that simulate and predict water flow are used to estimate how natural systems respond to different scenarios such as changes in climate, land use, and soil management. The output from these models can inform policy and regulatory decisions regarding water and land management practices. Numerical models have become increasingly easy to employ with advances in computer technology a

2h

Brain protein promotes maintenance of chronic pain

Study results illuminate the potential of novel approach for the treatment of chronic pain.

2h

Contextual engineering improves success of projects in non-industrial societies

Humanitarian engineering projects often focus on bringing western technologies to non-industrialized societies. But environmental and cultural factors in these locations may be very different from conditions in the West, and the projects may not meet client needs if engineers do not fully understand the context in which they are operating.

2h

How preprocessing methods affect the conversion efficiency of biomass energy production

Research on energy production from biomass usually focuses on the amount of energy generated. But it is also important to consider how much energy goes into the process, a component that is often neglected. A study from the University of Illinois takes a look at the bioconversion efficiency of two products often used as biomass for energy production, miscanthus giganteus and sugarcane bagasse.

2h

Antibody-based eye drops show promise for treating dry eye disease

Researchers have identified the presence of a specific type of antibody, called anti-citrullinated protein autoantibodies, or ACPAs, in human tear fluid. Patients with dry eye disease experienced reduced signs and symptoms of the condition in response to a new eye drop treatment that targets ACPAs.

3h

How preprocessing methods affect the conversion efficiency of biomass energy production

Research on energy production from biomass usually focuses on the amount of energy generated. But it is also important to consider how much energy goes into the process, a component that is often neglected. A study from the University of Illinois takes a look at the bioconversion efficiency of two products often used as biomass for energy production, miscanthus giganteus and sugarcane bagasse.

3h

3h

THEORETICALLY, Is VR Time Dilation possible?

One thing that is common is alot of VR Stories, Is Time Dilation; One day in real life might be experienced by the Players as 6 days in game. Or 1 hour is 4 hours. Stiff like that. I'm not asking about if its Possible now with the tech we have, or if its even being worked on. Rather, I'm asking, is something like this even theoretically Possible, according to what we currently know about how Huma

3h

3h

Dyson's $2.5 billion investment in electric vehicles scrapped

https://www.ibtimes.co.uk/end-road-dyson-quits-race-make-electric-cars-1670151 Too much competition in electric vehicle market leads multi-billion dollar investment down the drain submitted by /u/Sonofarson [link] [comments]

3h

3h

3h

Bones Filled with Marrow Served as Prehistoric Humans' 'Cans of Soup'

Around 400,000 years ago, humans set aside bones filled with tasty grease and marrow, storing them like canned soup for later meals.

3h

Black holes stunt growth of dwarf galaxies

Astronomers at the University of California, Riverside, have discovered that powerful winds driven by supermassive black holes in the centers of dwarf galaxies have a significant impact on the evolution of these galaxies by suppressing star formation.

3h

NASA sees Atlantic subtropical storm Melissa form off New England coast

Satellite data has confirmed the formation of Subtropical Storm Melissa. NASA's Terra Satellite provided a visible image the former Nor'easter turned subtropical storm off the coast of New England.

3h

Contextual engineering improves success of projects in non-industrial societies

Humanitarian engineering projects often focus on bringing western technologies to non-industrialized societies. But environmental and cultural factors in these locations may be very different from conditions in the West, and the projects may not meet client needs if engineers do not fully understand the context in which they are operating.

3h

Hydrologic simulation models that inform policy decisions are difficult to interpret

Hydrologic models that simulate and predict water flow are used to estimate how natural systems respond to different scenarios such as changes in climate, land use, and soil management. The output from these models can inform policy and regulatory decisions regarding water and land management practices. Numerical models have become increasingly easy to employ with advances in computer technology a

3h

Researchers identify brain protein that promotes maintenance of chronic pain

Study results illuminate the potential of novel approach for the treatment of chronic pain.

3h

SLAS Discovery releases special issue

October's SLAS Discovery features part 1 of a 2-part special issue on 'Membrane Proteins: New Approaches to Probes, Technologies and Drug Design.' Part 2 of this special edition will be featured in December.

3h

Nanoscale manipulation of light leads to exciting new advancement

Controlling the interactions between light and matter has been a long-standing ambition for scientists seeking to develop and advance numerous technologies that are fundamental to society. With the boom of nanotechnology in recent years, the nanoscale manipulation of light has become both, a promising pathway to continue this advancement, as well as a unique challenge due to new behaviors that app

3h

Expert second opinion improves reliability of melanoma diagnoses

A new study has found that obtaining a second opinion from pathologists who are board certified or have fellowship training in dermatopathology can help improve the accuracy and reliability of diagnosing melanoma.

3h

Nanoscale manipulation of light leads to exciting new advancement

Controlling the interactions between light and matter has been a long-standing ambition for scientists seeking to develop and advance numerous technologies that are fundamental to society. With the boom of nanotechnology in recent years, the nanoscale manipulation of light has become both, a promising pathway to continue this advancement, as well as a unique challenge due to new behaviors that app

3h

Life Might Survive on a Planet Orbiting a Black Hole — If It Can Stand the Harsh Light

A more realistic simulation of the black hole featured in the movie Interstellar. (Credit: James et al./IOP Science) In the 2014 movie Interstellar, astronauts investigate planets orbiting a supermassive black hole as potential homes for human life. A supermassive black hole warps surrounding space-time, according to Einstein’s theory of general relativity, and at least one of the planets in the m

3h

With warming, get used to blackouts to prevent wildfires

Expect more preventative power blackouts in California as the climate gets hotter and drier and the wildfire season gets nastier and longer, scientists say.

3h

New research integrates borophene and graphene into 2-D heterostructures

Nanomaterials could provide the basis of many emerging technologies, including extremely tiny, flexible, and transparent electronics.

3h

New tool enables Nova Scotia lobster fishery to address impacts of climate change

U.S. and Canadian researchers have developed a tool that incorporates projected changes in ocean climate onto a geographic fishery management area. Now fishermen, resource managers, and policy-makers can use it to plan for the future sustainability of the lobster fishery in Nova Scotia and Canadian waters of the Gulf of Maine.

3h

Food-insecure Canadian households may have trouble affording prescription medication

Food insecurity is linked to higher disease rates but not much is known about the reasons for this. A new study of more than 10,000 Canadian households shows that this connection may be at least partially attributed to lack of access to prescription medication.

3h

National focus on overdose prevention should include alcohol too, study suggests

The need to prevent and rapidly treat opioid overdoses is in the spotlight. But a new study suggests more focus is needed on the risk of alcohol overdoses among people who use opioids of all kinds, and other drugs. Ninety percent of residential recovery center patients surveyed had overdosed on alcohol at least once, and 80 percent of them said that at the time of their overdose, they had also bee

3h

Facebook's Libra currency abandoned by major financial companies

Facebook Inc's ambitious efforts to establish a global digital currency called Libra suffered severe setbacks on Friday, as major payment companies including Mastercard and Visa Inc quit …

3h

New tool enables Nova Scotia lobster fishery to address impacts of climate change

U.S. and Canadian researchers have developed a tool that incorporates projected changes in ocean climate onto a geographic fishery management area. Now fishermen, resource managers, and policy-makers can use it to plan for the future sustainability of the lobster fishery in Nova Scotia and Canadian waters of the Gulf of Maine.

3h

Suomi NPP satellite finds a weaker typhoon Hagibis nearing Japan

On Oct. 10, Hagibis was a super typhoon, but overnight, the storm weakened to typhoon status. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the large storm that stretched along most of the big islands of Japan.

3h

Porsche and Boeing Want to Build This Sexy Flying Car Together

Flying Porsche German carmaker Porsche is teaming up with aerospace giant Boeing to build a resplendent flying car — a speedy and elegant way for the ultra-wealthy to glide over frustrated peasants stuck in road traffic below. “Porsche is looking to enhance its scope as a sports car manufacturer by becoming a leading brand for premium mobility,” said Porsche exec Detlev von Platen in a press rele

3h

New tool enables Nova Scotia lobster fishery to address impacts of climate change

Researchers use long-term survey data sets and climate models to help fishing communities plan for a warmer ocean. Researchers have developed a tool that incorporates projected changes in ocean climate onto a geographic fishery management area. Now fishermen, resource managers, and policy-makers can use it to plan for the future sustainability of the lobster fishery in Nova Scotia and Canadian wat

4h

'Electroadhesive' stamp picks up and puts down microscopic structures

New technique could enable assembly of circuit boards and displays with more minute components.

4h

Coffee bean extracts alleviate inflammation, insulin resistance in mouse cells

Food science and human nutrition researchers are interested in the potential of inflammation-fighting compounds found in the silverskin and husk of coffee beans, not only for their benefits in alleviating chronic disease, but also in adding value to would-be 'waste' products from the coffee processing industry.

4h

Opioid Rx dosages drop with state law changes

The total amount of opioids dispensed per new opioid prescription decreased by 22% in Penn Medicine outpatient practices in New Jersey after the state passed a law limiting prescriptions to a five-day supply for new opioid prescriptions. Penn Medicine implemented an electronic health record (EMR) alert, or 'nudge,' to notify clinicians if that limit had been reached.

4h

Alexei Leonov, first human to walk in space, dies aged 85

The Soviet cosmonaut almost didn’t make it back into his capsule in 1965, when his suit inflated in the space vacuum Alexei Leonov, the legendary Soviet cosmonaut who became the first human to walk in space 54 years ago, has died in Moscow at 85. The Russian space agency Roscosmos announced the news on its website on Friday, but gave no cause of death. Leonov had health issues for several years,

4h

Creating 2D heterostructures for future electronics

New research integrates nanomaterials into heterostructures, an important step toward creating nanoelectronics.

4h

NASA to test its first all-electric plane, the X-57

The experimental X-57 Maxwell is the agency's first all-electric plane. It will also be the first manned X-plane that NASA has tested in decades. Electric planes could help to significantly lower the environmental costs of flying, but it'll likely be at least a decade before these aircraft hit the commercial market. None Since the 1940s, NASA has been testing experimental aircraft (aka X-planes)

4h

New tool enables Nova Scotia lobster fishery to address impacts of climate change

Researchers use long-term survey data sets and climate models to help fishing communities plan for a warmer ocean. US and Canadian researchers have developed a tool that incorporates projected changes in ocean climate onto a geographic fishery management area. Now fishermen, resource managers, and policy-makers can use it to plan for the future sustainability of the lobster fishery in Nova Scotia

4h

Watch a Giant 3D Printer Spit out an Entire Boat

Three for One The University of Maine just set three world records in one fell swoop. Using the world’s largest prototype polymer 3D printer, a UMaine team built the world’s largest 3D-printed boat, which also happened to be the world’s largest solid 3D-printed object — and a new time-lapse video lets you watch the vessel’s record-setting, three-day construction come together in half a minute. Sh

4h

Alzheimer's disease: Brain immune cells may offer new treatment target

A new study attributes the link between tau protein clumping and brain damage in Alzheimer's disease to brain immune cells called microglia.

4h

Bored to death: What is boreout syndrome?

Boreout syndrome is akin to burnout syndrome, but rather than arising from an excess of challenging work, it arises from a surfeit of it. Many would scoff at the idea that not having enough work to do would be anything to complain about, but boreout can have some serious impacts on your physical and mental health. One man was so distressed about his boreout that he sued his employer, claiming tha

4h

Suomi NPP satellite finds a weaker typhoon Hagibis nearing Japan

On Oct. 10, Hagibis was a super typhoon, but overnight, the storm weakened to typhoon status. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image of the large storm that stretched along most of the big islands of Japan.

4h

UPR Hasn't Paid Some TAs for Nearly Two Months

Graduate students at the University of Puerto Rico Río Piedras campus have issued a public statement denouncing their institution over late payments for teaching and research assistants.

4h

Sorry, Darwin, but bacteria don’t compete to survive

“Survival of the friendliest” outweighs “survival of the fittest” for groups of bacteria, according to new research. The research reveals that bacteria would rather unite against external threats, such as antibiotics, rather than fight against each other. The discovery is a major step towards understanding complex bacteria interactions and the development of new treatment models for a wide range

4h

The Long Road to Edible Cottonseed

The FDA recently approved the genetically modified product. Texas A and M's Keerti Rathore speaks with The Scientist about why and how it was developed.

4h

Scientists Keep Brain Tissue From Dead Mice Alive For Weeks

Brain Tissue A team of researchers at the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research in Japan have developed a new way to keep brain tissue from animals alive and viable for up to 25 days. So far, scientists have been limited to carrying out experiments with brain tissue for only a couple of days, according to Science Alert . “This method can be used for more than explanted tissues from animal

4h

2019 Nobel Prizes: What you can learn from this year's winners

Each year, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awards six Nobel Prizes. The categories are: literature, physics, chemistry, peace, economics, and physiology & medicine. The Nobel prizes will be announced each business-day until October 14. Nobel Peace Prize Ethio­pian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali won the Nobel Peace on Friday for helping to resolve the border conflict with neighboring Eritrea.

5h

Test dig selv: Hvor godt har du styr på klimaforandringerne?

Det vælter rundt med myter om klimaet. Men hvor godt har du egentlig styr på fakta?

5h

Nanoscale manipulation of light leads to exciting new advancement

Scientists in the Theoretical Nanophotonics Group at The University of New Mexico's Department of Physics and Astronomy have made an exciting new advancement to this end, in a pioneering research effort titled 'Analysis of the Limits of the Near-Field Produced by Nanoparticle Arrays,' published recently in the journal, ACS Nano, a top journal in the field of nanotechnology.

5h

The Tables Turn on Tony Beets | Gold Rush

In a role reversal, Tony needs Parker's help this time. Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://www.i

5h

Has Jurassic Park fostered misunderstanding about extinction?

Jurassic Park has fueled public misconceptions about science's abilities to bring extinct species back to life. De-extinction technology can resurrect genetic material from extinct species into their living relatives in a way that can assist conservation efforts. Fostering empathy for other-than-human lives through stories might be the key to addressing the current ecological catastrophe. In 1993

5h

New soft actuators could make soft robots less bulky

Engineers have developed a way to build soft robots that are compact, portable and multifunctional. The advance was made possible by creating soft, tubular actuators whose movements are electrically controlled, making them easy to integrate with small electronic components. As a proof of concept, engineers used the new actuators to build an untethered, battery-powered, walking soft robot and a sof

5h

Family of crop viruses at the molecular level

For the first-time we can take a molecular-level look at one of the world's deadliest crop killers.

5h

'Cross-transfer' benefits of special exercise technique questioned

Researchers question the effectiveness of a patented exercise system for relieving lower back pain.

5h

Combination of techniques could improve security for IoT devices

A multi-pronged data analysis approach that can strengthen the security of Internet of Things (IoT) devices — such as smart TVs, home video cameras and baby monitors — against current risks and threats has been created.

5h

An ambitious effort to map the human body’s individual cells gets backing from NIH

Agency to spend $200 million on comprehensive, useful, and user-friendly cell maps

5h

Opioid Rx dosages drop 22% in Penn Medicine's NJ practices following changes to state law

The total amount of opioids dispensed per new opioid prescription decreased by 22% in Penn Medicine outpatient practices in New Jersey after the state passed a law limiting prescriptions to a five-day supply for new opioid prescriptions. Penn Medicine implemented an electronic health record (EMR) alert, or 'nudge,' to notify clinicians if that limit had been reached.

5h

Coffee bean extracts alleviate inflammation, insulin resistance in mouse cells

Food science and human nutrition researchers at the University of Illinois are interested in the potential of inflammation-fighting compounds found in the silverskin and husk of coffee beans, not only for their benefits in alleviating chronic disease, but also in adding value to would-be 'waste' products from the coffee processing industry.

5h

'Electroadhesive' stamp picks up and puts down microscopic structures

New technique could enable assembly of circuit boards and displays with more minute components.

5h

Ancient Teeth Reveal Social Stratification Dates Back to Bronze Age Societies

Humans have a history of status division stretching back at least 4,000 years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Ancient Teeth Reveal Social Stratification Dates Back to Bronze Age Societies

Humans have a history of status division stretching back at least 4,000 years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Ancient Teeth Reveal Social Stratification Dates Back to Bronze Age Societies

Humans have a history of status division stretching back at least 4,000 years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Chinese Rappers Take On the Surveillance State

In 2017, the television series Rap of China debuted to 100 million views in the first four hours of its release. Prior to the show, rap had existed in China only in underground circles; it had become mainstream overnight. But its ascendance to the realm of pop culture would have dire consequences for freedom of speech in the country. A year later, as Rap of China headed into its second season, th

5h

How Some Nobel Prize-Winning Battery Research Weathered the Test of Time

Scientists found that some early commercial lithium batteries held up pretty well after about 35 years in storage. exxonsolarclock2.jpg An Exxon solar clock consisting on one 1970s-era100mAh Exxon battery on the left connected to the solar array in the center and a clock on the right. Image credits: This image was published in the Journal of Power Sources, “ Lithium-titanium disulfide rechargeab

5h

Our Ravenous Galaxy Keeps Stealing Smaller Galaxies

Big Thief Orbiting is par for the course in our universe. The Earth orbits the Sun, the Moon orbits the Earth, and more than 50 galaxies orbit the Milky Way, the biggest of those being the Large Magellanic Cloud. Now, new research indicates that at least six of the galaxies currently orbiting the Milky Way actually used to orbit the Large Magellanic Cloud directly — until our galaxy snatched them

5h

Canada's Decision To Make Public More Clinical Trial Data Puts Pressure On FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration treats most data it gets on the development of new drugs and medical devices as confidential to companies. Critics say making the data public would help patients. (Image credit: Teerapat Seedafong/EyeEm/Getty Images)

5h

These new soft actuators could make soft robots less bulky

Engineers at the University of California have developed a way to build soft robots that are compact, portable and multifunctional. The advance was made possible by creating soft, tubular actuators whose movements are electrically controlled, making them easy to integrate with small electronic components. As a proof of concept, engineers used the new actuators to build an untethered, battery-power

5h

Why Do We Have Eyelashes? New Study Says It's to Keep Our Eyes Moist

Do eyelashes exist, in part, to keep our eyes from drying out? (Credit: KDdesignphoto/Shutterstock) Why do we have eyelashes? The answer might seem simple: Those thick hairs on the end of our eyelids simply exist to block intruding particles from landing on our eyeballs. And, in fact, that’s what many scientists have hypothesized. It explains why camels evolved to have long lashes for wandering th

5h

Ice Sheets Are Eroded by "Upside-down Rivers"

Warm ocean waters cut deep channels in the ice that exacerbate melting and sea level rise — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

How old is the ice on the moon?

While a majority of the icy deposits on the moon are likely billions of years old, some may be much more recent, according to new research. The discovery of ice deposits in craters scattered across the moon’s south pole has helped to renew interest in exploring the lunar surface, but no one is sure exactly when or how that ice got there. Lead author Ariel Deutsch, a graduate student in the earth,

5h

Can AI simulations predict the future?

While multi-agent artificial intelligence was first used in the sixties, advances in technology have made it extremely sophisticated. Everything from online trading to disaster response training can be accomplished with MAAI. The dark side of MAAI is the potential manipulation of voters and other insidious applications. None The recent U.S. backflip on Syria has certainly not helped the nation's

5h

Quantum plasmonic control of trions in a picocavity with monolayer WS2

Monitoring and controlling the neutral and charged excitons (trions) in two-dimensional (2D) materials are essential for the development of high-performance devices. However, nanoscale control is challenging because of diffraction-limited spatial resolution of conventional far-field techniques. Here, we extend the classical tip-enhanced photoluminescence based on tip-substrate nanocavity to quant

5h

Structural dispersion-based reduction of loss in epsilon-near-zero and surface plasmon polariton waves

The field of plasmonics has substantially affected the study of light-matter interactions at the subwavelength scale. However, dissipation losses still remain an inevitable obstacle in the development of plasmonic-based wave propagation. Although different materials with moderate losses are being extensively studied, absorption arguably continues to be the key challenge in the field. Here, we the

5h

Coupling ultracold matter to dynamical gauge fields in optical lattices: From flux attachment to Z2 lattice gauge theories

From the standard model of particle physics to strongly correlated electrons, various physical settings are formulated in terms of matter coupled to gauge fields. Quantum simulations based on ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide a promising avenue to study these complex systems and unravel the underlying many-body physics. Here, we demonstrate how quantized dynamical gauge fields can be cr

5h

Microscopic origin of the chiroptical response of optical media

The potential for enhancing the optical activity of natural chiral media using engineered nanophotonic components has been central in the quest toward developing next-generation circular-dichroism spectroscopic techniques. Through confinement and manipulation of optical fields at the nanoscale, ultrathin optical elements have enabled a path toward achieving order-of-magnitude enhancements in the

5h

Allosteric pathway selection in templated assembly

Assembling large numbers of molecular building blocks into functional nanostructures is no trivial task. It relies on guiding building blocks through complex energy landscapes shaped by synergistic and antagonistic supramolecular interactions. In nature, the use of molecular templates is a potent strategy to navigate the process to the desired structure with high fidelity. Yet, nature’s templatin

5h

Soft nanocomposite electroadhesives for digital micro- and nanotransfer printing

Automated handling of microscale objects is essential for manufacturing of next-generation electronic systems. Yet, mechanical pick-and-place technologies cannot manipulate smaller objects whose surface forces dominate over gravity, and emerging microtransfer printing methods require multidirectional motion, heating, and/or chemical bonding to switch adhesion. We introduce soft nanocomposite elec

5h

Stretchable elastic synaptic transistors for neurologically integrated soft engineering systems

Artificial synaptic devices that can be stretched similar to those appearing in soft-bodied animals, such as earthworms, could be seamlessly integrated onto soft machines toward enabled neurological functions. Here, we report a stretchable synaptic transistor fully based on elastomeric electronic materials, which exhibits a full set of synaptic characteristics. These characteristics retained even

5h

Electrically controlled liquid crystal elastomer-based soft tubular actuator with multimodal actuation

Soft tubular actuators can be widely found both in nature and in engineering applications. The benefits of tubular actuators include (i) multiple actuation modes such as contraction, bending, and expansion; (ii) facile fabrication from a planar sheet; and (iii) a large interior space for accommodating additional components or for transporting fluids. Most recently developed soft tubular actuators

5h

Borophene-graphene heterostructures

Integration of dissimilar two-dimensional (2D) materials is essential for nanoelectronic applications. Compared to vertical stacking, covalent lateral stitching requires bottom-up synthesis, resulting in rare realizations of 2D lateral heterostructures. Because of its polymorphism and diverse bonding geometries, borophene is a promising candidate for 2D heterostructures, although suitable synthes

5h

Ketones and aldehydes as alkyl radical equivalents for CboxhH functionalization of heteroarenes

The polar nature of the CO bond commonly allows it to undergo direct attack by nucleophiles at the electrophilic carbon atom in which ketones and aldehydes act as alkyl carbocation equivalents. In contrast, transformations in which ketones and aldehydes act as alkyl radical equivalents (generated in carbonyl carbon) are unknown. Here, we describe a new catalytic activation mode that combines prot

5h

The King Sacrifices the Best of Fact and Fiction

The epic cycle of Shakespeare’s Henriad is a narrative feat practically unmatched in English literature. The saga of victory and betrayal spans the reigns of multiple real kings, but it has only so much to do with actual history. Rather, it’s a work of mythmaking that massages the truth into a hero’s journey about the young wastrel “Prince Hal” becoming the noble King Henry V. David Michôd’s new

6h

Radio Atlantic: How ISIS Returns

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher ( How to Listen ) The Atlantic staff writer Mike Giglio has been reporting on the Islamic State since before Americans knew what to call it. He documents his five years in the region for a new book , Shatter the Nations: ISIS and the War for the Caliphate . He joins Edward-Isaac Dovere to discuss the abrupt changes happening in Syr

6h

Fast-acting German insecticide lost in the aftermath of WWII

A new study explores the chemistry as well as the complicated and alarming history of DFDT, a fast-acting insecticide.

6h

Six degrees of nuclear separation

For the first time, scientists have printed 3D parts that pave the way to recycling up to 97 percent of the waste produced by nuclear reactors.

6h

CO2 emissions cause lost labor productivity, research shows

The planet's warming climate has led to countless changes that are affecting all of us. Droughts, hurricanes, rising sea levels and forest fires—all are now regular events in a world that saw close to 40 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions released into our atmosphere last year.

6h

Private property, not productivity, precipitated Neolithic agricultural revolution

Humankind first started farming in Mesopotamia about 11,500 years ago. Subsequently, the practices of cultivating crops and raising livestock emerged independently at perhaps a dozen other places around the world, in what archaeologists call the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution. It's one of the most thoroughly-studied episodes in prehistory—but a new paper in the Journal of Political Economy show

6h

A Man Heard 'Scratching' Noises in His Ear. It Was a Spider.

A man who felt a tickling and scratching sensation in his ear soon discovered something horrifying: A spider had crawled into his ear.

6h

The impact of human-caused noise pollution on birds

Anthropogenic noise pollution (ANP) is a globally invasive phenomenon impacting natural systems, but most research has occurred at local scales with few species. Researchers in this study investigated continental-scale breeding season associations with ANP for 322 bird species to test whether local-scale predictions are consistent at broad spatial extents for an extensive group of North American b

6h

Sox9 reshapes the biliary tree in Alagille syndrome

Mose model shows that SOX9 gene influences the severity Alagille syndrome.

6h

Six degrees of nuclear separation

For the first time, scientists have printed 3D parts that pave the way to recycling up to 97 percent of the waste produced by nuclear reactors.

6h

Private property, not productivity, precipitated Neolithic agricultural revolution

The Neolithic Agricultural Revolution is one of the most thoroughly-studied episodes in prehistory. But a new article shows that most explanations for it don't agree with the evidence, and offers a new interpretation.

6h

CO2 emissions cause lost labor productivity

Extreme high temperatures caused by CO2 emissions could lead to losses in labor productivity. The authors found that every trillion tons of CO2 emitted could cause global GDP losses of about half a percent. They add that we may already be seeing economic losses of as much as 2% of global GDP as a result of what we have already emitted.

6h

New in the Hastings Center Report, September-October 2019

The moral status of research animals with human brain cells, AI and doctoring, data privacy in California, tributes to Dan Callahan, and more in the September-October 2019.

6h

Eliud Kipchoge Is Set to Break the 2-Hour Marathon Barrier

On Saturday, the best marathoner on earth could make history on a straight, flat course, aided by controversial shoes and a phalanx of 41 pacers.

6h

The Guardian view on the polluters: days of reckoning | Editorial

Fossil fuel companies have worked for decades to shape attitudes and undermine science. The crisis dictates that they must now be confronted The huge differences in the voting records of MPs on climate issues, revealed in the Guardian’s rankings today, should immediately disabuse anyone of the notion that Britain’s elected politicians are united – apart from a handful of contrarians – in their eff

6h

Our brains walk a fine line for maximum performance

To maximize information processing, the brain tunes itself to be as excitable as possible without tipping into disorder, new research confirms. Researchers long wondered how the billions of independent neurons in the brain come together to reliably build a biological machine that easily beats the most advanced computers. All of those tiny interactions appear to be tied to something that guarantee

6h

Nazi scientists created an alternative to DDT pesticide

DFDT, a fast-acting insecticide, has an alarming history, researchers report. “We set out to study the growth of crystals in a little-known insecticide and uncovered its surprising history, including the impact of World War II on the choice of DDT—and not DFDT—as a primary insecticide in the 20th century,” says Bart Kahr, professor of chemistry at New York University and one of the study’s senior

6h

Online games could limit screen time while making money

Game creators could change their products to cut players’ screen time while making more money, according to new research. Yulia Nevskaya’s first foray into the World of Warcraft started one evening at 7PM. She created an avatar to represent her in the online video game and set off to explore another land. “It’s like another Earth. It looked like paradise,” says Nevskaya, an assistant professor of

6h

CO2 emissions cause lost labor productivity, new Concordia research shows

Extreme high temperatures caused by CO2 emissions could lead to losses in labor productivity. The authors found that every trillion tonnes of CO2 emitted could cause global GDP losses of about half a percent. They add that we may already be seeing economic losses of as much as 2% of global GDP as a result of what we have already emitted.

6h

Koala Immune Response to Genome-Inserting Retroviruses Identified

Small RNAs called piRNAs provide a first line of defense against the viruses.

6h

Certain gut bacteria may prevent rotavirus infection

The presence of certain gut bacteria in the digestive tract can prevent and cure rotavirus infection in mice, research finds. Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe, life-threatening diarrhea in children worldwide. The findings, published in the journal Cell , may explain why rotavirus causes severe, life-threatening disease in some people and only mild disease in others. The work could lead to

6h

Six degrees of nuclear separation

Argonne scientists look to 3-D printing to ease separation anxiety, which paves the way to recycle more nuclear material.

6h

2020 Nissan Versa Review: Safer, Smoother, Still-Affordable Small Sedan

The 2020 Nissan Versa has more safety features, a better ride, and 40 mpg highway fuel efficiency in the just-shipped third generation of this subcompact sedan. The Versa feels more substantial and polished. It’s adequate on the interstate. The car has been lowered, widened, and lengthened, which makes it look sleeker (think baby Altima) at the expense of rear-seat room. The trunk, however, is hu

6h

Sex Worker Website Hacked, Details on 250,000+ Users Now for Sale

Private Parts Prostitution is legal in the Netherlands, but that doesn’t mean every Dutch person who engages in sex work — or hires a sex worker — wants their identity revealed. Now, many might not have a choice in the matter. A website used by Dutch sex workers and their customers to discuss experiences was just hacked — and the hacker is now trying to sell the stolen data on the dark web, accor

6h

Climate change: Big lifestyle changes are the only answer

The experts tell us that small, easy changes alone will not be enough to combat climate change.

7h

Private property, not productivity, precipitated Neolithic agricultural revolution

The Neolithic Agricultural Revolution is one of the most thoroughly-studied episodes in prehistory. But a new paper by Sam Bowles and Jung-Kyoo Choi shows that most explanations for it don't agree with the evidence, and offers a new interpretation.

7h

Researchers rediscover fast-acting German insecticide lost in the aftermath of WWII

A new study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society explores the chemistry as well as the complicated and alarming history of DFDT, a fast-acting insecticide.

7h

West Nile Virus: Causes, Symptoms and Prevention

Most people bitten by a West Nile virus mosquito won't get sick, but in a small percentage of people, the virus invades the brain and spinal cord, which results in serious illness.

7h

7h

The Jussie Smollett Episode of Law & Order: SVU Was Surprisingly Nuanced

It’s been nearly nine months since the Empire actor and singer Jussie Smollett first told Chicago police that two strange men had slipped a noose around his neck while calling him racist and homophobic slurs. The incident was quickly revealed to be a hoax, reportedly staged by Smollett himself, with the help of two men he knew. The reversal caused an uproar: Smollett was arrested and indicted on

7h

7h

Silicon Valley Cynicism in the Age of Trump and Zuckerberg

The new reality is all too clear and corrosive: The world is a ceaseless battle for dominance in which you take advantage of anyone foolish enough to trust you.

7h

A Climate Protester Just Glued Himself to the Top of an Airplane

Plane Resistance Climate activists from the global environmental group Extinction Rebellion are bringing their protest strategies to new heights. In an unusual stunt, former Paralympian James Brown reportedly smuggled a tube of glue through London’s City Airport and then clambered onto the roof of a British Airways plane and stuck himself there using the glue. Video footage of the incident spread

7h

Firefighting foam leaves toxic legacy in drinking water near military bases

It was a Sunday tradition at Bethany Slavic Missionary Church. After morning services, Florin Ciuriuc joined the line of worshippers waiting to fill their jugs with gallons of free drinking water from a well on the property, a practice church leaders had encouraged.

7h

7h

7h

7h

8 Weird Robots NASA Wants To Send To Space

submitted by /u/Danj_memes_ [link] [comments]

7h

7h

7h

New material captures carbon dioxide and converts it into useful chemicals

The captured CO2 can be converted into useful organic materials.

7h

Massive California Power Outage Triggers Chaos in Science Labs

Researchers without access to backup power scramble to save invaluable specimens and expensive reagents — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Forskare kartlägger allt liv på jorden

Mycket är okänt om den levande naturen: Vi vet att artsamhällen världen över förändras på grund av till exempel klimatuppvärmningen, mer intensivt jordbruk och skogsavverkning. Men hur ser artsamhällena ut idag och vilka processer formar dem? Det har vi dålig koll på, eftersom hela 80 procent av alla arter ännu är okända – en hopplös utgångspunkt om vi ska förvalta naturresurserna hållbart, menar

7h

Daily briefing: Why squaring the circle is catnip for cranks

Nature, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03110-5 The mesmerizing appeal of a mathematical impossibility, DNA reveals Bronze Age family ties and California power cuts trigger chaos in science labs.

7h

Uber takes stake in online grocery group Cornershop

Uber said Friday it agreed to take a majority stake in Cornershop, an online grocery provider in Chile, Mexico, and which recently expanded to Peru and Canada.

7h

Google gave 'substantial' amounts of money to climate change deniers

Despite outward pledges to combat climate crisis, tech giant supports organisations campaigning against climate legislation

7h

Six degrees of nuclear separation

For the first time, Argonne scientists have printed 3D parts that pave the way to recycling up to 97 percent of the waste produced by nuclear reactors. From left to right: Peter Kozak, Andrew Breshears, M Alex Brown, co-authors of a recent Scientific Reports article detailing their breakthrough. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)

7h

Sox9 reshapes the biliary tree in Alagille syndrome

Mose model shows that SOX9 gene influences the severity Alagille syndrome.

7h

Researchers rediscover fast-acting German insecticide lost in the aftermath of WWII

A new study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society explores the chemistry as well as the complicated and alarming history of DFDT, a fast-acting insecticide.

7h

40% of people did not visit a family doctor after being released from prison

A new study analyzing the experiences of people released from provincial prison in Ontario in 2010 has found that 60% of people who were in Ontario's prison system were seen by a family doctor in the two years after being released from prison compared to 85% of people in the general population.

7h

Norfolk RSPCA centre saves 50th seal with injuries from rubbish

The "necklace" injuries, many caused by discarded plastic waste, are becoming more common, says the RSPCA.

7h

Population aging to create pockets of climate vulnerability in the US

Population aging projections across the US show a divide between cities and rural areas, which could lead to pockets of vulnerability to climate change.

7h

How Mere Humans Manage to Comprehend the Vastness of the Universe

Peering into the unknown requires us to recognize our own mental blind spots — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Tastes great, less land-filling … beer in a paper bottle

Danish brewer Carlsberg says it is developing a paper beer bottle made from sustainably sourced wood fibers.

7h

Vivid gladiator fresco discovered at Pompeii

A vivid fresco depicting an armour-clad gladiator standing victorious as his wounded opponent stumbles gushing blood has been discovered in the ancient Roman city of Pompeii, Italy's culture ministry said Friday.

7h

Scientist Wins Nobel Prize, Then Announces Belief in Aliens

Numbers Game Astronomer Didier Queloz is “convinced” aliens exist — and that we could find them before 2050. “I can’t believe we are the only living entity in the universe,” he said during an event on Tuesday — the same day he found out he’d won the Nobel Prize in Physics — according to The Telegraph . “There are just way too many planets, way too many stars, and the chemistry is universal. The c

7h

Shaping nanoparticles for improved quantum information technology

Particles that are mere nanometers in size are at the forefront of scientific research today. They come in many different shapes: rods, spheres, cubes, vesicles, S-shaped worms and even donut-like rings. What makes them worthy of scientific study is that, being so tiny, they exhibit quantum mechanical properties not possible with larger objects.

7h

Family of crop viruses revealed at high resolution for the first time

For the first-time we can take a molecular-level look at one of the world's deadliest crop killers.

7h

Population aging to create pockets of climate vulnerability in the US

Population aging projections across the US show a divide between cities and rural areas, which could lead to pockets of vulnerability to climate change.

7h

How Mere Humans Manage to Comprehend the Vastness of the Universe

Peering into the unknown requires us to recognize our own mental blind spots — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Unbalanced Chromosomal Inheritance More Common than Thought

A genomic analysis from 23andMe suggests that people inherit two copies of a chromosome from only one parent nearly twice as often as researchers had realized.

8h

Family of crop viruses revealed at high resolution for the first time

For the first-time we can take a molecular-level look at one of the world's deadliest crop killers.

8h

The Conspiracy of Silence Is Cracking

What if the White House threw an obstruction party and no one came? Or perhaps more accurately, what if the White House threw an obstruction party and people came anyway? Earlier this week, White House Counsel Pat Cipollone sent a lengthy rant to House Democrats, announcing that the administration would refuse to cooperate with the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. The letter reste

8h

New test diagnoses Lyme disease within 15 minutes

Current testing for Lyme disease, called the standard 2-tiered approach or the STT, involves running two complex assays (ELISA and western blot) to detect antibodies against the bacterium, and requires experienced personnel in a lab, and a few hours to carry out and interpret. Biomedical engineers have developed a rapid microfluidic test that can detect Lyme disease with similar performance as the

8h

The impact of human-caused noise pollution on birds

Anthropogenic noise pollution (ANP) is a globally invasive phenomenon impacting natural systems, but most research has occurred at local scales with few species. Researchers in this study investigated continental-scale breeding season associations with ANP for 322 bird species to test whether local-scale predictions related to breeding habitat, migratory behavior, body mass, and vocal traits are c

8h

Humans Are Causing a Larger Impact on the Planet than an Asteroid Impact or Flood Basalt

Volcanic plume from Soufriere Hills on Montserrat, see from the ISS on October 11, 2009. Image: NASA. Carbon dioxide! Little did we realize 100 years ago how this simple gas would become such a cultural lightning rod. Yet here we are, in what might be an existential fight focused on how much carbon dioxide humans pump into Earth's atmosphere. It isn't a little bit, either. No, humans might now be

8h

How Mere Humans Manage to Comprehend the Vastness of the Universe

Peering into the unknown requires us to recognize our own mental blind spots — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Washington state experiments with buyouts, restoring floodplains to avoid future disasters

Standing amid cottonwood trees and a thicket of other vegetation, Jon Hansen looks out over a sunlight-dappled ribbon of crystal water running over a rocky bed. He's standing on a site that until recently was filled with houses and mobile homes—properties that flooded six times in 20 years when the Cedar River spilled over its banks.

8h

600 former EPA officials demand investigation into Trump administration over California threats

Nearly 600 former Environmental Protection Agency officials have called for an investigation into whether the agency's leaders abused their authority by threatening punitive action against California.

8h

Clock ticks as SpaceX builds craft for NASA

Two weeks ago, the head of NASA seemed sick of waiting for SpaceX and Boeing Co. to finish developing the capsules that are supposed to carry U.S. astronauts to and from the International Space Station.

8h

The impact of human-caused noise pollution on birds

Anthropogenic noise pollution (ANP) is a globally invasive phenomenon impacting natural systems, but most research has occurred at local scales with few species. Researchers in this study investigated continental-scale breeding season associations with ANP for 322 bird species to test whether local-scale predictions related to breeding habitat, migratory behavior, body mass, and vocal traits are c

8h

Check Out This Beautiful Design for a Moon Habitat

Moontopia Professor Lewis Dartnell, a professor at the University of Westminster, has an ingenious plan to build a human colony on the Moon — and though it would require certain sacrifices, it manages to retain most of the creature comforts we enjoy on here on Earth. His “Moontopia” habitat would be built inside massive hollow tubes , originally formed by lunar volcanic eruptions. The idea is tha

8h

Slower walkers have older brains and bodies at 45

The walking speed of 45-year-olds can be used as a marker of their aging brains and bodies. The evidence was there in neurocognitive testing these individuals took at age 3 to indicate who would become the slower walkers. At 45, slower walkers have 'accelerated aging' on a 19-measure scale devised by researchers, and their lungs, teeth and immune systems tended to be in worse shape than the people

8h

New test diagnoses Lyme disease within 15 minutes

Current testing for Lyme disease, called the standard 2-tiered approach or the STT, involves running two complex assays (ELISA and western blot) to detect antibodies against the bacterium, and requires experienced personnel in a lab, and a few hours to carry out and interpret. Biomedical engineers have developed a rapid microfluidic test that can detect Lyme disease with similar performance as the

8h

Under time pressure, people tell us what we want to hear

When asked to answer questions quickly and impulsively, people tend to respond with a socially desirable answer rather than an honest one, a set of experiments shows.

8h

Overweight before age 40 increases the cancer risk

The risk of cancer increases considerably if you gain weight before the age of 40.

8h

Habitual tea drinking modulates brain efficiency: Evidence from brain connectivity evaluation

The researchers recruited healthy older participants to two groups according to their history of tea drinking frequency and investigated both functional and structural networks to reveal the role of tea drinking on brain organization.

8h

New material captures carbon dioxide and converts it into useful chemicals

The captured CO2 can be converted into useful organic materials.

8h

Aleksei Leonov, First to Walk in Space, Dies at 85

The Russian cosmonaut’s thrilling feat in 1965 nearly cost him his life, but raised Soviet prestige during the Cold War space race against the United States.

8h

Why Is Turkey in NATO Anyway?

“We think that this is a bad idea.” A senior State Department official told reporters yesterday that the Turkish attacks on northeastern Syria targeting Kurdish fighters who have been America’s best partners in defeating ISIS in the country would help no one—not even Turkey. “This will not increase their security, our security, or the security of anybody else in the region.” Donald Trump, after a

8h

The Endless Aerial Surveillance of the Border

Where, exactly, does the border end? A collaboration between journalism students and the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a civil-liberties group, probes this deceptively simple question. Ask a mapmaker, a geographer, or an average American, and the United States’s southern land border is a thin line extending from Texas to California. But ask law enforcement, and the answer is much more complicat

8h

The impact of human-caused noise pollution on birds

Anthropogenic noise pollution (ANP) is a globally invasive phenomenon impacting natural systems, but most research has occurred at local scales with few species. Researchers in this study investigated continental-scale breeding season associations with ANP for 322 bird species to test whether local-scale predictions are consistent at broad spatial extents for an extensive group of North American b

8h

Shaping nanoparticles for improved quantum information technology

Argonne researchers find that semiconductor nanoparticles in the shape of rings have attractive properties for quantum networking and computation.

8h

8h

8h

Virgin Orbit says it wants to send tiny spacecraft to Mars in 2022

The company’s LauncherOne system is designed to send satellites to low-Earth orbit. Does it really have the power to send a payload to the Red Planet?

8h

Why Don't More Women Win Nobels in Science?

Here's a look at why more women don't win more Nobel Prizes in science, an issue that involves women's exclusion from education and careers in science.

8h

Cold temperatures linked to high status

Researchers have discovered that people associate cold temperatures with luxury items, which is important for companies that are trying to promote products that convey high status.

8h

Chronobiology: Sleep and synaptic rhythms

Chronobiologists show how critical the sleep-wake cycle is for protein and phosphorylation dynamics in synapses to ultimately regulate its activity.

8h

Bacteria contradict Darwin: Survival of the friendliest

New microbial research suggests that 'survival of the friendliest' outweighs 'survival of the fittest' for groups of bacteria. Bacteria make space for one another and sacrifice properties if it benefits the bacterial community as a whole.

8h

Bacteria contradict Darwin: Survival of the friendliest

New microbial research at the University of Copenhagen suggests that 'survival of the friendliest' outweighs 'survival of the fittest' for groups of bacteria. Bacteria make space for one another and sacrifice properties if it benefits the bacterial community as a whole. The discovery is a major step towards understanding complex bacteria interactions and the development of new treatment models for

8h

NRL launches space weather instrument on NASA satellite

A U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) instrument aboard NASA's Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) satellite will deliver unprecedented information to help scientists investigate how both terrestrial and solar weather impact the ionosphere, the ionized region of Earth's upper atmosphere. ICON launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, Oct. 10.

8h

Bacteria contradict Darwin: Survival of the friendliest

New microbial research at the University of Copenhagen suggests that 'survival of the friendliest' outweighs 'survival of the fittest' for groups of bacteria. Bacteria make space for one another and sacrifice properties if it benefits the bacterial community as a whole. The discovery is a major step towards understanding complex bacteria interactions and the development of new treatment models for

8h

Nobel Peace Prize: 1901-Present

Here's a look at all Nobel Peace Prize recipients, including Barack Obama, Mother Teresa, Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King Jr.

8h

Repurposed quinacrine synergizes with cisplatin, reducing the effective dose required for treatment

The authors have developed the Accelera TED platform to repurpose drugs for HNSCC treatment; using in vitro assays and in vivo models.

8h

Family of crop viruses revealed at high resolution for the first time

For the first-time we can take a molecular-level look at one of the world's deadliest crop killers.

8h

Lung cancer screening guidelines do not detect disease among first responders

National lung cancer screening guidelines are inadequate to diagnose patients who contract lung cancer from occupational exposure, including first responders, according to a study reported today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer's North America Conference on Lung Cancer in Chicago.

8h

Slower walkers have older brains and bodies at 45

The walking speed of 45-year-olds can be used as a marker of their aging brains and bodies. The evidence was there in neurocognitive testing these individuals took at age 3 to indicate who would become the slower walkers. At 45, slower walkers have 'accelerated aging' on a 19-measure scale devised by researchers, and their lungs, teeth and immune systems tended to be in worse shape than the people

8h

Expert second opinion improves reliability of melanoma diagnoses

A new study led by UCLA researchers, have found that obtaining a second opinion from pathologists who are board certified or have fellowship training in dermatopathology can help improve the accuracy and reliability of diagnosing melanoma.

8h

Overcoming the blood-brain-barrier: Delivering therapeutics to the brain

For the first time, scientists have identified a simple way that can effectively transport medication into the brain – which could lead to improved treatments for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

8h

Illumination of abnormal neuronal activities caused by myelin impairment

The neural circuit basis for motor learning tasks when myelination is impaired has been illuminated for the first time. Researchers also succeeded in compensating for the impaired motor learning process by pairing appropriate actions with brain photo-simulation to promote synchronization of neuronal activities. This could contribute to future treatments for neurological and psychiatric diseases in

8h

Liquid metals the secret ingredients to clean up environment

Liquid metal catalysts show great promise for capturing carbon and cleaning up pollutants, requiring so little energy they can even be created in the kitchen.

8h

Fairy-wrens change breeding habits to cope with climate change

Warmer temperatures linked to climate change are having a big impact on the breeding habits of one of Australia's most recognisable bird species.

8h

The Navy Just Patented a Compact Fusion Reactor, but Will It Work?

Fusion power has been the Holy Grail of clean energy for decades. Now the US Navy has secured a patent on a compact fusion reactor design that would revolutionize the world — if it works. The entire situation is something of a muddle, even by the standards of the US Trade and Patent Office, which is really saying something. Let’s start at the beginning. Fusion could provide enormous amounts of en

8h

The Nobel Prize: What Is it Good For?

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences minted nine new science Nobel Laureates this week. But in the 118 years that such prizes have been awarded, only 20 out of more than 600 have gone to women. The result, critics say, reflects and reinforces longstanding biases in scientific communities.

8h

Giant reptiles once ruled Australia. Their loss sparked an ecological disaster

Study finds that in the absence of apex reptiles, mammals began to decimate ecosystems

8h

Revelations from a lifetime of dance | Judith Jamison and members of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

"Dance can elevate our human experience beyond words," says Judith Jamison, artistic director emerita of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. In between performances of excerpts from Alvin Ailey's classic works "Revelations" and "Cry," Jamison reflects on the enduring power of dance to transform history into art that thrills audiences around the world. (Performances by Solomon Dumas, Samantha F

8h

Scientists chase cause of mysterious vaping illness as death toll rises

Nature, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03033-1 Confusion reins as researchers sort through the complex US e-cigarette market.

8h

The Books Briefing: The Revolution Will Be Written About

As mass pro-democracy demonstrations continue to rock Hong Kong and student-led strikes around the world call for action against climate change , the variety of works in this Books Briefing can lend insight into the many forms protest has taken over the decades. In his graphic memoir, March , Representative John Lewis documents the struggle and heartbreak, as well as the victories, of the civil-r

9h

Physics: DNA-PAINT super-resolution microscopy at speed

Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy allow researchers to study biological processes below the classical diffraction limit of light. Researchers have now developed DNA-PAINT, a variant of these so-called super-resolution approaches.

9h

Physics: An ultrafast glimpse of the photochemistry of the atmosphere

Researchers have explored the initial consequences of the interaction of light with molecules on the surface of nanoscopic aerosols.

9h

Under time pressure, people tell us what we want to hear

When asked to answer questions quickly and impulsively, people tend to respond with a socially desirable answer rather than an honest one, a set of experiments shows.

9h

Public reporting on aortic valve surgeries has decreased access, study finds

Public reporting on aortic valve replacement outcomes has resulted in fewer valve surgeries for people with endocarditis, a new study has found. The researchers looked at national data from people with injection drug use and non-injection drug use-associated endocarditis and found that these patients were 30 percent less likely to receive valve surgery two years after outcomes data become public t

9h

Encyclopedic tumor analysis for guiding treatment of advanced, broadly refractory cancers: results from the RESILIENT trial

RESILIENT was a single arm, open label, phase II/III study to test if label agnostic therapy regimens guided by Encyclopedic Tumor Analysis can offer meaningful clinical benefit for patients with relapsed refractory metastatic malignancies. Patients with advanced refractory solid organ malignancies where disease had progressed following 2 lines of systemic treatments were enrolled in the trial. At

9h

Crabs are being found in the Thames with stomachs full of plastic

Crabs in the Thames are ingesting “shocking” amounts of plastic and may be passing it on in high doses to other species in the river, researchers have found

9h

Mark Zuckerberg: Wearables Will Soon Read Your Mind

ZuckerBrain At an event hosted by Facebook-backed research center Chan Zuckerberg BioHub on Thursday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg reiterated that the social network is still hoping to one day release a brain-controlled wearable that replaces the mouse and keyboard with your brain activity, CNBC reports . “The goal is to eventually make it so that you can think something and control something in

9h

Sidder der et livsfarligt værktøj for enden af din sikre cobot?

PLUS. Selvom en cobot-arm i sig selv er sikker, kan billedet hurtigt ændre sig, hvis der sættes en skruemaskine eller en vinkelsliber for enden af den. Det mangler der fokus på, mener sikkerhedskonsulent.

9h

What Made Me Reconsider the Anthropocene

Looming over the new food court of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History is one of those creatures so massive and menacing that its mere existence in Earth’s ancient past counsels against time-travel research. It is an accurate, if unbelievable, model of the Megalodon shark—52 feet long, dagger-studded maw agape. These things ate baleen whales and, hovering here above tourists munchi

9h

Letters: ‘The Anthropocene Epoch Is Not Hubris’

The Anthropocene Is a Joke In August, Peter Brannen argued that the period during which humans have had a significant impact on Earth—which some scientists have proposed calling the Anthropocene—should not be considered a new geological epoch. Peter Brannen asserts that little will ultimately remain of human changes to the Earth, arguing that they are a brief “event” rather than the beginning of

9h

Drugs for better long-term treatment of poorly controlled asthma discovered

Searching for better treatments for poorly controlled asthma, University of South Florida Health researchers examined how the distinct structure of five drugs affected their long-term ability to treat airway obstruction. They investigated how each of the drugs regulated a bitter taste receptor known as TAS2R14 — a G protein-coupled receptor expressed on human airway smooth muscle. Diphenhydramine

9h

Overweight before age 40 increases the cancer risk

The risk of cancer increases considerably if you gain weight before the age of 40.

9h

Adipogenic progenitors keep muscle stem cells young

In adult skeletal muscle, loss of myofiber integrity caused by mechanical injuries or diseases are repaired by resident muscle stem cells, called satellite cells, which promptly exit from quiescence after disruption of muscle architecture to expand, differentiate and drive tissue regeneration.

9h

Habitual tea drinking modulates brain efficiency: Evidence from brain connectivity evaluation

The researchers recruited healthy older participants to two groups according to their history of tea drinking frequency and investigated both functional and structural networks to reveal the role of tea drinking on brain organization.

9h

Conclusions from a behavioral aging study on male and female F2 hybrid mice on age-related behavior

Due to strain-specific behavioral idiosyncrasies, inbred mouse strains are suboptimal research models for behavioral aging studies.

9h

Alexei Leonov: First person to walk in space dies aged 85

Soviet cosmonaut Alexei Leonov floated above the Earth for 12 minutes in 1965.

9h

The Twitch That Helps Your Intestines Grow

Pulsing movements in an embryo are crucial to helping intestines grow into the wonder tube that it is, a study finds.

9h

Physics: DNA-PAINT super-resolution microscopy at speed

Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy allow researchers to study biological processes below the classical diffraction limit of light. Researchers have now developed DNA-PAINT, a variant of these so-called super-resolution approaches.

9h

Physics: An ultrafast glimpse of the photochemistry of the atmosphere

Researchers have explored the initial consequences of the interaction of light with molecules on the surface of nanoscopic aerosols.

9h

Powerful new genomics method can be used to reveal the causes of rare genetic diseases

The technique makes use of the fact that people inherit two copies or "alleles" of virtually every gene, one from the mother and one from the father. The new method compares activity levels of maternal and paternal alleles across the genome and detects when the activity of an allele lies far enough outside the normal range to be a plausible cause of disease.

9h

Rare sleep disorder common among veterans with PTSD

Military veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder or concussion suffer from a thrashing form of sleep behavior at a rate that is far higher than the general population, according to a new study. Researchers next want to probe whether the sleep disorder might provide an early signal of the development of neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

9h

Type 2 diabetes and obesity could be treated by new, less invasive procedure

New research has found that a newly tested medical device, called Sleeveballoon, mimics the effects of traditional bariatric surgery in rodents and produces impressive results on body weight, fatty liver and diabetes control.

9h

Powerful new genomics method can be used to reveal the causes of rare genetic diseases

The technique makes use of the fact that people inherit two copies or "alleles" of virtually every gene, one from the mother and one from the father. The new method compares activity levels of maternal and paternal alleles across the genome and detects when the activity of an allele lies far enough outside the normal range to be a plausible cause of disease.

9h

Around half a million men who have sex with men in the EU need PrEP but cannot access it

This estimate on the 'PrEP gap' in Europe was published in a paper in Eurosurveillance today stating that 500 000 men who have sex with men in the European Union currently cannot access HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), despite being very likely to use it. The paper is based on findings from European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control monitoring and the European Men-Who-Have-Sex-With-Men

9h

Study questions 'cross-transfer' benefits of special exercise technique

A paper recently published by researchers from the Ohio Musculoskeletal and Neurological Institute (OMNI) at the Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine questions the effectiveness of a patented exercise system for relieving lower back pain.

9h

Population aging to create pockets of climate vulnerability in the US

Population aging projections across the US show a divide between cities and rural areas, which could lead to pockets of vulnerability to climate change.

9h

New material captures carbon dioxide

The captured CO2 can be converted into useful organic materials.

9h

Cuts in alcohol duty linked to 2000 more alcohol-related deaths in England

Government cuts to alcohol taxes have had dramatic consequences for public health, including nearly 2000 more alcohol-related deaths in England since 2012, according to new research from the University of Sheffield's School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR).

9h

Imaging tumor stiffness could help enhance treatment for breast and pancreatic cancer

Using a noninvasive imaging technique that measures the stiffness of tissues gives crucial new information about cancer architecture and could aid the delivery of treatment to the most challenging tumors, new research shows.

9h

This must be the climate crisis election | Ed Miliband

Having a few ‘green policies’ is no longer enough. Ask yourself: what will your next MP do to save the world? The government that wins the next election stands to govern for half of the decade that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change says we have left to tackle the climate emergency. It will also oversee next year’s international conference on the climate crisis ( COP 26 ) – the most imp

9h

Worldwide PC shipments were on the rise in Q3

Neither Intel’s CPU shortage nor the US-China trade war had a meaningful impact on global PC shipments during the third quarter. According to preliminary results from research and advisory firm …

9h

This Awful Tabloid Predicts a Killer Asteroid Almost Every Day

On October 4, 2019, writers at the British tabloid The Daily Express published five separate articles about what they claimed were killer asteroids careening toward the Earth. At the Express , this seems fairly typical. It’s rare for a day to go by without the newspaper warning, or heavily implying, that a deadly space rock is about to annihilate civilization. Between September 7 and October 8, f

9h

Cities Examine Proper—and Improper—Uses of Facial Recognition

From New York City to Portland, Oregon, officials consider regulating how government and private businesses deploy the technology.

9h

Researchers Turn CRISPR Into a Virus-Killing Machine

On the surface, Ebola and the flu might not seem all that similar — one can cause organ failure or death, while the other usually just makes you feel really crummy — but they actually have the same underlying cause: an RNA-based virus. That’s the type of virus behind some of the most common — and deadly — illnesses in the world, and researchers have just discovered a way to use the powerful gene-

9h

Existing drug may extend life with congestive heart failure

Preclinical studies show that a common blood pressure medication called Aliskiren can prevent fluid retention and muscle wasting in patients with congestive heart failure. Aliskiren inhibits the enzyme that regulates blood pressure, can delay the progression of congestive heart failure , and lengthen survival rates, report the researchers. More than 5 million Americans live with congestive heart

10h

Blood test raises hopes of tackling 'silent killer'

It is the 'silent killer' that claimed the life of Albert Einstein and affects 1% of men over the age of 65, but researchers at the University of Dundee believe they may be able to reduce the number of fatalities caused by abdominal aortic aneurysms.

10h

Overcoming the blood-brain-barrier: Delivering therapeutics to the brain

For the first time, scientists have identified a simple way that can effectively transport medication into the brain – which could lead to improved treatments for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

10h

Physics: DNA-PAINT super-resolution microscopy at speed

Optimized DNA sequences allow for 10-times faster image acquisition in DNA-PAINT.

10h

Bacteria contradict Darwin: Survival of the friendliest

New microbial research at the University of Copenhagen suggests that 'survival of the friendliest' outweighs 'survival of the fittest' for groups of bacteria. Bacteria make space for one another and sacrifice properties if it benefits the bacterial community as a whole.

10h

Type 2 diabetes and obesity could be treated by new, less invasive procedure

New research from King's College London published in EBioMedicine, has found that a newly tested medical device, called Sleeveballoon, mimics the effects of traditional bariatric surgery in rodents and produces impressive results on body weight, fatty liver and diabetes control.

10h

Illumination of abnormal neuronal activities caused by myelin impairment

The neural circuit basis for motor learning tasks when myelination is impaired has been illuminated for the first time by an international collaboration of university research teams. They also succeeded in compensating for the impaired motor learning process by pairing appropriate actions with brain photo-simulation to promote synchronization of neuronal activities. This could contribute to future

10h

Copernicium Is A Strange Element Indeed

OK, let’s talk about something with pretty much no practical relevance whatsoever: the element copernicium. That’s #112, just below mercury in the periodic table, and its longest-lived isotope has a half-life of 29 seconds. Which is actually pretty impressive – that’s one of the longest-lived elements up there at those atomic weights, and it’s long enough that if you look smart you can actually s

10h

Vestjyske prutter, oversvømmede marker og bornholmsk fotosyntese: Mød fire landmænd, der passer på planeten

Landbruget har ry for at koste på klimakontoen, men 'en markant forandring' er i gang, vurderer ekspert.

10h

We Can’t Even Comprehend the Massive Data Haul We’ll Soon Get From Sensors

“Hey Google, how’s my health this morning?” “One moment,” says your digital assistant. It takes thirty seconds for the full diagnostic to run, as the system deploys dozens of sensors capturing gigabytes of data. Smart sensors in toothbrush and toilet, wearables in bedding and clothing, implantables inside your body—a mobile health suite with a 360-degree view of your system. “Your microbiome look

10h

What science tells us about fire hazards facing Cape Town and its surrounds

South Africa's Cape Peninsula—home to the picturesque city of Cape Town—is part of the only region in the world with fynbos. Fynbos is the world's most diverse vegetation type – even more so than tropical rainforests.

10h

This Is the First-Ever Smartphone Made Completely in Africa

Shop Local A Rwandan company called Mara Group just released two new smartphones — the Mara X and the pricier Mara Z — which are the first ever to be manufactured entirely in Africa. The two Android phones are more expensive than others available in the area, according to Fast Company , but Mara Group is banking on people willing to dish out a little extra for the opportunity to support local eco

10h

UPR Hasn't Paid Some TAs for Nearly 2 Months

Graduate students at the University of Puerto Rico Río Piedras campus have issued a public statement denouncing their institution over late payments for teaching and research assistants.

10h

Cold temperatures linked to high status

For decades, luxury retailers around the world have conveyed the message that cold temperatures are a sign of status with descriptions like "icy steel Swiss watches," "cool silk scarves" and "icy bling." But researchers have never studied whether people truly associate cold temperatures with status and luxury.

10h

Using industrial waste as insulation for buildings

ETH spinoff FenX transforms industrial waste into a porous foam suitable for building insulation. Unlike other sustainable materials used for the purpose, this type of insulation is non-flammable and inexpensive to produce.

10h

A psychotherapist explains why some adults react badly to young climate strikers

Young climate strikers I spoke to recently are confused and distressed about the things adults are doing. It's not just inaction during the worsening climate crisis that bothers them, but the increasingly bizarre criticism many older people throw at striking schoolchildren, in the media and elsewhere. In the absence of any meaningful attempts to restrain global carbon emissions, the direct action

10h

How barnacle geese adjust their migratory habits in the face of climate change

The climate is changing at an unprecedented rate, and so are the environments of many plant and animal species. Populations die out in places that become intolerable, and thrive in other places that have become more benign.

10h

The structure of master growth regulator

A team of Whitehead Institute scientists has for the first time revealed the molecular structure of a critical growth regulator bound to its partner proteins, creating a fine-grained view of how they interact to sense nutrient levels and control cell growth. Their findings, described in the October 10th online issue of Science, help answer longstanding questions about how the mTORC1 kinase, and it

10h

Researchers create new glass ceramic material from industrial contaminants

A new glass ceramic material could become a better alternative to use in construction. Miguel Hernández University (UMH) professor Manuel Jordán has contributed to the creation of a new glass ceramic material from sludge contaminated with toxic chromium. This new material has high resistance to bending compared to others of the same class, and once processed, is nontoxic and environmentally harmle

10h

Astrophysicists use artificial intelligence to determine exoplanets sizes

Using a machine learning technique, a team of Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço researchers constrained the radius of an exoplanet with known mass.

10h

Physics: An ultrafast glimpse of the photochemistry of the atmosphere

Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have explored the initial consequences of the interaction of light with molecules on the surface of nanoscopic aerosols.

10h

Chronobiology: Sleep and synaptic rhythms

Chronobiologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich, Germany, show in two articles in the journal Science how critical the sleep-wake cycle is for protein and phosphorylation dynamics in synapses to ultimately regulate its activity.

10h

Cold temperatures linked to high status

Researchers have discovered that people associate cold temperatures with luxury items, which is important for companies that are trying to promote products that convey high status.

10h

Rare sleep disorder common among veterans with PTSD

Military veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder or concussion suffer from a thrashing form of sleep behavior at a rate that is far higher than the general population, according to a new study by researchers at the VA Portland Health Care System and Oregon Health & Science University. Researchers next want to probe whether the sleep disorder might provide an early signal of the development of

10h

Liquid metals the secret ingredients to clean up environment

Liquid metal catalysts show great promise for capturing carbon and cleaning up pollutants, requiring so little energy they can even be created in the kitchen.

10h

Powerful new genomics method can be used to reveal the causes of rare genetic diseases

The technique, which appears in the latest issue of Science, makes use of the fact that people inherit two copies or "alleles" of virtually every gene, one from the mother and one from the father. The new method compares activity levels of maternal and paternal alleles across the genome and detects when the activity of an allele lies far enough outside the normal range to be a plausible cause of d

10h

New test diagnoses Lyme disease within 15 minutes

Current testing for Lyme disease, called the standard 2-tiered approach or the STT, involves running two complex assays (ELISA and western blot) to detect antibodies against the bacterium, and requires experienced personnel in a lab, and a few hours to carry out and interpret. Columbia biomedical engineers have developed a rapid microfluidic test that can detect Lyme disease with similar performan

10h

It’s Almost 2020 and There’s a Cassette Tape Shortage

Tape Delay Yesterday, Pitchfork reported that a material shortage has thrown a roadblock into the production of cassette tapes. Yes, you read that right: cassette tapes. Gamma ferric oxide is the most common material used in the magnetic strips of tape that store audio on cassettes. There’s only one factory used to refine the substance and it’s been under renovation for nearly a year — hurting a

10h

How barnacle geese adjust their migratory habits in the face of climate change

The climate is changing at an unprecedented rate, and so are the environments of many plant and animal species. Populations die out in places that become intolerable, and thrive in other places that have become more benign.

10h

The structure of master growth regulator

A team of Whitehead Institute scientists has for the first time revealed the molecular structure of a critical growth regulator bound to its partner proteins, creating a fine-grained view of how they interact to sense nutrient levels and control cell growth. Their findings, described in the October 10th online issue of Science, help answer longstanding questions about how the mTORC1 kinase, and it

10h

Research identifies chemical mechanism that shows how iron in soils can immobilize arsenic

Sandia National Laboratories researchers have discovered the mechanism to "switch on" iron residing in clay mineral structures, leading to the understanding of how to make iron reactive under oxygen-free conditions.

10h

New material captures carbon dioxide

A new material that can selectively capture carbon dioxide (CO2) molecules and efficiently convert them into useful organic materials has been developed by researchers at Kyoto University, along with colleagues at the University of Tokyo and Jiangsu Normal University in China. They describe the material in the journal Nature Communications.

10h

Liquid metals the secret ingredients to clean up environment

Forget the laboratory, substances that can solve environmental problems by capturing carbon dioxide, decontaminating water and cleaning up pollutants can be easily created in a kitchen, a UNSW Sydney study shows.

10h

These animal species are dear to us, but can we protect them?

Animal species that are dear to us in the Netherlands often spend a large part or all of their lifecycle in other parts of the world. But their habitats worldwide are under increasing pressure, are often inadequately protected and much poorer than the global average. "If we truly care about these animals, we must pay more attention to East Africa, and Central and South Asia," says Alexander van Ou

10h

2 Mummies Unearthed in Ancient Egyptian Cemetery Where King Tut and Other Royalty Were Buried

Two mummies have been unearthed in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, the cemetery holding the tomb of King Tut and other Egyptian royalty.

10h

These animal species are dear to us, but can we protect them?

Animal species that are dear to us in the Netherlands often spend a large part or all of their lifecycle in other parts of the world. But their habitats worldwide are under increasing pressure, are often inadequately protected and much poorer than the global average. "If we truly care about these animals, we must pay more attention to East Africa, and Central and South Asia," says Alexander van Ou

10h

»Vi skal væk fra den lineære tankegang:« Virksomheder vil ikke længere brænde gode kemikalier af

PLUS. Myndighederne skal hjælpe til, hvis virksomheder i højere grad skal genanvende deres proceskemikalier i stedet for at destruere dem, mener projektgruppe.

10h

Listen: How to get out of the insomnia rut

What’s the cause of insomnia? And what can you do about it? Sleep expert Jade Wu has some answers. “I would say it almost doesn’t matter why you got insomnia in the first place. Many people have different reasons for why they get insomnia. Maybe you moved, got a new job, had a baby, went through menopause. But what keeps you in the insomnia rut ?” says Wu, a clinical psychologist at Duke Universi

10h

10h

Quantum weirdness could allow a person-sized wormhole to last forever

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

10h

10h

10h

10h

10h

10h

For Toyota, hydrogen still the route forward

submitted by /u/AkitaBijin [link] [comments]

10h

10h

Impeachment? What Impeachment? It’s Trump-Rally Time.

MINNEAPOLIS —As he neared the end of his 100-minute speech last night, President Donald Trump proclaimed that he’s the lone candidate putting forward a “positive vision for America.” Anyone listening to the first hour and a half of his rally would have been hard-pressed to find it. Minutes after taking the stage inside the Target Center arena, Trump ditched the teleprompter and reenacted what he

10h

Fairy-wrens change breeding habits to cope with climate change

Warmer temperatures linked to climate change are having a big impact on the breeding habits of one of Australia's most recognisable bird species, according to researchers at The Australian National University (ANU).

10h

Infrared imaging shines a light on deep tumors

A new deep-tissue imaging technique can see beneath the skin of living subjects to illuminate buried tumors with unparalleled clarity, researchers report. In a new study, the researchers demonstrate how their technique can help predict the response of cancer patients to immunotherapy and to track their progress following treatment. “We call this infrared vision for non-invasively peering into bio

10h

The dangers of DIY genetic testing – Science Weekly podcast

Whether for ancestry or health, millions of us are choosing to have our genetic fingerprints analysed by using direct-to-consumer kits from private companies. But can the results of these tests be trusted in a clinical setting? Senior doctors have called for a crackdown on home genetic-testing kits and this week, Hannah Devlin finds out why Continue reading…

10h

Here’s How the UK Avoided A “Vape Lung” Epidemic

America finds itself in the midst of a “vape lung” epidemic — but the mysterious lung illness afflicting vapers in the U.S. hasn’t hit the U.K. nearly as hard. The difference seems to stem from the differences in how American and British regulatory agencies and politicians have responded to the rise of e-cigarettes, according to Vice . While the U.K. government sees vaping as part of a long-term

10h

Amoebae teamed up to form world’s oldest slime mold

Slime has been present on Earth for almost 2 billion years, according to a reassessment of fossil evidence. The new research confirms that a fossil from Western Australia is the planet’s oldest known land-dwelling slime mold. The fossil in question, Myxomitodes stirlingensi , is a hairpin-shaped trace of biological activity from the rocks of the Stirling Range, a mountain region 200 miles southea

10h

Drone captures video of melting Greenland glacier

Study could help scientists track sea level rise

10h

Does the World Need a More Powerful Supercollider?

A next-generation atom smasher would cost billions of dollars. Europe and China both plan to build one, but scientists are debating if it's worth it. collision-animation.gif Particle collisions event simulation at 13,000 GeV in the CMS, a general-purpose detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Image credits: CERN Physics Friday, October 11, 2019 – 09:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) —

10h

Tern HSD S8i and P9 Review: Our Fave New Cargo E-Bike

Tern’s folding, electric commuter bikes have gotten even better.

10h

Google Stadia Could Reach 'Negative Latency'—We'll See!

That may sound like "time travel" but its not.

10h

What you might have missed

Nature's waning ability to protect us, rumbles and screams from Mars and a traffic-light system for Earthquakes – here are some highlights from a week in science.

11h

What the Breaking Bad Film Gets Right About Jesse

This review contains light spoilers for El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie and major spoilers for the Breaking Bad series . In an era of controversial series finales, Breaking Bad was the rare show to stick the landing . The AMC drama set in New Mexico about Walter White (Bryan Cranston), a milquetoast high-school chemistry teacher who decays into a morally bankrupt drug kingpin, tied up every loose

11h

Fremtidens ølflaske er lavet af papir – og plast

Ølgiganten Carlsberg og firmaet Paboco præsenterede fredag en prototype på en ølflaske lavet af papir. Men der venter stadig utallige skridt på vejen, før et endeligt produkt er færdigt.

11h

Nobel Prize in Literature: 1901-Present

The winners of the Nobel Prize in Literature, including Toni Morrison, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and John Steinbeck.

11h

The dangers of DIY genetic testing – Science Weekly podcast

Whether for ancestry or health, millions of us are choosing to have our genetic fingerprints analysed by using direct-to-consumer kits from private companies. But can the results of these tests be trusted in a clinical setting? Senior doctors have called for a crackdown on home genetic-testing kits and this week, Hannah Devlin finds out why. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.c

11h

Studying the snowmelt episodes of a Pyrenean river with a seismometer

A team of researchers at Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera of the Spanish National research Council (ICTJA-CSIC) has analysed the seismic signals generated by the variations in water flow of the Aragón river due to the snow melting in its upper basin. In the study, which has been published in the journal PLOS ONE, the researchers describe identifying snowmelt episodes from the temporal vari

11h

Cancelled Dyson electric car project received £5m from UK government

UK taxpayers gave around £5m to the company Dyson to support the electric car project that it announced this week will be scrapped

11h

Could gut bacteria neutralize our American diets?

A specific strain of human gut bacteria breaks down the chemical fructoselysine and turns it into harmless byproducts, according to new research in mice. The study sheds light on how human gut microbes break down processed foods—especially potentially harmful chemical changes that modern food manufacturing processes often produce. Eating processed foods such as breads, cereals, and sodas is assoc

11h

Research reveals millennials hindered from disconnecting by fear of missing out

Millennials desperate to digitally disconnect are being hindered by the fear of missing out (FoMo), social influences and the increasing digitalisation of tourism services, new research reveals.

11h

Radiation detector with the lowest noise in the world boosts quantum work

Researchers from Aalto University and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have built a super-sensitive bolometer, a type of thermal radiation detector. The new radiation detector, made of a gold-palladium mixture makes it easier to measure the strength of electromagnetic radiation in real time. Bolometers are used widely in thermal cameras in the construction industry and in satellites to mea

11h

Unlocking cedar's hidden potential against pests

Trained as an entomologist, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) chemist Fred Eller still has a soft place in his heart for insect-related research. When he noticed ants climbing up the pole of his backyard hummingbird feeder to steal sugar water from birds, he didn't like it.

11h

National Audubon report claims two-thirds of North American birds at risk due to climate change

A team of researchers working for the National Audubon Society has found evidence that suggests approximately two-thirds of North American breeding birds are at risk of extinction from climate change over the next century. The group has published the results of their analysis in Conservation Science and Practice.

11h

Unlocking cedar's hidden potential against pests

Trained as an entomologist, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) chemist Fred Eller still has a soft place in his heart for insect-related research. When he noticed ants climbing up the pole of his backyard hummingbird feeder to steal sugar water from birds, he didn't like it.

11h

National Audubon report claims two-thirds of North American birds at risk due to climate change

A team of researchers working for the National Audubon Society has found evidence that suggests approximately two-thirds of North American breeding birds are at risk of extinction from climate change over the next century. The group has published the results of their analysis in Conservation Science and Practice.

11h

Cigarettes weave a complex path through past century, historian finds

Tobacco is not a simple crop. It is commodity fraught with health, economic and political implications. These last are the focus of Sarah Milov's new book.

11h

Human intelligence: have we reached the limit of knowledge?

Despite huge advances in science over the past century, our understanding of nature is still far from complete. Not only have scientists failed to find the Holy Grail of physics—unifying the very large (general relativity) with the very small (quantum mechanics) – they still don't know what the vast majority of the universe is made up of. The sought after Theory of Everything continues to elude us

11h

What Astronomers Can Learn From Hot Jupiters, the Scorching Giant Planets of the Galaxy

Many of the planets that are roughly the size of Jupiter orbit right next to their stars, burning at thousands of degrees

11h

How remote working can increase stress and reduce well-being

Remote working is becoming more popular than ever. A study released by the Swiss office provider IWG found that 70% of professionals work remotely at least one day a week, while 53% work remotely for at least half of the week. Some multinationals have their entire staff working remotely, with no fixed office presence at all, which can result in having employees situated all over the world.

11h

A virus is attacking koalas' genes—but their DNA is fighting back

A virus that infects koalas is steadily integrating itself into their DNA, ensuring that it is passed down from generation to generation. But the koala genome is defending itself, revealing that DNA has its own immune system to shut down invaders.

11h

Bees can learn higher numbers than we thought – if we train them the right way

Bees are pretty good at maths—as far as insects go, at least. We already know, for example, that they can count up to four and even understand the concept of zero.

11h

Fairy-wrens change breeding habits to cope with climate change

Warmer temperatures linked to climate change are having a big impact on the breeding habits of one of Australia's most recognisable bird species, according to researchers at The Australian National University (ANU).

11h

Prospecting for gold just got a lot easier

Looking for gold? Every good explorer knows there's no silver bullet in finding an ore deposit, but a University of South Australia researcher is hoping to change all that.

11h

Plugging the brain drain

In a world of growing educational and professional mobility, there is an urgent need, from an individual nation's perspective to reduce the potentially harmful effects of what is commonly referred to as the "brain drain". The brain drain refers to the loss of one's intellectuals and talented students and workers to another nation where they may benefit their adopted state, often never to return ho

11h

New genetic link found for some forms of SIDS

Some forms of sudden infant death syndrome stem from a genetic mutation that keeps infants from processing lipids in milk, a new study has discovered. The build-up of unprocessed fatty material disrupts heart functions. While no treatments are yet available, the finding could help in genetic screening. Drugs are also being tested to see if they can help.

11h

Physicists look to navigational 'rhumb lines' to study polymer's unique spindle structure

A new study describes how spheres can be transformed into twisted spindles thanks to insights from 16th century navigational tools. Researchers show how polymers can contract into spiral structures, known as loxodromes, that have complex patterning ten times smaller than the width of a human hair.

11h

A reliable clock for your microbiome

The microbiome is a treasure trove of information about human health and disease, but getting it to reveal its secrets is challenging. A new genetic 'repressilator' circuit acts like a clock that tracks how bacterial growth changes over time with single-cell precision. This tool allows scientists to noninvasively study the dynamics of the microbiome, and also unlocks the potential for complex, syn

11h

A virus is attacking koalas' genes—but their DNA is fighting back

A virus that infects koalas is steadily integrating itself into their DNA, ensuring that it is passed down from generation to generation. But the koala genome is defending itself, revealing that DNA has its own immune system to shut down invaders.

11h

Bees can learn higher numbers than we thought – if we train them the right way

Bees are pretty good at maths—as far as insects go, at least. We already know, for example, that they can count up to four and even understand the concept of zero.

11h

Fairy-wrens change breeding habits to cope with climate change

Warmer temperatures linked to climate change are having a big impact on the breeding habits of one of Australia's most recognisable bird species, according to researchers at The Australian National University (ANU).

11h

Violent flaring revealed at the heart of a black hole system

An international team of astronomers, led by the University of Southampton, have used state-of-the-art cameras to create a high frame-rate movie of a growing black hole system at a level of detail never seen before. In the process they uncovered new clues to understanding the immediate surroundings of these enigmatic objects. The scientists publish their work in a new paper in Monthly Notices of t

11h

Physicists look to navigational 'rhumb lines' to study polymer's unique spindle structure

A new study describes how spheres can be transformed into twisted spindles thanks to insights from 16th century navigational tools. Researchers show how polymers can contract into spiral structures, known as loxodromes, that have complex patterning ten times smaller than the width of a human hair.

11h

Techtopia #127: Robot er bartender, og dens fætter fejer gade

Mennesker er dovne, dyre og dårlige til at lære nye opgaver. Det mener estiske robotmagere, der vil erstatte bartendere og gadefejere med robotter.

11h

Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal

Researchers have created a metallic microdevice in which they can define and tune patterns of superconductivity. Their discovery holds great promise for quantum technologies of the future.

11h

Targeting immune cells may be potential therapy for Alzheimer's

A study has found that microglia drive neurodegeneration in diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, that are linked to tau protein. Targeting microglia may help treat such diseases.

11h

Jumping genes can cause rare developmental disorders in children

The largest study of its kind into childhood developmental disorders has discovered that jumping genes cause genetic changes in some patients with undiagnosed neurodevelopmental diseases. The research enabled genetic diagnoses for three children with previously undiagnosed rare developmental diseases, enrolled in the Deciphering Developmental Disorders project. Reported in Nature Communications, t

11h

Deciphering the early stages of Parkinson's disease is a matter of time

Researchers haveidentified for the first time the initial steps of alpha-synuclein protein aggregates related to early onsets of hereditary Parkinson cases. The results may help the understanding of the early stages of the disease and how it develops over time.

11h

Radiation detector with the lowest noise in the world boosts quantum work

The nanoscale radiation detector is a hundred times faster than its predecessors, and can function without interruption.

11h

Right whales ‘whisper’ to their kids to avoid predators

As new moms, North Atlantic right whales “whisper” to their young calves to avoid attracting predators, according to a new study. The whales, which are critically endangered , have few natural predators due to their size, but their calves are vulnerable to orcas and sharks when young. The study reveals the new mothers drastically reduce their production of a vocalization known as an “up call” tha

11h

Photos of new Google Pixel laptop leak, reveal unique rubber design and high-powered screen

A new leak shows Google getting into the 4K laptiop market with the Pixel Go, a 13.3-inch device that will feature a distinctive rubber grip case and Google's 'Molecular Display' technology.

11h

Preparing For an Inevitable CME

Let’s consider the following scenario – the Earth is at risk for a disruptive event. This event has, conservatively, about a 0.2% chance of happening on any given year. But that is the most conservative estimate, at the high end it could be more like 12% over the next decade . Either way the chance of this type of event happening in the 21st century is quite high, and no matter what it is inevita

11h

Astronauts swapping more batteries in week's 2nd spacewalk

Space station astronauts ventured out Friday on their second spacewalk this week to swap more batteries.

11h

Artificial intelligence helps rangers protect endangered wildlife

At the turn of the 20th century, more than 100,000 wild tigers roamed across Southeast Asia. Today, fewer than 4,000 remain, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

11h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Put Down Your Phone

Webby founder and filmmaker Tiffany Shlain joins us to talk about her weekly tech Shabbat, a day in which her family abstains from modern technology.

11h

12h

Artificial intelligence helps rangers protect endangered wildlife

At the turn of the 20th century, more than 100,000 wild tigers roamed across Southeast Asia. Today, fewer than 4,000 remain, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

12h

This Is What Adapting to Climate Change Looks Like

California has always promised Americans a glimpse of the future. But this week, the Golden State is forecasting a future that nobody wants to live in. Millions of people across California lost their power this week, after the local utility Pacific Gas and Electric intentionally shut off electrical lines to avoid starting wildfires in dangerously dry and windy conditions. The outage—termed a “pub

12h

The Self-Confidence Tipping Point

In the ’90s, when I was growing up, self-esteem was treated by adults like a magical invincibility shield. Self-confidence could protect you from all of life’s horrors, the thinking seemed to be. In one excruciating episode, my 10-year-old classmates and I were forced to list qualities we liked about one another as a narcotics officer looked on grimly. Self-esteem would keep us from doing drugs,

12h

Cows Need Friends to Be Happy

A cow is a beast bred for uniformity. Whether black-and-white Holsteins or ginger-colored Jerseys, the marvel of the herd is that such unvaried selfsameness has been coaxed, over time, out of bovine diversity. Identical cows lift up identical, dozy eyes. Jaws slide, muffled by fodder, chewing cud. A handful of breeds dominates the beef, dairy, and leather industries the world over. Cattle are “a

12h

Farlig, men sjælden virus fundet i flåter nær naturlegeplads

Ekspert anbefaler, at du beskytter dig mod flåtbid, hvis du færdes omkring Tisvilde Hegn i Nordsjælland.

12h

Image of the Day: No Longer Endangered

Back from the brink of near-extinction, the Kirtland’s warbler population has grown and expanded its range.

12h

Saving heather will help to save our wild bees

A new study published today in the journal Current Biology from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Royal Holloway, University of London, has discovered that a natural nectar chemical in Calluna heather called callunene can act as a medicine to protect bumblebees from a harmful parasite. The parasite, Crithidia bombi, is common among wild bumblebees and can be transmitted between bumblebees on flow

12h

Saving heather will help to save our wild bees

A new study published today in the journal Current Biology from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Royal Holloway, University of London, has discovered that a natural nectar chemical in Calluna heather called callunene can act as a medicine to protect bumblebees from a harmful parasite. The parasite, Crithidia bombi, is common among wild bumblebees and can be transmitted between bumblebees on flow

12h

Publisher retracts paper when authors try publishing it again in another of its journals

Pro-tip: If you’re going to try to publish the same paper twice, don’t submit the duplicated version to a journal from the same publisher where you published the original — especially if you plan to monkey with the data. Well, don’t try to publish the same paper twice, nor monkey with data, period. But you’ll … Continue reading

12h

A traumatic past can make you a better social worker, but it might block you studying it in the first place

Last year, I received a phone call from a prospective student. She wanted to know if our university would accept her into a Master of Social Work program. Another local university had just knocked her back.

12h

An ultrafast glimpse of the photochemistry of the atmosphere

Our lives are governed by submicroscopic processes in the nanocosmos. Indeed many natural phenomena begin with a minuscule shift in the states of atoms or molecules, triggered by radiation. One such process has now been elucidated by a team led by Prof. Matthias Kling and Dr. Boris Bergues at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (LAP), which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians Universität (LMU)

12h

Meet the new prototype in electromagnetic oil spill remediation technology

Many Fermilab followers are aware that Fermilab's Office of Partnerships & Technology Transfer licensed the laboratory's electromagnetic oil spill remediation technology to Natural Science LLC in 2015. This agreement enabled Natural Science, led by physicist and inventor Arden Warner, to design and develop a novel electromagnetic technology for cleaning oil spills. A key milestone of the agreement

12h

1st Fenix Research Infrastructure webinar: HPC and Cloud Infrastructure for Neuroscientists

The ICEI project is delivering a set of e-infrastructure services that will be federated to form the Fenix Research Infrastructure. This webinar offers an overview of ICEI/Fenix and introduces the services and available resources of the Fenix Infrastructure. It also provides information for interested users on how to get access and further details on how to use the data repositories that are avai

12h

Insights from research on how to break cycle of violence against women

In response to a wave of protests following a spate of brutal attacks on women, South African President Cyril Ramaphosa has again committed himself to addressing this problem urgently.

12h

In-office gene therapy for wet age-related macular degeneration is coming

Gene therapy is showing promise for one of the most common causes of blindness.

12h

First man to conduct spacewalk, Alexei Leonov, has died: assistant

Alexei Leonov, a Soviet-era cosmonaut who was the first man to conduct a spacewalk in 1965, died Friday in Moscow aged 85, his assistant said.

12h

NASA engineer's 'helical engine' may violate the laws of physics

A NASA engineer has published plans for an engine that could accelerate a rocket without using propellant. But there are questions over whether it could work

12h

Frozen Earth in 'Snowpiercer' Is a Grim (and Possible) Future for Our Warming Planet

The grim future of new TNT sci-fi series "Snowpiercer" began with climate change. Could our rapidly warming world undergo a global deep freeze?

12h

Traveling with Odysseus

The intellectual value of movement through space — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

12h

University of Maine 3D print the world's largest 3D printed boat.

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

12h

12h

12h

12h

12h

12h

AI, debugging

Oh, that AI would reach the level of being able to handle debugging the ipados & ios operating systems, so we would no longer have to go through the death maze that is apple customer service / bug reporting. submitted by /u/mrhells84 [link] [comments]

12h

UK hatches plan to build world's first fusion power plant

Nature, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03039-9 Nuclear scientists are designing an ambitious prototype facility that could demonstrate commercial energy production by 2040.

12h

Porsche teams up with Boeing to build flying cars for rich people

Porsche and Boeing are teaming up to build luxury, electric-powered vertical takeoff and landing aircraft for rich people to fly above traffic-choked cities. They are the latest …

12h

Ethiopia PM Abiy wins Nobel Peace Prize for mending ties with Eritrea

Hailed as a visionary and reformer, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for his efforts to resolve the long-running conflict with neighbouring foe Eritrea.

12h

Total loses bid for palm oil tax break

France's constitutional court rejected on Friday a bid by oil firm Total to secure a tax break for using controversial palm oil to create biofuel.

12h

Florida mangroves reveal complex relationship between climate and natural systems

Mangroves are tropical, salt-tolerant trees that grow in the intertidal zone of coastal waters. They don't tolerate cold weather, particularly extreme freezes, during which they die and get replaced by coastal salt marshes.

13h

Summit supercomputer simulates how humans will 'brake' during Mars landing

The type of vehicle that will carry people to the Red Planet is shaping up to be "like a two-story house you're trying to land on another planet. The heat shield on the front of the vehicle is just over 16 meters in diameter, and the vehicle itself, during landing, weighs tens of metric tons. It's huge," said Ashley Korzun, a research aerospace engineer at NASA's Langley Research Center.

13h

Climate change is causing tropical moths to shrink in size

Researchers have discovered the first evidence of tropical insects shrinking in size in their bid to survive rising temperatures.

13h

Climate change is causing tropical moths to shrink in size

Researchers have discovered the first evidence of tropical insects shrinking in size in their bid to survive rising temperatures.

13h

1,8 GW: Et enkelt selskab vil fordoble dansk havmølle-kapacitet

Selskabet Wind Estate har sendt tre ansøgninger til Energistyrelsen om at bygge havmølleparker ud for Djursland, Samsø og Møn. Parkerne vil gøre firmaet til den største ejer af havmøller herhjemme.

13h

Crowdsourcing consumer loans can bolster business growth and reduce crime

Imagine being able to borrow money from strangers, but without the potential of getting your thumbs broken if you miss a payment.

13h

Mini Gravitational-Wave Detector Could Probe Dark Matter

A miniature gravitational wave detector under development would measure higher-frequency waves than LIGO — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Därför får Abiy Ahmed Nobels fredspris

Etiopiens premiärminister får årets fredspris som tilldelas till Nobels minne. SVT sammanfattar årets Nobelpristagare tillsammans med Cecilia Gralde, som bevakat Nobel för SVT:s räkning i flera år.

13h

Tuffa arbetsvillkor för renskötarna i svenska Sapmí

Renskötsel innebär hög fysisk arbetsbelastning och är ett riskfyllt arbete under tuffa klimatiska förhållanden. Renskötarna utsätts även för psykosociala och ekonomiska påfrestningar i form av försämrad lönsamhet, ökade krav från omgivande samhälle och förändringar i betesområdenas miljöer. Till exempel förändrat skogsbruk, utbyggnad av vindkraft och utökning av gruvdrift är yttre faktorer som på

13h

Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal

Researchers at EPFL have created a metallic microdevice in which they can define and tune patterns of superconductivity. Their discovery, which holds great promise for quantum technologies of the future, has just been published in Science.

13h

New compiler makes quantum computers two times faster

A new paper from researchers at the University of Chicago introduces a technique for compiling highly optimized quantum instructions that can be executed on near-term hardware. This technique is particularly well suited to a new class of variational quantum algorithms, which are promising candidates for demonstrating useful quantum speedups. The new work was enabled by uniting ideas across the sta

13h

Unlocking a 140-year-old secret in physics

Semiconductors are the basic building blocks of today's digital, electronic age, providing us a multitude of devices that benefit our modern life, including computer, smartphones and other mobile devices. Improvements in semiconductor functionality and performance are likewise enabling next-generation applications of semiconductors for computing, sensing and energy conversion. Yet researchers have

13h

The Slow Moon Climbs — the evolution of menopause

A scholarly work on the role and treatment of menopause

13h

Work of renowned UK psychologist Hans Eysenck ruled ‘unsafe’

Eysenck’s ‘cancer-prone’ personality theory had come under criticism for decades The work of one of the most famous and influential British psychologists of all time, Hans Eysenck, is under a cloud following an investigation by King’s College London, which has found 26 of his published papers “unsafe”. King’s says the results and conclusions of the papers “were not considered scientifically rigor

13h

California’s Plan to Buy Carbon Offsets in the Amazon Raises Ethical Concerns

Some indigenous peoples, policymakers, environmentalists, and researchers view California's new carbon offset program as a novel way to financially support those struggling against the odds to protect tropical forests. Others say that it won't stem deforestation and it could even harm vulnerable communities.

13h

What is free will, really? Steven Pinker explains.

Free will exists, but by no means is it a miracle. We use "free will" to describe the more complex processes by which behavior is selected in the brain. These neurological steps taken to make decisions respect all laws of physics. "Free will wouldn't be worth having or extolling, in moral discussions, if it didn't respond to expectations of reward, punishment, praise, blame," Pinker says. Enlight

13h

14h

How the War Against ISIS Was Won, Before It Was Lost

If you ask an Istanbullu where to find plant food or pesticide, you will be directed to a shopping arcade in an underpass beside the Galata Bridge, in the neighborhood of Karaköy, where these items are sold in rows of identical shops. Fishing equipment is sold a few blocks over, where nets and harpoons hang from awnings and mannequins in wetsuits clutter the sidewalks. A little farther along are

14h

The Impeachable Tweets

Forget creating more committees. Forget trying to get at the secret server in the White House. Forget issuing more subpoenas that will never be obeyed. The House already has everything it needs for impeachment, right now, and all of it was provided by President Donald J. Trump. His public statements—and especially his tweets—are a record of impeachable admissions. Like the suspect in the last min

14h

Deborah Levy’s Disorienting, Captivating Fiction

In her autobiographical essay Things I Don’t Want to Know (2013), the British novelist, playwright, and poet Deborah Levy reexamines a notebook she kept during a visit to Poland in 1988. On a train from Warsaw to Kraków, she observes a soldier saying goodbye to three women: his mother, his sister, and his girlfriend. He kisses his mother’s hand, his sister’s cheek, and his girlfriend’s lips. In h

14h

PODCAST: Sådan kunne vi genbruge kemikalier, der i dag brændes af

Kemikalier sendes til forbrænding, selvom de kunne genanvendes. Dine brugerdata er dyrebare, både for dig og datavirksomhederne. Teknologiens Mediehus vil være Danmarks mest transparente for brugerne. Skal klimatrolde også have ordet i debatten?

14h

Medie: Amazon-medarbejdere ser videooptagelser fra folks hjem

Optagelser fra Amazons Cloud Cam kan ende med at blive set af ansatte hos Amazon i forbindelse med AI-oplæring.

14h

Life may have begun with simple genes made out of urine

Urea, a chemical found in urine, can be used to make simple genetic molecules similar to DNA – which could have been the basis of the first life on Earth

14h

Bacterial variability in the mammalian gut captured by a single-cell synthetic oscillator

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12638-z Synthetic gene oscillators can be used to control timed function and periodic expression of genes. Here the authors demonstrate in vivo implementation in the mammalian gut that can keep time over several days.

14h

Anthropogenic shift towards higher risk of flash drought over China

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12692-7 Flash droughts are widely discussed in the scientific community since the rapid onset of the 2012 drought in the USA. Here, the authors model the temporal frequency of potential flash drought events and the exposure risk over China for the next 80 years.

14h

A Chlamydia pneumoniae adhesin induces phosphatidylserine exposure on host cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12419-8 The Chlamydia pneumoniae adhesin LIPP plays a role in host cell entry and infection. Here, the authors find that LIPP binds to the host plasma membrane and mediates phosphatidylserine translocation, enhancing pathogen internalization without induction of apoptosis.

14h

Species abundance information improves sequence taxonomy classification accuracy

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12669-6 Taxonomy classification of amplicon sequences is an important step in investigating microbial communities in microbiome analysis. Here, the authors show incorporating environment-specific taxonomic abundance information can lead to improved species-level classification accuracy across common sample types.

14h

Programmable broadband optical field spectral shaping with megahertz resolution using a simple frequency shifting loop

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12688-3 Full spectral and temporal control of light has a multitude of applications but is often limited in frequency resolution. The authors implement a scheme using a frequency shifting optical loop for optical field spectral shaping with a high degree of control and megahertz resolution

14h

How to control single-molecule rotation

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12605-8 The orientation of a molecule on a surface affects many processes, so the ability to control single-molecule rotation could be powerful. Here, the authors use the electric field from a scanning tunneling microscope tip to precisely induce unidirectional rotation of a polar molecule, allowing visualization of

14h

Contribution of retrotransposition to developmental disorders

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12520-y Retrotransposition events have been linked to some human disorders. Here, Gardner et al. systematically search for mobile genetic elements (ME) in trio whole exome-sequencing datasets and ascertain 9 de novo MEs and further estimate genome-wide germline ME burden and constraint.

14h

Sufu- and Spop-mediated downregulation of Hedgehog signaling promotes beta cell differentiation through organ-specific niche signals

Nature Communications, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-12624-5 Dynamic mesenchyme derived signals are known to direct proper organ formation and cell specification in vivo. Here the authors show in mice that mesenchyme derived Hedgehog and Wnt instruct the formation of the pancreas and beta cells, and that Wnt inhibition promotes beta cell formation from human pluripoten

14h

Google Maps Adds Voice Guidance For Visually Impaired

Google Maps' voice guidance was built for people with impaired vision (via Google) Google Maps is making it easier for blind and visually impaired users …

14h

New genetic link found for some forms of SIDS

Some forms of sudden infant death syndrome stem from a genetic mutation that keeps infants from processing lipids in milk, a new study has discovered. The build-up of unprocessed fatty material disrupts heart functions. While no treatments are yet available, the finding could help in genetic screening. Drugs are also being tested to see if they can help.

14h

A reliable clock for your microbiome

The microbiome is a treasure trove of information about human health and disease, but getting it to reveal its secrets is challenging. A new genetic 'repressilator' circuit developed at the Wyss Institute and HMS acts like a clock that tracks how bacterial growth changes over time with single-cell precision. This tool allows scientists to noninvasively study the dynamics of the microbiome, and als

14h

Jumping genes can cause rare developmental disorders in children

The largest study of its kind into childhood developmental disorders has discovered that jumping genes cause genetic changes in some patients with undiagnosed neurodevelopmental diseases. The research from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and its collaborators enabled genetic diagnoses for three children with previously undiagnosed rare developmental diseases, enrolled in the Deciphering Developmenta

14h

Deciphering the early stages of Parkinson's disease is a matter of time

Researchers at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and the University of Virginia School of Medicine, USA, identified for the first time the initial steps of alpha-synuclein protein aggregates related to early onsets of hereditary Parkinson cases. The results may help the understanding of the early stages of the disease and how it develops over time.

14h

Radiation detector with the lowest noise in the world boosts quantum work

The nanoscale radiation detector is a hundred times faster than its predecessors, and can function without interruption.

14h

Online Gambling of Pure Chance: Wager Distribution, Risk Attitude, and Anomalous Diffusion

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50168-2

14h

Predicting shockwave lithotripsy outcome for urolithiasis using clinical and stone computed tomography texture analysis variables

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51026-x

14h

The photocurrent generated by photon replica states of an off-resonantly coupled dot-cavity system

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51320-8

14h

Improving water retention capacity of an aeolian sandy soil with feldspathic sandstone

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51257-y

14h

14h

Depletion of CD40 on CD11c+ cells worsens the metabolic syndrome and ameliorates hepatic inflammation during NASH

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-50976-6 Depletion of CD40 on CD11c + cells worsens the metabolic syndrome and ameliorates hepatic inflammation during NASH

14h

14h

Kawasaki Disease following administration of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in young children

Scientific Reports, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-51137-5

14h

From design to lift-off: blasting experiments into outer space

Nature, Published online: 11 October 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-03097-z If you want an astronaut to run your experiment alongside their many other responsibilities, keeping it simple is the key.

14h

Experience: ‘I discovered my hairdresser was my brother’

The DNA test had found a man who had the same percentage match as me. I got a text: ‘You’re not going to believe this. He lives in Calgary, too’ Having your hair cut is such an intimate thing, it’s almost like therapy. So, when I moved from Saskatchewan to Calgary in 2012, finding a good stylist was high on my to-do list. A friend recommended Troy and I liked him right away. After a quick consult

14h

A Season of Fire Tests Indonesia’s Efforts to Curb Deforestation

At issue is whether recent successes had more to do with the weather and less with policy changes.

14h

Københavns Lufthavn: Det kan ikke svare sig at genbruge kemikalier fra afisning

PLUS. Afisningsmidler fra flyene i Københavns Lufthavn bliver i dag sendt til spildevandsrens. Skal kemikalierne i stedet genanvendes, kræver det ny teknologi og store omlægninger.

14h

14h

14h

Badger culls have varying impacts on cattle TB

The UK government policy sees cattle TB incidence fall in two badger cull areas but rise in a third.

14h

A reliable clock for your microbiome

For all the attention the human microbiome has been getting over the last few years, one aspect of such research rarely makes headlines: the difficulty of observing how it changes over time in response to various stimuli. The most common analysis method is extracting bacteria from fecal samples and then sequencing their genomes, but this approach, while minimally invasive, loses crucial informatio

15h

Where Do Democrats Go From Here?

The White House has long embraced a strategy of stonewalling House Democrats’ various investigations into Donald Trump, from refusing to hand over the president’s tax returns to directing former White House Counsel Don McGahn not to testify before Congress. Now, three weeks after reports of Trump’s phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, in which Trump sought an investigation into

15h

A reliable clock for your microbiome

For all the attention the human microbiome has been getting over the last few years, one aspect of such research rarely makes headlines: the difficulty of observing how it changes over time in response to various stimuli. The most common analysis method is extracting bacteria from fecal samples and then sequencing their genomes, but this approach, while minimally invasive, loses crucial informatio

15h

Better protection sought for Thailand's helmeted hornbill

Time is running out for Thailand's dwindling population of helmeted hornbills thanks to poaching of the exotic birds for the ivory-like casques atop their big red and yellow beaks.

15h

Better protection sought for Thailand's helmeted hornbill

Time is running out for Thailand's dwindling population of helmeted hornbills thanks to poaching of the exotic birds for the ivory-like casques atop their big red and yellow beaks.

15h

Nobel Peace Prize: Why is it so important?

Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed is named as the winner of this year's Nobel Peace Prize.

15h

Plastic pollution: How Ibiza is tackling its problem with waste

Hundreds of thousands of Brits travel to Ibiza each summer, but what happens to their waste when they leave?

15h

Overvågningsforslag: 233 procent flere nummerplade-kameraer og ansigtsgenkendelse mellem linjerne

Masser af kameraer, muligvis ansigtsgenkendelse, og live-overvågning, som ekspert bedømmer som »fuldstændig urealistisk«, er elementer i regeringens udspil til markant mere overvågning af danskerne.

15h

15h

Praksislægerne må komme ind i kampen

Flere speciallæger er ikke i sig selv nok til at sikre mere behandlingskapacitet i almen praksis. Ligesom i sygehussektoren og kommunerne er der ingen vej uden om reformer, der kan frigøre ressourcer til faglig kvalitet og bedre tilgængelighed i almen praksis.

16h

Det sure og det søde fra chefredaktøren

En veritabel gajolæske i Hillerød, den fede kommunikator og Mutter Region der slår i bordet. Aktuelle emner får ros eller ris af chefredaktør på Dagens Medicin, Nicolai Döllner.

16h

Dansk læge bag ny forskningsplatform på Twitter

Forskere og patienter fra hele verden kan nu deltage i forskningsprojekter via en ny forskningsplatform på Twitter. Fint initiativ, men Twitter har stadig en meget begrænset ­brugerskare, siger formanden for LVS.

16h

CEO of German business software group SAP steps down

Bill McDermott, the American chief executive of massive German business software maker SAP, will quit after a decade in charge, the company said Friday.

16h

'Unacceptable' power cuts blasted as California fire risk spreads south

Hundreds of thousands of Californians were still without electricity due to pre-emptive blackouts Thursday as hot, windy conditions causing wildfires spread south toward Los Angeles, in a situation blasted as "unacceptable" by the state's governor.

16h

Sensitive robots are safer

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

16h

Museum explores spooky science behind 'Frankenstein', 'The Mummy'

What is the spookiest thing about "Frankenstein," "The Mummy" and "Dracula"? The hideous monster? The ancient curse? The sharp fangs?

16h

NASA launches satellite to explore where air meets space

NASA launched a satellite on Thursday night to explore the mysterious, dynamic region where air meets space.

16h

Hong Kong’s Worsening Press Climate

HONG KONG—Police officers here have made an art of kettling , or encircling, their quarry. Usually the police trap and funnel large groups of people inside a park , or a shopping mall , and bar them from leaving. Those inside are not under arrest, and yet they are not free to go. As protests in this city have entered their fifth month, police tactics have grown more sudden, more violent, and more

16h

”Strålande” samarbete prisas

Lundaforskare har tagit fram en metod för att individualisera behandlingen med ett nyligen godkänt radioaktivt cancerläkemedel – genom att avbilda läkemedlet inne i patienten.

16h

NASA and SpaceX hope for manned mission to ISS in early 2020

SpaceX could launch US astronauts to the International Space Station as early as next year if tests on the company's long-delayed Crew Dragon capsule prove conclusive, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said Thursday.

16h

Artificial meat is now made in space, coming to a supermarket near you

Creating meat from cells is no longer the realm of science fiction: a Russian cosmonaut did it aboard the International Space Station, and it is just a matter of time before these products arrive in supermarkets.

16h

In Nairobi, recycling poo is cleaning up the slums

"When I started, there was poop in bags everywhere," said Ricky Ojwang, skillfully navigating a rubbish-strewn canal in Mukuru, a Nairobi slum where he's worked to improve sanitation since 2012.

16h

NASA administrator explains Twitter spat with SpaceX

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said Thursday that a recent Twitter statement critical of SpaceX was a signal to all the space agency's contractors about realistic development timelines.

16h

Artificial meat is now made in space, coming to a supermarket near you

Creating meat from cells is no longer the realm of science fiction: a Russian cosmonaut did it aboard the International Space Station, and it is just a matter of time before these products arrive in supermarkets.

16h

New research says changes in driver shifts and pick-up choices for food delivery services can boost profits

The food delivery business, popularized by mobile online services such as Grubhub, OrderUp, and DoorDash, has become a $200 billion industry, which is expected to grow by more than 15% annually over the next five years. New research published in the INFORMS journal Transportation Science reveals how food delivery businesses can implement changes in driver shifts and order delivery structures that

16h

Physicists look to navigational 'rhumb lines' to study polymer's unique spindle structure

From the intricate patterns of pollen grains to the logarithmic spirals of nautilus shells, biology is full of complex patterns, shapes, and geometries. Many of these intricate structures play important roles in biological function, but can be difficult to create in a lab without state-of-the-art equipment or expensive and energy-consuming processes and materials.

16h

Electromagnetic healing devices for dogs: Studies show “Meh”

Does a pulsed electromagnetic field device work to help dogs recover from surgery? The answer is below. Spoiler alert: The answer is "probably not".

17h

Scientists Can Now Predict The Weird Behaviour of Oobleck

Remember that weird stuff you played with as a kid?

17h

17h

'Ultimate gift to future generations': plan to laser map all land on Earth

Project to record cultural, geological and environmental treasures at risk from climate crisis A project to produce detailed maps of all the land on Earth through laser scanning has been revealed by researchers who say action is needed now to preserve a record of the world’s cultural, environmental and geological treasures. Prof Chris Fisher, an archaeologist from Colorado State University, said

17h

17h

17h

17h

17h

Quantum weirdness could allow a person-sized wormhole to last forever

We were unsure if wormholes could exist long enough to allow a person through. Now calculations indicate they are extremely rare, but could last the age of the universe

18h

19h

Om 30 år skal din bøf og mælk være klimaneutral: Vi har bare ingen anelse om, hvordan vi gør det

Landbruget vil i 2050 være klimaneutral, men det kræver helt nye tiltag og mere viden, lyder det fra branchen og forsker.

19h

Emil fik kræft efter masser af timer i solariet: Der indså jeg, at jeg var dødelig

Mænd bliver ved med at gå i solarium, selv om de kender risikoen.

19h

Country diary: richness can be found among the rot

Allendale, Northumberland: Fungi and leaf mould are all part of the recycling that makes my garden thrive Autumn is a rich, woodsy potpourri of scents as I rake leaves from the garden paths. Seeing them as a harvest rather than a nuisance, I lay the leaves over the shady border to rot down and improve the soil. Bulbs will push up through the leaf mould in spring. One path that I clear by hand has

19h

Photos of the Week: Ute Muster, Snow Leopard, Highway Acrobat

A dog exhibition in Bishkek, the World Athletics Championships in Doha, a Kali Uchis performance in Texas, Extinction Rebellion protests in Australia, a demon-king burning in India, attacks on Kurdish sites in Syria, unrest in Haiti, the Masham Sheep Fair in England, rice harvest in China, new public artwork in Paris, and much more.

19h

Kvinder sætter sig på jobbet som ledende overlæge

På 11 år er andelen af kvinder blandt de ledende overlæger næsten fordoblet. Og den udvikling må gerne fortsætte, siger lægeformand. Men det handler nu også om andet end køn, siger sygehusdirektør.

19h

Ind med kandidattjeneren

Da jeg var studentervikar på anæstesiafdelingen i Gentofte i 1978, var der smørrebrød til vagtholdene, hvilket gav glæde, men også sammenhold, skriver Torben Mogensen, tidligere vicedirektør på Hvidovre Hospital.

19h

Regioner har anskaffet robotter uden en klar plan

Robotkirurgi er utvivlsomt en lovende teknik for nogle typer indgreb, men den tages ukritisk i brug i visse regioner uden forudgående videnskabelige protokoller. Hvor er ansvarligheden for den overordnede prioritering?

19h

Specialet er den naturlige organisationsenhed

Den eksperimenterende tilgang til ledelsesbegrebet, man har haft i regionerne, har ikke været forankret i hverken empiri eller baseret på kendte ledelses- eller organisationsformer.

19h

Physicists look to navigational 'rhumb lines' to study polymer's unique spindle structure

A new study describes how spheres can be transformed into twisted spindles thanks to insights from 16th century navigational tools. Researchers show how polymers can contract into spiral structures, known as loxodromes, that have complex patterning ten times smaller than the width of a human hair. The research was a collaboration between physicists at the University of Pennsylvania and the École S

19h

CF patients experience improved lung health with lumacaftor-ivacaftor but with caveats

In adolescent and adult patients with cystic fibrosis taking lumacaftor-ivacaftor (ORKAMBI®), the combination drug appears to improve lung function and body weight and reduce the need for intravenous antibiotic treatment, according to a French study published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

19h

19h

CFCS: Cyberkriminelle vil gå efter digitale simkort

Cyberkriminelle vil forsøge at knække sikkerheden omkring fremtidens digitale simkort, eSim, blandt andet for at overtage folks telefonnumre, vurderer Center for Cybersikkerhed, der også opsummerer en række andre sikkerhedsmæssige udfordringer for telesektoren i en nyudgivet trusselsvurdering.

19h

»Jeg håber sandelig ikke, jeg er valgt, fordi jeg er en kvinde«

Diskussionen om køn er uinteressant – hvis kvinder vil have en karriere, så skal de nok få det, siger Alice Skovhede Nielsen. Hun er ny ledende overlæge på akutmodtagelsen på Sydvestjysk Sygehus i Esbjerg og vil aldrig selv skele til køn, når hun ansætter.

20h

Nyt netværk skal få flere kvinder på topposter

Kvinder er for dårligt repræsenteret på ledelsesgangene i det danske sundhedsvæsen. Derfor skal et nyt netværk hjælpe kvinderne frem, siger en af initiativtagerne.

20h

Første undersøgelse af sin art: Danske udviklingsafdelinger er 'agil-hybride'

Nationens virksomheder blander agil metodik med lidt af hvert. Men over tid giver de agile metoder pote i forhold til produktivitet, viser ny analyse, som er den første af sin slags.

20h

Scientists Have Successfully Kept Mouse Brain Tissue Alive in The Lab For Weeks

The same technique could be tested on human tissue.

20h

Råstoffer behandles som affald: Tonsvis af nyttig kemi går op i røg

PLUS. Kemikaliebranchen vurderer, at der bliver sendt massive mængder kemikalier til forbrænding, selv om de kunne genanvendes.

21h

22h

22h

Nanoscale 3D printing technique is 1,000 times faster

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

22h

22h

22h

22h

22h

Donald Trump joins Amazon owned Twtich channel as part of 2020 campaign election efforts

Donald Trump's 2020 re-election campaign has turned to Twitch, owned by one of Trump's favorite nemeses, Jeff Bezos. The Trump campaign will stream campaign events over the service.

22h

California’s Power Outages Are About Wildfires—But Also Money

PG&E turned off the power for more than 700,000 customers to keep them safe from wildfires. Its bankruptcy likely played a role as well.

22h

Artificial Intelligence Learns to Talk Back to Bigots

Algorithms are already used to remove online hate speech. Now scientists have taught an AI to respond—which they hope might spark more discourse. Christopher Intagliata reports.

22h

Linking long noncoding RNA to drug resistance [Commentaries]

As we move into the era of personalized medicine, it may not be too far off that a visit to our doctor includes a number of genome-scale “seq” experiments to diagnose disease and estimate our likelihood of response to an array of possible treatments. One such experiment measures the cell’s…

22h

Horsefly object-directed polarotaxis is mediated by a stochastically distributed ommatidial subtype in the ventral retina [Neuroscience]

The ventral compound eye of many insects contains polarization-sensitive photoreceptors, but little is known about how they are integrated into visual functions. In female horseflies, polarized reflections from animal fur are a key stimulus for host detection. To understand how polarization vision is mediated by the ventral compound eye, we…

22h

Battery-free, lightweight, injectable microsystem for in vivo wireless pharmacology and optogenetics [Engineering]

Pharmacology and optogenetics are widely used in neuroscience research to study the central and peripheral nervous systems. While both approaches allow for sophisticated studies of neural circuitry, continued advances are, in part, hampered by technology limitations associated with requirements for physical tethers that connect external equipment to rigid probes inserted…

22h

Trichomonas vaginalis extracellular vesicles are internalized by host cells using proteoglycans and caveolin-dependent endocytosis [Biochemistry]

Trichomonas vaginalis, a human-infective parasite, causes the most prevalent nonviral sexually transmitted infection worldwide. This pathogen secretes extracellular vesicles (EVs) that mediate its interaction with host cells. Here, we have developed assays to study the interface between parasite EVs and mammalian host cells and to quantify EV internalization by mammalian…

22h

If the shoo fits: cows painted with zebra stripes keep flies in line

Insect bites can be significantly cut using a cunning disguise, researchers find Painting a cow to look something like a zebra has been found to reduce fly bites by 50%. Researchers believe painting stripes on to cattle is a world-first and could become an environmentally friendly alternative to pesticides. Continue reading…

23h

23h

23h

Researchers Find Dietary Changes That Help Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease

(Credit: Rimma Bondarenko/Shutterstock) In recent years, researchers have pinpointed a group of compounds called FODMAPs that are common trigger foods for people with irritable bowel syndrome. But it wasn’t immediately clear whether eliminating these foods could also help people with more serious conditions like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis — or if it might actually hurt their already-sen

23h

Tænkeboks: Hvilken planet er astronauten landet på?

Nu kan du dykke ned i ugens tænkeboks.

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

Artificial Intelligence Learns to Talk Back to Bigots

Algorithms are already used to remove online hate speech. Now scientists have taught an AI to respond—which they hope might spark more discourse. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Artificial Intelligence Learns to Talk Back to Bigots

Algorithms are already used to remove online hate speech. Now scientists have taught an AI to respond—which they hope might spark more discourse. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

The Atlantic Politics Daily: Where in the World is Rudy Giuliani?

Comments or questions? Send us an email anytime. Were you forwarded this email? Sign yourself up here. We appreciate your continued support for our journalism. Developing (ARAM ROSTON / REUTERS) Our White House reporter finds Rudy Giuliani deep in the middle of scandal that’s getting more convoluted by the day. First, the players: Who are Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman? As first reported in the Wall

1d

1d

Toyota reveals new Mirai concept, the second-generation of its hydrogen fuel cell-powered luxury car

In the on-going tussle between battery-powered and combustion engine vehicles, Toyota's hydrogen fuel cell technology seems to combine the best of both worlds – fossil-free EV propulsion paired …

1d

Nyheder for denne dato er endnu ikke blevet noteret

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image